WorldWideScience

Sample records for emergency ii method

  1. Analytical methods under emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlet, J.

    1983-01-01

    This lecture discusses methods for the radiochemical determination of internal contamination of the body under emergency conditions, here defined as a situation in which results on internal radioactive contamination are needed quickly. The purpose of speed is to determine the necessity for medical treatment to increase the natural elimination rate. Analytical methods discussed include whole-body counting, organ counting, wound monitoring, and excreta analysis. 12 references

  2. Graduates perception towards instructional methods of emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graduates perception towards instructional methods of emergency medicine: affecting their self-confidence in emergency departments. Mohamed Daffalla Awadalla, Ahmed Abd Elrahman Abdalla, Sami Mahjoub Taha ...

  3. A Model for a Level II Emergency Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-02

    uni t Kramer 6 4) Technologist on call: Radiology, Laboratory, Blood Bank. 5) Trained personnel available to take electrocardiograms on call and...and ICU /CCU on the second floor. Flight medicine which has some collateral roles with the emergency department is located in the south basement and...II I I I I 1 19 [21] ICU /CCU I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 122 121 ICI.L’CCI I _I _I _I _I __I _I I I I I I IEl I I I I I I I 1 __ 12 [23

  4. Emerging nondestructive inspection methods for aging aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, A; Dahlke, L; Gieske, J [and others

    1994-01-01

    This report identifies and describes emerging nondestructive inspection (NDI) methods that can potentially be used to inspect commercial transport and commuter aircraft for structural damage. The nine categories of emerging NDI techniques are: acoustic emission, x-ray computed tomography, backscatter radiation, reverse geometry x-ray, advanced electromagnetics, including magnetooptic imaging and advanced eddy current techniques, coherent optics, advanced ultrasonics, advanced visual, and infrared thermography. The physical principles, generalized performance characteristics, and typical applications associated with each method are described. In addition, aircraft inspection applications are discussed along with the associated technical considerations. Finally, the status of each technique is presented, with a discussion on when it may be available for use in actual aircraft maintenance programs. It should be noted that this is a companion document to DOT/FAA/CT-91/5, Current Nondestructive Inspection Methods for Aging Aircraft.

  5. The Emergence of the Analytical Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Maja

    2012-01-01

    accountability, visibility and documentation. It is argued that pedagogy is generated as a sequential and unit-specified way of working on the production of ‘the learning child’, forming a time- and material-optimising approach. Hereby, the nursery teacher, as a daily scientific researcher, comes to serve...... the nation by an ongoing observational intervention, producing the learning foundation for the entrepreneurial citizen, and thus the nation as a knowledge society in a globalised world. This is what this article terms the emergence of the analytical method....

  6. Interview-based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Meisel, Zachary F; Choo, Esther K; Garro, Aris C; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow Guthrie, Kate

    2015-09-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Mathematics for natural scientists II advanced methods

    CERN Document Server

    Kantorovich, Lev

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the advanced mathematical techniques useful for physics and engineering students, presented in a form accessible to physics students, avoiding precise mathematical jargon and laborious proofs. Instead, all proofs are given in a simplified form that is clear and convincing for a physicist. Examples, where appropriate, are given from physics contexts. Both solved and unsolved problems are provided in each chapter. Mathematics for Natural Scientists II: Advanced Methods is the second of two volumes. It follows the first volume on Fundamentals and Basics.

  8. Interview-Based Qualitative Research in Emergency Care Part II: Data Collection, Analysis and Results Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L.; Meisel, Zachary; Choo, Esther K.; Garro, Aris; Sasson, Comilla; Morrow, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methods are increasingly being used in emergency care research. Rigorous qualitative methods can play a critical role in advancing the emergency care research agenda by allowing investigators to generate hypotheses, gain an in-depth understanding of health problems or specific populations, create expert consensus, and develop new intervention and dissemination strategies. In Part I of this two-article series, we provided an introduction to general principles of applied qualitative health research and examples of its common use in emergency care research, describing study designs and data collection methods most relevant to our field (observation, individual interviews, and focus groups). Here in Part II of this series, we outline the specific steps necessary to conduct a valid and reliable qualitative research project, with a focus on interview-based studies. These elements include building the research team, preparing data collection guides, defining and obtaining an adequate sample, collecting and organizing qualitative data, and coding and analyzing the data. We also discuss potential ethical considerations unique to qualitative research as it relates to emergency care research. PMID:26284572

  9. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Geir Anton

    2013-01-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  10. Emerging tomographic methods within the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, Geir Anton, E-mail: geir.johansen@ift.uib.no [University of Bergen (UiB), Bergen, (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    Since industrial process tomography was introduced as a concept almost two decades ago, the considerable progress within a large variety of sensing modalities has to a large extent been technology driven. Industrial tomography applications may be divided into three categories: 1) Laboratory systems, 2) Field equipment for diagnostics and mapping purposes, and 3) Permanently installed systems. Examples on emerging methods on all categories will be presented, either from R and D at the University of Bergen and/or our industrial partners. Most developments are within the first category, where tomographs are used to provide better understanding of various processes such as pipe flow, separators, mixers and reactors. Here tomographic data is most often used to provide better process knowledge, for reference measurements and validation and development of process models, and finally for development for instruments and process equipment. The requirement here may be either high spatial resolution or high temporal resolution, or combinations of these. Tomographic field measurements are applied to either to inspect processes or equipment on a regular base or at faulty or irregular operation, or to map multicomponent systems such petroleum reservoirs, their structure and the distribution gas, oil and water within them. The latter will only be briefly touched upon here. Tomographic methods are increasingly being used for process and equipment diagnostics. The requirements vary and solutions based on repetition of single measurements, such as in column scanning, to full tomographic systems where there is sufficiently space or access. The third category is tomographic instruments that are permanently installed in situ in a process. These need not provide full tomographic images and instruments with fewer views are often preferred to reduce complexity and increase the instrument reliability. (author)

  11. Psychiatric emergencies (part II): psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, A; Giannuzzi, R; Sollazzo, F; Petrongolo, L; Bernardini, L; Dain, S

    2013-02-01

    In this Part II psychiatric disorders coexisting with organic diseases are discussed. "Comorbidity phenomenon" defines the not univocal interrelation between medical illnesses and psychiatric disorders, each other negatively influencing morbidity and mortality. Most severe psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, show increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease, related to poverty, use of psychotropic medication, and higher rate of preventable risk factors such as smoking, addiction, poor diet and lack of exercise. Moreover, psychiatric and organic disorders can develop together in different conditions of toxic substance and prescription drug use or abuse, especially in the emergency setting population. Different combinations with mutual interaction of psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders are defined by the so called "dual diagnosis". The hypotheses that attempt to explain the psychiatric disorders and substance abuse relationship are examined: (1) common risk factors; (2) psychiatric disorders precipitated by substance use; (3) psychiatric disorders precipitating substance use (self-medication hypothesis); and (4) synergistic interaction. Diagnostic and therapeutic difficulty concerning the problem of dual diagnosis, and legal implications, are also discussed. Substance induced psychiatric and organic symptoms can occur both in the intoxication and withdrawal state. Since ancient history, humans selected indigene psychotropic plants for recreational, medicinal, doping or spiritual purpose. After the isolation of active principles or their chemical synthesis, higher blood concentrations reached predispose to substance use, abuse and dependence. Abuse substances have specific molecular targets and very different acute mechanisms of action, mainly involving dopaminergic and serotoninergic systems, but finally converging on the brain's reward pathways, increasing dopamine in nucleus accumbens. The most common

  12. 78 FR 71785 - Passenger Train Emergency Systems II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... rescue access signage requirements. FRA is also establishing requirements for low-location emergency exit path markings to assist occupants in reaching and operating emergency exits, particularly under... West Building, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through...

  13. 77 FR 153 - Passenger Train Emergency Systems II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... emergency exit path markings to assist occupants in reaching and operating primary emergency exits... Transportation, West Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590-0001. Hand Delivery or Courier: Docket Management Facility, U.S. Department of Transportation, West Building...

  14. New Methods in Supersymmetric Theories and Emergent Gauge Symmetry

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    It is remarkable that light or even massless spin 1 particles can be composite. Consequently, gauge invariance is not fundamental but emergent. This idea can be realized in detail in supersymmetric gauge theories. We will describe the recent development of non-perturbative methods that allow to test this idea. One finds that the emergence of gauge symmetry is linked to some results in contemporary mathematics. We speculate on the possible applications of the idea of emergent gauge symmetry to realistic models.

  15. [Pathogenesis of temporomandibular dysfunction. II. Statistical method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vágó, P

    1989-08-01

    The variables of the epidemiologic assessments concerned with the aetiology of the mandible joint disfunction were examined in the course of statistical analyses, in general, in their pairwise connections and possibly a multi-variable linear regression calculation was employed. In the course of the examination, for establishing the linear, empirically tested model of the aetiology of the mandible joint disfunction a new type statistical method, the LISREL (Linear Structural Relationship) method was employed. An advantage of this assessment consists in that not only observed variables may figure as the variables of the structural equation but also latent variables which cannot be observed but it is supposable that they are factors of the observed variables. This statistical method is described in closer details in the article in connection with the forming of the aetiological model.

  16. Improvement Methods in NPP's Radiation Emergency Plan: An Administrative Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoon Wook; Yang, He Sun

    2009-01-01

    The Radiation Emergency Plan (REP) can be divided into a technical and an administrative responses. The domestic NPP's REPs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the administrative response and improvement methods are also suggested in this treatise. The fields of the reviews are the composition of the emergency response organizations, the activation criteria of the organizations, the selection of the staffings and the reasonableness of the REP's volume. In addition, the limitations of the current radiation exercises are reviewed and the improvement method of the exercise is presented. It is expected that the suggested recommendations will be helpful in establishing useful REPs and making practical radiation exercises in Korea

  17. [Finger extension. II. Materials and methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, J N; Boabighi, A; Laudet, C; Guerin-Surville, H; Baux, S

    1992-06-01

    The study of the extensor apparatus through different methods concerns 200 fingers, the most of fresh cadavers. The dissection through direct observation or with surgical microscope of the dorsal aponeurosis of 30 fingers has been completed by an histological study of 10 fingers. The mechanic properties of each dorsal aponeurotic structure has been tested by extensometry on 12 fingers. The functional study of the role and of the transmission of the different motor components concerns 128 fingers. It has been completed by experimental sections of each aponeurotic structure concerning 20 fingers.

  18. Rapid Method For Determination Of Radiostrontium In Emergency Milk Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-01-01

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  19. Rapid method for determination of radiostrontium in emergency milk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxwell III, S.L.; Culligan, B.K.

    2009-01-01

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of radiostrontium within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than the previous method that use calcination or cation-exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta-interferences. When a 100 mL sample aliquot is used with a 20 minute count time, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq x L -1 , well below generic emergency action levels. (author)

  20. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN EMERGENCY MILK SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-07-17

    A new rapid separation method for radiostrontium in emergency milk samples was developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Bioassay Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that will allow rapid separation and measurement of Sr-90 within 8 hours. The new method uses calcium phosphate precipitation, nitric acid dissolution of the precipitate to coagulate residual fat/proteins and a rapid strontium separation using Sr Resin (Eichrom Technologies, Darien, IL, USA) with vacuum-assisted flow rates. The method is much faster than previous method that use calcination or cation exchange pretreatment, has excellent chemical recovery, and effectively removes beta interferences. When a 100 ml sample aliquot is used, the method has a detection limit of 0.5 Bq/L, well below generic emergency action levels.

  1. [Time point and methods for emergency killing in cattle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khol, J L; Schafbauer, T; Wittek, T

    2016-01-01

    Emergency killing is defined as the killing of injured or ill animals to avoid excessive pain or harm. Decision-making for emergency killing or a prolonged therapy can be difficult and has to be based on the case history and results of the clinical examination contributing to the prognosis, particularly in downer cows. Evaluation of enzyme activities and total bilirubin can be used as additional factors pointing to a guarded prognosis; however, none of these parameters provides a clear cut-off value indicating a poor prognosis and mandatory emergency killing. Euthanasia by intravenous drug application is seen as the least stressful method of killing and should therefore always be the first method of choice for emergency killing in cattle. Drugs containing pentobarbital as well as a combination of three different drugs (T61-Injektionslösung, MSD Animal Health) are available for euthanasia in cattle. All drugs must be administered by a veterinarian. Before application of pentobarbital, an animal should be deeply sedated. The administration of T61 requires anaesthesia of the animal and it is not licensed for use in pregnant animals. Alternative methods for emeragency killing, including captive bolt stunning and the use of firearms, although not regularly performed by veterinarians, should be assessed concerning their correct application and performance. When captive bolt stunning or emergency killing using firearms is performed, the correct position of the device is crucial as well as a quick exsanguination or the application of a pithing rod for the actual killing of the animal after captive bolt stunning. In addition to medical considerations, economic and personal factors contribute to the decision about emergency killing in cattle. Therefore, veterinarians should aim to evaluate each case thoroughly based on personal knowledge and experience, case history, clinical findings and laboratory parameters to avoid prolonged suffering of the animal.

  2. Methods of humidity determination Part II: Determination of material humidity

    OpenAIRE

    Rübner, Katrin; Balköse, Devrim; Robens, E.

    2008-01-01

    Part II covers the most common methods of measuring the humidity of solid material. State of water near solid surfaces, gravimetric measurement of material humidity, measurement of water sorption isotherms, chemical methods for determination of water content, measurement of material humidity via the gas phase, standardisation, cosmonautical observations are reviewed.

  3. An emergency bioassay method for actinides in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiongxin; Kramer-Tremblay, Sheila

    2011-08-01

    A rapid bioassay method has been developed for the sequential measurements of actinides in human urine samples. The method involves actinide separation from a urine matrix by co-precipitation with hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO), followed by anion exchange and extraction chromatography column purification, and final counting by alpha spectrometry after cerium fluoride micro-precipitation. The minimal detectable activities for the method were determined to be 20 mBq L(-1) or less for plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes, with an 8-h sample turn-around time. Spike tests showed that this method would meet the requirements for actinide bioassay following a radiation emergency.

  4. Emerging Methods and Systems for Observing Life in the Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, F.; Pearlman, J.; Simmons, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is a growing need for observations of life in the sea at time and space scales consistent with those made for physical and chemical parameters. International programs such as the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS) and Marine Biodiversity Observation Networks (MBON) are making the case for expanded biological observations and working diligently to prioritize essential variables. Here we review past, present and emerging systems and methods for observing life in the sea from the perspective of maintaining continuous observations over long time periods. Methods that rely on ships with instrumentation and over-the-side sample collections will need to be supplemented and eventually replaced with those based from autonomous platforms. Ship-based optical and acoustic instruments are being reduced in size and power for deployment on moorings and autonomous vehicles. In parallel a new generation of low power, improved resolution sensors are being developed. Animal bio-logging is evolving with new, smaller and more sophisticated tags being developed. New genomic methods, capable of assessing multiple trophic levels from a single water sample, are emerging. Autonomous devices for genomic sample collection are being miniaturized and adapted to autonomous vehicles. The required processing schemes and methods for these emerging data collections are being developed in parallel with the instrumentation. An evolving challenge will be the integration of information from these disparate methods given that each provides their own unique view of life in the sea.

  5. Implementation of Active Learning Method in Unit Operations II Subject

    OpenAIRE

    Ma'mun, Sholeh

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Active Learning Method which requires students to take an active role in the process of learning in the classroom has been applied in Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Islamic University of Indonesia for Unit Operations II subject in the Even Semester of Academic Year 2015/2016. The purpose of implementation of the learning method is to assist students in achieving competencies associated with the Unit Operations II subject and to help in creating...

  6. Rapid separation method for actinides in emergency air filter samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L; Culligan, Brian K; Noyes, Gary W

    2010-12-01

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and strontium in air filter samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations. The actinides and strontium in air filter method utilizes a rapid acid digestion method and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and Sr Resin cartridges. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha emitters are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified (90)Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency air filter samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinide and (90)Sr in air filter results were reported in less than 4 h with excellent quality. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A ground moving target emergency tracking method for catastrophe rescue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Li, D.; Li, G.

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, great disasters happen now and then. Disaster management test the emergency operation ability of the government and society all over the world. Immediately after the occurrence of a great disaster (e.g., earthquake), a massive nationwide rescue and relief operation need to be kicked off instantly. In order to improve the organizations efficiency of the emergency rescue, the organizers need to take charge of the information of the rescuer teams, including the real time location, the equipment with the team, the technical skills of the rescuers, and so on. One of the key factors for the success of emergency operations is the real time location of the rescuers dynamically. Real time tracking methods are used to track the professional rescuer teams now. But volunteers' participation play more and more important roles in great disasters. However, real time tracking of the volunteers will cause many problems, e.g., privacy leakage, expensive data consumption, etc. These problems may reduce the enthusiasm of volunteers' participation for catastrophe rescue. In fact, the great disaster is just small probability event, it is not necessary to track the volunteers (even rescuer teams) every time every day. In order to solve this problem, a ground moving target emergency tracking method for catastrophe rescue is presented in this paper. In this method, the handheld devices using GPS technology to provide the location of the users, e.g., smart phone, is used as the positioning equipment; an emergency tracking information database including the ID of the ground moving target (including the rescuer teams and volunteers), the communication number of the handheld devices with the moving target, and the usually living region, etc., is built in advance by registration; when catastrophe happens, the ground moving targets that living close to the disaster area will be filtered by the usually living region; then the activation short message will be sent to the selected

  8. Method for the analysis pre and post radiological emergency (MAPPER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Velazquez, R.S.; Perez Gonzalez, F.; Fornet Rodriguez, O.; Mustelier Echavarria, A.; Miller Clemente, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Everything practices associated to the employment he/she gives ionizing radiations it generates a risk, and therefore the possibility exists potentially, he/she gives occurrences he/she gives a radiological accident. Assisting it, all the entities where the nuclear techniques are applied, they should have a method that allows them to evaluate, before y/o after having happened a radiological accident, if the planning and preparation to face emergencies give this it is or it has been effective

  9. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR EMERGENCY WATER AND URINE SAMPLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Bioassay Lab participated in the 2008 NRIP Emergency Response program administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in May, 2008. A new rapid column separation method was used for analysis of actinides and {sup 90}Sr the NRIP 2008 emergency water and urine samples. Significant method improvements were applied to reduce analytical times. As a result, much faster analysis times were achieved, less than 3 hours for determination of {sup 90}Sr and 3-4 hours for actinides. This represents a 25%-33% improvement in analysis times from NRIP 2007 and a {approx}100% improvement compared to NRIP 2006 report times. Column flow rates were increased by a factor of two, with no significant adverse impact on the method performance. Larger sample aliquots, shorter count times, faster cerium fluoride microprecipitation and streamlined calcium phosphate precipitation were also employed. Based on initial feedback from NIST, the SRS Environmental Bioassay Lab had the most rapid analysis times for actinides and {sup 90}Sr analyses for NRIP 2008 emergency urine samples. High levels of potential matrix interferences may be present in emergency samples and rugged methods are essential. Extremely high levels of {sup 210}Po were found to have an adverse effect on the uranium results for the NRIP-08 urine samples, while uranium results for NRIP-08 water samples were not affected. This problem, which was not observed for NRIP-06 or NRIP-07 urine samples, was resolved by using an enhanced {sup 210}Po removal step, which will be described.

  10. Identifying Emerging Trends of Financial Business Method Patents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Sang Lee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Financial technology has become an important part of the banking industry in recent times. This study attempts to propose a framework to identify emerging areas and trends using financial business method patents. Based on the abstracts of financial business method patents registered at the United States Patent and Trademark Office, this study first applies latent Dirichlet allocation to identify emerging topics. The probability of the annual occurrence of each topic is adjusted through the exponentially weighted moving average to reflect the importance of the recent probability of topics. Each topic is classified as “hot” or “cold” depending on whether the exponentially weighted moving average of the probabilities exceeds the threshold. We applied survival analysis to the time gap of recurrently becoming hot from a cold status with the associated factor of financial business method patents. The findings suggest that the topic with the short granted period and high forward citation is likely to become hot. In addition, the topic that is aged and specific in narrow areas is likely to continuously change into the hot or cold status. The approach proposed in this study contributes toward understanding topic emergence in the financial area and pursuing sustainable development.

  11. Technological considerations in emergency instrumentation preparedness. Phase II-D. Evaluation testing and calibration methodology for emergency radiological instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bramson, P.E.; Andersen, B.V.; Fleming, D.M.; Kathren, R.L.; Mulhern, O.R.; Newton, C.E.; Oscarson, E.E.; Selby, J.M.

    1976-09-01

    In response to recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the Division of Operational Safety, U.S. ERDA has contracted with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories to survey the adequacy of existing instrumentation at nuclear fuel cycle facilities to meet emergency requirements and to develop technical criteria for instrumentation systems to be used in assessment of environmental conditions following plant emergencies. This report, the fifth in a series, provides: (1) calibration methods to assure the quality of radiological measurements and (2) testing procedures for determining whether an emergency radiological instrument meets the performance specifications. Three previous reports in this series identified the emergency instrumentation needs for power reactors, mixed oxide fuel plants, and fuel reprocessing facilities. Each of these three reports contains a Section VI, which sets forth applicable radiological instrument performance criteria and calibration requirements. Testing and calibration procedures in this report have been formatted in two parts: IV and V, each divided into three subsections: (1) Power Reactors, (2) Mixed Oxide Fuel Plants, and (3) Fuel Reprocessing Facilities. The three performance criteria subsections directly coincide with the performance criteria sections of the previous reports. These performance criteria sections have been reproduced in this report as Part III with references of ''required action'' added

  12. Technological considerations in emergency instrumentation preparedness. Phase II-D. Evaluation testing and calibration methodology for emergency radiological instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramson, P.E.; Andersen, B.V.; Fleming, D.M.; Kathren, R.L.; Mulhern, O.R.; Newton, C.E.; Oscarson, E.E.; Selby, J.M.

    1976-09-01

    In response to recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the Division of Operational Safety, U.S. ERDA has contracted with Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories to survey the adequacy of existing instrumentation at nuclear fuel cycle facilities to meet emergency requirements and to develop technical criteria for instrumentation systems to be used in assessment of environmental conditions following plant emergencies. This report, the fifth in a series, provides: (1) calibration methods to assure the quality of radiological measurements and (2) testing procedures for determining whether an emergency radiological instrument meets the performance specifications. Three previous reports in this series identified the emergency instrumentation needs for power reactors, mixed oxide fuel plants, and fuel reprocessing facilities. Each of these three reports contains a Section VI, which sets forth applicable radiological instrument performance criteria and calibration requirements. Testing and calibration procedures in this report have been formatted in two parts: IV and V, each divided into three subsections: (1) Power Reactors, (2) Mixed Oxide Fuel Plants, and (3) Fuel Reprocessing Facilities. The three performance criteria subsections directly coincide with the performance criteria sections of the previous reports. These performance criteria sections have been reproduced in this report as Part III with references of ''required action'' added.

  13. Adaptation-II of the surrogate methods for linear programming ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adaptation-II of the surrogate methods for linear programming problems. SO Oko. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Mathematical Sciences Vol. 5(1) 2006: 63-71. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjmas.v5i1.21381.

  14. German Emergency Care in Neurosurgery and Military Neurology during World War II, 1939-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahnisch, Frank W

    2016-01-01

    A critical analysis of the historical involvement of neurology and neurosurgery in military emergency care services enables us to better contextualize and appreciate the development of modern neurology at large. Wartime neurosurgery and civil brain science during the German Nazi period tightly coalesced in examining the specific injury types, which military neurosurgeons such as Wilhelm Toennis, Klaus Joachim Zuelch, and Georg Merrem encountered and treated based on their neurophysiological understanding gained from earlier peacetime research. Collaborative associations with Dr. Toennis in particular proved to be highly beneficial to other military neurologists and neurosurgeons during World War II and beyond. This article also discusses the prewar developments and considers the fate of German neurosurgeons and military neurologists after the war. The envisaged dynamic concepts of fast action, reaction, and recycling, which contemporary physicians had intensively studied in the preceding scientific experiments in their neurophysiological laboratories, had already been introduced into neurological surgery during the interwar period. In retrospect, World War II emergency rescue units greatly strengthened military operations through an active process of 'recycling' indispensable army personnel. Neurosurgical emergency chains thereby introduced another decisive step in the modernization of warfare, in that they increased the momentum of military mobility in the field. Notwithstanding the violence of warfare and the often inhumane ways in which such knowledge in the field of emergency neurology was gained, the protagonists among the group of experts in military neurology and neurosurgery strongly contributed to the postwar clinical neuroscience community in Germany. In differing political pretexts, this became visible in both East Germany and West Germany after the war, while the specific military and political conditions under which this knowledge of emergency medicine

  15. Emergency Versus Delayed Cholecystectomy After Percutaneous Transhepatic Gallbladder Drainage in Grade II Acute Cholecystitis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendi, Ahmed; El-Shafei, Mohamed; Emara, Doaa

    2017-02-01

    In grade II acute cholecystitis patients presenting more than 72 h after onset of symptoms, we prospectively compared treatment with emergency (ELC) to delayed laparoscopic cholecystectomy performed 6 weeks after percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage (PTGBD). Four hundred ninety-five patients with acute cholecystitis were assessed for eligibility; 345 were excluded or declined to participate. One hundred fifty patients were treated after consent with either ELC or PTGBD. Both PTGBD and ELC were able to resolve quickly cholecystitis sepsis. ELC patients had a significantly higher conversion rate (24 vs. 2.7 %, P cholecystitis sepsis. Delayed cholecystectomy after PTGBD produces better outcomes with a lower conversion rate, fewer procedure-related complications, and a shorter hospital stay than emergency cholecystectomy.

  16. PROMETHEE II: A knowledge-driven method for copper exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Maysam; Ali Torabi, S.; Norouzi, Gholam-Hossain; Hamzeh, Mohammad; Elyasi, Gholam-Reza

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the application of a well-known Multi Criteria Decision Making (MCDM) technique called Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE II) to explore porphyry copper deposits. Various raster-based evidential layers involving geological, geophysical, and geochemical geo-datasets are integrated to prepare a mineral prospectivity mapping (MPM). In a case study, thirteen layers of the Now Chun copper deposit located in the Kerman province of Iran are used to explore the region of interest. The PROMETHEE II technique is applied to produce the desired MPM, and the outputs are validated using twenty-one boreholes that have been classified into five classes. This proposed method shows a high performance when providing the MPM while reducing the cost of exploratory drilling in the study area.

  17. A Decision Model for Emergency Warehouse Location Based on a Novel Stochastic MCDA Method: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkang He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available China is one of the disaster-prone countries in the world. Constructing a rapid and effective relief logistic system is important for disaster-responding at country level. Strategic prepositioning of emergency items, especially the decision of appropriate emergency warehouses location, has significant impacts on rapid disaster response to ensure sufficient relief supplies. The emergency warehouse location decision is a complex problem, where a wide variety of criteria need to be considered and the preference information of decision makers (DMs may be imprecise or even absent. In this paper, we identify key effectiveness-oriented criteria used to evaluate the alternative emergency warehouse locations and make an attempt to propose a new multicriteria ranking method to solve the problem of inaccurate or uncertain weight information based on stochastic pairwise dominant relations and the pruning procedure of ELECTRE-II method. The proposed method extends the conventional ELECTRE-II method by incorporating inaccurate information and broadens its application to emergency warehouse location field. The feasibility and applicability of the proposed method are illustrated with a simulated example.

  18. Numerical method for solving integral equations of neutron transport. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loyalka, S.K.; Tsai, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    In a recent paper it was pointed out that the weakly singular integral equations of neutron transport can be quite conveniently solved by a method based on subtraction of singularity. This previous paper was devoted entirely to the consideration of simple one-dimensional isotropic-scattering and one-group problems. The present paper constitutes interesting extensions of the previous work in that in addition to a typical two-group anisotropic-scattering albedo problem in the slab geometry, the method is also applied to an isotropic-scattering problem in the x-y geometry. These results are compared with discrete S/sub N/ (ANISN or TWOTRAN-II) results, and for the problems considered here, the proposed method is found to be quite effective. Thus, the method appears to hold considerable potential for future applications. (auth)

  19. Method to characterize spinons as emergent elementary particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ying; Sandvik, Anders W

    2011-10-07

    We develop a technique to directly study spinons (emergent spin S=1/2 particles) in quantum spin models in any number of dimensions. The size of a spinon wave packet and of a bound pair (a triplon) are defined in terms of wave-function overlaps that can be evaluated by quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the same information is contained in the spin-spin correlation function as well. We illustrate the method in one dimension. We confirm that spinons are well-defined particles (have exponentially localized wave packet) in a valence-bond-solid state, are marginally defined (with power-law shaped wave packet) in the standard Heisenberg critical state, and are not well defined in an ordered Néel state (achieved in one dimension using long-range interactions).

  20. Microgrants - a method of facilitating research in emergency medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Microgrants is a novel concept where small grants are used to facilitate research. The concept might have a place in developing emergency medicine research, especially in countries where emergency medicine in not established or in new areas of research. Two examples of the beneficial...... effects of microgrants in emergency medicine research are described. Emergency medicine interest groups and foundations should consider setting up microgrant schemes....

  1. Microfinance as a method of facilitating research in emergency medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Brabrand, Mikkel; Folkestad, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Microgrants are a novel concept where small grants are used to facilitate research. The concept might have a place in developing emergency medicine research, especially in countries where emergency medicine is not established or in new areas of research. Two examples of the beneficial effects...... of microgrants in emergency medicine research are described. Emergency medicine interest groups and foundations should consider setting up microgrant schemes....

  2. Effective Methods and Emerging Trends in Engineering Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective Methods and Emerging Trends in Engineering. Education. Abdelkrim Haddad. Mechanical Engineering Department,. PO Box 840, Makkah University, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Accepté le 08/12/2007. ﺺﺨﻠﻣ. ﺔﯾدﺎﺼﺘﻗﻻا ﺔﯿﻤﻨﺘﻟا ﻲﻓ ﺎﻤﮭﻣ ارود ﻲﺳﺪﻨﮭﻟا ﻦﯾﻮﻜﺘﻟا ﺐﻌﻠﯾ. ﻢﻟﺎﻌﻟا لود ﻦﯿﺑ ﺎﮭﺘﻌﻤﺳ اﺬﻛو ﺔﻣﻸﻟ ﺔﯿﻋﺎﻤﺘﺟﻻا و . نﺎﻧﺮﻘﻟا لﻼﺧ. جﺎﻣدﻹا ﻦﻣز ﻦﯾﺮﺸﻌﻟاو ﺪﺣاﻮﻟا نﺮﻘﻟا ...

  3. Methods for implementing revisions to emergency operating procedures. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, L.B.; Bell, A.J.

    1984-05-01

    In response to the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has published the TMI Action Plan. The TMI Action Plan Item I.C.1 called for the upgrading of Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs) at nuclear power plants. The program developed from this Action Plan item has resulted in utility efforts to: (1) revise EOPs; (2) train personnel in the use of the EOPs; and (3) implement the revised EOPs. The NRC supported the study presented in this report to identify factors which influence the effectiveness of training and implementation of revised EOPs. The NRC's major concern was the possible effects of negative transfer of training. The report includes a summary of existing methods for implementing revisions to procedures based on interviews of plant personnel, a review of the training literature applicable to the effect of previously learned procedures on the learning of and performance with revised procedures (i.e., negative transfer) and recommendations of methods and schedules for implementing revised EOPs. While the study found that the concern over negative transfer of training was not as great as anticipated, several recommendations were made. These include: (1) overtraining of operators to reduce the effect of observed negative transfer; and (2) implementation of the revised EOPs as soon as possible after training to minimize the time operators must rely upon the old EOPs after having been trained on the revised EOPs. The results of the study should be useful both to the utilities and the NRC in the development and review of EOP implementation programs

  4. Adsorption desalination: An emerging low-cost thermal desalination method

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, K. C.

    2013-01-01

    Desalination, other than the natural water cycle, is hailed as the panacea to alleviate the problems of fresh water shortage in many water stressed countries. However, the main drawback of conventional desalination methods is that they are energy intensive. In many instances, they consumed electricity, chemicals for pre- and post-treatment of water. For each kWh of energy consumed, there is an unavoidable emission of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) at the power stations as well as the discharge of chemically-laden brine into the environment. Thus, there is a motivation to find new direction or methods of desalination that consumed less chemicals, thermal energy and electricity.This paper describes an emerging and yet low cost method of desalination that employs only low-temperature waste heat, which is available in abundance from either the renewable energy sources or exhaust of industrial processes. With only one heat input, the Adsorption Desalination (AD) cycle produces two useful effects, i.e., high grade potable water and cooling. In this article, a brief literature review, the theoretical framework for adsorption thermodynamics, a lumped-parameter model and the experimental tests for a wide range of operational conditions on the basic and the hybrid AD cycles are discussed. Predictions from the model are validated with measured performances from two pilot plants, i.e., a basic AD and the advanced AD cycles. The energetic efficiency of AD cycles has been compared against the conventional desalination methods. Owing to the unique features of AD cycle, i.e., the simultaneous production of dual useful effects, it is proposed that the life cycle cost (LCC) of AD is evaluated against the LCC of combined machines that are needed to deliver the same quantities of useful effects using a unified unit of $/MWh. In closing, an ideal desalination system with zero emission of CO2 is presented where geo-thermal heat is employed for powering a temperature-cascaded cogeneration plant.

  5. Maintenance Activity Planning by Reability Centered Maintenance II Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachmad Hidayat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This research discuss maintenance activity by using RCM II method to determine failure function risk at compresor screw. Calculation is given to magnitude optimum time maintenance interval by considering the cost maintenance and the cost reparation. From the research results with RPN points out that critical component that needs to get main priority in give maintenance on compresor screw are bust logistic on timeworn piston, and on filter's sponge airs to come out damage that gets RPN 45. Optimum maintenance interval point one that acquired to prevent failure on compresor screw smaller than appreciative MTTF which indicate optimum maintenance interval in avoiding its bust happening logistic component before happening damage.

  6. Method for developing arrangements for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953. Emergency preparedness and response. Publication date: October 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-09-01

    Response (EPR) series is an update to IAEA-TECDOC-953. It aims to: fulfil in part the IAEA's function under article 5.a(ii) of the Assistance Convention, and to provide a compendium of best practice for planners aiming both to comply with the Requirements and to improve their own capabilities for responding to radiation emergencies, while the Secretariat facilitates consensus on formal guidance for meeting the Safety Requirements. The publication incorporates material from existing IAEA emergency preparedness Safety Guides updating it to be consistent with the Requirements, to incorporate best practice, the results of research and the latest lessons identified in past emergencies, and to reflect relevant issues of international law. It provides a practical source of information relevant to the development of an integrated national, local and operator capability for emergency response based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply the method described in this publication, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic principles for response to a nuclear or radiological emergency. They should review the relevant international guidance beforehand. This publication provides information concerning methodologies, techniques and available results of research relating to response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. It also provides a practical, step-by-step method for developing integrated operator, local and national capabilities for emergency response. It does not provide IAEA endorsed guidance or recommendations because this material has not undergone the process of peer reviews needed to become part of the IAEA Safety Standards Series. This publication concerns preparations for radiation emergencies. The range of potential radiation emergencies of concern is enormous, extending from a major reactor emergency to emergencies involving lost or stolen radioactive material. This method covers planning for the entire range. The

  7. Method for the development of emergency response preparedness for nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    This report supplements IAEA emergency preparedness guidance published in the 1980s, and is consistent with the new international guidance. It provides practical advice for the development of an emergency response capability based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply this method, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic radiological emergency response principles. Therefore, other applicable international guidance should be reviewed before using this report. This report provides a practical step-by-step method for developing integrated user, local and national emergency response capabilities. It can also be used as the basis for conducting an audit of an existing emergency response capability

  8. Type II Natural Killer T (NKT) Cells And Their Emerging Role In Health And Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Kumar, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells recognize lipid antigens presented by a class I MHC-like molecule CD1d, a member of the CD1 family. While most of the initial studies on NKT cells focused on a subset with semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) termed iNKT cells, majority of CD1d-restricted lipid-reactive human T cells express diverse TCRs and are termed as type II NKT cells. These cells constitute a distinct population of circulating and tissue-resident effector T cells with immune-regulatory properties. They react to a growing list of self- as well as non-self lipid ligands, and share some properties with both iNKT as well as conventional T cells. Emerging body of evidence points to their role in the regulation of immunity to pathogens/tumors and in autoimmune/metabolic disorders. Improved understanding of the biology of these cells and the ability to manipulate their function may be of therapeutic benefit in diverse disease conditions. PMID:28115591

  9. Type II NKT Cells and Their Emerging Role in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V; Kumar, Vipin

    2017-02-01

    NKT cells recognize lipid Ags presented by a class I MHC-like molecule CD1d, a member of the CD1 family. Although most initial studies on NKT cells focused on a subset with semi-invariant TCR termed invariant NKT cells, the majority of CD1d-restricted lipid-reactive human T cells express diverse TCRs and are termed type II NKT cells. These cells constitute a distinct population of circulating and tissue-resident effector T cells with immune-regulatory properties. They react to a growing list of self- as well as non-self-lipid ligands, and share some properties with both invariant NKT and conventional T cells. An emerging body of evidence points to their role in the regulation of immunity to pathogens/tumors and in autoimmune/metabolic disorders. An improved understanding of the biology of these cells and the ability to manipulate their function may be of therapeutic benefit in diverse disease conditions. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Emerging methods, technologies and process management in software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrucci, Filomena; Tortora, Genny; Tucci, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    A high-level introduction to new technologies andmethods in the field of software engineering Recent years have witnessed rapid evolution of software engineering methodologies, and until now, there has been no single-source introduction to emerging technologies in the field.

  11. SEPARATION OF Fe (III, Cr(III, Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, AND Pb(II METAL IONS USING POLY(EUGENYL OXYACETIC ACID AS AN ION CARRIER BY A LIQUID MEMBRANE TRANSPORT METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Harimu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fe (III, Cr(III, Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Pb(II  metal ions had been separated using poly(eugenyl oxyacetic acid as an ion carrier by bulk liquid membrane transport method. The effect of pH, polyeugenyl oxyacetic acid ion carrier concentration, nitric acid concentration in the stripping solution, transport time, and metal concentration were optimized. The result showed that the optimum condition for transport of metal ions was at pH 4 for ion Fe(III and at pH 5 for Cr(III, Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Pb(II ions. The carrier volumes were optimum with concentration of 1 x 10-3 M at 7.5 mL for Cr(III, Cu (II,  Ni(II, Co(II ions and at 8.5 mL for Fe(III and Pb(II ions. The concentration of HNO3 in stripping phase was optimum at 2 M for Fe(III and Cu(II ions, 1 M for Cr(III, Ni(II and Co(II ions, and 0.5 M for Pb(II ion. The optimum transport times were 36 h for Fe(III and Co(II ions, and 48 h for Cr(III, Cu (II, Ni(II, and Pb(II ions. The concentration of metal ions accurately transported were 2.5 x 10-4 M for Fe(III and Cr(III ions, and 1 M for Cu (II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Pb(II ions. Compared to other metal ions the transport of Fe(III was the highest with selectivity order of Fe(III > Cr(III > Pb(II > Cu(II > Ni(II > Co(II. At optimum condition, Fe(III ion was transported through the membrane at 46.46%.   Keywords: poly(eugenyl oxyacetic acid, transport, liquid membrane, Fe (III, Cr(III, Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Pb(II ions

  12. The development of episodic foresight: emerging concepts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Judith A; Mayhew, Estelle M Y; Prabhakar, Janani

    2011-01-01

    Episodic foresight is here defined as the ability to project oneself into the future and mentally simulate situations and outcomes. Tasks used to study the development of episodic foresight in young children are reviewed and compared to tasks used to study other future-oriented abilities (planning, delay of gratification, and prospective memory) in the same age-group. We argue for the importance of accounting for and minimizing the role of other cognitive demands in research tasks. Because episodic foresight is an emerging ability in young children, more research needs to be directed at the contexts in which it emerges and the extent to which episodic foresight is part of a growing ability for mental representation.

  13. Method for Expressing Public Opinions Concerning the Introduction of an Emerging Technology to Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Ito, Kyoko; Ohnishi, Satoshi; Nishida, Shogo

    Emerging technology may have considerable social impact. Because emerging technology has not yet been introduced in society, it is needed general public express its opinions on emerging technology. It is important that expressing opinion must have social spirit. A method to limit facility of the Internet and activate social spirit is proposed. Evaluation experiment were conducted to test the effectiveness of the proposed method, and the participant could express opinion with social spirit.

  14. Training healthcare personnel for mass-casualty incidents in a virtual emergency department: VED II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Wm Leroy; Youngblood, Patricia; Harter, Phillip; Kusumoto, Laura; Dev, Parvati

    2010-01-01

    Training emergency personnel on the clinical management of a mass-casualty incident (MCI) with prior chemical, biological, radioactive, nuclear, or explosives (CBRNE) -exposed patients is a component of hospital preparedness procedures. The objective of this research was to determine whether a Virtual Emergency Department (VED), designed after the Stanford University Medical Center's Emergency Department (ED) and populated with 10 virtual patient victims who suffered from a dirty bomb blast (radiological) and 10 who suffered from exposure to a nerve toxin (chemical), is an effective clinical environment for training ED physicians and nurses for such MCIs. Ten physicians with an average of four years of post-training experience, and 12 nurses with an average of 9.5 years of post-graduate experience at Stanford University Medical Center and San Mateo County Medical Center participated in this IRB-approved study. All individuals were provided electronic information about the clinical features of patients exposed to a nerve toxin or radioactive blast before the study date and an orientation to the "game" interface, including an opportunity to practice using it immediately prior to the study. An exit questionnaire was conducted using a Likert Scale test instrument. Among these 22 trainees, two-thirds of whom had prior Code Triage (multiple casualty incident) training, and one-half had prior CBRNE training, about two-thirds felt immersed in the virtual world much or all of the time. Prior to the training, only four trainees (18%) were confident about managing CBRNE MCIs. After the training, 19 (86%) felt either "confident" or "very confident", with 13 (59%) attributing this change to practicing in the virtual ED. Twenty-one (95%) of the trainees reported that the scenarios were useful for improving healthcare team skills training, the primary objective for creating them. Eighteen trainees (82%) believed that the cases also were instructive in learning about clinical

  15. Hybrid Decision-making Method for Emergency Response System of Unattended Train Operation Metro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobo Zhao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Suitable selection of the emergency alternatives is a critical issue in emergency response system of Unattended Train Operation (UTO metro system of China. However, there is no available method for dispatcher group in Operating Control Center (OCC to evaluate the decision under emergency situation. It was found that the emergency decision making in UTO metro system is relative with the preferences and the importance of multi-dispatcher in emergency. Regarding these factors, this paper presents a hybrid method to determinate the priority weights of emergency alternatives, which aggregates the preference matrix by constructing the emergency response task model based on the Weighted Ordered Weighted Averaging (WOWA operator. This calculation approach derives the importance weights depending on the dispatcher emergency tasks and integrates it into the Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA operator weights based on a fuzzy membership relation. A case from train fire is given to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the proposed methods for Group Multi-Criteria Decision Making (GMCDM in emergency management of UTO metro system. The innovation of this research is paving the way for a systematic emergency decision-making solution which connects the automatic metro emergency response system with the GMCDM theory.

  16. An improved method for seed-bank analysis : Seedling emergence after removing the soil by sieving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Heerdt, G.N.J.; Bekker, R.M.; Bakker, J.P.; Verweij, G.L.

    1. The seedling emergence method for assessing the size of the seed bank is improved by washing soil samples on a fine sieve and spreading the thus concentrated samples in a 3-5 mm thick layer on sterilized potting compost. 2. The method largely increases the number of seedlings that emerge as

  17. Kaizen: a method of process improvement in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gregory H; McCoin, Nicole Streiff; Lescallette, Richard; Russ, Stephan; Slovis, Corey M

    2009-12-01

    Recent position statements from health care organizations have placed a strong emphasis on continuous quality improvement (CQI). CQI finds many of its roots in kaizen, which emphasizes small, low-cost, low-risk improvements. Based on the successful Kaizen Programs at organizations such as Toyota, the authors thought the emergency department (ED) would be an ideal environment to benefit from such a program. The authors sought to create a CQI program using a suggestion-based model that did not require a large time commitment, was easy to implement, and had the potential to empower all physicians in the department. It would not take the place of other improvement efforts, but instead augment them. The hypothesis was that such a program would foster sustainable engagement of emergency physicians in system improvement efforts and lead to a continuous stream of low-cost implementable system improvement interventions. A CQI program was created for the physician staff of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, focusing on a suggestion-based model using kaizen philosophy. Lectures teaching kaizen philosophy were presented. Over the past 4 years, a methodology was developed utilizing a Web-based application, the Kaizen Tracker, which aids in the submission and implementation of suggestions that are called kaizen initiatives (KIs). The characteristics of the KIs submitted, details regarding resident and faculty participation, and the effectiveness of the Kaizen Tracker were retrospectively reviewed. There were 169, 105, and 101 KIs placed in the postimplementation calendar years 2006, 2007, and 2008, respectively. Seventy-six percent of KIs submitted thus far have identified a "process problem." Fifty-three percent of KIs submitted have led to operational changes within the ED. Ninety-three percent of the resident physicians entered at least one KI, and 73% of these residents submitted more than one KI. Sixty-nine percent of the

  18. A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

  19. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: An approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Mahony, Mary T.; Doolan, Donal; O'Sullivan, Alice; Hession, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire

  20. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: an approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Mary T; Doolan, Donal; O'Sullivan, Alice; Hession, Michael

    2008-06-15

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire.

  1. Emergency First Responders' Experience with Colorimetric Detection Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra L. Fox; Keith A. Daum; Carla J. Miller; Marnie M. Cortez

    2007-10-01

    Nationwide, first responders from state and federal support teams respond to hazardous materials incidents, industrial chemical spills, and potential weapons of mass destruction (WMD) attacks. Although first responders have sophisticated chemical, biological, radiological, and explosive detectors available for assessment of the incident scene, simple colorimetric detectors have a role in response actions. The large number of colorimetric chemical detection methods available on the market can make the selection of the proper methods difficult. Although each detector has unique aspects to provide qualitative or quantitative data about the unknown chemicals present, not all detectors provide consistent, accurate, and reliable results. Included here, in a consumer-report-style format, we provide “boots on the ground” information directly from first responders about how well colorimetric chemical detection methods meet their needs in the field and how they procure these methods.

  2. Individual feature identification method for nuclear accident emergency decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yingfeng; Wang Jianlong; Lin Xiaoling; Yang Yongxin; Lu Xincheng

    2014-01-01

    According to the individual feature identification method and combining with the characteristics of nuclear accident emergency decision-making, the evaluation index system of the nuclear accident emergency decision-making was determined on the basis of investigation and analysis. The effectiveness of the nuclear accident emergency decision-making was evaluated based on the individual standards by solving the individual features of the individual standard identification decisions. The case study shows that the optimization result is reasonable, objective and reliable, and it can provide an effective analysis method and decision-making support for optimization of nuclear accident emergency protective measures. (authors)

  3. Selective Extraction of Co(II in the Presence of Mn(II, Ni(II and Cu(II Using Salting-out Phase Separation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Shafiqul Alam

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of Co(II in the presence of Mn(II, Ni(II and Cu(II has been studied using the mixture of 2-propanol with water upon the addition of CaCl2 in the concentration range of 3.0 – 5.0 mol dm-3 (M. Co(II was extracted selectively to the extent of 80% into the 2-propanol phase at 5.0 M CaCl2. The percent of extraction of other transition metal ions, for example Mn(II, Ni(II and Cu(II was much lower than that of Co(II, but they were stripped in the aqueous phase upon addition of CaCl2. Therefore, selective extraction of Co(II from these metal ions was attained by using the mixture of water and 2-propanol. Co(II was extracted as CoCl42- from the aqueous phase into the 2-propanol phase through the formation of ion pair, Ca2+ - CoCl42-. A mechanism is proposed to explain the extraction.

  4. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Genitourinary Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-07-01

    -life experiences, and small group discussions in place of traditional lectures. In doing so, a goal of the curriculum is to encourage self-directed learning, improve understanding and knowledge retention, and improve the educational experience of our residents. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: small group modules authored by education faculty and content experts based on the core emergency medicine content. This program also includes resident submitted questions that were developed during review of the content. The Socratic Method, used during small group sessions, encourages active participation; small groups also focus on the synthesis and application of knowledge through the discussion of real life experiences. The use of free open access medical education (FOAM resources allows learners to work at their own pace and maximize autonomy.

  5. II meeting on emergency in radioactive facilities: Madrid, 19-20 December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This meeting, sponsored by Spanish Radiation Protection Society and CIEMAT, had the following topics: - Radiation protection in Hospitals. - Accidents in Hospitals. - Prevention of accidents in Hospitals - Social impact of accidents in Hospitals. - Risks and emergency in Hospitals - National and International regulations - Emergency plans

  6. Method for the development of emergency response preparedness for nuclear or radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    This report supplements IAEA emergency preparedness guidance published in the 1980s, and is consistent with the new international guidance. It provides practical advice for the development of an emergency response capability based on the potential nature and magnitude of the risk. In order to apply this method, emergency planners should have a good understanding of the basic radiological emergency response principles. Therefore, other applicable international guidance should be reviewed before using this report. This report provides a practical step-by-step method for developing integrated user, local and national emergency response capabilities. It can also be used as the basis for conducting an audit of an existing emergency response capability. 14 refs, 4 figs, 4 tabs

  7. 24 CFR Appendix II to Subpart C of... - Development of Standards; Calculation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; Calculation Methods II Appendix II to Subpart C of Part 51 Housing and Urban Development Office of the...; Calculation Methods I. Background Information Concerning the Standards (a) Thermal Radiation: (1) Introduction... radiation being emitted. The radiation can cause severe burn, injuries and even death to exposed persons...

  8. SYNTHESIS OF POLYEUGENYL OXYACETIC ACID AS A CARRIER TO SEPARATE HEAVY METAL ION Fe (III, Cr(III, Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, AND Pb(II THAT USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La Harimu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyeugenyl oxyacetic acid has been synthesized from polyeugenol and chloroacetic acid and applied to separate metal Fe(III, Cr(III, Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II, and Pb(II using solvent extraction method. pH effect, polyeugenyl oxyacetic acid ion carrier concentration, extraction time, and metal concentration optimized to gain optimum condition. The result of experiment indicated that polyeugenyl oxyacetic acid resulted the yellowed brown synthesis with melting point 125 °C and yield 68.9%. The Characterization of spectroscopy IR attributed by absorption to the area 1735,8 cm -1 as carbonyl extend vibration (C=O acid and 1H-NMR that was attributed by chemical shift at 4.6 ppm as carboxy proton (CH2-C=0. The metal separation optimum condition gained pH 3-6 for ion Fe(III, pH 5 for ion Cr(III, Ni(II, and Co(II and pH 6 for ion Cu(II, and Pb(II. Optimum carrier concentraction 5 mL, 10 mL, and 15 mL for ion Fe(III, and ion Cr(III, Ni(II, Co(II, and ion Cu(II, Pb(II respectively. Extraction time 2.5 h for ion Fe(III, 20 h for ion Cr(III, and 36 h for ion Cu(II, Pb(II, Ni(II, and Co(II. Metal concentration that would extracted correctly (0.75-5 x 10-4 M for ion Fe(III, (0.75-2.5 x 10-4 M for ion Cr(III, Ni(II, and Co(II and (0.75-1 x 10-4 M for ion Cu(II and Pb(II. The best polyeugenil oxyacetic acid response to separate ion Fe(III than other ions with selectivity order Fe(III> Cr(III> Cu(II> Pb(II> Ni(II> Co(II.   Keywords: polyeugenil oxyacetic acid, pH, extraction time, metal concentraction, solvent extraction

  9. Emerging research methods and their application to road safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarko, Andrew; Boyle, Linda Ng; Montella, Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    The study of road safety has seen great strides over the past few decades with advances in analytical methods and research tools that allow researchers to provide insights into the complex interactions of the driver, vehicle, and roadway. Data collection methods range from traditional traffic and roadway sensors to instrumented vehicles and driving simulators, capable of providing detailed data on both the normal driving conditions and the circumstances surrounding a safety critical event. In September 2011, the Third International Conference on Road Safety and Simulation was held in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, which was hosted by the Purdue University Center for Road Safety and sponsored by the Transportation Research Board and its three committees: ANB20 Safety Data, Analysis and Evaluation, AND30 Simulation and Measurement of Vehicle and Operator Performance, and ABJ95 Visualization in Transportation. The conference brought together two hundred researchers from all over the world demonstrating some of the latest research methods to quantify crash causality and associations, and model road safety. This special issue is a collection of 14 papers that were presented at the conference and then peer-reviewed through this journal. These papers showcase the types of analytical tools needed to examine various crash types, the use of naturalistic and on-road data to validate the use of surrogate measures of safety, and the value of driving simulators to examine high-risk situations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Emerging Computational Methods for the Rational Discovery of Allosteric Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jeffrey R; Lee, Christopher T; Durrant, Jacob D; Malmstrom, Robert D; Feher, Victoria A; Amaro, Rommie E

    2016-06-08

    Allosteric drug development holds promise for delivering medicines that are more selective and less toxic than those that target orthosteric sites. To date, the discovery of allosteric binding sites and lead compounds has been mostly serendipitous, achieved through high-throughput screening. Over the past decade, structural data has become more readily available for larger protein systems and more membrane protein classes (e.g., GPCRs and ion channels), which are common allosteric drug targets. In parallel, improved simulation methods now provide better atomistic understanding of the protein dynamics and cooperative motions that are critical to allosteric mechanisms. As a result of these advances, the field of predictive allosteric drug development is now on the cusp of a new era of rational structure-based computational methods. Here, we review algorithms that predict allosteric sites based on sequence data and molecular dynamics simulations, describe tools that assess the druggability of these pockets, and discuss how Markov state models and topology analyses provide insight into the relationship between protein dynamics and allosteric drug binding. In each section, we first provide an overview of the various method classes before describing relevant algorithms and software packages.

  11. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Gastrointestinal Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2017-01-01

    -directed learning, improve understanding and knowledge retention, and improve the educational experience of our residents. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: small group modules authored by education faculty and content experts, based on core emergency medicine content. This program also includes resident submitted questions that were developed during review of the content. The Socratic Method, used during small group sessions encourages active participation; small groups also focus on synthesis and application of knowledge through discussion of real life experiences. The use of free open access medical education (FOAM resources allows learners to work at their own pace and maximize autonomy in resident learning.

  12. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  14. Ultrafast optical imaging technology: principles and applications of emerging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikami Hideharu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High-speed optical imaging is an indispensable technology for blur-free observation of fast transient dynamics in virtually all areas including science, industry, defense, energy, and medicine. High temporal resolution is particularly important for microscopy as even a slow event appears to occur “fast” in a small field of view. Unfortunately, the shutter speed and frame rate of conventional cameras based on electronic image sensors are significantly constrained by their electrical operation and limited storage. Over the recent years, several unique and unconventional approaches to high-speed optical imaging have been reported to circumvent these technical challenges and achieve a frame rate and shutter speed far beyond what can be reached with the conventional image sensors. In this article, we review the concepts and principles of such ultrafast optical imaging methods, compare their advantages and disadvantages, and discuss an entirely new class of applications that are possible using them.

  15. Unipuncture double-access method in emergent endovascular procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hörer, Tal M; Hammo, Sari; Lönn, Lars

    2013-01-01

    We describe a technique to gain an additional endovascular access in acute situations in which a large-bore introducer is already inserted or in situations in which multiple accesses are impaired because of other reasons. Using an existing percutaneous femoral artery access, a second guide wire...... is inserted into the introducer, which is later withdrawn and applied onto one of the two guide wires. A double-wire access is then achieved. This access can be used, for example, for angiography or embolization catheters. This method might be useful in situations in which a quick and unplanned extra access...... is needed. It is, for example, applicable in hemodynamically unstable patients in whom percutaneous access can be difficult to obtain or in aortic endovascular procedures when an unplanned access is needed to insert an additional catheter for angiography and embolization....

  16. Dynamical behavior of a rumor transmission model with Holling-type II functional response in emergency event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Liang'an; Jiang, Jiehui; Gong, Sixing; He, Bing

    2016-05-01

    Rumor transmission has become an important issue in emergency event. In this paper, a rumor transmission model with Holling-type II functional response was proposed, which provides excellent explanations of the scientific knowledge effect with rumor spreading. By a global analysis of the model and studying the stability of the rumor-free equilibrium and the rumor-endemic equilibrium, we found that the number of infective individuals equal to zero or positive integer as time went on. A numerical simulation is carried out to illustrate the feasibility of our main results. The results will provide the theoretical support to rumor control in emergency event and also provide decision makers references for the public opinions management.

  17. Application of Carrier Element-Free Co-precipitation Method for Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) Ions Determination in Water Samples Using Chrysin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layth Imad Abd Ali; Wan Aini Wan Ibrahim; Azli Sulaiman; Mohd Marsin Sanagi

    2015-01-01

    A co-precipitation method was developed to separate and pre-concentrate Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions using an organic co precipitant, chrysin without adding any carrier element termed as carrier element-free co-precipitation (CEFC). Analytes were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The influence of analytical conditions, such as pH of the solution, quantity of co-precipitant, standing time, centrifugation rate and time, sample volume, and interference of concomitant ions were investigated over the recovery yields of the trace metals. The limit of detection, the limit of quantification and linearity range obtained from the FAAS measurements were found to be in the range of 0.64 to 0.86 μg L -1 , 2.13 to 2.86 μg L -1 and 0.9972 to 0.9989 for Ni(II), Cu(III) and Zn(II) ions, respectively. The precision of the method, evaluated as the relative standard deviation (RSD) obtained after analyzing a series of 10 replicates, was between 2.6 % to 3.9 % for the trace metal ions. The proposed procedure was applied and validated by analyzing river water reference material for trace metals (SLRS-5) and spiking trace metal ions in some water samples. The recoveries of the analyte metal ions were between 94.7-101.2 %. (author)

  18. Advanced diagnostic methods in oral and maxillofacial pathology. Part II: immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Richard C K; Daniels, Troy E; Greenspan, John S; Regezi, Joseph A

    2002-01-01

    The practice of pathology is currently undergoing significant change, in large part due to advances in the analysis of DNA, RNA, and proteins in tissues. These advances have permitted improved biologic insights into many developmental, inflammatory, metabolic, infectious, and neoplastic diseases. Moreover, molecular analysis has also led to improvements in the accuracy of disease diagnosis and classification. It is likely that, in the future, these methods will increasingly enter into the day-to-day diagnosis and management of patients. The pathologist will continue to play a fundamental role in diagnosis and will likely be in a pivotal position to guide the implementation and interpretation of these tests as they move from the research laboratory into diagnostic pathology. The purpose of this 2-part series is to provide an overview of the principles and applications of current molecular biologic and immunologic tests. In Part I, the biologic fundamentals of DNA, RNA, and proteins and methods that are currently available or likely to become available to the pathologist in the next several years for their isolation and analysis in tissue biopsies were discussed. In Part II, advances in immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence methods and their application to modern diagnostic pathology are reviewed.

  19. Hybrid Prediction Method for Aircraft Interior Noise, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of the project is research and development of methods for application of the Hybrid FE-SEA method to aircraft vibro-acoustic problems. This proposal...

  20. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings, ...

  1. AIR Tools II: algebraic iterative reconstruction methods, improved implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Christian; Jørgensen, Jakob Sauer

    2017-01-01

    with algebraic iterative methods and their convergence properties. The present software is a much expanded and improved version of the package AIR Tools from 2012, based on a new modular design. In addition to improved performance and memory use, we provide more flexible iterative methods, a column-action method...

