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Sample records for emergency hospital service

  1. [Preclinic in the hospital. In-hospital emergency and rescue service in a large hospital].

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    Byhahn, C; Meininger, D; Bueck, M; Kessler, P; Füllner, M; Lischke, V

    2001-06-08

    Many hospitals have a special resuscitation service that is responsible for life-threatening emergencies outside the hospitals intensive care unit, i.e. in the wards and in patient-treatment areas. In contrast, there is generally no emergency service caring for patients, visitors or personnel outside of these areas. In order to provide emergency medical help in the entire hospital area, in 1999 we instituted an additional in-hospital emergency service to cover the larger hospital area. This paper describes the structure of our in-hospital emergency service and our experience in the first 26 months after its establishment. We analysed the emergency protocols of all 147 episodes, that had occurred within the first 26 months. We classified them according to type of disease and/or injury by using the NACA score (range 1 to 7) to assess the severity of disease and/or injury. 45 episodes took place within one of the 17 hospital buildings. 92 requests for help came from the hospital service and treatment areas including walkways and passages, while 3 came from the immediate vicinity outside of the hospital. A total of 7 requests turned out to be pranks, and 31.3% responses proved to be unnecessary when the team arrived at the scene. Of the total of 125 treated cases, 30 had a NACA score between 4 and 6, denoting life-threatening injury and/or disease. 6 patients were found dead at the scene or died shortly after arrival of the team. 101 of the patients had to be admitted to the hospital's emergency room. Since its establishment, knowledge of the existence of our in-hospital emergency service has steadily increased within the hospital community. As a consequence, number of events have likewise steadily increased. We believe that a total of 20.4% life-threatening events underscores the importance of the service in our large and extended hospital area. We also feel that our adherence to the training and personnel requirements demanded of public emergency services is

  2. Organization structure and the performance of hospital emergency services.

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    Georgopoulos, B S

    1985-07-01

    A comparative study of 30 hospital emergency departments (EDs) and nearly 1,500 individuals associated with them was conducted. Data were obtained from institutional records, physicians, patients, and other sources. The object was to investigate the relationship between the organization and performance of these health service systems. The study assessed the quality of medical care, the quality of nursing care, and the economic efficiency of hospital EDs. The results show substantial interinstitutional differences in these criteria. They also show a significant relationship between medical and nursing care, but not between the quality of care and economic efficiency. Differences in ED performance are related to medical staffing patterns, medical teaching affiliation, personnel training, scope of emergency services, number of patient visits processed, and hospital size and complexity. Not all of these variables, however, correlate positively with all three criteria of performance, nor are they equally important to each.

  3. [Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services].

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    Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Bermejo Alegría, Rosa María; Más Castillo, Adelia; Hidalgo Montesinos, María Dolores; Gomis Cebrián, Rafael; Calle Urra, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public hospitals in 2008 and 2009. The adjusted model including all perceived quality and sociodemographic variables explained 47.1% of the variance (adjusted R(2)). Of all the independent variables included, only eight were significant in predicting the level of patient satisfaction. These variables were related to the patient's opinion of the relationship with medical staff (p = 0.041), nurses' and porters' professionalism (p = 0.010 and 0.022), infrastructure (cleanliness and comfort) (p = 0.033 and 0.008), information received at discharge (p = 0.000), waiting time in the emergency department (p = 0.000) and the perception of treatment-diagnosis without failure (p = 0.028). The variables influencing emergency patients' satisfaction were determined, allowing areas where corrective action could be introduced to be identified. In addition, possible confounding factors that should be controlled for when comparing results among distinct hospitals were identified. The emergency satisfaction questionnaire is a useful instrument to evaluate and improve quality of care. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  5. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  6. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil.

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    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, João Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thumé, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-22

    Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. The present work can be classified as a cross-sectional ecological study. To carry out the present study, data of all 5843 Brazilian hospitals were categorized among high complexity centers and small hospitals. The geographical access barriers were identified through the use of two-step floating catchment area method. Once concluded the previous step an evaluation using the Getis-Ord-Gi method was performed to identify spatial clusters of municipalities with limited access to high complexity centers but well covered by well-equipped small hospitals. The analysis of accessibility index of high complexity centers highlighted large portions of the country with nearly zero hospital beds by inhabitant. In contrast, it was possible observe a group of 1595 municipalities with high accessibility to small hospitals, simultaneously with a low coverage of high complexity centers. Among the 1595 municipalities with good accessibility to small hospitals, 74% (1183) were covered by small hospitals with at least 60% of minimum emergency service requirements. The spatial clusters analysis aggregated 589 municipalities with high values related to minimum emergency service requirements. Small hospitals in these 589 cities could promote the equity in access to emergency services benefiting more than eight million people. There is a spatial disequilibrium within the country with prominent gaps in the health care network for emergency services. Taking this challenge into consideration, small hospitals could be a possible solution and foster equity in access

  7. Emergency medical services and congestion : urban sprawl and pre-hospital emergency care time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This research measured the association between urban sprawl and emergency medical service (EMS) response time. The purpose was to test the hypothesis that features of the built environment increase the probability of delayed ambulance arrival. Using ...

  8. Referral to the Hospital And Emergency Ambulance Service Uses Patterns of the Inmates and Convicts

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    Emine Oncu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses patterns of the inmates and convicts in an E type prison. Material and Method: In this descriptive study, it was evaluated the prison records associated with referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses for one year in 2010- 2011. Of the statistical analysis, descriptive statistics, chi-square test and Fisher%u2019s Exact Test were used. Results: All inmates and convicts were man, the median of age was 30,0 (min 18- max 68 years and substance use was 34,5%. The number of prisoners were referred to the hospital 815, total referrals were 1491; (referrals ranged from one to six and most common in January; and according to frequency, reasons of the referral were eyes problems, musculoskeletal disorders and psychological problems. Emergency medical service was used for in medical causes (78,3%, accident, trauma and injuries (16,4%, suicide (5,3%. Discussion: Findings from the study show that prisoners are more likely to have suffered physical and mental health problems that compared to the rest of society and have significantly high substance use rates.

  9. Intermediate Services After Behavioral Health Hospitalization: Effect on Rehospitalization and Emergency Department Visits.

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    Fullerton, Catherine A; Lin, Hollis; O'Brien, Peggy L; Lenhart, Gregory M; Crable, Erika L; Mark, Tami L

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effect of intermediate service use on behavioral health inpatient readmissions and subsequent emergency department (ED) visits among Medicaid enrollees. Data were from fee-for-service inpatient admissions from the 2008 Medicaid Analytic eXtract files for adults with a primary diagnosis of a mental or substance use disorder. A multivariate survival analysis estimated the association between posthospital services-particularly intermediate services (residential, partial hospital, intensive outpatient, and other rehabilitative services)-and time to readmission or ED visit. A propensity score-matched sample was used to examine the relationship between time to readmission and ED visit in the nondisabled and disabled populations more closely. The sample included 32,037 adults (nondisabled, 27.6%; disabled, 72.4%). Only 2.5% of nondisabled adults and 5.4% of disabled adults used intermediate services within seven days of hospital discharge. In the multivariate analysis, significant associations were found between intermediate service use and readmissions and ED visits in the nondisabled population (hazard ratio [HR]=.71, p=.04, and HR=.68, p<.01, respectively), but not in the disabled population. Significant associations were also found between use of other health care in the seven-day posthospitalization period and decreased time to readmission and ED visits in the nondisabled population and increased time to readmission and ED visits in the disabled population. In the propensity score--matched analysis, use of intermediate services was not significant in either population. The low use of intermediate services may reflect limited availability as well as Medicaid coverage limits. Research is needed to determine the optimal number and type of intermediate services for this population to minimize the need for additional hospital services.

  10. Assessment of client satisfaction on emergency department services in Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Hawassa, Southern Ethiopia.

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    Worku, Mesfin; Loha, Eskindir

    2017-06-27

    Satisfaction refers to a state of pleasure or contentment with an action, event or service, especially one that was previously desired. Regarding to client, satisfaction is the level of happiness that clients experience having used a service. It therefore reflects the gap between the expected service and the experience of the service, from the client's point of view. Information was unavailable regarding the level of satisfaction of patients towards emergency health care servicesat Hawassa University Referral Hospital thatserve a huge catchment area; and this study addressed this gap. Cross-sectional study was conducted from March 13 to May 15/2014. Systematic sampling method was used to enroll study participants. The data was collected by trained data collectors using pre-structured questionnaire. A total 407 clients were enrolled under this study with respondent rate of 96.9%. Nearly two third of study participants were male, 270 (66.3%). 86.7% of study participants were satisfied by services provided in Emergency Out Patient Department (OPD). The percentage of study satisfaction with physical examination by Doctor, nursing, laboratory and pharmacy services were 95.6%, 89.9%, 84.7% and 67.6%, respectively. Only 31.9% were satisfied with availability of drugs in the pharmacy. Regarding to staff courtesy, 91.7% of study participants were satisfied by the manner shown by the staffs working in Emergency OPD. The vast majority of the participants (97%) were satisfied with the courtesy of Medical laboratory personnel and the least satisfaction (79.4%) was recorded for security guards. This study showed low level of patient satisfaction in pharmacy services specifically due to unavailability of drugs due to lack of sustained supply of drugs.

  11. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

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    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  12. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  13. Pre-Hospital Emergency Medical Services: An Epidemiological Survey in Mashhad, Iran

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    Mohsen Seyyednozadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Providing appropriate care, in the right place and at the right time, is the main goal of emergency medical services (EMS to save lives. The present study aimed to assess the pre-hospital EMS in Mashhad, the second largest metropolis in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this research, data were extracted from the pre-hospital emergency mission forms, which were collected from the EMS stations in Mashhad and suburbs through systematic random sampling. In addition, supplementary information was obtained from the ambulance dispatch cards and emergency communication center forms. Results:Automobile accidents (33.7% and cardiovascular events (17.8% were the most common causes of contacts to the EMS. In the city and road stations, the mean response time was 2.6 and 1.6 minutes, while the mean time of arrival at the scene was 13.2 and 11.4 minutes, and the mean evacuation time was 13.2 and 11.4 minutes, respectively. Individuals aged 20-29 (25.2% and more than 60 years (23.9% constituted the majority of the cases receiving EMS. Conclusion: According to the results, the ‘golden time’ for emergency care was of great importance in the patients injured in car accidents or affected by cardiovascular events. Furthermore, a significant difference was observed in the time indices of EMS in Mashhad city with the EMS standards due to the lack of human resources or EMS facilities. Some contacts to the EMS were unnecessary, and no expert team aid was needed in some cases. It is recommended that citizens be trained on solving the problems associated with road traffic by implementing mobile emergency, while transfer units must be established for the better provision of emergency care by the EMS in Mashhad.

  14. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

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    Lyon Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA is a common medical emergency with significant mortality and significant neurological morbidity. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS may be tasked to OHCA. We sought to assess the impact of tasking a HEMS service to OHCA and characterise the nature of these calls. Method Retrospective case review of all HEMS calls to Surrey and Sussex Air Ambulance, United Kingdom, over a 1-year period (1/9/2010-1/9/2011. All missions to cases of suspected OHCA, of presumed medical origin, were reviewed systematically. Results HEMS was activated 89 times to suspected OHCA. This represented 11% of the total HEMS missions. In 23 cases HEMS was stood-down en-route and in 2 cases the patient had not suffered an OHCA on arrival of HEMS. 25 patients achieved return-of-spontaneous circulation (ROSC, 13 (52% prior to HEMS arrival. The HEMS team were never first on-scene. The median time from first collapse to HEMS arrival was 31 minutes (IQR 22–40. The median time from HEMS activation to arrival on scene was 17 minutes (IQR 11.5-21. 19 patients underwent pre-hospital anaesthesia, 5 patients had electrical or chemical cardioversion and 19 patients had therapeutic hypothermia initiated by HEMS. Only 1 post-OHCA patient was transported to hospital by air. The survival to discharge rate was 6.3%. Conclusion OHCA represents a significant proportion of HEMS call outs. HEMS most commonly attend post-ROSC OHCA patients and interventions, including pre-hospital anaesthesia and therapeutic hypothermia should be targeted to this phase. HEMS are rarely first on-scene and should only be tasked as a first response to OHCA in remote locations. HEMS may be most appropriately utilised in OHCA by only attending the scene if a patient achieves ROSC.