  2. Emergent semiclassical time in quantum gravity: II. Full geometrodynamics and minisuperspace examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Edward

    2007-01-01

    I apply the preceding paper's emergent semiclassical time approach to geometrodynamics. The analogy between the two papers is useful at the level of the quadratic constraints, while I document the differences between the two due to the underlying differences in their linear constraints. I find that the emergent time-dependent wave equation for the universe in general not a time-dependent Schroedinger equation but rather a more general equation containing second time derivatives, and estimate in which regime this becomes significant. I provide a specific minisuperspace example for my emergent semiclassical time scheme and compare it with the hidden York time scheme. Overall, interesting connections are shown between Newtonian, Leibniz-Mach-Barbour, Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) and cosmic times, while the Euler and York hidden dilational times are argued to be somewhat different from these

  3. Inverse scattering transform method and soliton solutions for Davey-Stewartson II equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkadiev, V.A.; Pogrebkov, A.K.; Polivanov, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    The inverse scattering method for Davey-Stewartson II (DS-II) equation including both soliton and continuous spectrum solutions is developed. The explicit formulae for N-soliton solutions are given. Note that our solitons decrease as |z| -2 with z tending to infinity. (author). 8 refs

  4. Marketing medical services to the affluent. Part II of "An emerging niche market opportunity".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulaski, M J

    1997-01-01

    Society is split between a desire for access to quality health care and a reluctance, by some, to pay for it. Looking at this cost/access dichotomy historically enables one to recognize an emerging niche market--designer care delivered in a boutique setting.

  5. Improved methods for predicting peptide binding affinity to MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kamilla Kjærgaard; Andreatta, Massimo; Marcatili, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are expressed on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells where they display peptides to T helper cells, which orchestrate the onset and outcome of many host immune responses. Understanding which peptides will be presented...... by the MHC-II molecule is therefore important for understanding the activation of T helper cells and can be used to identify T-cell epitopes. We here present updated versions of two MHC class II peptide binding affinity prediction methods, NetMHCII and NetMHCIIpan. These were constructed using an extended...

  6. Comparison of microstickies measurement methods. Part II, Results and discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra R. Doshi; Angeles Blanco; Carlos Negro; Concepcion Monte; Gilles M. Dorris; Carlos C. Castro; Axel Hamann; R. Daniel Haynes; Carl Houtman; Karen Scallon; Hans-Joachim Putz; Hans Johansson; R. A. Venditti; K. Copeland; H.-M. Chang

    2003-01-01

    In part I of the article we discussed sample preparation procedure and described various methods used for the measurement of microstickies. Some of the important features of different methods are highlighted in Table 1. Temperatures used in the measurement methods vary from room temperature in some cases, 45 °C to 65 °C in other cases. Sample size ranges from as low as...

  7. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population

  8. Advanced Aqueous Phase Catalyst Development using Combinatorial Methods, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Combinatorial methods are proposed to develop advanced Aqueous Oxidation Catalysts (AOCs) with the capability to mineralize organic contaminants present in effluents...

  9. Assessing emergency situations and their aftermath in urban areas: The EMRAS II Urban Areas Working Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiessen, K.M.; Andersson, Kasper Grann; Berkovskyy, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Urban Areas Working Group is part of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s EMRAS II (Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) Programme. The goal of this Working Group is to test and improve the capabilities of models used in assessment of radioactive contamination in urban settings......, models, and parameter values used by different assessors. Preliminary conclusions emphasize the value of explaining individual approaches and the importance of understanding the effects of different assumptions and parameter values on the modeling results....

  10. Method and system for conserving power in a telecommunications network during emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conrad, Stephen H [Algodones, NM; O' Reilly, Gerard P [Manalapan, NJ

    2011-10-11

    Disclosed is a method and apparatus for conserving power in a telecommunications network during emergency situations. A permissible number list of emergency and/or priority numbers is stored in the telecommunications network. In the event of an emergency or power failure, input digits of a call to the telecommunications network are compared to the permissible number list. The call is processed in the telecommunications network and routed to its destination if the input digits match an entry in the permissible number list. The call is dropped without any further processing if the input digits do not match an entry in the permissible number list. Thus, power can be conserved in emergency situations by only allowing emergency and/or priority calls.

  11. Advanced Bayesian Methods for Lunar Surface Navigation, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation of this project is the application of advanced Bayesian methods to integrate real-time dense stereo vision and high-speed optical flow with an...

  12. Emergency planning and the Control of Major Accident Hazards (COMAH/Seveso II) Directive: An approach to determine the public safety zone for toxic cloud releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Mahony, Mary T. [Department of Public Health, Health Services Executive - Southern Area, Sarsfield House, Sarsfield Road, Wilton, Cork (Ireland)], E-mail: maryt.omahony@mailp.hse.ie; Doolan, Donal [Cork County Fire and Rescue Service, North Mall, Cork (Ireland)], E-mail: donal.doolan@corkcoco.ie; O' Sullivan, Alice [Cork Joint Emergency Planning Office, Health Services Executive - Southern Area, Unit 5 South Ring Business Park, Kinsale Road, Wilton, Cork (Ireland)], E-mail: aosullivan@nicholasodwyer.com; Hession, Michael [Cork County Fire and Rescue Service, North Mall, Cork (Ireland)], E-mail: michael.hession@corkcoco.ie

    2008-06-15

    The EU Control of Major Accidents Hazards Directive (Seveso II) requires an external emergency plan for each top tier site. This paper sets out a method to build the protection of public health into emergency planning for Seveso sites in the EU. The method involves the review of Seveso site details prescribed under the directive. The site safety report sets out the potential accident scenarios. The safety report's worst-case scenario, and chemical involved, is used as the basis for the external emergency plan. A decision was needed on the appropriate threshold value to use as the level of concern to protect public health. The definitions of the regulatory standards (air quality standards and occupational standards) in use were studied, how they are derived and for what purpose. The 10 min acute exposure guideline level (AEGL) for a chemical is recommended as the threshold value to inform decisions taken to protect public health from toxic cloud releases. The area delimited by AEGL 1 defines the population who may be concerned about being exposed. They need information based on comprehensive risk assessment. The area delimited by AEGL 2 defines the population for long-term surveillance when indicated and may include first responders. The area delimited by AEGL 3 defines the population who may present acutely to the medical services. It ensures that the emergency responders site themselves safely. A standard methodology facilitates discussions with plant operators and concerned public. Examples show how the methodology can be adapted to suit explosive risk and response to fire.

  13. Web-based emergency response exercise management systems and methods thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, John W.; Mercer, Michael B.; Heath, Zach; Yang, Lynn I.

    2014-09-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for simulating portions of an emergency response exercise includes generating situational awareness outputs associated with a simulated emergency and sending the situational awareness outputs to a plurality of output devices. Also, the method includes outputting to a user device a plurality of decisions associated with the situational awareness outputs at a decision point, receiving a selection of one of the decisions from the user device, generating new situational awareness outputs based on the selected decision, and repeating the sending, outputting and receiving steps based on the new situational awareness outputs. Other methods, systems, and computer program products are included according to other embodiments of the invention.

  14. Established and emerging methods for assessment of small and large intestinal motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, D; Poulsen, J L; Sandberg, T H

    2017-01-01

    and validation of objective methods to evaluate motility of the whole gut is important. Such techniques may be applied in clinical settings as diagnostic tools, in research to elucidate underlying mechanisms of diseases, and to evaluate how the gut responds to various drugs. A wide array of such methods exists...... emerged, with the advantages that they are less invasive, use no radiation, and provide much more detailed information. PURPOSE: This review outlines well-established and emerging methods to evaluate small bowel and colonic motility in clinical settings and in research. The latter include the 3D...

  15. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  16. Emerging Forms of the Part II of Jonathan Swift's Novel “Gulliver’s Travels”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Tikhonenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of grotesque forms in Jonathan Swift's novel "Gulliver’s Travels" based on the text of part II of the novel "A Voyage to Brobdingnag". On the basis of the selected actual material, displays of the grotesque elements in the semantic field of the work’s text are traced. The grotesque world of the novel is the author's model of mankind, in which J. Swift presents his view not only on the state of the modern system of England, but also on the nature of man in general, reveals the peculiarities of the psychology of human nature, especially human socialization. In part II, the author continues to develop a complex and contradictory picture of human existence in front of the reader, the world of giants appears as an ambivalent system in which the features of an ideal society and ideal ruler, in author’s opinion, with the ugly face of man and society, are marvelously combined.

  17. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II) user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David P. Colton

    2007-01-01

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time

  18. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  19. Highly selective apo-arginase based method for sensitive enzymatic assay of manganese (II) and cobalt (II) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gayda, Galina; Zakalskiy, Andriy; Zakalska, Oksana; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2018-03-01

    A novel enzymatic method of manganese (II) and cobalt (II) ions assay, based on using apo-enzyme of Mn2 +-dependent recombinant arginase I (arginase) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (DMO) as a chemical reagent is proposed. The principle of the method is the evaluation of the activity of L-arginine-hydrolyzing of arginase holoenzyme after the specific binding of Mn2 + or Co2 + with apo-arginase. Urea, which is the product of enzymatic hydrolysis of L-arginine (Arg), reacts with DMO and the resulted compound is detected by both fluorometry and visual spectrophotometry. Thus, the content of metal ions in the tested samples can be determined by measuring the level of urea generated after enzymatic hydrolysis of Arg by reconstructed arginase holoenzyme in the presence of tested metal ions. The linearity range of the fluorometric apo-arginase-DMO method in the case of Mn2 + assay is from 4 pM to 1.10 nM with a limit of detection of 1 pM Mn2 +, whereas the linearity range of the present method in the case of Co2 + assay is from 8 pM to 45 nM with a limit of detection of 2.5 pM Co2 +. The proposed method being highly sensitive, selective, valid and low-cost, may be useful to monitor Mn2 + and Co2 + content in clinical laboratories, food industry and environmental control service.

  20. Prediction of Mortality after Emergent Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Placement: Use of APACHE II, Child-Pugh and MELD Scores in Asian Patients with Refractory Variceal Hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen Sheng; Wu, Reng Hong; Lin, Ching Yih; Chen, Jyh Jou; Sheu, Ming Juen; Koay, Lok Beng; Lee, Chuan [Chi-Mei Foundation Medical Center, Tainan (China)

    2009-10-15

    This study was designed to determine if existing methods of grading liver function that have been developed in non-Asian patients with cirrhosis can be used to predict mortality in Asian patients treated for refractory variceal hemorrhage by the use of the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. Data for 107 consecutive patients who underwent an emergency TIPS procedure were retrospectively analyzed. Acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II), Child-Pugh and model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) scores were calculated. Survival analyses were performed to evaluate the ability of the various models to predict 30-day, 60-day and 360-day mortality. The ability of stratified APACHE II, Child-Pugh, and MELD scores to predict survival was assessed by the use of Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test. No patient died during the TIPS procedure, but 82 patients died during the follow-up period. Thirty patients died within 30 days after the TIPS procedure; 37 patients died within 60 days and 53 patients died within 360 days. Univariate analysis indicated that hepatorenal syndrome, use of inotropic agents and mechanical ventilation were associated with elevated 30-day mortality (p < 0.05). Multivariate analysis showed that a Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 predicted increased risk of death at 30, 60 and 360 days (p < 0.05). APACHE II scores could only predict mortality at 360 days (p < 0.05). A Child-Pugh score > 11 or an MELD score > 20 are predictive of mortality in Asian patients with refractory variceal hemorrhage treated with the TIPS procedure. An APACHE II score is not predictive of early mortality in this patient population.

  1. Sensitive metal ions (II) determination with resonance Raman method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhi; Bracero, Lucas A.; Chen, Lei; Song, Wei; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bing

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, a new proposal for the quantitative evaluation of divalent metal ions (M2+) is developed by the use of the competitive resonance Raman (RR)-based method. Upon excitation with light of the appropriate wavelength (532 nm), a strong electric field is generated that couples with the resonance of the complex (zincon-M2+), increasing the character signals of these complexes, resulting in sensitive detection. Herein, the RR probe, zincon-M2+ complex that the RR intensity gets lower with the decreasing of the M2+ concentration, which leads to the transformation of the Raman information. As a result, by using the proposed RR-based method, we could find the liner calibration curves of Cu2+ and Ni2+, which show the potential in quantitative evaluation of an unknown sample. In addition, the abundant fingerprint information shows that RR leads to the successful analysis of a blended solution, which contains two ions: Cu2+ and Ni2+.

  2. Analyzing Interactions by an IIS-Map-Based Method in Face-to-Face Collaborative Learning: An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lanqin; Yang, Kaicheng; Huang, Ronghuai

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes a new method named the IIS-map-based method for analyzing interactions in face-to-face collaborative learning settings. This analysis method is conducted in three steps: firstly, drawing an initial IIS-map according to collaborative tasks; secondly, coding and segmenting information flows into information items of IIS; thirdly,…

  3. [Pharmacogenetics II. Research molecular methods, bioinformatics and ethical concerns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudén, E

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of the individual pharmacological response based on the genotype. Its objective is to optimize treatment in an individual basis, thereby creating a more efficient and safe personalized therapy. In the second part of this review, the molecular methods of study in pharmacogenetics, including microarray technology or DNA chips, are discussed. Among them we highlight the microarrays used to determine the gene expression that detect specific RNA sequences, and the microarrays employed to determine the genotype that detect specific DNA sequences, including polymorphisms, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The relationship between pharmacogenetics, bioinformatics and ethical concerns is reviewed.

  4. Dimensional analysis and qualitative methods in problem solving: II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescetti, D

    2009-01-01

    We show that the underlying mathematical structure of dimensional analysis (DA), in the qualitative methods in problem-solving context, is the algebra of the affine spaces. In particular, we show that the qualitative problem-solving procedure based on the parallel decomposition of a problem into simple special cases yields the new original mathematical concepts of special points and special representations of affine spaces. A qualitative problem-solving algorithm piloted by the mathematics of DA is illustrated by a set of examples.

  5. THE STANDARDIZED CANDLE METHOD FOR TYPE II PLATEAU SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares E, Felipe; Hamuy, Mario; Pignata, Giuliano; Maza, Jose; Bersten, Melina; Phillips, Mark M.; Morrel, Nidia I.; Suntzeff, Nicholas B.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Matheson, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study the 'standardized candle method' using a sample of 37 nearby (redshift z V ) = 0.2 mag. The correlation between plateau luminosity and expansion velocity previously reported in the literature is recovered. Using this relation and assuming a standard reddening law (R V = 3.1), we obtain Hubble diagrams (HDs) in the BVI bands with dispersions of ∼0.4 mag. Allowing R V to vary and minimizing the spread in the HDs, we obtain a dispersion range of 0.25-0.30 mag, which implies that these objects can deliver relative distances with precisions of 12%-14%. The resulting best-fit value of R V is 1.4 ± 0.1.

  6. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, B.J., E-mail: bdalton@swin.edu.au [Centre for Quantum and Optical Science, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Jeffers, J. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4ONG (United Kingdom); Barnett, S.M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-15

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker–Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  7. Grassmann phase space methods for fermions. II. Field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, B.J.; Jeffers, J.; Barnett, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    In both quantum optics and cold atom physics, the behaviour of bosonic photons and atoms is often treated using phase space methods, where mode annihilation and creation operators are represented by c-number phase space variables, with the density operator equivalent to a distribution function of these variables. The anti-commutation rules for fermion annihilation, creation operators suggests the possibility of using anti-commuting Grassmann variables to represent these operators. However, in spite of the seminal work by Cahill and Glauber and a few applications, the use of Grassmann phase space methods in quantum-atom optics to treat fermionic systems is rather rare, though fermion coherent states using Grassmann variables are widely used in particle physics. This paper presents a phase space theory for fermion systems based on distribution functionals, which replace the density operator and involve Grassmann fields representing anti-commuting fermion field annihilation, creation operators. It is an extension of a previous phase space theory paper for fermions (Paper I) based on separate modes, in which the density operator is replaced by a distribution function depending on Grassmann phase space variables which represent the mode annihilation and creation operators. This further development of the theory is important for the situation when large numbers of fermions are involved, resulting in too many modes to treat separately. Here Grassmann fields, distribution functionals, functional Fokker–Planck equations and Ito stochastic field equations are involved. Typical applications to a trapped Fermi gas of interacting spin 1/2 fermionic atoms and to multi-component Fermi gases with non-zero range interactions are presented, showing that the Ito stochastic field equations are local in these cases. For the spin 1/2 case we also show how simple solutions can be obtained both for the untrapped case and for an optical lattice trapping potential.

  8. Workshop on future instruments for nuclear and particle physics and methods at the FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhaus, J.

    2002-01-01

    Conference report: The 'Workshop on Future Instruments for Nuclear and Particle Physics and Methods' at the FRM-II took place on April 12th, 2002 in Garching. The scope of the workshop was to bring together different groups of interest in the field of nuclear and particle physics as well as nuclear methods in view of the future experimental facilities at the new German neutron source FRM-II. Besides the conventional neutron sources, the FRM-II will provide new sources for neutron rich fission fragments, positrons and ultra cold neutrons. They will extend intensities from existing sources by orders of magnitude. Throughout the workshop the speakers pointed out the urgent need to start the operation of the FRM-II immediately in order not to lose this unique advantage. (orig.)

  9. Isotropic Navier-Stokes turbulence. II. Statistical approximation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraichnan, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    This chapter is concerned with the construction of systematic approximations to the statistics of Navier-Stokes (NS) turbulence. There are difficulties related both to nonlinearity and to the complexity of the dynamical system. The basic task in forming statistical approximations is to use partial information about a very large system in order to make valid predictions of desired averages. This can be a nontrivial undertaking even for linear systems whose exact solutions are completely understood. Guiding principles should include preservation of invariance and conservation properties in approximations and care not to violate realizability (positivity of probability density). The chapter surveys some kinds of statistical description and some approximation methods that have been applied to homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in an incompressible NS fluid. This is followed by an outline of one approach, centered about the construction of stochastic models, that has had some success. Finally, a little is said about new approaches. All of this discussion is tied back to the qualitative physics discussed in the preceding chapter. Equation numbering reflects the chapter number, the section number, and then the consecutive equation number. 32 refs

  10. Image and Imaging an Emergency Department: Expense and Benefit of Different Quality Assessment Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Andrea Pfortmueller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this era of high-tech medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to assess patient satisfaction. There are several methods to do so, but these differ greatly in terms of cost, time, and labour and external validity. The aim of this study is to describe and compare the structure and implementation of different methods to assess the satisfaction of patients in an emergency department. Methods. The structure and implementation of the different methods to assess patient satisfaction were evaluated on the basis of a 90-minute standardised interview. Results. We identified a total of six different methods in six different hospitals. The average number of patients assessed was 5012, with a range from 230 (M5 to 20 000 patients (M2. In four methods (M1, M3, M5, and M6, the questionnaire was composed by a specialised external institute. In two methods, the questionnaire was created by the hospital itself (M2, M4.The median response rate was 58.4% (range 9–97.8%. With a reminder, the response rate increased by 60% (M3. Conclusion. The ideal method to assess patient satisfaction in the emergency department setting is to use a patient-based, in-emergency department-based assessment of patient satisfaction, planned and guided by expert personnel.

  11. The USSR Victory in World War II and the Emergence of the Independent Republic of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa M. Efimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Victorious ending of the World War 2 on May, 9, 1945, stroke a crushing blow on the military axis Berlin - Rome - Tokyo. The USSR played a decisive role both on European and Asian fronts. Fulfilling its allied duty the Soviet Union entered the war in the Far East on 9 August, 1945 and defeated the Japanese army in Manchuria. This act became a great contribution to liberation of Asian peoples from the Japanese occupation. On the 17 August 1945 the Republic of Indonesia declared its independence. The recognition on the side of international community as well as diplomatic support became\\e vital for the survival of the newly emerged Republic.The Soviet victory together with the allied nations in the Second World War, the new status of the USSR as a superpower, its constant anticolonial stance stimulated former colonies to appeal to the Soviet Union for backing and support. One of the first was the Republic of Indonesia, to which the USSR rendered all kind of help and encourages. The present article which is a result of the study of newly available documents from several recently opened Soviet archives shows the Soviet backing of Indonesia in the UN, its diplomatic recognition, in strengthening of Indonesian status as a sovereign state on the international arena as a whole.

  12. Evaluating the response of complex systems to environmental threats: the Σ II method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corynen, G.C.

    1983-05-01

    The Σ II method was developed to model and compute the probabilistic performance of systems that operate in a threatening environment. Although we emphasize the vulnerability of complex systems to earthquakes and to electromagnetic threats such as EMP (electromagnetic pulse), the method applies in general to most large-scale systems or networks that are embedded in a potentially harmful environment. Other methods exist for obtaining system vulnerability, but their complexity increases exponentially as the size of systems is increased. The complexity of the Σ II method is polynomial, and accurate solutions are now possible for problems for which current methods require the use of rough statistical bounds, confidence statements, and other approximations. For super-large problems, where the costs of precise answers may be prohibitive, a desired accuracy can be specified, and the Σ II algorithms will halt when that accuracy has been reached. We summarize the results of a theoretical complexity analysis - which is reported elsewhere - and validate the theory with computer experiments conducted both on worst-case academic problems and on more reasonable problems occurring in practice. Finally, we compare our method with the exact methods of Abraham and Nakazawa, and with current bounding methods, and we demonstrate the computational efficiency and accuracy of Σ II

  13. Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: II. Biological consequences of exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Mark E.; Choy, Steven J.; Moore, Jeremy N.; Banda, Jo A.; Gefell, Daniel J.; Minarik, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain one fifth of the world’s surface freshwater and have been impacted by human activity since the Industrial Revolution. In addition to legacy contaminants, nitrification and invasive species, this aquatic ecosystem is also the recipient of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) with poorly understood biological consequences. In the current study, we documented the presence, concentrations, and biological effects of CECs across 27 field sites in six Great Lakes tributaries by examining over 2250 resident and caged sunfish (Lepomis ssp.) for a variety of morphological and physiological endpoints and related these results to CEC occurrence. CEC were ubiquitous across studies sites and their presence and concentrations in water and sediment were highest in effluent dominated rivers and downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges. However, even putative upstream reference sites were not free of CEC presence and fish at these sites exhibited biological effects consistent with CEC exposure. Only the Fox River exhibited consistent adverse biological effects, including increased relative liver size, greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles and increased plasma glucose concentrations. Canonical Redundancy Analysis revealed consistent patterns of biological consequences of CEC exposure across all six tributaries. Increasing plasma glucose concentrations, likely as a result of pollutant-induced metabolic stress, were associated with increased relative liver size and greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles. These indicators of pollutant exposure were inversely correlated with indicators of reproductive potential including smaller gonad size and less mature gametes. The current study highlights the need for greater integration of chemical and biological studies and suggests that CECs in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin may adversely affect the reproductive potential of exposed fish populations. PMID:28953953

  14. Contaminants of emerging concern in tributaries to the Laurentian Great Lakes: II. Biological consequences of exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Linnea M.; Jorgenson, Zachary G.; Brigham, Mark E.; Choy, Steven J.; Moore, Jeremy N.; Banda, Jo A.; Gefell, D.J.; Minarik, Thomas A.; Schoenfuss, Heiko L.

    2017-01-01

    The Laurentian Great Lakes contain one fifth of the world’s surface freshwater and have been impacted by human activity since the Industrial Revolution. In addition to legacy contaminants, nitrification and invasive species, this aquatic ecosystem is also the recipient of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) with poorly understood biological consequences. In the current study, we documented the presence, concentrations, and biological effects of CECs across 27 field sites in six Great Lakes tributaries by examining over 2250 resident and caged sunfish (Lepomis ssp.) for a variety of morphological and physiological endpoints and related these results to CEC occurrence. CEC were ubiquitous across studies sites and their presence and concentrations in water and sediment were highest in effluent dominated rivers and downstream of municipal wastewater treatment plant discharges. However, even putative upstream reference sites were not free of CEC presence and fish at these sites exhibited biological effects consistent with CEC exposure. Only the Fox River exhibited consistent adverse biological effects, including increased relative liver size, greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles and increased plasma glucose concentrations. Canonical Redundancy Analysis revealed consistent patterns of biological consequences of CEC exposure across all six tributaries. Increasing plasma glucose concentrations, likely as a result of pollutant-induced metabolic stress, were associated with increased relative liver size and greater prominence of hepatocyte vacuoles. These indicators of pollutant exposure were inversely correlated with indicators of reproductive potential including smaller gonad size and less mature gametes. The current study highlights the need for greater integration of chemical and biological studies and suggests that CECs in the Laurentian Great Lakes Basin may adversely affect the reproductive potential of exposed fish populations.

  15. Method for Developing a Communication Strategy and Plan for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Emergency Preparedness and Response. Publication Date: July 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this publication is to provide a practical resource for emergency planning in the area of public communication in the development of a radiation emergency communication plan (RECP). The term 'public communication' is defined as any activity that communicates information to the public and the media during a nuclear or radiological emergency. To avoid confusion, the term public communication has been used in this publication rather than public information, which may be used in other IAEA publications and documents to ensure consistency with the terminology used in describing the command and control system. This publication also aims to fulfil in part functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency (Assistance Convention), as well as meeting requirements stated in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-2, Preparedness and Response for a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency. Under Article 5(a)(11) of the Assistance Convention, one function of the IAEA is to collect and disseminate to States Parties and Member States information concerning methodologies, techniques and results of research with regard to the response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. This publication is intended to provide guidance to national and local authorities on developing an RECP which incorporates the specific functions, arrangements and capabilities that will be required for public communication during a nuclear or radiological emergency. The two main features of this publication are the template provided to develop an RECP and detailed guidance on developing a communication strategy for emergency preparedness and response to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The template is consistent with the outline of the national radiation emergency plan proposed in Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (EPR-Method 2003). This publication is part of the IAEA

  16. Lactic Acid Fermentation, Urea and Lime Addition : Promising Faecal Sludge Sanitizing Methods for Emergency Sanitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, C.; Malambo, D.H.; Gonzalez Perez, M.E.; Nobela, H.N.; De Pooter, L.; Spit, J.; Hooijmans, C.M.; Van de Vossenberg, J.; Greya, W.; Thole, B.; Van Lier, J.B.; Brdjanovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, three faecal sludge sanitizing methods—lactic acid fermentation, urea treatment and lime treatment—were studied for application in emergency situations. These methods were investigated by undertaking small scale field trials with pit latrine sludge in Blantyre, Malawi. Hydrated

  17. Education Student Research Paradigms and Emerging Scholar Identities: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Patrick D.; Croxton, Rebecca A.; Kirkman, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Using a mixed-methods approach, this study sought to understand a general sense of paradigm confidence and to see how this confidence relates to doctoral student identities as emerging scholars. Identity development was explored among 46 education doctoral students at a midsized public university in the Southeast. Researchers examined students'…

  18. Exploring Dual Identification among Muslim-American Emerging Adults: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirin, Selcuk R.; Bikmen, Nida; Mir, Madeeha; Fine, Michelle; Zaal, Mayida; Katsiaficas, Dalal

    2008-01-01

    This mixed methods study explored dual identification among Muslim-American emerging adults of immigrant origin. A closer look was taken at the relationship between American and Muslim identifications and how this relationship was influenced by experiences of discrimination, acculturative and religious practices, and whether it varied by gender.…

  19. Identifying Effective Methods of Instruction for Adult Emergent Readers through Community-Based Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmer, Rachel; Hayes-Harb, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    We present a community-based research project aimed at identifying effective methods and materials for teaching English literacy skills to adult English as a second language emergent readers. We conducted a quasi-experimental study whereby we evaluated the efficacy of two approaches, one based on current practices at the English Skills Learning…

  20. Modeling factors influencing the demand for emergency department services in ontario: a comparison of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meaney Christopher

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments are medical treatment facilities, designed to provide episodic care to patients suffering from acute injuries and illnesses as well as patients who are experiencing sporadic flare-ups of underlying chronic medical conditions which require immediate attention. Supply and demand for emergency department services varies across geographic regions and time. Some persons do not rely on the service at all whereas; others use the service on repeated occasions. Issues regarding increased wait times for services and crowding illustrate the need to investigate which factors are associated with increased frequency of emergency department utilization. The evidence from this study can help inform policy makers on the appropriate mix of supply and demand targeted health care policies necessary to ensure that patients receive appropriate health care delivery in an efficient and cost-effective manner. The purpose of this report is to assess those factors resulting in increased demand for emergency department services in Ontario. We assess how utilization rates vary according to the severity of patient presentation in the emergency department. We are specifically interested in the impact that access to primary care physicians has on the demand for emergency department services. Additionally, we wish to investigate these trends using a series of novel regression models for count outcomes which have yet to be employed in the domain of emergency medical research. Methods Data regarding the frequency of emergency department visits for the respondents of Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS during our study interval (2003-2005 are obtained from the National Ambulatory Care Reporting System (NACRS. Patients' emergency department utilizations were linked with information from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS which provides individual level medical, socio-demographic, psychological and behavioral information for

  1. Human immune responses to H. pylori HLA Class II epitopes identified by immunoinformatic methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songhua Zhang

    Full Text Available H. pylori persists in the human stomach over decades and promotes several adverse clinical sequelae including gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer that are linked to the induction and subsequent evasion of chronic gastric inflammation. Emerging evidence indicates that H. pylori infection may also protect against asthma and some other immune-mediated conditions through regulatory T cell effects outside the stomach. To characterize the complexity of the CD4+ T cell response generated during H. pylori infection, computational methods were previously used to generate a panel of 90 predicted epitopes conserved among H. pylori genomes that broadly cover HLA Class II diversity for maximum population coverage. Here, these sequences were tested individually for their ability to induce in vitro responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells by interferon-γ ELISpot assay. The average number of spot-forming cells/million PBMCs was significantly elevated in H. pylori-infected subjects over uninfected persons. Ten of the 90 peptides stimulated IFN-γ secretion in the H. pylori-infected group only, whereas two out of the 90 peptides elicited a detectable IFN-γ response in the H. pylori-uninfected subjects but no response in the H. pylori-infected group. Cytokine ELISA measurements performed using in vitro PBMC culture supernatants demonstrated significantly higher levels of TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β1 in the H. pylori-infected subjects, whereas IL-17A expression was not related to the subjects H. pylori-infection status. Our results indicate that the human T cell responses to these 90 peptides are generally increased in actively H. pylori-infected, compared with H. pylori-naïve, subjects. This information will improve understanding of the complex immune response to H. pylori, aiding rational epitope-driven vaccine design as well as helping identify other H. pylori epitopes with potentially immunoregulatory effects.

  2. OUTCOME OF GARTLAND TYPE – II SUPRACONDYLAR FRACTURES OF HUMERUS TREATED BY CONSERVATIVE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Mitra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The current literatures recommend operative method (closed reduction and pinning for type II supracondylar fractures of humerus. But some surgeons still prefer conservative method for type II supracondylar fractures of humerus. We pr esent results of 14 cases of type II supracondylar fractures treated with CR and AE POP immobilization . The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of conservative treatment in management of type II supracondylar fracture of humerus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fourteen children treated by conservative methods (CR & AE POP between January 2013 and December 2014 is included in this study. The mean age group is 6.8 years (3 years - 11 years. The patient follow up is done for a minimum of 10 - 12 weeks. Treatment outcome is based on final clinical and radiological assessments and grading of results was done using Flynn’s criteria. RESULTS: Gartland type II fracture gives 82% excellent results and 28 % good results as per Flynn’s criteria. Of the 14 patien ts only two cases required re manipulation. Surgical intervention was not needed for any of the patients. No patients in this study developed compartment syndrome / cubitus varus deformity. CONCLUSION: Satisfactory results can be obtained with conservative treatment (closed reduction and above elbow POP if proper selection of the patient and careful clinical and radiological follow up is done

  3. Demonstrating sensemaking emergence in artificial agents: A method and an example

    OpenAIRE

    GEORGEON , Olivier L.; Marshall , James

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We propose an experimental method to study the possible emergence of sensemaking in artificial agents. This method involves analyzing the agent’s behavior in a test bed environment that presents regularities in the possibilities of interaction afforded to the agent, while the agent has no presuppositions about the underlying functioning of the environment that explains such regularities. We propose a particular environment that permits such an experiment, called the Sm...

  4. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Psychiatric Emergencies Small Group Module

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew King; Sarah Greenberger; Michael Prats; Creagh Boulger; Alyssa Tyransky; Laura Thompson; Nicholas Kman; Cynthia Leung; Jennifer Mitzman; Michael Barrie; Sorabh Khandelwal; Christopher San Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Audience: This curriculum created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center was designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM) residents, PGY-1 to PGY-3, as well as medical students and attending physicians. Introduction: In 2007, there were 12 million adult Emergency Department visits for mental health and substance abuse complaints. This represents 12.5% of all adult emergency department visits.1 Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis ...

  5. Methods for Discovery and Surveillance of Pathogens in Hotspots of Emerging Infectious Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Randi Holm

    Viruses are everywhere, and can infect all living things. They are constantly evolving, and new diseases are emerging as a result. Consequently, they have always been of interest to scientists and people in general. Several outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases transmitting from animals...... to virion enrichment compared to samples with no enrichment. We have used these methods to perform pathogen discovery in faecal samples collected from small mammals in Sierra Leone, to describe the presence of pathogenic viruses and bacteria in this area. From these data we were furthermore able to acquire...

  6. Operation method and operation control device for emergency core cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fujii, Tadashi [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mizutani, Akira

    1996-05-07

    The present invention provides a method of reducing continuous load capacity of an emergency cooling system of a BWR type reactor and a device reducing a rated capacity of an emergency power source facility. Namely, the emergency core cooling system comprises a first cooling system having a plurality of power source systems based on a plurality of emergency power sources and a second cooling system having a remaining heat removing function. In this case, when the first cooling system is operated the manual starting under a predetermined condition that an external power source loss event should occur, a power source division different from the first cooling system shares the operation to operate the secondary cooling system simultaneously. Further, the first cooling system is constituted as a high pressure reactor core water injection system and the second cooling system is constituted as a remaining heat removing system. With such a constitution, a high pressure reactor core water injection system for manual starting and a remaining heat removing system of different power source division can be operated simultaneously before automatic operation of the emergency core cooling system upon loss of external power source of a nuclear power plant. (I.S.)

  7. Transforming criticality control methods for EBR-II fuel handling during reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberle, C.S.; Dean, E.M.; Angelo, P.L.

    1995-01-01

    A review of the Department of Energy (DOE) request to decommission the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was conducted in order to develop a scope of work and analysis method for performing the safety review of the facility. Evaluation of the current national standards, DOE orders, EBR-II nuclear safeguards and criticality control practices showed that a decommissioning policy for maintaining criticality safety during a long term fuel transfer process did not exist. The purpose of this research was to provide a technical basis for transforming the reactor from an instrumentation and measurement controlled system to a system that provides both physical constraint and administrative controls to prevent criticality accidents. Essentially, this was done by modifying the reactor core configuration, reactor operations procedures and system instrumentation to meet the safety practices of ANS-8.1-1983. Subcritical limits were determined by applying established liquid metal reactor methods for both the experimental and computational validations

  8. Emergency material allocation with time-varying supply-demand based on dynamic optimization method for river chemical spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Jiping; Jiang, Dexun; Wang, Peng

    2018-04-13

    Aiming to minimize the damage caused by river chemical spills, efficient emergency material allocation is critical for an actual emergency rescue decision-making in a quick response. In this study, an emergency material allocation framework based on time-varying supply-demand constraint is developed to allocate emergency material, minimize the emergency response time, and satisfy the dynamic emergency material requirements in post-accident phases dealing with river chemical spills. In this study, the theoretically critical emergency response time is firstly obtained for the emergency material allocation system to select a series of appropriate emergency material warehouses as potential supportive centers. Then, an enumeration method is applied to identify the practically critical emergency response time, the optimum emergency material allocation and replenishment scheme. Finally, the developed framework is applied to a computational experiment based on south-to-north water transfer project in China. The results illustrate that the proposed methodology is a simple and flexible tool for appropriately allocating emergency material to satisfy time-dynamic demands during emergency decision-making. Therefore, the decision-makers can identify an appropriate emergency material allocation scheme in a balance between time-effective and cost-effective objectives under the different emergency pollution conditions.

  9. Newly Emerging Drugs of Abuse and Their Detection Methods: An ACLPS Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Wheeler, Sarah E; Venkataramanan, Raman; Rymer, Jacqueline A; Pizon, Anthony F; Lynch, Michael J; Tamama, Kenichi

    2018-01-29

    Illicit drug abuse has reached an epidemic level in the United States. Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury-related deaths since 2008 due to the recent surge of opioid overdose by heroin, controlled prescription drugs, and nonmethadone synthetic opioids. Synthetic designer drugs such as synthetic cathinones ("bath salts") and synthetic cannabinoids ("Spice" and "K2") continue to emerge and attract recreational users. The emergence of new drugs of abuse poses a steep challenge for clinical toxicology laboratories. Limited information about the emerging drugs and their metabolism, "rebranding" of the illicit drugs, and a lack of Food and Drug Administration-approved screening methods for these drugs contribute to this difficulty. Here we review detection methods that can aid in identifying emerging drugs of abuse. One promising approach is the utilization of untargeted drug screening by mass spectrometry. Historically, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been the gold standard. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry offer improved detection capability of new drugs with simplified sample preparation, making it the new standard. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Separation of rare earths by ion exchange method: ion retainer Zn (II) and Cu (II) and Dowex-50 X-4 and Amberlite IR-120 resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavanin, L.A.; Tfouni, E.; Serra, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    The separation of rare earths from Brazilian monazite by ion exchange method is presented. The performance of Dowex-50 X-4 (50 to 100 mesh) and Amberlite IR-120 (20-30 mesh) and Cu (II) and Zn (II) is compared. (A.R.H.) [pt

  11. Application of LCA method to an emergency lamp 626 Autotest Beghelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Paolo; Buttol, Patrizia; Danielli, Gabriele; Pareschi, Romano M.; Tani, Giovanni

    2001-02-01

    This study was performed jointly by ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment), Bologna and Florence Universities and the firm BEGHELLI1. The system function to be studied is the lighting of a room where a blackout has occurred. The functional unit is an emergency lamp manufactured by BEGHELLI, provided by a fluorescent tube and an accumulator battery with lead elements. The lamp life lasts 10 years. LCA is obtained by using the SimaPro 3.1 code and two methods: Eco indicator 95 with the normalisation weight ascribed to 10 years and a new method obtained by enclosing into the Eco - indicator 95 method some new damage categories such as some raw material depletion, solid and energy. The results show that the accumulator battery, the structure of the lamp and the electronic board are the components with greater environmental damage and the electrical energy for use produces 31% of total damage calculated by the Eco - indicator method. The most important categories of damage produced by accumulator battery are acidification due to material production and heavy metals due to disposal treatment of lead, and the ones produced by electronic card are acidification and winter smog due to copper production. To reduce the damage of emergency lamp some new solutions have been proposed. Finally the characteristics to obtain emergency lamp Ecolabel have been proposed.

  12. Comparative Analysis and Pedestrian Simulation Evaluation on Emergency Evacuation Test Methods for Urban Rail Transit Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijia Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergency evacuation test method of rail transit station not only affects the operation safety of the station, but it also has significant influence on the scale and cost of the station. A reasonable test method should guarantee both the safety of evacuation and that the investment is neither excessive nor too conservative. The paper compares and analyzes the differences of the existing emergency evacuation test methods of rail stations in China and other regions on the evacuation load, evacuation time calculation and the capacity of egress components, etc. Based on the field survey analysis, the desired velocity distribution of pedestrians in various station facilities and the capacity of egress components have been obtained, and then the parameters of pedestrian simulation tool were calibrated. By selecting a station for the case study, an evacuation simulation model has been established, where five evacuation scenarios have been set according to different specifications and the simulation results have been carefully analyzed. Through analyzing the simulation results, some modification proposals of the current emergency evacuation test method in the design manual have been considered, including taking into account the section passenger volume, walking time on escalators and stairs of the platform, and the condition in which the escalator most critical to evacuation should be considered as out of service.

  13. Comparison of the Efficacy of Oral and Injectable Forms of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Grade Ii Traumatic Ulcers in Emergency Wards of University Hospitals of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Hajiesmaieli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic ulcers are one of the most common causes of referral to emergency wards and interfere with wound healing. Even in a complete sterile condition, all of the ulcers may be contaminated with bacteria, but a few of them progress and cause clinical manifestations. There is a controversy on the use prophylactic antibiotics in traumatic ulcers. In this study we compare the efficacy of oral and injectable forms of antibiotics in prophylaxis of infection. Methods: In this clinical trial study, 237 cases suffering from grade II traumatic ulcers were selected by simple random method and divided into 2 groups; first group was administered 1 gram cephazoline prior to suturing and received no other antibiotics , while the second group received 500 mg cephalexin capsule before suturing and continued the treatment for 24 hours. (500 mg QID .Patients were followed up on day 7, 10 and 30 after discharge from hospital for infection of the wounds. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS 11 software using Chi-squire and Fisher exact tests. Results: According to the findings, confounding variables such as sex, age, width of the wound, traumatic cause and site and also the time course until referral to the emergency ward were similar in both groups. Prevalence of infection in the group receiving oral and injection forms of antibiotic was 2.5% and 1.7%, respectively, difference of which was not significant.(P=0.683 Conclusion: As the prevalence of wound infection is similar in both groups, oral forms of antibiotics can be used instead of injectable forms for wound infection prophylaxis.

  14. Machining of composite materials. I - Traditional methods. II - Non-traditional methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrate, S.; Walton, D. A.

    Traditional and nontraditional methods for machining organic-matrix and metal-matrix composites are reviewed. Such traditional procedures as drilling, cutting, sawing, routing, and grinding are discussed together with the damage introduced into composites by these manipulations. Particular attention is given to new, nontraditional methods, including laser, water-jet, electrodischarge, electrochemical spark, and ultrasonic machining methods showing that, these methods often speed up cutting and improve the surface quality. Moreover, it is sometimes possible to use new methods in cases where traditional methods are ineffective.

  15. Electrocardiography interpretation training in emergency medicine: methods, resources, competency assessment, and national standardization

    OpenAIRE

    Özel, Betül Akbuğa; Demircan, Ahmet; Keleş, Ayfer; Bildik, Fikret; Özel, Deniz; Ergin, Mehmet; Günaydin, Gül Pamukçu

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s). The aim of this study was to evaluate the status of electrocardiography (ECG) training in emergency medicine residency programs in Turkey, and the attitude of the program representatives towards standardization of such training. Methods. This investigation was planned as a cross-sectional study. An 18-item questionnaire was distributed to directors of residency programs. Responses were evaluated using SPSS (v.16.0), and analyzed using the chi-square test. Results. Thirty...

  16. Improved methods for predicting peptide binding affinity to MHC class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kamilla Kjaergaard; Andreatta, Massimo; Marcatili, Paolo; Buus, Søren; Greenbaum, Jason A; Yan, Zhen; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-06

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are expressed on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells where they display peptides to T helper cells, which orchestrate the onset and outcome of many host immune responses. Understanding which peptides will be presented by the MHC-II molecule is therefore important for understanding the activation of T helper cells and can be used to identify T-cell epitopes. We here present updated versions of two MHC-II-peptide binding affinity prediction methods, NetMHCII and NetMHCIIpan. These were constructed using an extended data set of quantitative MHC-peptide binding affinity data obtained from the Immune Epitope Database covering HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, HLA-DP and H-2 mouse molecules. We show that training with this extended data set improved the performance for peptide binding predictions for both methods. Both methods are publicly available at www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.3 and www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.2. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Resistance Torque Based Variable Duty-Cycle Control Method for a Stage II Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Meipeng; Zheng, Shuiying

    2017-07-01

    The resistance torque of a piston stage II compressor generates strenuous fluctuations in a rotational period, and this can lead to negative influences on the working performance of the compressor. To restrain the strenuous fluctuations in the piston stage II compressor, a variable duty-cycle control method based on the resistance torque is proposed. A dynamic model of a stage II compressor is set up, and the resistance torque and other characteristic parameters are acquired as the control targets. Then, a variable duty-cycle control method is applied to track the resistance torque, thereby improving the working performance of the compressor. Simulated results show that the compressor, driven by the proposed method, requires lower current, while the rotating speed and the output torque remain comparable to the traditional variable-frequency control methods. A variable duty-cycle control system is developed, and the experimental results prove that the proposed method can help reduce the specific power, input power, and working noise of the compressor to 0.97 kW·m-3·min-1, 0.09 kW and 3.10 dB, respectively, under the same conditions of discharge pressure of 2.00 MPa and a discharge volume of 0.095 m3/min. The proposed variable duty-cycle control method tracks the resistance torque dynamically, and improves the working performance of a Stage II Compressor. The proposed variable duty-cycle control method can be applied to other compressors, and can provide theoretical guidance for the compressor.

  18. [Bovine serum albumin in the presence of zinc (II) by fluorescence method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gen-Hua; Wang, Jie; Chen, Jin-Long; Guo, Chang; Wang, Pei-San; Wang, Dong-Xiang; Wang, Zhu-Qing

    2008-04-01

    The interaction between norfloxacin and bovine serum albumin, and the influence of Zinc (II) on the system of norfloxacin and bovine serum albumin was studied under physiological condition by fluorescence method. It was shown that norfloxacin has a powerful ability to quench the BSA fluorescence via a nonradiative energy transfer mechanism. The fluorescence quenching data were analyzed according to Stern-Volmer equation and double-reciprocal equation, and the binding constant (K) and the binding sites (n) were obtained. In the system of binary complex of NFLX and BSA, K = 6.80 x 10(5) and n = 1.21. There is a strong combination between NFLX and BSA, which offers the condition for the serum protein to be deposited and transported in vivo. Besides, the combination between NFLX and BSA becomes stronger in the presence of Zinc (II). According to Stern-Volmer equation and double-reciprocal equation, the concentration of Znic (II) is denser, and the binding constant (K) and the binding sites (n) are bigger. By studying the binding interaction between Zinc (II), norfloxacin and BSA, the mechanism of the interaction among norfloxacin, Zinc (II) and protein in organism, is furtherly discussed.

  19. Rapid qualitative research methods during complex health emergencies: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ginger A; Vindrola-Padros, Cecilia

    2017-09-01

    The 2013-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa highlighted both the successes and limitations of social science contributions to emergency response operations. An important limitation was the rapid and effective communication of study findings. A systematic review was carried out to explore how rapid qualitative methods have been used during global heath emergencies to understand which methods are commonly used, how they are applied, and the difficulties faced by social science researchers in the field. We also asses their value and benefit for health emergencies. The review findings are used to propose recommendations for qualitative research in this context. Peer-reviewed articles and grey literature were identified through six online databases. An initial search was carried out in July 2016 and updated in February 2017. The PRISMA checklist was used to guide the reporting of methods and findings. The articles were assessed for quality using the MMAT and AACODS checklist. From an initial search yielding 1444 articles, 22 articles met the criteria for inclusion. Thirteen of the articles were qualitative studies and nine used a mixed-methods design. The purpose of the rapid studies included: the identification of causes of the outbreak, and assessment of infrastructure, control strategies, health needs and health facility use. The studies varied in duration (from 4 days to 1 month). The main limitations identified by the authors were: the low quality of the collected data, small sample sizes, and little time for cross-checking facts with other data sources to reduce bias. Rapid qualitative methods were seen as beneficial in highlighting context-specific issues that need to be addressed locally, population-level behaviors influencing health service use, and organizational challenges in response planning and implementation. Recommendations for carrying out rapid qualitative research in this context included the early designation of community leaders as a point of

  20. Contrast enhanced MR imaging of female pelvic cancers: Established methods and emerging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punwani, Shonit, E-mail: shonit.punwani@gmail.com [Department of Academic Radiology, 2nd Floor Podium, University College London Hospital, 235 Euston Road, London NW1 2BU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-15

    Contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of female pelvic cancers has been established for over 20 years. Conventional contrast enhanced imaging involves acquiring a set of pre-contrast T1 weighted images, followed by intravenous injection of an gadolinium based contrast agent and subsequent acquisition of a second set of contrast enhanced images. Developments in MR hardware and pulse sequences over the last 10 years have made dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) protocols possible. DCE-MRI entails imaging of the same volume repeatedly prior to, during and following contrast injection. There have also been developments in image analysis methods and tools to reflect the increased data acquired. Qualitative analysis of contrast enhanced imaging (whether a single set or temporal series) by radiologists remains the mainstay for clinical reporting. Semi-quantitative assessment of signal intensity versus time curves and full pharmacokinetic modelling methods have emerged for evaluation of DCE-MRI data. DCE-MRI has found an established role in the detection, localisation and staging of female pelvic malignancies. Emerging applications of DCE-MRI include assessment of tumour grade, histology prior to and following treatment and prediction of individual and final treatment outcome. This article reviews the biophysical basis of contrast enhancement, the technical aspects of performance and analysis of DCE-MRI studies, and the established and emerging clinical utility of DCE-MRI in female pelvic malignancies.

  1. Wanted: studies on mortality estimation methods for humanitarian emergencies, suggestions for future research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Measuring rates and circumstances of population mortality (in particular crude and under-5 year mortality rates is essential to evidence-based humanitarian relief interventions. Because prospective vital event registration is absent or deteriorates in nearly all crisis-affected populations, retrospective household surveys are often used to estimate and describe patterns of mortality. Originally designed for measuring vaccination coverage, the two-stage cluster survey methodology is frequently employed to measure mortality retrospectively due to limited time and resources during humanitarian emergencies. The method tends to be followed without considering alternatives, and there is a need for expert advice to guide health workers measuring mortality in the field. In a workshop in France in June 2006, we deliberated the problems inherent in this method when applied to measure outcomes other than vaccine coverage and acute malnutrition (specifically, mortality, and considered recommendations for improvement. Here we describe these recommendations and outline outstanding issues in three main problem areas in emergency mortality assessment discussed during the workshop: sampling, household data collection issues, and cause of death ascertainment. We urge greater research on these issues. As humanitarian emergencies become ever more complex, all agencies should benefit from the most recently tried and tested survey tools.

  2. A Novel Emergency Department-based Community Notification Method for Clinical Research Without Consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Gerald F; Giraldo, Patricia; Deitch, Kenneth; Aguilera, Elizabeth Andrea; Cadar, Sorin; Lares, Claudia; O'Malley, Rika Nagakuni; Oqroshidze, Nino; Verma, Manisha; Chudnofsky, Carl

    2017-06-01

    We used an emergency department (ED)-based method to provide targeted, individualized consultation; community notification; and public disclosure and collect data regarding willingness to participate in prospective resuscitation research requiring waiver of consent. We conducted a prospective survey of convenience cohort in an urban ED. We targeted the community of ED patients with pulmonary disease for individualized notification and public disclosure using a 1) large poster, 2) scripted oral presentation describing an emergency intubation clinical trial, and 3) video demonstration. Approximately 10% of our annual ED census, 6,936 subjects, enrolled. Of that total, 29 were also subjects in a prospective coincident endotracheal resuscitation intubation study, which enrolled a total of 262 subjects. ED community notification was provided to 22 of the 29 (75.9%) subjects prior to the visit during which they were intubated (13 agreed to participate, six declined, and three undecided) and seven of the 29 subjects subsequent to enrollment in the intubation study (five agreed to participate and two undecided). Fourteen of the 29 patients who participated in both projects had undergone endotracheal intubation at least once prior to community notification: 10 agreed to participate in the study, two declined, and two were undecided. Emergency department-based community notification and public disclosure is a viable way to provide information to a target population and collect data about the success of the notification. Feedback data collection is critical to an ethical understanding of the success of community notification for the institutional review board and investigators. Collection of feedback data should be required as a subject protection for exception from informed consent in emergency settings. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. Reevaluation of nasal swab method for dose estimation at nuclear emergency accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Yuji; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Kurihara, Osamu; Akashi, Makoto

    2008-01-01

    ICRP Publication 66 human respiratory tract model has been used extensively over in exposure dose assessment. It is well known that respiratory deposition efficiency of inhaled aerosol and its deposition region strongly depend on the particle size. In most of exposure accidents, however, nobody knows a size of inhaled aerosol. And thus two default aerosol sizes of 5μ in AMAD for the workers and 1μ in AMAD for the public are given as being representative in the ICRP model, but both sizes are not linked directly to the maximum dose. In this study, the most hazardous size to our health effects and how to estimate an intake activity was discussed from a viewpoint of emergency medicine. In exposure accident of alpha emitter such as Pu-239, lung monitor and bioassay measurements are not the best methods for rapid estimation with high sensitivity, so that an applicability of nasal swab method has been investigated. A computer software, LUDEP, was used in the calculation of respiratory deposition. It showed that the effective dose per unit intake activity strongly depended on the inhaled aerosol size. In case of Pu-239 dioxide aerosols, it was confirmed that the maximum of dose conversion factor was observed around 0.01μ. It means that this 0.01μ is the most hazardous size at exposure accident of Pu-239. From analysis of the relationship between AI and ET l deposition, it was found that the dose conversion factor from the activity deposited in ET l region also was affected by the aerosol size. The usage of the ICRP's default size in nasal swab method might cause obvious underestimation of the intake activity. Dose estimation based on nasal swab method is possible from safety side at nuclear emergency, and the availability in quantity should be reevaluated for emergency medicine considering of chelating agent administration. (author)

  4. FREEZING AND THAWING TIME PREDICTION METHODS OF FOODS II: NUMARICAL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya TÜLEK

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Freezing is one of the excellent methods for the preservation of foods. If freezing and thawing processes and frozen storage method are carried out correctly, the original characteristics of the foods can remain almost unchanged over an extended periods of time. It is very important to determine the freezing and thawing time period of the foods, as they strongly influence the both quality of food material and process productivity and the economy. For developing a simple and effectively usable mathematical model, less amount of process parameters and physical properties should be enrolled in calculations. But it is a difficult to have all of these in one prediction method. For this reason, various freezing and thawing time prediction methods were proposed in literature and research studies have been going on.

  5. Results of an interlaboratory comparison of analytical methods for contaminants of emerging concern in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderford, Brett J; Drewes, Jörg E; Eaton, Andrew; Guo, Yingbo C; Haghani, Ali; Hoppe-Jones, Christiane; Schluesener, Michael P; Snyder, Shane A; Ternes, Thomas; Wood, Curtis J

    2014-01-07

    An evaluation of existing analytical methods used to measure contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) was performed through an interlaboratory comparison involving 25 research and commercial laboratories. In total, 52 methods were used in the single-blind study to determine method accuracy and comparability for 22 target compounds, including pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and steroid hormones, all at ng/L levels in surface and drinking water. Method biases ranged from caffeine, NP, OP, and triclosan had false positive rates >15%. In addition, some methods reported false positives for 17β-estradiol and 17α-ethynylestradiol in unspiked drinking water and deionized water, respectively, at levels higher than published predicted no-effect concentrations for these compounds in the environment. False negative rates were also generally contamination, misinterpretation of background interferences, and/or inappropriate setting of detection/quantification levels for analysis at low ng/L levels. The results of both comparisons were collectively assessed to identify parameters that resulted in the best overall method performance. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the calibration technique of isotope dilution were able to accurately quantify most compounds with an average bias of <10% for both matrixes. These findings suggest that this method of analysis is suitable at environmentally relevant levels for most of the compounds studied. This work underscores the need for robust, standardized analytical methods for CECs to improve data quality, increase comparability between studies, and help reduce false positive and false negative rates.

  6. Method and basis set investigation for trans-platinum(II oxime complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray SAYIN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimized molecular structure and stretching frequencies of platinum(II oxime complex were investigated with HF, MP2, pure and hybrid DFT methods. CEP-4G, CEP-31G, CEP-121G, LANL2DZ, LANL2MB and SDD basis sets were used in calculations. Correlation coefficients of bond lengths and angles, computational job cpu time and stretching frequencies were used to determine the best method and basis set. The results show that HF/CEP-31G is the best level for bond lengths, angles and computational job cpu time.  BPW91/CEP-31G is the best levels for stretching frequencies of oximato-bridged Pt(II complex.

  7. Complexity Quantification for Overhead Transmission Line Emergency Repair Scheme via a Graph Entropy Method Improved with Petri Net and AHP Weighting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the characteristics of emergency repair in overhead transmission line accidents, a complexity quantification method for emergency repair scheme is proposed based on the entropy method in software engineering, which is improved by using group AHP (analytical hierarchical process method and Petri net. Firstly, information structure chart model and process control flowchart model could be built by Petri net. Then impact factors on complexity of emergency repair scheme could be quantified into corresponding entropy values, respectively. Finally, by using group AHP method, weight coefficient of each entropy value would be given before calculating the overall entropy value for the whole emergency repair scheme. By comparing group AHP weighting method with average weighting method, experiment results for the former showed a stronger correlation between quantified entropy values of complexity and the actual consumed time in repair, which indicates that this new method is more valid.

  8. Environmental Sensitivity in Nuclear Emergencies in Rural and Semi-natural Environments. Report of Working Group 8, Environmental Sensitivity of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-11-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by comparison with measured values in the environment or by comparing them with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. The programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in transfer data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. The following topics were addressed in nine working groups: Reference Approaches for Human Dose Assessment - Working Group 1: Reference Methodologies for Controlling Discharges of Routine Releases; - Working Group 2: Reference Approaches to Modelling for Management and Remediation at NORM and Legacy Sites; - Working Group 3: Reference Models for Waste Disposal Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment; - Working Group 4: Biota Modelling; - Working Group 5: Wildlife Transfer Coefficient Handbook; - Working Group 6: Biota Dose

  9. 11th Biennial Conference on Emerging Mathematical Methods, Models and Algorithms for Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Manchanda, Pammy; Bhardwaj, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    The present volume contains invited talks of 11th biennial conference on “Emerging Mathematical Methods, Models and Algorithms for Science and Technology”. The main message of the book is that mathematics has a great potential to analyse and understand the challenging problems of nanotechnology, biotechnology, medical science, oil industry and financial technology. The book highlights all the features and main theme discussed in the conference. All contributing authors are eminent academicians, scientists, researchers and scholars in their respective fields, hailing from around the world.

  10. A further study of the method for estimation of SAGE II opaque cloud occurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Veiga, Robert E.; Vann, Lelia B.; Minnis, Patrick; Kent, Geoffrey S.

    2001-01-01

    Information on vertical cloud distribution is important to atmospheric radiative calculation, general circulation modeling, and climate study. The method used for estimating the vertical structure of opaque cloud occurrence from the solar occultation observations obtained by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II has been reviewed for further understanding of the nature of the derived cloud statistics. Most importantly, based on the SAGE II tropical observations (1985-1998), the present study illustrates that the derived opaque cloud occurrence at a given altitude is generally independent of the cloud occurrence at other altitudes, except for some anticorrelation between high-level (12.5 km) and low-level (1-3 km) clouds. This feature of the layer cloud frequency independence is also evident when regional data over the Pacific warm pool and the eastern Pacific are examined. The independent information of the layer cloud frequency is significant and makes it possible to use the derived vertical distribution of cloud occurrence to estimate the probability of multilayer clouds. The limitation is that it is difficult to determine how frequently the multilayer clouds are actually overlapping or how frequently thick cloud (>1 km) really occurs based on the SAGE II observations alone. A discussion of the SAGE II tropical opaque cloud occurrence in relation to the cloud climatology based on visual observations from surface stations and ships, the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data, and the cloud statistics using rawinsonde records is also provided.

  11. Multidisciplinary evaluation of an emergency department nurse navigator role: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Melanie; Fulbrook, Paul; Kinnear, Frances B

    2017-09-20

    To utilise multidisciplinary staff feedback to assess their perceptions of a novel emergency department nurse navigator role and to understand the impact of the role on the department. Prolonged emergency department stays impact patients, staff and quality of care, and are linked to increased morbidity and mortality. One innovative strategy to facilitate patient flow is the navigator: a nurse supporting staff in care delivery to enhance efficient, timely movement of patients through the department. However, there is a lack of rigorous research into this emerging role. Sequential exploratory mixed methods. A supernumerary emergency department nurse navigator was implemented week-off-week-on, seven days a week for 20 weeks. Diaries, focus groups, and an online survey (24-item Navigator Role Evaluation tool) were used to collect and synthesise data from the perspectives of multidisciplinary departmental staff. Thematic content analysis of cumulative qualitative data drawn from the navigators' diaries, focus groups and survey revealed iterative processes of the navigators growing into the role and staff incorporating the role into departmental flow, manifested as: Reception of the role and relationships with staff; Defining the role; and Assimilation of the role. Statistical analysis of survey data revealed overall staff satisfaction with the role. Physicians, nurses and others assessed it similarly. However, only 44% felt the role was an overall success, less than half (44%) considered it necessary, and just over a third (38%) thought it positively impacted inter-professional relationships. Investigation of individual items revealed several areas of uncertainty about the role. Within-group differences between nursing grades were noted, junior nurses rating the role significantly higher than more senior nurses. Staff input yielded invaluable insider feedback for ensuing modification and optimal instigation of the navigator role, rendering a sense of departmental

  12. An improved method/setup for extended testing after the Cigre, Method II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Mogens; Holbøll, Joachim; Rygal, Roman

    1992-01-01

    protection of the different test objects, and the sample production and preparation, among others, were of the utmost importance for the end results of this test. Results of using the system on epoxy with and without fillers are presented. Based on these results, the critical points of the method...... are discussed. The application of the system showed typical behavior of the discharges and lifetimes that was strongly dependent on the filler type...

  13. Geometric design method for occlusal outlines of complex class I and class II inlay cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Masafumi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Takada, Yukyo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a geometric design method for the occlusal outlines of complex inlay cavities as a continuation study of a previous design method for simple class I inlay cavity. A method for extending the occlusal outline to the buccal or lingual groove and to three preparation types of the proximal portions of class II inlay cavities -namely, straight line preparation, sweeping curve preparation, and reverse curve preparation- was investigated. To ensure the smoothness of the occlusal outline, a Bézier curve was introduced in the design. A minimal number of control points for the curve was applied to define each preparation type. The design method was experimentally applied to mandibular and maxillary first molars. Smooth outlines of the complex inlay cavities in the molars with tool accessibility throughout the cavities were achievable by using the present method.

  14. A method for the determination of ascorbic acid using the iron(II)-pyridine-dimethylglyoxime complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, S. P.; Mahajan, M.

    1998-01-01

    A simple and rapid spectrophotometric method for the determination of ascorbic acid is proposed. Ascorbic acid reduces iron (III) to iron (II) which forms a red colored complex with dimethylglyoxime in the presence of pyridine. The absorbance of the resulting solution is measured at 514 nm and a linear relationship between absorbance and concentration of ascorbic acid is observed up to 14 μg ml -1 . Studies on the interference of substances usually associated with ascorbic acid have been carried out and the applicability of the method has been tested by analysing pharmaceutical preparations of vitamin C [it

  15. A Delphi Method Analysis to Create an Emergency Medicine Educational Patient Satisfaction Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kory S. London

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Feedback on patient satisfaction (PS as a means to monitor and improve performance in patient communication is lacking in residency training. A physician’s promotion, compensation and job satisfaction may be impacted by his individual PS scores, once he is in practice. Many communication and satisfaction surveys exist but none focus on the emergency department setting for educational purposes. The goal of this project was to create an emergency medicine-based educational PS survey with strong evidence for content validity. Methods: We used the Delphi Method (DM to obtain expert opinion via an iterative process of surveying. Questions were mined from four PS surveys as well as from group suggestion. The DM analysis determined the structure, content and appropriate use of the tool. The group used four-point Likert-type scales and Lynn’s criteria for content validity to determine relevant questions from the stated goals. Results: Twelve recruited experts participated in a series of seven surveys to achieve consensus. A 10-question, single-page survey with an additional page of qualitative questions and demographic questions was selected. Thirty one questions were judged to be relevant from an original 48-question list. Of these, the final 10 questions were chosen. Response rates for individual survey items was 99.5%. Conclusion: The DM produced a consensus survey with content validity evidence. Future work will be needed to obtain evidence for response process, internal structure and construct validity.

  16. The Emergent Capabilities of Distributed Satellites and Methods for Selecting Distributed Satellite Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbin, B. A.; Seager, S.; Ross, A.; Hoffman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Distributed satellite systems (DSS) have emerged as an effective and cheap way to conduct space science, thanks to advances in the small satellite industry. However, relatively few space science missions have utilized multiple assets to achieve their primary scientific goals. Previous research on methods for evaluating mission concepts designs have shown that distributed systems are rarely competitive with monolithic systems, partially because it is difficult to quantify the added value of DSSs over monolithic systems. Comparatively little research has focused on how DSSs can be used to achieve new, fundamental space science goals that cannot be achieved with monolithic systems or how to choose a design from a larger possible tradespace of options. There are seven emergent capabilities of distributed satellites: shared sampling, simultaneous sampling, self-sampling, census sampling, stacked sampling, staged sampling, and sacrifice sampling. These capabilities are either fundamentally, analytically, or operationally unique in their application to distributed science missions, and they can be leveraged to achieve science goals that are either impossible or difficult and costly to achieve with monolithic systems. The Responsive Systems Comparison (RSC) method combines Multi-Attribute Tradespace Exploration with Epoch-Era Analysis to examine benefits, costs, and flexible options in complex systems over the mission lifecycle. Modifications to the RSC method as it exists in previously published literature were made in order to more accurately characterize how value is derived from space science missions. New metrics help rank designs by the value derived over their entire mission lifecycle and show more accurate cumulative value distributions. The RSC method was applied to four case study science missions that leveraged the emergent capabilities of distributed satellites to achieve their primary science goals. In all four case studies, RSC showed how scientific value was

  17. DISTANCE DETERMINATION TO 12 TYPE II SUPERNOVAE USING THE EXPANDING PHOTOSPHERE METHOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M. I.; Hamuy, Mario; Lira, P.; Maza, J.; Clocchiatti, A.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N.; Roth, M.; Suntzeff, N. B.; Matheson, T.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Leonard, D. C.

    2009-01-01

    We use early-time photometry and spectroscopy of 12 Type II plateau supernovae (SNe IIP) to derive their distances using the expanding photosphere method (EPM). We perform this study using two sets of Type II supernova (SN II) atmosphere models, three filter subsets ({BV}, {BVI}, and {VI}), and two methods for the host-galaxy extinction, which leads to 12 Hubble diagrams. We find that systematic differences in the atmosphere models lead to ∼50% differences in the EPM distances and to a value of H 0 between 52 and 101 km s -1 Mpc -1 . Using the {VI} filter subset we obtain the lowest dispersion in the Hubble diagram, σ μ = 0.32 mag. We also apply the EPM analysis to the well observed SN IIP 1999em. With the {VI} filter subset we derive a distance ranging from 9.3 ± 0.5 Mpc to 13.9 ± 1.4 Mpc depending on the atmosphere model employed.

  18. Extending the boundaries: autoethnography as an emergent method in mental health nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kim; McAllister, Margaret; O'Brien, Louise

    2006-03-01

    An exploration of the 'self' is generally considered a fundamental and necessary place from which to commence practice as a mental health nurse. Self-awareness and attention to one's own feelings, thoughts, and experiences can contribute to the therapeutic use of self in effective provision of mental health nursing care. This purposeful use of self, inherent in the role of the mental health nurse, may also be seen as synchronous to the role of the qualitative researcher who seeks to uncover the meaning of others' experiences. Autoethnography is a qualitative research method that connects the researcher's personal self to the broader cultural context. Evocative writing, where the writer shares personal stories on their experiences, is used to extend understanding of a particular social issue. This paper will argue how this emerging method in social science research is of particular relevance to mental health nursing research and practice.

  19. EPICOR-II resin characterization and proposed methods for degradation analysis. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, J.D.; McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Sanders, R.D. Sr.

    1984-06-01

    One goal of the EPICOR-II Research and Disposition Program is the examination of the EPICOR-II organic ion-exchange resins for physical and chemical degradation. This report summarizes preliminary information necessary for the evaluation of the resins for degradation. Degradation of the synthetic organic ion-exchange resins should be efficiently and accurately measurable by using the baseline data provided by the nonirradiated resin characterization. The degradation threshold is about 10 8 rads, approximately the same dose rate the resins will have received by the examination date. If degradation has not occurred at the first examination point, later examinations will detect resin degradation using the same analytical methods. The results from the characterization tests will yield practical and useful data on the actual effects of radiation on commercial synthetic organic ion-exchange resins. 10 references, 12 figures

  20. Stroke Education in an Emergency Department Waiting Room: a Comparison of Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Yvonne Chan1

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the emergency department (ED waiting room hosts a large, captive audience of patients and visitors, it may be an ideal location for conduct-ing focused stroke education. The aim of this study was to assess the effective-ness of various stroke education methods.Methods: Patients and visitors of an urban ED waiting room were randomized into one of the following groups: video, brochure, one-to-one teaching, combi-nation of these three methods, or control group. We administered a 13-question multiple-choice test to assess stroke knowledge prior to, immediately after, and at 1 month post-education to patients and visitors in the ED waiting room.Results: Of 4 groups receiving education, all significantly improved their test scores immediately post intervention (test scores 9.4±2.5-10.3±2.0, P<0.01. At 1 month, the combination group retained the most knowledge (9.4±2.4 exceed-ing pre-intervention and control scores (both 6.7±2.6, P<0.01.Conclusion: Among the various stroke education methods delivered in the ED waiting room, the combination method resulted in the highest knowledge reten-tion at 1-month post intervention.

  1. Advances in explosives analysis--part II: photon and neutron methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kathryn E; Greenfield, Margo T; McGrane, Shawn D; Moore, David S

    2016-01-01

    The number and capability of explosives detection and analysis methods have increased dramatically since publication of the Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry special issue devoted to Explosives Analysis [Moore DS, Goodpaster JV, Anal Bioanal Chem 395:245-246, 2009]. Here we review and critically evaluate the latest (the past five years) important advances in explosives detection, with details of the improvements over previous methods, and suggest possible avenues towards further advances in, e.g., stand-off distance, detection limit, selectivity, and penetration through camouflage or packaging. The review consists of two parts. Part I discussed methods based on animals, chemicals (including colorimetry, molecularly imprinted polymers, electrochemistry, and immunochemistry), ions (both ion-mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry), and mechanical devices. This part, Part II, will review methods based on photons, from very energetic photons including X-rays and gamma rays down to the terahertz range, and neutrons.

  2. An efficient method for multiple site-directed mutagenesis using type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Kun; Xin, Ying; Zhang, Zhiying

    2015-05-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) methods are very important in modern molecular biology, biochemistry, and protein engineering. Here, we present a novel SDM method that can be used for multiple mutation generation using type IIs restriction enzymes. This approach is faster and more convenient than the overlap polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method due to its having fewer reaction steps and being cheaper than, but as convenient as, enzymatic assembly. We illustrate the usefulness of our method by introducing three mutations into the bacterial Streptococcus thermophilus Cas9 (bStCas9) gene, converting the humanized S. thermophilus Cas9 (hStCas9) gene into nuclease dead or H847A nickase mutants and generating sunnyTALEN mutagenesis from a wild-type TALEN backbone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II) ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Ting; Qu, Fei; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we developed a facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II) ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine. Polyethyleneimine is a cationic polymer that has no absorption in the wavelength range of 250–800 nm. When trace amounts of copper(II) ion was added to the colorless polyethyleneimine solution, copper(II) ion could react with the amino groups of the polyethyleneimine to form a dark blue cuprammonium complex whose absorption spectrum exhibit...

  4. Past speculations of the future: a review of the methods used for forecasting emerging health technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doos, Lucy; Packer, Claire; Ward, Derek; Simpson, Sue; Stevens, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Forecasting can support rational decision-making around the introduction and use of emerging health technologies and prevent investment in technologies that have limited long-term potential. However, forecasting methods need to be credible. We performed a systematic search to identify the methods used in forecasting studies to predict future health technologies within a 3–20-year timeframe. Identification and retrospective assessment of such methods potentially offer a route to more reliable prediction. Design Systematic search of the literature to identify studies reported on methods of forecasting in healthcare. Participants People are not needed in this study. Data sources The authors searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and grey literature sources, and included articles published in English that reported their methods and a list of identified technologies. Main outcome measure Studies reporting methods used to predict future health technologies within a 3–20-year timeframe with an identified list of individual healthcare technologies. Commercially sponsored reviews, long-term futurology studies (with over 20-year timeframes) and speculative editorials were excluded. Results 15 studies met our inclusion criteria. Our results showed that the majority of studies (13/15) consulted experts either alone or in combination with other methods such as literature searching. Only 2 studies used more complex forecasting tools such as scenario building. Conclusions The methodological fundamentals of formal 3–20-year prediction are consistent but vary in details. Further research needs to be conducted to ascertain if the predictions made were accurate and whether accuracy varies by the methods used or by the types of technologies identified. PMID:26966060

  5. Diagnostic accuracy and use of nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography by emergency physicians: phase II of the FOTO-ED study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Beau B; Thulasi, Praneetha; Fraser, Clare L; Keadey, Matthew T; Ward, Antoinette; Heilpern, Katherine L; Wright, David W; Newman, Nancy J; Biousse, Valérie

    2013-07-01

    During the first phase of the Fundus Photography vs Ophthalmoscopy Trial Outcomes in the Emergency Department study, 13% (44/350; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9% to 17%) of patients had an ocular fundus finding, such as papilledema, relevant to their emergency department (ED) management found by nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography reviewed by neuro-ophthalmologists. All of these findings were missed by emergency physicians, who examined only 14% of enrolled patients by direct ophthalmoscopy. In the present study, we evaluate the sensitivity of nonmydriatic ocular fundus photography, an alternative to direct ophthalmoscopy, for relevant findings when photographs are made available for use by emergency physicians during routine clinical care. Three hundred fifty-four patients presenting to our ED with headache, focal neurologic deficit, visual change, or diastolic blood pressure greater than or equal to 120 mm Hg had nonmydriatic fundus photography obtained (Kowa nonmydriatic α-D). Photographs were placed on the electronic medical record for emergency physician review. Identification of relevant findings on photographs by emergency physicians was compared with a reference standard of neuro-ophthalmologist review. Emergency physicians reviewed photographs of 239 patients (68%). Thirty-five patients (10%; 95% CI 7% to 13%) had relevant findings identified by neuro-ophthalmologist review (6 disc edema, 6 grade III/IV hypertensive retinopathy, 7 isolated hemorrhages, 15 optic disc pallor, and 1 retinal vascular occlusion). Emergency physicians identified 16 of 35 relevant findings (sensitivity 46%; 95% CI 29% to 63%) and also identified 289 of 319 normal findings (specificity 91%; 95% CI 87% to 94%). Emergency physicians reported that photographs were helpful for 125 patients (35%). Emergency physicians used nonmydriatic fundus photographs more frequently than they performed direct ophthalmoscopy, and their detection of relevant abnormalities improved. Ocular fundus

  6. Ultrasound-assisted extraction method for the simultaneous determination of emerging contaminants in freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Diana Nara Ribeiro; Grosseli, Guilherme Martins; Mozeto, Antonio Aparecido; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Fadini, Pedro Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Sediments are the fate of several emerging organic contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products and hormones, and therefore an important subject in environmental monitoring studies. In the present work, a simple and sensitive method was developed, validated and applied for the simultaneous extraction of atenolol, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, propranolol, triclosan, estrone, 17-β-estradiol and 17-α-ethinylestradiol using ultrasound-assisted extraction from freshwater sediment samples followed by solid-phase extraction clean-up and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection. The solvent type and extraction pH were evaluated to obtain the highest recoveries of the compounds. The best method shows absolute recoveries between 54.0 and 94.4% at 50 ng/g concentration. The method exhibits good precision with relative standard deviation ranging from 1.0-16%. The detection and quantification limits ranged from 0.006-0.067 and 0.016-0.336 ng/g, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to freshwater sediment samples collected from different sites in Jundiaí River basin of São Paulo State, Brazil. The compounds atenolol, caffeine, propranolol and triclosan were detected in all the sampling sites with concentrations of 13.8, 41.0, 28.5 and 176 ng/g, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. fNIRS: An emergent method to document functional cortical activity during infant movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota eNishiyori

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The neural basis underlying the emergence of goal-directed actions in infants has been severely understudied, with minimal empirical evidence for hypotheses proposed. This was largely due to the technological constraints of traditional neuroimaging techniques. Recently, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS technology has emerged as a tool developmental scientists are finding useful to examine cortical activity, particularly in young children and infants due to its greater tolerance to movements than other neuroimaging techniques. fNIRS provides an opportunity to finally begin to examine the neural underpinnings as infants develop goal-directed actions.In this methodological paper, I will outline the utility, challenges, and outcomes of using fNIRS to measure the changes in cortical activity as infants reach for an object. I will describe the advantages and limitations of the technology, the setup I used to study primary motor cortex activity during infant reaching, and example steps in the analyses processes. I will present exemplar data to illustrate the feasibility of this technique to quantify changes in hemodynamic activity as infants move. The viability of this research method opens the door to expanding studies of the development of neural activity related to goal-directed actions in infants. I encourage others to share details of techniques used, as well, including analyticals, to help this neuroimaging technology grow as others, such as EEG and fMRI have.

  8. A Delphi Method Analysis to Create an Emergency Medicine Educational Patient Satisfaction Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Kory S; Singal, Bonita; Fowler, Jennifer; Prepejchal, Rebecca; Simmons, Stefanie; Finefrock, Douglas

    2015-12-01

    Feedback on patient satisfaction (PS) as a means to monitor and improve performance in patient communication is lacking in residency training. A physician's promotion, compensation and job satisfaction may be impacted by his individual PS scores, once he is in practice. Many communication and satisfaction surveys exist but none focus on the emergency department setting for educational purposes. The goal of this project was to create an emergency medicine-based educational PS survey with strong evidence for content validity. We used the Delphi Method (DM) to obtain expert opinion via an iterative process of surveying. Questions were mined from four PS surveys as well as from group suggestion. The DM analysis determined the structure, content and appropriate use of the tool. The group used four-point Likert-type scales and Lynn's criteria for content validity to determine relevant questions from the stated goals. Twelve recruited experts participated in a series of seven surveys to achieve consensus. A 10-question, single-page survey with an additional page of qualitative questions and demographic questions was selected. Thirty one questions were judged to be relevant from an original 48-question list. Of these, the final 10 questions were chosen. Response rates for individual survey items was 99.5%. The DM produced a consensus survey with content validity evidence. Future work will be needed to obtain evidence for response process, internal structure and construct validity.

  9. Simple determination of sulfate ion in rain by volumetric methods using lead (II) nitrate and dithizone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Yongzuo; Zhou Qizhi (Sichuan Univ., Chengdu, SC (China)); Iwatsuki, M.; Fukasawa, T. (Yamanashi Univ., Yamanashi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1993-05-10

    Nowadays, 'acid rain' is one of serious problems in the world. Sulfate ion is one of main constituents in the acid rain, and its rapid and reliable determination is very important for the application to a lot of samples. For its determination, turbidimetry, spectrophotometry and ion chromatography are generally employed. In this paper, volumetric methods are proposed for simple determination of sulfate ion in rain. Lead (II) nitrate and dithizone are used as titrant and indicator, respectively, and the end point is determined either visually or photometrically. Recovery ratio of ions, precision, and effect of foreign ions on determination of sulfate ion by the methods were studied, and compared with those by the turbidimetry and ion chromatography. The proposed methods, especially the visual titration has advantages of simplicity, rapidity, and suitability for routine analysis, and requires no expensive equipment. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Methods of Celestial Mechanics Volume II: Application to Planetary System, Geodynamics and Satellite Geodesy

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    G. Beutler's Methods of Celestial Mechanics is a coherent textbook for students as well as an excellent reference for practitioners. Volume II is devoted to the applications and to the presentation of the program system CelestialMechanics. Three major areas of applications are covered: (1) Orbital and rotational motion of extended celestial bodies. The properties of the Earth-Moon system are developed from the simplest case (rigid bodies) to more general cases, including the rotation of an elastic Earth, the rotation of an Earth partly covered by oceans and surrounded by an atmosphere, and the rotation of an Earth composed of a liquid core and a rigid shell (Poincaré model). (2) Artificial Earth Satellites. The oblateness perturbation acting on a satellite and the exploitation of its properties in practice is discussed using simulation methods (CelestialMechanics) and (simplified) first order perturbation methods. The perturbations due to the higher-order terms of the Earth's gravitational potential and reso...

  11. Prioritizing sewer rehabilitation projects using AHP-PROMETHEE II ranking method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessili, Abdelhak; Benmamar, Saadia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a methodology for the prioritization of sewer rehabilitation projects for Algiers (Algeria) sewer networks to support the National Sanitation Office in its challenge to make decisions on prioritization of sewer rehabilitation projects. The methodology applies multiple-criteria decision making. The study includes 47 projects (collectors) and 12 criteria to evaluate them. These criteria represent the different issues considered in the prioritization of the projects, which are structural, hydraulic, environmental, financial, social and technical. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP) is used to determine weights of the criteria and the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE II) method is used to obtain the final ranking of the projects. The model was verified using the sewer data of Algiers. The results have shown that the method can be used for prioritizing sewer rehabilitation projects.

  12. Emergency estimations of paraquat in plasma. A comparison of the RIA and ion pair/colorimetric methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.J.; Jarvie, D.R.; Levitt, T.

    1979-01-01

    A comparison was made between the RIA method for paraquat in plasma, and a modified colorimetric method involving ion-pair extraction of paraquat. The comparison was carried out on plasma from patients admitted with paraquat poisoning. The correlation between the methods was good and both were found to be sufficiently rapid for emergency use. (Auth.)

  13. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehan Liu

    Full Text Available A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA, 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences. Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60. Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  14. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehan; Xie, Na; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  15. Emergency medicine resident physicians' perceptions of electronic documentation and workflow: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, P M; Redden, L; Poole, S; Pozner, C N; Horsky, J; Raja, A S; Poon, E; Schiff, G; Landman, A

    2015-01-01

    To understand emergency department (ED) physicians' use of electronic documentation in order to identify usability and workflow considerations for the design of future ED information system (EDIS) physician documentation modules. We invited emergency medicine resident physicians to participate in a mixed methods study using task analysis and qualitative interviews. Participants completed a simulated, standardized patient encounter in a medical simulation center while documenting in the test environment of a currently used EDIS. We recorded the time on task, type and sequence of tasks performed by the participants (including tasks performed in parallel). We then conducted semi-structured interviews with each participant. We analyzed these qualitative data using the constant comparative method to generate themes. Eight resident physicians participated. The simulation session averaged 17 minutes and participants spent 11 minutes on average on tasks that included electronic documentation. Participants performed tasks in parallel, such as history taking and electronic documentation. Five of the 8 participants performed a similar workflow sequence during the first part of the session while the remaining three used different workflows. Three themes characterize electronic documentation: (1) physicians report that location and timing of documentation varies based on patient acuity and workload, (2) physicians report a need for features that support improved efficiency; and (3) physicians like viewing available patient data but struggle with integration of the EDIS with other information sources. We confirmed that physicians spend much of their time on documentation (65%) during an ED patient visit. Further, we found that resident physicians did not all use the same workflow and approach even when presented with an identical standardized patient scenario. Future EHR design should consider these varied workflows while trying to optimize efficiency, such as improving

  16. Spectrophotometric Determination of Iron(II and Cobalt(II by Direct, Derivative, and Simultaneous Methods Using 2-Hydroxy-1-Naphthaldehyde-p-Hydroxybenzoichydrazone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Anusuya Devi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimized and validated spectrophotometric methods have been proposed for the determination of iron and cobalt individually and simultaneously. 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde-p-hydroxybenzoichydrazone (HNAHBH reacts with iron(II and cobalt(II to form reddish-brown and yellow-coloured [Fe(II-HNAHBH] and [Co(II-HNAHBH] complexes, respectively. The maximum absorbance of these complexes was found at 405 nm and 425 nm, respectively. For [Fe(II-HNAHBH], Beer’s law is obeyed over the concentration range of 0.055–1.373 μg mL−1 with a detection limit of 0.095 μg mL−1 and molar absorptivity ɛ, 5.6 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. [Co(II-HNAHBH] complex obeys Beer’s law in 0.118–3.534 μg mL−1 range with a detection limit of 0.04 μg mL−1 and molar absorptivity, ɛ of 2.3 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. Highly sensitive and selective first-, second- and third-order derivative methods are described for the determination of iron and cobalt. A simultaneous second-order derivative spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of these metals. All the proposed methods are successfully employed in the analysis of various biological, water, and alloy samples for the determination of iron and cobalt content.

  17. A review of hemodynamic monitoring techniques, methods and devices for the emergency physician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laher, Abdullah E; Watermeyer, Matthew J; Buchanan, Sean K; Dippenaar, Nicole; Simo, Nelly Clotilde Tchouambou; Motara, Feroza; Moolla, Muhammed

    2017-09-01

    The emergency department (ED) is frequently the doorway to the intensive care unit (ICU) for a significant number of critically ill patients presenting to the hospital. Hemodynamic monitoring (HDM) which is a key component in the effective management of the critically ill patient presenting to the ED, is primarily concerned with assessing the performance of the cardiovascular system and determining the correct therapeutic intervention to optimise end-organ oxygen delivery. The spectrum of hemodynamic monitoring ranges from simple clinical assessment and routine bedside monitoring to point of care ultrasonography and various invasive monitoring devices. The clinician must be aware of the range of available techniques, methods, interventions and technological advances as well as possess a sound approach to basic hemodynamic monitoring prior to selecting the optimal modality. This article comprises an in depth discussion of an approach to hemodynamic monitoring techniques and principles as well as methods of predicting fluid responsiveness as it applies to the ED clinician. We review the role, applicability and validity of various methods and techniques that include; clinical assessment, passive leg raising, blood pressure, finger based monitoring devices, the mini-fluid challenge, the end-expiratory occlusion test, central venous pressure monitoring, the pulmonary artery catheter, ultrasonography, bioreactance and other modern invasive hemodynamic monitoring devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gender differences in neurological emergencies part II: a consensus summary and research agenda on traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David W; Espinoza, Tamara R; Merck, Lisa H; Ratcliff, Jonathan J; Backster, Anika; Stein, Donald G

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. There is strong evidence that gender and sex play an important role across the spectrum of TBI, from pathophysiology to clinical care. In May 2014, Academic Emergency Medicine held a consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes." A TBI working group was formed to explore what was known about the influence of sex and gender on TBI and to identify gaps for future research. The findings resulted in four major recommendations to guide the TBI research agenda. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. A FTA-based method for risk decision-making in emergency response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Hongyan

    2014-01-01

    Decision-making problems in emergency response are usually risky and uncertain due to the limited decision data and possible evolvement of emergency scenarios. This paper focuses on a risk decisionmaking problem in emergency response with several distinct characteristics including dynamic...

  20. Newspaper reporting and the emergence of charcoal burning suicide in Taiwan: A mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Yeh; Tsai, Chi-Wei; Biddle, Lucy; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Gunnell, David

    2016-03-15

    It has been suggested that extensive media reporting of charcoal burning suicide was a key factor in the rapid spread of this novel method in many East Asian countries. But very few empirical studies have explored the relationship between media reporting and the emergence of this new method of suicide. We investigated the changing pattern of media reporting of charcoal burning suicides in Taiwan during 1998-2002 when this method of suicide increased most rapidly, assessing whether the characteristics of media reporting were associated with the changing incidence of suicide using this method. A mixed method approach, combining quantitative and qualitative analysis of newspaper content during 1998-2002 was used. We compared differences in reporting characteristics before and after the rapid increase in charcoal burning suicide. Point-biserial and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the associations between the media item content and changes in suicide rates. During the period when charcoal burning suicide increased rapidly, the number of reports per suicide was considerably higher than during the early stage (0.31 vs. 0.10). Detailed reporting of this new method was associated with a post-reporting increase in suicides using the method. Qualitative analysis of news items revealed that the content of reports of suicide by charcoal burning changed gradually; in the early stages of the epidemic (1999-2000) there was convergence in the terminology used to report charcoal burning deaths, later reports gave detailed descriptions of the setting in which the death occurred (2001) and finally the method was glamourized and widely publicized (2001-2002). Our analysis was restricted to newspaper reports and did not include TV or the Internet. Newspaper reporting was associated with the evolution and establishment of charcoal burning suicide. Working with media and close monitoring of changes in the incidence of suicide using a new method might help

  1. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antigen presenting cells (APCs) sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC...... II) molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making...... the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance...

  2. Ionophoretic method in the study of mixed ligand ternary chelates of UO2(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) involving nitrilotriacetate and cytosine as ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, A.P.; Mishra, S.K.; Yadava, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    A novel electrophoretic technique is described for the assessment of the equilibria in mixed-ligand complex system in solution. It is based on the movement of spot of the metal ion under an electric field with the complexants added in the background electrolyte at fixed pH. The concentration of primary ligand nitrilotriacetate was constant while that of secondary ligand (cytosine) was varied. The plot of log (cytosine) against mobility was used to obtain information on the formation of the mixed complexes and to calculate its stability constants. Experimentally obtained logK values are as 5.62, 4.55 and 4.42 for mixed complexes of UO 2 (II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) respectively at μ=0.1 and temp.=35 +- 01.degC. (author). 10 refs

  3. A method for the determination of ascorbic acid using the iron(II)-pyridine-dimethylglyoxime complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arya, S. P.; Mahajan, M. [Haryana, Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-05-01

    A simple and rapid spectrophotometric method for the determination of ascorbic acid is proposed. Ascorbic acid reduces iron (III) to iron (II) which forms a red colored complex with dimethylglyoxime in the presence of pyridine. The absorbance of the resulting solution is measured at 514 nm and a linear relationship between absorbance and concentration of ascorbic acid is observed up to 14 {mu}g ml{sup -1}. Studies on the interference of substances usually associated with ascorbic acid have been carried out and the applicability of the method has been tested by analysing pharmaceutical preparations of vitamin C. [Italiano] Si propone un rapido e semplice metodo spettrofotometrico per la determinazione dell`acido ascorbico. L`acido ascorbico riduce il ferro(III) a ferro(II) che forma con la dimetilgliossima, in presenza di piridina, un complesso colorato in rosso. L`assorbanza della soluzione risultante e` misurata a 514 nm e si ottiene una relazione lineare tra assorbanza e concentrazione dell`acido ascorbico fino a 14 {mu}g ml{sup -1}. Si sono condotti studi sugli interferenti usualmente associati all`acido ascorbico ed e` stata valutata l`applicabilita` del metodo all`analisi di preparati farmaceutici di vitamina C.

  4. Testing the applicability of the k 0-NAA method at the MINT's TRIGA MARK II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siong, Wee Boon; Dung, Ho Manh; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Salim, Nazaratul Ashifa Abd.; Elias, Md. Suhaimi

    2006-01-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at MINT is using the NAA technique since 1980s and is the only laboratory in Malaysia equipped with a research reactor, namely the TRIGA MARK II. Throughout the years the development of NAA technique has been very encouraging and was made applicable to a wide range of samples. At present, the k 0 method has become the preferred standardization method of NAA (k 0 -NAA) due to its multi-elemental analysis capability without using standards. Additionally, the k 0 method describes NAA in physically and mathematically understandable definitions and is very suitable for computer evaluation. Eventually, the k 0 -NAA method has been adopted by MINT in 2003, in collaboration with the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Vietnam. The reactor neutron parameters (α and f) for the pneumatic transfer system and for the rotary rack at various locations, as well as the detector efficiencies were determined. After calibration of the reactor and the detectors, the implemented k 0 method was validated by analyzing some certified reference materials (including IAEA Soil 7, NIST 1633a, NIST 1632c, NIST 1646a and IAEA 140/TM). The analysis results of the CRMs showed an average u score well below the threshold value of 2 with a precision of better than ±10% for most of the elemental concentrations obtained, validating herewith the introduction of the k 0 -NAA method at the MINT

  5. [Management of children with headache in a Pediatric Emergency Department before and after the introduction of the Second International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-II)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioachin, Anna; Fiumana, Elisa; Tarocco, Anna; Verzola, Adriano; Forini, Elena; Guerra, Valentina; Salani, Manuela; Faggioli, Raffaella

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how the management of children admitted with headache to a Pediatric Emergency Department, was modified by the introduction of the Second International Classification of Headache Disorders ( ICHD-II) published in 2004. The complexity and average costs of the services provided to patients in 2002 and 2011 were compared. The results revealed a decrease in the number of tests performed and in-hospital admissions. However, tests were more complex, and an increase in requests of specialist advice was observed. We hypothesized that this change may be related to the introduction of ICHD-II, which suggests a more rational approach to the child with headache and a better use of hospital resources.

  6. Environmental Design with Regard to Emergency and Scarce Resources: a few Method Reflections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Tucci

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The essay illustrates a few method or project approach reflections on a range of questions: the ones faced by all branches of knowledge of ‘Environmental Design’. Today, those branches are asked to tackle the broader ‘environmental question’ in a more and more crucial and binding way, and to provide answers to more and more frequent emergency situations, dealing also with increasingly scarce resources in our cities and territories. A few questions are posed: which logic-cognitive phases is it necessary to bear in mind to set a proper changing action? Which criteria – or meta-criteria – is it convenient to adopt in order to direct process, project and product choices? Which is the ideal framework of reference requirements which a changing action should always respect and bear in mind? A framework of possible operative indications may be based on the interdisciplinary approach, typical of Environmental Design, and on meta-criteria; the purpose is to define an open system with nine method requirements for seeking the proper processes for protecting, safeguarding, preserving as well as recovering and changing the environment, increasing its value.

  7. Simulating extracorporeal membrane oxygenation emergencies to improve human performance. Part II: assessment of technical and behavioral skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, JoDee M; Murphy, Allison A; Boyle, Kristine B; Yaeger, Kim A; Halamek, Louis P

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare professionals are expected to make rapid, correct decisions in critical situations despite what may be a lack of real practical experience in a particular crisis situation. Successful resolution of a medical crisis depends upon demonstration not only of appropriate technical skills but also of key behavioral skills (eg, leadership, communication, and teamwork). We have developed a hands-on, high fidelity, simulation-based training program (ECMO Sim) to provide healthcare professionals with the opportunity to learn and practice the technical and behavioral skills necessary to manage ECMO emergencies. Nine ECMO nurse specialists participated in two sequential randomly assigned simulated ECMO emergencies. The simulated emergencies were captured on videotape and reviewed with the subjects during facilitated debriefings that occurred immediately following each scenario. All videotapes were scored for key technical and behavioral skills by reviewers blinded to the sequence of the scenarios. The ratings of the subjects' technical and behavioral skills in each scenario were compared. Subjects performed key technical skills correctly more often in the second simulated ECMO emergency. In addition, their response times for three out of five specific technical tasks improved from the first to the second simulated emergency by an average of 27 seconds. Subjects' behavioral skills were rated more highly by masked reviewers in the second simulated ECMO emergency. The improvement in comprehensive behavioral scores from the first to the second scenario reached statistical significance in eight of nine subjects. After exposure to high-fidelity simulated ECMO emergencies, subjects demonstrated significant improvements in their technical and behavioral skills. ECMO Sim creates a learning environment that readily supports the acquisition of the technical and behavioral skills that are important in solving clinically significant, potentially life-threatening problems that can

  8. Non-Surgical Breast-Conserving Treatment (KORTUC-BCT Using a New Radiosensitization Method (KORTUC II for Patients with Stage I or II Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ogawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to establish a non-surgical breast-conserving treatment (BCT using KORTUC II radiosensitization treatment. A new radiosensitizing agent containing 0.5% hydrogen peroxide and 0.83% sodium hyaluronate (a CD44 ligand has been developed for intra-tumoral injection into various tumors. This new method, named KORTUC II, was approved by our local ethics committee for the treatment of breast cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. A total of 72 early-stage breast cancer patients (stage 0, 1 patient; stage I, 23; stage II, 48 were enrolled in the KORTUC II trial after providing fully informed consent. The mean age of the patients was 59.7 years. A maximum of 6 mL (usually 3 mL for tumors of less than approximately 3 cm in diameter of the agent was injected into breast tumor tissue twice a week under ultrasonographic guidance. For radiotherapy, hypofraction radiotherapy was administered using a tangential fields approach including an ipsilateral axillary region and field-in-field method; the energy level was 4 MV, and the total radiation dose was 44 Gy administered as 2.75 Gy/fraction. An electron boost of 3 Gy was added three times. Treatment was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects in all 72 patients. No patients showed any significant complications other than mild dermatitis. A total of 24 patients under 75 years old with stage II breast cancer underwent induction chemotherapy (EC and/or taxane prior to KORTUC II treatment, and 58 patients with estrogen receptor-positive tumors also received hormonal therapy following KORTUC II. The mean duration of follow-up as of the end of September 2014 was 51.1 months, at which time 68 patients were alive without any distant metastases. Only one patient had local recurrence and died of cardiac failure at 6.5 years. Another one patient had bone metastases. For two of the 72 patients, follow-up ended after several months following KORTUC II treatment. In conclusion, non

  9. Detection and enumeration of coliforms in drinking water: current methods and emerging approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rompré, Annie; Servais, Pierre; Baudart, Julia; de-Roubin, Marie Renée; Laurent, Patrick

    2002-03-01

    The coliform group has been used extensively as an indicator of water quality and has historically led to the public health protection concept. The aim of this review is to examine methods currently in use or which can be proposed for the monitoring of coliforms in drinking water. Actually, the need for more rapid, sensitive and specific tests is essential in the water industry. Routine and widely accepted techniques are discussed, as are methods which have emerged from recent research developments.Approved traditional methods for coliform detection include the multiple-tube fermentation (MTF) technique and the membrane filter (MF) technique using different specific media and incubation conditions. These methods have limitations, however, such as duration of incubation, antagonistic organism interference, lack of specificity and poor detection of slow-growing or viable but non-culturable (VBNC) microorganisms. Nowadays, the simple and inexpensive membrane filter technique is the most widely used method for routine enumeration of coliforms in drinking water.The detection of coliforms based on specific enzymatic activity has improved the sensitivity of these methods. The enzymes beta-D galactosidase and beta-D glucuronidase are widely used for the detection and enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli, respectively. Many chromogenic and fluorogenic substrates exist for the specific detection of these enzymatic activities, and various commercial tests based on these substrates are available. Numerous comparisons have shown these tests may be a suitable alternative to the classical techniques. They are, however, more expensive, and the incubation time, even though reduced, remains too long for same-day results. More sophisticated analytical tools such as solid phase cytometry can be employed to decrease the time needed for the detection of bacterial enzymatic activities, with a low detection threshold. Detection of coliforms by molecular methods is also

  10. Patient flow within UK emergency departments: a systematic review of the use of computer simulation modelling methods

    OpenAIRE

    Mohiuddin, Syed; Busby, John; Savovi?, Jelena; Richards, Alison; Northstone, Kate; Hollingworth, William; Donovan, Jenny L; Vasilakis, Christos

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) is common in the UK as in other countries worldwide. Computer simulation is one approach used for understanding the causes of ED overcrowding and assessing the likely impact of changes to the delivery of emergency care. However, little is known about the usefulness of computer simulation for analysis of ED patient flow. We undertook a systematic review to investigate the different computer simulation methods and their contribution for a...

  11. Optimization Methods to Minimize Emergence Time While Maintaining Adequate Post-Operative Analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Tams, Carl; Syroid, Noah; Johnson, Ken B.; Egan, Talmage D.; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2011-01-01

    A rapid emergence from anesthesia combined with an extended duration of adequate analgesia is desired. Difficulties arise when trying to achieve a rapid emergence and provide adequate analgesia for procedures associated with moderate post operative pain. We propose to use pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models with optimization techniques to determine anesthetic drugs ratios to improve post-anesthetic outcomes of emergence and analgesia. We hypothesize that optimized propofol, r...

  12. Epr of free radicals in solids II trends in methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders; Lund, Anders

    2012-01-01

    EPR of Free Radicals in Solids: Trends in Methods and Applications, 2nd ed. presents a critical two volume review of the methods and applications of EPR (ESR) for the study of free radical processes in solids. Emphasis is on the progress made in the developments in EPR technology, in the application of sophisticated matrix isolation techniques and in the advancement in quantitative EPR that have occurred since the 1st edition was published. Improvements have been made also at theoretical level, with the development of methods based on first principles and their application to the calculation of magnetic properties as well as in spectral simulations. EPR of Free Radicals in Solids II focuses on the trends in applications of experimental and theoretical methods to extract structural and dynamical properties of radicals and spin probes in solid matrices by continuous wave (CW) and pulsed techniques in nine chapters written by experts in the field. It examines the studies involving radiation- and photo-induced in...

  13. EPR of free radicals in solids II trends in methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lund, Anders; Lund, Anders

    2012-01-01

    EPR of Free Radicals in Solids: Trends in Methods and Applications, 2nd ed. presents a critical two volume review of the methods and applications of EPR (ESR) for the study of free radical processes in solids. Emphasis is on the progress made in the developments in EPR technology, in the application of sophisticated matrix isolation techniques and in the advancement in quantitative EPR that have occurred since the 1st edition was published. Improvements have been made also at theoretical level, with the development of methods based on first principles and their application to the calculation of magnetic properties as well as in spectral simulations. EPR of Free Radicals in Solids II focuses on the trends in applications of experimental and theoretical methods to extract structural and dynamical properties of radicals and spin probes in solid matrices by continuous wave (CW) and pulsed techniques in nine chapters written by experts in the field. It examines the studies involving radiation- and photo-induced in...

  14. Lactic Acid Fermentation, Urea and Lime Addition: Promising Faecal Sludge Sanitizing Methods for Emergency Sanitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Anderson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, three faecal sludge sanitizing methods—lactic acid fermentation, urea treatment and lime treatment—were studied for application in emergency situations. These methods were investigated by undertaking small scale field trials with pit latrine sludge in Blantyre, Malawi. Hydrated lime was able to reduce the E. coli count in the sludge to below the detectable limit within 1 h applying a pH > 11 (using a dosage from 7% to 17% w/w, depending faecal sludge alkalinity, urea treatment required about 4 days using 2.5% wet weight urea addition, and lactic acid fermentation needed approximately 1 week after being dosed with 10% wet weight molasses (2 g (glucose/fructose/kg and 10% wet weight pre-culture (99.8% pasteurised whole milk and 0.02% fermented milk drink containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota. Based on Malawian prices, the cost of sanitizing 1 m3 of faecal sludge was estimated to be €32 for lactic acid fermentation, €20 for urea treatment and €12 for hydrated lime treatment.

  15. Study of the Bus Dynamic Coscheduling Optimization Method under Urban Rail Transit Line Emergency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuedong; Wang, Jiaxi; Chen, Shasha

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important urban commuter transportation modes, urban rail transit (URT) has been acting as a key solution for supporting mobility needs in high-density urban areas. However, in recent years, high frequency of unexpected events has caused serious service disruptions in URT system, greatly harming passenger safety and resulting in severe traffic delays. Therefore, there is an urgent need to study emergency evacuation problem in URT. In this paper, a method of bus dynamic coscheduling is proposed and two models are built based on different evacuation destinations including URT stations and surrounding bus parking spots. A dynamic coscheduling scheme for buses can be obtained by the models. In the model solution process, a new concept—the equivalent parking spot—is proposed to transform the nonlinear model into an integer linear programming (ILP) problem. A case study is conducted to verify the feasibility of models. Also, sensitivity analysis of two vital factors is carried out to analyze their effects on the total evacuation time. The results reveal that the designed capacity of buses has a negative influence on the total evacuation time, while an increase in the number of passengers has a positive effect. Finally, some significant optimizing strategies are proposed. PMID:25530750

  16. Study of the Bus Dynamic Coscheduling Optimization Method under Urban Rail Transit Line Emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most important urban commuter transportation modes, urban rail transit (URT has been acting as a key solution for supporting mobility needs in high-density urban areas. However, in recent years, high frequency of unexpected events has caused serious service disruptions in URT system, greatly harming passenger safety and resulting in severe traffic delays. Therefore, there is an urgent need to study emergency evacuation problem in URT. In this paper, a method of bus dynamic coscheduling is proposed and two models are built based on different evacuation destinations including URT stations and surrounding bus parking spots. A dynamic coscheduling scheme for buses can be obtained by the models. In the model solution process, a new concept—the equivalent parking spot—is proposed to transform the nonlinear model into an integer linear programming (ILP problem. A case study is conducted to verify the feasibility of models. Also, sensitivity analysis of two vital factors is carried out to analyze their effects on the total evacuation time. The results reveal that the designed capacity of buses has a negative influence on the total evacuation time, while an increase in the number of passengers has a positive effect. Finally, some significant optimizing strategies are proposed.

  17. Emerging methods for the study of coastal ecosystem landscape structure and change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John C.; Danielson, Jeffrey J.; Purkis, Sam

    2013-01-01

    Coastal landscapes are heterogeneous, dynamic, and evolve over a range of time scales due to intertwined climatic, geologic, hydrologic, biologic, and meteorological processes, and are also heavily impacted by human development, commercial activities, and resource extraction. A diversity of complex coastal systems around the globe, spanning glaciated shorelines to tropical atolls, wetlands, and barrier islands are responding to multiple human and natural drivers. Interdisciplinary research based on remote-sensing observations linked to process studies and models is required to understand coastal ecosystem landscape structure and change. Moreover, new techniques for coastal mapping and monitoring are increasingly serving the needs of policy-makers and resource managers across local, regional, and national scales. Emerging remote-sensing methods associated with a diversity of instruments and platforms are a key enabling element of integrated coastal ecosystem studies. These investigations require both targeted and synoptic mapping, and involve the monitoring of formative processes such as hydrodynamics, sediment transport, erosion, accretion, flooding, habitat modification, land-cover change, and biogeochemical fluxes.

  18. Diagnostic tools in PEM fuel cell research: Part II. Physical/chemical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jinfeng; Zi Yuan, Xiao; Wang, Haijiang; Martin, Jonathan J.; Zhang, Jiujun [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council (Canada); Blanco, Mauricio [Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation, National Research Council (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2008-03-15

    To meet the power density, reliability and cost requirements that will enable a widespread use of fuel cells, many research activities focus on an understanding of the thermodynamics as well as the fluid mechanical and electrochemical processes within a fuel cell. To date, a wide range of experimental diagnostics is imperative not only to help a fundamental understanding of fuel cell dynamics but also to provide benchmark-quality data for modeling research. This paper reviews various tools for diagnosing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells and stacks, and attempts to incorporate the most recent technical advances in PEM fuel cell diagnosis. In Part I of the review we covered electrochemical techniques. In Part II, we review various physical/chemical methods and outline the principle, experimental implementation and data processing of each technique. Capabilities and weaknesses of these techniques are also discussed. (author)

  19. Optimizing the Structure of Tetracyanoplatinate (II): A Comparison of Relativistic Density Functional Theory Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The geometry of tetracyanoplatinate(II) (TCP) has been optimized with density functional theory (DFT) calculations in order to compare different computational strategies. Two approximate scalar relativistic methods, i.e. the scalar zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) and non...... is almost quantitatively reproduced in the ZORA and ECP calculations. In addition, the effect of the exchange-correlation functional and one-electron basis set was studied by employing the two generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals, BLYP and PBE, as well as their hybrid version B3LYP and PBE0...... in combination with both correlation consistent and Ahlrichs type basis sets. The platinum-carbon bond length (relativistic or non-relativistic) is approximately 1% shorter on using the PBE exchange-correlation functional compared to the BLYP functional but including exact exchange has no significant effect...

  20. Synchrotron Phase Tomography: An Emerging Imaging Method for Microvessel Detection in Engineered Bone of Craniofacial Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Giuliani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of large 3D constructs, such as certain craniofacial bone districts, is nowadays a critical challenge. Indeed, the amount of oxygen needed for cell survival is able to reach a maximum diffusion distance of ~150–200 μm from the original vascularization vector, often hampering the long-term survival of the regenerated tissues. Thus, the rapid growth of new blood vessels, delivering oxygen and nutrients also to the inner cells of the bone grafts, is mandatory for their long-term function in clinical practice. Unfortunately, significant progress in this direction is currently hindered by a lack of methods with which to visualize these processes in 3D and reliably quantify them. In this regard, a challenging method for simultaneous 3D imaging and analysis of microvascularization and bone microstructure has emerged in recent years: it is based on the use of synchrotron phase tomography. This technique is able to simultaneously identify multiple tissue features in a craniofacial bone site (e.g., the microvascular and the calcified tissue structure. Moreover, it overcomes the intrinsic limitations of both histology, achieving only a 2D characterization, and conventional tomographic approaches, poorly resolving the vascularization net in the case of an incomplete filling of the newly formed microvessels by contrast agents. Indeed, phase tomography, being based on phase differences among the scattered X-ray waves, is capable of discriminating tissues with similar absorption coefficients (like vessels and woven bone in defined experimental conditions. The approach reviewed here is based on the most recent experiences applied to bone regeneration in the craniofacial region.

  1. A simple non-destructive method for estimating aboveground biomass of emergent aquatic macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Samira Correia Nunes

    Full Text Available Abstract: Aim Non-destructive methods for estimating aquatic macrophytes biomass may be employed by using indirect measurements, especially in experimental studies, thus enabling the conservation of plant samples. It is possible to estimate macrophyte biomass by developing mathematical equations that relate the plants’ dry mass to their morphological variables. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between different morphological variables and biomass in order to determine which variable is easier to be obtained for the emergent aquatic macrophytes Crinum americanum and Spartina alterniflora. Methods We obtained the aboveground area and height of individuals of both species, with different sizes and distinct developmental stages. The samples were collected in the Itanhaém River Estuary (SP, Brazil. The plants were dried in a laboratory oven and weighed so as to obtain their dry mass. Simple linear regression analyses were applied to the morphological variables and the individual dry mass to obtain equations. Results For the both species, the relationship between area and biomass, and the relationship between individual height and biomass presented significant coefficients of determination (p < 0.0001. For the elaboration of models involving the individual height, we used only one morphological measure for each individual, whereas for models involving the individual area it was necessary to obtain more than one hundred morphological measurements per individual. Conclusions The morphological variables chosen are good attributes for estimating the aboveground biomass of C. americanum and S. alterniflora. Considering the models’ adjustment and the consumed time to obtain the measurements, we conclude that the individual height measurement is better for biomass estimation for both species.

  2. Team communication patterns in emergency resuscitation: a mixed methods qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Lisa Anne; Mastoras, George; Rahimpour, Mitra; Sohmer, Benjamin; Weitzman, Brian; Cwinn, A Adam; Hobin, Tara; Parush, Avi

    2017-12-01

    In order to enhance patient safety during resuscitation of critically ill patients, we need to optimize team communication and enhance team situational awareness but little is known about resuscitation team communication patterns. The objective of this study is to understand how teams communicate during resuscitation; specifically to assess for a shared mental model (organized understanding of a team's relationships) and information needs. We triangulated 3 methods to evaluate resuscitation team communication at a tertiary care academic trauma center: (1) interviews; (2) simulated resuscitation observations; (3) live resuscitation observations. We interviewed 18 resuscitation team members about shared mental models, roles and goals of team members and procedural expectations. We observed 30 simulated resuscitation video recordings and documented the timing, source and destination of communication and the information category. We observed 12 live resuscitations in the emergency department and recorded baseline characteristics of the type of resuscitations, nature of teams present and type and content of information exchanges. The data were analyzed using a qualitative communication analysis method. We found that resuscitation team members described a shared mental model. Respondents understood the roles and goals of each team member in order to provide rapid, efficient and life-saving care with an overall need for situational awareness. The information flow described in the interviews was reflected during the simulated and live resuscitations with the most responsible physician and charting nurse being central to team communication. We consolidated communicated information into six categories: (1) time; (2) patient status; (3) patient history; (4) interventions; (5) assistance and consultations; 6) team members present. Resuscitation team members expressed a shared mental model and prioritized situational awareness. Our findings support a need for cognitive aids to

  3. Assessment of the Extraction Methods for Monitoring Phthalate Emerging Contaminants in Groundwater and Tap Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotto, I.; Padilla, I. Y.; De Jesús, N. H.; Torres, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Trace organic contaminants such as phthalates, among other chemicals of emerging concerns, have not historically been considered as pollutants but are being detected in water, posing a potential risk to public health and the environment. One of the most common phthalates of particular concern is di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a plasticizer normally found in plastics and consumer products, including: cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, medical devices, food packages, water bottles, and wiring cables. DEHP has been associated with preterm birth, a major cause of neonatal mortality and health complications. This study aims at monitoring the presence and concentration of DEHP and other phthalates in groundwater and tap water systems in Puerto Rico, which has one of the highest rates of preterm birth in the U.S. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggests a liquid-liquid extraction method that uses methylene chloride as the preferred organic solvent for the extractions. This work presents modified EPA methods that reduce the volume of sample and solvent used, lower the time of analysis, increase productivity, and decrease hazards and waste. Distribution coefficient of DEHP between methylene chloride and water are estimated and related to sample extraction efficiency. Research results indicate that DEHP is in fact distributed between water and methylene chloride with a distribution coefficient average value of 1.24. The study concludes that the sample and solvent volumes have influence on the efficiency but have not an effect on the distribution coefficient. The tests show higher extraction efficiencies for lower DEHP concentrations and higher extraction volumes. Results from the water analysis show presence of DEHP in 55% of groundwater and 44% of tap water samples, indicating a potential exposure through water.

  4. IMPLEMENTATION OF ACTIVE TEACHING METHODS AND EMERGING TOPICS IN PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND REMOTE SENSING SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kosmatin Fras

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fast technological developments in photogrammetry and remote sensing areas demand quick and steady changes in the education programme and its realization. The university teachers and assistants are faced with ensuring the learning materials, data and software for practical lessons, as well as project proposals for student’s team work and bachelor or master thesis. In this paper the emerging topics that already have a considerable impact in the practice are treated mostly from the educational aspect. These relatively new topics that are considered in this paper are unmanned aerial systems for spatial data collection, terrestrial and aerial laser scanning, mobile mapping systems, and novelties in satellite remote sensing. The focus is given to practical implementation of these topics into the teaching and learning programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation at the University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, and experiences gained by the authors so far. Together with the technological advances, the teaching approaches must be modernized as well. Classical approaches of teaching, where a lecturer gives lecture ex cathedra and students are only listeners, are not effective enough. The didactics science of teaching has developed and proved in the practice many useful approaches that can better motivate students for more active learning. We can use different methods of team work like pro et contra debate, buzzing groups, press conference, moderated discussion etc. An experimental study on active teaching methods in the class of students of the Master programme of Geodesy and Geoinformation has been made and the results are presented. After using some new teaching methods in the class, the students were asked to answer two types of a questionnaire. First questionnaire was the standard form developed by Noel Entwistle, an educational psychologist who developed the Approaches to Studying Inventory (ASI for identifying deep and

  5. Transition of Care from the Emergency Department to the Outpatient Setting: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad S. Kessler

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The goal of this study was to characterize current practices in the transition of care between the emergency department and primary care setting, with an emphasis on the use of the electronic medical record (EMR. Methods: Using literature review and modified Delphi technique, we created and tested a pilot survey to evaluate for face and content validity. The final survey was then administered face-to-face at eight different clinical sites across the country. A total of 52 emergency physicians (EP and 49 primary care physicians (PCP were surveyed and analyzed. We performed quantitative analysis using chi-square test. Two independent coders performed a qualitative analysis, classifying answers by pre-defined themes (inter-rater reliability > 80%. Participants’ answers could cross several pre-defined themes within a given question. Results: EPs were more likely to prefer telephone communication compared with PCPs (30/52 [57.7%] vs. 3/49 [6.1%] P < 0.0001, whereas PCPs were more likely to prefer using the EMR for discharge communication compared with EPs (33/49 [67.4%] vs. 13/52 [25%] p < 0.0001. EPs were more likely to report not needing to communicate with a PCP when a patient had a benign condition (23/52 [44.2%] vs. 2/49 [4.1%] p < 0.0001, but were more likely to communicate if the patient required urgent follow-up prior to discharge from the ED (33/52 [63.5%] vs. 20/49 [40.8%] p = 0.029. When discussing barriers to effective communication, 51/98 (52% stated communication logistics, followed by 49/98 (50% who reported setting/environmental constraints and 32/98 (32% who stated EMR access was a significant barrier. Conclusion: Significant differences exist between EPs and PCPs in the transition of care process. EPs preferred telephone contact synchronous to the encounter whereas PCPs preferred using the EMR asynchronous to the encounter. Providers believe EP-to-PCP contact is important for improving patient care, but report varied

  6. Transition of Care from the Emergency Department to the Outpatient Setting: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Chad S.; Schwarz, Whitney W.; Schmitz, Gillian R.; Oh, Laura; Smith, Michael D.; Gross, Eric A.; House, Hans; Wadman, Michael C.; Lo, Bruce M.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to characterize current practices in the transition of care between the emergency department and primary care setting, with an emphasis on the use of the electronic medical record (EMR). Methods Using literature review and modified Delphi technique, we created and tested a pilot survey to evaluate for face and content validity. The final survey was then administered face-to-face at eight different clinical sites across the country. A total of 52 emergency physicians (EP) and 49 primary care physicians (PCP) were surveyed and analyzed. We performed quantitative analysis using chi-square test. Two independent coders performed a qualitative analysis, classifying answers by pre-defined themes (inter-rater reliability > 80%). Participants’ answers could cross several pre-defined themes within a given question. Results EPs were more likely to prefer telephone communication compared with PCPs (30/52 [57.7%] vs. 3/49 [6.1%] P < 0.0001), whereas PCPs were more likely to prefer using the EMR for discharge communication compared with EPs (33/49 [67.4%] vs. 13/52 [25%] p < 0.0001). EPs were more likely to report not needing to communicate with a PCP when a patient had a benign condition (23/52 [44.2%] vs. 2/49 [4.1%] p < 0.0001), but were more likely to communicate if the patient required urgent follow-up prior to discharge from the ED (33/52 [63.5%] vs. 20/49 [40.8%] p = 0.029). When discussing barriers to effective communication, 51/98 (52%) stated communication logistics, followed by 49/98 (50%) who reported setting/environmental constraints and 32/98 (32%) who stated EMR access was a significant barrier. Conclusion Significant differences exist between EPs and PCPs in the transition of care process. EPs preferred telephone contact synchronous to the encounter whereas PCPs preferred using the EMR asynchronous to the encounter. Providers believe EP-to-PCP contact is important for improving patient care, but report varied expectations

  7. Spectral methods in general relativity and large Randall-Sundrum II black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Cattoën, Céline; Page, Don N.; \\\\; Yaghoobpour-Tari, Shima

    2013-06-01

    Using a novel numerical spectral method, we have found solutions for large static Randall-Sundrum II (RSII) black holes by perturbing a numerical AdS5-CFT4 solution to the Einstein equation with a negative cosmological constant Λ that is asymptotically conformal to the Schwarzschild metric. We used a numerical spectral method independent of the Ricci-DeTurck-flow method used by Figueras, Lucietti, and Wiseman for a similar numerical solution. We have compared our black-hole solution to the one Figueras and Wiseman have derived by perturbing their numerical AdS5-CFT4 solution, showing that our solution agrees closely with theirs. We have obtained a closed-form approximation to the metric of the black hole on the brane. We have also deduced the new results that to first order in 1/(-ΛM2), the Hawking temperature and entropy of an RSII static black hole have the same values as the Schwarzschild metric with the same mass, but the horizon area is increased by about 4.7/(-Λ).