  15. [Interventions to solve overcrowding in hospital emergency services: a systematic review].

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    Bittencourt, Roberto José; Hortale, Virginia Alonso

    2009-07-01

    This review discusses interventions aimed at solving the problem of overcrowding in hospital emergency services (HES), characteristic of low organizational effectiveness. In free-access and restricted-access databases, the target descriptors were 'overcrowding; emergency; medicine; first aid'. The survey identified 66 citations of interventions, grouped in 47 related interventions. The majority of the studies used observational designs that evaluated the results before and after interventions. Of the 47 related interventions, 34 had results for organizational performance. Four were the most frequently cited: implementation of an observation unit for patients already hospitalized and awaiting diagnosis or clinical stabilization; designation of a dedicated nursing station for the patient's admission, discharge, or transfer; establishment of protocols with indicators of operational saturation and implementation of an emergency care unit. Analyzing 21 interventions that were intended to solve overcrowding in HES and with positive results for length-of-stay, 15 were related to patient stream improvement, interfering actively and positively in patient stream. Interventions that increased access barriers or that merely improved the HES structure were ineffective.

  16. Emergency department boarding and adverse hospitalization outcomes among patients admitted to a general medical service.

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    Lord, Kito; Parwani, Vivek; Ulrich, Andrew; Finn, Emily B; Rothenberg, Craig; Emerson, Beth; Rosenberg, Alana; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2018-03-20

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) has been associated with patient harm, yet little is known about the association between ED boarding and adverse hospitalization outcomes. We sought to examine the association between ED boarding and three common adverse hospitalization outcomes: rapid response team activation (RRT), escalation in care, and mortality. We conducted an observational analysis of consecutive patient encounters admitted from the ED to the general medical service between February 2013 and June 2015. This study was conducted in an urban, academic hospital with an annual adult ED census over 90,000. We defined boarding as patients with greater than 4h from ED bed order to ED departure to hospital ward. The primary outcome was a composite of adverse outcomes in the first 24h of admission, including RRT activation, care escalation to intensive care, or in-hospital mortality. A total of 31,426 patient encounters were included of which 3978 (12.7%) boarded in the ED for 4h or more. Adverse outcomes occurred in 1.92% of all encounters. Comparing boarded vs. non-boarded patients, 41 (1.03%) vs. 244 (0.90%) patients experienced a RRT activation, 53 (1.33%) vs. 387 (1.42%) experienced a care escalation, and 1 (0.03%) vs.12 (0.04%) experienced unanticipated in-hospital death, within 24h of ED admission. In unadjusted analysis, there was no difference in the composite outcome between boarding and non-boarding patients (1.91% vs. 1.91%, p=0.994). Regression analysis adjusted for patient demographics, acuity, and comorbidities also showed no association between boarding and the primary outcome. A sensitivity analysis showed an association between ED boarding and the composite outcome inclusive of the entire inpatient hospital stay (5.8% vs. 4.7%, p=0.003). Within the first 24h of hospital admission to a general medicine service, adverse hospitalization outcomes are rare and not associated with ED boarding. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  17. The evaluation of time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah.

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    Mohammadi, Mohsen; Nasiripour, Amir Ashkan; Fakhri, Mahmood; Bakhtiari, Ahad; Azari, Samad; Akbarzadeh, Arash; Goli, Ali; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2014-09-28

    This study evaluated the time performance in the emergency response center to provide pre-hospital emergency services in Kermanshah. This study was a descriptive retrospective cross-sectional study. In this study 500 cases of patients from Shahrivar (September) 2012 to the end of Shahrivar (September) 2013 were selected and studied by the non-probability quota method. The measuring tool included a preset cases record sheet and sampling method was completing the cases record sheet by referring to the patients' cases. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 and the concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics (Kruskal-Wallis test, benchmark Eta (Eta), Games-Howell post hoc test). The results showed that the interval mean between receiving the mission to reaching the scene, between reaching the scene to moving from the scene, and between moving from the scene to a health center was 7.28, 16.73 and 7.28 minutes. The overall mean of time performance from the scene to the health center was 11.34 minutes. Any intervention in order to speed up service delivery, reduce response times, ambulance equipment and facilities required for accuracy, validity and reliability of the data recorded in the emergency dispatch department, Continuing Education of ambulance staffs, the use of manpower with higher specialize levels such as nurses, supply the job satisfaction, and increase the coordination with other departments that are somehow involved in this process can provide the ground for reducing the loss and disability resulting from traffic accidents.

  18. Services quality in emergency department of Nemazee Hospital: Using SERVQUAL model

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    Maryam Gholami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is crucial to the long-run success in health care center. With regard to the highest patients’ referral to the emergency department and the existing challenges due to the patient’s need to urgent care, we aimed to evaluate health care services quality in this unit to find out whether the patients have different expectations from health care providers and if they perceive some dimensions of care more important than others. Method: The SERVQUAL scale method was used in this cross-sectional study on 100 patients in June 2015. Patient satisfaction questionnaire based on SERVQUAL model was evaluated with high content validity and the reliability was 0.97 and 0.81. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS, version 20.0 (IBM, USA. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, paired and independence sample t-test and ANOVA at the significance level 0.05. Results:The results showed that the quality gap in all dimensions was significant (P<0.001. The largest quality gap was related to responsiveness (-1.08 and the lowest belonged to assurance (-0.8. Demographic characteristics were analyzed and the number of referrals was significant in tangibility and assurance dimensions (P = 0.04; also, in all cases the patients’ expectations (total Mean=4.35 were higher than their perception (total Mean = 3.295. Conclusion: In order to improve emergency services, it is recommended that the hospital management should provide appropriate facilities, reduce waiting time, increase in attention to ordering system based on the patients’ condition, and improve the behavior of health care personnel to patient is placed on the agenda of hospital management.

  19. Quality improvement in emergency service delivery: Assessment of knowledge and skills amongst emergency nurses at Connaught Hospital, Sierra Leone

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    Hedda Bøe Nyhus

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This study has identified key aspects of emergency nursing speciality training to be developed through theoretical and skill-based education provided by the nursing schools and hospital clinical facilities in Sierra Leone.

  20. Patient Satisfaction with Pre-Hospital Emergency Services. A Qualitative Study Comparing Professionals' and Patients' Views.

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    García-Alfranca, Fernando; Puig, Anna; Galup, Carles; Aguado, Hortensia; Cerdá, Ismael; Guilabert, Mercedes; Pérez-Jover, Virtudes; Carrillo, Irene; Mira, José Joaquín

    2018-01-30

    Objective : To describe patient satisfaction with pre-hospital emergency knowledge and determine if patients and professionals share a common vision on the satisfaction predictors. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in two phases. First, a systematic review following the PRISMA protocol was carried out searching publications between January 2000 and July 2016 in Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane. Second, three focus groups involving professionals (advisers and healthcare providers) and a total of 79 semi-structured interviews involving patients were conducted to obtain information about what dimensions of care were a priority for patients. Results: Thirty-three relevant studies were identified, with a majority conducted in Europe using questionnaires. They pointed out a very high level of satisfaction of callers and patients. Delay with the assistance and the ability for resolution of the case are the elements that overlap in fostering satisfaction. The published studies reviewed with satisfaction neither the overall care process nor related the measurement of the real time in responding to an emergency. The patients and professionals concurred in their assessments about the most relevant elements for patient satisfaction, although safety was not a predictive factor for patients. Response capacity and perceived capacity for resolving the situation were crucial factors for satisfaction. Conclusions: Published studies have assessed similar dimensions of satisfaction and have shown high patient satisfaction. Expanded services resolving a wide number of issues that can concern citizens are also positively assessed. Delays and resolution capacity are crucial for satisfaction. Furthermore, despite the fact that few explanations may be given due to a lack of face-to-face attention, finding the patient's location, taking into account the caller's emotional needs, and maintaining phone contact until the emergency services arrive are high predictors of satisfaction.

  1. Patient Satisfaction with Pre-Hospital Emergency Services. A Qualitative Study Comparing Professionals’ and Patients’ Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alfranca, Fernando; Puig, Anna; Galup, Carles; Aguado, Hortensia; Cerdá, Ismael; Guilabert, Mercedes; Pérez-Jover, Virtudes; Carrillo, Irene

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To describe patient satisfaction with pre-hospital emergency knowledge and determine if patients and professionals share a common vision on the satisfaction predictors. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in two phases. First, a systematic review following the PRISMA protocol was carried out searching publications between January 2000 and July 2016 in Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane. Second, three focus groups involving professionals (advisers and healthcare providers) and a total of 79 semi-structured interviews involving patients were conducted to obtain information about what dimensions of care were a priority for patients. Results: Thirty-three relevant studies were identified, with a majority conducted in Europe using questionnaires. They pointed out a very high level of satisfaction of callers and patients. Delay with the assistance and the ability for resolution of the case are the elements that overlap in fostering satisfaction. The published studies reviewed with satisfaction neither the overall care process nor related the measurement of the real time in responding to an emergency. The patients and professionals concurred in their assessments about the most relevant elements for patient satisfaction, although safety was not a predictive factor for patients. Response capacity and perceived capacity for resolving the situation were crucial factors for satisfaction. Conclusions: Published studies have assessed similar dimensions of satisfaction and have shown high patient satisfaction. Expanded services resolving a wide number of issues that can concern citizens are also positively assessed. Delays and resolution capacity are crucial for satisfaction. Furthermore, despite the fact that few explanations may be given due to a lack of face-to-face attention, finding the patient’s location, taking into account the caller’s emotional needs, and maintaining phone contact until the emergency services arrive are high predictors of satisfaction

  2. Characteristics of Emergency Services for the Elderly—A Regional Hospital Example

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    Ching-Lin Huang

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: This study's primary goal was to investigate the most common clinical signs and symptoms of the various diseases most common in elderly patients, who presented to the emergency service, and the care of these patients in Hsinchu County to facilitate a more efficient and useful emergency medical service.

  3. A national research agenda for pre-hospital emergency medical services in the Netherlands: a Delphi-study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glind, I.M. van de; Berben, S.A.A.; Zeegers, F.; Poppen, H.; Hoogeveen, M.; Bolt, I.; Grunsven, P. van; Vloet, L.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services (EMS) more research is needed to direct and underpin care delivery and inform policy. To target future research efforts, this study aimed to determine future research priorities with representatives of the EMS field. METHODS: A four-round online

  4. How Multidimensional Health Locus of Control predicts utilization of emergency and inpatient hospital services.

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    Mautner, Dawn; Peterson, Bridget; Cunningham, Amy; Ku, Bon; Scott, Kevin; LaNoue, Marianna

    2017-03-01

    Health locus of control may be an important predictor of health care utilization. We analyzed associations between health locus of control and frequency of emergency department visits and hospital admissions, and investigated self-rated health as a potential mediator. Overall, 863 patients in an urban emergency department completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control instrument, and self-reported emergency department use and hospital admissions in the last year. We found small but significant associations between Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and utilization, all of which were mediated by self-rated health. We conclude that interventions to shift health locus of control may change patients' perceptions of their own health, thereby impacting utilization.

  5. Relationship between organizational climate and burnout syndrome in the emergency service of a hospital Category III-2. Lima, Peru 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Zenaida Solís Chuquiyaur; Luisa Zamudio Eslava; Juan Matzumura Kasano; Hugo Gutiérrez Crespo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between organizational climate and Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals of the Emergency Service in a Hospital Category III-2. Material and methods: quantitative, prospective, correlational cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 43 nurses, using a non-probability sampling for convenience. For analysis and study of the variables, Rensis Likert scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used. Results: The organizational clima...