  8. Spectral methods in general relativity and large Randall-Sundrum II black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Cattoën, Céline; Page, Don N.; Yaghoobpour-Tari, Shima, E-mail: abdolrah@ualberta.ca, E-mail: celine.cattoen-gilbert@canterbury.ac.nz, E-mail: dpage@ualberta.ca, E-mail: yaghoobp@ualberta.ca [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

    2013-06-01

    Using a novel numerical spectral method, we have found solutions for large static Randall-Sundrum II (RSII) black holes by perturbing a numerical AdS{sub 5}-CFT{sub 4} solution to the Einstein equation with a negative cosmological constant Λ that is asymptotically conformal to the Schwarzschild metric. We used a numerical spectral method independent of the Ricci-DeTurck-flow method used by Figueras, Lucietti, and Wiseman for a similar numerical solution. We have compared our black-hole solution to the one Figueras and Wiseman have derived by perturbing their numerical AdS{sub 5}-CFT{sub 4} solution, showing that our solution agrees closely with theirs. We have obtained a closed-form approximation to the metric of the black hole on the brane. We have also deduced the new results that to first order in 1/(−ΛM{sup 2}), the Hawking temperature and entropy of an RSII static black hole have the same values as the Schwarzschild metric with the same mass, but the horizon area is increased by about 4.7/(−Λ)

  9. A HUBBLE DIAGRAM FROM TYPE II SUPERNOVAE BASED SOLELY ON PHOTOMETRY: THE PHOTOMETRIC COLOR METHOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Galbany, L.; Hamuy, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Kuncarayakti, H. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago (Chile); Anderson, J. P. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Casilla 19, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, M. M.; Campillay, A.; Castellón, S.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Stritzinger, M. D.; Contreras, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bolt, L. [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hgel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Burns, C. R. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Folatelli, G. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata, CONICET, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina); Freedman, W. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Krisciunas, K. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Krzeminski, W., E-mail: dthomas@das.uchile.cl [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2015-12-20

    We present a Hubble diagram of SNe II using corrected magnitudes derived only from photometry, with no input of spectral information. We use a data set from the Carnegie Supernovae Project I for which optical and near-infrared light curves were obtained. The apparent magnitude is corrected by two observables, one corresponding to the slope of the plateau in the V band and the second a color term. We obtain a dispersion of 0.44 mag using a combination of the (V − i) color and the r band and we are able to reduce the dispersion to 0.39 mag using our golden sample. A comparison of our photometric color method (PCM) with the standardized candle method (SCM) is also performed. The dispersion obtained for the SCM (which uses both photometric and spectroscopic information) is 0.29 mag, which compares with 0.43 mag from the PCM for the same SN sample. The construction of a photometric Hubble diagram is of high importance in the coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys, which will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will prohibit spectroscopic follow up in the vast majority of cases, and hence methods must be deployed which can proceed using solely photometric data.

  10. Impact of international humanitarian service-learning on emerging adult social competence: A mixed-methods evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Schvaneveldt

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results from a study into international humanitarian service-learning experiences on young adult volunteers. Specifically, the service-learning experiences of emerging adults who had served in orphanages in Latin America were assessed, in a pre- and post-test design, for their development in areas of social competency such as identity, self-efficacy, self-esteem and ethnocentric attitudes. A mixed-methods design using both qualitative and quantitative measures was used. Both qualitative and quantitative results identified significant and important impacts on the development of the social competencies of these emerging adults. In addition, several qualitative themes illustrated that longer term international service-learning experiences have a profound impact on the social competence of emerging adults. Keywords: International humanitarian service, service-learning, emerging adult competency

  11. A local control strategy for power systems in transient emergency state; Part II - implementation and test results by stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliyu, U.; El-Abiad, A.H.

    1982-11-01

    The functional design of a local control strategy considered suitable for bulk power system disturbed into transient emergency state was set forth in the companion paper. It utilized a particular control procedure based on an adaptively specified angle velocity threshold limit criteria. In order to consolidate the validity of the strategy, this paper describes its algorithmic implementation and discusses two extensive test results. The design philosophy and implementation of the proposed control framework are based on the hierachical control approach.

  12. Explaining transgression in respiratory rate observation methods in the emergency department: A classic grounded theory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flenady, Tracy; Dwyer, Trudy; Applegarth, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Abnormal respiratory rates are one of the first indicators of clinical deterioration in emergency department(ED) patients. Despite the importance of respiratory rate observations, this vital sign is often inaccurately recorded on ED observation charts, compromising patient safety. Concurrently, there is a paucity of research reporting why this phenomenon occurs. To develop a substantive theory explaining ED registered nurses' reasoning when they miss or misreport respiratory rate observations. This research project employed a classic grounded theory analysis of qualitative data. Seventy-nine registered nurses currently working in EDs within Australia. Data collected included detailed responses from individual interviews and open-ended responses from an online questionnaire. Classic grounded theory (CGT) research methods were utilised, therefore coding was central to the abstraction of data and its reintegration as theory. Constant comparison synonymous with CGT methods were employed to code data. This approach facilitated the identification of the main concern of the participants and aided in the generation of theory explaining how the participants processed this issue. The main concern identified is that ED registered nurses do not believe that collecting an accurate respiratory rate for ALL patients at EVERY round of observations is a requirement, and yet organizational requirements often dictate that a value for the respiratory rate be included each time vital signs are collected. The theory 'Rationalising Transgression', explains how participants continually resolve this problem. The study found that despite feeling professionally conflicted, nurses often erroneously record respiratory rate observations, and then rationalise this behaviour by employing strategies that adjust the significance of the organisational requirement. These strategies include; Compensating, when nurses believe they are compensating for errant behaviour by enhancing the patient's outcome

  13. Novel Emergency Medicine Curriculum Utilizing Self-Directed Learning and the Flipped Classroom Method: Obstetric and Gynecologic Emergencies Small Group Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian McGrath

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This curriculum, created and implemented at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, was primarily designed to educate our emergency medicine (EM residents (PGY1-3 and emergency medicine/internal medicine (EM/IM residents (PGY1-5 on core obstetrics and gynecology topics in EM. Additional audience members include medical students and faculty physicians. Introduction: In 2013, there were over 1 million emergency department visits in the United States which resulted in primary obstetric or gynecologic diagnoses.1 EM Residents must be proficient in the differential diagnosis and management of the wide variety of obstetric and gynecologic emergencies. To do this, we developed a flipped classroom curricular model, which consists of self-directed learning activities completed by learners, followed by small group discussions pertaining to the topic reviewed. The active learning fostered by this type of curriculum increases faculty and learner engagement and interaction time typically absent in traditional lecture-based formats.2-4 Studies have revealed that the application of knowledge through case studies, personal interaction with content experts, and integrated questions are effective learning strategies for EM residents.4-6 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center EM residency didactic curriculum recently transitioned to a “flipped classroom” approach.7-10 Our didactic curriculum is delivered over the course of 18 months; however, it could easily be adapted to other academic calendar cycles. The flipped classroom curriculum maximizes didactic time and resident engagement, fosters intellectual curiosity and active learning, and meets the needs of today’s learners. 3,6,11 Objectives: We aim to teach the presentation and management of obstetric and gynecologic emergencies through the creation of a flipped classroom design. This unique, innovative curriculum utilizes resources chosen by education faculty and resident

  14. Understanding discharge communication behaviours in a pediatric emergency care context: a mixed methods observation study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet A; Bishop, Andrea; Plint, Amy; MacPhee, Shannon; Zemek, Roger; Chorney, Jill; Jabbour, Mona; Porter, Stephen; Sawyer, Scott

    2017-04-17

    One of the most important transitions in the continuum of care for children is discharge to home. Optimal discharge communication between healthcare providers and caregivers (e.g., parents or other guardians) who present to the emergency department (ED) with their children is not well understood. The lack of policies and considerable variation in practice regarding discharge communication in pediatric EDs pose a quality and safety risk for children and their parents. The aim of this mixed methods study is to better understand the process and structure of discharge communication in a pediatric ED context to contribute to the design and development of discharge communication interventions. We will use surveys, administrative data and real-time video observation to characterize discharge communication for six common illness presentations in a pediatric ED: (1) asthma, (2) bronchiolitis, (3) abdominal pain, (4) fever, (5) diarrhea and vomiting, and (6) minor head injury. Participants will be recruited from one of two urban pediatric EDs in Canada. Video recordings will be analyzed using Observer XT. We will use logistic regression to identify potential demographic and visit characteristic cofounders and multivariate logistic regression to examine association between verbal and non-verbal behaviours and parent recall and comprehension. Video recording of discharge communication will provide an opportunity to capture important data such as temporality, sequence and non-verbal behaviours that might influence the communication process. Given the importance of better characterizing discharge communication to identify potential barriers and enablers, we anticipate that the findings from this study will contribute to the development of more effective discharge communication policies and interventions.

  15. The Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Study II: rationale, design and methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    March John S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents the rationale, design, and methods of the Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Treatment Study II (POTS II, which investigates two different cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT augmentation approaches in children and adolescents who have experienced a partial response to pharmacotherapy with a serotonin reuptake inhibitor for OCD. The two CBT approaches test a "single doctor" versus "dual doctor" model of service delivery. A specific goal was to develop and test an easily disseminated protocol whereby child psychiatrists would provide instructions in core CBT procedures recommended for pediatric OCD (e.g., hierarchy development, in vivo exposure homework during routine medical management of OCD (I-CBT. The conventional "dual doctor" CBT protocol consists of 14 visits over 12 weeks involving: (1 psychoeducation, (2, cognitive training, (3 mapping OCD, and (4 exposure with response prevention (EX/RP. I-CBT is a 7-session version of CBT that does not include imaginal exposure or therapist-assisted EX/RP. In this study, we compared 12 weeks of medication management (MM provided by a study psychiatrist (MM only with two types of CBT augmentation: (1 the dual doctor model (MM+CBT; and (2 the single doctor model (MM+I-CBT. The design balanced elements of an efficacy study (e.g., random assignment, independent ratings with effectiveness research aims (e.g., differences in specific SRI medications, dosages, treatment providers. The study is wrapping up recruitment of 140 youth ages 7–17 with a primary diagnosis of OCD. Independent evaluators (IEs rated participants at weeks 0,4,8, and 12 during acute treatment and at 3,6, and 12 month follow-up visits. Trial registration NCT00074815

  16. Application of improved topsis method to accident emergency decision-making at nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jin; Cai Qi; Zhang Fan; Chang Ling

    2009-01-01

    Given the complexity in multi-attribute decision-making on nuclear accident emergency, and by integrating subjective weight and impersonal weight of each evaluating index, a decision-making model for emergency plan at nuclear power stations is established with the application of improved TOPSIS model. The testing results indicated that the improved TOPSIS-based multi-attribute decision-making has a better assessment results. (authors)

  17. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  18. Optimal Continuous-Monitoring Design of Single-arm Phase II Trial Based on the Simulated Annealing Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Lee, J. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Simon’s two-stage design is commonly used in phase II single-arm clinical trials because of its simplicity and smaller sample size under the null hypothesis compared to the one-stage design. Some studies extend this design to accommodate more interim analyses (i.e., three-stage or four-stage designs). However, most of these studies, together with the original Simon’s two-stage design, are based on the exhaustive search method, which is difficult to extend to high-dimensional, general multi-stage designs. In this study, we propose a simulated annealing (SA)-based design to optimize the early stopping boundaries and minimize the expected sample size for multi-stage or continuous monitoring single-arm trials. We compare the results of the SA method, the decision-theoretic method, the predictive probability method, and the posterior probability method. The SA method can reach the smallest expected sample sizes in all scenarios under the constraints of the same type I and type II errors. The expected sample sizes from the SA method are generally 10–20% smaller than those from the posterior probability method or the predictive probability method, and are slightly smaller than those from the decision-theoretic method in almost all scenarios. The SA method offers an excellent alternative in designing phase II trials with continuous monitoring. PMID:23545075

  19. A facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we developed a facile, sensitive, and rapid spectrophotometric method for copper(II ion detection in aqueous media using polyethyleneimine. Polyethyleneimine is a cationic polymer that has no absorption in the wavelength range of 250–800 nm. When trace amounts of copper(II ion was added to the colorless polyethyleneimine solution, copper(II ion could react with the amino groups of the polyethyleneimine to form a dark blue cuprammonium complex whose absorption spectrum exhibited two absorption peaks at 275 and 630 nm, respectively. The effects of parameters such as polyethyleneimine concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and the most suitable medium for the reaction were investigated. A linear relationship (R2 = 0.9997 between absorbance and the concentration of copper(II ion was found at the maximum absorption peak of 275 nm in the concentration range of 2–400 μM. The detection limit for copper(II ion was 566 nM. The response of polyethyleneimine toward different metal ions was investigated, and polyethyleneimine displayed a high selectivity for the copper(II ion among the metal ions examined. This biocompatible and sensitive sensor may find applications in copper(II ion detection in environmental and biological processes.

  20. Drug-Intake Methods and Social Identity: The Use of Marijuana in Blunts among Southeast Asian Adolescents and Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soller, Brian; Lee, Juliet P.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines why Southeast Asian American adolescents and emerging adults in two urban settings prefer to use "blunts," or hollowed-out cigars filled with marijuana, over other methods of drug intake. Rationales for preferring blunts were both instrumental and social. Blunts allowed users to more easily share marijuana, the preferred drug…

  1. Evaluation of the effect of coal cleaning of fugitive elements. Part II. Analytical methods. Final report, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosshart, R.E.; Price, A.A.; Ford, C.T.

    1980-03-01

    This report contains the analytical and test methods which were used routinely at Bituminous Coal Research, Inc. during the project. The procedures contained herein should aid coal industry laboratories and others, including commercial laboratories, who might be required to determine trace elements in coal. Some of the procedures have been presented in previous BCR reports; however, this report includes additional procedures which are described in greater detail. Also presented are many as the more basic coal methods which have been in use at BCR for many years, or which have been adapted or refined from other standard reference sources for coal and water. The basis for choosing specific analytical procedures for trace elements in coal is somewhat complex. At BCR, atomic absorption was selected as the basic method in the development of these procedures. The choice was based on sensitivity, selectivity, accuracy, precision, practicability, and economy. Whenever possible, the methods developed had to be both adequate and amenable for use by coal industry laboratories by virtue of relative simplicity and cost. This is not to imply that the methods described are simple or inexpensive; however, atomic abosrption techniques do meet these criteria in relation to more complex and costly methods such as neutron activation, mass spectrometry, and x-ray fluorescence, some of which require highly specialized personnel as well as access to sophisticated nuclear and computational facilities. Many of the analytical procedures for trace elements in coal have been developed or adapted specifically for the BCR studies. Their presentation is the principal purpose of this report.

  2. Emergent emotion

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Elaine Finbarr

    2016-01-01

    I argue that emotion is an ontologically emergent and sui generis. I argue that emotion meets both of two individually necessary and jointly sufficient conditions for ontological emergence. These are, (i) that emotion necessarily has constituent parts to which it cannot be reduced, and (ii) that emotion has a causal effect on its constituent parts (i.e. emotion demonstrates downward causation).\\ud \\ud I argue that emotion is partly cognitive, partly constituted by feelings and partly perceptu...

  3. Lipid Based Formulations of Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS Class II Drugs: Strategy, Formulations, Methods and Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šoltýsová I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Active ingredients in pharmaceuticals differ by their physico-chemical properties and their bioavailability therefore varies. The most frequently used and most convenient way of administration of medicines is oral, however many drugs are little soluble in water. Thus they are not sufficiently effective and suitable for such administration. For this reason a system of lipid based formulations (LBF was developed. Series of formulations were prepared and tested in water and biorelevant media. On the basis of selection criteria, there were selected formulations with the best emulsification potential, good dispersion in the environment and physical stability. Samples of structurally different drugs included in the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS were obtained, namely Griseofulvin, Glibenclamide, Carbamazepine, Haloperidol, Itraconazol, Triclosan, Praziquantel and Rifaximin, for testing of maximal saturation in formulations prepared from commercially available excipients. Methods were developed for preparation of formulations, observation of emulsification and its description, determination of maximum solubility of drug samples in the respective formulation and subsequent analysis. Saturation of formulations with drugs showed that formulations 80 % XA and 20 % Xh, 35 % XF and 65 % Xh were best able to dissolve the drugs which supports the hypothesis that it is desirable to identify limited series of formulations which could be generally applied for this purpose.

  4. Efeito do armazenamento da calda na eficácia de herbicidas aplicados em pré-emergência (parte II Effect of storage time of diluted herbicides mix on their effectiveness: pre-emergency herbicides (part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton H. Ramos

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Diferentes tipos de pulverizadores são utilizados para a aplicação de herbicidas sendo que, em pequenas propriedades, é comum, por questões econômicas, a adaptação de barras ou pistolas manuais a tanques de grande capacidade. Por outro lado, em grandes propriedades, é crescente a tendência da substituição do sistema tradicional de reabastecimento dos pulverizadores pelo sistema de calda pronta. Em ambos os casos, pode haver a necessidade de um armazenamento prolongado nos tanques ou no veículo reabastecedor, principalmente na ocorrência de períodos prolongados de chuva. Torna-se, portanto, importante a determinação de períodos de tempo pelos quais as caldas de herbicidas possam ser armazenadas, sem que haja prejuízo à eficácia dos mesmos. O presente trabalho estudou os efeitos do tempo de armazenamento da calda sobre a eficácia de herbicidas aplicados em pré-emergência. O experimento foi instalado no delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso, com três repetições, no ano agrícola 91/92, em área da Fazenda Experimental da Faculdade de Ciências Agrárias e Veterinárias da UNESP, município de Jaboticabal, Estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Avaliou-se as formulações comerciais de ametryne e diuron com 00, 05, 10, 15, 20, 25 e 30 dias de armazenamento da calda, além de uma testemunha, onde não se efetuou a aplicação de herbicidas. Foram realizadas contagens do número de emergências e altura, por espécie, das plantas daninhas em 1,2 m2 por parcela, aos 30, 45 e 59 dias após a aplicação e uma avaliação visual do controle geral por parcela aos 95 dias após a aplicação. Os resultados obtidos mostram que nenhum dos períodos de armazenamento testados interferiu significativamente na eficiência dos herbicidas, independente do produto utilizado (teste de F a 5%. Portanto, conclui-se que as caldas dos herbicidas testados puderam ser utilizadas normalmente, quando armazenadas por até 30 dias.Different types of

  5. Tests of two methods for identifying founder effects in metapopulations reveal substantial type II error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, R Graham; Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M

    2013-03-01

    Genetic analysis has been promoted as a way to reconstruct recent historical dynamics ("historical demography") by screening for signatures of events, such as bottlenecks, that disrupt equilibrium patterns of variation. Such analyses might also identify "metapopulation" processes like extinction and recolonization or source-sink dynamics, but this potential remains largely unrealized. Here we use simulations to test the ability of two currently used strategies to distinguish between a set of interconnected subpopulations (demes) that have undergone bottlenecks or extinction and recolonization events (metapopulation dynamics) from a set of static demes. The first strategy, decomposed pairwise regression, provides a holistic test for heterogeneity among demes in their patterns of isolation-by-distance. This method suffered from a type II error rate of 59-100 %, depending on parameter conditions. The second strategy tests for deviations from mutation-drift equilibrium on a deme-by-deme basis to identify sites likely to have experienced recent bottlenecks or founder effects. Although bottleneck tests have good statistical power for single populations with recent population declines, their validity in structured populations has been called into question, and they have not been tested in a metapopulation context with immigration (or colonization) and population recovery. Our simulations of hypothetical metapopulations show that population recovery can rapidly eliminate the statistical signature of a bottleneck, and that moderate levels of gene flow can generate a false signal of recent population growth for demes in equilibrium. Although we did not cover all possible metapopulation scenarios, the performance of the tests was disappointing. Our results indicate that these methods might often fail to identify population bottlenecks and founder effects if population recovery and/or gene flow are influential demographic features of the study system.

  6. An adaptive finite element method for computing emergency manoeuvres of ground vehicles in complex driving scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanarachos, S.; Alirezaei, M.

    2015-01-01

    In emergency cases a vehicle has to avoid colliding with one or more obstacles, stay within road boundaries, satisfy acceleration and jerk limits, fulfil stability requirements and respect vehicle system dynamics limitations. The real time solution of such a problem is difficult and as a result

  7. Critical Emergency Medicine Procedural Skills: A Comparative Study of Methods for Teaching and Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Dane M.; And Others

    Three critical procedural skills in emergency medicine were evaluated using three assessment modalities--written, computer, and animal model. The effects of computer practice and previous procedure experience on skill competence were also examined in an experimental sequential assessment design. Subjects were six medical students, six residents,…

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A MOLECULAR METHOD TO IDENTIFY THE EMERGING PATHOGEN HEPATITIS E IN WATER SAMPLES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is an emerging pathogen that causes significant illness in the developing world. Like the hepatitis A virus, it is transmitted via the fecal-oral route and can cause short-term, acute hepatitis. In addition, hepatitis E has been found to cause a signific...

  9. A harmonised European framework for method validation to support research on emerging pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwesig, D.; Borchers, U.; Chancerelle, L.; Dulio, V.; Eriksson, U.; Farré, M.; Goksoyr, A.; Lamoree, M.H.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Lepom, P.; Leverett, D.; O'Neill, A.; Robinson, R.; Silharova, K.; Slobodnik, J.; Tolgyessy, P.; Tutundjian, R.; Wegener, J.W.M.; Westwood, A.

    2011-01-01

    Any investigation of environmental processes related to chemical substances or their effects depends on reliable, comparable analytical data. This also holds true for the impact of climate change on occurrence, distribution and effects of emerging pollutants, with respect to which there is

  10. The Semiconductor Industry and Emerging Technologies: A Study Using a Modified Delphi Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Edgar A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to determine what leaders in the semiconductor industry thought the future of computing would look like and what emerging materials showed the most promise to overcome the current theoretical limit of 10 nanometers for silicon dioxide. The researcher used a modified Delphi technique in two…

  11. Multilocus Sequence Typing Methods for the Emerging Campylobacter Species C. hyointestinalis, C. lanienae, C. sputorum, C. concisus, and C. curvus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William G.; Chapman, Mary H.; Yee, Emma; On, Stephen L. W.; McNulty, Desmond K.; Lastovica, Albert J.; Carroll, Anne M.; McNamara, Eleanor B.; Duffy, Geraldine; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) systems have been reported previously for multiple food- and food animal-associated Campylobacter species (e.g., C. jejuni, C. coli, C. lari, and C. fetus) to both differentiate strains and identify clonal lineages. These MLST methods focused primarily on campylobacters of human clinical (e.g., C. jejuni) or veterinary (e.g., C. fetus) relevance. However, other, emerging, Campylobacter species have been isolated increasingly from environmental, food animal, or human clinical samples. We describe herein four MLST methods for five emerging Campylobacter species: C. hyointestinalis, C. lanienae, C. sputorum, C. concisus, and C. curvus. The concisus/curvus method uses the loci aspA, atpA, glnA, gltA, glyA, ilvD, and pgm, whereas the other methods use the seven loci defined for C. jejuni (i.e., aspA, atpA, glnA, gltA, glyA, pgm, and tkt). Multiple food animal and human clinical C. hyointestinalis (n = 48), C. lanienae (n = 34), and C. sputorum (n = 24) isolates were typed, along with 86 human clinical C. concisus and C. curvus isolates. A large number of sequence types were identified using all four MLST methods. Additionally, these methods speciated unequivocally isolates that had been typed ambiguously using other molecular-based speciation methods, such as 16S rDNA sequencing. Finally, the design of degenerate primer pairs for some methods permitted the typing of related species; for example, the C. hyointestinalis primer pairs could be used to type C. fetus strains. Therefore, these novel Campylobacter MLST methods will prove useful in differentiating strains of multiple, emerging Campylobacter species. PMID:22919636

  12. An Illustration of New Methods in Machine Condition Monitoring, Part II: Adaptive outlier detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniadou, I.; Worden, K.; Marchesiello, S.; Mba, C.; Garibaldi, L.

    2017-05-01

    There have been many recent developments in the application of data-based methods to machine condition monitoring. A powerful methodology based on machine learning has emerged, where diagnostics are based on a two-step procedure: extraction of damage-sensitive features, followed by unsupervised learning (novelty detection) or supervised learning (classification). The objective of the current pair of papers is simply to illustrate one state-of-the-art procedure for each step, using synthetic data representative of reality in terms of size and complexity. The second paper in the pair will deal with novelty detection. Although there has been considerable progress in the use of outlier analysis for novelty detection, most of the papers produced so far have suffered from the fact that simple algorithms break down if multiple outliers are present or if damage is already present in a training set. The objective of the current paper is to illustrate the use of phase-space thresholding; an algorithm which has the ability to detect multiple outliers inclusively in a data set.

  13. Feasibility Studies of the Two Filters Method in TJ-II for Electron Temperature Measurements in High Density Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiao, D.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Varandas, C.

    2009-01-01

    The TJ-II plasma soft X-ray emission was studied in order to establish an adequate setup for an electron temperature diagnostic suitable for high density, with spatial and temporal resolutions, based on the two-filters method. The preliminary experimental results reported were obtained with two diagnostics (an X-ray PHA based on a Ge detector and a tomography system) already installed in TJ-II stellarator. These results lead to the conclusion that the two-filters method was a suitable option for an electron temperature diagnostic for high-density plasmas in TJ-II. We present the design and fi rst results obtained with a prototype for the measurement of electron temperature in TJ-II plasmas heated with energetic neutral beams. This system consists in two AXUV20A detectors which measure the soft X-ray plasma emissivity trough beryllium filters of different thickness. From the two-filters technique it is possible to estimate the electron temperature. The analyses carried out allowed concluding which filter thicknesses are most suited for TJ-II plasmas, and enhanced the need of a computer code to simulate signals and plasma compositions. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. SN 2016jhj at redshift 0.34: extending the Type II supernova Hubble diagram using the standard candle method

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; Galbany, L.; Filippenko, A. V.; González-Gaitán, S.; Yasuda, N.; Maeda, K.; Tanaka, M.; Morokuma, T.; Moriya, T. J.; Tominaga, N.; Nomoto, K.; Komiyama, Y.; Anderson, J. P.; Brink, T. G.; Carlberg, R. G.; Folatelli, G.; Hamuy, M.; Pignata, G.; Zheng, W.

    2017-12-01

    Although Type Ia supernova cosmology has now reached a mature state, it is important to develop as many independent methods as possible to understand the true nature of dark energy. Recent studies have shown that Type II supernovae (SNe II) offer such a path and could be used as alternative distance indicators. However, the majority of these studies were unable to extend the Hubble diagram above redshift z = 0.3 because of observational limitations. Here, we show that we are now ready to move beyond low redshifts and attempt high-redshift (z ≳ 0.3) SN II cosmology as a result of new-generation deep surveys such as the Subaru/Hyper Suprime-Cam survey. Applying the 'standard candle method' to SN 2016jhj (z = 0.3398 ± 0.0002; discovered by HSC) together with a low-redshift sample, we are able to construct the highest-redshift SN II Hubble diagram to date with an observed dispersion of 0.27 mag (i.e. 12-13 per cent in distance). This work demonstrates the bright future of SN II cosmology in the coming era of large, wide-field surveys like that of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  15. Feasibility Studies of the Two Filters Method in TJ-II for Electron Temperature Measurements in High Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiao, D.; Medina, F.; Ochando, M.; Varandas, C.

    2009-07-01

    The TJ-II plasma soft X-ray emission was studied in order to establish an adequate setup for an electron temperature diagnostic suitable for high density, with spatial and temporal resolutions, based on the two-filters method. The preliminary experimental results reported were obtained with two diagnostics (an X-ray PHA based on a Ge detector and a tomography system) already installed in TJ-II stellarator. These results lead to the conclusion that the two-filters method was a suitable option for an electron temperature diagnostic for high-density plasmas in TJ-II. We present the design and fi rst results obtained with a prototype for the measurement of electron temperature in TJ-II plasmas heated with energetic neutral beams. This system consists in two AXUV20A detectors which measure the soft X-ray plasma emissivity trough beryllium filters of different thickness. From the two-filters technique it is possible to estimate the electron temperature. The analyses carried out allowed concluding which filter thicknesses are most suited for TJ-II plasmas, and enhanced the need of a computer code to simulate signals and plasma compositions. (Author) 7 refs.

  16. MIGRATION AND GROWTH OF PROTOPLANETARY EMBRYOS. II. EMERGENCE OF PROTO-GAS-GIANT CORES VERSUS SUPER EARTH PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Beibei [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Xiaojia [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Lin, Douglas N. C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Aarseth, Sverre J., E-mail: bbliu1208@gmail.com [Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge University, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 15%-20% of solar type stars contain one or more gas giant planets. According to the core-accretion scenario, the acquisition of their gaseous envelope must be preceded by the formation of super-critical cores with masses 10 times or larger than that of the Earth. It is natural to link the formation probability of gas giant planets with the supply of gases and solids in their natal disks. However, a much richer population of super Earths suggests that (1) there is no shortage of planetary building block material, (2) a gas giant's growth barrier is probably associated with whether it can merge into super-critical cores, and (3) super Earths are probably failed cores that did not attain sufficient mass to initiate efficient accretion of gas before it is severely depleted. Here we construct a model based on the hypothesis that protoplanetary embryos migrated extensively before they were assembled into bona fide planets. We construct a Hermite-Embryo code based on a unified viscous-irradiation disk model and a prescription for the embryo-disk tidal interaction. This code is used to simulate the convergent migration of embryos, and their close encounters and coagulation. Around the progenitors of solar-type stars, the progenitor super-critical-mass cores of gas giant planets primarily form in protostellar disks with relatively high (≳ 10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) mass accretion rates, whereas systems of super Earths (failed cores) are more likely to emerge out of natal disks with modest mass accretion rates, due to the mean motion resonance barrier and retention efficiency.

  17. Rapid assessment of health needs in mass emergencies: review of current concepts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha-Sapir, D

    1991-01-01

    The increase in the number of natural disasters and their impact on population is of growing concern to countries at risk and agencies involved in health and humanitarian action. The numbers of persons killed or disabled as a result of earthquakes, cyclones, floods and famines have reached record levels in the last decade. Population density, rampant urbanization and climatic changes have brought about risk patterns that are exposing larger and larger sections of populations in developing countries to life-threatening natural disasters. Despite substantial spending on emergency relief, the approaches to relief remain largely ad hoc and amateurish, resulting generally in inappropriate and/or delayed action. In recent years, mass emergencies of the kind experienced in Bangladesh or the Sahelian countries have highlighted the importance of rapid assessment of health needs for better allocation of resources and relief management. As a result, the development of techniques for rapid assessment of health needs has been identified as a priority for effective emergency action. This article sketches the health context of disasters in terms of mortality and morbidity patterns; it describes initial assessment techniques currently used and their methodological biases and constraints; it also discusses assessment needs which vary between different types of disasters and the time frame within which assessments are undertaken. Earthquakes, cyclones, famines, epidemics or refugees all have specific risk profiles and emergency conditions which differ for each situation. Vulnerability to mortality changes according to age and occupation, for earthquakes and famines. These risk factors then have significant implications for the design of rapid assessment protocols and checklists. Experiences from the field in rapid survey techniques and estimation of death rates are discussed, with emphasis on the need for a reliable denominator even for the roughest assessment. Finally, the

  18. Computational Methods for Audio-Visual Analysis of Emergent Leadership in Teams

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchez-Cortes, Dairazalia; Gatica-Perez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Face-to-face interactions are part of everyday life, ranging from family to working in teams and to global communities. Social psychologists have long studied these interactions with the aim of understanding behavior, motivations, and emergence of interaction patterns. An organization is environment rich in daily interactions including structured periodic meetings, planning, brainstorming, negotiations, decision-making and informal gatherings and leaders play a key role in many of them. Leade...

  19. A method for using unmanned aerial vehicles for emergency investigation of single geo-hazards and sample applications of this method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haifeng; Long, Jingjing; Yi, Wu; Yi, Qinglin; Zhang, Guodong; Lei, Bangjun

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have become widely used in emergency investigations of major natural hazards over large areas; however, UAVs are less commonly employed to investigate single geo-hazards. Based on a number of successful investigations in the Three Gorges Reservoir area, China, a complete UAV-based method for performing emergency investigations of single geo-hazards is described. First, a customized UAV system that consists of a multi-rotor UAV subsystem, an aerial photography subsystem, a ground control subsystem and a ground surveillance subsystem is described in detail. The implementation process, which includes four steps, i.e., indoor preparation, site investigation, on-site fast processing and application, and indoor comprehensive processing and application, is then elaborated, and two investigation schemes, automatic and manual, that are used in the site investigation step are put forward. Moreover, some key techniques and methods - e.g., the layout and measurement of ground control points (GCPs), route planning, flight control and image collection, and the Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry processing - are explained. Finally, three applications are given. Experience has shown that using UAVs for emergency investigation of single geo-hazards greatly reduces the time, intensity and risks associated with on-site work and provides valuable, high-accuracy, high-resolution information that supports emergency responses.

  20. Method of power self-regulation of CFBR-II reactor based on DSP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Zhongxiong; Zhou Wenxiang

    2007-01-01

    To the control system of Power Self-regulation of CFBR-II Reactor, a new digital control scheme based on DSP has been brought forward. The TMS320F2812 DSP chip is adopted as the core controller to realize Power self-regulation of CFBR-II Reactor. In this paper, the successful program of DSP control system is introduced in both hardware and software technology in detail. (authors)

  1. An alternative method to measure the likelihood of a financial crisis in an emerging market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özlale, Ümit; Metin-Özcan, Kıvılcım

    2007-07-01

    This paper utilizes an early warning system in order to measure the likelihood of a financial crisis in an emerging market economy. We introduce a methodology, where we can both obtain a likelihood series and analyze the time-varying effects of several macroeconomic variables on this likelihood. Since the issue is analyzed in a non-linear state space framework, the extended Kalman filter emerges as the optimal estimation algorithm. Taking the Turkish economy as our laboratory, the results indicate that both the derived likelihood measure and the estimated time-varying parameters are meaningful and can successfully explain the path that the Turkish economy had followed between 2000 and 2006. The estimated parameters also suggest that overvalued domestic currency, current account deficit and the increase in the default risk increase the likelihood of having an economic crisis in the economy. Overall, the findings in this paper suggest that the estimation methodology introduced in this paper can also be applied to other emerging market economies as well.

  2. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Reverté

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs.

  3. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  4. Evaluation of the Emergency Response Command Center. Development of a method for evaluating the performance of the ERCC during exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groth, M.

    1997-02-01

    The report describes the development of a structured method for evaluation and analysis of staff performance in the Emergency Response Command Centre (ERCC) during exercises. A comprehensive literature search including current research and theoretical bases in the area of group dynamics has been carried out. To supplement this, ERCC activities during an emergency exercise were observed and responsible staff individuals and others involved were interviewed. From this material, two evaluation instruments were constructed: An Evaluation form for the function of ERCC, which addresses: Activation, information handling, teamwork and overall critique of the exercise; and an Evaluation form for responsible personnel in ERCC, which addresses: Activation, procedures-checklists etc, information handling, teamwork, personnel qualifications, and overall critique of the exercise. The method has been tested in two actual exercises at Ringhals NPP and has been found to effectively fulfill its purpose. 7 refs

  5. Students benefit from developing their own emergency medicine OSCE stations: a comparative study using the matched-pair method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinke, Wolfgang; Rotzoll, Daisy; Hempel, Gunther; Zupanic, Michaela; Stumpp, Patrick; Kaisers, Udo X; Fischer, Martin R

    2013-10-07

    Students can improve the learning process by developing their own multiple choice questions. If a similar effect occurred when creating OSCE (objective structured clinical examination) stations by themselves it could be beneficial to involve them in the development of OSCE stations. This study investigates the effect of students developing emergency medicine OSCE stations on their test performance. In the 2011/12 winter semester, an emergency medicine OSCE was held for the first time at the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Leipzig. When preparing for the OSCE, 13 students (the intervention group) developed and tested emergency medicine examination stations as a learning experience. Their subsequent OSCE performance was compared to that of 13 other students (the control group), who were parallelized in terms of age, gender, semester and level of previous knowledge using the matched-pair method. In addition, both groups were compared to 20 students who tested the OSCE prior to regular emergency medicine training (test OSCE group). There were no differences between the three groups regarding age (24.3 ± 2.6; 24.2 ± 3.4 and 24 ± 2.3 years) or previous knowledge (29.3 ± 3.4; 29.3 ± 3.2 and 28.9 ± 4.7 points in the multiple choice [MC] exam in emergency medicine). Merely the gender distribution differed (8 female and 5 male students in the intervention and control group vs. 3 males and 17 females in the test OSCE group).In the exam OSCE, participants in the intervention group scored 233.4 ± 6.3 points (mean ± SD) compared to 223.8 ± 9.2 points (p OSCE group scored 223.2 ± 13.4 points. Students who actively develop OSCE stations when preparing for an emergency medicine OSCE achieve better exam results.

  6. The repeatability of three diagnostic methods (visual using ICDAS II, laser fluorescence, and radiographic) for early caries detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmasari, S.; Lestari, W.; Ko, B. B.; Noh, Z.; Asmail, N.; Yaacob, N.

    2017-08-01

    Newly introduced ICDAS II as a visual method, laser fluorescence as another technique that have ability to quantify early mineral loss of tooth structure and intra oral radiograph, are methods can be used in the clinic. To provide standardization for comprehensive caries management at an early stage, all methods supposed to be tested between users. The objective of this research is to evaluate the repeatability of each system. It is a comparative cross sectional study using 100 extracted permanent teeth without obvious cavitation (premolar & molar) that were collected and stored in thymol solution. The teeth were embedded on the wax block and labeled with numbers. All 5 surfaces were examined by 5 examiners using visual (ICDAS II), laser fluorescence (LF) and radiographic examination. The data were then analyzed to measure intra and inter examiner repeatability using Cronbach’s alpha and inter-item correlation matrix. Intra-examiner repeatability for all examiners was >0.7. Chronbach’s a value for inter-examiner repeatability for ICDAS II was >0.8 on 3 surfaces except on buccal and lingual. LF exhibit repeatability of >0.8 on all surfaces. Radiograph shows a low value of inter examiner repeatability (caries detection in daily clinical basis. Laser fluorescence exhibits the highest repeatability while the radiograph showed weak inter-examiner repeatability. Treatment decisions of ICDAS II propose more preventive treatment for early caries lesions compared to laser fluorescence.

  7. The relationship between intention to leave the hospital and coping methods of emergency nurses after workplace violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, In-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2018-04-01

    To identify the relationship between emergency nurses' intention to leave the hospital and their coping methods following workplace violence. Emergency departments report a high prevalence of workplace violence, with nurses being at particular risk of violence from patients and patients' relatives. Violence negatively influences nurses' personal and professional lives and increases their turnover. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive survey study. Participants were nurses (n = 214) with over one year of experience of working in an emergency department. We measured workplace violence, coping after workplace violence experiences and job satisfaction using scales validated through a preliminary survey. Questionnaires were distributed to all nurses who signed informed consent forms. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the relationships between nurses' intention to leave the hospital and their coping methods after workplace violence. Verbal abuse was the most frequent violence experience and more often originated from patients' relatives than from patients. Of the nurses who experienced violence, 61.0% considered leaving the hospital. As for coping, nurses who employed problem-focused coping most frequently sought to identify the problems that cause violence, while nurses who employed emotion-focused coping primarily attempted to endure the situation. The multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that female sex, emotion-focused coping and job satisfaction were significantly related to emergency nurses' intention to leave. Emotion-focused coping seems to have a stronger effect on intention to leave after experiencing violence than does job satisfaction. Nurse managers should begin providing emergency nurses with useful information to guide their management of violence experiences. Nurse managers should also encourage nurses to report violent experiences to the administrative department rather than resorting to emotion-focused coping

  8. Analytical method for the evaluation of the outdoor air contamination by emerging pollutants using tree leaves as bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Pedro José; Martín, Julia; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an analytical method, based on sonication-assisted extraction, clean-up by dispersive solid-phase extraction and determination by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of 15 emerging pollutants in leaves from four ornamental tree species. Target compounds include perfluorinated organic compounds, plasticizers, surfactants, brominated flame retardant, and preservatives. The method was optimized using Box-Behnken statistical experimental design with response surface methodology and validated in terms of recovery, accuracy, precision, and method detection and quantification limits. Quantification of target compounds was carried out using matrix-matched calibration curves. The highest recoveries were achieved for the perfluorinated organic compounds (mean values up to 87%) and preservatives (up to 88%). The lowest recoveries were achieved for plasticizers (51%) and brominated flame retardant (63%). Method detection and quantification limits were in the ranges 0.01-0.09 ng/g dry matter (dm) and 0.02-0.30 ng/g dm, respectively, for most of the target compounds. The method was successfully applied to the determination of the target compounds on leaves from four tree species used as urban ornamental trees (Citrus aurantium, Celtis australis, Platanus hispanica, and Jacaranda mimosifolia). Graphical abstract Analytical method for the biomonitorization of emerging pollutants in outdoor air.

  9. Streptococcus suis: a re-emerging pathogen associated with occupational exposure to pigs or pork products. Part II - Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Zając, Violetta; Sroka, Jacek; Wasiński, Bernard; Cisak, Ewa; Sawczyn, Anna; Kloc, Anna; Wójcik-Fatla, Angelina

    2018-03-14

    Streptococcus suis is a re-emerging zoonotic pathogen that may cause severe disease, mostly meningitis, in pigs and in humans having occupational contact with pigs and pork, such as farmers, slaughterhose workers and butchers. The first stage of the pathogenic process, similar in pigs and humans, is adherence to and colonisation of mucosal and/or epithelial surface(s) of the host. The second stage is invasion into deeper tissue and extracellular translocation of bacterium in the bloodstream, either free in circulation or attached to the surface of monocytes. If S. suis present in blood fails to cause fatal septicaemia, it is able to progress into the third stage comprising penetration into host's organs, mostly by crossing the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier to gain access to the central nervous system (CNS) and cause meningitis. The fourth stage is inflammation that plays a key role in the pathogen esis of both systemic and CNS infections caused by S. suis. The pathogen may induce the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines that cause septic shock and/or the recruitment and activation of different leukocyte populations, causing acute inflammation of the CNS. Streptococcus suis can also evoke - through activation of microglial cells, astrocytes and possibly other cell types - a fulminant inflammatory reaction of the brain which leads to intracranial complications, including brain oedema, increased intracranial pressure, cerebrovascular insults, and deafness, as a result of cochlear sepsis. In all stages of the pathogenic process, S. suis interacts with many types of immunocompetent host's cells, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mononuclear macrophages, lymphocytes, dendritic cells and microglia, using a range of versatile virulence factors for evasion of the innate and adaptive immune defence of the host, and for overcoming environmental stress. It is estimated that S. suis produces more than 100 different virulence

  10. Streptococcus suis: a re-emerging pathogen associated with occupational exposure to pigs or pork products. Part II – Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus suis is a re-emerging zoonotic pathogen that may cause severe disease, mostly meningitis, in pigs and in humans having occupational contact with pigs and pork, such as farmers, slaughterhose workers and butchers. The first stage of the pathogenic process, similar in pigs and humans, is adherence to and colonisation of mucosal and/or epithelial surface(s of the host. The second stage is invasion into deeper tissue and extracellular translocation of bacterium in the bloodstream, either free in circulation or attached to the surface of monocytes. If S. suis present in blood fails to cause fatal septicaemia, it is able to progress into the third stage comprising penetration into host’s organs, mostly by crossing the blood-brain barrier and/or blood–cerebrospinal fluid barrier to gain access to the central nervous system (CNS and cause meningitis. The fourth stage is inflammation that plays a key role in the pathogen esis of both systemic and CNS infections caused by S. suis . The pathogen may induce the overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines that cause septic shock and/or the recruitment and activation of different leukocyte populations, causing acute inflammation of the CNS. Streptococcus suis can also evoke – through activation of microglial cells, astrocytes and possibly other cell types – a fulminant inflammatory reaction of the brain which leads to intracranial complications, including brain oedema, increased intracranial pressure, cerebrovascular insults, and deafness, as a result of cochlear sepsis. In all stages of the pathogenic process, S. suis interacts with many types of immunocompetent host’s cells, such as polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mononuclear macrophages, lymphocytes, dendritic cells and microglia, using a range of versatile virulence factors for evasion of the innate and adaptive immune defence of the host, and for overcoming environmental stress. It is estimated that S. suis produces more than

  11. Mixed Methods in Emerging Academic Subdisciplines: The Case of Sport Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Roest, Jan-Willem; Spaaij, Ramón; van Bottenburg, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the prevalence and characteristics of mixed methods research in the relatively new subdiscipline of sport management. A mixed methods study is undertaken to evaluate the epistemological/philosophical, methodological, and technical levels of mixed methods design in sport management research. The results indicate that mixed…

  12. Mixed Methods in Emerging Academic Subdisciplines : The Case of Sport Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roest, Jan Willem; Spaaij, Ramón; van Bottenburg, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the prevalence and characteristics of mixed methods research in the relatively new subdiscipline of sport management. A mixed methods study is undertaken to evaluate the epistemological/philosophical, methodological, and technical levels of mixed methods design in sport

  13. Mixed methods in emerging academic subdisciplines: the case of sport management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Roest, J.-W.; Spaaij, R.; van Bottenburg, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the prevalence and characteristics of mixed methods research in the relatively new subdiscipline of sport management. A mixed methods study is undertaken to evaluate the epistemological/philosophical, methodological, and technical levels of mixed methods design in sport

  14. Application of GRA method, dynamic analysis and fuzzy set theory in evaluation and selection of emergency treatment technology for large scale phenol spill incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Yu, Lean; Li, Lian

    2017-05-01

    Select an appropriate technology in an emergency response is a very important issue with various kinds of chemical contingency spills frequently taking place. Due to the complexity, fuzziness and uncertainties of the chemical contingency spills, the theory of GRA method, dynamic analysis combined with fuzzy set theory will be appropriately applied to selection and evaluation of emergency treatment technology. Finally, a emergency phenol spill accidence occurred in highway is provided to illustrate the applicability and feasibility of the proposed methods.

  15. Emergent sandbar dynamics in the lower Platte River in eastern Nebraska: methods and results of pilot study, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jason S.; Schultze, Devin M.; Zelt, Ronald B.

    2013-01-01

    The lower Platte River corridor provides important habitats for two State- and federally listed bird species: the interior least tern (terns; Sternula antillarum athallassos) and the piping plover (plovers; Charadrius melodus). However, many of the natural morphological and hydrological characteristics of the Platte River have been altered substantially by water development, channelization, hydropower operations, and invasive vegetation encroachment, which have decreased the abundance of high-quality nesting and foraging habitat for terns and plovers. The lower Platte River (LPR), defined as 103 miles (mi) of the Platte River between its confluence with the Loup River and its confluence with the Missouri River, has narrowed since the late-19th and early-20th centuries, yet it partially retains many geomorphologic and hydrologic characteristics important to terns and plovers. These birds nest on the sandbars in the river and along shorelines at sand- and gravel-pit lakes in the adjacent valley. The need to balance continued economic, infrastructure, and resource development with the conservation of important physical and aquatic habitat resources requires increased understanding of the physical and biological dynamics of the lower Platte River. Spatially and temporally rich datasets for emergent sandbar habitats are necessary to quantify emergent sandbar dynamics relative to hypothesized controls and stressors. In cooperation with the Lower Platte South Natural Resources District, the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a pilot study of emergent sandbar dynamics along a 22-mi segment of the LPR downstream from its confluence with Salt Creek, near Ashland, Nebraska. The purposes of the study were to: (1) develop methods to rapidly assess sandbar geometries and locations in a wide, sand-bed river, and (2) apply and validate the method to assess emergent sandbar dynamics over three seasons in 2011. An examination of the height of sandbars relative to the local stage of

  16. Use of tetrazolium (TTC, Germ's and greenhouse plant emergences methods for testing seed vigour of selected ornamental plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Hołubowicz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the years 1996-1997 the experiments were carried out on methods to investigate seed vigour of tassel flower (Amaranthus caudatus L., sand pink (Dianthus chinensis L., babies' breath (Gypsophila elegans M.B., sweet pea (Lathyrus odorathus L., African marigold (Tagetes erecta L. and zinnia (Zinnia elegans Jasq.. The main goals of this research were to specify conditions for accelerated ageing (AA of the seeds of a few selected ornamental plant species and to choose the most appropriate methods for their seed vigour evaluation in the laboratory and greenhouse conditions. All used in the experiments seeds came from the commercial seed lots from Polish seed company. Evaluation was carried out on the seed samples with high and low vigour. The latter ones were received through subjecting the seed samples to AA, i.e. by placing them in 100% relative humidity (RH at 44°C, except African marigold-at 42°C, in the darkness and keeping them for 144, 88, 100, 48, 72 and 72 hours, respectively. The tested seed vigour estimated methods included the Germ's method, the 2,3,5-triphenyl tetrazoilum chloride (TTC method and the test of plant emergences in the greenhouse. The high vigour seeds samples were used as a check. The Germ's method was found to be useful to evaluate sand pink, babies' breath and African marigold seed vigour, whereas the TTC method was found to be suitable for vigour evaluation of sand pink, babies' breath and zinnia. At present stage of our knowledge about seed vigour, the plant emergences in the greenhouse method was found to be the best for evaluation of seed vigour of tassel flower, sand pink, babies' breath, sweet pea and zinnia. It is reasonable to combine a few methods of seed vigour evaluation for ornamental plant species.

  17. A Comparative Study of Compression Methods and the Development of CODEC Program of Biological Signal for Emergency Telemedicine Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, T.S.; Kim, J.S. [Changwon National University, Changwon (Korea); Lim, Y.H. [Visionite Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea); Yoo, S.K. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2003-05-01

    In an emergency telemedicine system such as the High-quality Multimedia based Real-time Emergency Telemedicine(HMRET) service, it is very important to examine the status of the patient continuously using the multimedia data including the biological signals(ECG, BP, Respiration, S{sub p}O{sub 2}) of the patient. In order to transmit these data real time through the communication means which have the limited transmission capacity, it is also necessary to compress the biological data besides other multimedia data. For this purpose, we investigate and compare the ECG compression techniques in the time domain and in the wavelet transform domain, and present an effective lossless compression method of the biological signals using JPEG Huffman table for an emergency telemedicine system. And, for the HMRET service, we developed the lossless compression and reconstruction program of the biological signals in MSVC++ 6.0 using DPCM method and JPEG Huffman table, and tested in an internet environment. (author). 15 refs., 17 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Verification of the fulfilment of the purposes of Basel II, Pillar 3 through application of the web log mining methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Munk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is the verification of the fulfilment of the purposes of Basel II, Pillar 3 – market discipline during the recent financial crisis. The objective of the paper is to describe the current state of the working out of the project that is focused on the analysis of the market participants’ interest in mandatory disclosure of financial information by a commercial bank by means of advanced methods of web log mining. The output of the realized project will be the verification of the assumptions related to the purposes of Basel III by means of the web mining methods, the recommendations for possible reduction of mandatory disclosure of information under Basel II and III, the proposal of the methodology for data preparation for web log mining in this application domain and the generalised procedure for users’ behaviour modelling dependent on time. The schedule of the project has been divided into three phases. The paper deals with its first phase that is focusing on the data pre-processing, analysis and evaluation of the required information under Basel II, Pillar 3 since 2008 and its disclosure into the web site of a commercial bank. The authors introduce the methodologies for data preparation and known heuristic methods for path completion into web log files with respect to the particularity of investigated application domain. They propose scientific methods for modelling users’ behaviour of the webpages related to Pillar 3 with respect to time.

  19. A fluorescence method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide and restriction endonuclease HpaII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Chunyan; Xiong, Yanxiang; Zhang, Yuanjian; Liu, Songqin; Pu, Yuepu

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in many biological events and is associated with various diseases. Most traditional methods for detection of DNA methylation are based on the complex and expensive bisulfite method. In this paper, we report a novel fluorescence method to detect DNA and DNA methylation based on graphene oxide (GO) and restriction endonuclease HpaII. The skillfully designed probe DNA labeled with 5-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and optimized GO concentration keep the probe/target DNA still adsorbed on the GO. After the cleavage action of HpaII the labeled FAM is released from the GO surface and its fluorescence recovers, which could be used to detect DNA in the linear range of 50 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 43 pM. DNA methylation induced by transmethylase (Mtase) or other chemical reagents prevents HpaII from recognizing and cleaving the specific site; as a result, fluorescence cannot recover. The fluorescence recovery efficiency is closely related to the DNA methylation level, which can be used to detect DNA methylation by comparing it with the fluorescence in the presence of intact target DNA. The method for detection of DNA and DNA methylation is simple, reliable and accurate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies via Modeling of Milestones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W [ORNL; Schlicher, Bob G [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, patents, news archives, and online mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

  1. Simultaneous removal of Cd(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions via their complexation with HBANSA based on a combined ultrasound-assisted and cloud point adsorption method using CSG-BiPO4/FePO4as novel adsorbent: FAAS detection and optimization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirandish, Shadi; Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Dashtian, Kheibar; Jannesar, Ramin; Montazerozohori, Morteza; Pourebrahim, Faezeh; Zare, Mohammad Ali

    2017-08-15

    Ultrasound irradiation, cloud point and adsorption methods were coupled to develop a new technique for the simultaneous removal of Cd(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions after their complexation with (E)-4-((2-hydroxybenzylidene) amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (HBANSA). In order to reduce cost and improve practicability of process, chitosan gel (CSG) composited with bismuth(III) phosphate/iron(III) phosphate nanoparticles (CSG-BiPO 4 /FePO 4 ) were hydrothermally synthesized followed by their characterization using FE-SEM, EDS and XRD analysis. The operational parameters such as metal ions concentration, CSG-BiPO 4 /FePO 4 mass, sonication time and temperature were investigated and optimized using central composite design (CCD). In addition, the possible significant correlation between these variables and removal efficiency was studied from which the maximum efficiencies were obtained at 5.57mg/L, 51.49°C, 0.018g and 10.73min corresponding to metal ions concentration, temperature, CSG-BiPO 4 /FePO 4 and sonication time, respectively. Moreover, at these conditions, the removal percentages of the Cd(II), Ni(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) ions were found to be 96.24, 93.73, 95.55 and 97.47, respectively. After applying various isotherms, the Langmuir isotherm model was found to be most appropriate model for describing and fitting the experimental equilibrium data and thus maximum mono-layer adsorption capacities of 8.61, 8.54, 8.65 and 8.62mgg -1 were obtained for Cd(II), Pb(II), Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions, respectively. The study of kinetics showed well applicability of pseudo second order kinetic model with maximum mass transfer rate in adsorption process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensitive spectrophotometric determination of Co(II) using dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction method in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, Foroozan; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Taei, Masoumeh; Nekouei, Mohsen; Mozafari, Elmira

    2016-05-01

    Analytical performance of conventional spectrophotometer was developed by coupling of effective dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction method with spectrophotometric determination for ultra-trace determination of cobalt. The method was based on the formation of Co(II)-alpha-benzoin oxime complex and its extraction using a dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction technique. During the present work, several important variables such as pH, ligand concentration, amount and type of dispersive, and extracting solvent were optimized. It was found that the crucial factor for the Co(II)-alpha benzoin oxime complex formation is the pH of the alkaline alcoholic medium. Under the optimized condition, the calibration graph was linear in the ranges of 1.0-110 μg L(-1) with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.5 μg L(-1). The preconcentration operation of 25 mL of sample gave enhancement factor of 75. The proposed method was applied for determination of Co(II) in soil samples.

  3. Seawater: an alternative grassy weed control method for post emergence herbicides in tropical turfgrass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddin, M.K.; Ismail, M.R.; Juraimi, A.S.; Hamdani, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Research was designed to reduce herbicide use by replacing post emergence herbicides with readily available sea water to control tropical turfgrass weeds. In studies evaluating the use of saline solutions for weed control, four salinity levels (0, 24, 48 and 72 dS m/sup -1/) were applied once to 30 grassy weed species, along with seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) (as a control) during December, 2007 to March, 2008. The results on injury ratings for salt tolerant weeds were categorized as highly susceptible, moderately susceptible and extremely tolerant. C. dactylon, E. indica, E. virescense, E. unioloides and I. globosa were very susceptible and found to be effectively controlled (100%) at 72 dS m/sup -1/ salinity treatment. However, two most serious weeds viz. wiry eragrostis (E. atrovirens) and lesser dropseed (S. diander), were found to be extremely tolerant, and were not controlled even at the highest salinity level of 72 dS m/sup -1/. P. vaginatum and E. atrovirens did not show significant decrease in shoot and root dry weight at highest salinity levels (72 dS m/sup -1/). The results indicate that sea water has excellent potential for sustainable control of several common grassy weeds in tropical turf. (author)

  4. [Design and validation of a clinical simulation method for teaching nurses to use the Emergency Severity Index for triage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Ruipérez, Tomás; Adánez Martínez, María de Gracia; Díaz Agea, José Luís; García Pérez, Bartolomé; Leal Costa, César

    2015-06-01

    To design and validate a clinical simulation method for training nurses to use the Emergency Severity Index (ESI) for triage. Descriptive, cross-sectional study carried out in the emergency department of Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca in Murcia, Spain. The educational intervention had 3 phases focused on theory, skills, and application. The participants, who were nurses with at least a year's experience in the emergency department, numbered 55, 43, and 32 in each phase, respectively. They undertook training in ESI for triage (phase 1), participated in simulations with patient-actors (phase 2), and applied their acquired skills (phase 3). We used Cohen's K and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) to compare the nurses' triage assignments to gold-standard triage assignments. We had data for 1100, 799, and 410 observations of performance in each phase, respectively. Agreement statistics between the nurses' performance and the gold standard were 0.68, 0.67, and 0.68 (Cohen's K) and 0.870, 0.836, and 0.811 (ICC) in each phase, respectively. These results reflect good agreement. This study supports the relevance of clinical simulations for training nurses to implement structured triage, and in particular to use the ESI. We can state that this study opens the door to further research into whether the reliability of triage can be improved by using this approach, specifically whether it can facilitate better interobserver agreement.

  5. Smoking, Cardiac Symptoms, and an Emergency Care Visit: A Mixed Methods Exploration of Cognitive and Emotional Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyn A. Tappe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency departments and hospitals are being urged to implement onsite interventions to promote smoking cessation, yet little is known about the theoretical underpinnings of behavior change after a healthcare visit. This observational pilot study evaluated three factors that may predict smoking cessation after an acute health emergency: perceived illness severity, event-related emotions, and causal attribution. Fifty smokers who presented to a hospital because of suspected cardiac symptoms were interviewed, either in the emergency department (ED or, for those who were admitted, on the cardiac inpatient units. Their data were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies to capture the individual, first-hand experience and to evaluate trends over the illness chronology. Reported perceptions of the event during semistructured interview varied widely and related to the individual’s intentions regarding smoking cessation. No significant differences were found between those interviewed in the ED versus the inpatient unit. Although the typical profile was characterized by a peak in perceived illness severity and negative emotions at the time the patient presented in the ED, considerable pattern variation occurred. Our results suggest that future studies of event-related perceptions and emotional reactions should consider using multi-item and multidimensional assessment methods rated serially over the event chronology.

  6. Delay Tolerant Networking with Data Triage Method based on Emergent User Policies for Disaster Information Network System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriki Uchida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When Disaster Information Network System is considered in local areas that were heavy damaged by the East Japan Great Earthquake in 2011, the resiliency of the network system is one of significant subjects for the restoration of the areas. DTN (Delay Tolerant Network has been focused for the effective methods for such inoperable network circumstances. However, when DTN is applied for the local areas, there are some problems such as message delivery rate and latency because there are fewer roads, cars, and pedestrians than in urban areas. In this paper, we propose the Enhanced Media Coordinate System for its architecture, and Data Triage method by emergent user policies is introduced to improve the QoS in Disaster Information Network System in local areas. In the proposed method, every message is tagged with the priority levels by data types with considering emergent user policies, and the high priority messages are firstly duplicated to transmittable nodes. Then, the experimental results by the GIS map of a Japanese coastal town and the future studies are discussed.