  6. Availability and use of emergency obstetric care services in public hospitals in Laos PDR: a systems analysis.

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    Douangphachanh, Xaysomphou; Ali, Moazzam; Outavong, Phathammavong; Alongkon, Phengsavanh; Sing, Menorath; Chushi, Kuroiwa

    2010-12-01

    The maternal mortality ratio in Laos in 2005 was 660 per 100,000 lives birth which was the third highest in Asia-Pacific Region. The objective was to determine the availability and use of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in provincial and district hospitals in Borikhamxay, Khammouane, and Savannakhet provinces using UN guidelines. A hospital-based cross sectional survey was conducted from January to March 2008. All district (30) and provincial hospitals (3) from three provinces were included. Analysis was based on hospital records reflecting 12 months of facility data. Data indicates that only 14 hospitals (42.4%) were providing EmOC services, i.e., 9 basic, 5 comprehensive services. The proportion of births in EmOC facilities was only 11.2%, the met need was a very low 14.5%, and the cesarean section rate was only 0.9%. The case fatality rate in Borikhanxay province was 2.8%; in Khammouane and in Savannakhet provinces it was less than 1%. Record keeping at hospitals was poor. Signal functions provided in the last three months showed only 48.5% of the facilities performed assisted vaginal delivery. This is the first study in Lao PDR to assess EmOC services. Almost all the indicators were below the UN recommendations. Health planners must take evidence-based decisions to rectify and improve the situation in the hospitals regarding EmOC services. These data can therefore help government to assign and allocate budgets appropriately, and help policymakers and planners to identify systemic bottlenecks and prioritize solutions and will help in improving maternal health.

  7. Emergency Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  8. Relationship between organizational climate and burnout syndrome in the emergency service of a hospital Category III-2. Lima, Peru 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenaida Solís Chuquiyaur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between organizational climate and Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals of the Emergency Service in a Hospital Category III-2. Material and methods: quantitative, prospective, correlational cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 43 nurses, using a non-probability sampling for convenience. For analysis and study of the variables, Rensis Likert scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used. Results: The organizational climate was average level (81.4% followed by a high level (18.6% and the Burnout Syndrome corresponds to low level (86% and medium (14% level. The relationship between organizational climate and Burnout Syndrome was low (rho = -0.11. Conclusions: In the Emergency Service, the level of organizational climate was fairly favorable with absence of Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals. There is not significant relationship between the two variables.

  9. Pre-hospital intubation by anaesthesiologists in patients with severe trauma: an audit of a Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service

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    Lossius Hans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesiologists are airway management experts, which is one of the reasons why they serve as pre-hospital emergency physicians in many countries. However, limited data are available on the actual quality and safety of anaesthesiologist-managed pre-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI. To explore whether the general indications for ETI are followed and what complications are recorded, we analysed the use of pre-hospital ETI in severely traumatised patients treated by anaesthesiologists in a Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS. Methods A retrospective audit of prospectively registered data concerning patients with trauma as the primary diagnosis and a National Committee on Aeronautics score of 4 - 7 during the period of 1994-2005 from a mixed rural/urban Norwegian HEMS was performed. Results Among the 1255 cases identified, 238 successful pre-hospital ETIs out of 240 attempts were recorded (99.2% success rate. Furthermore, we identified 47 patients for whom ETI was performed immediately upon arrival to the emergency department (ED. This group represented 16% of all intubated patients. Of the ETIs performed in the ED, 43 patients had an initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS Conclusions We found a very high success rate of pre-hospital ETI and few recorded complications in the studied anaesthesiologist-manned HEMS. However, a substantial number of trauma patients were intubated first on arrival in the ED. This delay may represent a quality problem. Therefore, we believe that more studies are needed to clarify the reasons for and possible clinical consequences of the delayed ETIs.

  10. Comparative analysis of three pre-hospital emergency medical services organizations in India and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Razzak, Junaid A.; Naseer, Rizwan; Hyder, Adnan A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Strengthened EMS systems are urgently required in South Asia to reduce needless death and disability. Several EMS models have been introduced in India and Pakistan, and research on these models can facilitate improvements to EMS in the region. Our objective was to conduct a cross-case comparative analysis of three EMS organizations in India and Pakistan – GVK EMRI, Aman Foundation and Rescue 1122 – in order to draw out similarities and differences in their models. Study Design Case study methodology was used to systematically explore the organizational models of GVK EMRI (Karnataka, India), Aman Foundation (Karachi, Pakistan), and Rescue 1122 (Punjab, Pakistan). Methods Qualitative methods – interviews, document review and non-participant observation – were utilized, and using a process of constant comparison, data were analyzed across cases according to the WHO health system ‘building blocks’. Results Emergent themes under each health system ‘building block’ of service delivery, health workforce, medical products and technology, health information systems, leadership and governance, and financing were described. Cross-cutting issues not applicable to any single building block were further identified. Conclusions This cross-case comparison, the first of its kind in low- and middle-income countries, highlights key innovations and lessons, and areas of further research across EMS organizations in India, Pakistan and other resource-poor settings. PMID:27080583

  11. A lean case study in an oncological hospital: implementation of a telephone triage system in the emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, José Crespo; Ramos, Madalena; Paixão, Carina

    2013-01-01

    Lean practices and thinking have increased substantially in the last few years. Applications of lean practices to health care are found worldwide. Despite that, new contributions are required because the application of lean thinking to hospitals has a long way to go. Lean practices and thinking do not include, in the literature or practice programs, any references to triage systems in health care units. The common triage systems require physical presence, but there are alternative methods to avoid the need to move patients: these alternative triage systems, given their characteristics, may be included in the spectrum of lean practices. Currently, patients that are already known to suffer from cancer are encouraged to go to hospital (public or private, with an oncological focus) when facing side effects from chemotherapy or radiation treatments; they are then submitted to a triage system (present themselves to the hospital for examination). The authors of this paper propose the introduction of telephone or email triage for impaired patients as a valid substitute for moving them physically, thereby often avoiding several unnecessary moves. This approach has, in fact, characteristics similar to a lean practice in that it reduces costs and maintains, if done properly, the overall service offered. The proposed 'remote' triage emerged from the results of a large survey sent to patients and also as the outcome of a set of semistructured interviews conducted with hospital nurses. With the results they obtained, the authors felt comfortable proposing this approach both to public and private hospitals, because the study was conducted in the most important, largest, and best-known oncological unit in Spain. As a final result, the health care unit studied is now taking the first steps to implement a remote triage system by telephone, and has begun to reduce the previously necessary movement of impaired patients.

  12. Variability in Criteria for Emergency Medical Services Routing of Acute Stroke Patients to Designated Stroke Center Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Koenig, William; Bosson, Nichole; Song, Sarah; Saver, Jeffrey L; Mack, William J; Sanossian, Nerses

    2015-09-01

    Comprehensive stroke systems of care include routing to the nearest designated stroke center hospital, bypassing non-designated hospitals. Routing protocols are implemented at the state or county level and vary in qualification criteria and determination of destination hospital. We surveyed all counties in the state of California for presence and characteristics of their prehospital stroke routing protocols. Each county's local emergency medical services agency (LEMSA) was queried for the presence of a stroke routing protocol. We reviewed these protocols for method of stroke identification and criteria for patient transport to a stroke center. Thirty-three LEMSAs serve 58 counties in California with populations ranging from 1,175 to nearly 10 million. Fifteen LEMSAs (45%) had stroke routing protocols, covering 23 counties (40%) and 68% of the state population. Counties with protocols had higher population density (1,500 vs. 140 persons per square mile). In the six counties without designated stroke centers, patients meeting criteria were transported out of county. Stroke identification in the field was achieved using the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Screen in 72%, Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen in 7% and a county-specific protocol in 22%. California EMS prehospital acute stroke routing protocols cover 68% of the state population and vary in characteristics including activation by symptom onset time and destination facility features, reflecting matching of system design to local geographic resources.

  13. A lean case study in an oncological hospital: implementation of a telephone triage system in the emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crespo de Carvalho J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available José Crespo de Carvalho,1 Madalena Ramos,1 Carina Paixão2 1Business School, University Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Instituto Português de Oncologia, Lisbon, Portugal Abstract: Lean practices and thinking have increased substantially in the last few years. Applications of lean practices to health care are found worldwide. Despite that, new contributions are required because the application of lean thinking to hospitals has a long way to go. Lean practices and thinking do not include, in the literature or practice programs, any references to triage systems in health care units. The common triage systems require physical presence, but there are alternative methods to avoid the need to move patients: these alternative triage systems, given their characteristics, may be included in the spectrum of lean practices. Currently, patients that are already known to suffer from cancer are encouraged to go to hospital (public or private, with an oncological focus when facing side effects from chemotherapy or radiation treatments; they are then submitted to a triage system (present themselves to the hospital for examination. The authors of this paper propose the introduction of telephone or email triage for impaired patients as a valid substitute for moving them physically, thereby often avoiding several unnecessary moves. This approach has, in fact, characteristics similar to a lean practice in that it reduces costs and maintains, if done properly, the overall service offered. The proposed 'remote' triage emerged from the results of a large survey sent to patients and also as the outcome of a set of semistructured interviews conducted with hospital nurses. With the results they obtained, the authors felt comfortable proposing this approach both to public and private hospitals, because the study was conducted in the most important, largest, and best-known oncological unit in Spain. As a final result, the health care unit studied is now taking

  14. Adding physical therapy services in the emergency department to prevent immobilization syndrome - a feasibility study in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousignant-Laflamme, Yannick; Beaudoin, Ann-Marie; Renaud, Anne-Marie; Lauzon, Stephanie; Charest-Bossé, Marie-Catherine; Leblanc, Louise; Grégoire, Maryse

    2015-12-03

    The association between the functional decline occurring with bedrest and hospitalization in older persons is well-known. A long wait in the emergency department (ED), where patients can be bedridden, is a risk factor for the development of an immobilization syndrome (IS). IS is one of the unwanted consequences of inactivity, which causes pathological changes in most organs and systems. Early mobility interventions, such as physical therapy (PT) delivered in the ED, may prevent its development. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on this topic. The goal of this study was to (i) assess the feasibility and (ii) explore the potential clinical value of adding PT services to the ED, in collaboration with nursing staff, to prevent IS. For 12 weeks, PT services were delivered in the ED to older persons (>65 years old) presenting with ≥1 clinical signs associated with the development of IS. Patients were screened by ED nurses and then seen by the physiotherapist. In order to assess feasibility, access to patients, percentage of patients who met eligibility criteria, acceptability of the intervention, and barriers/facilitators to the implementation were measured. To describe the clinical benefits of early PT services, we counted the number of new IS cases among patients after their admission to the ward. After 12 weeks, the ED nurses screened 187 potential patients and 20 received PT services in the ED (before their admission to the ward). Accessibility was not an issue and we observed good acceptability from the milieu. We did not find majors problems or insurmountable obstacles to implementation of the intervention. Clinical outcomes showed that nine patients received PT treatments in the ED and on the ward (after their admission). For the 11 other patients, no PT interventions were done in the ED following the assessment. Follow-up of these 11 patients showed that two of them developed IS during their hospital stay. As for the nine patients who began

  15. Profile of motorcycle victims from the emergency service of a university hospital

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    José Luís Amim Zabeu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological survey of motorcycle accidents occurring in a city with over one million inhabitants and treated at university hospital of reference between the months of July and November 2010. METHODS: Cross sectional study using structured interview (standardized form to document the data collection: age, gender, income, using time and capacity of the motorcycle. RESULTS: From 114 cases, it was observed that the profile of the victim of motorcycle accident treated at this hospital is a young person, male, possessing a driver's license for less than five years, with a monthly income average around one thousand reais (local currency, owner of a motorcycle with low capacity (less than 150 cc and low educational attainment. The accidents occurred predominantly in the urban area, in the afternoons and one third of them were considered work-related accidents, death generated in 3 per cent of cases and open fractures in 11 per cent of them. CONCLUSION: The incidence of motorcycle accidents involved mainly young men with little experience in traffic and low level of education.

  16. Pre-hospital transfusion of packed red blood cells in 147 patients from a UK helicopter emergency medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard M; de Sausmarez, Eleanor; McWhirter, Emily; Wareham, Gary; Nelson, Magnus; Matthies, Ashley; Hudson, Anthony; Curtis, Leigh; Russell, Malcolm Q

    2017-02-14

    Early transfusion of packed red blood cells (PRBC) has been associated with improved survival in patients with haemorrhagic shock. This study aims to describe the characteristics of patients receiving pre-hospital blood transfusion and evaluate their subsequent need for in-hospital transfusion and surgery. The decision to administer a pre-hospital PRBC transfusion was based on clinical judgment. All patients transfused pre-hospital PRBC between February 2013 and December 2014 were included. Pre-hospital and in-hospital records were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients were included. 142 patients had traumatic injuries and 5 patients had haemorrhagic shock from a medical origin. Median Injury Severity Score was 30. 90% of patients receiving PRBC had an ISS of >15. Patients received a mean of 2.4(±1.1) units of PRBC in the pre-hospital phase. Median time from initial emergency call to hospital arrival was 114 min (IQR 103-140). There was significant improvement in systolic (p Pre-hospital transfusion of packed red cells has the potential to improvde outcome for trauma patients with major haemorrhage. The pre-hospital time for trauma patients can be several hours, suggesting transfusion needs to start in the pre-hospital phase. Hospital transfusion research suggests a 1:1 ratio of packed red blood cells to plasma improves outcome and further research into pre-hospital adoption of this strategy is needed. Pre-hospital PRBC transfusion significantly reduces the time to transfusion for major trauma patients with suspected major haemorrhage. The majority of patients receiving pre-hospital PRBC were severely injured and required further transfusion in hospital. Further research is warranted to determine which patients are most likely to have outcome benefit from pre-hospital blood products and what triggers should be used for pre-hospital transfusion.

  17. Pre-hospital severe traumatic brain injury - comparison of outcome in paramedic versus physician staffed emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkanen, Toni; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti; Huhtala, Heini; Silfvast, Tom; Virta, Janne; Randell, Tarja; Yli-Hankala, Arvi

    2016-04-29

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of death and permanent disability. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel are often the first healthcare providers attending patients with TBI. The level of available care varies, which may have an impact on the patient's outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate mortality and neurological outcome of TBI patients in two regions with differently structured EMS systems. A 6-year period (2005 - 2010) observational data on pre-hospital TBI management in paramedic-staffed EMS and physician-staffed EMS systems were retrospectively analysed. Inclusion criteria for the study were severe isolated TBI presenting with unconsciousness defined as Glasgow coma scale (GCS) score ≤ 8 occurring either on-scene, during transportation or verified by an on-call neurosurgeon at admission to the hospital. For assessment of one-year neurological outcome, a modified Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) was used. During the 6-year study period a total of 458 patients met the inclusion criteria. One-year mortality was higher in the paramedic-staffed EMS group: 57 % vs. 42 %. Also good neurological outcome was less common in patients treated in the paramedic-staffed EMS group. We found no significant difference between the study groups when considering the secondary brain injury associated vital signs on-scene. Also on arrival to ED, the proportion of hypotensive patients was similar in both groups. However, hypoxia was common in the patients treated by the paramedic-staffed EMS on arrival to the ED, while in the physician-staffed EMS almost none of the patients were hypoxic. Pre-hospital intubation by EMS physicians probably explains this finding. The results suggest to an outcome benefit from physician-staffed EMS treating TBI patients. ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01454648.

  18. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints.

  19. Acuerdo diagnóstico entre equipos de emergencias y servicios hospitalarios Diagnostic agreement between emergency teams and hospital services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Fernández-Cotrina

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Desde hace 10 años, la Empresa Pública de Emergencias Sanitarias de Andalucía estudia la concordancia de sus equipos con la atención primaria y los hospitales. Se investiga el acuerdo diagnóstico entre estos equipos y los hospitalarios, y en caso de encontrar diferencias, se valora si éstas podrían estar en función del equipo de emergencias, el recurso de traslado o el centro hospitalario. Pacientes y método: Estudio descriptivo. Se incluyó a 510 pacientes (seleccionados al azar cuyos datos se conocía, atendidos por equipos 061 de Málaga en 2001 y que precisaron traslado a algún hospital público. Se recabaron datos sobre la filiación, la asistencia recibida, el traslado, el centro hospitalario y el diagnóstico. El máximo de diagnósticos permitidos fue 3, codificados según la clasificación CIE-9 MC. Para la comparación se utilizó el índice kappa. Resultados: Se perdieron 10 casos. La media de diagnósticos del 061 por paciente fue de 1,48, mientras que en los informes hospitalarios fue de 1,59. Los más frecuentes hacían referencia a traumatismos y enfermedades cardiovasculares (los inespecíficos se aproximaron al 20%. El 59% de los pacientes tenía al menos un diagnóstico coincidente. Para un nivel de confianza del 95% obtuvimos un índice kappa de 0,478 (proporción de conformidad del 73,9%. Conclusiones: Obtuvimos una concordancia global moderada, con mejores resultados para el Equipo de Coordinación Avanzada y traslados en ambulancia convencional por la simplicidad de los diagnósticos. Sólo llegó a niveles considerados como «buenos» el Hospital Costa del Sol, con el que se comparten las guías de trabajo. El porcentaje de diagnósticos poco precisos fue alto. Las propuestas de mejora deberán ir desde la revisión de los modos de trabajo hasta la aplicación de nuevas tecnologías.Objectives: Over the last 10 years the Public Health Emergency Service of Andalusia (Spain has been conducting a study

  20. [Financial analysis of a department of general surgery in a French hospital. The new "fee-for-service" reimbursement system results in a high deficit for emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdy, G; Dalban-Sillas, B; Leclerc, C; Bonnaventure, F; Roullet Audy, J-C; Frileux, P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a detailed analysis of income and expense in a department of general surgery in a French hospital under the new system of funding based on a "fee-for-service" principle. All hospital stays of year 2006 were analysed retrospectively. The conditions of admission (elective vs. emergency), the principal diagnosis, and surgical procedures were examined. We determined hospital costs and the reimbursement for every admission. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-five hospitalizations generated an income of 8Meuros with a deficit of 1.3Meuros. The 775 elective admissions generated 50% of the income and 13% of the deficit (178,562euros). Seven hundred and forty-nine emergency admissions generated 45% of the income and 82% of deficit (1.1Meuros). Four hundred and sixty-one admissions for endoscopy generated 5% of the income and 5% of the deficit (67,249euros). Hospital stays of less than two days (the minimum duration of stay for total reimbursement) caused a loss of 122,624euros. Length of hospital stay below the lower limit caused a loss of 42,850euros. Elective surgical activity in digestive surgery can generate a balanced budget provided the length of hospital stay is reduced to the minimum, sometimes to the detriment of patient comfort. Emergency admissions result in a large deficit between cost and reimbursement; this fact may lead hospitals to avoid emergency activity in the future unless appropriate remedial measures are taken.

  1. Serviço de Emergência Psiquiátrica em hospital geral: estudo retrospectivo Servicio de emergencia psiquiátrica en hospital general: estudio retrospectivo Emergency psychiatric service in general hospitals: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sérgio Pereira de Sousa

    2010-09-01

    SEPHG, 43,45% de tales pacientes fueron derivados al CAPS-ad. Se desprende de los resultados cuán imprescindibles son los servicios de salud mental.The Emergency Psychiatric Service in General Hospitals (SEPHG, acronym in Portuguese is a service included in the psychiatric reform movement. The purpose of the present study was to characterize patients with psychological distress treated at the Dr. Estevam SEPHG, located in Sobral, Ceará state. This exploratory study was performed using documental analyses with a quantitative approach, and involved 191 clients treated at the referred SEPHG from January to December 2007. Data collection was performed using a client register book, which contained information obtained from the patients' medical record. There was a predominance of male patients (70.15%, aged 30-49 years (48.71% and single (74.86%. Most patients were from the city of Sobral (69.64%. In 42.40% of cases, the diagnosis was of alcohol use/abuse. Most clients (66.50% sought the service voluntarily. After being evaluated at the SEPHG, 43.45% of patients were referred to the local Center for Psychosocial Care -Alcohol and other Drugs. The results emphasize the importance of mental health.

  2. Validation of the Los Angeles pre-hospital stroke screen (LAPSS in a Chinese urban emergency medical service population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Early and accurate diagnosis of stroke by emergency medical service (EMS paramedics is critical for reducing pre-hospital delays. The Los Angeles pre-hospital stroke screen (LAPSS has been widely used as a validated screening tool for early identifying stroke patients by EMS paramedics. However, validation of LAPSS has never been performed in Chinese stroke population. This study is aimed to verify the LAPSS for early identifying stroke patients in a Chinese urban EMS. METHODS: 76 paramedics of five urban first aid stations attached to Beijing 120 EMS were involved. The paramedics were trained by professionals to quickly screen patients based on LAPSS. Potential "target stroke" individuals who met the base LAPSS screen criteria were identified. Sensitivity and specificity analyses of the LAPSS were calculated. RESULTS: From June 10, 2009 to June 10, 2010, paramedics transported a total of 50,220 patients. 1550 patients who met the baseline screen criteria were identified as the potential "target stroke" population. 1130 patients had the completed LAPSS information datasheet and 997 patients were clinically diagnosed with stroke. The average time of completing the LAPSS was 4.3±3.0 minutes (median, 5 minutes. The sensitivity and specificity of the LAPSS in this study was 78.44% and 90.22%, respectively. After adjusting for age factor by excluding patients of >45 years old, the sensitivity was significantly increased to 82.95% with specificity unchanged. CONCLUSION: The paramedics of Beijing 120 EMS could efficiently use LAPSS as a screening tool for early identifying stroke patients. While the sensitivity of LAPSS in Chinese urban patient population was lower than those reported in previous LAPSS validation studies, the specificity was consistent with these studies. After excluded the item of "Age>45 years", the sensitivity was improved.

  3. Validation of the Los Angeles pre-hospital stroke screen (LAPSS) in a Chinese urban emergency medical service population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shengyun; Sun, Haixin; Lei, Yanni; Gao, Ding; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yilong; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Anxin; Wang, Wenzhi; Zhao, Xingquan

    2013-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis of stroke by emergency medical service (EMS) paramedics is critical for reducing pre-hospital delays. The Los Angeles pre-hospital stroke screen (LAPSS) has been widely used as a validated screening tool for early identifying stroke patients by EMS paramedics. However, validation of LAPSS has never been performed in Chinese stroke population. This study is aimed to verify the LAPSS for early identifying stroke patients in a Chinese urban EMS. 76 paramedics of five urban first aid stations attached to Beijing 120 EMS were involved. The paramedics were trained by professionals to quickly screen patients based on LAPSS. Potential "target stroke" individuals who met the base LAPSS screen criteria were identified. Sensitivity and specificity analyses of the LAPSS were calculated. From June 10, 2009 to June 10, 2010, paramedics transported a total of 50,220 patients. 1550 patients who met the baseline screen criteria were identified as the potential "target stroke" population. 1130 patients had the completed LAPSS information datasheet and 997 patients were clinically diagnosed with stroke. The average time of completing the LAPSS was 4.3±3.0 minutes (median, 5 minutes). The sensitivity and specificity of the LAPSS in this study was 78.44% and 90.22%, respectively. After adjusting for age factor by excluding patients of >45 years old, the sensitivity was significantly increased to 82.95% with specificity unchanged. The paramedics of Beijing 120 EMS could efficiently use LAPSS as a screening tool for early identifying stroke patients. While the sensitivity of LAPSS in Chinese urban patient population was lower than those reported in previous LAPSS validation studies, the specificity was consistent with these studies. After excluded the item of "Age>45 years", the sensitivity was improved.