  7. Comparison of traditional and interactive teaching methods in a UK emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Peter; Elliott, Tim; Ronald, Julie; Paterson, Brodie

    2009-12-01

    Didactic teaching remains a core component of undergraduate education, but developing computer assisted learning (CAL) packages may provide useful alternatives. We compared the effectiveness of interactive multimedia-based tutorials with traditional, lecture-based models for teaching arterial blood gas interpretation to fourth year medical students. Participants were randomized to complete a tutorial in either lecture or multimedia format containing identical content. Upon completion, students answered five multiple choice questions assessing post-tutorial knowledge, and provided feedback on their allocated learning method. Marks revealed no significant difference between either group. All lecture candidates rated their teaching as good, compared with 89% of the CAL group. All CAL users found multiple choice questions assessment useful, compared with 83% of lecture participants. Both groups highlighted the importance of interaction. CAL complements other teaching methods, but should be seen as an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, traditional methods, thus offering students a blended learning environment.

  8. An Emerging Complimentary Medicine-Yolk Oil Made from Heating Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsung-Ming Hu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Yolk oil is common in Asia. According to the Flora Sinensis, yolk oil is a multipurpose medicine, with specific dermatological and fever indications. Nowadays, it is generally used as a complimentary medicine for heart diseases. Yolk oil can be made from heating or chemical extraction method. It is generally believed that yolk oil made from heating (YOheat method is more effective as a medicine than that from extraction (YOext. The technical details of the heating method remain an issue of argument, including the degree of char and the threat of carcinogens formed during the heating process. Most yolk oil related studies used YOext as research material. Nevertheless, animal studies have showed that YOheat reduced triglycerides and total cholesterol in rodent liver. It is expected an easy-to-make complimentary medicine like YOheat may become even more common and thus evidence based studies should be conducted to verify its pharmacological effects and safety.

  9. An emerging complimentary medicine-yolk oil made from heating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tsung-Ming; Lan, Tsuo-Hung; Loh, El-Wui

    2012-07-01

    Yolk oil is common in Asia. According to the Flora Sinensis, yolk oil is a multipurpose medicine, with specific dermatological and fever indications. Nowadays, it is generally used as a complimentary medicine for heart diseases. Yolk oil can be made from heating or chemical extraction method. It is generally believed that yolk oil made from heating (YOheat) method is more effective as a medicine than that from extraction (YOext). The technical details of the heating method remain an issue of argument, including the degree of char and the threat of carcinogens formed during the heating process. Most yolk oil related studies used YOext as research material. Nevertheless, animal studies have showed that YOheat reduced triglycerides and total cholesterol in rodent liver. It is expected an easy-to-make complimentary medicine like YOheat may become even more common and thus evidence based studies should be conducted to verify its pharmacological effects and safety.

  10. Research Techniques Made Simple: Emerging Methods to Elucidate Protein Interactions through Spatial Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yonglu; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-12-01

    Interactions between proteins are essential for fundamental cellular processes, and the diversity of such interactions enables the vast variety of functions essential for life. A persistent goal in biological research is to develop assays that can faithfully capture different types of protein interactions to allow their study. A major step forward in this direction came with a family of methods that delineates spatial proximity of proteins as an indirect measure of protein-protein interaction. A variety of enzyme- and DNA ligation-based methods measure protein co-localization in space, capturing novel interactions that were previously too transient or low affinity to be identified. Here we review some of the methods that have been successfully used to measure spatially proximal protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Resilience in Emergency Medical Responders: A Pilot Study of a Reflective Journal Intervention Using a Mixed Methods Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Rowntree

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Emergency Medical Responders (EMRs work in potentially traumatic situations as part of their job. To enable them to do so requires a degree of resilience (i.e., the ability to bounce back from exposure to disruptive events. Taking a mixed-methods approach, the proposed study addresses the question of whether a reflective journal intervention will impact EMRs’ resilience to support positive outcomes. Data will be collected in four EU countries. The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale will be administered for pre- and post-intervention assessment, while qualitative data will be collected for further analysis.

  12. Emerging therapies in neurorehabilitation II

    CERN Document Server

    Raya, Rafael; González, José

    2016-01-01

    This book reports on the latest technological and clinical advances in the field of neurorehabilitation. It is, however, much more than a conventional survey of the state-of-the-art in neurorehabilitation technologies and therapies. It was written on the basis of a week of lively discussions between PhD students and leading research experts during the Summer School on Neurorehabilitation (SSNR2014), held September 15-19 in Baiona, Spain. Its unconventional format makes it a perfect guide for all PhD students, researchers and professionals interested in gaining a multidisciplinary perspective on current and future neurorehabilitation scenarios.  The book addresses various aspects of neurorehabilitation research and practice, including a selection of common impairments affecting CNS function, such as stroke and spinal cord injury, as well as cutting-edge rehabilitation and diagnostics technologies, including robotics, neuroprosthetics, brain-machine interfaces and neuromodulation.

  13. Managing the peri-implant mucosa: a clinically reliable method for optimizing soft tissue contours and emergence profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parpaiola, Andrea; Sbricoli, Luca; Guazzo, Riccardo; Bressan, Eriberto; Lops, Diego

    2013-10-01

    The proper representation of soft tissue contours for a natural aspect of the peri-implant mucosa and its mimesis with the adjacent teeth is a crucial aspect of the esthetic area restoration. This paper describes a method for the easy transfer of the peri-implant tissue morphology onto impression material with a view to achieving an accurate, custom implant restoration. The procedure described is suitable both for single and multi-unit implant-supported prostheses. Once the peri-implant mucosa is sculpted by the provisional restoration, the emergence profile is duplicated. The implant analog is embedded into laboratory stone or plaster in a mixing cup and allowed to set. The provisional restoration is removed from the oral cavity and screwed to the implant analog; then, a polyether material is placed in the mixing cup so that the provisional restoration is put into impression material at the level of the prosthetic emergence profile. After the polyether polymerizing, the provisional prosthesis is unscrewed and replaced with the stock hexed transfer for the final impression. Next, cold self-curing resin is poured into this gap and left to set. A custom transfer for this single implant site is thus obtained. This modified transfer is then removed and screwed onto the implant in the oral cavity for the definitive impression. The technique described enables a faithful reproduction of the peri-implant soft tissues and emergence profile. An emergence profile that mimics the natural tooth should be obtained by successful esthetic implant restoration. Moreover, it allows proper hygiene, which is fundamental for implant maintenance. The best way to achieve the correct emergence profile is to sculpture the peri-implant mucosa by means of a provisional prosthesis. Prefabricated provisional crowns cannot mimic the complexity and the variations of human soft tissue. Therefore, only a chair-side modification of the provisional restoration can accomplish the optimal result. Such

  14. Methods for reducing sepsis mortality in emergency departments and inpatient units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Martin E; D'Angelo, John; Jacobsen, Diane; Jarrett, Mark P; Kabcenell, Andrea I; Masick, Kevin D; Parmentier, Darlene; Nelson, Karen L; Stier, Lori

    2015-05-01

    As part of a zero-tolerance approach to preventable deaths, North Shore-LIJ Health System (North Shore-LIJ) leadership prioritized a major patient safety initiative to reduce sepsis mortality in 2009 across 10 acute care hospitals (an 11th joined later). At baseline (2008), approximately 3,500 patients were discharged with a diagnosis of sepsis, which ranked as the top All Patient Refined Diagnosis-Related Group by number of deaths (N = 883). Initially, the focus was sepsis recognition and treatment in the emergency departments (EDs). North Shore-LIJ, the 14th largest health care system in the United States, cares for individuals at every stage of life at 19 acute care and specialty hospitals and more than 400 outpatient physician practice sites throughout New York City and the greater New York metropolitan area. The health system launched a strategic partnership with the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) in August 2011 to accelerate the pace of sepsis improvement. Throughout the course of the initiative, North Shore-LIJ collaborated with many local, state, national, and international organizations to test innovative ideas, share evidence-based best practices, and, more recently, to raise public awareness. North Shore-LIJ reduced overall sepsis mortality by approximately 50% in a six-year period (2008-2013; sustained through 2014) and increased compliance with sepsis resuscitation bundle elements in the EDs and inpatient units in the 11 acute care hospitals. Improvements were achieved by engaging leadership; fostering interprofessional collaboration, collaborating with other leading health care organizations; and developing meaningful, real-time metrics for all levels of staff.

  15. Prioritizing humanitarian assistance in a complex emergency: a decision method for military forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, S.J.H.; de Boer, S.J.; Voordijk, Johannes T.

    2004-01-01

    The article develops a decision support model for a military commander who has to determine what humanitarian assistance will be provided in cooperation with which civil organizations in peacekeeping situations. After an investigation of the current methods decision theory was used to develop an

  16. Infrared thermometry of water-stressed crops - emerging methods and technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infrared thermometry has shown potential to quantify water stress in crop canopy. This presentation will outline the limited irrigation experiments by the USDA-ARS in northern Colorado, which is used for a framework to evaluate canopy temperature. Recent methods have been introduced that may be accu...

  17. 27 CFR 479.26 - Alternate methods or procedures; emergency variations from requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND CERTAIN OTHER FIREARMS Administrative and Miscellaneous...) The alternate method or procedure will not be contrary to any provision of law and will not result in... provisions of law. Variations from requirements granted under this paragraph are conditioned on compliance...

  18. Experiences with a compound method for estimating the time since death. II. Integration of non-temperature-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henssge, C; Althaus, L; Bolt, J; Freislederer, A; Haffner, H T; Henssge, C A; Hoppe, B; Schneider, V

    2000-01-01

    The period since death was estimated at the scene in 72 consecutive cases using the temperature-based nomogram method as the primary method and supplemented by examination of criteria such as lividity, rigor mortis, mechanical and electrical excitability of skeletal muscle and chemical excitability of the iris. A case-oriented, computer-assisted selection of the non-temperature-based methods and integration of the results into a common result of the compound method was made following a special logistic. The limits of the period since death as estimated by the nomogram were improved in 49 cases by including the non-temperature-based methods and also provided results in 4 cases where the temperature method could not be used. In a further 6 cases the non-temperature-based methods confirmed the limits estimated by the temperature method but in 14 cases a useful result could not be obtained. In only one of the cases investigated was the upper limit of the period since death, as estimated by the criterion re-establishment of rigor (8 h post-mortem), in contradiction with the period determined by the police investigations (9.4 h post-mortem).

  19. Automated Dissolution for Enteric-Coated Aspirin Tablets: A Case Study for Method Transfer to a RoboDis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sarah A; Martini, Luigi

    2014-08-01

    Dissolution method transfer is a complicated yet common process in the pharmaceutical industry. With increased pharmaceutical product manufacturing and dissolution acceptance requirements, dissolution testing has become one of the most labor-intensive quality control testing methods. There is an increased trend for automation in dissolution testing, particularly for large pharmaceutical companies to reduce variability and increase personnel efficiency. There is no official guideline for dissolution testing method transfer from a manual, semi-automated, to automated dissolution tester. In this study, a manual multipoint dissolution testing procedure for an enteric-coated aspirin tablet was transferred effectively and reproducibly to a fully automated dissolution testing device, RoboDis II. Enteric-coated aspirin samples were used as a model formulation to assess the feasibility and accuracy of media pH change during continuous automated dissolution testing. Several RoboDis II parameters were evaluated to ensure the integrity and equivalency of dissolution method transfer from a manual dissolution tester. This current study provides a systematic outline for the transfer of the manual dissolution testing protocol to an automated dissolution tester. This study further supports that automated dissolution testers compliant with regulatory requirements and similar to manual dissolution testers facilitate method transfer. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  20. Optimal locations of piezoelectric patches for supersonic flutter control of honeycomb sandwich panels, using the NSGA-II method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezami, M; Gholami, B

    2016-01-01

    The active flutter control of supersonic sandwich panels with regular honeycomb interlayers under impact load excitation is studied using piezoelectric patches. A non-dominated sorting-based multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, called non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) is suggested to find the optimal locations for different numbers of piezoelectric actuator/sensor pairs. Quasi-steady first order supersonic piston theory is employed to define aerodynamic loading and the p-method is applied to find the flutter bounds. Hamilton’s principle in conjunction with the generalized Fourier expansions and Galerkin method are used to develop the dynamical model of the structural systems in the state-space domain. The classical Runge–Kutta time integration algorithm is then used to calculate the open-loop aeroelastic response of the system. The maximum flutter velocity and minimum voltage applied to actuators are calculated according to the optimal locations of piezoelectric patches obtained using the NSGA-II and then the proportional feedback is used to actively suppress the closed loop system response. Finally the control effects, using the two different controllers, are compared. (paper)

  1. Uncertainty estimation with a small number of measurements, part II: a redefinition of uncertainty and an estimator method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hening

    2018-01-01

    This paper is the second (Part II) in a series of two papers (Part I and Part II). Part I has quantitatively discussed the fundamental limitations of the t-interval method for uncertainty estimation with a small number of measurements. This paper (Part II) reveals that the t-interval is an ‘exact’ answer to a wrong question; it is actually misused in uncertainty estimation. This paper proposes a redefinition of uncertainty, based on the classical theory of errors and the theory of point estimation, and a modification of the conventional approach to estimating measurement uncertainty. It also presents an asymptotic procedure for estimating the z-interval. The proposed modification is to replace the t-based uncertainty with an uncertainty estimator (mean- or median-unbiased). The uncertainty estimator method is an approximate answer to the right question to uncertainty estimation. The modified approach provides realistic estimates of uncertainty, regardless of whether the population standard deviation is known or unknown, or if the sample size is small or large. As an application example of the modified approach, this paper presents a resolution to the Du-Yang paradox (i.e. Paradox 2), one of the three paradoxes caused by the misuse of the t-interval in uncertainty estimation.

  2. Predicting Appropriate Admission of Bronchiolitis Patients in the Emergency Department: Rationale and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Stone, Bryan L; Johnson, Michael D; Nkoy, Flory L

    2016-03-07

    In young children, bronchiolitis is the most common illness resulting in hospitalization. For children less than age 2, bronchiolitis incurs an annual total inpatient cost of $1.73 billion. Each year in the United States, 287,000 emergency department (ED) visits occur because of bronchiolitis, with a hospital admission rate of 32%-40%. Due to a lack of evidence and objective criteria for managing bronchiolitis, ED disposition decisions (hospital admission or discharge to home) are often made subjectively, resulting in significant practice variation. Studies reviewing admission need suggest that up to 29% of admissions from the ED are unnecessary. About 6% of ED discharges for bronchiolitis result in ED returns with admission. These inappropriate dispositions waste limited health care resources, increase patient and parental distress, expose patients to iatrogenic risks, and worsen outcomes. Existing clinical guidelines for bronchiolitis offer limited improvement in patient outcomes. Methodological shortcomings include that the guidelines provide no specific thresholds for ED decisions to admit or to discharge, have an insufficient level of detail, and do not account for differences in patient and illness characteristics including co-morbidities. Predictive models are frequently used to complement clinical guidelines, reduce practice variation, and improve clinicians' decision making. Used in real time, predictive models can present objective criteria supported by historical data for an individualized disease management plan and guide admission decisions. However, existing predictive models for ED patients with bronchiolitis have limitations, including low accuracy and the assumption that the actual ED disposition decision was appropriate. To date, no operational definition of appropriate admission exists. No model has been built based on appropriate admissions, which include both actual admissions that were necessary and actual ED discharges that were unsafe. The

  3. Life Cycle Assessment and Water Footprint of Hydrogen Production Methods: From Conventional to Emerging Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Mehmeti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A common sustainability issue, arising in production systems, is the efficient use of resources for providing goods or services. With the increased interest in a hydrogen (H2 economy, the life-cycle environmental performance of H2 production has special significance for assisting in identifying opportunities to improve environmental performance and to guide challenging decisions and select between technology paths. Life cycle impact assessment methods are rapidly evolving to analyze multiple environmental impacts of the production of products or processes. This study marks the first step in developing process-based streamlined life cycle analysis (LCA of several H2 production pathways combining life cycle impacts at the midpoint (17 problem-oriented and endpoint (3 damage-oriented levels using the state-of-the-art impact assessment method ReCiPe 2016. Steam reforming of natural gas, coal gasification, water electrolysis via proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEM, solid oxide electrolyzer cell (SOEC, biomass gasification and reforming, and dark fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass were analyzed. An innovative aspect is developed in this study is an analysis of water consumption associated with H2 production pathways by life-cycle stage to provide a better understanding of the life cycle water-related impacts on human health and natural environment. For water-related scope, Water scarcity footprint (WSF quantified using Available WAter REmaining (AWARE method was applied as a stand-alone indicator. The paper discusses the strengths and weaknesses of each production pathway, identify the drivers of environmental impact, quantify midpoint environmental impact and its influence on the endpoint environmental performance. The findings of this study could serve as a useful theoretical reference and practical basis to decision-makers of potential environmental impacts of H2 production systems.

  4. Direct methods of soil-structure interaction analysis for earthquake loadings(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Chung Bang; Lee, S. R.; Kim, J. M.; Park, K. L.; Oh, S. B.; Choi, J. S.; Kim, Y. S.

    1994-07-01

    In this study, methods for 3-D soil-structure interaction analysis have been studied. They are 3-D axisymmetric analysis method, 3-D axisymmetric finite element method incorporating infinite elements, and 3-D boundary element methods. The computer code, named as 'KIESSI - PF', has been developed which is based on the 3-D axisymmetric finite element method coupled with infinite element method. It is able to simulate forced vibration test results of a soil-structure interaction system. The Hualien FVT post-correlation analysis before backfill and the blind prediction analysis after backfill have been carried out using the developed computer code 'KIESSI - PF'

  5. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  6. Transfer of Tritium in the Environment after Accidental Releases from Nuclear Facilities. Report of Working Group 7 Tritium Accidents of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (Emras II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Tritium Accidents Working Group

  7. In vitro anticancer drug test: A new method emerges from the model of glioma stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Riva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV astrocytoma and the most common malignant brain tumor. Current therapies provide a median survival of 12–15 months after diagnosis, due to the high recurrence rate. The failure of current therapies may be due to the presence, within the tumor, of cells characterized by enhanced self-renewal capacity, multilineage differentiation potential and elevated invasive behavior, called glioma stem cells (GSCs. To evaluate the pharmacological efficacy of selected drugs on six GSC lines, we set up a multiple drug responsivity assay based on the combined evaluation of cytomorphological and functional parameters, including the analysis of polymorphic nuclei, mitotic index and cell viability. In order to understand the real pharmacological efficacy of the tested drugs, we assigned a specific drug responsivity score to each GSC line, integrating the data produced by multiple assays. In this work we explored the antineoplastic effects of paclitaxel (PTX, an inhibitor of microtubule depolymerization, utilized as standard treatment in several cancers, and of valproic acid (VPA, an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs with multiple anticancer properties. We classified the six GSC lines as responsive or resistant to these drugs, on the basis of their responsivity scores. This method can also be useful to identify the best way to combine two or more drugs. In particular, we utilized the pro-differentiating effect of VPA to improve the PTX effectiveness and we observed a significant reduction of cell viability compared to single treatments.

  8. Dimensionality Reduction on SPD Manifolds: The Emergence of Geometry-Aware Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harandi, Mehrtash; Salzmann, Mathieu; Hartley, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Representing images and videos with Symmetric Positive Definite (SPD) matrices, and considering the Riemannian geometry of the resulting space, has been shown to yield high discriminative power in many visual recognition tasks. Unfortunately, computation on the Riemannian manifold of SPD matrices -especially of high-dimensional ones- comes at a high cost that limits the applicability of existing techniques. In this paper, we introduce algorithms able to handle high-dimensional SPD matrices by constructing a lower-dimensional SPD manifold. To this end, we propose to model the mapping from the high-dimensional SPD manifold to the low-dimensional one with an orthonormal projection. This lets us formulate dimensionality reduction as the problem of finding a projection that yields a low-dimensional manifold either with maximum discriminative power in the supervised scenario, or with maximum variance of the data in the unsupervised one. We show that learning can be expressed as an optimization problem on a Grassmann manifold and discuss fast solutions for special cases. Our evaluation on several classification tasks evidences that our approach leads to a significant accuracy gain over state-of-the-art methods.

  9. A Comparison of Risk Sensitive Path Planning Methods for Aircraft Emergency Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Plaunt, Christian; Smith, David E.; Smith, Tristan

    2009-01-01

    Determining the best site to land a damaged aircraft presents some interesting challenges for standard path planning techniques. There are multiple possible locations to consider, the space is 3-dimensional with dynamics, the criteria for a good path is determined by overall risk rather than distance or time, and optimization really matters, since an improved path corresponds to greater expected survival rate. We have investigated a number of different path planning methods for solving this problem, including cell decomposition, visibility graphs, probabilistic road maps (PRMs), and local search techniques. In their pure form, none of these techniques have proven to be entirely satisfactory - some are too slow or unpredictable, some produce highly non-optimal paths or do not find certain types of paths, and some do not cope well with the dynamic constraints when controllability is limited. In the end, we are converging towards a hybrid technique that involves seeding a roadmap with a layered visibility graph, using PRM to extend that roadmap, and using local search to further optimize the resulting paths. We describe the techniques we have investigated, report on our experiments with these techniques, and discuss when and why various techniques were unsatisfactory.

  10. Facilitated workshop method to involve stakeholders and public in decision making process in radiological emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustonen, Raimo; Sinkko, Kari; Haemaelaeinen, Raimo P.

    2006-01-01

    International organisations in radiation protection have for many years recommended that key players, e.g. authorities, expert organisations, industry, producers of foodstuffs and even the public, should be involved in the planning of protective actions in case of a nuclear accident. In this work, we have developed and tested a facilitated workshop method where representatives from various fields of the society aim to identify and evaluate systematically protective actions. Decision analysis techniques have been applied in workshops in order to find out the most feasible countermeasure strategies and to make the decision making-process transparent and auditable. The work builds on case studies where it was assumed that a hypothetical accident had led to a release of considerable amounts of radionuclides and therefore various types of countermeasures should be considered. This paper provides experiences gained in several European countries on how to facilitate this kind of workshops and how modern decision analysis techniques can be applied in the decision-making process

  11. Usability of the Massachusetts Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in the Emergency Department: A Mixed-methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Sabrina J; Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B; Gish, Rebecca E; Neri, Pamela M; Takhar, Sukhjit S; Weiner, Scott G; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Landman, Adam B

    2016-04-01

    Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs) are underutilized, despite evidence showing that they may reduce the epidemic of opioid-related addiction, diversion, and overdose. We evaluated the usability of the Massachusetts (MA) PDMP by emergency medicine providers (EPs), as a system's usability may affect how often it is used. This was a mixed-methods study of 17 EPs. We compared the time and number of clicks required to review one patient's record in the PDMP to three other commonly performed computer-based tasks in the emergency department (ED: ordering a computed tomography [CT] scan, writing a prescription, and searching a medication history service integrated within the electronic medical record [EMR]). We performed semistructured interviews and analyzed participant comments and responses regarding their experience using the MA PDMP. The PDMP task took a longer time to complete (mean = 4.22 minutes) and greater number of mouse clicks to complete (mean = 50.3 clicks) than the three other tasks (CT-pulmonary embolism = 1.42 minutes, 24.8 clicks; prescription = 1.30 minutes, 19.5 clicks; SureScripts = 1.45 minutes, 9.5 clicks). Qualitative analysis yielded four main themes about PDMP usability, three negative and one positive: 1) difficulty accessing the PDMP, 2) cumbersome acquiring patient medication history information within the PDMP, 3) nonintuitive display of patient medication history information within the PDMP, and 4) overall perceived value of the PDMP despite an inefficient interface. The complicated processes of gaining access to, logging in, and using the MA PDMP are barriers to preventing its more frequent use. All states should evaluate the PDMP usability in multiple practice settings including the ED and work to improve provider enrollment, login procedures, patient information input, prescription data display, and ultimately, PDMP data integration into EMRs. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. Examining emergency department communication through a staff-based participatory research method: identifying barriers and solutions to meaningful change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenzie A; Engel, Kirsten G; McCarthy, Danielle M; Buckley, Barbara A; Mercer Kollar, Laura Min; Donlan, Sarah M; Pang, Peter S; Makoul, Gregory; Tanabe, Paula; Gisondi, Michael A; Adams, James G

    2010-12-01

    We test an initiative with the staff-based participatory research (SBPR) method to elicit communication barriers and engage staff in identifying strategies to improve communication within our emergency department (ED). ED staff at an urban hospital with 85,000 ED visits per year participated in a 3.5-hour multidisciplinary workshop. The workshop was offered 6 times and involved: (1) large group discussion to review the importance of communication within the ED and discuss findings from a recent survey of patient perceptions of ED-team communication; (2) small group discussions eliciting staff perceptions of communication barriers and best practices/strategies to address these challenges; and (3) large group discussions sharing and refining emergent themes and suggested strategies. Three coders analyzed summaries from group discussions by using latent content and constant comparative analysis to identify focal themes. A total of 127 staff members, including attending physicians, residents, nurses, ED assistants, and secretaries, participated in the workshop (overall participation rate 59.6%; range 46.7% to 73.3% by staff type). Coders identified a framework of 4 themes describing barriers and proposed interventions: (1) greeting and initial interaction, (2) setting realistic expectations, (3) team communication and respect, and (4) information provision and delivery. The majority of participants (81.4%) reported that their participation would cause them to make changes in their clinical practice. Involving staff in discussing barriers and facilitators to communication within the ED can result in a meaningful process of empowerment, as well as the identification of feasible strategies and solutions at both the individual and system levels. Copyright © 2010 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Consensus methods to identify a set of potential performance indicators for systems of emergency and urgent care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Patricia; Nicholl, Jon

    2010-04-01

    To identify a comprehensive set of indicators to enable Primary Care Trust (PCT) commissioners in England and other NHS decision-makers to monitor the performance of systems of emergency and urgent care for which they are responsible. Using a combination of Delphi RAND methods in three successive rounds of consultation and nominal group review, we canvassed expert opinion on 70 potential indicators as good measures of system performance. The two Delphi panels consisted of senior clinicians and researchers, and urgent care leads and commissioners in PCTs and Strategic Health Authorities (SHAs). The indicators were formatted into a questionnaire according to whether they were outcome, process, structure, or equity-based measures. Participants scored each indicator on a Likert scale of 1-9 and had the opportunity to consider their scores informed by the group scores and feedback. The questionnaire was refined after each round. To ensure that the indicators rated most highly by the Delphi panels covered all dimensions of performance, the results of the Delphi were reviewed by a nominal group consisting of two researchers and three clinicians from the local health services research network (LHSR). Overall, the process yielded 16 candidate indicators. It also produced a core set of serious, emergency and urgent care-sensitive conditions (defined as conditions whose exacerbations should be managed by a well-performing system without admission to an inpatient bed), for use with the indicators. System-wide measures to monitor performance across multiple services should encourage providers to work for patient benefit in an integrated way. They will also assist commissioners to monitor and improve emergency and urgent care for their local populations. The indicators are now being calculated using routinely available data, and tested for their responsiveness to capture change over time.

  14. New spectrophotometric method for the determination of Hg (II) in fish samples

    OpenAIRE

    Martiniano, Lorena Carvalho; Bezerra, Cicero Welligton Brito; Marques, Edmar Pereira; Sousa, Antonio Gouveia de; Fernandes, Ridvan Nunes; Marques, Aldaléa Lopes Brandes

    2008-01-01

    Um novo método espectrofotométrico simples, sensível e com boa seletividade é apresentado para a determinação rápida de mercúrio (II) em nível de traços com 2-mercapto-5-metilbenzilimidazol (MMBI) como um novo reagente espectrofotométrico (lambda max = 320 nm), em um meio aquoso ligeiramente alcalino (tampão Britton-Robinson (BR) 0,04 M, pH 8,0). A reação é instantânea e a absorbância permanece estável por mais de 24 horas. O coeficiente de absorção molar encontrado foi de 2,71 x 10(4) L mol-...

  15. Image processing methods for noise reduction in the TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.es [Departamento de Informatica y Automatica, UNED, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Farias, G. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Vega, J.; Pastor, I. [Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusion, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We describe an approach in order to reduce or mitigate the stray-light on the images and show the exceptional results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyze the parameters to take account in the proposed process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a simplified exampled in order to explain the proposed process. - Abstract: The Thomsom Scattering diagnostic of the TJ-II stellarator provides temperature and density profiles. The CCD camera acquires images corrupted with noise that, in some cases, can produce unreliable profiles. The main source of noise is the so-called stray-light. In this paper we describe an approach that allows mitigation of the effects that stray-light has on the images: extraction regions with connected-components. In addition, the robustness and effectiveness of the noise reduction technique is validated in two ways: (1) supervised classification and (2) comparison of electron temperature profiles.

  16. Novel methods and expected run II performance of ATLAS track reconstruction in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland Wolfgang; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding and optimal track reconstruction performance of ATLAS in the core of high pT objects is paramount for a number of techniques such as jet energy and mass calibration, jet flavour tagging, and hadronic tau identification as well as measurements of physics quantities like jet fragmentation functions. These dense environments are characterized by charged particle separations on the order of the granularity of ATLAS’s inner detector. With the insertion of a new innermost layer in this tracking detector, which allows measurements closer to the interaction point, and an increase in the centre of mass energy, these difficult environments will become even more relevant in Run II, such as in searches for heavy resonances. Novel algorithmic developments to the ATLAS track reconstruction software targeting these topologies as well as the expected improved performance will be presented.

  17. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Atsuko Koyama; Laura Hagopian; Judith Linden

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others...

  18. Conventional methods and emerging wastewater polishing technologies for palm oil mill effluent treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Wai Loan; Kassim, Mohd Azraai; Muda, Khalida; Loh, Soh Kheang; Affam, Augustine Chioma

    2015-02-01

    The Malaysian palm oil industry is a major revenue earner and the country is ranked as one of the largest producers in the world. However, growth of the industry is synonymous with a massive production of agro-industrial wastewater. As an environmental protection and public health concern, the highly polluting palm oil mill effluent (POME) has become a major attention-grabber. Hence, the industry is targeting for POME pollution abatement in order to promote a greener image of palm oil and to achieve sustainability. At present, most palm oil mills have adopted the ponding system for treatment. Due to the successful POME pollution abatement experiences, Malaysia is currently planning to revise the effluent quality standards towards a more stringent discharge limits. Hence, the current trend of POME research focuses on developing tertiary treatment or polishing systems for better effluent management. Biotechnologically-advanced POME tertiary (polishing) technologies as well as other physicochemical methods are gaining much attention as these processes are the key players to push the industry towards the goal of environmental sustainability. There are still ongoing treatment technologies being researched and the outcomes maybe available in a while. However, the research completed so far are compiled herein and reported for the first time to acquire a better perspective and insight on the subject with a view of meeting the new standards. To this end, the most feasible technology could be the combination of advanced biological processes (bioreactor systems) with extended aeration, followed by solids separation prior to discharge. Chemical dosing is favoured only if effluent of higher quality is anticipated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Geographic information systems (GIS): an emerging method to assess demand and provision for rehabilitation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalent, Laura; Borsy, Emily; Landry, Michel D; Cott, Cheryl

    2013-09-01

    To illustrate the application of geographic information systems (GIS) as a tool to assess rehabilitation service delivery by presenting results from research recently conducted to assess demand and provision for community rehabilitation service delivery in Ontario, Canada. Secondary analysis of data obtained from existing sources was used to establish demand and provision profiles for community rehabilitation services. These data were integrated using GIS software. A number of descriptive maps were produced that show the geographical distribution of service provision variables (location of individual rehabilitation health care providers and location of private and publicly funded community rehabilitation clinics) in relation to the distribution of demand variables (location of the general population; location of specific populations (i.e., residents age 65 and older) and distribution of household income). GIS provides a set of tools for describing and understanding the spatial organization of the health of populations and the distribution of health services that can aid the development of health policy and answer key research questions with respect to rehabilitation health services delivery. Implications for Rehabilitation It is important to seek out alternative and innovative methods to examine rehabilitation service delivery. GIS is a computer-based program that takes any data linked to a geographically referenced location and processes it through a software system that manages, analyses and displays the data in the form of a map, allowing for an alternative level of analysis. GIS provides a set of tools for describing and understanding the spatial organization of population health and health services that can aid the development of health policy and answer key research questions with respect to rehabilitation health services delivery.

  20. Methods and Model Development for Coupled RELAP5/PARCS Analysis of the Atucha-II Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Ward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of CNA-II, several tasks were required. Methods and models were developed in several areas. HELIOS lattice models were developed and benchmarked against WIMS/MCNP5 results generated by NA-SA. Cross-sections for the coupled RELAP5/PARCS calculation were extracted from HELIOS within the GenPMAXS framework. The validation of both HELIOS and PARCS was performed primarily by comparisons to WIMS/PUMA and MCNP for idealized models. Special methods were developed to model the control rods and boron injection systems of CNA-II. The insertion of the rods is oblique, and a special routine was added to PARCS to treat this effect. CFD results combined with specialized mapping routines were used to model the boron injection system. In all cases there was good agreement in the results which provided confidence in the neutronics methods and modeling. A coupled code benchmark between U of M and U of Pisa is ongoing and results are still preliminary. Under a LOCA transient, the best estimate behavior of the core appears to be acceptable.

  1. Methods and Model Development for Coupled RELAP5/PARCS Analysis of the Atucha-II Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.M.; Collins, B.S.; Xu, Y.; Downar, Th.J.; Madariaga, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to analyze the steady state and transient behavior of CNA-II, several tasks were required. Methods and models were developed in several areas. HELIOS lattice models were developed and benchmarked against WIMS/MCNP5 results generated by NA-SA. Cross-sections for the coupled RELAP5/PARCS calculation were extracted from HELIOS within the Gen PMAXS framework. The validation of both HELIOS and PARCS was performed primarily by comparisons to WIMS/PUMA and MCNP for idealized models. Special methods were developed to model the control rods and boron injection systems of CNA-II. The insertion of the rods is oblique, and a special routine was added to PARCS to treat this effect. CFD results combined with specialized mapping routines were used to model the boron injection system. In all cases there was good agreement in the results which provided confidence in the neutronics methods and modeling. A coupled code benchmark between U of M and U of Pisa is ongoing and results are still preliminary. Under a LOCA transient, the best estimate behavior of the core appears to be acceptable

  2. Construction of a coarse-grain quasi-classical trajectory method. II. Comparison against the direct molecular simulation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, R. L.; Grover, M. S.; Schwartzentruber, T. E.; Panesi, M.

    2018-02-01

    This work presents the analysis of non-equilibrium energy transfer and dissociation of nitrogen molecules (N2(g+1Σ) ) using two different approaches: the direct molecular simulation (DMS) method and the coarse-grain quasi-classical trajectory (CG-QCT) method. The two methods are used to study thermochemical relaxation in a zero-dimensional isochoric and isothermal reactor in which the nitrogen molecules are heated to several thousand degrees Kelvin, forcing the system into strong non-equilibrium. The analysis considers thermochemical relaxation for temperatures ranging from 10 000 to 25 000 K. Both methods make use of the same potential energy surface for the N2(g+1Σ ) -N2(g+1Σ ) system taken from the NASA Ames quantum chemistry database. Within the CG-QCT method, the rovibrational energy levels of the electronic ground state of the nitrogen molecule are lumped into a reduced number of bins. Two different grouping strategies are used: the more conventional vibrational-based grouping, widely used in the literature, and energy-based grouping. The analysis of both the internal state populations and concentration profiles show excellent agreement between the energy-based grouping and the DMS solutions. During the energy transfer process, discrepancies arise between the energy-based grouping and DMS solution due to the increased importance of mode separation for low energy states. By contrast, the vibrational grouping, traditionally considered state-of-the-art, captures well the behavior of the energy relaxation but fails to consistently predict the dissociation process. The deficiency of the vibrational grouping model is due to the assumption of strict mode separation and equilibrium of rotational energy states. These assumptions result in errors predicting the energy contribution to dissociation from the rotational and vibrational modes, with rotational energy actually contributing 30%-40% of the energy required to dissociate a molecule. This work confirms the

  3. "I love my ECPs": challenges to bridging emergency contraceptive users to more effective contraceptive methods in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Engle, Kelly Ladin; Hinson, Laura; Chin-Quee, Dawn

    2011-07-01

    Emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) are becoming more popular, yet little is known about the contraceptive preferences of women who take ECPs. Women purchasing ECPs were recruited from pharmacies in Accra, Ghana. A total of 24 semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted in May 2008. Nearly all participants preferred ECPs to other contraceptive methods. Although fear of side effects from oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), intrauterine devices and injectables were deterrents to use of those methods, side effects from ECPs were acceptable to this small and highly self-selected group of ECP users. Participants had little knowledge about how other contraceptive methods work and expressed a strong distrust and dislike of condoms. Study participants loved their ECPs, despite minor discomforts like bleeding, and most had no concerns about repeated use, though these findings may not apply to women outside Accra or women who obtain ECPs from non-pharmacy settings. Future interventions should work to dispel myths about OCPs, condoms and other modern methods, and focus on basic contraception education.

  4. Two fluid space-time discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. Part II: Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sollie, W.E.H.; van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The numerical method for two fluid flow computations presented in Sollie, Bokhove \\& van der Vegt, Two Fluid Space-Time Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method. Part I: Numerical Algorithm is applied to a number of one and two dimensional single and two fluid test problems, including a magma -

  5. An Analysis of U.S. Sex Education Programs and Evaluation Methods. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Douglas; And Others

    This volume, second in a series of five, focuses on methods to evaluate sex education programs. It is presented in five chapters. Chapter One critically reviews previously used methods of evaluating programs and makes suggestions for improving those evaluations. Problems of experimental designs which incorporate an experimental/control group and…

  6. Constrained Optimization Methods in Health Services Research-An Introduction: Report 1 of the ISPOR Optimization Methods Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, William; Buyukkaramikli, Nasuh; Thokala, Praveen; Morton, Alec; Sir, Mustafa Y; Marshall, Deborah A; Tosh, Jon; Padula, William V; Ijzerman, Maarten J; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S

    2017-03-01

    Providing health services with the greatest possible value to patients and society given the constraints imposed by patient characteristics, health care system characteristics, budgets, and so forth relies heavily on the design of structures and processes. Such problems are complex and require a rigorous and systematic approach to identify the best solution. Constrained optimization is a set of methods designed to identify efficiently and systematically the best solution (the optimal solution) to a problem characterized by a number of potential solutions in the presence of identified constraints. This report identifies 1) key concepts and the main steps in building an optimization model; 2) the types of problems for which optimal solutions can be determined in real-world health applications; and 3) the appropriate optimization methods for these problems. We first present a simple graphical model based on the treatment of "regular" and "severe" patients, which maximizes the overall health benefit subject to time and budget constraints. We then relate it back to how optimization is relevant in health services research for addressing present day challenges. We also explain how these mathematical optimization methods relate to simulation methods, to standard health economic analysis techniques, and to the emergent fields of analytics and machine learning. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A simple and rapid identification method for newly emerged porcine Deltacoronavirus with loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanfan Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine Deltacoronavirus (PDCoV is a newly emerged enteropathogenic coronavirus that causes diarrhea and mortality in neonatal piglets. PDCoV has spread to many countries around the world, leading to significant economic losses in the pork industry. Therefore, a rapid and sensitive method for detection of PDCoV in clinical samples is urgently needed. Results In this study, we developed a single-tube one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP assay specific for nucleocapsid gene to diagnose and monitor PDCoV infections. The detection limit of RT-LAMP assay was 1 × 101 copies of PDCoV, which was approximately 100-fold more sensitive than gel-based one-step reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. This assay could specifically amplify PDCoV and had no cross amplification with porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV, transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV, porcine kobuvirus (PKoV, porcine astrovirus (PAstV, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV, classic swine fever virus (CSFV, and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2. By screening a panel of clinical specimens (N = 192, this method presented a similar sensitivity with nested RT-PCR and was 1–2 log more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR in detection of PDCoV. Conclusions The RT-LAMP assay established in this study is a potentially valuable tool, especially in low-resource laboratories and filed settings, for a rapid diagnosis, surveillance, and molecular epidemiology investigation of PDCoV infections. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work for detection of newly emerged PDCoV with LAMP technology.

  8. Improved Linear Algebra Methods for Redshift Computation from Limited Spectrum Data - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Leslie; Waagen, Alex; Aijaz, Nabella; Hurley, Michael; Luis, Apolo; Rinsky, Joel; Satyavolu, Chandrika; Gazis, Paul; Srivastava, Ashok; Way, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Given photometric broadband measurements of a galaxy, Gaussian processes may be used with a training set to solve the regression problem of approximating the redshift of this galaxy. However, in practice solving the traditional Gaussian processes equation is too slow and requires too much memory. We employed several methods to avoid this difficulty using algebraic manipulation and low-rank approximation, and were able to quickly approximate the redshifts in our testing data within 17 percent of the known true values using limited computational resources. The accuracy of one method, the V Formulation, is comparable to the accuracy of the best methods currently used for this problem.

  9. Novel and validated titrimetric method for determination of selected angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists in pharmaceutical preparations and its comparison with UV spectrophotometric determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikant H. Patil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel and simple titrimetric method for determination of commonly used angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists (ARA-IIs is developed and validated. The direct acid base titration of four ARA-IIs, namely eprosartan mesylate, irbesartan, telmisartan and valsartan, was carried out in the mixture of ethanol:water (1:1 as solvent using standardized sodium hydroxide aqueous solution as titrant, either visually using phenolphthalein as an indicator or potentiometrically using combined pH electrode. The method was found to be accurate and precise, having relative standard deviation of less than 2% for all ARA-IIs studied. Also, it was shown that the method could be successfully applied to the assay of commercial pharmaceuticals containing the above-mentioned ARA-IIs. The validity of the method was tested by the recovery studies of standard addition to pharmaceuticals and the results were found to be satisfactory. Results obtained by this method were found to be in good agreement with those obtained by UV spectrophotometric method. For UV spectrophotometric analysis ethanol was used as a solvent and wavelength of 233 nm, 246 nm, 296 nm, and 250 nm was selected for determination of eprosartan mesylate, irbesartan, telmisartan, and valsartan respectively. The proposed titrimetric method is simple, rapid, convenient and sufficiently precise for quality control purposes. Keywords: Angiotensin-II-receptor antagonists, Titrimetric assay, UV spectrophotometry, Validation

  10. Method for the determination of technical specifications limiting temperature in EBR-II operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Hill, D.J.; Ku, J.Y.

    1994-01-01

    The methodology and analysis procedure to qualify the Mark-V and Mark-VA fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor II are summarized in this paper. Fuel performance data and design safety criteria are essential for thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety evaluations. Normal and off-normal operation duty cycles and transient classifications are required for the safety assessment of the fuels. The temperature limits of subassemblies were first determined by a steady-state thermal-structural and fuel damage analysis, in which a trial-and-error approach was used to predict the maximum allowable fuel pin temperature that satisfies the design criteria for steady-state normal operation. The steady-state temperature limits were used as the basis of the off-normal transient analysis to assess the safety performance of the fuel for anticipated, unlikely and extremely unlikely events. If the design criteria for the off-normal events are not satisfied, then the subassembly temperature limit is reduced and an iterative procedure is employed until all design criteria are met

  11. A method of experimental rheumatoid arthritis induction using collagen type II isolated from chicken sternal cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaoliang; Shotorbani, Siamak Sandoghchian; Jiang, Xugan; Ma, Rui; Shen, Huiling; Kong, Fanzhi; Xu, Huaxi

    2013-07-01

    At present, collagen‑induced arthritis (CIA) is the best known and most extensively used model for the immunological and pathological characteristics of human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This model is useful not only in aiding our understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease, but also in the development of new therapies. Bovine, porcine and human collagen has been used to induce CIA; however, response has been identified to vary between strains and injection conditions, and false positive results and reduced potency are common as a result of minor contaminants or deglycosylated protein. Therefore, in the present study, type II collagen (CII) was isolated and purified from chicken sternal cartilage and was found to successfully induce the RA model. Furthermore, T helper 17 (Th17) cells were observed to infiltrate the joint on day 45 following induction by CII. In vitro, expression of toll‑like receptor 2 (TLR2) increased in peritoneal macrophages stimulated by CII. In addition, blockage of TLR2 was identified to markedly decrease levels of TGF‑β and IL‑6 in the cell culture supernatant. The results indicate that CII isolated from chicken sternal cartilage may be recognized by TLR2 on macrophages, leading to TGF‑β and IL‑6 production and subsequent activation of Th17 cells which mediates CIA development.

  12. An Insight into the Anticancer Activities of Ru(II-Based Metallocompounds Using Docking Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ajibade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike organic molecules, reports on docking of metal complexes are very few; mainly due to the inadequacy of force fields in docking packages to appropriately characterize the metal atoms that consequentially hinder the rational design of metal-based drug complexes. In this study we have made used Molegro and Autodock to predict the anticancer activities of selected Ru(II complexes against twelve anticancer targets. We observed that introducing the quantum calculated atomic charges of the optimized geometries significantly improved the docking predictions of these anticancer metallocompounds. Despite several limitations in the docking of metal-based complexes, we obtained results that are highly correlated with the available experimental results. Most of our newly proposed metallocompounds are found theoretically to be better anticancer metallocompounds than all the experimentally proposed RAPTA complexes. An interesting features of a strong interactions of new modeled of metallocompounds against the two base edges of DNA strands suggest similar mechanisms of anticancer activities similar to that of cisplatin. There is possibility of covalent bonding between the metal center of the metallocompounds and the residues of the receptors DNA-1, DNA-2, HDAC7, HIS and RNR. However, the general results suggest the possibility of metals positioning the coordinated ligands in the right position for optimal receptor interactions and synergistic effects, rather than forming covalent bonds.

  13. Golden gate shuffling: a one-pot DNA shuffling method based on type IIs restriction enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Engler

    Full Text Available We have developed a protocol to assemble in one step and one tube at least nine separate DNA fragments together into an acceptor vector, with 90% of recombinant clones obtained containing the desired construct. This protocol is based on the use of type IIs restriction enzymes and is performed by simply subjecting a mix of 10 undigested input plasmids (nine insert plasmids and the acceptor vector to a restriction-ligation and transforming the resulting mix in competent cells. The efficiency of this protocol allows generating libraries of recombinant genes by combining in one reaction several fragment sets prepared from different parental templates. As an example, we have applied this strategy for shuffling of trypsinogen from three parental templates (bovine cationic trypsinogen, bovine anionic trypsinogen and human cationic trypsinogen each divided in 9 separate modules. We show that one round of shuffling using the 27 trypsinogen entry plasmids can easily produce the 19,683 different possible combinations in one single restriction-ligation and that expression screening of a subset of the library allows identification of variants that can lead to higher expression levels of trypsin activity. This protocol, that we call 'Golden Gate shuffling', is robust, simple and efficient, can be performed with templates that have no homology, and can be combined with other shuffling protocols in order to introduce any variation in any part of a given gene.

  14. Continuation Methods and Non-Linear/Non-Gaussian Estimation for Flight Dynamics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose herein to augment current NASA spaceflight dynamics programs with algorithms and software from three domains. First, we use parameter continuation methods...

  15. Monitoring of emerging pollutants in Guadiamar River basin (South of Spain): analytical method, spatial distribution and environmental risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Eva; Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Martín, Julia; Santos, Antonio; Santos, Juan Luis; Aparicio, Irene; Alonso, Esteban

    2016-12-01

    Guadiamar River is located in the southwest of the Iberian Peninsula and connects two protected areas in the South of Spain: Sierra Morena and Doñana National Park. It is sited in an area affected by urban, industrial and agriculture sewage pollution and with tradition on intensive mining activities. Most of the studies performed in this area have been mainly focused on the presence of heavy metals and, until now, little is known about the occurrence of other contaminants such as emerging organic pollutants (EOPs). In this work, an analytical method has been optimized and validated for monitoring of forty-seven EOPs in surface water. The analytical method has been applied to study the distribution and environmental risk of these pollutants in Guadiamar River basin. The analytical method was based on solid-phase extraction and determination by liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole-tandem mass spectrometry. The 60 % of the target compounds were found in the analyzed samples. The highest concentrations were found for two plasticizers (bisphenol A and di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate, mean concentration up to 930 ng/L) and two pharmaceutical compounds (caffeine (up to 623 ng/L) and salicylic acid (up to 318 ng/L)). This study allowed to evaluate the potential sources (industrial or urban) of the studied compounds and the spatial distribution of their concentrations along the river. Environmental risk assessment showed a major risk on the south of the river, mainly due to discharges of wastewater effluents.

  16. The CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels: II – The 3D case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Barone

    1993-05-01

    Full Text Available If the collisions are redefined as a flux a kinetic conservation law can be written in divergence form. This can be handled numerically, in the framework of Finite Particle Approximation, using the CRF-method. In this paper we use the CRF-method for semiconductors' intravalley collision kernels. We extend the results obtained in a previous paper to the case of a 3D momentum space.

  17. Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953) (French Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides a practical resource for emergency planning and fulfils, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. If used effectively, it will help users to develop a capability to adequately respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency

  18. Method for Developing Arrangements for Response to a Nuclear or Radiological Emergency (Updating IAEA-TECDOC-953) (Spanish Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides a practical resource for emergency planning and fulfils, in part, functions assigned to the IAEA in the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. If used effectively, it will help users to develop a capability to adequately respond to a nuclear or radiological emergency

  19. Specificity of the ion exchange/atomic absorption method for free copper(II) species determination in natural waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweileh, J.A.; Lucyk, D.; Kratochvil, B.; Cantwell, F.F.

    1987-02-15

    Concentrations of the free copper(II) species (Cu/sup 2 +/) measured by the ion exchange/atomic absorption (IEX) method in the presence of various concentrations of the ligands citrate, glycinate, phthalate, salicylate, chloride, and fulvate are compared to concentrations measured with a cupric ion selective electrode (ISE) and/or to concentrations calculated from known metal-ligand formation constants. The IEX method is considerably more sensitive for Cu/sup 2 +/ than the ISE method but is subject to interference from cationic and neutral copper complexes as well as from filterable colloids copper-hydroxo species at higher pH values. Accurate values of Cu/sup 2 +/ concentration are obtained by both methods in the presence of anionic copper-ligand complexes. Since fulvate, which is the principal ligand present in natural freshwaters, forms anionic copper complexes, the IEX method possesses adequate selectivity for measuring Cu/sup 2 +/ at trace levels in such waters. The complexing capacity of an acidic lake water with a very low dissolved organic carbon content was measured as 3.0 x 10/sup -8/ M by monitoring Cu/sup 2 +/ concentration by the IEX method during titration with copper nitrate.

  20. Two selective HPTLC methods for determination of some angiotensin II receptor antagonists in tablets and biological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Gamal A; Abd El-Wadood, Hanaa M; Khairy, Mohamed; Khorshed, Ahmed A

    2017-07-01

    Two simple, selective, precise and highly sensitive high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) methods have been developed and validated for analysis of five angiotensin II receptor antagonists, namely losartan, irbesartan valsartan, candesartan and olmesartan, which are widely used in clinical practice. HPTLC of the drugs was performed on pre-coated silica gel HPTLC plates 60 F 254 by development using a mobile phase composed of chloroform-acetone-glacial acetic acid (7.8:1.5:0.7m v/v/v), which was suitable for all of the studied drugs. The first method depended on utilizing reflectance/fluorescence mode for detection while the second method depended on using 2,3,5,6-tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone as spraying reagent for the first time to form orange spots scanned at 460 nm. A good linear relationship was obtained over the concentration ranges of 1.2-60 and 360-3000 ng/band while detection and quantification limits were in the ranges of 0.07-0.43, 45.2-140.49 and 0.21-1.29, 137.05-425.74 ng/band for reflectance/fluorescence and reflectance/absorbance methods respectively. The developed methods were applied successfully for their determination in tablets and spiked human plasma for reflectance/fluorescence method with good accuracy and precision, and so can be applied in the pharmacokinetic and bioavailability studies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A multicriteria model for ranking of improvement approaches in construction companies based on the PROMETHÉE II method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Maciel de Melo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of the construction production process may be improved using several different methods such as Lean Construction, ISO 9001, ISO 14001 or ISO 18001. Construction companies need a preliminary study and systematic implementation of changes to become more competitive and efficient. This paper presents a multicriteria decision model for the selection and ranking of such alternatives for improvement approaches regarding the aspects of quality, sustainability and safety, based on the PROMETHEE II method. The adoption of this model provides more confidence and visibility for decision makers. One of the differentiators of this model is the use of a fragmented set of improvement alternatives. These alternatives were combined with some restrictions to create a global set of alternatives. An application to three scenarios, considering realistic data, was developed. The results of the application show that the model should be incorporated into the strategic planning process of organizations.

  2. Evaluation of a Delphi technique based expert judgement method for LCA valuation - DELPHI II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakala, S.; Wilson, B.

    1999-01-01

    Transparency and certainty are essential qualities for an acceptable and trusted valuation method. Based on the evaluation of the expert judgement method developed in the Delphi I study both of these criteria may be only partially accomplished by such a method. As for the technical procedure the method is well documented and transparency is good. Argumentation of the judgements, however, should be increased. The quality of the valuation indexes is explicitly available, but their certainty is very low for most interventions. The opinions of the experts differ much from each other. How much this depends on different values and how much on differences in knowledge etc. is impossible to assess. Also, how much the technique used and the statistical handling of the expert answers may have impacted the eventual scores of different interventions is difficult to assess. However, application of the expert judgement by means of the Delphi-technique to LCA valuation is a new idea, and, consequently, the method is still very much under development, far from maturity. This should be taken into account when considering the results out of the evaluation of the case study, which was the third of the kind in Europe

  3. Development of polymer film dosage forms of lidocaine for buccal administration: II. Comparison of preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hirokazu; Nakamori, Takahiko; Arakawa, Yotaro; Iida, Kotaro; Danjo, Kazumi

    2002-11-01

    In previous studies, we prepared film dosage forms of lidocaine (LC) with hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as a film base using the solvent evaporation (SE) method. However, from the viewpoint of environmental issues, a reduction in organic solvent use in pharmaceutical and other industries is required. In this study, we prepared the LC films by direct compression of the physical mixture (DCPM method) and direct compression of the spray dried powder (DCSD method). Magnesium stearate, which was required as a lubricant for direct compression, showed no effect on the LC release rate. The LC release rate (%/h) was independent of the compression pressure, but a higher pressure was preferable to easily remove the film from the punches. An increase in the film weight decreased the LC release rate expressed in %/h, whereas no significant effect of film weight was observed on the LC release rate from unit surface area expressed in mg/h/cm(2). The LC release rate (%/h) was independent of the LC content, suggesting that the LC release rate (mg/h) can be quantitatively controlled by changing the LC content in the formulation. The LC release rate and penetration rate were affected by the preparation method; that is, DCPM method dosage form. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association J Pharm Sci 91:2424-2432, 2002

  4. Studying Emerge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael; Selin, Cynthia; Rodegher, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The Emerge event, held in Tempe, AZ in March 2012, brought together a range of scientists, artists, futurists, engineers and students in order to experiment with innovative methods for thinking about the future. These methodological techniques were tested through nine workshops, each of which made...... use of a different format; Emerge as a whole, then, offered an opportunity to study a diverse set of future-oriented engagement practices. We conducted an event ethnography, in which a team of 11 researchers collaboratively developed accounts of the practices at play within Emerge and its workshops...

  5. Evaluation of a Delphi technique based expert judgement method for LCA valuation - DELPHI II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virtanen, Y.; Torkkeli, S. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Environmental Technology; Wilson, B. [Landbank Environmental Research and Consulting, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    Because of the complexity and trade-offs between different points of the life cycles of the analysed systems, a method which measures the environmental damage caused by each intervention is needed in order to make a choice between the products. However, there is no commonly agreed methodology for this particular purpose. In most of the methods the valuation is implicitly or explicitly based on economic criteria. For various reasons, however, economically obtained criteria do not necessarily reflect ecological arguments correctly. Thus, there is a need for new, ecologically based valuation methods. One such approach is the expert judgement method, based on the Delphi technique, which rejects the economic basis in favour of the judgements of a group of environmental experts. However, it is not self evident that the expert judgement based environmental rating of interventions will be essentially more correct and certain than other methods. In this study the method was evaluated at different points of the procedure in order to obtain a picture of the quality of the indexes produced. The evaluation was based on an actual Delphi study made in 1995-1996 in Finland, Sweden and Norway. The main questions addressed were the significance of the results and the operational quality of the Delphi procedure. The results obtained by applying the expert method indexes were also compared with the results obtained with other valuation methods for the background life cycle inventory of the case study. Additional material included feedback data from panellists of the case study, collected with a questionnaire. The questionnaire data was analysed to identify major dimensions in the criteria for evaluating interventions and correlation of the final indexes of the Delphi I study with these dimensions. The rest of the questionnaire material was used to document panellists' opinions and experiences of the Delphi process, familiarity with the environmental impacts of various

  6. Solar radiation measurements in forests - II. methods based on the principle of hemispherical photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaci, J.; Kolar, U.; Thormann, J.-J.

    1999-01-01

    The know-how in the field of solar radiation distribution in forests is important for basic ecological investigations and silvicultural practice. Three methods of solar radiation assessment based on hemispherical canopy photography are compared in the present article: a hemispherical photography by means of a fish-eye lens, a horizontoscope and the ALI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer. Experiences, improved methods and a drawing of a horizontoscope stand which was elaborated at the Chair of Silviculture are presented. Fairly good results with some limitations can be achieved with the improved stable horizontoscope in silvicultural work. Hemispherical photography is appropriate for the assessment of light conditions in all stand types and can thus be used in research work. The method has recently been undergoing intensive development. Digitalization of the entire system will speed up standardization. The ALI-2000 instrument is highly suitable for regeneration research in conditions of abundant plant vegetation, in reach sites and modified stands [sl

  7. Evaluation of a Delphi technique based expert judgement method for LCA valuation - DELPHI II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtanen, Y.; Torkkeli, S.

    1999-01-01

    Because of the complexity and trade-offs between different points of the life cycles of the analysed systems, a method which measures the environmental damage caused by each intervention is needed in order to make a choice between the products. However, there is no commonly agreed methodology for this particular purpose. In most of the methods the valuation is implicitly or explicitly based on economic criteria. For various reasons, however, economically obtained criteria do not necessarily reflect ecological arguments correctly. Thus, there is a need for new, ecologically based valuation methods. One such approach is the expert judgement method, based on the Delphi technique, which rejects the economic basis in favour of the judgements of a group of environmental experts. However, it is not self evident that the expert judgement based environmental rating of interventions will be essentially more correct and certain than other methods. In this study the method was evaluated at different points of the procedure in order to obtain a picture of the quality of the indexes produced. The evaluation was based on an actual Delphi study made in 1995-1996 in Finland, Sweden and Norway. The main questions addressed were the significance of the results and the operational quality of the Delphi procedure. The results obtained by applying the expert method indexes were also compared with the results obtained with other valuation methods for the background life cycle inventory of the case study. Additional material included feedback data from panellists of the case study, collected with a questionnaire. The questionnaire data was analysed to identify major dimensions in the criteria for evaluating interventions and correlation of the final indexes of the Delphi I study with these dimensions. The rest of the questionnaire material was used to document panellists' opinions and experiences of the Delphi process, familiarity with the environmental impacts of various interventions

  8. Mean Field Type Control with Congestion (II): An Augmented Lagrangian Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achdou, Yves, E-mail: achdou@ljll.univ-paris-diderot.fr; Laurière, Mathieu [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions, UMR 7598, UPMC, CNRS (France)

    2016-12-15

    This work deals with a numerical method for solving a mean-field type control problem with congestion. It is the continuation of an article by the same authors, in which suitably defined weak solutions of the system of partial differential equations arising from the model were discussed and existence and uniqueness were proved. Here, the focus is put on numerical methods: a monotone finite difference scheme is proposed and shown to have a variational interpretation. Then an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers for solving the variational problem is addressed. It is based on an augmented Lagrangian. Two kinds of boundary conditions are considered: periodic conditions and more realistic boundary conditions associated to state constrained problems. Various test cases and numerical results are presented.