  4. The evaluation of the patients who admitted to a regional hospital emergency service with suspect of rabies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Tunç

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rabies is one of the highest mortality ratesinfectious disease. The aim was the evaluation of the patientswho admitted to The Batman Regional State HospitalEmergency Service with suspect of rabies in the datesbetween June 2011 and November 2011.Materials and methods: Totally, 166 cases who admittedto our center was recorded according to the followingdata: place of residence (rural/urban, contact type andwound information, time after the contact, whether vaccineor immunoglobulin is applied or not and also the species,breed and being owned of suspected animal.Results: Our study population consisted of a total of 166cases including 38 women (23%, 128 men (77% withthe mean age of 22.01 ± 17.90 years. Of all subjects, 105(63% lived in urban and 61 (37% lived in rural areas.Eighty-five percent of suspicious animals (51% had anowner, while 81 animals were unattended.Conclusions: Our results showed that all admitted patientswere vaccinated and the ones contacted with petsor had a surface wound were vaccinated with 3 doses.Moreover, since the 49% of our cases were contactedwith animals which cannot be follow-up, our study obviouslyreveals that in our country deficiencies in the controlof waifs still is a public health problem and increases thecost of vaccination. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 383-386Key words: Rabies, suspected bite, rabies prophylaxis

  5. Service Robots for Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    services to maintain the quality of healthcare provided. This thesis and the Industrial PhD project aim to address logistics, which is the most resource demanding service in a hospital. The scale of the transportation tasks is huge and the material flow in a hospital is comparable to that of a factory. We...... believe that these transportation tasks, to a great extent, can be and will be automated using mobile robots. This thesis consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable...... manual work and offer many advantages beyond robotics. Finally, this thesis outlines our contributions in representation of multi-floor buildings, which is a vital requirement to achieve robust and practical, real-world service robot applications....

  6. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  7. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  8. [Observed vs expected mortality in the emergency service of a general hospital. Evaluation by the APACHE II and multiple organ failure classification systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrales-Vargas, N; Laniado-Laborín, R

    1995-01-01

    Problem that originated the investigation: It was not known if the observed mortality in the Emergency room of the Tijuana General Hospital was lower, equal or higher, than the expected mortality. 1) Evaluate in a prospective fashion the mortality rate in that hospital service, and then compare that rate with an expected mortality rate proposed in the literature (Role). 2) Determine the prognostic value in our hospital of the Multiple Organ Failure classification system (MOF). The Multiple Organ Failure classification system showed in our study an excellent predicting capacity for mortality.

  9. Serviço de emergências psiquiátricas em hospital geral universitário: estudo prospectivo Psychiatric emergency service in a school general hospital: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia de SB dos Santos

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Realizar estudo transversal de serviço regionalizado de emergências psiquiátricas inserido em hospital universitário de emergências pela caracterização da clientela e do atendimento. MÉTODOS: Os dados foram colhidos por um protocolo, sendo considerados todos os atendimentos realizados durante dois meses. RESULTADOS: Foram preenchidos 600 protocolos que corresponderam a 96,5% dos atendimentos efetuados no período estudado, referentes a 487 pacientes. A maioria desses era do sexo masculino, sem vínculos conjugais, com baixa escolaridade, profissionalmente inativa e morava com familiares. Os diagnósticos mais freqüentes foram transtorno do uso de substância psicoativa (26,3%, esquizofrenias (15,5%, episódio maníaco (11,8%, depressão maior (10,9% e transtornos não psicóticos (10,9%, havendo diferenças entre os sexos quanto à proporção de algumas categorias diagnósticas. Após o atendimento inicial, 2/3 recebeu medicação e 1/2 permaneceu em observação, sendo que 1/4 permaneceu mais de 10h no serviço. Cerca de 20% dos atendimentos resultaram em internação integral e 60%, em encaminhamentos para seguimento ambulatorial. Alta por evasão representou apenas 2,0% dos atendimentos. Os usuários repetitivos não diferiram daqueles que tiveram atendimento único quanto a estado civil, vínculo empregatício e condições de moradia, mas apresentaram maior freqüência de internações anteriores e de transtornos psicóticos. CONCLUSÕES: O serviço atendeu pacientes com quadros psiquiátricos graves, em real situação de urgência, sendo observada uma ampliação das funções do serviço de emergências psiquiátricas e sua efetiva inserção na rede pública de serviços de saúde mental.OBJECTIVES: The aim was to carry out a prospective study about the characteristics of the public seen at a psychiatric emergency room and of its service. METHODS: The data were acquired though a protocol developed for this study and

  10. The emergency room at the Rotunda Hospital: evidence of an improving service over the past 3 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Talukdar, S

    2014-12-01

    This is a retrospective review of the Rotunda Hospital Emergency Room (ER) documentation with respect to attendances for a 4-month period (August-November) in both 2009 and 2012. The aim was to quantify the workload and assess the quality of care offered to patients attending the ER over the two time periods and to highlight any improvements in care after changes were implemented following the initial 2009 review.

  11. 'The first pulse you take is your own' - but don't forget your colleagues'. Emotion teamwork in pre-hospital emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckes, Nicolas; Nurok, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the way that intense emotions, both positive and negative, are collectively regulated at work by pre-hospital emergency teams. We analyse the collective strategies and solutions that are developed in daily medical work by teams and individuals with a view to furthering the action. After a review of the literature on emotion work in work collectives, we discuss the nature of pre-hospital emergency work and the role of emotions in this work. We then examine the collective management of both disruptive and desired emotions by teams during interventions. The last section reflects on the long-term management of emotions at work using Randall Collins' concepts of interaction ritual and emotional energy. This study relies on fieldwork performed in emergency medical services in New York and Paris. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  12. A geographic information system analysis of the impact of a statewide acute stroke emergency medical services routing protocol on community hospital bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimos, Andrew W; Ward, Shana; Brice, Jane H; Enright, Dianne; Rosamond, Wayne D; Goldstein, Larry B; Studnek, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to determine if a statewide Emergency Medical Services (EMSs) Stroke Triage and Destination Plan (STDP), specifying bypass of hospitals unable to routinely treat stroke patients with thrombolytics (community hospitals), changed bypass frequency of those hospitals. Using a statewide EMS database, we identified stroke patients eligible for community hospital bypass and compared bypass frequency 1-year before and after STDP implementation. Symptom onset time was missing for 48% of pre-STDP (n = 2385) and 29% of post-STDP (n = 1612) cases. Of the remaining cases with geocodable scene addresses, 58% (1301) in the pre-STDP group and 61% (2,078) in the post-STDP group were ineligible for bypass, because a community hospital was not the closest hospital to the stroke event location. Because of missing data records for some EMS agencies in 1 or both study periods, we included EMS agencies from only 49 of 100 North Carolina counties in our analysis. Additionally, we found conflicting hospital classifications by different EMS agencies for 35% of all hospitals (n = 38 of 108). Given these limitations, we found similar community hospital bypass rates before and after STDP implementation (64%, n = 332 of 520 vs. 63%, n = 345 of 552; P = .65). Missing symptom duration time and data records in our state's EMS data system, along with conflicting hospital classifications between EMS agencies limit the ability to study statewide stroke routing protocols. Bypass policies may apply to a minority of patients because a community hospital is not the closest hospital to most stroke events. Given these limitations, we found no difference in community hospital bypass rates after implementation of the STDP. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. FASTER (Face, Arm, Speech, Time, Emergency Response): experience of Central Coast Stroke Services implementation of a pre-hospital notification system for expedient management of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W; Crimmins, D; Donaldson, W; Risti, R; Clarke, T A; Whyte, S; Sturm, J

    2012-02-01

    Despite benefit in acute ischaemic stroke, less than 3% of patients receive tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in Australia. The FASTER (Face, Arm, Speech, Time, Emergency Response) protocol was constructed to reduce pre-hospital and Emergency Department (ED) delays and improve access to thrombolysis. This study aimed to determine if introduction of the FASTER protocol increases use of tPA using a prospective pre- and post-intervention cohort design in a metropolitan hospital. A pre-hospital assessment tool was used by ambulance services to screen potential tPA candidates. The acute stroke team was contacted, hospital bypass allowed, triage and CT radiology alerted, and the patient rapidly assessed on arrival to ED. Data were collected prospectively during the first 6 months of the new pathway and compared to a 6-month period 12 months prior to protocol initiation. In the 6 months following protocol introduction, 115 patients presented within 24 hours of onset of an ischaemic stroke: 22 (19%) received thrombolysis, significantly greater than five (7%) of 67 patients over the control period, p=0.03. Overall, 42 patients were referred via the FASTER pathway, with 21 of these receiving tPA (50%). One inpatient stroke was also treated. Only two referrals (patients involving the ambulance services and streamlined hospital assessment is effective and efficient in improving patient access to thrombolysis. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospital emergency preparedness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    Emergency preparedness and professional competency among health care providers during hurricanes Katrina and Rita: Pilot study results. Disaster Management and. Response, 5(4), 99-110. United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction (UNISDR). (2008). 2008-2009 World. Disaster Reduction Campaign.

  15. Save lives, make hospital safe in emergencies: framework for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Save lives, make hospital safe in emergencies: framework for disaster preparedness in hospitals in Nigeria. ... Nigerian Journal of Postgraduate Medicine ... All over the world, it is becoming obvious that there is a need to make hospitals safe at times of disasters and emergencies, when the need for their services become ...

  16. Strengthening surgical services at the soum (first-referral) hospital: the WHO emergency and essential surgical care (EESC) program in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jaymie A; Orgoi, Sergelen; Govind, Salik; Price, Raymond R; Lundeg, Ganbold; Kehrer, Beat

    2012-10-01

    Provision of surgical care continues to receive little attention and funding despite the growing burden of surgical disease worldwide. In 2004, The World Health Organization (WHO) established the Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (EESC) program, which was designed to strengthen surgical services at the first-referral hospital. There are limited data documenting the implementation and scale-up of such services. We describe the nationwide implementation of the EESC program in Mongolia over a 6 year period. Surgical services were increased in rural areas of Mongolia using the WHO Integrated Management of Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (IMEESC) toolkit from 2004 to 2010. Fund of knowledge tests and program evaluation was done to measure uptake, response, and perceived importance of the program. Two years after the pilot sites were launched, programmatic impact on short-term process measures was evaluated using the WHO Monitoring and Evaluation form. The program was implemented in 14 aimags/provinces (66.67 %) and 178 soum hospitals (52.66 %). Fund of knowledge scores increased from 47.72 % (95 % confidence interval (CI) 40.7-54.7) to 77.9 % (95 % CI 70.1-85.7, p = 0.0001) after the training program. 1 year post-training, there was a 57.1 % increase in the availability of emergency rooms, 59.1 % increase in the supply of emergency kits, a 73.64 % increase in the recording of emergency care cases, and a 46.66 % increase in the provision of facility and instrument usage instructions at the pilot sites. The EESC program was successfully implemented and scaled up at a national level with improvements in short-term process measures.

  17. Evaluation of pre-hospital administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by emergency medical services for patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Takahashi, Hideto; Ichikawa, Masao; Nishida, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2013-12-10

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-hospital adrenaline (epinephrine) administered by emergency medical services to patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest. Controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study, in which pairs of patients with or without (control) adrenaline were created with a sequential risk set matching based on time dependent propensity score. Japan's nationwide registry database of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest registered between January 2007 and December 2010. Among patients aged 15-94 with out of hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by a bystander, we created 1990 pairs of patients with and without adrenaline with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) and 9058 pairs among those with non-VF/VT. Overall and neurologically intact survival at one month or at discharge, whichever was earlier. After propensity matching, pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services was associated with a higher proportion of overall survival (17.0% v 13.4%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.60) but not with neurologically intact survival (6.6% v 6.6%; 1.01, 0.78 to 1.30) among those with VF/VT; and higher proportions of overall survival (4.0% v 2.4%; odds ratio 1.72, 1.45 to 2.04) and neurologically intact survival (0.7% v 0.4%; 1.57, 1.04 to 2.37) among those with non-VF/VT. Pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services improves the long term outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, although the absolute increase of neurologically intact survival was minimal.

  18. Physician perceptions and recommendations about pre-hospital emergency medical services for patients with ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction in Abu Dhabi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callachan, Edward L; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Bruijns, Stevan; Wallis, Lee A

    2016-01-01

    Physician perceptions about emergency medical services (EMS) are important determinants of improving pre-hospital care for cardiac emergencies. No data exist on physician attitudes towards EMS care of patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. To describe the perceptions towards EMS among physicians caring for patients with STEMI in Abu Dhabi. We surveyed a convenience sample of physicians involved in the care of patients with STEMI (emergency medicine, cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery and intensive care) in four government facilities with 24/7 Primary PCI in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi. Surveys were distributed using dedicated email links, and used 5-point Likert scales to assess perceptions and attitudes to EMS. Of 106 physician respondents, most were male (82%), practicing in emergency medicine (47%) or cardiology (44%) and the majority (63%) had been in practice for >10 years. Less than half of the responders (42%) were "Somewhat Satisfied" (35%) or "Very Satisfied" (7%) with current EMS level of care for STEMI patients. Most respondents were "Very Likely" (67%) to advise a patient with a cardiac emergency to use EMS, but only 39% felt the same for themselves or their family. Most responders were supportive (i.e. "Strongly Agree") of the following steps to improve EMS care: 12-lead ECG and telemetry to ED by EMS (69%), EMS triage of STEMI to PCI facilities (65%), and activation of PCI teams by EMS (58%). Only 19% were supportive of pre-hospital fibrinolytics by EMS. There were no significant differences in the responses among the specialties. Most physicians involved in STEMI care in Abu Dhabi are very likely to advise patients to use EMS for a cardiac emergency, but less likely to do so for themselves or their families. Different specialties had concordant opinions regarding steps to improve pre-hospital EMS care for STEMI.

  19. Factors associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene by emergency medical service personnel: a population-based study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Hayashida, Sumito; Yoshiya, Kazuhisa; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2016-10-26

    To investigate the association between the difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel and prehospital demographic factors and reasons for EMS calls. A retrospective, observational study. Osaka City, Japan. A total of 100 649 patients transported to medical institutions by EMS from January 2013 to December 2013. The definition of difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene was EMS personnel making ≥5 phone calls to medical institutions until a decision to transport was determined. Multivariable analysis was used to assess the relationship between difficulty in hospital acceptance and prehospital factors and reasons for EMS calls. Multivariable analysis showed the elderly, foreigners, loss of consciousness, holiday/weekend, and night-time to be positively associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene. As reasons for EMS calls, gas poisoning (adjusted OR 3.281, 95% CI 1.201 to 8.965), trauma by assault (adjusted OR 2.662, 95% CI 2.390 to 2.966), self-induced drug abuse/gas poisoning (adjusted OR 4.527, 95% CI 3.921 to 5.228) and self-induced trauma (adjusted OR 1.708, 95% CI 1.369 to 2.130) were positively associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene. Ambulance records in Osaka City showed that certain prehospital factors such as night-time were positively associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene, and reasons for EMS calls, such as self-induced drug abuse/gas poisoning, were also positive predictors for difficulty in hospital acceptance at the scene. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Oiling the gate: a mobile application to improve the admissions process from the emergency department to an academic community hospital inpatient medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Russell; Hyde, Jensen Hart; Davis, Mike

    2018-01-01

    The process of admitting patients from the emergency department (ED) to an academic internal medicine (AIM) service in a community teaching hospital is one fraught with variability and disorder. This results in an inconsistent volume of patients admitted to academic versus private hospitalist services and results in frustration of both ED and AIM clinicians. We postulated that implementation of a mobile application (app) would improve provider satisfaction and increase admissions to the academic service. The app was designed and implemented to be easily accessible to ED physicians, regularly updated by academic residents on call, and a real-time source of the number of open AIM admission spots. We found a significant improvement in ED and AIM provider satisfaction with the admission process. There was also a significant increase in admissions to the AIM service after implementation of the app. We submit that the implementation of a mobile app is a viable, cost-efficient, and effective method to streamline the admission process from the ED to AIM services at community-based hospitals.

  1. Is hospital care of major importance for outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Experience acquired from patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted to one of two hospitals over a 16-year period in the municipality of Göteborg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, J; Abrahamsson, P; Bång, A; Lindqvist, J; Karlsson, T; Herlitz, J

    2000-02-01

    To describe patient characteristics, hospital investigations and interventions and early mortality among patients being hospitalized after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in two hospitals. Municipality of Göteborg, Sweden. All patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were successfully resuscitated and admitted to hospital between 1 October 1980 and 31 December 1996. All patients were resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted alive to one of the two city hospitals in Göteborg. Of 579 patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital, 253 (44%) were discharged alive and of 459 patients admitted to Ostra Hospital, 152 (33%) were discharged alive (P percentage of patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital underwent coronary angiography (P < 0.001), electrophysiological testing (P < 0.001), Holter recording (P < 0.001), echocardiography (P = 0.004), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, P = 0.009), implantation of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD, P = 0.03) and exercise stress tests (P = 0.003). Inhabitants in the catchment area of Ostra Hospital had a less favourable socio-economic profile. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest may be affected by the course of hospital management. Other variables that might influence survival are socio-economic factors and cardiorespiratory status on admission to hospital. Further investigation is called for as more patients are being hospitalised alive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

  2. Ambulatory care sensitive conditions at out-of-hospital emergence services in Croatia: a longitudinal study based on routinely collected data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjšek, Diana; Benčić, Miro; Keglević, Mladenka Vrcić

    2014-12-01

    Conditions for which a hospital and emergency utilization can be considered avoidable are often referred as ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Until now, there has been no published research related to ACSCs in Croatia. This study was undertaken with the aim of determining the trends relating to ACSCs in out-of-hospital ES from 1995-2012. The study is based on data from the Croatian Health Service Yearbooks. Five chronic and three acute conditions were chosen: diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, asthma and COPD, bacterial pneumonia, urinary tract infections and skin infections. The results indicate that the ES in Croatia is overused, and consequently ACSCs are over-represented; 23.3% Croatian citizens visited the ES and around 15% of all diagnoses belonged to the ACSCs, with decreased trend. The leading diagnosis is hypertension, followed by asthma and COPD. For a better understanding of the importance of ACSC within the Croatian context, further research is needed.

  3. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  4. Diagnosis and Transfer of Stroke Patients by Emergency Medical Services: Case of Vali-Asr hospital, Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiedeh Bahrampouri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Currently, volunteer forces are among the main members of the healthcare service body, particularly in the treatment sector, and play a key role in healthcare and treatment services. Since efficient human resources are the greatest and most important assets of all organizations, the organization constantly works to train, retain, and get maximum benefit of these valuable assets. The main objective of this work is to prioritize the Motivational factors and satisfaction of the volunteer forces participating in treatment and health programs in the case of emergencies. Methods: The statistic research community of this work is all volunteers (N=600 in treatment and health programs in Kerman province. Using the Morgan Table, 360 statistical subjects were selected. The data-gathering instrument used in this research was Andam’s questionnaire of motivational factors with reliability of 0.94, and Galindo-Kuhn and Guzley (2001 questionnaire of satisfaction with reliability of 0.92. To determine research data distribution, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied. Moreover, for data analysis inferential statistics tests of Friedman, Mann–Whitney U, and Kruskal–Wallis were used at significance level of p<0.05. Results: The present research revealed that the most and least important motivational factors in volunteers of treatment and health units are purposeful motivation and financial motivation with average rankings of 5.45 and 1.99, respectively. In addition, among the satisfaction factors, the volunteers reported communication with volunteers and organizational communication as the most and least important satisfaction factors, respectively. The results of this research indicated that the female volunteers participated in volunteer activities with greater occupational, support, progress, and social motivations. In addition, single participants had greater occupational, social, and financial motivations towards participation in these

  5. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Shiraishi

    Full Text Available There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear.The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH time for those patients (2h; early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset vs. gradual-onset (late group (>2h. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality.The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP, respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001; whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001 and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001 were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5% patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.99; P = 0.043.Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients.

  6. Time Interval from Symptom Onset to Hospital Care in Patients with Acute Heart Failure: A Report from the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Sakai, Tetsuro; Takagi, Atsutoshi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Iida, Kiyoshi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Fukuda, Keiichi; Nagao, Ken; Sato, Naoki; Takayama, Morimasa

    2015-01-01

    There seems to be two distinct patterns in the presentation of acute heart failure (AHF) patients; early- vs. gradual-onset. However, whether time-dependent relationship exists in outcomes of patients with AHF remains unclear. The Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Database prospectively collects information of emergency admissions via EMS service to acute cardiac care facilities from 67 participating hospitals in the Tokyo metropolitan area. Between 2009 and 2011, a total of 3811 AHF patients were registered. The documentation of symptom onset time was mandated by the on-site ambulance team. We divided the patients into two groups according to the median onset-to-hospitalization (OH) time for those patients (2h); early- (presenting ≤2h after symptom onset) vs. gradual-onset (late) group (>2h). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. The early OH group had more urgent presentation, as demonstrated by a higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, and higher incidence of pulmonary congestion (48.6% vs. 41.6%; P<0.001); whereas medical comorbidities such as stroke (10.8% vs. 7.9%; P<0.001) and atrial fibrillation (30.0% vs. 26.0%; P<0.001) were more frequently seen in the late OH group. Overall, 242 (6.5%) patients died during hospitalization. Notably, a shorter OH time was associated with a better in-hospital mortality rate (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.99; P = 0.043). Early-onset patients had rather typical AHF presentations (e.g., higher SBP or pulmonary congestion) but had a better in-hospital outcome compared to gradual-onset patients.

  7. Emergency medical services versus private transport of trauma patients in the Sultanate of Oman: a retrospective audit at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Kashmiri, Ammar; Al-Hajri, Hamood; Al-Harthy, Abdullah

    2014-09-01

    This study aims to assess the differences in the outcome of road traffic trauma patients between those transported by emergency medical services (EMS) and those privately transported to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in the Sultanate of Oman in 2011. This is a retrospective study of road traffic trauma patients admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between January to December 2011. Data for all cases were retrieved from the emergency department database. The general linear multivariate regression analysis model was performed to test the differences in outcome. The analysis controlled for age, gender, ethnicity, weekend injury, time of injury, triage status, Injury Severity Score, existence of head injury, need for intensive care unit admission and need for surgical management. There were 821 trauma cases in 2011. 66.7% were transported by EMS. Male patients represented 65.7% of the cases. There was no significant difference in the characteristics of EMS and non-EMS trauma patients. In terms of inhospital mortality, the relative ratio of inhospital mortality between EMS and non-EMS groups was 0.64 (0.36-1.13), and p value 0.13. There is no significant difference in all other secondary outcomes tested. EMS transported trauma patients had a statistically non-significant 36% reduction in mortality compared with privately transported patients admitted to the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in 2011. Further, research that incorporates prehospital factors such as crash to arrival of EMS services and transport time to definitive healthcare facility should be conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of such a system in trauma care. Since non-EMS transport is likely to continue, public first aid training is critical to reduce mortality and morbidity of road traffic trauma in Oman. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Patient experience of general practice and use of emergency hospital services in England: regression analysis of national cross-sectional time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Thomas E; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew J

    2018-01-22

    The UK Government has introduced several national policies to improve access to primary care. We examined associations between patient experience of general practice and rates of visits to accident and emergency (A&E) departments and emergency hospital admissions in England. The study included 8124 general practices between 2011-2012 and 2013-2014. Outcome measures were annual rates of A&E visits and emergency admissions by general practice population, according to administrative hospital records. Explanatory variables included three patient experience measures from the General Practice Patient Survey: practice-level means of experience of making an appointment, satisfaction with opening hours and overall experience (on 0-100 scales). The main analysis used random-effects Poisson regression for cross-sectional time series. Five sensitivity analyses examined changes in model specification. Mean practice-level rates of A&E visits and emergency admissions increased from 2011-2012 to 2013-2014 (310.3-324.4 and 98.8-102.9 per 1000 patients). Each patient experience measure decreased; for example, mean satisfaction with opening hours was 79.4 in 2011-2012 and 76.6 in 2013-2014. In the adjusted regression analysis, an SD increase in experience of making appointments (equal to 9 points) predicted decreases of 1.8% (95% CI -2.4% to -1.2%) in A&E visit rates and 1.4% (95% CI -1.9% to -0.9%) in admission rates. This equalled 301 174 fewer A&E visits and 74 610 fewer admissions nationally per year. Satisfaction with opening hours and overall experience were not consistently associated with either outcome measure across the main and sensitivity analyses. Associations between patient experience of general practice and use of emergency hospital services were small or inconsistent. In England, realistic short-term improvements in patient experience of general practice may only have modest effects on A&E visits and emergency admissions. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  9. Initial Management of Poisoned Patients in Emergency Medical Services and Non-poisoning Hospitals in Tehran: The Comparison between Expected and Performed Managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hassanian-Moghadam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no clear data on the adherence of emergency medical services (EMS paramedics and hospital staff rather than those working in poisoning centers to the guidelines for managing acutely poisoned patients in developing countries. Methods: During a 6-month period, all EMS-managed poisoned patients along with those initially managed in a non-poisoning center before being referred to a poisoning hospital in Tehran, Iran, were instructed. Then the indications for administrating the activated charcoal (AC as well as performing gastric lavage (GL and tracheal intubation were studied and compared to the recommended guidelines. Results: A total of 3347 cases, including 1859 males (55.6%, were evaluated. There were significant differences between expected and performed endotracheal intubations in both EMS and other medical centers (P-value = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively as well as the administration of GL and AC in other medical centers (P-values= 0.003 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion: More extensive educational programs should be established to improve the preliminary management of poisoned patients performed by EMS paramedics and staff of hospitals other than poisoning centers.