  9. Integral method for the calculation of Hawking radiation in dispersive media. II. Asymmetric asymptotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Analog gravity experiments make feasible the realization of black hole space-times in a laboratory setting and the observational verification of Hawking radiation. Since such analog systems are typically dominated by dispersion, efficient techniques for calculating the predicted Hawking spectrum in the presence of strong dispersion are required. In the preceding paper, an integral method in Fourier space is proposed for stationary 1+1-dimensional backgrounds which are asymptotically symmetric. Here, this method is generalized to backgrounds which are different in the asymptotic regions to the left and right of the scattering region.

  10. Lagrangian methods in plasma dynamics. II - Construction of Lagrangians for plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, J. P.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of the construction of suitable Lagrangian functions for the dynamics of a cold plasma in such a way as to retain the relativistically covariant formalism. In one method, this is achieved by the introduction of a set of three variables which label the world lines of the particles. A second method results in a Clebsch-type representation. Sturrock's relativistic Lagrangian and Low's hot plasma Lagrangian are also briefly discussed in the context of the present work. The behavior of the canonical stress tensor is considered. The applicability of many of the general results in part I (Dougherty, 1970) is ensured by establishing the existence of the Lagrangian function.

  11. Novel method to sample very high power CO2 lasers: II Continuing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric, John; Seibert, Daniel B., II; Green, Lawrence I.

    2005-04-01

    For the past 28 years, the Laser Hardened Materials Evaluation Laboratory (LHMEL) at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH, has worked with CO2 lasers capable of producing continuous energy up to 150 kW. These lasers are used in a number of advanced materials processing applications that require accurate spatial energy measurements of the laser. Conventional non-electronic methods are not satisfactory for determining the spatial energy profile. This paper describes continuing efforts in qualifying the new method in which a continuous, real-time electronic spatial energy profile can be obtained for very high power, (VHP) CO2 lasers.

  12. Collection evaluation in University libraries (II. Methods based on collection use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Àngels Massísimo i Sánchez de Boado

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This is our second paper devoted to the collection evaluation in the university libraries. Seven methods are described, based on collection use. Their advantages and disadvantages are discussed, as well as their usefulness for a range of library types

  13. Methodological issues affecting the study of fish parasites. II. Sampling method affects ectoparasite studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvach, Yuriy; Ondračková, Markéta; Janáč, Michal; Jurajda, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 1 (2016), s. 59-66 ISSN 0177-5103 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP505/12/G112 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Parasite community * Fish sampling method * Methodology * Parasitological examination * Rutilus rutilus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.549, year: 2016

  14. The ion exchange and its connection the industry II.- Calculation methods for installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Lopez Perez, B.; Gutierrez Jodra, L.

    1960-01-01

    An exposure is made of calculation methods for ion exchange installations based on kinetic considerations and similarity with other unitary operations. Factors to be experimentally obtained as well as difficulties which may occur in its determination are also given. Calculation procedures most commonly used in industry are enclosed and explained with numerical resolution of a problem of water demineralization. (Author) 22 refs

  15. Performances of analytical methods for freshwater analysis assessed through intercomparison exercises. II. Major ions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert MUNTAU

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available From 1991 to 1997, nine intercomparison exercises on rainwater and freshwater samples were held in the framework of an activity connecting laboratories participating in different projects (Environmental studies in the Mediterranean basin, Italian network for the study of wet deposition, Acidification of mountain lakes, Limnological studies of Lake Léman, Monitoring of atmospheric deposition in forests. The number of participants increased from 72 in 1991 to 177 in 1997. Among the measured variables (pH, conductivity, alkalinity, major ions and nutrients, Ca, Mg, Na, K, ammonium, sulphate, chloride and nitrate are considered in this paper. The methods commonly used by the laboratories involved in the exercises are compared for precision, and an estimate of the performance of each method at different concentrations is made. The results show that some of the participating laboratories use analytical methods which are not reliable for the concentration values occurring in freshwater and/or in rainwater. However, outliers are also produced by laboratories using well-performing methods, indicating the importance of introducing analytical control procedures.

  16. Spine surgeon's kinematics during discectomy, part II: operating table height and visualization methods, including microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Yoon; Kim, Kyung Hyun; Kuh, Sung Uk; Chin, Dong Kyu; Kim, Keun Su; Cho, Yong Eun

    2014-05-01

    Surgeon spine angle during surgery was studied ergonomically and the kinematics of the surgeon's spine was related with musculoskeletal fatigue and pain. Spine angles varied depending on operation table height and visualization method, and in a previous paper we showed that the use of a loupe and a table height at the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum are optimal for reducing musculoskeletal loading. However, no studies have previously included a microscope as a possible visualization method. The objective of this study is to assess differences in surgeon spine angles depending on operating table height and visualization method, including microscope. We enrolled 18 experienced spine surgeons for this study, who each performed a discectomy using a spine surgery simulator. Three different methods were used to visualize the surgical field (naked eye, loupe, microscope) and three different operating table heights (anterior superior iliac spine, umbilicus, the midpoint between the umbilicus and the sternum) were studied. Whole spine angles were compared for three different views during the discectomy simulation: midline, ipsilateral, and contralateral. A 16-camera optoelectronic motion analysis system was used, and 16 markers were placed from the head to the pelvis. Lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, cervical lordosis, and occipital angle were compared between the different operating table heights and visualization methods as well as a natural standing position. Whole spine angles differed significantly depending on visualization method. All parameters were closer to natural standing values when discectomy was performed with a microscope, and there were no differences between the naked eye and the loupe. Whole spine angles were also found to differ from the natural standing position depending on operating table height, and became closer to natural standing position values as the operating table height increased, independent of the visualization method

  17. Patient flow within UK emergency departments: a systematic review of the use of computer simulation modelling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohiuddin, Syed; Busby, John; Savović, Jelena; Richards, Alison; Northstone, Kate; Hollingworth, William; Donovan, Jenny L; Vasilakis, Christos

    2017-05-09

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) is common in the UK as in other countries worldwide. Computer simulation is one approach used for understanding the causes of ED overcrowding and assessing the likely impact of changes to the delivery of emergency care. However, little is known about the usefulness of computer simulation for analysis of ED patient flow. We undertook a systematic review to investigate the different computer simulation methods and their contribution for analysis of patient flow within EDs in the UK. We searched eight bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, COCHRANE, WEB OF SCIENCE, CINAHL, INSPEC, MATHSCINET and ACM DIGITAL LIBRARY) from date of inception until 31 March 2016. Studies were included if they used a computer simulation method to capture patient progression within the ED of an established UK National Health Service hospital. Studies were summarised in terms of simulation method, key assumptions, input and output data, conclusions drawn and implementation of results. Twenty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 19 used discrete event simulation and 2 used system dynamics models. The purpose of many of these studies (n=16; 76%) centred on service redesign. Seven studies (33%) provided no details about the ED being investigated. Most studies (n=18; 86%) used specific hospital models of ED patient flow. Overall, the reporting of underlying modelling assumptions was poor. Nineteen studies (90%) considered patient waiting or throughput times as the key outcome measure. Twelve studies (57%) reported some involvement of stakeholders in the simulation study. However, only three studies (14%) reported on the implementation of changes supported by the simulation. We found that computer simulation can provide a means to pretest changes to ED care delivery before implementation in a safe and efficient manner. However, the evidence base is small and poorly developed. There are some methodological, data, stakeholder

  18. Chemicals of emerging concern in water and bottom sediment in Great Lakes areas of concern, 2010 to 2011-Collection methods, analyses methods, quality assurance, and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy E.; Langer, Susan K.; Menheer, Michael A.; Foreman, William T.; Furlong, Edward T.; Smith, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) cooperated with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on a study to identify the occurrence of chemicals of emerging concern (CECs) in water and bottom-sediment samples collected during 2010–11 at sites in seven areas of concern (AOCs) throughout the Great Lakes. Study sites include tributaries to the Great Lakes in AOCs located near Duluth, Minn.; Green Bay, Wis.; Roches­ter, N.Y.; Detroit, Mich.; Toledo, Ohio; Milwaukee, Wis.; and Ashtabula, Ohio. This report documents the collection meth­ods, analyses methods, quality-assurance data and analyses, and provides the data for this study. Water and bottom-sediment samples were analyzed at the USGS National Water Quality Laboratory in Denver, Colo., for a broad suite of CECs. During this study, 135 environmental and 23 field dupli­cate samples of surface water and wastewater effluent, 10 field blank water samples, and 11 field spike water samples were collected and analyzed. Sixty-one of the 69 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 4433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.002 to 11.2 micrograms per liter. Twenty-eight of the 48 pharmaceuticals (research method 8244) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.0029 to 22.0 micro­grams per liter. Ten of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols analyzed (research method 4434) were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.16 to 10,000 nanograms per liter. During this study, 75 environmental, 13 field duplicate samples, and 9 field spike samples of bottom sediment were collected and analyzed for a wide variety of CECs. Forty-seven of the 57 wastewater indicator chemicals (laboratory method 5433) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.921 to 25,800 nanograms per gram. Seventeen of the 20 steroid hormones and sterols (research method 6434) analyzed were detected at concentrations ranging from 0.006 to 8,921 nanograms per gram. Twelve of

  19. Emergency treatment of male blunt urethral trauma in China: Outcome of different methods in comparison with other countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumeng Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of male urethral trauma is always a challenging problem. In China, as the incidence of urethral trauma keeps rising, more and more studies relating to this are being published. To compare the outcome of different emergency treatments in China and other countries, we searched Chinese and English literature about this topic in the past 16 years. A total of 167 studies involving 5314 patients were included, with 144 in Chinese and 23 in English. All studies were retrospective in nature. Based on the analyses, surgical methods include open realignment, endoscopic realignment and primary repair, and we summarized and compared the success rate and complications (mainly erectile dysfunction and incontinence of each method. We found that realignment of posterior urethra has similar success rate in China and other countries, but the outcome of realignment of anterior urethra is variable. The reason remains unknown. While long abandoned in Western countries, primary repair of anterior urethra is still an option in China and has high success rate. Keywords: Urethral trauma, Urethrogram, Endoscopic realignment, Primary repair

  20. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  1. A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part II: Artificial heat exchanges for multiphase shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpas, Fabien; Franquet, Erwin; Saurel, Richard; Le Metayer, Olivier

    2007-08-01

    The relaxation-projection method developed in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, E. Franquet, E. Daniel, O. Le Metayer, A relaxation-projection method for compressible flows. Part I: The numerical equation of state for the Euler equations, J. Comput. Phys. (2007) 822-845] is extended to the non-conservative hyperbolic multiphase flow model of Kapila et al. [A.K. Kapila, Menikoff, J.B. Bdzil, S.F. Son, D.S. Stewart, Two-phase modeling of deflagration to detonation transition in granular materials: reduced equations, Physics of Fluids 13(10) (2001) 3002-3024]. This model has the ability to treat multi-temperatures mixtures evolving with a single pressure and velocity and is particularly interesting for the computation of interface problems with compressible materials as well as wave propagation in heterogeneous mixtures. The non-conservative character of this model poses however computational challenges in the presence of shocks. The first issue is related to the Riemann problem resolution that necessitates shock jump conditions. Thanks to the Rankine-Hugoniot relations proposed and validated in Saurel et al. [R. Saurel, O. Le Metayer, J. Massoni, S. Gavrilyuk, Shock jump conditions for multiphase mixtures with stiff mechanical relaxation, Shock Waves 16 (3) (2007) 209-232] exact and approximate 2-shocks Riemann solvers are derived. However, the Riemann solver is only a part of a numerical scheme and non-conservative variables pose extra difficulties for the projection or cell average of the solution. It is shown that conventional Godunov schemes are unable to converge to the exact solution for strong multiphase shocks. This is due to the incorrect partition of the energies or entropies in the cell averaged mixture. To circumvent this difficulty a specific Lagrangian scheme is developed. The correct partition of the energies is achieved by using an artificial heat exchange in the shock layer. With the help of an asymptotic analysis this heat exchange takes a similar form as

  2. Electroencephalographic sleep of healthy children. Part II: Findings using automated delta and REM sleep measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, P A; Reynolds, C F; Kupfer, D J; Houck, P

    1987-12-01

    Using earlier developed computer-based measurement methods, delta and REM activity were examined during sleep as a function of age, gender, and time of night in 85 healthy, 6- to 16-year-old children. Chronological age was found to account most strongly for differences in automated delta and REM count measures in this age range. Increasing age was shown to be associated with a significant decline in both automated measures, but the effect was much greater for the delta count measure. The age-related decline in delta wave activity was reflected primarily in a linear decline in 2.0-3.0 Hz delta activity, that is, in the faster end of the delta frequency band. Examination of these measurements in successive NREM and REM sleep periods confirmed that, in children as in adults, delta activity decreases and REM activity increases across the night. Findings are discussed relative to those obtained in the same children using standard measurement methods.

  3. Sensitive method for precise measurement of endogenous angiotensins I, II and III in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, M.; Yoshida, K.; Akabane, S.

    1987-01-01

    We measured endogenous angiotensins (ANGs) I, IIandIII using a system of extraction by Sep-Pak column followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with radioimmunoassay (RIA). An excellent separation of ANGs was obtained by HPLC. The recovery of ANGs I, IIandIII was 80-84%, when these authentic peptides were added to 6 ml of plasma. The coefficient of variation of the ANGs was 0.04-0.09 for intra-assay and 0.08-0.13 for inter-assay, thereby indicating a good reproducibility. Plasma ANGs I, IIandIII measured by this method in 5 normal volunteers were 51,4.5 and 1.2 pg/ml. In the presence of captopril, ANGs IIandIII decreased by 84% and 77%, respectively, while ANG I increased 5.1 times. This method is therefore useful to assess the precise levels of plasma ANGs

  4. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zo, Jae Ill; Park, Jong Ho; Baek, Hee Jong

    1999-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage 1, 2, 3A non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study

  5. General Superfield Quantization Method. II. General Superfield Theory of Fields: Hamiltonian Formalism

    OpenAIRE

    Reshetnyak, A. A.

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of started in Ref.[1] construction procedure of the general superfield quantization method for gauge theories in Lagrangian formalism the rules for Hamiltonian formulation of general superfield theory of fields (GSTF) are introduced and are on the whole considered. Mathematical means developed in [1] for Lagrangian formulation of GSTF are extended to use in Hamiltonian one. Hamiltonization for Lagrangian formulation of GSTF via Legendre transform of superfunction $S_{L}\\bigl(...

  6. Formal Solutions for Polarized Radiative Transfer. II. High-order Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janett, Gioele; Steiner, Oskar; Belluzzi, Luca, E-mail: gioele.janett@irsol.ch [Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL), 6605 Locarno-Monti (Switzerland)

    2017-08-20

    When integrating the radiative transfer equation for polarized light, the necessity of high-order numerical methods is well known. In fact, well-performing high-order formal solvers enable higher accuracy and the use of coarser spatial grids. Aiming to provide a clear comparison between formal solvers, this work presents different high-order numerical schemes and applies the systematic analysis proposed by Janett et al., emphasizing their advantages and drawbacks in terms of order of accuracy, stability, and computational cost.

  7. A fully automated and scalable timing probe-based method for time alignment of the LabPET II scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Arnaud; Thibaudeau, Christian; Bouchard, Jonathan; Gaudin, Émilie; Paulin, Caroline; Lecomte, Roger; Fontaine, Réjean

    2018-05-01

    A fully automated time alignment method based on a positron timing probe was developed to correct the channel-to-channel coincidence time dispersion of the LabPET II avalanche photodiode-based positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. The timing probe was designed to directly detect positrons and generate an absolute time reference. The probe-to-channel coincidences are recorded and processed using firmware embedded in the scanner hardware to compute the time differences between detector channels. The time corrections are then applied in real-time to each event in every channel during PET data acquisition to align all coincidence time spectra, thus enhancing the scanner time resolution. When applied to the mouse version of the LabPET II scanner, the calibration of 6 144 channels was performed in less than 15 min and showed a 47% improvement on the overall time resolution of the scanner, decreasing from 7 ns to 3.7 ns full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  8. The unified method: II. NLS on the half-line with t-periodic boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenells, J; Fokas, A S

    2012-01-01

    Boundary value problems for integrable nonlinear evolution PDEs formulated on the half-line can be analyzed by the unified method introduced by one of the authors and used extensively in the literature. The implementation of this general method to this particular class of problems yields the solution in terms of the unique solution of a matrix Riemann–Hilbert problem formulated in the complex k-plane (the Fourier plane), which has a jump matrix with explicit (x, t)-dependence involving four scalar functions of k, called spectral functions. Two of these functions depend on the initial data, whereas the other two depend on all boundary values. The most difficult step of the new method is the characterization of the latter two spectral functions in terms of the given initial and boundary data, i.e. the elimination of the unknown boundary values. For certain boundary conditions, called linearizable, this can be achieved by simply using algebraic manipulations. Here, we first present an effective characterization of the spectral functions in terms of the given initial and boundary data for the general case of non-linearizable boundary conditions. This characterization is based on the analysis of the so-called global relation and on the introduction of the so-called Gelfand–Levitan–Marchenko representations of the eigenfunctions defining the spectral functions. We then concentrate on the physically significant case of t-periodic Dirichlet boundary data. After presenting certain heuristic arguments which suggest that the Neumann boundary values become periodic as t → ∞, we show that for the case of the NLS with a sine-wave as Dirichlet data, the asymptotics of the Neumann boundary values can be computed explicitly at least up to third order in a perturbative expansion and indeed at least up to this order are asymptotically periodic. (paper)

  9. Application of blocking diagnosis methods to general circulation models. Part II: model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriopedro, D.; Trigo, R.M. [Universidade de Lisboa, CGUL-IDL, Faculdade de Ciencias, Lisbon (Portugal); Garcia-Herrera, R.; Gonzalez-Rouco, J.F. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra II, Facultad de C.C. Fisicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A previously defined automatic method is applied to reanalysis and present-day (1950-1989) forced simulations of the ECHO-G model in order to assess its performance in reproducing atmospheric blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. Unlike previous methodologies, critical parameters and thresholds to estimate blocking occurrence in the model are not calibrated with an observed reference, but objectively derived from the simulated climatology. The choice of model dependent parameters allows for an objective definition of blocking and corrects for some intrinsic model bias, the difference between model and observed thresholds providing a measure of systematic errors in the model. The model captures reasonably the main blocking features (location, amplitude, annual cycle and persistence) found in observations, but reveals a relative southward shift of Eurasian blocks and an overall underestimation of blocking activity, especially over the Euro-Atlantic sector. Blocking underestimation mostly arises from the model inability to generate long persistent blocks with the observed frequency. This error is mainly attributed to a bias in the basic state. The bias pattern consists of excessive zonal winds over the Euro-Atlantic sector and a southward shift at the exit zone of the jet stream extending into in the Eurasian continent, that are more prominent in cold and warm seasons and account for much of Euro-Atlantic and Eurasian blocking errors, respectively. It is shown that other widely used blocking indices or empirical observational thresholds may not give a proper account of the lack of realism in the model as compared with the proposed method. This suggests that in addition to blocking changes that could be ascribed to natural variability processes or climate change signals in the simulated climate, attention should be paid to significant departures in the diagnosis of phenomena that can also arise from an inappropriate adaptation of detection methods to the climate of the

  10. Utilization of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA Method in Increasing the Revenue of Emergency Department; a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shahrami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The balance between revenue and cost of an organization/system is essential to maintain its survival and quality of services. Emergency departments (ED are one of the most important parts of health care delivery system. Financial discipline of EDs, by increasing the efficiency and profitability, can directly affect the quality of care and subsequently patient satisfaction. Accordingly, the present study attempts to investigate failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA method in identifying the problems leading to the loss of ED revenue and offer solutions to help fix these problems. Methods: This prospective cohort study investigated the financial records of ED patients and evaluated the effective errors in reducing the revenue in ED of Imam Hossein hospital, Tehran, Iran, from October 2007 to November 2009. The whole department was divided based on FMEA into one main system and six subsystems. The study was divided in two phases. In the first phase, the problems leading to the loss in the revenue in each subsystem were identified and weighted to four groups using risk priority number (RPN, and the solutions for fixing them were planned. Then, at the second phase discovered defects in the first phase were fixed according to their priority. Finally, the impact of each solution was compared before and after interventions using the repeated measure ANOVA test. Results: At last, 100 financial records of ED patients were evaluated during the first phase of the study. The average of ED revenue in the six months of the first phase was 73.1±3.65 thousands US dollar/month. 12 types of errors were detected in the predefined subsystems. ED revenue rose from 73.1 to 153.1, 207.06, 240, and 320 thousands US dollar/month after solving of first, second, third, and fourth priority problems, respectively (337.75% increase in two years (p<0.001. 111.0% increase in the ED revenue after solving of first priority problems reveals that they were

  11. Utilization of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA Method in Increasing the Revenue of Emergency Department; a Prospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Shahrami

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The balance between revenue and cost of an organization/system is essential to maintain its survival and quality of services. Emergency departments (ED are one of the most important parts of health care delivery system. Financial discipline of EDs, by increasing the efficiency and profitability, can directly affect the quality of care and subsequently patient satisfaction. Accordingly, the present study attempts to investigate failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA method in identifying the problems leading to the loss of ED revenue and offer solutions to help fix these problems. Methods: This prospective cohort study investigated the financial records of ED patients and evaluated the effective errors in reducing the revenue in ED of Imam Hossein hospital, Tehran, Iran, from October 2007 to November 2009. The whole department was divided based on FMEA into one main system and six subsystems. The study was divided in two phases. In the first phase, the problems leading to the loss in the revenue in each subsystem were identified and weighted to four groups using risk priority number (RPN, and the solutions for fixing them were planned. Then, at the second phase discovered defects in the first phase were fixed according to their priority. Finally, the impact of each solution was compared before and after interventions using the repeated measure ANOVA test. Results: At last, 100 financial records of ED patients were evaluated during the first phase of the study. The average of ED revenue in the six months of the first phase was 73.1±3.65 thousands US dollar/month. 12 types of errors were detected in the predefined subsystems. ED revenue rose from 73.1 to 153.1, 207.06, 240, and 320 thousands US dollar/month after solving of first, second, third, and fourth priority problems, respectively (337.75% increase in two years (p<0.001. 111.0% increase in the ED revenue after solving of first priority problems reveals that they were

  12. Questionnaire Survey on Asthma Management of Japanese Allergists II. Treatment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuharu Tsukioka

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available A questionnaire on the treatment of asthma was sent to 586 physicians. They consisted of specialists authorized by the Japanese Society of Allergology and councillors of the society who were treating patients with bronchial asthma. Of the total of 306 (52% respondents, 241 replied to questions relating to adult asthma and 129 to questions relating to childhood asthma (including duplicate replies. For acute treatment, methods most commonly selected by physicians were, in increasing order of popularity, for adults: parenteral aminophylline, oxygen inhalation, parenteral steroids and parenteral adrenaline; for schoolchildren (6–16 years: parenteral aminophylline, inhaled β-stimulant, oxygen inhalation, inhaled β-stimulant + disodium cromoglycate (DSCG, parenteral steroids; and for infants (≤5 years: inhaled β-stimulant, parenteral aminophylline, oxygen inhalation, inhaled β-stimulant + DSCG and parenteral steroids. For maintenance treatment, methods most commonly selected by physicians were, in increasing order of popularity, for adults: oral administration of sustained-release theophylline, inhaled steroids and DSCG inhalation; for schoolchildren (6–16 years: DSCG inhalation, oral administration of sustained-release theophylline, oral administration of antiallergic agent preparation and (β-stimulant + DSCG inhalant; and for infants: DSCG inhalation, oral administration of sustained-release theophylline, oral administration of antiallergicagent preparation and β-stimulant + DSCG inhalant. The questionnaire results clearly showed that different drugs were selected for the treatment of asthma in adults, schoolchildren and infants.

  13. Non-animal methods to predict skin sensitization (II): an assessment of defined approaches *.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Alépée, Nathalie; Allen, David; Ashikaga, Takao; Casey, Warren; Clouet, Elodie; Cluzel, Magalie; Desprez, Bertrand; Gellatly, Nichola; Göbel, Carsten; Kern, Petra S; Klaric, Martina; Kühnl, Jochen; Martinozzi-Teissier, Silvia; Mewes, Karsten; Miyazawa, Masaaki; Strickland, Judy; van Vliet, Erwin; Zang, Qingda; Petersohn, Dirk

    2018-02-23

    Skin sensitization is a toxicity endpoint of widespread concern, for which the mechanistic understanding and concurrent necessity for non-animal testing approaches have evolved to a critical juncture, with many available options for predicting sensitization without using animals. Cosmetics Europe and the National Toxicology Program Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods collaborated to analyze the performance of multiple non-animal data integration approaches for the skin sensitization safety assessment of cosmetics ingredients. The Cosmetics Europe Skin Tolerance Task Force (STTF) collected and generated data on 128 substances in multiple in vitro and in chemico skin sensitization assays selected based on a systematic assessment by the STTF. These assays, together with certain in silico predictions, are key components of various non-animal testing strategies that have been submitted to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development as case studies for skin sensitization. Curated murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and human skin sensitization data were used to evaluate the performance of six defined approaches, comprising eight non-animal testing strategies, for both hazard and potency characterization. Defined approaches examined included consensus methods, artificial neural networks, support vector machine models, Bayesian networks, and decision trees, most of which were reproduced using open source software tools. Multiple non-animal testing strategies incorporating in vitro, in chemico, and in silico inputs demonstrated equivalent or superior performance to the LLNA when compared to both animal and human data for skin sensitization.

  14. Fundamentals in Biostatistics for Investigation in Pediatric Dentistry: Part II -Biostatistical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Socorro; Garrocho-Rangel, Arturo

    The main purpose of the second part of this series was to provide the reader with some basic aspects of the most common biostatistical methods employed in health sciences, in order to better understand the validity, significance and reliability of the results from any article on Pediatric Dentistry. Currently, as mentioned in the first paper, Pediatric Dentists need basic biostatistical knowledge to be able to apply it when critically appraise a dental article during the Evidence-based Dentistry (EBD) process, or when participating in the development of a clinical study with dental pediatric patients. The EBD process provides a systematic approach of collecting, review and analyze current and relevant published evidence about oral health care in order to answer a particular clinical question; then this evidence should be applied in everyday practice. This second report describes the most commonly used statistical methods for analyzing and interpret collected data, and the methodological criteria to be considered when choosing the most appropriate tests for a specific study. These are available to Pediatric Dentistry practicants interested in reading or designing original clinical or epidemiological studies.

  15. Recovery of heavy elements from Sea water II. A new method of Uranium analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, D. C.; Bentley, W. C.

    1953-11-01

    On the basis of the somewhat limited number of analyses that have been reported to date, it would appear that the concentration in certain deep sea sediments of the uranium daughter products ioniuim and radium is higher than would be expected. Since it is most reasonable to assume that these products were derived from the uranium in the superimposed water column, the uranium content of sea water has been a matter of some interest. Since it is norrmally present only to the extent of a few parts per billion, and other salts to over l0' that level, its estimation in even a semi-quantitative manner was found to be a difficult matter for a considerable time. The problem was finally solved by methods developed by Hernegger and Karlik^ in 1935, and all of the assays reported to the present time (summarized in Appendix l) have been based on their techniques.

  16. Modified method of perturbed stationary states. II. Semiclassical and low-velocity quantal approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, T.A.

    1978-10-01

    For one-electron heteropolar systems, the wave-theoretic Lagrangian of Paper I 2 is simplified in two distinct approximations. The first is semiclassical; the second is quantal, for velocities below those for which the semiclassical treatment is reliable. For each approximation, unitarity and detailed balancing are discussed. Then, the variational method as described by Demkov is used to determine the coupled equations for the radial functions and the Euler-Lagrange equations for the translational factors which are part of the theory. Specific semiclassical formulae for the translational factors are given in a many-state approximation. Low-velocity quantal formulae are obtained in a one-state approximation. The one-state results of both approximations agree with an earlier determination by Riley. 14 references

  17. A restricted Steiner tree problem is solved by Geometric Method II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dazhi; Zhang, Youlin; Lu, Xiaoxu

    2013-03-01

    The minimum Steiner tree problem has wide application background, such as transportation system, communication network, pipeline design and VISL, etc. It is unfortunately that the computational complexity of the problem is NP-hard. People are common to find some special problems to consider. In this paper, we first put forward a restricted Steiner tree problem, which the fixed vertices are in the same side of one line L and we find a vertex on L such the length of the tree is minimal. By the definition and the complexity of the Steiner tree problem, we know that the complexity of this problem is also Np-complete. In the part one, we have considered there are two fixed vertices to find the restricted Steiner tree problem. Naturally, we consider there are three fixed vertices to find the restricted Steiner tree problem. And we also use the geometric method to solve such the problem.

  18. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  19. Neutron measurement at the thermal column of the Malaysian Triga Mark II reactor using gold foil activation method and TLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalbi, Safwan; Salleh, Wan Norhayati Wan; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Aliff Ashraff Rosdi, Muhammad; Syahir Sarkawi, Muhammad; Liyana Jamsari, Nur; Nasir, Nur Aishah Mohd

    2018-01-01

    In order to design facilities for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), the neutron measurement must be considered to obtain the optimal design of BNCT facility such as collimator and shielding. The previous feasibility study showed that the thermal column could generate higher thermal neutrons yield for BNCT application at the TRIGA MARK II reactor. Currently, the facility for BNCT are planned to be developed at thermal column. Thus, the main objective was focused on the thermal neutron and epithermal neutron flux measurement at the thermal column. In this measurement, pure gold and cadmium were used as a filter to obtain the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes from inside and outside of the thermal column door of the 200kW reactor power using a gold foil activation method. The results were compared with neutron fluxes using TLD 600 and TLD 700. The outcome of this work will become the benchmark for the design of BNCT collimator and the shielding

  20. Use of ICDAS-II, Fluorescence-Based Methods, and Radiography in Detection and Treatment Decision of Occlusal Caries Lesions: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Jablonski-Momeni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To use visual inspection (ICDAS-II, laser fluorescence (LF, fluorescence based camera (FC and radiographic examination (BW for detection of caries and for treatment decision. Methods. The occlusal sites of 84 extracted permanent teeth were examined using all methods and treatment decisions (preventive or operative care were recorded based on each method independently. For validation of the findings, fissures were opened with rotating instruments and clinical depth was determined as gold standard. Correlations (, sensitivity, specificity and AUC were calculated. McNemar test was used to show whether different methods led to significant changes in treatment decisions. Results. Highest correlation was found between ICDAS-II and FC ( 0.84, ICDAS-II and gold standard (0.82 and FC and gold standard (0.81. ICDAS-II provided the highest performance (AUC 1.0, followed by FC (0.95 and LF (0.88. The greatest difference was found for treatment planning of dentine lesions, where the use of FC (cut-offs according to the literature had the greatest agreement between operative treatment and dentine lesions, followed by use of ICDAS-II. Conclusion. ICDAS-II may have high potential for detection and treatment planning, and other devices, especially the fluorescence camera, can add substantial information to the visual examination, enabling examiners plan treatment more accurately.

  1. Potentiometric determination of stability constants of cyanoacetato complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and lead(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusinović, T; Filipović, I

    1981-03-01

    Stability constants of cyanoacetato complexes of cobalt(II), nickel(II), copper(II), zinc(II), cadmium(II) and lead(II) were determined potentiometrically at 25.0 +/- 0.1 degrees and ionic strength 2M (sodium perchlorate). The stability constants were evaluated by a weighted least-squares method.

  2. Pareto-Lognormal Modeling of Known and Unknown Metal Resources. II. Method Refinement and Further Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agterberg, Frits, E-mail: agterber@nrcan.gc.ca [Geological Survey of Canada (Canada)

    2017-07-01

    Pareto-lognormal modeling of worldwide metal deposit size–frequency distributions was proposed in an earlier paper (Agterberg in Nat Resour 26:3–20, 2017). In the current paper, the approach is applied to four metals (Cu, Zn, Au and Ag) and a number of model improvements are described and illustrated in detail for copper and gold. The new approach has become possible because of the very large inventory of worldwide metal deposit data recently published by Patiño Douce (Nat Resour 25:97–124, 2016c). Worldwide metal deposits for Cu, Zn and Ag follow basic lognormal size–frequency distributions that form straight lines on lognormal Q–Q plots. Au deposits show a departure from the straight-line model in the vicinity of their median size. Both largest and smallest deposits for the four metals taken as examples exhibit hyperbolic size–frequency relations and their Pareto coefficients are determined by fitting straight lines on log rank–log size plots. As originally pointed out by Patiño Douce (Nat Resour Res 25:365–387, 2016d), the upper Pareto tail cannot be distinguished clearly from the tail of what would be a secondary lognormal distribution. The method previously used in Agterberg (2017) for fitting the bridge function separating the largest deposit size–frequency Pareto tail from the basic lognormal is significantly improved in this paper. A new method is presented for estimating the approximate deposit size value at which the upper tail Pareto comes into effect. Although a theoretical explanation of the proposed Pareto-lognormal distribution model is not a required condition for its applicability, it is shown that existing double Pareto-lognormal models based on Brownian motion generalizations of the multiplicative central limit theorem are not applicable to worldwide metal deposits. Neither are various upper tail frequency amplification models in their present form. Although a physicochemical explanation remains possible, it is argued that

  3. Pareto-Lognormal Modeling of Known and Unknown Metal Resources. II. Method Refinement and Further Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agterberg, Frits

    2017-01-01

    Pareto-lognormal modeling of worldwide metal deposit size–frequency distributions was proposed in an earlier paper (Agterberg in Nat Resour 26:3–20, 2017). In the current paper, the approach is applied to four metals (Cu, Zn, Au and Ag) and a number of model improvements are described and illustrated in detail for copper and gold. The new approach has become possible because of the very large inventory of worldwide metal deposit data recently published by Patiño Douce (Nat Resour 25:97–124, 2016c). Worldwide metal deposits for Cu, Zn and Ag follow basic lognormal size–frequency distributions that form straight lines on lognormal Q–Q plots. Au deposits show a departure from the straight-line model in the vicinity of their median size. Both largest and smallest deposits for the four metals taken as examples exhibit hyperbolic size–frequency relations and their Pareto coefficients are determined by fitting straight lines on log rank–log size plots. As originally pointed out by Patiño Douce (Nat Resour Res 25:365–387, 2016d), the upper Pareto tail cannot be distinguished clearly from the tail of what would be a secondary lognormal distribution. The method previously used in Agterberg (2017) for fitting the bridge function separating the largest deposit size–frequency Pareto tail from the basic lognormal is significantly improved in this paper. A new method is presented for estimating the approximate deposit size value at which the upper tail Pareto comes into effect. Although a theoretical explanation of the proposed Pareto-lognormal distribution model is not a required condition for its applicability, it is shown that existing double Pareto-lognormal models based on Brownian motion generalizations of the multiplicative central limit theorem are not applicable to worldwide metal deposits. Neither are various upper tail frequency amplification models in their present form. Although a physicochemical explanation remains possible, it is argued that

  4. GB-InSAR monitoring and observational method for landslide emergency management: the Montaguto earthflow (AV, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ferrigno

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available On 10 March 2010, because of the heavy rainfall in the preceding days, the Montaguto landslide (Southern Italy reactivated, affecting both state road 90 Delle Puglie and the Rome–Bari railway. A similar event occurred on May 2005 and on September 2009. As a result, the National Civil Protection Department (DPC started an accurate monitoring and analysis program. A monitoring project using the GB-InSAR (ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar system was emplaced to investigate the landslide kinematics, plan urgent safety measures for risk mitigation and design long-term stabilization work.Here, we present the GB-InSAR monitoring system results and its applications in the observational method (OM approach. GB-InSAR is an established instrument for long-term campaigns aimed at early warning and monitoring during construction works. Our paper further develops these aspects in that it highlights how the OM based on the GB-InSAR technique can produce savings in terms of cost and time in engineering projects without compromising safety. This study focuses on the key role played by the monitoring activities during the design and planning activities, with special reference to the emergency phase.

  5. GB-InSAR monitoring and observational method for landslide emergency management: the Montaguto earthflow (AV, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrigno, Federica; Gigli, Giovanni; Fanti, Riccardo; Intrieri, Emanuele; Casagli, Nicola

    2017-06-01

    On 10 March 2010, because of the heavy rainfall in the preceding days, the Montaguto landslide (Southern Italy) reactivated, affecting both state road 90 Delle Puglie and the Rome-Bari railway. A similar event occurred on May 2005 and on September 2009. As a result, the National Civil Protection Department (DPC) started an accurate monitoring and analysis program. A monitoring project using the GB-InSAR (ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar) system was emplaced to investigate the landslide kinematics, plan urgent safety measures for risk mitigation and design long-term stabilization work.Here, we present the GB-InSAR monitoring system results and its applications in the observational method (OM) approach. GB-InSAR is an established instrument for long-term campaigns aimed at early warning and monitoring during construction works. Our paper further develops these aspects in that it highlights how the OM based on the GB-InSAR technique can produce savings in terms of cost and time in engineering projects without compromising safety. This study focuses on the key role played by the monitoring activities during the design and planning activities, with special reference to the emergency phase.

  6. Carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils by nonbiological laboratory methods: annotated bibliography. Part I. Laboratory methods of analysis. Part II. Analysis results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichorz, R. S.

    1976-04-09

    Recent emphases have been directed by Federal government regulatory agencies and other research groups on the carcinogenic effects of certain aromatic hydrocarbon components in naturally occurring petroleum products. These are used in plant operations, and underline the importance of evaluating environments. Since Rocky Flats Plant uses large quantities of fuel oil, the author was prompted to undertake a search of the chemical literature. Articles and accounts of studies were reviewed on nonbiological laboratory methods for determining the carcinogenicity of residual fuel oils and related high-boiling petroleum fractions. The physical and chemical methods involve the separation or measurement (or both) of polynuclear aromatic constituents which generally are responsible for the carcinogenic effects. Thus, the author suggests that the total carcinogenic activity of any petroleum product may not be due to a specific potent carcinogen, but rather to the cumulative effect of several individually weak carcinogens. The literature search is presented as an annotated bibliography, current as of January 1, 1975, and includes significant parts of the studies along with the total number of other references found when the citation was examined in its entirety. Part I deals with laboratory chemical and physical methods of determining carcinogenicity or polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (or both) in residual fuel oils and contains ten entries. Part II includes the results of testing specific fuel oils for carcinogenic constituents and contains eleven entries. An author index and subject categories are included.

  7. Weight and Veterans' Environments Study (WAVES) I and II: Rationale, Methods, and Cohort Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Shannon N; Tarlov, Elizabeth; Powell, Lisa M; Wing, Coady; Matthews, Stephen A; Slater, Sandy; Gordon, Howard S; Berbaum, Michael; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2018-03-01

    To present the rationale, methods, and cohort characteristics for 2 complementary "big data" studies of residential environment contributions to body weight, metabolic risk, and weight management program participation and effectiveness. Retrospective cohort. Continental United States. A total of 3 261 115 veterans who received Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care in 2009 to 2014, including 169 910 weight management program participants and a propensity score-derived comparison group. The VA MOVE! weight management program, an evidence-based lifestyle intervention. Body mass index, metabolic risk measures, and MOVE! participation; residential environmental attributes (eg, food outlet availability and walkability); and MOVE! program characteristics. Descriptive statistics presented on cohort characteristics and environments where they live. Forty-four percent of men and 42.8% of women were obese, whereas 4.9% of men and 9.9% of women engaged in MOVE!. About half of the cohort had at least 1 supermarket within 1 mile of their home, whereas they averaged close to 4 convenience stores (3.6 for men, 3.9 for women) and 8 fast-food restaurants (7.9 for men, 8.2 for women). Forty-one percent of men and 38.6% of women did not have a park, and 35.5% of men and 31.3% of women did not have a commercial fitness facility within 1 mile. Drawing on a large nationwide cohort residing in diverse environments, these studies are poised to significantly inform policy and weight management program design.

  8. Spectrophotometric Method for Differentiation of Human Skin Melanoma. II. Diagnostic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruk, V. G.; Ivanov, A. P.; Kvaternyuk, S. M.; Barunb, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental data on the spectral dependences of the optical diffuse reflection coefficient for skin from different people with melanoma or nevus are presented in the form of the probability density of the diffuse reflection coefficient for the corresponding pigmented lesions. We propose a noninvasive technique for differentiating between malignant and benign tumors, based on measuring the diffuse reflection coefficient for a specific patient and comparing the value obtained with a pre-set threshold. If the experimental result is below the threshold, then it is concluded that the person has melanoma; otherwise, no melanoma is present. As an example, we consider the wavelength 870 nm. We determine the risk of malignant transformation of a nevus (its transition to melanoma) for different measured diffuse reflection coefficients. We have studied the errors in the method, its operating characteristics and probability characteristics as the threshold diffuse reflection coefficient is varied. We find that the diagnostic confidence, sensitivity, specificity, and effectiveness (accuracy) parameters are maximum (>0.82) for a threshold of 0.45-0.47. The operating characteristics for the proposed technique exceed the corresponding parameters for other familiar optical approaches to melanoma diagnosis. Its distinguishing feature is operation at only one wavelength, and consequently implementation of the experimental technique is simplified and made less expensive.

  9. State-of-the-art of non-hormonal methods of contraception: II. Chemical barrier contraceptives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batár, István

    2010-04-01

    Chemical contraceptives mainly known as spermicides are one of the oldest types of contraceptives. The industrial revolution facilitated new developments, and they became a leading and widespread method. However, their use declined in the second half of the 20th century, and came under focus again only with the upsurge of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). The effectiveness of spermicides depends on the users' compliance and pregnancy rates vary widely: from 6/100 woman-year (with perfect use) to 26/100 woman-year (with typical use). Preparations consist of two components: an excipient (foam, cream, jelly, soluble film, suppository or tablet); and a chemical agent with spermicidal properties (acidic compound, microbicidal agent, detergent). The most widely used active agent has been the surface active (detergent) nonoxynol-9 (N-9). Based on their mode of action (surfactant effect of detergents, enzymatic action of microbicides on cell metabolism) spermicides were thought to provide protection against STIs including HIV. Recent studies have, however, shown that detergents may actually increase the risk. Because of this, there is an urgent need for a suitable non-detergent spermicide, and research should focus on developing new compounds to replace N-9 and other agents having similar undesired effects. This paper reviews the latest studies reporting results on these recent developments.

  10. Analysis in Banach spaces volume II probabilistic methods and operator theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hytönen, Tuomas; Veraar, Mark; Weis, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    This second volume of Analysis in Banach Spaces, Probabilistic Methods and Operator Theory, is the successor to Volume I, Martingales and Littlewood-Paley Theory. It presents a thorough study of the fundamental randomisation techniques and the operator-theoretic aspects of the theory. The first two chapters address the relevant classical background from the theory of Banach spaces, including notions like type, cotype, K-convexity and contraction principles. In turn, the next two chapters provide a detailed treatment of the theory of R-boundedness and Banach space valued square functions developed over the last 20 years. In the last chapter, this content is applied to develop the holomorphic functional calculus of sectorial and bi-sectorial operators in Banach spaces. Given its breadth of coverage, this book will be an invaluable reference to graduate students and researchers interested in functional analysis, harmonic analysis, spectral theory, stochastic analysis, and the operator-theoretic approac...

  11. Biocompatibility and antimicrobial activity of zinc(II doped hydroxyapatite, synthesized by hydrothermal method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kojić Vesna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain multifunctional materials with good biocompatibility and antimicrobial effect, hydroxyapatite (HAp doped with Zn2+ was synthesized by hydrothermal method. Powders with different content of zinc ions were synthesized and compared with undoped HAp to investigation of Zn2+ ion influence on the antimicrobial activity of HAp. Analyses of undoped and Zn2+-doped powders before and after thermal treatment at 1200ºC were performed by SEM and XRD. Antimicrobial effects of powders were examined in relation to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans in liquid medium. The results showed that the obtained powders have good antimicrobial activity, but higher antimicrobial activities of powders doped with Zn2+ were observed after annealing at 1200°C. For powders annealed at 1200°C in vitro biocompatibility tests MTT and DET with MRC-5 fibroblast cells in liquid medium were carried out. Based on MTT and DET tests it was shown that powders do not have a significant cytotoxic effect, which was confirmed by SEM analysis of MRC-5 fibroblast cells after theirs in vitro contact with powders. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45019 and FP7-REGPOT-2009-1 NANOTECH FTM

  12. The application of the k0-standardization method at the TRIGA Mark II reactor, Ljubljana, Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacimovic, Radojko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Stegnar, Peter; Smodis, Borut

    2002-01-01

    The k 0 -standardization method of neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA) was launched in the 1970s and since then continuously developed. Nowadays, k 0 -NAA became widespread as a practical analytical tool used to analyse different sample matrices. At the Jozef Stefan Institute (IJS), the KAYZERO/SOLCOI software package has been introduced for data processing after extensive testing and comparison with other available programs. In the process of validation of the software a suite of natural matrix reference materials (RMs) were used. Five certified reference materials (CRMs) from the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), two standard reference materials (SRMs) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), three RMs from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and one RM from IJS were analysed. Altogether, results for ten elements in inorganic matrices and twenty-one elements in organic matrices, obtained by k 0 -instrumental neutron activation analysis (k 0 -INAA), were compared to certified values. The results obtained show good agreement with certified or assigned values except for Fe and U in inorganic matrices, and Al and Cr in organic matrices. (author)

  13. Investigation of sol-gel transition by rheological methods. Part II. Results and discussion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KUDRYAVTSEV Pavel Gennadievich

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work rheological studies of the gelling process were carried out. We have developed a measuring system for studying the rheology of the gelation process. It consisted of several measuring cells of the Weiler-Rebinder type, system for automatic regulation of the composition of the medium and thermostabilization system. This complex is designed to measure the dependence of the value of the ultimate shear stress as a function of time, from the start of the sol-gel transition to the complete conversion of the sol to the gel. The developed device has a wide range of measured values of critical shear stresses τ0 = (0,05÷50000 Dyne/cm2. Using the developed instrument, it was possible to establish the shape of the initial section of the curve τ0 = f(t and develop a methodology for more accurate determination of gelation time. The developed method proved that the classical method for determining the start time of the sol-gel transition using the point of intersection of the tangent to the linear part of the rheological curve τ0 = f(t, gives significantly distorted results. A new phenomenon has been discovered: the kinetic curves in the coordinates of the Avrami-Erofeev-Bogolyubov equation have an inflection point which separates the kinetic curve into two parts, the initial and the final. It was found that the constant k in the Avrami–Erofeev–Bogolyubov equation does not depend on the temperature and is the same for both the initial and final parts of the kinetic curve. It depends only on the chemical nature of the reacting system. It was found that for the initial section of the kinetic curves, the value of the parameter n in the Avrami-Erofeev-Bogolyubov equation was n = 23,4±2,8 and, unlike the final section of the rheological curve, does not depend on temperature. A large value of this parameter can be interpreted as the average number of directions of growth of a fractal aggregate during its growth. The value of this parameter

  14. Mineral elements in dental composites by atomic and nuclear analytical methods. II. Improved analysis by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preoteasa, E.A.; Ciortea, C.; Fluerasu, D.; Enescu, S.E.; Preoteasa, Elena

    2000-01-01

    In the corrosive environment of the mouth, a diversity of interactions take place at the solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces of a tooth's filling. Moreover, the mineral elements of the restorative material may induce a complex response of the organism. The approach of these problems requires sensitive surface elemental analysis of the composite and of the dental enamel and dentine. Particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is such a method and has been applied in investigations of hard dental tissues; however, it was not used so far in the study of dental composites. We continue our study by evaluating the potential of PIXE for analysis of these materials. Three types of composites with two color shades each have been studied. The measurements were performed with 3 MeV protons, using a hyperpure Ge detector in a spectroscopic chain connected to a computer. The spectra were processed with the dedicated program Leone. PIXE without additional Al absorbent foil allowed the detection of Z > 14 elements in composites. In two glass- and ceramics-based materials we found: Ca, Zr, Ba, Yb and traces of Sr and In in Tetric Ceram (Vivadent); and Ca, Zr, Ba, Hf, possibly Mn, and traces of Ni, Ho, Ti, Fe, Cr in Valux Plus (3M Dental), after elimination of the escape peaks. In quartz-based Evicrol (Spofa), Si, Ca, Ti, Fe and traces of K, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn were seen. Materials with different color shades showed variations of Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu in Evicrol, as contrasted to Tetric Ceram and Valux Plus whose spectra were color-invariant. By its sensitivity and low background, PIXE enables the detection of many trace elements in dental composites; it could serve also in new materials' development and forensic expertise. (authors)

  15. Optimal Dose and Method of Administration of Intravenous Insulin in the Management of Emergency Hyperkalemia: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziv Harel

    Full Text Available Hyperkalemia is a common electrolyte disorder that can result in fatal cardiac arrhythmias. Despite the importance of insulin as a lifesaving intervention in the treatment of hyperkalemia in an emergency setting, there is no consensus on the dose or the method (bolus or infusion of its administration. Our aim was to review data in the literature to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of insulin in the management of emergency hyperkalemia.We searched several databases from their date of inception through February 2015 for eligible articles published in any language. We included any study that reported on the use of insulin in the management of hyperkalemia.We identified eleven studies. In seven studies, 10 units of regular insulin was administered (bolus in five studies, infusion in two studies, in one study 12 units of regular insulin was infused over 30 minutes, and in three studies 20 units of regular insulin was infused over 60 minutes. The majority of included studies were biased. There was no statistically significant difference in mean decrease in serum potassium (K+ concentration at 60 minutes between studies in which insulin was administered as an infusion of 20 units over 60 minutes and studies in which 10 units of insulin was administered as a bolus (0.79±0.25 mmol/L versus 0.78±0.25 mmol/L, P = 0.98 or studies in which 10 units of insulin was administered as an infusion (0.79±0.25 mmol/L versus 0.39±0.09 mmol/L, P = 0.1. Almost one fifth of the study population experienced an episode of hypoglycemia.The limited data available in the literature shows no statistically significant difference between the different regimens of insulin used to acutely lower serum K+ concentration. Accordingly, 10 units of short acting insulin given intravenously may be used in cases of hyperkalemia. Alternatively, 20 units of short acting insulin may be given as a continuous intravenous infusion over 60 minutes in patients with severe

  16. Effectiveness of Cooperative Learning (Jigsaw II) Method in Teaching English as a Foreign Language to Engineering Students (Case of Firat University, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomleksiz, M. N.

    2007-01-01

    The present study compares the effects of the cooperative jigsaw II method and traditional teacher-centred teaching method on improving vocabulary knowledge and active-passive voice in English as a foreign language for engineering students and the students' attitudes towards learning English. Jigsaw is a cooperative learning model that involves…

  17. Quantification of beta-cell function during IVGTT in Type II and non-diabetic subjects: assessment of insulin secretion by mathematical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjems, L L; Vølund, A; Madsbad, Sten

    2001-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We compared four methods to assess their accuracy in measuring insulin secretion during an intravenous glucose tolerance test in patients with Type II (non-insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus and with varying beta-cell function and matched control subjects. METHODS: Eight control...

  18. EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Pantić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency contraception refers to any device or drug that is used as an emergency procedure to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sexual intercourse.The first method of emergency contraception was high dose of estrogen. Concern about side effects led to subsequent development of the so-called Yuzpe regimen which combined ethinil estradiol with levonorgestrel and levonorgestrel alone. Less convenient to use is the copper intauterine contraceptive device.It is known that in some women sexual steroids may inhibit or delay ovulation and may interfere with ovum and sperm transport and implantation. Copper intrauterine device causes a foreign-body effect on the endometrium and a direct toxic effect to sperm and blastocyst.The Yuzpe regimen reduces the risk of pregnancy after a single act of sexual intercourse by about 75% and the levonorgestrel alone by about 85%. The copper intrauterine device is an extremely effective method for selected patients.Nausea and vomiting are common among women using the Yuzpe regimen and considerably less common among women using levonorgestrel alone regimen.Emergency contraception is relatively safe with no contraindications except pregnancy. It is ineffective if a woman is pregnant. There is no need for a medical hystory or a phisical examination before providing emergency contraceptive pills. They are taken long before organogenesis starts, so they should not have a teratogenic effect.Counseling should include information about correct use of the method, possible side effects and her preferences for regular contraception.Unintended pregnancy is a great problem. Several safe, effective and inexpensive methods of emergency contraception are available including Yuzpe regimen, levonorges-trel-only regimen and copper intrauterine device.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF CLINOPTILOLITE MODIFIED WITH IONS OF HYDROGEN, PALLADIUM(II, AND COPPER(II BY IR AND DIFFUSE REFLECTANCE SPECTRAL METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Rakytskaya

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Changes appeared in IR and diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra of clinoptilolite as a result of its modification by boiling in nitric acid solutions (0.25-3 M and anchoring active components on it were analyzed. As was shown by IR spectroscopy, the increase in acid concentration caused a high-frequency shift of the band attributed to asymmetric stretching vibrations of the Si-O-Al fragment due to the clinoptilolite dealumination. The values of this shift were not changed after active components anchoring on the acid modified clinoptilolite samples.  The band of deformation vibrations of OH groups in water molecules (at 1633 cm-1 for natural clinoptilolite was weakly affected (a slight high-frequency shift by the acid concentration increase and remained practically unaffected by anchoring palladium and copper ions. However,  the effect of Pd(II and Cu(II anchoring on IR spectra could be observed through a low-frequency shift of the band characterizing stretching vibration νОН of OH groups in water molecules indicating some disturbance of hydrogen bonds in H2O molecules and a change in their energy. The UV region of diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra of all anchored catalyst samples showed the appearance of new intense bands at 224-226, 279-284, and 327-334 nm which were absent Pd-Cu complexes which attendance is necessary for catalytic low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide with air oxygen. It should be noted that a new band appeared at 351-363 nm would be assigned to individual Pd(II indicating that some portion of palladium(II ions did not participate in the formation of the catalytically active bimetallic Pd-Cu complexes. The presence of individual palladium(II was confirmed by the fact that only the bends characteristic of square planar palladium(II complexes were observed in the palladium(II absorbing region in the visible part of diffuse reflectance UV-vis spectra. Additionaly, theses spectra also contained the bends corresponding

  20. Emergency contraceptive pills as a backup for lactational amenorrhea method (LAM) of contraception: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Omar M; Hassen, Shaimaa G; Nour, Sanna A; Kames, Mervat A; Yones, Entsar M

    2013-03-01

    The use of breastfeeding as a method of birth spacing occasionally ends in "unplanned pregnancy." This is due to unexpected expiration of one or more of the lactation amenorrhea method (LAM) prerequisites. The current study tests a new concept that the in-advance provision of single packet of progestogen emergency contraception (EC) pills during the postpartum LAM counseling may decrease the incidence of unplanned pregnancy during breastfeeding. This was a registered two-armed randomized controlled trial (NCT 01111929). Women intending to breastfeed and to postpone pregnancy for 1 year or more were approached. They received adequate postpartum contraceptive counseling. Women intending to use LAM were randomly assigned to one of two groups. The LAM-only group received the proper LAM counseling and did not receive counseling about EC. The LAM-EC group received counseling for both LAM and EC with in-advance provision of one packet of EC pills. They were advised to use these pills if one of the prerequisites of LAM expires and sexual relation has occurred before the initiation of another regular contraceptive protection. All the participants were advised that they need to use another regular method upon expiration of any of the LAM prerequisites. Eligible women were 1158 parturients randomized into two equal groups. Forty-four percent of the women provided with EC used them. Significantly more women in the LAM-EC group initiated regular contraception within or shortly after the first 6 months postpartum when compared with those in the LAM-only group (30.5% vs. 7.3%, respectively; p=.0004). Pregnancy occurred in 5% of the LAM-only group as compared with 0.8% in the LAM-EC group (p=.005). Minimal side effects were reported after EC use. In-advance provision of EC pills can increase the rate of initiation of regular contraception once one or more of the prerequisites of LAM expire. Consequently, the use of EC pills as a temporary backup of LAM can decrease the incidence

  1. Balance sheet method assessment for nitrogen fertilization in winter wheat: II. alternative strategies using the CropSyst simulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Corbellini

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available It is important, both for farmer profit and for the environment, to correctly dose fertilizer nitrogen (N for winter wheat growth. Balance-sheet methods are often used to calculate the recommended dose of N fertilizer. Other methods are based on the dynamic simulation of cropping systems. Aim of the work was to evaluate the balance-sheet method set up by the Region Emilia-Romagna (DPI, by comparing it with the cropping systems simulation model CropSyst (CS, and with an approach based on fixed supplies of N (T. A 3-year trial was structured as a series of N fertility regimes at 3 sites (Papiano di Marsciano, Ravenna, San Pancrazio. The N-regimes were generated at each site-year as separate trials in which 3 N rates were applied: N1 (DPI, N2 (DPI+50 kg ha-1 N at spike initiation, N3 (DPI + 50 kg ha-1 N at early booting. Above ground biomass and soil data (NO3-N and water were sampled and used to calibrate CS. Doses of fertilizer N were calculated by both DPI and CS for winter wheat included in three typical rotations for Central and Northern Italy. Both these methods and method T were simulated at each site over 50 years, by using daily generated weather data. The long-term simulation allowed evaluating such alternative fertilization strategies. DPI and CS estimated comparable crop yields and N leached amounts, and both resulted better than T. Minor risk of leaching emerged for all N doses. The N2 and N3 rates allowed slightly higher crop yields than N1.

  2. Development of a simultaneous high resolution typing method for three SLA class II genes, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 and the analysis of SLA class II haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, MinhThong; Choi, Hojun; Choi, Min-Kyeung; Cho, Hyesun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Cha, Se-Yeon; Seo, Kunho; Dadi, Hailu; Park, Chankyu

    2015-06-15

    The characterization of the genetic variations of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is essential to understand the relationship between the genetic diversity of MHC molecules and disease resistance and susceptibility in adaptive immunity. We previously reported the development of high-resolution individual locus typing methods for three of the most polymorphic swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class II loci, namely, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1. In this study, we extensively modified our previous protocols and developed a method for the simultaneous amplification of the three SLA class II genes and subsequent analysis of individual loci using direct sequencing. The unbiased and simultaneous amplification of alleles from the all three hyper-polymorphic and pseudogene containing genes such as MHC genes is extremely challenging. However, using this method, we demonstrated the successful typing of SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 for 31 selected individuals comprising 26 different SLA class II haplotypes which were identified from 700 animals using the single locus typing methods. The results were identical to the known genotypes from the individual locus typing. The new method has significant benefits over the individual locus typing, including lower typing cost, use of less biomaterial, less effort and fewer errors in handling large samples for multiple loci. We also extensively characterized the haplotypes of SLA class II genes and reported three new haplotypes. Our results should serve as a basis to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms of MHC class II and differences in immune responses to exogenous antigens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. cobalt (ii), nickel (ii)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The manganese (II), cobalt (II), nickel (II) and copper (II) complexes of N, N' – bis(benzoin)ethylenediiminato have been prepared and characterized by infrared, elemental analysis, conductivity measurements and solubility. The potentiometric, and elemental analyses studies of the complexes revealed 1:1 ...

  4. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Hagopian, Laura; Linden, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Emergency post-coital contraception (EC) is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD) and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method), and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference. PMID:24453516

  5. Emerging Options for Emergency Contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Koyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency post-coital contraception (EC is an effective method of preventing pregnancy when used appropriately. EC has been available since the 1970s, and its availability and use have become widespread. Options for EC are broad and include the copper intrauterine device (IUD and emergency contraceptive pills such as levonorgestrel, ulipristal acetate, combined oral contraceptive pills (Yuzpe method, and less commonly, mifepristone. Some options are available over-the-counter, while others require provider prescription or placement. There are no absolute contraindications to the use of emergency contraceptive pills, with the exception of ulipristal acetate and mifepristone. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, safety, side effects, clinical considerations, and patient preferences with respect to EC usage. The decision of which regimen to use is influenced by local availability, cost, and patient preference.