  10. Avaliação dos serviços hospitalares de emergência do estado do Rio de Janeiro Evaluation of emergency hospital services in the state of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele O´Dwyer

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo avalia as Unidades Hospitalares de Urgência/Emergência e registrou a relação da emergência com usuários, outros serviços do hospital e com a rede assistencial. Abordou a relação entre trabalhadores, a dimensão do seu quadro, formação e vencimentos. Relacionou a infra-estrutura cobrindo aspectos essenciais da organização, onde a assistência foi um dos componentes desse objeto mais amplo. Foi realizado um estudo descritivo com aplicação de questionário para os chefes de serviços, em uma amostra de 30 hospitais. Os depoimentos indicam que a ineficiência da atenção básica e da rede induzem à superlotação (que atingiu 80% dos hospitais, o que deteriora as condições de trabalho e assistência. O déficit de recursos humanos encontrado foi maior que o tecnológico. A precariedade dos vínculos empregatícios foi apontada como fator que dificulta a fixação e qualificação do profissional. Os itens melhor avaliados foram: relacionamento com chefia, confiança e expectativa com o serviço. Os piores foram salários, tamanho de equipe e medicina do trabalho. O investimento em recursos humanos é imprescindível. Há necessidade das políticas públicas articularem intervenções mais efetivas já que as vigentes definem a configuração dos territórios sanitários com suas redes hierarquizadas e solidárias.This study aimed at the evaluation of urgency/emergency hospital units and recorded the relations of emergency units with users, other hospital services and the healthcare network and approached the size of the teams, the relations among the professionals, their qualification and income. It further describes the infrastructure of these services including basic organizational aspects. The aspect care was one component in this broader object. It is a descriptive study applying a questionnaire to the heads of the emergency services of a sample of 30 hospitals.The statements suggest the overcrowding of

  11. Hospital pharmacists' evaluation of drug wholesaler services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W O; Ryan, M R; Roberts, K B

    1983-10-01

    Services provided by drug wholesalers were evaluated by hospital pharmacists. A survey was mailed to 1500 randomly selected pharmacy directors. Respondents indicated availability and use of 26 customer services. Pharmacists rated the services that they used on the basis of importance of the service and satisfaction with the service. The 644 returned questionnaires indicated that most services were available to a large majority of respondents. Most services used were rated as important or essential. Most respondents were satisfied with wholesaler services; the service with which the most respondents were dissatisfied was stocking of pharmaceuticals in single-unit packaging. Of other services that were widely used and rated important, prompt crediting for delivery errors, few out-of-stock items, frequent pickup of return merchandise, and stocking of injectable pharmaceuticals received low satisfaction ratings. Same-day delivery service and emergency delivery of prescription items were unavailable to more than 40% of respondents. Hospital pharmacists were generally satisfied with services provided by drug wholesalers. Wholesalers should be aware of the particular service needs of hospital pharmacists, and further studies of these needs should be conducted.

  12. Out-of-hospital stroke screen accuracy in a state with an emergency medical services protocol for routing patients to acute stroke centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimos, Andrew W; Ward, Shana; Brice, Jane H; Rosamond, Wayne D; Goldstein, Larry B; Studnek, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) protocols, which route patients with suspected stroke to stroke centers, rely on the use of accurate stroke screening criteria. Our goal is to conduct a statewide EMS agency evaluation of the accuracies of the Cincinnati Prehospital Stroke Scale (CPSS) and the Los Angeles Prehospital Stroke Screen (LAPSS) for identifying acute stroke patients. We conducted a retrospective study in North Carolina by linking a statewide EMS database to a hospital database, using validated deterministic matching. We compared EMS CPSS or LAPSS results (positive or negative) to the emergency department diagnosis International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. We calculated sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative likelihood ratios for the EMS diagnosis of stroke, using each screening tool. We included 1,217 CPSS patients and 1,225 LAPSS patients evaluated by 117 EMS agencies from 94 North Carolina counties. Most EMS agencies contributing data had high annual patient volumes and were governmental agencies with nonvolunteer, emergency medical technician-paramedic service level providers. The CPSS had a sensitivity of 80% (95% confidence interval [CI] 77% to 83%) versus 74% (95% CI 71% to 77%) for the LAPSS. Each had a specificity of 48% (CPSS 95% CI 44% to 52%; LAPSS 95% CI 43% to 53%). The CPSS and LAPSS had similar test characteristics, with each having only limited specificity. Development of stroke screening scales that optimize both sensitivity and specificity is required if these are to be used to determine transport diversion to acute stroke centers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Characterization of sexual abuse cases valued in the emergency services and outpatient consultation of a first-level hospital institution in the department of Cauca, 2007 - 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Cerón Hernández

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual abuse affects millions of children and adolescents and it impacts on their physical and mental health. Objective: To characterize the cases of sexual abuse valued in the emergency services and external consultation of a hospital institution of first level in the department of Cauca between 2007 and 2015. Materials and methods: A descriptive, retrospective study of victims of sexual abuse attended in external consultation/emergencies was made. Temporal and sociodemographic variables of the victim/aggressor and the context where the event occurred were selected. The analysis was done in Epi Info. Measures of central tendency, dispersion, proportions and reasons were calculated. The relationship between variables was assessed by using the Fischer test. Results: 77% of the victims were women, 23% men, at ages between 2 to 16 years and 100% were students. The act was committed by a single aggressor. Besides, in 93.0% of the cases, the act was perpetrated by acquaintances, of whom 42.9% were family members. Conclusions: Despite the control and regulation measures, the results suggest that sexual abuse takes place at very early ages. The aggressor is almost always a commonly known person with consanguineous bond, which facilitates the perpetuation of the act towards the family nucleus through deceit, blackmail or threat.

  14. Measuring the impact of emergency medical services (EMS) on out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival in a developing country: A key metric for EMS systems' performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Mazen; Al Assad, Reem; Abi Aad, Yasmin; Gharios, Nour; Refaat, Marwan M; Tamim, Hani

    2017-07-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) can be used to evaluate the overall performance of the emergency medical services' (EMS) system. This study assessed the impact of EMS on OHCA survival rates in a setting where the prehospital system is underdeveloped.A retrospective chart review was carried out over a 5-year period of all adult OHCA patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary care center in Lebanon.A total of 271 patients with OHCA (179 [66.1%] men, mean age of 69.9 [standard deviation = 15.0 years] were enrolled. The most common OHCA location was residence/home (58.7%). The majority of arrests were witnessed (51.7%) with 6.1% witnessed by EMS; 211 patients (75.6%) were transported to the ED by EMS. Prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was done by EMS for 43.2% of the patients, whereas only 4.4% received CPR from a family member/bystander. Prehospital automated external defibrillator use was documented in 1.5% of cases in the prehospital setting. Only 2 patients had return of spontaneous circulation prior to ED arrival. Most patients (96.7%) were resuscitated in the ED. Patients presented to the ED mostly in asystole (79.3%). Forty-three patients (15.9%) survived to hospital admission and 13 (4.8%) were discharged alive with over half of them (53.8%) had a good neurological outcome upon discharge (cerebral performance category 1 or 2).Survival of EMS-treated OHCA victims in Lebanon is not as expected. Medical oversight of EMS activities is needed to link EMS activities to clinical outcomes and improve survival from cardiac arrest in Lebanon.

  15. VT - Vermont Hospital Service Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Hospital service areas (HSAs) are organized by towns and are based on inpatient discharges where the diagnosis indicated the need for immediate care. Plurality...

  16. Factores relacionados con la satisfacción del paciente en los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Parra Hidalgo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conocer las variables de calidad percibida que se relacionan con la satisfacción e identificar la influencia de los factores sociodemográficos en el grado de satisfacción del usuario de las urgencias hospitalarias. Métodos: Encuesta telefónica con cuestionario de elaboración propia a una muestra de 3600 usuarios de los servicios de urgencias de nueve hospitales públicos durante los años 2008 y 2009. Resultados: El modelo ajustado que incluye todas las variables de calidad percibida y las variables sociodemográficas explicó el 47,1% de la varianza (R² corregida. De todas las variables independientes incluidas, sólo ocho resultaron significativas para predecir la satisfacción del paciente. Estas variables hacen referencia al trato del personal médico (p = 0,041, la profesionalidad del personal de enfermería (p = 0,010 y del celador (p = 0,022, la infraestructura (limpieza y confort (p = 0,033 y 0,008, la información recibida al alta (p = 0,000, el tiempo pasado en urgencias (p = 0,000 y la percepción de tratamiento-diagnóstico sin fallos (p = 0,028. Conclusiones: Los resultados obtenidos con la aplicación del cuestionario permitieron identificar las áreas donde implantar acciones correctoras mediante la identificación de las variables que influyen en la satisfacción del paciente de urgencias, así como la identificación de posibles factores de confusión a controlar para su utilización en la comparación de resultados entre diferentes hospitales. El cuestionario de satisfacción en urgencias es un instrumento útil para evaluar y mejorar la calidad asistencial.Objectives: To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public

  17. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — EMS Locations in Kansas The EMS stations dataset consists of any location where emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are stationed or based out of, or where...

  18. “I WENT TO THE NEAREST HEALTH CLINIC...”: FREE DEMAND OF THE EMERGENCY SERVICE OF AUNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Casarotto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: compreender os motivos e necessidades que estimulam a população a buscar assistência básica de saúde em um Pronto Socorro de um hospital universitário do interior do Rio Grande do Sul. MÉTODOS: pesquisa de campo, qualitativa, descritiva e exploratória. Coleta de dados por meio de 31 entrevistas semiestruturada, trabalhadas através da análise temática. RESULTADOS: a maioria dos entrevistados era mulheres e a faixa etária predominante entre 20 e 50 anos. Principais motivos foram: falta de resolutividade na atenção básica, seguido pela falta e demora no apoio diagnóstico; o horário de distribuição de senhas na atenção básica; demora da consulta em especialidades médicas e falta de médico na rede básica. CONCLUSÃO: profissionais da saúde, dentre eles a enfermagem, e gestores precisam se aliar à população no enfrentamento dessa problemática, discutindo e pactuando estratégias para atender às necessidades de saúde, buscando um atendimento que vise à universalidade, equidade e integralidade.