  6. Emerging Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Schwaller, Pedro; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilit...

  7. American Association for Emergency Psychiatry Task Force on Medical Clearance of Adult Psychiatric Patients. Part II: Controversies over Medical Assessment, and Consensus Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; Nordstrom, Kimberly; Anderson, Eric L; Ng, Anthony T; Zun, Leslie S; Peltzer-Jones, Jennifer M; Allen, Michael H

    2017-06-01

    The emergency medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to United States emergency departments (ED), usually termed "medical clearance," often varies between EDs. A task force of the American Association for Emergency Psychiatry (AAEP), consisting of physicians from emergency medicine, physicians from psychiatry and a psychologist, was convened to form consensus recommendations for the medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to U.S.EDs. The task force reviewed existing literature on the topic of medical evaluation of psychiatric patients in the ED and then combined this with expert consensus. Consensus was achieved by group discussion as well as iterative revisions of the written document. The document was reviewed and approved by the AAEP Board of Directors. Eight recommendations were formulated. These recommendations cover various topics in emergency medical examination of psychiatric patients, including goals of medical screening in the ED, the identification of patients at low risk for co-existing medical disease, key elements in the ED evaluation of psychiatric patients including those with cognitive disorders, specific language replacing the term "medical clearance," and the need for better science in this area. The evidence indicates that a thorough history and physical examination, including vital signs and mental status examination, are the minimum necessary elements in the evaluation of psychiatric patients. With respect to laboratory testing, the picture is less clear and much more controversial.

  8. Implantation of a essential diesel generator CN Vandellos II and fifth emergency diesel generator Asco; Implantacion de un 3er generador diesel esencial en C.N. Vandellos II y un 5 generador diesel de emergencia en Asco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambra, M.

    2011-07-01

    This article describes the project for the installation of an additional emergency diesel generator in both Asco and Vandellos NPPs. The basic objectives of this project are to improve the availability of the emergency generation system, in order to provide greater ability to address potential contingencies, and also to increase the flexibility of the preventive periodic maintenance of the emergency diesel generators. This maintenance, that is currently a milestone of the critical path of the refueling outage, will be performed on-line. The new diesel generator will be sized to support all the loads considered in the safety case and also the consumption of its own auxiliary systems, and will be tested for operability assessment on the same periodical basis than the existing ones. The solution adopted will also permit that the N diesel generator may be connected to any bus bar class 1E in a station black-out scenario. (Author)

  9. Factors associated with the utilization of primary care emergency centers in a Spanish region with high population dispersion: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Barbero, Belén; Otero-García, Laura; Blasco-Hernández, Teresa; San Sebastián, Miguel

    2014-09-03

    Adequate access to primary care emergency centers is particularly important in rural areas isolated from urban centers. However, variability in utilization of emergency services located in primary care centers among inhabitants of nearby geographical areas is understudied. The objectives of this study are twofold: 1) to analyze the association between the availability of municipal emergency care centers and utilization of primary care emergency centers (PCEC), in a Spanish region with high population dispersion; and 2) to determine healthcare providers' perceptions regarding PCEC utilization. A mixed-methods study was conducted. Quantitative phase: multilevel logistic regression modeling using merged data from the 2003 Regional Health Survey of Castile and Leon and the 2001 census data (Spain). Qualitative phase:14 in-depth- interviews of rural-based PCEC providers. Having PCEC as the only emergency center in the municipality was directly associated with its utilization (p use. PCEC users were considered to be predominantly workers and students with scheduling conflicts with rural primary care opening hours. The location of emergency care centers is associated with PCEC utilization. Increasing access to primary care by extending hours may be an important step toward optimal PCEC utilization. Further research would determine whether lower PCEC use by certain groups is associated with disparities in access to care.

  10. College in Mind: A Mixed-Methods Study of How Emerging Adults with Psychiatric Disabilities Prepare for and Transition to and through Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Laura Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation study employs an exploratory sequential mixed methods design to investigate how emerging adults with psychiatric disabilities plan for and transition to and through college. Special attention is paid to how disclosure of disability status in educational contexts can influence both educational and recovery outcomes. Though more…

  11. Interaction of Fe(II) with Polyacrylic Acid as a Simplification of Humic Acid: Comparison of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budi Setiawan

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the safety assessment around the disposal facility, the interaction behavior of radionuclides/metal ions into organic material (such as humic acids) exist in natural water becomes an important study. To avoid the effect of heterogeneous composition of humic acid, polyacrylic acids (abbrev. APA) was used as are representative of homogeneous polymeric weak acid. The experiments have been carried out by solvent extraction and ion exchange methods to find out the suitable method for the study of complex formation of Fe(II) with humic acid(AH) and APA. The solvent extraction experiment has been done by using diphenylthiocarbazone (dithizone) in CCl 4 and C Fe(II) were 10 -8 M to 10 -5 M, pH around 5 and I=0.1M NaCI. In ionic exchange experiment, C Fe(II) were 10 -8 to 10 -4 M, pH from 4.8 to 5.5 in I=0.1M NaCl. The apparent complex formation constant is defined as β α = [ML]/([M][R]), where [M] and [ML] are concentration of free and bound of Fe(II) and [R] is the concentration of dissociated carboxylic group in macromolecules of PAA. The results shown that, for solvent extraction experiments, variable concentration of Fe(II) had no appreciable influence on the distribution ratio of Fe(II)-polyacrylate at the tracer concentration with the log D to be 1.32 ± 0.03 (pcH 5.25). At macro concentration, the distribution ratio of Fe(II) becomes smaller due to oxidation and obtained log D value to be 1.04 ± 0.07 (pcH 5.34). An interest kind was observed at higher PAA concentration, the distribution ratio curve becomes higher presumably due to the problem on redox sensitive characteristic of Fe(II) and/or coagulation of Fe(II)-polyacrylate at the interface of aqueous-organic phases. In case of ionic exchange method, the plot of I/Kd versus [R] gives a straight line result indicating this method is appropriate and more superior compare than solvent extraction method to determine the complex formation constant. (author)

  12. Adsorption Kinetics of Manganese (II) in wastewater of Chemical laboratory with Column Method using Sugarcane Bagasse as Adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaini, H.; Abubakar, S.; Saifuddin

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to separate manganese (II) metal in the wastewater using sugarcane bagasse as an adsorbent. Experimental design, the independent variables are contact time (0; 30; 60; 90; 120; 150; 180; 210; 240 minutes, respectively) and activation treatment (without activation, physical activation, activation by H2SO4 0.5 N and activation by NaOH 0.5 N. Fixed variables consist of adsorbent mass (50 g), adsorbent particle size (30 mesh), flow rate (7 L/min) and volume of adsorbent (10 L). The dependent variable is the concentration of manganese. The results showed that the separation process of manganese by adsorption method was influenced by contact time and activation type. The kinetic studies show that the adsorption mechanism satisfies the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. Maximum adsorption capacity (qm) for adsorbents without treatment is 0.971 mg/g, physical treatment is 0.889 mg/g, chemical treatment by H2SO4 is 0.858 mg/g and chemical treatment by NaOH is 1.016 mg/g.

  13. A novel whole genome amplification method using type IIS restriction enzymes to create overhangs with random sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoming; Wan, Baihui; Li, Chunchuan; Liu, Yu; Wang, Jing; Mou, Haijin; Liang, Xingguo

    2014-08-20

    Ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) is a whole genome amplification (WGA) method, for which genomic DNA is cleaved into numerous fragments and then all of the fragments are amplified by PCR after attaching a universal end sequence. However, the self-ligation of these fragments could happen and may cause biased amplification and restriction of its application. To decrease the self-ligation probability, here we use type IIS restriction enzymes to digest genomic DNA into fragments with 4-5nt long overhangs with random sequences. After ligation to an adapter with random end sequences to above fragments, PCR is carried out and almost all present DNA sequences are amplified. In this study, whole genome of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was amplified and the amplification efficiency was evaluated by quantitative PCR. The results suggested that our approach could provide sufficient genomic DNA with good quality to meet requirements of various genetic analyses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. A randomized phase II dose-response exercise trial among colon cancer survivors: Purpose, study design, methods, and recruitment results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Justin C; Troxel, Andrea B; Ky, Bonnie; Damjanov, Nevena; Zemel, Babette S; Rickels, Michael R; Rhim, Andrew D; Rustgi, Anil K; Courneya, Kerry S; Schmitz, Kathryn H

    2016-03-01

    Observational studies indicate that higher volumes of physical activity are associated with improved disease outcomes among colon cancer survivors. The aim of this report is to describe the purpose, study design, methods, and recruitment results of the courage trial, a National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored, phase II, randomized, dose-response exercise trial among colon cancer survivors. The primary objective of the courage trial is to quantify the feasibility, safety, and physiologic effects of low-dose (150 min·week(-1)) and high-dose (300 min·week(-1)) moderate-intensity aerobic exercise compared to usual-care control group over six months. The exercise groups are provided with in-home treadmills and heart rate monitors. Between January and July 2015, 1433 letters were mailed using a population-based state cancer registry; 126 colon cancer survivors inquired about participation, and 39 were randomized onto the study protocol. Age was associated with inquiry about study participation (Pclinical, or geographic characteristics were associated with study inquiry or randomization. The final trial participant was randomized in August 2015. Six month endpoint data collection was completed in February 2016. The recruitment of colon cancer survivors into an exercise trial is feasible. The findings from this trial will inform key design aspects for future phase 2 and phase 3 randomized controlled trials to examine the efficacy of exercise to improve clinical outcomes among colon cancer survivors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of an extractive spectrophotometric method for the determination of copper(II) in leafy vegetable and pharmaceutical samples using pyridoxal-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (PPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, L Subramanyam; Kumar, J Rajesh; Reddy, K Janardhan; Reddy, A Varada

    2005-07-13

    A highly sensitive extractive spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of copper(II) using pyridoxal-4-phenyl-3-thiosemicarbazone(PPT) as an analytical reagent. The PPT forms reddish brown species of copper(II) at a pH range of 3.0-5.5, and the complex was extracted into n-butanol. The Cu(II)-PPT complex shows maximum absorbance at 440 nm, with molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity being 2.16 x 10(4) L mol(-1) cm(-1) and 2.94 x 10(-3) microg cm(-2), respectively. The system obeys Beer's law in the range of 0.2-5.0 mg/L. The regression coefficient of the Beer's law straight line is 0.338, and the correlation coefficient is 0.96. The detection limit of the method is 0.0065 microg mL(-1). Most of the common metal ions generally found associated with copper do not interfere. The repeatability of the method was checked by finding the relative standard deviation. The developed method has been successfully employed for the determination of copper(II) in leafy vegetable and pharmaceutical samples. The method is evaluated by analyzing samples from the Bureau of Analyzed Samples (BCS 233, 266, 216/1, 207, and 179) and by intercomparison of experimental values using AAS.

  16. Method for developing an optimal emergence profile using heat-polymerized provisional restorations for single-tooth implant-supported restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintosh, Daniel C T; Sutherland, Mark

    2004-03-01

    This article describes a method for creating an improved emergence profile with single-tooth, implant-supported restorations. An easily trimmed silicone gingival substitute is used to allow polymerization of acrylic resin provisional restorations to achieve control of the emergence profile. Gingival trauma is minimized by eliminating intraoral use of monomer and minimizing surgical procedures. Provisional restorations can be assessed to ensure the contour is acceptable and the trimmed gingival substitute can be used to fabricate a similar profile in the definitive prosthesis. The provisional restorations may be used instead of standard prefabricated healing abutments to guide the healing contours of the peri-implant gingival tissue.

  17. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST methods for the emerging Campylobacter species C. hyointestinalis, C. lanienae, C. sputorum, C. concisus and C. curvus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G Miller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Multilocus sequence typing (MLST systems have been reported previously for multiple food- and food animal-associated Campylobacter species (e.g. C. jejuni, C. coli, C. lari and C. fetus to both differentiate strains and identify clonal lineages. These MLST methods focused primarily on campylobacters of human clinical (e.g. C. jejuni or veterinary (e.g. C. fetus relevance. However, other, emerging, Campylobacter species have been isolated increasingly from environmental, food animal or human clinical samples. We describe herein MLST methods for five emerging Campylobacter species: C. hyointestinalis, C. lanienae, C. sputorum, C. concisus and C. curvus. The concisus/curvus method uses the loci aspA, atpA, glnA, gltA, glyA, ilvD and pgm, whereas the other methods use the seven loci defined for C. jejuni (i.e., aspA, atpA, glnA, gltA, glyA, pgm, and tkt. Multiple food animal and human clinical C. hyointestinalis (n=48, C. lanienae (n=34 and C. sputorum (n=24 isolates were typed, along with 86 human clinical C. concisus and C. curvus isolates. A large number of sequence types (STs were identified using all four MLST methods. Similar to Campylobacter MLST methods described previously, these novel MLST methods identified mixed isolates containing two or more strains of the same species. Additionally, these methods speciated unequivocally isolates that had been typed ambiguously using other molecular-based speciation methods, such as 16S rDNA sequencing. Finally, the design of degenerate primer pairs for some methods permitted the typing of related species; for example, the C. hyointestinalis primer pairs could be used to type C. fetus strains. Therefore, these novel Campylobacter MLST methods will prove useful in speciating and differentiating strains of multiple, emerging Campylobacter species.

  18. EDITORIAL: Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications Introduction to the special issue on electromagnetic inverse problems: emerging methods and novel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, O.; Lesselier, D.

    2010-07-01

    Inverse problems in electromagnetics have a long history and have stimulated exciting research over many decades. New applications and solution methods are still emerging, providing a rich source of challenging topics for further investigation. The purpose of this special issue is to combine descriptions of several such developments that are expected to have the potential to fundamentally fuel new research, and to provide an overview of novel methods and applications for electromagnetic inverse problems. There have been several special sections published in Inverse Problems over the last decade addressing fully, or partly, electromagnetic inverse problems. Examples are: Electromagnetic imaging and inversion of the Earth's subsurface (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and T Habashy) October 2000 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2001 Electromagnetic and ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and J Bowler) December 2002 Electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles (Guest Editors: D Lesselier and W C Chew) December 2004 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets (Guest Editors: K Belkebir and M Saillard) December 2005 Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: 3D targets (Guest Editors: A Litman and L Crocco) February 2009 In a certain sense, the current issue can be understood as a continuation of this series of special sections on electromagnetic inverse problems. On the other hand, its focus is intended to be more general than previous ones. Instead of trying to cover a well-defined, somewhat specialized research topic as completely as possible, this issue aims to show the broad range of techniques and applications that are relevant to electromagnetic imaging nowadays, which may serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement for all those entering this active and rapidly developing research area. Also, the

  19. Analysis of MHC class II antigens in Japanese IDDM by a novel HLA-typing method, hybridization protection assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, T; Shimada, A; Kasuga, A; Kasatani, T; Ozawa, Y; Ishii, M; Takei, I; Suzuki, Y; Kobayashi, A; Takeda, S

    1994-03-01

    We examined HLA Class II antigens in 116 Japanese IDDM patients [84 typical IDDM (T-IDD); 32 slowly progressive IDDM (S-IDD)] by the hybridization protection assay (HPA) which is a novel HLA typing method based on hybridization of acridinium-ester-labeled DNA probes to amplified DNA. We detected HLA-DRB1, -DQA1 and -DQB1 genes by this method which is capable of analyzing over 50 samples within 4 h with high sensitivity. Positive associations were found in DRB1*0405, DRB1*0802, DRB1*0901, DQA1*0301, DQB1*0303 and DQB1*0401, negative correlations in DRB1*0403, DR2, DR12, DRB1*0801 or 03, DQA1*0101 or 02, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 and DQB1*0602 alleles. The absence of aspartic acid (Asp) at position 57 of the DRB1 chain and the presence of arginine (Arg) at position 52 of the DQA1 chain correlated positively with both types of IDDM. There were no significant differences in HLA between T-IDD and S-IDD. These results suggest that the absence of Asp at position 57 of the DRB1 chain and the presence of Arg at position 52 of the DQA1 chain are significant Japanese IDDM patients and that DRB1*0802, in which the amino acid at position 57 is aspartic acid, may play a role in the pathogenesis of IDDM. Also, T-IDD and S-IDD have common bases in the HLA gene.

  20. Emergency planning of the city of Munich with reference to nuclear facilities, especially the nuclear power stations Isar I and II, resp. the reactor in Garching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    During the hearing of Munich's city council of 13.7.1990 thirteen experts were heard on the following subjects: Hazard potential of Isar reactors and FRM reactor and appropriate radioactive waste transports; responsibilities in emergency planning. Some of the experts cannot visualize a major accident and propose not to cater for it. Shelters and evacuation are not planned for Munich, both solutions not being realizable for all inhabitants. Nuclear phaseout is seen by some as a measure of prevention. (HSCH) [de

  1. A method for emergency flooding of the gland in the main circulating pump of pressurized water reactors and the connection therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalicky, A.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the emergency flooding of the main circulating pumps of a pressurized water reactor such that in pressure drop in the flooded gland owing to pump suction, the pump head is connected by the pressure difference action to the flooding gland pipe, this via the heat sink and the filter of the emergency flooding circuit connected to the pump head. The emergency flooding circuit consisting of a pressure reducing valve, a check valve and a stop valve is connected to the pump head, behind the heat sink and the filter. The pressure reducing valve separates two pressure spaces. The former is connected to the pump head via the check valve and to the flooding pipe via the stop valve and the check valve. The latter is connected to the suction pump. (B.S.)

  2. Biophysical study on the interaction between two palladium(II) complexes and human serum albumin by Multispectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidifar, Maryam, E-mail: saeidifar@merc.ac.ir [Department of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Materials and Energy Research Center, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan [Department of Chemistry, University of Sistan and Baluchestan, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbar Saboury, Ali [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The interaction of [Pd(bpy)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (I) and ([Pd(phen)(n-pr-dtc)]Br (II) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, phen=1,10-phenanthroline and n-pr-dtc=n-propyldithiocarbamate) with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using fluorescence, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy techniques under simulative physiological conditions (pH=7.4). It was observed that the two complexes interact with HSA via static fluorescence quenching. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that the binding process was spontaneous and that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces play a major role in the association of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes. The activation energy (E{sub a}), binding constant (K{sub b}) and number of binding sites (n) of the HSA–Pd(II) complexes were calculated from fluorescence data at 293 K, 303 K and 311 K. The conformational alternations of protein secondary structure in the presence of Pd(II) complexes were demonstrated using synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, UV–vis absorption and circular dichroism techniques. Furthermore, the apparent distance between donor (HSA) and acceptor (Pd(II) complexes) was determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The binding studies between these complexes and HSA give us key insights into the transportation, distribution and toxicity of newly design antitumor Pd(II) complexes in human blood. - Highlights: • The HSA binding properties of two Palladium (II) complexes were studied. • Static quenching mechanism is effective in the interaction of HSA with Pd(II) complexes. • Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces were involved in the Pd(II) complexes–HSA interaction. • 3D fluorescence was used to study the interaction between two complexes and HSA.

  3. Understanding the Virtualization of the Backpacker Culture and the Emergence of the Flashpacker: A Mixed-Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Cody Morris

    2010-01-01

    Backpackers are pioneers of mobility, who provide a unique domain for critical tourism research. The lineage of backpacker ideals, including pursuit of authentic experiences, independence, escape and social interaction, can be traced back to the "tramps" of the 1880s and the "drifters" of the 1970s. The recent emergence of the…

  4. Infusion of Emerging Technologies and New Teaching Methods into the Mechanical Engineering Curriculum at the City College of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delale, Feridun; Liaw, Benjamin M.; Jiji, Latif M.; Voiculescu, Ioana; Yu, Honghui

    2011-01-01

    From October 2003 to April 2008 a systemic reform of the Mechanical Engineering program at The City College of New York was undertaken with the goal of incorporating emerging technologies (such as nanotechnology, biotechnology, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), intelligent systems) and new teaching methodologies (such as project based…

  5. Eye Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Eye Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Eye Emergencies Marfan syndrome significantly increases your risk of retinal detachment, a ...

  6. Improving the Ar I and II branching ratio calibration method: Monte Carlo simulations of effects from photon scattering/reflecting in hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, J. E.; Den Hartog, E. A.

    2018-03-01

    The Ar I and II branching ratio calibration method is discussed with the goal of improving the technique. This method of establishing a relative radiometric calibration is important in ongoing research to improve atomic transition probabilities for quantitative spectroscopy in astrophysics and other fields. Specific suggestions are presented along with Monte Carlo simulations of wavelength dependent effects from scattering/reflecting of photons in a hollow cathode.

  7. [Observed vs expected mortality in the emergency service of a general hospital. Evaluation by the APACHE II and multiple organ failure classification systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales-Vargas, N; Laniado-Laborín, R

    1995-01-01

    Problem that originated the investigation: It was not known if the observed mortality in the Emergency room of the Tijuana General Hospital was lower, equal or higher, than the expected mortality. 1) Evaluate in a prospective fashion the mortality rate in that hospital service, and then compare that rate with an expected mortality rate proposed in the literature (Role). 2) Determine the prognostic value in our hospital of the Multiple Organ Failure classification system (MOF). The Multiple Organ Failure classification system showed in our study an excellent predicting capacity for mortality.

  8. Psychiatric Institutions and the Emerging Institutional Scene in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... psychiatric institutions, and (ii) to report the emerging institutions providing psychiatric services in Nigeria. The method employed was the ex-post facto research which enabled content analysis technique through a critical review of documents and materials related to Nigerian orthodox psychiatric institutions and services.

  9. Multi-stakeholder perspectives on access, availability and utilization of emergency obstetric care services in Lagos, Nigeria: A mixed-methods study

    OpenAIRE

    Aduragbemi Banke-Thomas; Kikelomo Wright; Olatunji Sonoiki; Onaedo Ilozumba; Babatunde Ajayi; Olawunmi Okikiolu; Oluwarotimi Akinola

    2017-01-01

    Globally, Nigeria is the second most unsafe country to be pregnant, with Lagos, its economic nerve center having disproportionately higher maternal deaths than the national average. Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) is effective in reducing pregnancyrelated morbidities and mortalities. This mixed-methods study quantitatively assessed women’s satisfaction with EmOC received and qualitatively engaged multiple key stakeholders to better understand issues around EmOC access, availability and utiliz...

  10. Total antioxidant capacity assay of human serum using copper(II)-neocuproine as chromogenic oxidant: the CUPRAC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Güçlü, Kubilay; Ozyürek, Mustafa; Karademir, Saliha Esin; Altun, Mehmet

    2005-09-01

    Tests measuring the combined antioxidant effect of the nonenzymatic defenses in biological fluids may be useful in providing an index of the organism's capability to counteract reactive species known as prooxidants, resist oxidative damage and combat oxidative stress-related diseases. The selected chromogenic redox reagent for the assay of human serum should be easily accessible, stable, selective, respond to all types of biologically important antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, reduced glutathione (GSH), uric acid and bilirubin, regardless of chemical type or hydrophilicity. Currently, there is no rapid method for total antioxidant assay of human serum meeting the above criteria. Our recently developed cupric reducing antioxidant capacity (CUPRAC) spectrophotometric method for a number of polyphenols and flavonoids using the copper(II)-neocuproine reagent in ammonium acetate buffer was now applied to a complete series of plasma antioxidants for the assay of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of serum, and the resulting absorbance at 450 nm was recorded either directly (e.g. for ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol and glutathione) or after incubation at 50 degrees C for 20 min (e.g. for uric acid, bilirubin and albumin), quantitation being made by means of a calibration curve. The lipophilic antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene, were assayed in dichloromethane (DCM). Lipophilic antioxidants of serum were extracted with n-hexane from an ethanolic solution of serum subjected to centrifugation. Hydrophilic antioxidants of serum were assayed after perchloric acid precipitation of proteins in the centrifugate. The molar absorptivities, linear ranges and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) coefficients of the serum antioxidants were established with respect to the CUPRAC spectrophotometric method, and the results (TEAC, or TEAC coefficients) were evaluated in comparison to the findings of the ABTS/TEAC reference method

  11. The "covariation method" for estimating the parameters of the standard Dynamic Energy Budget model II: Properties and preliminary patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lika, Konstadia; Kearney, Michael R.; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    The covariation method for estimating the parameters of the standard Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model provides a single-step method of accessing all the core DEB parameters from commonly available empirical data. In this study, we assess the robustness of this parameter estimation procedure and analyse the role of pseudo-data using elasticity coefficients. In particular, we compare the performance of Maximum Likelihood (ML) vs. Weighted Least Squares (WLS) approaches and find that the two approaches tend to converge in performance as the number of uni-variate data sets increases, but that WLS is more robust when data sets comprise single points (zero-variate data). The efficiency of the approach is shown to be high, and the prior parameter estimates (pseudo-data) have very little influence if the real data contain information about the parameter values. For instance, the effects of the pseudo-value for the allocation fraction κ is reduced when there is information for both growth and reproduction, that for the energy conductance is reduced when information on age at birth and puberty is given, and the effects of the pseudo-value for the maturity maintenance rate coefficient are insignificant. The estimation of some parameters (e.g., the zoom factor and the shape coefficient) requires little information, while that of others (e.g., maturity maintenance rate, puberty threshold and reproduction efficiency) require data at several food levels. The generality of the standard DEB model, in combination with the estimation of all of its parameters, allows comparison of species on the basis of parameter values. We discuss a number of preliminary patterns emerging from the present collection of parameter estimates across a wide variety of taxa. We make the observation that the estimated value of the fraction κ of mobilised reserve that is allocated to soma is far away from the value that maximises reproduction. We recognise this as the reason why two very different

  12. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    importance for understanding the nature of immune responses and identifying T cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines and immunotherapies. Given the large number of MHC variants, and the costly experimental procedures needed to evaluate individual peptide–MHC interactions, computational predictions have...... become particularly attractive as first-line methods in epitope discovery. However, only a few so-called pan-specific prediction methods capable of predicting binding to any MHC molecule with known protein sequence are currently available, and all of them are limited to HLA-DR. Here, we present the first...... pan-specific method capable of predicting peptide binding to any HLA class II molecule with a defined protein sequence. The method employs a strategy common for HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ molecules to define the peptide-binding MHC environment in terms of a pseudo sequence. This strategy allows...

  13. Comparisons of indoor active and passive air sampling methods for emerging and legacy halogenated flame retardants in Beijing, China offices

    OpenAIRE

    Seth Newton; Ulla Sellström; Stuart Harrad; Gang Yu; Cynthia A. de Wit

    2016-01-01

    One active and two passive air sampling configurations were deployed simultaneously in three offices in Beijing, China to test their comparability for sampling emerging and legacy halogenated flame retardants spanning a large range of octanol–air partition coefficients (KOA). Sampling in each office was carried out for three consecutive 28-day periods in the spring-summer of 2013. The active sampler was run for 2.5 h at different times every day for 28 days to parallel the passive samplers an...

  14. Training experience at Experimental Breeder Reactor II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, J.W.; McCormick, R.P.; McCreery, H.I.

    1978-01-01

    The EBR-II Training Group develops, maintains,and oversees training programs and activities associated with the EBR-II Project. The group originally spent all its time on EBR-II plant-operations training, but has gradually spread its work into other areas. These other areas of training now include mechanical maintenance, fuel manufacturing facility, instrumentation and control, fissile fuel handling, and emergency activities. This report describes each of the programs and gives a statistical breakdown of the time spent by the Training Group for each program. The major training programs for the EBR-II Project are presented by multimedia methods at a pace controlled by the student. The Training Group has much experience in the use of audio-visual techniques and equipment, including video-tapes, 35 mm slides, Super 8 and 16 mm film, models, and filmstrips. The effectiveness of these techniques is evaluated in this report

  15. Evaluation of cavitated and non-cavitated carious lesions using the WHO basic methods, ICDAS-II and laser fluorescence measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was aimed to compare the diagnostic outcome of the WHO criteria, ICDAS-II criteria and laser fluorescence measurements in measuring the caries ratings of children. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: The study involved 31 children between 3 and 14 years of age, attending the Department of Pedodontics at Maulana Azad College of Dental Sciences, New Delhi. The surface-related caries status was registered according to the WHO basic method criteria (1997. Additionally, the ICDAS-II visual criteria and the DIAGNOdent readings were documented. Statistical analysis used: The data were analysed with ezANOVA and Excel 2000 (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA, USA. Results: The mean ICDAS-II values amounted to 8.76 ± 0.72. The mean values for DMFS/def were 7.67 ± 0.91, whereas for DIAGNOdent it amounted to 4.00 ± 0.62. Conclusions: In conclusion, this study showed the diagnostic potential of the ICDAS-II criteria in comparison to the traditional WHO criteria by means of the non-cavitated caries lesions additionally detected. The DIAGNOdent use in field studies that already apply detailed visual criteria seems to bring limited additional information.

  16. Radiotracer method to study the transport of mercury(II)chloride from water to sediment and air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaca, F.; Aras, N.K.

    2004-01-01

    The fate of dissolved Hg(II) in surface waters is an important component of the Hg cycle. A simple experimental methodology was used to understand and measure the transport of Hg(II) from water to air and sediment. The use of radioactive dissolved Hg tracer for the determination of evasion and deposition is found to be a very useful technique. The evasion of mercury was investigated during a 140-hour period. It was observed that about a quarter of mercury chloride remained in the water phase, the other quarter was emitted via the evasion process and half of it deposited in sediment. (author)

  17. EMERGE: A Randomized Phase II Study of the Antibody-Drug Conjugate Glembatumumab Vedotin in Advanced Glycoprotein NMB-Expressing Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Denise A; Weaver, Robert; Melisko, Michelle E; Saleh, Mansoor N; Arena, Francis P; Forero, Andres; Cigler, Tessa; Stopeck, Alison; Citrin, Dennis; Oliff, Ira; Bechhold, Rebecca; Loutfi, Randa; Garcia, Agustin A; Cruickshank, Scott; Crowley, Elizabeth; Green, Jennifer; Hawthorne, Thomas; Yellin, Michael J; Davis, Thomas A; Vahdat, Linda T

    2015-05-10

    Glycoprotein NMB (gpNMB), a negative prognostic marker, is overexpressed in multiple tumor types. Glembatumumab vedotin is a gpNMB-specific monoclonal antibody conjugated to the potent cytotoxin monomethyl auristatin E. This phase II study investigated the activity of glembatumumab vedotin in advanced breast cancer by gpNMB expression. Patients (n = 124) with refractory breast cancer that expressed gpNMB in ≥ 5% of epithelial or stromal cells by central immunohistochemistry were stratified by gpNMB expression (tumor, low stromal intensity, high stromal intensity) and were randomly assigned 2:1 to glembatumumab vedotin (n = 83) or investigator's choice (IC) chemotherapy (n = 41). The study was powered to detect overall objective response rate (ORR) in the glembatumumab vedotin arm between 10% (null) and 22.5% (alternative hypothesis) with preplanned investigation of activity by gpNMB distribution and/or intensity (Stratum 1 to Stratum 3). Glembatumumab vedotin was well tolerated as compared with IC chemotherapy (less hematologic toxicity; more rash, pruritus, neuropathy, and alopecia). ORR was 6% (five of 83) for glembatumumab vedotin versus 7% (three of 41) for IC, without significant intertreatment differences for predefined strata. Secondary end point revealed ORR of 12% (10 of 83) versus 12% (five of 41) overall, and 30% (seven of 23) versus 9% (one of 11) for gpNMB overexpression (≥ 25% of tumor cells). Unplanned analysis showed ORR of 18% (five of 28) versus 0% (0 of 11) in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), and 40% (four of 10) versus 0% (zero of six) in gpNMB-overexpressing TNBC. Glembatumumab vedotin is well tolerated in heavily pretreated patients with breast cancer. Although the primary end point in advanced gpNMB-expressing breast cancer was not met for all enrolled patients (median tumor gpNMB expression, 5%), activity may be enhanced in patients with gpNMB-overexpressing tumors and/or TNBC. A pivotal phase II trial (METRIC

  18. Comparisons of indoor active and passive air sampling methods for emerging and legacy halogenated flame retardants in Beijing, China offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Newton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One active and two passive air sampling configurations were deployed simultaneously in three offices in Beijing, China to test their comparability for sampling emerging and legacy halogenated flame retardants spanning a large range of octanol–air partition coefficients (KOA. Sampling in each office was carried out for three consecutive 28-day periods in the spring-summer of 2013. The active sampler was run for 2.5 h at different times every day for 28 days to parallel the passive samplers and sample a total volume comparable to that sampled by the passive samplers (∼20 m3. At the end of each 28-day sampling period, a separate active air sample was taken by running the sampler pump continuously for about 2.5 days. The comparability of measured concentrations varied between the air sampling configurations and for different compounds. The predominant compound measured in nearly all samples was BDE-209, a compound known to have heavy use in China. Several emerging flame retardants were also detected including DBE-DBCH, PBT, HBB, DDC-CO, and DBDPE. Very little of the tetra-hexabrominated BDEs associated with the technical PentaBDE product was observed.

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of Trends and Emerging Technologies in All Types of Fuel Cells Based on a Computational Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaya Ogawa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Fuel cells have been attracting significant attention recently as highly efficient and eco-friendly energy generators. Here, we have comprehensively reviewed all types of fuel cells using computational analysis based on a citation network that detects emerging technologies objectively and provides interdisciplinary data to compare trends. This comparison shows that the technologies of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs and electrolytes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs are at the mature stage, whereas those of biofuel cells (BFCs and catalysts in PEFCs are currently garnering attention. It does not mean, however, that the challenges of SOFCs and PEFC electrolytes have been overcome. SOFCs need to be operated at lower temperatures, approximately 500 °C. Electrolytes in PEFCs still suffer from a severe decrease in proton conductivity at low relative humidity and from their high cost. Catalysts in PEFCs are becoming attractive as means to reduce the platinum catalyst cost. The emerging technologies in PEFC catalysts are mainly heteroatom-doped graphene/carbon nanotubes for metal-free catalysts and supports for iron- or cobalt-based catalysts. BFCs have also received attention for wastewater treatment and as miniaturized energy sources. Of particular interest in BFCs are membrane reactors in microbial fuel cells and membrane-less enzymatic biofuel cells.

  20. Comparison of APACHE II and SAPS II Scoring Systems in Prediction of Critically ill Patients’ Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aminiahidashti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Using physiologic scoring systems for identifying high-risk patients for mortality has been considered recently. This study was designed to evaluate the values of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (SAPS II models in prediction of 1-month mortality of critically ill patients.Methods: The present prospective cross sectional study was performed on critically ill patients presented to emergency department during 6 months. Data required for calculation of the scores were gathered and performance of the models in prediction of 1-month mortality were assessed using STATA software 11.0.Results: 82 critically ill patients with the mean age of 53.45 ± 20.37 years were included (65.9% male. Their mortality rate was 48%. Mean SAPS II (p < 0.0001 and APACHE II (p = 0.0007 scores were significantly higher in dead patients. Area under the ROC curve of SAPS II and APACHE II for prediction of mortality were 0.75 (95% CI: 0.64 - 0.86 and 0.72 (95% CI: 0.60 - 0.83, respectively (p = 0.24. The slope and intercept of SAPS II were 1.02 and 0.04, respectively. In addition, these values were 0.92 and 0.09 for APACHE II, respectively.Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that APACHE II and SAPS II had similar value in predicting 1-month mortality of patients. Discriminatory powers of the mentioned models were acceptable but their calibration had some amount of lack of fit, which reveals that APACHE II and SAPS II are partially perfect.

  1. Recombinant hemoglobin II from Lucina pectinata: a large-scale method for hemeprotein expression in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Cacimar; Pietri, Ruth; Lorenzo, Wilmarie; Roman, Elddie; Granell, Laura B; Cadilla, Carmen L; López-Garriga, Juan

    2010-02-01

    Hemoglobin II from the clam L. pectinata is an O(2) reactive protein that remains oxygenated in the presence of other molecules. To determine the mechanism of ligand selection in this hemoglobin, rHbII was expressed in large quantities using an improved fermentation process. The highest protein yield was obtained by: transforming HbII into the BLi5 cells, inducing and supplementing the culture during the mid-log phase with 1 mM IPTG, 30 microg/mL hemin chloride and 1% glucose, and decreasing the temperature to 30 degrees C after induction. In addition, cell culture density was greatly enhanced by using glycerol, adding MgSO(4), supplementing the media with glucose after the glycerol was consumed and maintaining the dissolved oxygen at 35%. Under these conditions the maximum protein yield obtained was approximately 2,300 mg/L. The results indicate that rHbII is similar to the native protein. The protocol was validated with other hemoglobins, indicating that it can be extended to other hemeproteins.

  2. An Improved Method for Removal of Azo Dye Orange II from Textile Effluent Using Albumin as Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Ohashi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Azo dyes are generally resistant to biodegradation due to their complex structures. Acid orange II is one of the most widely used dyes in the textile industry. The influence of bovine serum albumin (BSA in different concentrations, pH, and time of contact on Orange II was investigated using kinetics and adsorption-isotherm experiments. The results showed that the maximum colour removed from dye/albumin was 99.50% and that a stable dye-protein complex had been formed at pH 3.5 and in a proportion of 1:3 (v/v, respectively. The synthetic effluent did not show toxicity to the microcrustacean Artemia salina, and showed a CL50 equal to 97 µg/mL to azo dye orange II. Additionally, the methodology was effective in removing the maximum of orange II using BSA by adsorption at pH 3.5 which mainly attracted ions to the azo dye during the adsorption process. This suggests that this form of treatment is economical and easy to use which potentially could lead to bovine serum albumin being used as a sorbent for azo dyes.

  3. Harwell emergency handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    The Harwell Laboratory Emergency Handbook 1987 contains emergency procedures to deal with any incident which might occur at AERE Harwell involving radioactive or toxic material releases. The Handbook gives details of the duties of members of the Site Emergency Organization and other key members of staff, the methods by which incidents are controlled, the communication links and liaison arrangements with other organizations and the possible consequences and actions that may be needed following an emergency. (UK)

  4. Information transfer for multi-trauma patients on discharge from the emergency department: mixed-method narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja, Pauline; Aitken, Leanne M; Cooke, Marie L

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a report of a review conducted to identify (a) best practice in information transfer from the emergency department for multi-trauma patients; (b) conduits and barriers to information transfer in trauma care and related settings; and (c) interventions that have an impact on information communication at handover and beyond. Information transfer is integral to effective trauma care, and communication breakdown results in important challenges to this. However, evidence of adequacy of structures and processes to ensure transfer of patient information through the acute phase of trauma care is limited. Papers were sourced from a search of 12 online databases and scanning references from relevant papers for 1990-2009. The review was conducted according to the University of York's Centre for Reviews and Dissemination guidelines. Studies were included if they concerned issues that influenced information transfer for patients in healthcare settings. Forty-five research papers, four literature reviews and one policy statement were found to be relevant to parts of the topic, but not all of it. The main issues emerging concerned the impact of communication breakdown in some form, and included communication issues within trauma team processes, lack of structure and clarity during handovers including missing, irrelevant and inaccurate information, distractions and poorly documented care. Many factors influence information transfer but are poorly identified in relation to trauma care. The measurement of information transfer, which is integral to patient handover, has not been the focus of research to date. Nonetheless, documented patient information is considered evidence of care and a resource that affects continuing care. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Diagnostic method based on the analysis of vibration and acoustic emission. Monitoring of emergency diesel NPP Garona

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paniagua, L.; Munoz, M.; Moreno, F.; Arroyo, J.; Monne, C.

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance Technicians, more and more, must dispose of predictive tools to diagnose the state of the equipment, especially if they are responsible for the emergency diesel in a Nuclear Power Plant. the use of these tools should be understood as a complement to more classic Preventive Maintenance of the equipment, thus increasing their availability because the parameters necessary for evaluating motor behaviour are taken while the engine is in operation. In this way, it facilitates the decision-making on whether to carry out certain preventive tasks. The basic information about this diagnostic tool presented in this article is based on the reading, recording and analysis of pressure, vibrations and acoustic emission in each engine cylinder during its operating cycle. A nice addition to the above diagnosis is carrying out and endoscopy of each cylinder, which enables the observation of: water leaks, injector leaks, the spraying of each injector, valve leaks,... etc. This article describes the fundamentals of a non-intrusive, easy to use and low cost tool, used to check the function of Emergency Diesel engines, as well as the experience of its use in the St. Maria Garona Nuclear Plant. The article also describes the case of a fault which occurred in the Nuclear Power plant in Garona that would hardly have been possible to detect by other means. This tool was developed jointly by the Engines Laboratory of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Zaragoza and the St. Maria Garona Nuclear Plant. It has been further improved, extended and optimized over the more than 10 years of its use. (Author)

  6. Emergency contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the uterus CHOICES FOR EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION Two emergency contraceptive pills may be bought without a prescription. Plan ... to provide ongoing birth control. MORE ABOUT EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTIVE PILLS Women of any age can buy Plan ...

  7. Lung Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Marfan Foundation Marfan & Related Disorders What is Marfan Syndrome? What are Related Disorders? What are the Signs? ... Emergencies Lung Emergencies Surgeries Lung Emergencies People with Marfan syndrome can be at increased risk of sudden lung ...

  8. Benchmark Energetic Data in a Model System for Grubbs II Metathesis Catalysis and Their Use for the Development, Assessment, and Validation of Electronic Structure Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2009-01-31

    We present benchmark relative energetics in the catalytic cycle of a model system for Grubbs second-generation olefin metathesis catalysts. The benchmark data were determined by a composite approach based on CCSD(T) calculations, and they were used as a training set to develop a new spin-component-scaled MP2 method optimized for catalysis, which is called SCSC-MP2. The SCSC-MP2 method has improved performance for modeling Grubbs II olefin metathesis catalysts as compared to canonical MP2 or SCS-MP2. We also employed the benchmark data to test 17 WFT methods and 39 density functionals. Among the tested density functionals, M06 is the best performing functional. M06/TZQS gives an MUE of only 1.06 kcal/mol, and it is a much more affordable method than the SCSC-MP2 method or any other correlated WFT methods. The best performing meta-GGA is M06-L, and M06-L/DZQ gives an MUE of 1.77 kcal/mol. PBEh is the best performing hybrid GGA, with an MUE of 3.01 kcal/mol; however, it does not perform well for the larger, real Grubbs II catalyst. B3LYP and many other functionals containing the LYP correlation functional perform poorly, and B3LYP underestimates the stability of stationary points for the cis-pathway of the model system by a large margin. From the assessments, we recommend the M06, M06-L, and MPW1B95 functionals for modeling Grubbs II olefin metathesis catalysts. The local M06-L method is especially efficient for calculations on large systems.

  9. A Comparison between the Effects of Scenario and Lecture-based Education Methods on Knowledge and Attitude of Emergency Medical Technicians towards Patients with Chest Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Parvaresh Masoud

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Education is one of the fundamental pillars of development of capabilities, skills, and competencies in different sectors of society. Application of modern education methods seems to be necessary due to rapid changes of social requirements. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of scenario and lecture-based education methods on knowledge and attitude of emergency medical technicians towards patients with chest trauma. Methods: A total of 160 emergency medical technicians were participated in this quasi-experimental research. The participants were divided into two groups of scenario- and lecture-based education. Required information were collected by knowledge and attitude questionnaire before and after the intervention. Data were then analyzed by paired t- and chi-square tests. Results: The mean of knowledge (p<0/001 and attitude (p<0.001 scores significantly increased in the scenario-based education group. Conclusion: Considering the effect of scenario-based education and its role in utilization of learner’s intellectual capability and creativity, it seems that scenario-based education is an appropriate alternative for traditional education methods.

  10. Determining the most suitable areas for artificial groundwater recharge via an integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in GIS environment (case study: Garabaygan Basin, Iran).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasiri, Hossein; Boloorani, Ali Darvishi; Sabokbar, Hassan Ali Faraji; Jafari, Hamid Reza; Hamzeh, Mohamad; Rafii, Yusef

    2013-01-01

    Flood spreading is a suitable strategy for controlling and benefiting from floods. Selecting suitable areas for flood spreading and directing the floodwater into permeable formations are amongst the most effective strategies in flood spreading projects. Having combined geographic information systems (GIS) and multi-criteria decision analysis approaches, the present study sought to locate the most suitable areas for flood spreading operation in the Garabaygan Basin of Iran. To this end, the data layers relating to the eight effective factors were prepared in GIS environment. This stage was followed by elimination of the exclusionary areas for flood spreading while determining the potentially suitable ones. Having closely examined the potentially suitable areas using the Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluations (PROMETHEE) II and analytic hierarchy process (AHP) methods, the land suitability map for flood spreading was produced. The PROMETHEE II and AHP were used for ranking all the alternatives and weighting the criteria involved, respectively. The results of the study showed that most suitable areas for the artificial groundwater recharge are located in Quaternary Q(g) and Q(gsc) geologic units and in geomorphological units of pediment and Alluvial fans with slopes not exceeding 3%. Furthermore, significant correspondence between the produced map and the control areas, where the flood spreading projects were successfully performed, provided further evidence for the acceptable efficiency of the integrated PROMETHEE II-AHP method in locating suitable flood spreading areas.

  11. Entrepreneurship, Emerging Technologies, Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thukral, Inderpreet S.; Von Ehr, James; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Groen, Arend J.; van der Sijde, Peter; Adham, Khairul Akmaliah

    2008-01-01

    Academics and practitioners alike have long understood the benefits, if not the risks, of both emerging markets and emerging technologies.Yet it is only recently that foresighted firms have embraced emerging technologies and emerging markets through entrepreneurial activity. Emerging technologies

  12. and Cu(II)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    complexes. The stoichiometry of the complexes were determined using Job's continuous variation method and the value was found to be 1:2 metal to ligand ratio. Stability constants ... Cobalt(II), Copper(II), Nickel(II), Spectrophotometric, Stability constant, Thermodynamic .... coordination of the metal ions with the chelating.

  13. Selecting a dynamic simulation modeling method for health care delivery research-part 2: report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Crown, William; Padula, William V; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Higashi, Mitchell K; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2015-03-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling can be used more effectively than other modeling methods. The hierarchical relationship between the health care delivery system, providers, patients, and other stakeholders exhibits a level of complexity that ought to be captured using dynamic simulation modeling methods. As a tool to help researchers decide whether dynamic simulation modeling is an appropriate method for modeling the effects of an intervention on a health care system, we presented the System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence (SIMULATE) checklist consisting of eight elements. This report builds on the previous work, systematically comparing each of the three most commonly used dynamic simulation modeling methods-system dynamics, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based modeling. We review criteria for selecting the most suitable method depending on 1) the purpose-type of problem and research questions being investigated, 2) the object-scope of the model, and 3) the method to model the object to achieve the purpose. Finally, we provide guidance for emerging good practices for dynamic simulation modeling in the health sector, covering all aspects, from the engagement of decision makers in the model design through model maintenance and upkeep. We conclude by providing some recommendations about the application of these methods to add value to informed decision making, with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement, starting with the problem definition. Finally, we identify areas in which further methodological development will likely occur given the growing "volume, velocity and variety" and availability of "big data" to provide empirical evidence and techniques

  14. Use of probabilistic safety analysis for design of emergency mitigation systems in hydrogen producer plant with sulfur-iodine technology, Section II: sulfuric acid decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza A, A.; Nelson E, P. F.; Francois L, J. L.

    2009-10-01

    Over the last decades, the need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases has prompted the development of technologies for the production of clean fuels through the use of primary energy resources of zero emissions, as the heat of nuclear reactors of high temperature. Within these technologies, one of the most promising is the hydrogen production by sulfur-iodine cycle coupled to a high temperature reactor initially proposed by General Atomics. By their nature and because it will be large-scale plants, the development of these technologies from its present phase to its procurement and construction, will have to incorporate emergency mitigation systems in all its parts and interconnections to prevent undesired events that could put threaten the plant integrity and the nearby area. For the particular case of sulfur-iodine thermochemical cycle, most analysis have focused on hydrogen explosions and failures in the primary cooling systems. While these events are the most catastrophic, is that there are also many other events that even taking less direct consequences, could jeopardize the plant operation, the people safety of nearby communities and carry the same economic consequences. In this study we analyzed one of these events, which is the formation of a toxic cloud prompted by uncontrolled leakage of concentrated sulfuric acid in the second section of sulfur-iodine process of General Atomics. In this section, the sulfuric acid concentration is near to 90% in conditions of high temperature and positive pressure. Under these conditions the sulfuric acid and sulfur oxides from the reactor will form a toxic cloud that the have contact with the plant personnel could cause fatalities, or to reach a town would cause suffocation, respiratory problems and eye irritation. The methodology used for this study is the supported design in probabilistic safety analysis. Mitigation systems were postulated based on the isolation of a possible leak, the neutralization of a pond of

  15. Multisite exploration of clinical decision making for antibiotic use by emergency medicine providers using quantitative and qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Larissa; Gudger, Glencora; Armstrong, Paige; Brooks, Gillian; Hinds, Pamela; Bhat, Rahul; Moran, Gregory J; Schwartz, Lisa; Cosgrove, Sara E; Klein, Eili Y; Rothman, Richard E; Rand, Cynthia

    2014-09-01

    To explore current practices and decision making regarding antimicrobial prescribing among emergency department (ED) clinical providers. We conducted a survey of ED providers recruited from 8 sites in 3 cities. Using purposeful sampling, we then recruited 21 providers for in-depth interviews. Additionally, we observed 10 patient-provider interactions at one of the ED sites. SAS 9.3 was used for descriptive and predictive statistics. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a thematic, constructivist approach with consensus coding using NVivo 10.0. Field and interview notes collected during the observational study were aligned with themes identified through individual interviews. Of 150 survey respondents, 76% agreed or strongly agreed that antibiotics are overused in the ED, while half believed they personally did not overprescribe. Eighty-nine percent used a smartphone or tablet in the ED for antibiotic prescribing decisions. Several significant differences were found between attending and resident physicians. Interview analysis identified 42 codes aggregated into the following themes: (1) resource and environmental factors that affect care; (2) access to and quality of care received outside of the ED consult; (3) patient-provider relationships; (4) clinical inertia; and (5) local knowledge generation. The observational study revealed limited patient understanding of antibiotic use. Providers relied heavily upon diagnostics and provided limited education to patients. Most patients denied a priori expectations of being prescribed antibiotics. Patient, provider, and healthcare system factors should be considered when designing interventions to improve antimicrobial stewardship in the ED setting.

  16. ADSA Foundation Scholar Award: Trends in culture-independent methods for assessing dairy food quality and safety: emerging metagenomic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marie

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the quality and safety of dairy food is critical to maintaining the competitiveness of dairy products in the food and beverage market and in reinforcing consumer confidence in the dairy industry. Raw milk quality has a significant effect on finished product quality. Several microbial groups found in raw milk have been shown to adversely affect the shelf life of pasteurized milk. Current microbiological criteria used to define milk quality are based primarily on culture-dependent methods, some of which are perceived to lack the desired sensitivity and specificity. To supplement traditional methods, culture-independent methods are increasingly being used to identify specific species or microbial groups, and to detect indicator genes or proteins in raw milk or dairy products. Some molecular subtyping techniques have been developed to track the transmission of microbes in dairy environments. The burgeoning "-omics" technologies offer new and exciting opportunities to enhance our understanding of food quality and safety in relation to microbes. Metagenomics has the potential to characterize microbial diversity, detect nonculturable microbes, and identify unique sequences or other factors associated with dairy product quality and safety. In this review, fluid milk will be used as the primary example to examine the adequacy and validity of conventional methods, the current trend of culture-independent methods, and the potential applications of metagenomics in dairy food research. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Finger counting method is more accurate than age-based weight estimation formulae in estimating the weight of Hong Kong children presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Jerome Lt; Chow, Eric Pf; Cattermole, Giles N; Graham, Colin A; Rainer, Timothy H

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the finger counting method and compare its performance with four commonly used age-based weight estimation formulae in children aged 1-9 years presenting to the ED in Hong Kong. A cross-sectional, observational study of children aged 1-9 years who presented to the ED of a tertiary referral hospital in Hong Kong over a 6 month period was conducted. Actual weight was compared with estimated weight using the finger counting method and four commonly used age-based weight estimation formulae. Bland-Altman analysis was performed to evaluate the degree of agreement in which the mean percentage difference (MPD) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) were calculated. Root mean squared error (RMSE) and proportions of weight estimates within 10%, 15% and 20% of actual weight were determined. A total of 4178 children were included. The finger counting method was the most accurate method (MPD 0.1%; 95% LOA -34.0% to 34.2%). The original Advanced Paediatric Life Support (APLS) formula (MPD -7.0%; 95% LOA -38.4% to 24.3%) and the updated APLS formula (MPD -0.4%; 95% LOA -38.5% to 37.8%) underestimated weight whereas the Luscombe formula (MPD 7.2%; 95% LOA -31.8% to 46.2%) and the Best Guess formula (MPD 10.6%; 95% LOA -27.3% to 48.4%) overestimated weight. The finger counting method had smallest RMSE of 4.06 kg and estimated the largest proportion of children within 10%, 15% and 20% of actual weight. The finger counting method outperforms the commonly used age-based weight estimation formulae in children aged 1-9 years presenting to the ED in Hong Kong. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Computer modelling for risk assessment of emergency situations and terrorist attacks during transportation using methods of fuzzy set theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosterev, V.V.; Boliatko, V.V.; Gusev, S.M.; Panin, M.P.; Averkin, A.N.

    1998-01-01

    Computer software for risk assessment of transportation of important freight has been developed. It incorporates models of transport accidents, including terrorist attacks. These models use, among the others, input data of cartographic character. Geographic information system technology and electronic maps of a geographic area are involved as an instrument for handling this kind of data. Fuzzy set theory methods as well as standard methods of probability theory have been used for quantitative risk assessment. Fuzzy algebraic operations and their computer realization are discussed. Risk assessment for one particular route of railway transportation is given as an example. (author)

  19. Fracture Behavior Investigation of a Typical Sandstone Under Mixed-Mode I/II Loading Using the Notched Deep Beam Bending Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Ren, L.; Xie, L. Z.; Ai, T.; He, B.

    2017-08-01

    The brittle fracture behavior of rocks under mixed-mode loading is important in rock engineering. First, a new configuration called the notched deep beam (NDB) specimen was introduced for the fracture testing of rock materials under mixed-mode I/II loading, and a series of finite element analyses were performed to calibrate the dimensionless fracture parameters (i.e., Y I, Y II and T^{*}). The results showed that an NDB specimen subjected to three-point bending is able to generate pure mode I loading, pure mode II loading, and any mixed-mode loading in between. Then, several NDB specimens made of sandstone were used to investigate the brittle fracture behavior of rock under mixed-mode I/II loading. The fracture surfaces were theoretically described using a statistical method, and the results indicated that all the fracture surfaces generated under different mixed-mode loading were statistically identical; to some extent, these results experimentally showed that only tensile fracture occurs under mixed-mode I/II loading. The obtained fracture strengths were then analyzed using several brittle fracture criteria. The empirical criterion, maximum energy release rate criterion, generalized maximum tangential stress (GMTS) criterion, and improved R-criterion accurately predicted the fracture strength envelope of the sandstone. Finally, based on the concepts of point stress and mean stress, the micro-crack zones (MCZs) under different mixed-mode loading were theoretically estimated based on the MTS and GMTS criteria. The critical radius of MCZ in the crack propagation direction was not a constant for all mixed-mode loading conditions regardless of whether the T-stress was considered. This result suggests that the size of the core region used to predict the crack initiation direction and fracture strength based on the GMTS criterion should be chosen more carefully.

  20. Seletividade de herbicidas: II - aplicação de herbicidas em pós-emergência inicial e tarida da cana-de-açúcar na época das chuvas Herbicide selectivity: II - herbicide application at initial and late and post-emergence of sugarcane in the rainy season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A.M. Azania

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho testar a seletividade dos herbicidas diuron+hexazinone, azafenidin+hexazinone, metribuzin e isoxaflutole, aplicados em pósemergência inicial e tardia das plantas de cana-de-açúcar, cultivar RB835089, na época das chuvas, em soqueira de terceiro corte, após colheita com queima prévia do canavial, em Araras-SP. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados com testemunhas pareadas, com cinco tratamentos e quatro repetições, existindo uma testemunha capinada para cada tratamento químico dentro de cada bloco. Os tratamentos foram: diuron+hexazinone (1.170+330 g ha-1, azafenidin+hexazinone (192,5+247,5 g ha-1, metribuzin (1.920 g ha-1, isoxaflutole (127,5 g ha-1 e testemunha. Concluiu-se que os herbicidas foram mais fitotóxicos quando aplicados na pós-emergência tardia. Em pós-emergência inicial, o isoxaflutole foi o único produto que afetou a produtividade agrícola. Na pós-emergência tardia, todos os herbicidas prejudicaram a produtividade agrícola, sendo o diuron+hexazinone o único produto que não afetou as características tecnológicas e o rendimento de açúcar.This research aimed to evaluate the selectivity of azafenidin+hexazinone, diuron+hexazinone, metribuzin and isoxaflutole to sugarcane, applied at initial and late post-emergence during the rainy season. The study was conducted over 3-yr sugarcane ratoons (cv. RB 835089, in Araras, SP. The experiment was arranged in randomized blocks with five treatments and four replications, and one weeded control for each treatment within each block. The treatments used were: (diuron+hexazinone (1,170 + 330 g ha-1, azafenidin+hexazinone (192.5+247.5 g ha-1, metribuzin (1,920 g ha-1 and isoxaflutole (127.5 g ha-1 and weed control. It was concluded that the herbicides damaged sugarcane the most when applied during late post-emergence. At early post-emergence, isoxaflutole was the only herbicide affecting yield. In late post-emergence, all the

  1. Childhood Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Waiting So Long? Admission to the Hospital Heroes on Medicine's Front Line Observation Emergency Care Fact Sheet Health & Safety Tips Campaigns SUBSCRIBE Emergency 101 Share this! Home » Emergency 101 Childhood Emergencies Keeping children healthy and safe is every parent’s No. 1 ...

  2. A comparative evaluation of emerging methods for errors of commission based on applications to the Davis-Besse (1985) event

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reer, B.; Dang, V.N.; Hirschberg, S.; Straeter, O.

    1999-12-01

    In considering the human role in accidents, the classical PSA methodology applied today focuses primarily on the omissions of actions required of the operators at specific points in the scenario models. A practical, proven methodology is not available for systematically identifying and analyzing the scenario contexts in which the operators might perform inappropriate actions that aggravate the scenario. As a result, typical PSA's do not comprehensively treat these actions, referred to as errors of commission (EOCs). This report presents the results of a joint project of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland) and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Garching, Germany) that examined some methods recently proposed for addressing the EOC issue. Five methods were investigated: 1 ) ATHEANA, 2) the Borssele screening methodology. 3) CREAM, 4) CAHR, and 5) CODA. In addition to a comparison of their scope, basic assumptions, and analytical approach, the methods were each applied in the analysis of PWR Loss of Feedwater scenarios based on the 1985 Davis-Besse event, in which the operator response included actions that can be categorized as EOCs. The aim was to compare how the methods consider a concrete scenario in which EOCs have in fact been observed. These case applications show how the methods are used in practical terms and constitute a common basis for comparing the methods and the insights that they provide. The identification of the potentially significant EOCs to be analysed in the PSA is currently the central problem for their treatment. The identification or search scheme has to consider an extensive set of potential actions that the operators may take. These actions may take place instead of required actions, for example, because the operators fail to assess the plant state correctly, or they may occur even when no action is required. As a result of this broad search space, most methodologies apply multiple schemes to

  3. A comparative evaluation of emerging methods for errors of commission based on applications to the Davis-Besse (1985) event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reer, B.; Dang, V.N.; Hirschberg, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Nuclear Energy and Safety Research Dept., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Straeter, O. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    In considering the human role in accidents, the classical PSA methodology applied today focuses primarily on the omissions of actions required of the operators at specific points in the scenario models. A practical, proven methodology is not available for systematically identifying and analyzing the scenario contexts in which the operators might perform inappropriate actions that aggravate the scenario. As a result, typical PSA's do not comprehensively treat these actions, referred to as errors of commission (EOCs). This report presents the results of a joint project of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI, Villigen, Switzerland) and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS, Garching, Germany) that examined some methods recently proposed for addressing the EOC issue. Five methods were investigated: 1 ) ATHEANA, 2) the Borssele screening methodology. 3) CREAM, 4) CAHR, and 5) CODA. In addition to a comparison of their scope, basic assumptions, and analytical approach, the methods were each applied in the analysis of PWR Loss of Feedwater scenarios based on the 1985 Davis-Besse event, in which the operator response included actions that can be categorized as EOCs. The aim was to compare how the methods consider a concrete scenario in which EOCs have in fact been observed. These case applications show how the methods are used in practical terms and constitute a common basis for comparing the methods and the insights that they provide. The identification of the potentially significant EOCs to be analysed in the PSA is currently the central problem for their treatment. The identification or search scheme has to consider an extensive set of potential actions that the operators may take. These actions may take place instead of required actions, for example, because the operators fail to assess the plant state correctly, or they may occur even when no action is required. As a result of this broad search space, most methodologies apply multiple schemes to

  4. Multiple triangulation and collaborative research using qualitative methods to explore decision making in pre-hospital emergency care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paramedics make important and increasingly complex decisions at scene about patient care. Patient safety implications of influences on decision making in the pre-hospital setting were previously under-researched. Cutting edge perspectives advocate exploring the whole system rather than individual influences on patient safety. Ethnography (the study of people and cultures has been acknowledged as a suitable method for identifying health care issues as they occur within the natural context. In this paper we compare multiple methods used in a multi-site, qualitative study that aimed to identify system influences on decision making. Methods The study was conducted in three NHS Ambulance Trusts in England and involved researchers from each Trust working alongside academic researchers. Exploratory interviews with key informants e.g. managers (n = 16 and document review provided contextual information. Between October 2012 and July 2013 researchers observed 34 paramedic shifts and ten paramedics provided additional accounts via audio-recorded ‘digital diaries’ (155 events. Three staff focus groups (total n = 21 and three service user focus groups (total n = 23 explored a range of experiences and perceptions. Data collection and analysis was carried out by academic and ambulance service researchers as well as service users. Workshops were held at each site to elicit feedback on the findings and facilitate prioritisation of issues identified. Results The use of a multi-method qualitative approach allowed cross-validation of important issues for ambulance service staff and service users. A key factor in successful implementation of the study was establishing good working relationships with academic and ambulance service teams. Enrolling at least one research lead at each site facilitated the recruitment process as well as study progress. Active involvement with the study allowed ambulance service researchers and service

  5. Multiple triangulation and collaborative research using qualitative methods to explore decision making in pre-hospital emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Maxine; O'Hara, Rachel; Hirst, Enid; Weyman, Andrew; Turner, Janette; Mason, Suzanne; Quinn, Tom; Shewan, Jane; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2017-01-24

    Paramedics make important and increasingly complex decisions at scene about patient care. Patient safety implications of influences on decision making in the pre-hospital setting were previously under-researched. Cutting edge perspectives advocate exploring the whole system rather than individual influences on patient safety. Ethnography (the study of people and cultures) has been acknowledged as a suitable method for identifying health care issues as they occur within the natural context. In this paper we compare multiple methods used in a multi-site, qualitative study that aimed to identify system influences on decision making. The study was conducted in three NHS Ambulance Trusts in England and involved researchers from each Trust working alongside academic researchers. Exploratory interviews with key informants e.g. managers (n = 16) and document review provided contextual information. Between October 2012 and July 2013 researchers observed 34 paramedic shifts and ten paramedics provided additional accounts via audio-recorded 'digital diaries' (155 events). Three staff focus groups (total n = 21) and three service user focus groups (total n = 23) explored a range of experiences and perceptions. Data collection and analysis was carried out by academic and ambulance service researchers as well as service users. Workshops were held at each site to elicit feedback on the findings and facilitate prioritisation of issues identified. The use of a multi-method qualitative approach allowed cross-validation of important issues for ambulance service staff and service users. A key factor in successful implementation of the study was establishing good working relationships with academic and ambulance service teams. Enrolling at least one research lead at each site facilitated the recruitment process as well as study progress. Active involvement with the study allowed ambulance service researchers and service users to gain a better understanding of the research

  6. Role of emerging methods in advanced DFT study of novel compounds with high-efficiency photovoltaic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, Pablo [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco (Spain); Wahnon, Perla; Sanchez, Kefren; Aguilera, Irene; Fernandez, Julio Juan [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Conesa, Jose Carlos [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cantoblanco (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    An exhaustive study of compounds with unusual electronic structure used as new efficient photovoltaic materials is presented. These intermediate band materials obtained by selective substitution of atoms of a host semiconductor by transition metals present a narrow, partially-filled band inside the semiconductor band-gap, separated from host valence and conduction bands. Therefore additional current carriers can be obtained from the absorption of low energy photons enabling electrons to get the conduction band through the intermediate band. Although standard DFT is a suitable tool for our purposes, in order to enhance prediction capabilities for these new materials there are some features, i.e. host semiconductor gap, which can be improved with advanced methods let be GW, exact exchange or hybrid functionals. Exact exchange studies have been done in several candidates for intermediate band material as well as advanced analysis of the correlation effect. Exact exchange method was implemented in our group within SIESTA. For the moment these studies have contributed to support the reliability of the prediction of intermediate band materials to such an extent that experimental samples are being grown. State-of-the-art techniques could complement the results obtained to date.

  7. Practical methods for the functioning evaluation of the whole body counter system Accuscan II of the ININ; Metodos practicos para la evaluacion del comportamiento del sistema contador de cuerpo entero Accuscan II del ININ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro L, M. M.; Ramirez J, F. J.; Mondragon C, L., E-mail: mercedes.alfaro@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Touca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The whole body counter system Accuscan II of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), was designed and built to quantify and to measure radionuclides fission product as well as gamma emitters, with a maximum sensibility of less than 10 n Ci for cobalt 60 at one time of counting of 5 minutes. The system has two detectors of Ge(Hp) with Beryllium window to a relative efficiency of 25% in a counting configuration of vertical scanning, this configuration gives a plane response of constant efficiency. In this work some practical methods developed in the Internal Dosimetry Laboratory to carry out the functioning evaluation of the whole body counter system Accuscan II of the ININ are described. With the obtained results of this evaluation we can decide fine adjustments will be necessary for the optimization of the equipment operation. The evaluation of this equipment was especially necessary, due to its 21 years-old antiquity and for the gradual changes that has in its functioning. The equipment is intrinsically a gamma spectrometry system and some described experiences could be applied too in other gamma spectrometry systems. (Author)

  8. Proceedings of the Workshop on Current and Emerging methods for Optimising Safety and Efficiency in Nuclear Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-02-01

    The workshop was organised by the Institute for Energy Technology (IFE) on behalf of the OECD Halden Reactor Project (OECD-HRP) and in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). The workshop brought together more than 100 people (operators, regulators, scientists, consultants, and contractors) from 25 countries. Program: Day 1 - Successful application of R and D in decommissioning and future needs (Welcome and Opening Speeches; Session 1: Workshop Introductory Presentations; Session 2: Experience from starting, on-going and completed decommissioning projects). Day 2 - R and D and application of advanced technologies for decommissioning (Session 3: New technologies for decommissioning; Session 4: Advanced information technologies for decommissioning). Day 3 - Improving decommissioning management on project, national and international level (Session 5: Challenges and methods for improving decommissioning; Session 6: Workshop closing)

  9. Implicit methods for equation-free analysis: convergence results and analysis of emergent waves in microscopic traffic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marschler, Christian; Sieber, Jan; Berkemer, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    within an error that is exponentially small with respect to the small parameter measuring time scale separation. Second, we apply this result to the idealized traffic modeling problem of phantom jams generated by cars with uniform behavior on a circular road. The traffic jams are waves that travel slowly...... against the direction of traffic. Equation-free analysis enables us to investigate the behavior of the microscopic traffic model on a macroscopic level. The standard deviation of cars' headways is chosen as the macroscopic measure of the underlying dynamics such that traveling wave solutions correspond......We introduce a general formulation for an implicit equation-free method in the setting of slow-fast systems. First, we give a rigorous convergence result for equation-free analysis showing that the implicitly defined coarse-level time stepper converges to the true dynamics on the slow manifold...

  10. Exploratory analysis of textual data from the Mother and Child Handbook using a text mining method (II): Monthly changes in the words recorded by mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Miki; Matsuda, Yoshio; Manaka, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Makiko; Ohwada, Michitaka; Matsubara, Shigeki

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the possibility of converting subjective textual data written in the free column space of the Mother and Child Handbook (MCH) into objective information using text mining and to compare any monthly changes in the words written by the mothers. Pregnant women without complications (n = 60) were divided into two groups according to State-Trait Anxiety Inventory grade: low trait anxiety (group I, n = 39) and high trait anxiety (group II, n = 21). Exploratory analysis of the textual data from the MCH was conducted by text mining using the Word Miner software program. Using 1203 structural elements extracted after processing, a comparison of monthly changes in the words used in the mothers' comments was made between the two groups. The data was mainly analyzed by a correspondence analysis. The structural elements in groups I and II were divided into seven and six clusters, respectively, by cluster analysis. Correspondence analysis revealed clear monthly changes in the words used in the mothers' comments as the pregnancy progressed in group I, whereas the association was not clear in group II. The text mining method was useful for exploratory analysis of the textual data obtained from pregnant women, and the monthly change in the words used in the mothers' comments as pregnancy progressed differed according to their degree of unease. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  11. Train operation in emergencies

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Limin; Qin, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest findings on train operation theories and methods in the context of emergencies. It examines and assesses a range of aspects—including the definition of a railway emergency, transport organization modes in emergencies, calculating railway transport capacity in emergencies, line planning in emergencies, train re-pathing in emergencies and train re-scheduling in emergencies—that are urgently needed in the railway transportation field, which faces the serious challenge of dealing with emergencies worldwide. The book highlights the latest research results in an integrated and systematic way, and the methodology presented is oriented on real-world problems, allowing it to be used not only directly in railway operational management, but also as the point of departure for further applications or theoretical research. As such, the book will be of considerable interest to graduate students and researchers in the field of traffic and transportation engineering.>.

  12. A quantitative method for determination of Co(II) based on the inner filter effect of reagents on the Raman scattering signals of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui Ying; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2007-03-21

    It is known that Raman scattering signals are one of main interference sources leading up to determination errors in spectrofluorometry, and thus the signals can be easily detected with a common spectrofluorometer. In this contribution, we propose a quantitative method based on the inner filter effect (IFE) of reagents on the Raman scattering signals of solvent by taking the complexation of divalent cobalt ion with 4-[(5-chloro-2-pyridyl)azo]-1,3-diaminobenzene (5-Cl-PADAB) as a model system. By adjusting the excitation wavelength of the spectrofluorometer, we could easily detect the Raman scattering signals of water at 424 nm where the maximum absorption of 5-Cl-PADAB reagent is located. In a solution of 5-Cl-PADAB, the Raman scattering signals of water are decreased owing to the IFE of 5-Cl-PADAB. If Co(II), which could form the binary complex of Co(II)/5-Cl-PADAB and consumes the 5-Cl-PADAB reagent, is present in such a case for a given amount of 5-Cl-PADAB solution, recovered Raman scattering signals could be observed and measured with a spectrofluorometer. It was found that the intensity of the enhanced Raman scattering signals is proportional to the Co(II) concentration over the range from 2.0 x 10(-7) mol L(-1) to 1.0 x 10(-5) mol L(-1), and the detection limit could reach 1.2 x 10(-7) mol L(-1). With that, Co(II) in samples could be detected with R.S.D. values lower than 2.6% and recoveries over the range of 97.2-104.7%.

  13. Simple hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane extraction method for pre-concentration of Cd(II) in environmental samples and detection by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carletto, Jeferson Schneider; Luciano, Raquel Medeiros; Bedendo, Gizelle Cristina; Carasek, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    A hollow fiber renewal liquid membrane (HFRLM) extraction method to determine cadmium (II) in water samples using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Ammonium O,O-diethyl dithiophosphate (DDTP) was used to complex cadmium (II) in an acid medium to obtain a neutral hydrophobic complex (ML 2 ). The organic solvent introduced to the sample extracts this complex from the aqueous solution and carries it over the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane, that had their walls previously filled with the same organic solvent. The organic solvent is solubilized inside the PDMS membrane, leading to a homogeneous phase. The complex strips the lumen of the membrane where, at higher pH, the complex Cd-DDTP is broken down and cadmium (II) is released into the stripping phase. EDTA was used to complex the cadmium (II), helping to trap the analyte in the stripping phase. A multivariate procedure was used to optimize the studied variables. The optimized variables were: sample (donor phase) pH 3.25, DDTP concentration 0.05% (m/v), stripping (acceptor phase) pH 8.75, EDTA concentration 1.5 x 10 -2 mol L -1 , extraction temperature 40 deg. C, extraction time 40 min, a solvent mixture N-butyl acetate and hexane (60/40%, v/v) with a volume of 100 μL, and addition of ammonium sulfate to saturate the sample. The sample volume used was 20 mL and the stripping volume was 165 μL. The analyte enrichment factor was 120, limit of detection (LOD) 1.3 μg L -1 , relative standard deviation (RSD) 5.5% and the working linear range 2-30 μg L -1 .

  14. Emergency Contraception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a doctor to have an IUD inserted. Emergency contraceptive pills can be very effective if they are ... use. Some women feel nauseous after they take emergency contraceptive pills. This feeling should go away in about ...

  15. Emergency Checklist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Week National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day Emergency Checklist If someone may have been poisoned, call the ... visit to the emergency room. Below is a checklist to help you in the event of a ...

  16. Prevalence, causes and consequences of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in emergency care: a mixed-methods study of UK NHS Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasan, Sunil; Gohil, Poonam; Cornelius, Victoria; Taylor, Cath

    2015-08-01

    To estimate prevalence and explore potential causes and consequences of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in UK emergency medicine consultants. A sequential mixed-methods design. Cross-sectional e-survey to all UK NHS emergency medicine consultants (n=1317) including Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) (compassion satisfaction/fatigue), followed by interviews with consultants scoring above (n=6) and below (n=6) predefined ProQOL thresholds. 681 (52%) consultants responded. Most (98%) reported at least 'average' compassion satisfaction. Higher scores were associated with type of workplace (designated trauma centres faring better) and number of years worked as a consultant (gradually worsen over time, except 20 years onwards when it improves). Consultants with lower (worse) compassion satisfaction scores were more likely to report being irritable with patients or colleagues and reducing their standards of care (a third reported these behaviours at least monthly) and were more likely to intend to retire early (59% had such plans). Key features distinguishing 'satisfied' from 'fatigued' interviewed consultants included having strategies to deal with the high work intensities associated with their role and having positive views of the team within which they worked. The degree of variety in their roles and the ability to maintain empathy for their patients were also distinguishing features between these groups. Findings support an urgent review of workforce and resources in emergency medicine and suggest that a multifactorial approach to identification, prevention and treatment of occupational stress in the workforce is required that considers individual, job and organisational factors, particularly those that impact on perceived control and support at work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Emergent Expertise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGivern, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The concept of emergence appears in various places within the literature on expertise and expert practice. Here, I examine some of these applications of emergence in the light of two prominent accounts of emergence from the philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. I evaluate these accounts with respect to several specific contexts in which…

  18. Acoustic transmission in non-uniform ducts with mean flow. I - The method of weighted residuals. II - The finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversman, W.; Astley, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of acoustic transmission through nonuniform ducts containing a high-speed subsonic flow is studied by means of the method of weighted residuals in the form of a modified Galerkin method and a Galerkin formulation of the finite element method. The method of weighted residuals is shown to employ the basis functions generated from eigenvalue calculations for the case of no flow, and is verified by comparison with exact eigenvalue calculations in the uniform duct case and numerical solutions of the one-dimensional form of the equations in the nonuniform duct case. The finite element scheme based on both the Galerkin method and the residual least squares method and employing eight-noded isoparametric elements is presented and used to investigate multimodal propagation by the coupling of the solution in the duct nonuniform section to modal expansions in uniform sections. Comparison of the results of the two methods reveals them to be in substantial agreement, and predicts the importance of multimodal interactions at high Mach numbers.

  19. Tier II Chemical Storage Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Facilities that store hazardous chemicals above certain quantities must submit an annual emergency and hazardous chemical inventory on a Tier II form. This is a...

  20. The use of performance improvement methods to enhance emergency department patient satisfaction in the United States: a critical review of the literature and suggestions for future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Edwin D; Cruz, Brian L; Baumann, Brigitte M

    2006-07-01

    The authors reviewed the evidence on performance improvement methods for increasing emergency department (ED) patient satisfaction to provide evidence-based suggestions for clinical practice. Data sources consisted of searches through MEDLINE, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, Cochrane Library, and Emergency Medicine Abstracts and a manual search of references. Articles were included if they reported a performance improvement intervention targeting patient satisfaction in the ED setting. Articles on studies not conducted in the United States or that failed to provide enough details to allow critical evaluation of the study were excluded. Two authors used structured evaluation criteria to independently review each retained study. Nineteen articles met all selection criteria. Three studies found varying levels of support for multicomponent interventions, predominantly focused on implementation of clinical practice guidelines for specific presenting complaints and process redesign. Sixteen studies evaluated single-component interventions, with the following having at least one supportive study: using alternating patient assignment to provider teams rather than "zone"-based assignment, enhancing provider communication and customer service skills, incorporating information delivery interventions (e.g., pamphlets, video) that target patient expectations, using preformatted charts, and establishing ED-based observation units for specific conditions such as asthma and chest pain. There is modest evidence supporting a range of performance improvement interventions for improving ED patient satisfaction. Further work is needed before specific, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding which process changes are most effective. Recommendations are made for improving the quality of performance improvement efforts in the ED setting.

  1. Texas Emergency Resource Management. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    surgical. Catheter , urethral. Sutures, nonabsorbable, with Morphine and substitutes. Containers for sterilization. attached needle. Oral electrolytes...Sulfa drugs. Forceps, dressing. Tracheotomy tube. Synthetic plasma volume Forceps, hemostatic. Tube, nasogastric expanders. Forceps, obstetrical...g) in the event of attack or upon advice from higher authority, institute plans to insure austere distribution of essential survival Item . (h

  2. The application of the optical system ATOS II for rapid prototyping methods of non-classical models of cogbelt pulleys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawiec Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread application of both gear wheels and cogbelt pulleys with noncircular generating line in technique stimulates the development of manufacturing and measuring methods of these wheels. The paper presents the rapid prototyping methods of models of cogbelt pulleys with nocircular evelope. Evaluation method of manufacturing accuracy of cogbelt pulleys, which are applied in unevenrunning belt transmissions, are presented. These transmissions are widely applied in steering techniques and drives of machines and devices. Verification of mapping accuracy of shape of geometrical model of cogbelt pulley was done with the application of noncontact optical system i.e. coordinate optical scanner GOM Atos Compact Scan 5M GOM company.

  3. [Principle and application of scattering power function method in X-ray fluorescence analysis. II. Incoherent scattering radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, S

    1999-02-01

    It was discovered that the relationship between mass attenuation coefficient and incoherent scattering is not an inverse proportion but a power function in a wide range of matrix compositon. Experimental results are in good agreement with this theoretical predition. A new method is recommended for matrix absorption correction according to the discovery and used for the determination of microelement Sr in geological samples as an application example. The accuracy of the results of heavy absorption samples obtained by this method is much better than those obtained by the traditional scattering internal method.

  4. External validation of the New Orleans Criteria (NOC), the Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II) for CT scanning in pediatric patients with minor head injury in a non-trauma center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schachar, Jennifer L. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Zampolin, Richard L.; Miller, Todd S.; Farinhas, Joaquim M.; Taragin, Benjamin H. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Freeman, Katherine [Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Biostatistics, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Head CT scans are considered the imaging modality of choice to screen patients with head trauma for neurocranial injuries; however, widespread CT imaging is not recommended and much research has been conducted to establish objective clinical predictors of intracranial injury (ICI) in order to optimize the use of neuroimaging in children with minor head trauma. To evaluate whether a strict application of the New Orleans Criteria (NOC), Canadian CT Head Rule (CCHR) and National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study II (NEXUS II) in pediatric patients with head trauma presenting to a non-trauma center (level II) could reduce the number of cranial CT scans performed without missing clinically significant ICI. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective analysis of pediatric patients with head trauma who received a cranial CT scan between Jan. 1, 2001, and Sept. 1, 2008, and identified which patients would have required a scan based on the criteria of the above listed decision instruments. We then determined the sensitivities, specificities and negative predictive values of these aids. In our cohort of 2,101 patients, 92 (4.4%) had positive head CT findings. The sensitivities for the NOC, CCHR and NEXUS II were 96.7% (95%CI 93.1-100), 65.2% (95%CI 55.5-74.9) and 78.3% (95%CI 69.9-86.7), respectively, and their negative predictive values were 98.7%, 97.6% and 97.2%, respectively. In contrast, the specificities for these aids were 11.2% (95%CI 9.8-12.6), 64.2% (95%CI 62.1-66.3) and 34.2% (95%CI 32.1-36.3), respectively. Therefore, in our population it would have been possible to scan at least 10.9% fewer patients. The number of cranial CT scans conducted in our pediatric cohort with head trauma would have been reduced had any of the three clinical decision aids been applied. Therefore, we recommend that further validation and adoption of pediatric head CT decision aids in non-trauma centers be considered to ultimately increase patient safety while reducing medical

  5. Update on emergency contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Wing Kay; Blumenthal, Paul D

    2016-12-01

    Emergency contraception provides a critical and time-sensitive opportunity for women to prevent undesired pregnancy after intercourse. Both access and available options for emergency contraception have changed over the last several years. Emergency contraceptive pills can be less effective in obese women. The maximum achieved serum concentration of levonorgestrel (LNG) is lower in obese women than women of normal BMI, and doubling the dose of LNG (3 mg) increases its concentration maximum, approximating the level in normal BMI women receiving one dose of LNG. Repeated use of both LNG and ulipristal acetate (UPA) is well tolerated. Hormonal contraception can be immediately started following LNG use, but should be delayed for 5 days after UPA use to avoid dampening the efficacy of UPA. The copper intrauterine device (IUD) is the only IUD approved for emergency contraception (and the most effective method of emergency contraception), but use of LNG IUD as emergency contraception is currently being investigated. Accurate knowledge about emergency contraception remains low both for patients and healthcare providers. Emergency contraception is an important yet underutilized tool available to women to prevent pregnancy. Current options including copper IUD and emergency contraceptive pills are safe and well tolerated. Significant gaps in knowledge of emergency contraception on both the provider and user level exist, as do barriers to expedient access of emergency contraception.

  6. Polydopamine imprinted magnetic nanoparticles as a method to purify and detect class II hydrophobins from heterogeneous mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveros G, D; Cordova, K; Michiels, C; Verachtert, H; Derdelinckx, G

    2016-11-01

    Hydrophobins are one of the most active surface active proteins in nature, with an amphiphilic nature and the ability to self-assembly in elastic monolayers, the possible applications in industry are continuously increasing. However, production and purification of these proteins still remains a tedious process. We introduce here the use of polydopamine as imprinter polymer to create specific magnetic nanoparticles for the recognition of Hydrophobin HFBII from Trichoderma reesei. The protein was molecularly imprinted to magnetic nanoparticles to facilitate its specific detection and purification from liquids or carbonated beverages in the presence of other proteins. The resulting magnetic nanoparticles were successfully imprinted adsorbing till 77,4µg of HFBII hydrophobin per miligram of nanoparticles. The adsorption capacity of the imprinted nanoparticles was also tested for specificity using a mixture of five different proteins and peptides. A slight cross interaction was observed when proteins of similar molecular weight to HFBII were used. With larger proteins and peptides the interaction was very low. with other class II Hydrophobins the interaction was very similar as to HFBII. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Flow Cytometric Clinical Immunomonitoring Using Peptide–MHC Class II Tetramers: Optimization of Methods and Protocol Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diahann T. S. L. Jansen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of novel strategies to induce tolerance in autoimmune and autoimmune-like conditions, clinical trials of antigen-specific tolerizing immunotherapy have become a reality. Besides safety, it will be essential to gather mechanistic data on responding CD4+ T cells to assess the effects of various immunomodulatory approaches in early-phase trials. Peptide–MHC class II (pMHCII multimers are an ideal tool for monitoring antigen-specific CD4+ T cell responses in unmanipulated cells directly ex vivo. Various protocols have been published but there are reagent and assay limitations across laboratories that could hinder their global application to immune monitoring. In this methodological analysis, we compare protocols and test available reagents to identify sources of variability and to determine the limitations of the tetramer binding assay. We describe a robust pMHCII flow cytometry-based assay to quantify and phenotype antigen-specific CD4+ T cells directly ex vivo from frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples, which we suggest should be tested across various laboratories to standardize immune-monitoring results.

  8. Metabolic monitoring in the intensive care unit: a comparison of the Medgraphics Ultima, Deltatrac II, and Douglas bag collection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, C; Grocott, M P W; Singer, M

    2015-02-01

    The accuracy of oxygen consumption measurement by indirect calorimeters is poorly validated in mechanically ventilated intensive care patients where multiple confounders exist. This study sought to compare the Medgraphics Ultima (MGU) and Deltatrac II (DTII) devices, and the Douglas bag (DB) technique in mechanically ventilated patients at rest. Prospective comparison of oxygen consumption measurement using three indirect calorimetry techniques in stable, resting mechanically ventilated patients at rest. Oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), resting energy expenditure (REE), and respiratory quotient (RQ) were recorded breath-by-breath by the MGU over a 30-75 min period. During this time, simultaneous measurements were taken using the DTII, the DB, or both. While there was no systematic error (bias) between measurements made by the three techniques (VO2: MGU vs DTII 3.6%, MGU vs DB 3.3%), the limits of agreement were wide (VO2: MGU vs DTII 33%, MGU vs DB 54%). Resting oxygen consumption values in stable mechanically ventilated patients measured by the three techniques showed acceptable bias but poor precision. There is an important clinical and research need to develop new indirect calorimeters specifically tailored to measure oxygen consumption during mechanical ventilation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Microbiological method for radiation sterilization (II). Identification procedure of gram positive bacteria by using BBL CRYSTAL GP identification kit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshikawa, Tomihiko

    2004-01-01

    The part II in this title series describes details of the commercially available BBL CRYSTAL GP Identification Kit with the software (Becton, Dickinson and Co., Ltd.), by which identification of Gram positive bacteria as well as their number becoming easier in the radiation sterilization of medical devices. Isolation of a bacterium has to be confirmed by microscopy and its Gram positive property, by the Gram staining. The exponentially growing bacteria are to be inoculated in the Kit and cultured for 18-24 hr at 37 deg C with the lid attached by substrates for identification. Reactions to substrates are to be judged by CRYSTAL auto-reader, which is further to be searched by the computer software (code-book) for final identification. For possible misidentification, re-isolation of the bacterium, prolonged culture, concentrated inoculation and re-consideration for ranking of identification the software provides are necessary as well as other identification approaches. Representative bacteria as the bioburden are spp. of Bacilli, Corynebacteria, Staphylococci and Micrococci. (N.I.)

  10. Rapid Estimation of Aircraft Performance Models using Differential Vortex Panel Method and Extended Kalman Filter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The problem of estimating the aerodynamic models for flight control of damaged aircraft using an innovative differential vortex lattice method tightly coupled with...

  11. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO-CULTURED AND WILD-TYPE PERKINSUS MARINUS. II: DOSING METHODS AND HOST RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endoparasites must breach host barriers to establish infection and then must survive host internal defenses to cause disease. Such barriers may frustrate attempts to experimentally transmit parasites by ?natural' methods. In addition, the host's condition may affect a study's out...

  12. A study on the evaluation of pneumothorax by imaging methods in patients presenting to the emergency department for blunt thoracic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Şeyhmus; Çevik, Arif Alper; Acar, Nurdan; Döner, Egemen; Sivrikoz, Cumhur; Özkan, Ragıp

    2015-09-01

    Pneumothorax (PNX) is the collection of air between parietal and visceral pleura, and collapsed lung develops as a complication of the trapped air. PNX is likely to develop spontaneously in people with risk factors. However, it is mostly seen with blunt or penetrating trauma. Diagnosis is generally confirmed by chest radiography [posteroanterior chest radiography (PACR)]. Chest ultrasound (US) is also a promising technique for the detection of PNX in trauma patients. There is not much literature on the evaluation of blunt thoracic trauma (BTT) and pneumothorax (PNX) in the emergency department (ED). The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of chest US for the diagnosis of PNX in patients presenting to ED with BTT. This study was carried out for a period of nine months in the ED of a university hospital. The chest US of patients was performed by emergency physicians trained in the field. The results were compared with anteroposterior chest radiography and/or CT scan of the chest. The APCR and chest CT results were evaluated by a radiology specialist blind to US findings. The evaluation of the radiology specialist was taken as the gold standard for diagnosis by imaging methods. Clinical follow-up was taken into consideration for the diagnosis of PNX in patients on whom CT scan was not performed. Chest US was performed on all two hundred and twelve patients (144 female and 68 male patients; mean age 45.8) who participated in this study. The supine APCR was performed on two hundred and ten (99%) patients and chest CT was performed on one hundred and twenty (56.6%). Out of the twenty-five (11.8%) diagnosed cases of PNX, 22 (88%) were diagnosed by chest US and 8 were diagnosed by APCR. For the detection of PNX, compared to clinical follow-up and chest CT, the sensitivity of chest US was 88%, specificity 99.5%, positive predictive value 95.7% and negative predictive value 98.4%. Chest US has not superseded supine and standing chest radiography for PNX

  13. Impedance cardiography - Old method, new opportunities. Part II. Testing of cardiovascular response to various factors of work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecka, Jadwiga; Siedlecki, Patryk; Bortkiewicz, Alicja

    2015-01-01

    Impedance cardiography seems to be a very good, although underappreciated diagnostic method. What may distinguish it from among the many research methods is the fact that it enables non-invasive monitoring of cardiac output, stroke volume and systemic vascular resistance. Holter recording of the hemodynamic parameters makes it possible to study them not only in stationary (hospital, outpatient clinic) conditions, but also during household or professional activities, e.g., during road vehicle driving. Assessment of the trends of changes in the circulatory system of the employee at work makes it possible to judge whether the type of work performed by the worker is well tolerated - whether it is not too hard or too stressful. This is important, therefore, impedance cardiography can be extensively used in occupational medicine. Provision of preventive care to workers according to current standards requires, on the one hand, the use of the latest diagnostic methods while, on the other hand, the methods must be inexpensive, because otherwise the employer would not be able or willing to pay the associated costs. Impedance cardiography meets those criteria; however, few data is available in literature worldwide on the use of this method in the research on the impact of occupational work on cardiovascular responses of the employees. This work reports the use of impedance cardiography in studies on the various aspects of work environment. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  14. Size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection as a method for speciation analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes. II. Validation of the method for analysis of pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojsiewicz-Pieńkowska, Krystyna

    2011-12-05

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the usefulness of the size exclusion chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection (SEC-ELSD) method in the identification and quantitative analysis of polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS). The process of validation for the method was conducted, and the values obtained were compared with the acceptance criteria. Particularly important was the conclusion that SEC-ELSD method showed a high specificity for PDMS. PDMS is an organosilicon polymer and for this reason, it does not exist as a concrete chemical species. Depending on the length of the chain, PDMS can be toxic for organism. So far, the SEC-ELSD method has not been applied for the control of pharmaceutical products containing such PDMS as dimeticone or simeticone. The safety of use and effectiveness of such pharmaceutical products relies on the control of their quality. Therefore, the analytical methods and procedures that meet acceptance criteria for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the PDMS should be used. In the case of the analysis of pharmaceutical products, the acceptance criteria are established and recommended by, for example, the Pharmacopoeias, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The progress of knowledge, however, requires the development of new analytical tools which are able to solve incoming problems. In the case of pharmaceutical formulations containing PDMS, which are used not only by adults but also by children, it is necessary to use analytical methods which are characterized by a high specificity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A novel method of adrenaline concentration detection using fiber optical biosensor based on the catalysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xuan; Huang, Jun; Li, Mingtian; Wang, Bin

    2008-12-01

    As an effective alternative to the nature enzyme, metallophthalocyanine (MPc), having the advantages of easy accessibility, good stability and low cost, are used as catalyzer for the adrenaline (AD) oxidation. In this paper, the oxidation of AD by dioxygen using iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) as the catalyst was studied by electronic absorption spectra. The experimental results indicate that the oxidation product of AD catalyzed by FePc is adrenochrome with characteristic peaks at 298 nm and 267 nm. The catalytic activities of FePc are evaluated by the ratios of the absorbance at 298 nm of adrenochrome. The optimal concentration, pH and temperature for the oxidation of AD are 5.0×10-5 M, 8.0 and 55 oC, respectively. By using lock-in technology, the fiber optic adrenaline biosensor based on FePc catalysis and fluorescence quenching was fabricated and studied. A linear relationship between φ, the phase delay of the sensor head, and AD concentration was observed in the range of 2.0×10-6 to 9.0×10-6 M and 2.0×10-5 to 9.0×10-5 M. The standard deviation (SD) values are 4.7×10-8 (n = 5) and 5.9×10-7 (n = 5) M, respectively, while the detection limit is 4.0×10-7 M. The biosensor has the response time of about 15 min and the preferred reproducibility and stability.

  16. Reporting Military Sexual Trauma: A Mixed-Methods Study of Women Veterans' Experiences Who Served From World War II to the War in Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kristina B; Mills, Peter D

    2016-08-01

    Since 2004, there has been increased effort to reduce military sexual trauma (MST) in the U.S. military. Although MST covers a range of inappropriate behaviors, the majority of research, treatment, and outreach are focused on sexual assault and the experiences of individuals serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. During a study on veterans' involvement in a national peace organization, participants were asked about their military experiences. Veterans served from World War II to current conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Emerging out of the responses were descriptions of women's experiences with MST, barriers to reporting incidents of sexual misconduct and sexual assault, and the challenges they faced when seeking care. Data were gathered using anonymous questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Out of 52 female veterans, the majority (90%) was subjected to at least one form of MST, and 15% (8) attempted to report the incident(s). Over half of the assailants were of a higher rank than the survivors. The majority of veterans remained silent due to lack of options to report, the status of perpetrators, and fear of retaliation. These data provide a glimpse into the challenges many women veterans faced when seeking assistance reporting incidents or obtaining health care for their MST. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  17. Determination of average molecular weights on organic reactor coolants. II.-Freezing point depression method for diphenyl-ether solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreira, M.

    1965-01-01

    In order to reduce limitations of solubility, the cryoscopic method developed for benzene solutions of polyphenyl mixtures has been extended to diphenyl-ether solutions by introducing some modifications imposed by the physico-chemical properties of this solvent. The Nernsto theory of Beckman's method has been revised, taking into account the heat-transfer characteristics of the system, and the results of that analysis have been used to fix upon the design parameters of a cryoscopic apparatus for measurements on diphenyl-ether solutions. (Author) 9 refs

  18. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel Part II: Plate bending test and proposal of a simplified evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masanori; Takaya, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel is proposed. • A simplified evaluation method is also proposed for the codification. • Both proposed evaluation method was validated by the plate bending test. • For codification, the local stress and strain behavior was analyzed. - Abstract: In the present study, to develop an evaluation procedure and design rules for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints, a method for evaluating the creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints was proposed based on finite element analysis (FEA) and a series of cyclic plate bending tests of longitudinal and horizontal seamed plates. The strain concentration and redistribution behaviors were evaluated and the failure cycles were estimated using FEA by considering the test conditions and metallurgical discontinuities in the weld joints. Inelastic FEA models consisting of the base metal, heat-affected zone and weld metal were employed to estimate the elastic follow-up behavior caused by the metallurgical discontinuities. The elastic follow-up factors determined by comparing the elastic and inelastic FEA results were determined to be less than 1.5. Based on the estimated elastic follow-up factors obtained via inelastic FEA, a simplified technique using elastic FEA was proposed for evaluating the creep-fatigue life in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. The creep-fatigue life obtained using the plate bending test was compared to those estimated from the results of inelastic FEA and by a simplified evaluation method.

  19. A composite method based on formal grammar and DNA structural features in detecting human polymerase II promoter region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutapa Datta

    Full Text Available An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the promoter regions where the transcription factor binding takes place. Predicting a promoter region de novo has been a theoretical goal for many researchers for a long time. There exists a number of in silico methods to predict the promoter region de novo but most of these methods are still suffering from various shortcomings, a major one being the selection of appropriate features of promoter region distinguishing them from non-promoters. In this communication, we have proposed a new composite method that predicts promoter sequences based on the interrelationship between structural profiles of DNA and primary sequence elements of the promoter regions. We have shown that a Context Free Grammar (CFG can formalize the relationships between different primary sequence features and by utilizing the CFG, we demonstrate that an efficient parser can be constructed for extracting these relationships from DNA sequences to distinguish the true promoter sequences from non-promoter sequences. Along with CFG, we have extracted the structural features of the promoter region to improve upon the efficiency of our prediction system. Extensive experiments performed on different datasets reveals that our method is effective in predicting promoter sequences on a genome-wide scale and performs satisfactorily as compared to other promoter prediction techniques.

  20. Spectral (Finite) Volume Method for Conservation Laws on Unstructured Grids II: Extension to Two Dimensional Scalar Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. J.; Liu, Yen; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The framework for constructing a high-order, conservative Spectral (Finite) Volume (SV) method is presented for two-dimensional scalar hyperbolic conservation laws on unstructured triangular grids. Each triangular grid cell forms a spectral volume (SV), and the SV is further subdivided into polygonal control volumes (CVs) to supported high-order data reconstructions. Cell-averaged solutions from these CVs are used to reconstruct a high order polynomial approximation in the SV. Each CV is then updated independently with a Godunov-type finite volume method and a high-order Runge-Kutta time integration scheme. A universal reconstruction is obtained by partitioning all SVs in a geometrically similar manner. The convergence of the SV method is shown to depend on how a SV is partitioned. A criterion based on the Lebesgue constant has been developed and used successfully to determine the quality of various partitions. Symmetric, stable, and convergent linear, quadratic, and cubic SVs have been obtained, and many different types of partitions have been evaluated. The SV method is tested for both linear and non-linear model problems with and without discontinuities.

  1. A Composite Method Based on Formal Grammar and DNA Structural Features in Detecting Human Polymerase II Promoter Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-01-01

    An important step in understanding gene regulation is to identify the promoter regions where the transcription factor binding takes place. Predicting a promoter region de novo has been a theoretical goal for many researchers for a long time. There exists a number of in silico methods to predict the promoter region de novo but most of these methods are still suffering from various shortcomings, a major one being the selection of appropriate features of promoter region distinguishing them from non-promoters. In this communication, we have proposed a new composite method that predicts promoter sequences based on the interrelationship between structural profiles of DNA and primary sequence elements of the promoter regions. We have shown that a Context Free Grammar (CFG) can formalize the relationships between different primary sequence features and by utilizing the CFG, we demonstrate that an efficient parser can be constructed for extracting these relationships from DNA sequences to distinguish the true promoter sequences from non-promoter sequences. Along with CFG, we have extracted the structural features of the promoter region to improve upon the efficiency of our prediction system. Extensive experiments performed on different datasets reveals that our method is effective in predicting promoter sequences on a genome-wide scale and performs satisfactorily as compared to other promoter prediction techniques. PMID:23437045

  2. Chapter 5: Exponential experiments on natural uranium graphite moderated systems. II: Correlation of results with the method of Syrett (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.; Moore, P.G.F.; Richmond, R.

    1963-01-01

    The results are given of exponential experiments on graphite moderated systems with fuel elements consisting of single rods and tubes of natural uranium metal. A correlation is given with the method of calculation proposed by Syrett (1961) and new consistent values of neutron yield and effective resonance integral are derived. (author)

  3. 33 CFR 127.1307 - Emergency Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emergency Manual. 127.1307... Waterfront Facilities Handling Liquefied Hazardous Gas Operations § 127.1307 Emergency Manual. (a) Each Emergency Manual must contain— (1) For each LHG handled— (i) A physical description of the LHG; (ii) A...

  4. Dental Emergencies

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Marke

    1982-01-01

    Emergency dental problems can result from trauma, dental pathology, or from dental treatment itself. While the physician can treat many instances of dental trauma, the patient should see a dentist as soon as possible so that teeth can be saved. Emergency treatment of dental pathology usually involves relief of pain and/or swelling. Bleeding is the most frequent post-treatment emergency. The physician should be able to make the patient comfortable until definitive dental treatment can be avail...

  5. A Tentative Research on the Education of Teacher by "Adlerian Psychology" (II) : Using Structured Group Encounter Method

    OpenAIRE

    柴山, 謙二; シバヤマ, ケンジ; Shibayama, Kenji

    1998-01-01

    This is a tentative research on the education of teacher explored in Adlerian Psychology that used the structured group encounter method. The purpose of teacher education by Adlerian Psychology is to develop and deepen social interests of teachers, and to learn this theory and psychological techniques at school. The process of short-time workshop for teachers who were specialized in guidance for pupils was designed and documented for the education of teacher, and the author participated in th...

  6. Characterization of a 20 kHz sonoreactor. Part II: analysis of chemical effects by classical and electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez Bernal, Verónica; Frías Ferrer, Ángel; Iniesta, Jesus; González García, José; Aldaz Riera, Antonio; Riera Franco de Sarabia, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    A new electrochemical redox probe has been investigated in order to characterize the local production of radicals during the cavitation events. The results have been compared with those obtained with Fe(CN)6 3-/Fe(CN)6 4- (electrochemical probe for local mechanical effects) and classical chemical methods such as iodide and Fricke dosimeters (chemical probes for global effects). Universidad de Alicante (project GR03-05).

  7. A mixed-methods needs assessment of adult diabetes mellitus (type II) and hypertension care in Toledo, Belize

    OpenAIRE

    Dekker, Annette M.; Amick, Ashley E.; Scholcoff, Cecilia; Doobay-Persaud, Ashti

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-communicable diseases, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension, continue to disproportionately burden low- and middle-income countries. However, little research has been done to establish current practices and management of chronic disease in these settings. The objective of this study was to examine current clinical management and identify potential gaps in care of patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension in the district of Toledo, Belize. Methods The study used a...

  8. A Medium-Voltage Motor Drive with a Modular Multilevel PWM Inverter Part II. Startup Method and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Kazutoshi; Hagiwara, Makoto; Akagi, Hirofumi

    This paper presents a medium-voltage motor drive with a modular multilevel PWM inverter, and focuses on a startup method and its performance. It is formed by six modular arms, each of which consists of a cascaded stack of multiple bidirectional chopper-cells. The frequency of the dominant ac-voltage fluctuation is equal to the motor (inverter) frequency. These fluctuations occur in the dc capacitor of each chopper-cell, and the magnitude of the fluctuation is inversely proportional to the motor frequency. Because of the increased voltage fluctuation in low-frequency regions, the so-called “volt-per-hertz control” cannot be applied in motor starting. The startup method proposed in this paper is suitable for a motor drive with the modular multilevel PWM inverter. It enables the motor to produce a startup torque loaded on the motor at an initial amplitude and a fixed frequency of the inverter while taking into account constraints on the motor current and the ac-voltage fluctuation. The validity of the startup method as well as the startup performance is confirmed by experiment and simulation.

  9. Application of Tikhonov regularization method to wind retrieval from scatterometer data II: cyclone wind retrieval with consideration of rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Jian; Huang Si-Xun; Fei Jian-Fang; Du Hua-Dong; Zhang Liang

    2011-01-01

    According to the conclusion of the simulation experiments in paper I, the Tikhonov regularization method is applied to cyclone wind retrieval with a rain-effect-considering geophysical model function (called GMF+Rain). The GMF+Rain model which is based on the NASA scatterometer-2 (NSCAT2) GMF is presented to compensate for the effects of rain on cyclone wind retrieval. With the multiple solution scheme (MSS), the noise of wind retrieval is effectively suppressed, but the influence of the background increases. It will cause a large wind direction error in ambiguity removal when the background error is large. However, this can be mitigated by the new ambiguity removal method of Tikhonov regularization as proved in the simulation experiments. A case study on an extratropical cyclone of hurricane observed with SeaWinds at 25-km resolution shows that the retrieved wind speed for areas with rain is in better agreement with that derived from the best track analysis for the GMF+Rain model, but the wind direction obtained with the two-dimensional variational (2DVAR) ambiguity removal is incorrect. The new method of Tikhonov regularization effectively improves the performance of wind direction ambiguity removal through choosing appropriate regularization parameters and the retrieved wind speed is almost the same as that obtained from the 2DVAR. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  10. Classification methods for noise transients in advanced gravitational-wave detectors II: performance tests on Advanced LIGO data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Jade; Heng, Ik Siong; Torres-Forné, Alejandro; Font, José A; Lynch, Ryan; Trifirò, Daniele; Cuoco, Elena; Cavaglià, Marco

    2017-01-01

    The data taken by the advanced LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors contains short duration noise transients that limit the significance of astrophysical detections and reduce the duty cycle of the instruments. As the advanced detectors are reaching sensitivity levels that allow for multiple detections of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources it is crucial to achieve a fast and accurate characterization of non-astrophysical transient noise shortly after it occurs in the detectors. Previously we presented three methods for the classification of transient noise sources. They are Principal Component Analysis for Transients (PCAT), Principal Component LALInference Burst (PC-LIB) and Wavelet Detection Filter with Machine Learning (WDF-ML). In this study we carry out the first performance tests of these algorithms on gravitational-wave data from the Advanced LIGO detectors. We use the data taken between the 3rd of June 2015 and the 14th of June 2015 during the 7th engineering run (ER7), and outline the improvements made to increase the performance and lower the latency of the algorithms on real data. This work provides an important test for understanding the performance of these methods on real, non stationary data in preparation for the second advanced gravitational-wave detector observation run, planned for later this year. We show that all methods can classify transients in non stationary data with a high level of accuracy and show the benefits of using multiple classifiers. (paper)

  11. Algebraic connectivity analysis in molecular electronic structure theory II: total exponential formulation of second-quantised correlated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyakh, Dmitry I.; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamentality of the exponential representation of a second-quantised correlated wave function is emphasised with an accent on the physical sense of cluster amplitudes as cumulants of the correlated ansatz. Three main wave function formalisms, namely, the configuration-interaction theory, the coupled-cluster approach, and the many-body perturbation theory (as well as their extensions, e.g. the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method, multireference schemes, etc.), are represented in an exponential form, leading to a formulation of the working equations in terms of cluster amplitudes. By expressing the corresponding many-body tensor equations in terms of cluster amplitudes, we could unambiguously check connectivity types and the asymptotic behaviour of all tensors/scalars involved (in the formal limit of an infinite number of correlated particles). In particular, the appearance of disconnected cluster amplitudes corresponds to unphysical correlations. Besides, we demonstrate that the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster approach, as well as certain excited-state configuration-interaction methods, can be recast in a fully connected (exponential) form, thus breaking the common belief that all truncated configuration-interaction methods violate connectivity. Our work is based on the recently developed algebraic framework which can be viewed as a complement to the classical diagrammatic analysis.

  12. Reproductive emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutkowitz, L Ari

    2005-03-01

    The emergency clinician is frequently called on to manage problems relating to the female reproductive tract. Because owners sel-dom have the medical knowledge needed to differentiate normal from abnormal reproductive behaviors, they frequently look to the emergency veterinarian for guidance and information during and after parturition. For this reason, it is essential that the veterinarian have a good understanding of the normal reproductive cycle as well as the common emergencies that may occur. This article reviews the events surrounding normal parturition in the dog and cat and the reproductive emergencies seen most commonly in practice.

  13. Development of a quantitative evaluation method for non-technical skills preparedness of operation teams in nuclear power plants to deal with emergency conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yim, Ho Bin; Kim, Ar Ryum; Seong, Poong Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We selected important non-technical skills for emergency conditions in NPPs. ► We proposed an evaluation method for the selected non-technical skills. ► We conducted two sets of training, 9 experiments each, with real plant operators. ► Teams showed consistent non-technical skills preparedness with changing scenarios. ► Non-technical skills preparedness gives plausible explanations why teams fail tasks. -- Abstract: Many statistical results from safety reports tell that human related errors are the dominant influencing factor on the safe operation of power plants. Fortunately, training operators for the technical and non-technical skills can prevent many types of human errors. In this study, four important non-technical skills in safety critical industries – medical, aviation, and nuclear – were selected to describe behaviors of operation teams in emergency conditions of nuclear power plants (NPPs): communication, leadership, situation awareness, and decision-making skills. Also, preparedness of the non-technical skills was defined, and a quantification method of those skills called NoT-SkiP (Non-Technical Skills Preparedness) was developed to represent ‘how well operation teams are prepared to deal with emergency conditions’ in the non-technical skills aspect by analyzing monitoring-control patterns and a verbal protocol. Two case studies were conducted to validate the method. The first case was applied to Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) and Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) training. Independent variables were scenario, training repetition, and members. Relative values of the NoT-SkiP showed a consistent trend with changing scenarios. However, when training was repeated with the same scenario, NoT-SkiP values of some team were changed. It was supposed that leaders of some teams exerted their knowledge acquired from the previous training and gave up thoroughness of using procedures. When members especially who play a dominant role

  14. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfall, Kerry; Frith, Lucy; Gamble, Carrol; Gilbert, Ruth; Mok, Quen; Young, Bridget

    2015-01-01

    Objective Alternatives to prospective informed consent to enable children with life-threatening conditions to be entered into trials of emergency treatments are needed. Across Europe, a process called deferred consent has been developed as an alternative. Little is known about the views and experiences of those with first-hand experience of this controversial consent process. To inform how consent is sought for future paediatric critical care trials, we explored the views and experiences of parents and practitioners involved in the CATheter infections in CHildren (CATCH) trial, which allowed for deferred consent in certain circumstances. Design Mixed method survey, interview and focus group study. Participants 275 parents completed a questionnaire; 20 families participated in an interview (18 mothers, 5 fathers). 17 CATCH practitioners participated in one of four focus groups (10 nurses, 3 doctors and 4 clinical trial unit staff). Setting 12 UK children's hospitals. Results Some parents were momentarily shocked or angered to discover that their child had or could have been entered into CATCH without their prior consent. Although these feelings resolved after the reasons why consent needed to be deferred were explained and that the CATCH interventions were already used in clinical care. Prior to seeking deferred consent for the first few times, CATCH practitioners were apprehensive, although their feelings abated with experience of talking to parents about CATCH. Parents reported that their decisions about their child's participation in the trial had been voluntary. However, mistiming the deferred consent discussion had caused distress for some. Practitioners and parents supported the use of deferred consent in CATCH and in future trials of interventions already used in clinical care. Conclusions Our study provides evidence to support the use of deferred consent in paediatric emergency medicine; it also indicates the crucial importance of practitioner communication

  15. Does an integrated Emergency Department Information System change the sequence of clinical work? A mixed-method cross-site study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Joanne; Li, Ling; Georgiou, Andrew; Paoloni, Richard; Gibson, Kathryn; Li, Julie; Stewart, Michael; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2014-12-01

    (1) to describe Emergency Department (ED) physicians' and nurses' perceptions about the sequence of work related to patient management with use of an integrated Emergency Department Information System (EDIS), and (2) to measure changes in the sequence of clinician access to patient information. A mixed method study was conducted in four metropolitan EDs. Each used the same EDIS which is a module of the hospitals' enterprise-wide clinical information system composed of many components of an electronic medical record. This enabled access to clinical and management information relating to patients attending all hospitals in the region. Phase one - data were collected from ED physicians and nurses (n=97) by 69 in-depth interviews, five focus groups (28 participants), and 26 h of observations. Phase two - physicians (n=34) in one ED were observed over 2 weeks. Data included whether and what type of information was accessed from the EDIS prior to first examination of the patient. Clinicians reported, and phase 2 observations confirmed, that the integrated EDIS led to changes to the order of information access, which held implications for when tests were ordered and results accessed. Most physicians accessed patient information using EDIS prior to taking the patients' first medical history (77/116; 66.4%, 95% CI: 57.8-75.0%). Previous discharge summaries (74%) and past test results (61%) were most frequently accessed and junior doctors were more likely to access electronic past history information than their senior colleagues (χ(2)=20.717, d.f.=1, p<0.001). The integrated EDIS created new ways of working for ED clinicians. Such changes could hold positive implications for: time taken to reach a diagnosis and deliver treatments; length of stay; patient outcomes and experiences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of the methods of fibrinolysis by tube thoracostomy and thoracoscopic decortication in children with stage II and III empyema: a prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Today, in spite of the developments in imaging methods and antibiotherapy, childhood pleural empyema is a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality. In recent years, it has been shown that there has been an increase in the frequency of pleural empyema in children, and antibiotic resistance in microorganisms causing pleural empyema has made treatment difficult. Despite the many studies investigating thoracoscopic debridement and fibrinolytic treatment separately in the management of this disease, there is are not enough studies comparing these two treatments. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the efficacy of two different treatment methods in stage II and III empyema cases and to present a perspective for treatment options. We excluded from the study cases with: i thoracoscopic intervention and fibrinolytic agent were contraindicated; ii immunosuppression or additional infection focus; iii concomitant diseases, those with bronchopleural fistula diagnosed radiologically, and Stage I cases. This gave a total of 54 cases: 23 (42.6% in stage II, and 31 (57.4% cases in stage III. These patients were randomized into two groups of 27 cases each for debridement or fibrinolytic agent application by video-assisted thoracoscopic decortication (VATS. The continuity of symptoms after the operation, duration of thoracic tube in situ, and the length of hospital stay in the VATS group were of significantly shorter duration than in the streptokinase applications (P=0.0001. In 19 of 27 cases (70.37% in which fibrinolytic treatment was applied and in 21 cases of 27 (77.77% in which VATS was applied, the lung was fully expanded and the procedure was considered successful. There was no significant difference with respect to success rates between the two groups (P=0.533. The complication rate in our cases was 12.96% and no mortality was observed. Similar success rates in thoracoscopic drainage and enzymatic debridement, and the low cost of enzymatic

  17. Development, validation, and application of a fast and simple GC-MS method for determination of some therapeutic drugs relevant in emergency toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Markus R; Welter, Jessica; Weber, Armin A; Maurer, Hans H

    2011-10-01

    To date, immunoassays are commercially available for quantification of valproic acid, salicylic acid, paracetamol, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and primidone. As they are no longer available, a fast, simple, and cost-effective quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and fully validated for these drugs. After simple and fast liquid-liquid extraction, the samples were analyzed by GC-MS using the selected ion monitoring mode. The method was validated including the parameters selectivity, calibration model, precision, accuracy, and extraction efficiency. The above-mentioned analytes were separated within 8.5 minutes and sensitively detected. No interfering peaks were observed in blank samples from 8 different sources. The linearity ranges were 20-200 mg/L for valproic acid, 100-1200 mg/L for salicylic acid, 10-200 mg/L for paracetamol, 10-200 mg/L for phenobarbital, 4-20 mg/L for primidone, and 2.5-30 mg/L for phenytoin. Generally accepted criteria for accuracy and precision were fulfilled for all analytes using 6-point calibration. Even 1-point calibration was applicable for all analytes. The assay was successfully applied to analysis of real plasma samples and proficiency testing material. The assay described allowed fast and reliable determination of analytes relevant in the diagnosis of poisonings. Furthermore, time- and cost-saving 1-point calibration was shown to be suitable for daily routine work, especially in emergency cases.

  18. Chronic Pain in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Mixed-Methods Cross-Sectional Study Examining Patient Characteristics and Reasons for Presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Poulin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic pain (CP accounts for 10–16% of emergency department (ED visits, contributing to ED overcrowding and leading to adverse events. Objectives. To describe patients with CP attending the ED and identify factors contributing to their visit. Methods. We used a mixed-method design combining interviews and questionnaires addressing pain, psychological distress, signs of opioid misuse, and disability. Participants were adults who attended the EDs of a large academic tertiary care center for their CP problem. Results. Fifty-eight patients (66% women; mean age 46.5, SD = 16.9 completed the study. The most frequently cited reason (60% for ED visits was inability to cope with pain. Mental health problems were common, including depression (61% and anxiety (45%. Participants had questions about the etiology of their pain, concerns about severe pain-related impairment, and problems with medication renewals or efficacy and sometimes felt invalidated in the ED. Although most participants had a primary care physician, the ED was seen as the only or best option when pain became unmanageable. Conclusions. Patients with CP visiting the ED often present with complex difficulties that cannot be addressed in the ED. Better access to interdisciplinary pain treatment is needed to reduce the burden of CP on the ED.

  19. Sex differences in the awareness of emergency contraceptive pills associated with unmarried Korean university students' intention to use contraceptive methods: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Won

    2015-09-22

    Awareness of emergency contraceptive pills (ECP) associated with an intention to use other contraceptive methods has rarely been investigated. This study compared the ECP awareness of males and females and its associations with intention to use four other contraceptive methods (condoms, oral contraceptive pills, and withdrawal and rhythm methods) in unmarried university students in Korea. This study explores the importance of ECP awareness in university students' contraceptive education. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was employed, in which 1372 unmarried university students (men, n = 755, women, n = 617) answered a Web-based survey. Sex differences in ECP awareness and four contraceptive intentions, and associations between ECP awareness and contraceptive intentions between sex were analysed using independent t-tests and χ (2) test. Variables yielding significant associations with contraceptive intentions (p a logistic regression using the adjusted odds ratio (AOR) to estimate the impact of ECP awareness on students' contraceptive intentions. Awareness of ECP was found in 88.2 % of participants, which was generally positive. There were significant sex differences in some ECP awareness and students' contraceptive intentions, and in the associations between previous ECP use and ECP awareness between male and female university students. In men, the belief that "ECP can cause sex with multiple partners" was associated with intention to use the rhythm method (AOR = 1.61, 95 % confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-2.56). For women, the belief that "ECP is necessary in case of condom breakage" was associated with intention to use the withdrawal (AOR = 058, 95 % CI = 0.37-0.93) or rhythm (AOR = 0.36, 95 % CI = 0.16-0.84) methods, and "ECP should be prescribed by a doctor" was associated with the intention to use the rhythm method (AOR = 0.45, 95 % CI = 0.26-0.77). ECP awareness was associated with the intentions of students to use withdrawal or rhythm methods. The

  20. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-II. 1. Deterministic Transport Methods for Reactor Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Marvin L.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss deterministic transport methods used today in neutronic analysis of nuclear reactors. This discussion is not exhaustive; our goal is to provide an overview of the methods that are most widely used for analyzing light water reactors (LWRs) and that (in our opinion) hold the most promise for the future. The current practice of LWR analysis involves the following steps: 1. Evaluate cross sections from measurements and models. 2. Obtain weighted-average cross sections over dozens to hundreds of energy intervals; the result is a 'fine-group' cross-section set. 3. [Optional] Modify the fine-group set: Further collapse it using information specific to your class of reactors and/or alter parameters so that computations better agree with experiments. The result is a 'many-group library'. 4. Perform pin cell transport calculations (usually one-dimensional cylindrical); use the results to collapse the many-group library to a medium-group set, and/or spatially average the cross sections over the pin cells. 5. Perform assembly-level transport calculations with the medium-group set. It is becoming common practice to use essentially exact geometry (no pin cell homogenization). It may soon become common to skip step 4 and use the many-group library. The output is a library of few-group cross sections, spatially averaged over the assembly, parameterized to cover the full range of operating conditions. 6. Perform full-core calculations with few-group diffusion theory that contains significant homogenizations and limited transport corrections. We discuss steps 4, 5, and 6 and focus mainly on step 5. One cannot review a large topic in a short summary without simplifying reality, omitting important details, and neglecting some methods that deserve attention; for this we apologize in advance. (author)