  19. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Iram; Humayun, Ayesha; Anwar, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Adil; Aslam, Muhammad; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients’ perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality) instrument was administered to determine patient’s expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Results Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant (p quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness (p service quality: p service departments showed no relationship with any of the perceived or expected dimension of service quality of hospitals. Conclusions Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients’ expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their quality assurance policy. PMID:28804582

  20. ¿Por qué los pacientes utilizan los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios por iniciativa propia? Why do patients use hospital emergency services on their own initiative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M Aranaz Andrés

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se pretende describir el perfil de usuario y determinar su motivación para visitar el servicio de urgencias hospitalario (SUH por iniciativa propia. Método: Se elaboró un cuestionario ad hoc que se aplicó por selección consecutiva a los pacientes que podían esperar asistencia (nivel 1 del triage durante una semana de noviembre de 2002. Resultados: Respondieron el cuestionario 348 pacientes, acudiendo por iniciativa propia el 82,5%. De éstos, el 17,7% desconocía el funcionamiento de atención primaria respecto a urgencias; el 18,8% consultó con su centro de salud; el 55,0% refirió preferencia por el SUH y el 13,5% acudió por demora en otros niveles asistenciales. El 50,5% era menor de 40 años y el 9,2%, extranjero. Conclusiones: Los cambios en el patrón de consumo de servicios sanitarios pueden comprometer la organización del Sistema Nacional de Salud, si no se adapta la oferta a la necesidad expresada y/o se interviene modulando el uso racional de los recursos sanitarios.Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the reasons why patients use hospital emergency services (HES on their own initiative and the characteristics of these users. Method: An ad hoc questionnaire was designed and applied by consecutive selection to patients who could have waited for medical care (level 1 triage over a 1-week period in November 2002. Results: A total of 348 patients completed the questionnaire; 82.5% attended on their own initiative; of these, 17.7% reported they did not know how Primary Care worked in relation to the Emergency Services; 18.8% consulted a Primary Care physician; 55.0% preferred the HES and 13.5% attended because of a delay in another health care setting. Half the patients (50.5% were younger than 40 years old and 9.2% were foreigners. Conclusions: Changes in health services' consumption patterns could jeopardize the public health system unless supply is adapted to the demand expressed and

  1. Variabilidad en la utilización de los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios del Sistema Nacional de Salud Variability in Spanish National Health System hospital emergency services utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Peiró

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Los objetivos de este estudio fueron estimar las tasas de frecuentación a los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios (SUH del Sistema Nacional de Salud (SNS por áreas de salud, el porcentaje de ingresos, las razones estandarizadas de utilización de urgencias y analizar la relación con los recursos hospitalarios. Métodos: Estudio ecológico combinando información de diversas fuentes (Encuesta de Establecimientos Sanitarios con Régimen de Internado 2006 y Conjunto Mínimo de Datos Básicos 2006 para estimar la frecuentación a los SUH y el porcentaje de ingresos asociado en 164 áreas de salud de 14 comunidades autónomas (CC.AA.. Resultados: Los 35,3 millones de habitantes de las 164 áreas de salud incluidas realizaron 16,2 millones de visitas (45,7 por 100 habitantes a los SUH del SNS, y de ellos ingresaron algo más de 2 millones (12,6%. Excluyendo el 5% de áreas extremas por cada cola, la frecuentación osciló entre 31,6 y 78,7 urgencias/100 habitantes y el porcentaje de ingresos entre el 7,6% y el 27,9%. Estas diferencias apenas se atenuaron al estandarizar. El factor CC.AA. explicó un 29% de la varianza en frecuentación y un 82% en ingresos. La frecuentación no se asoció al volumen poblacional de camas o médicos de plantilla, aunque sí al de médicos de urgencias, hospitales de menor tamaño y no docentes. Conclusiones: Las áreas de salud del SNS mantienen una gran variabilidad en frecuentación a urgencias e ingresos por urgencias, que parece asociarse a un uso diferencial por problemas de menor entidad.Objective: The aims of this study were to estimate the rate of hospital emergency services (HES visits per health area, the associated percentage of admissions and the standardized HES utilization ratio, and to analyze their relationship with hospital resources. Methods: We performed an ecological study that combined information from distinct sources (Survey of Health Care Hospitalization Establishments 2006 and

  2. Readiness of hospitals to provide Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and documentation of KMC service delivery: Analysis of Malawi 2014 Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavula, Kondwani; Likomwa, Dyson; Valsangkar, Bina; Luhanga, Richard; Chimtembo, Lydia; Dube, Queen; Gobezie, Wasihun Andualem; Guenther, Tanya

    2017-12-01

    Malawi introduced Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) in 1999 as part of its efforts to address newborn morbidity and mortality and has continued to expand KMC services across the country. Yet, data on availability of KMC services and routine service provision are limited. Data from the 2014 Emergency Obstetric Newborn Care (EmONC) survey, which was a census of all 87 hospitals in Malawi, were analyzed. The WHO service availability and readiness domains were used to generate indicators for KMC service readiness and an additional domain for documentation of KMC services was included. Levels of KMC service delivery were quantified using data extracted from a 12-month register review and a KMC initiation rate was calculated for each facility by dividing the reported number of babies initiated on KMC by the number of live births at facility. We defined three levels of KMC readiness and two levels of KMC operational status. 79% of hospitals (69/87) reported providing inpatient KMC services. More than half of the hospitals (62%; 54/87) met the most basic definition of readiness (staff, space for KMC and functional weighing scale) and 35% (30/87) met an expanded definition of readiness (guidelines, staff, space, scale and register in use). Only 15 % (13/87) of hospitals had all KMC tracer items. Less than half of the hospitals (43%; 37/87) met criteria for KMC operational status at minimum levels (≥1/100 live births), and just 16% (14/87) met criteria for KMC operational status at routine levels (≥5/100 live births). Our study found large differences between reported levels of KMC services and documented levels of KMC readiness and service provision among hospitals in Malawi. It is recommended that facility assessments of services such as KMC include record reviews to better estimate service availability and delivery. Further efforts to strengthen the capacity of Malawian hospitals to deliver KMC are needed.

  3. [Geriatric emergencies versus adult emergencies: retrospective analysis of medical emergencies at a general hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Artalejo, F; González Montalvo, J I; Sanz Segovia, F; Jaramillo Gómez, E; Banegas Banegas, J R; Rodríguez Mañas, L; Carbonell Collar, A

    1989-10-14

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the process of the attention to emergencies in patients older than 65 years and to compare it with the same process in adult patients. To this end, 965 clinical records of medical emergencies from the Hospital Central de la Cruz Roja in Madrid were retrospectively evaluated, and data were obtained regarding age, the cause for consultation, the investigations performed and their yield, the administration of drug therapy, the major diagnosis at the time of discharge from the service and the clinical course. It was found that all evaluated diagnostic investigations were carried out with equal or higher frequency in patients older than 65 years and that their mean clinical effectiveness was also higher. In addition, it was found that the patients older than 65 years were more commonly admitted to the hospital through the emergency service than the rest of the population. It was concluded, therefore, that the process of attention to emergencies has differential characteristics in the elderly population, and that if the number and proportion of old people increase as it will presumably happen during the two next decades, the cost of attention to emergencies and the number of emergency hospital admissions will also increase.

  4. Administration Medication Errors in Emergency Department in Level III Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia González Gómez

    2012-01-01

    • Objective: To determine the prevalence of medication errors associated with the administration in the emergency room of University Hospital Marques de Valdecilla. • Introduction: Adverse events related to health care, are increasingly common, it is estimated that between 44000 and 98000 people served in U.S. hospitals die from adverse events related to health care. In 7000 these deaths are caused by medication errors. In Spain the studies speak of similar figures. The emergency services are...

  5. Use of the TAC in the investigation of the migraine in the service of emergencies of the Hospital San Juan de Dios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Umana, M. V.

    2000-01-01

    The cephalalgia constitutes one of the symptoms that with more frequency in our days is evaluated in practices it prescribes daily. He prescribe faces every day to this suffering in emergencies services of our hospitals and the great affluence of patient for different causes is not possible to deepen in the study of patient with migraine. We know that many cephalalgia is caused by primary dysfunctions, but the one differential diagnoses they of 300 types and causes being one of the longest in medicine. The origin or type of many migraines can be necessary for careful amanuenses, taking into account family History, 'particular history', supplemented by a general and neurological exhaustive exploration to guide an presumptive diagnose. Among the justifications to request neuroimagenology studies find diverse. Those are strictly prescribe when we are in presence of a T.C.E. or when later to the patient's appropriate boarding we suspect a subaracnoidea hemorrhage, rupture of an aneurysm or a intracranial tumor. We also find just in case the famous one due to an inadequate boarding of the pathology, the anguish of patient and their relatives, aspect prescribes - legal and, at last but not less important requested of practices prescribes aberrant. The positive imagenology studies in the evaluation of patient with this migraine and normal data in the neurological exploration are very few [es

  6. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients’ perspective. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality instrument was administered to determine patient’s expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant (p < 0.003; p < 0.037, respectively as well as in perception of communication (p < 0.026. Other dimensions and overall hospital expected and perceived quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness (p < 0.005, but the perception of each dimension was significantly different in different educational categories (assurance: p < 0.001; empathy: p < 0.001; reliability: p < 0.001; tangibility: p < 0.001; responsiveness: p < 0.001; communication: p < 0.001; and for overall service quality: p < 0.001. Age and service departments showed no relationship with any of the perceived or expected dimension of service quality of hospitals. Conclusions: Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients’ expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their

  7. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Iram; Humayun, Ayesha; Anwar, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Adil; Aslam, Muhammad; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality) instrument was administered to determine patient's expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant ( p < 0.003; p < 0.037, respectively) as well as in perception of communication ( p < 0.026). Other dimensions and overall hospital expected and perceived quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness ( p < 0.005), but the perception of each dimension was significantly different in different educational categories (assurance: p < 0.001; empathy: p < 0.001; reliability: p < 0.001; tangibility: p < 0.001; responsiveness: p < 0.001; communication: p < 0.001; and for overall service quality: p < 0.001). Age and service departments showed no relationship with any of the perceived or expected dimension of service quality of hospitals. Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients' expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their quality assurance policy.

  8. Health services use associated with emergency department closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Enemark, Ulrika; Foldspang, Anders

    2011-01-01

    , 1997-2003. Data were extracted from administrative registries including information on individual use of emergency services and other hospital care, contact with GPs and socioeconomic background. Health services' use by the Morsø population was measured before reduction in emergency room opening hours...... of substitute health services. By contrast, Morsø women compared to the rest of Viborg county reduced their use of GP services in terms of face-to-face visits (β = -0.08, P = 0.020), telephone consultations (β = -0.11, P = 0.007), home visits (β = -0.48, P = 0.009), and their inpatient hospital utilization (β...... = -0.12, P = 0.022) during the period when emergeny services were only available in the daytime. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency services at neighbouring hospitals (40 kilometres distance) were able to compensate, in part, for the decreased local emergency service provision. Concurrent changes in health care...

  9. The Obstetrics Gynecology and Children's Hospital Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    The efficiency of emergency rooms is becoming increasingly important and has been addressed by legislation. Prompt emergency room service is expected when patients present to an emergency room with urgent health problems. However, depending on various factors, the wait times for access to health services can be ...

  10. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  11. Pre-Hospital Emergency in Iran: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghardashi, Fatemeh; Izadi, Ahmad Reza; Ravangard, Ramin; Mirhashemi, Sedigheh; Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba

    2016-05-01

    Pre-hospital care plays a vital role in saving trauma patients. This study aims to review studies conducted on the pre-hospital emergency status in Iran. Data were sourced from Iranian electronic databases, including SID, IranMedex, IranDoc, Magiran, and non-Iranian electronic databases, such as Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, available data and statistics for the country were used. All Persian-language articles published in Iranian scientific journals and related English-language articles published in Iranian and non-Iranian journals indexed on valid sites for September 2005 - 2014 were systematically reviewed. To review the selected articles, a data extraction form developed by the researchers as per the study's objective was adopted. The articles were examined under two categories: structure and function of pre-hospital emergency. A total of 19 articles were selected, including six descriptive studies (42%), four descriptive-analytical studies (21%), five review articles (16%), two qualitative studies (10.5%), and two interventional (experimental) studies (10.5%). In addition, of these, 14 articles (73.5%) had been published in the English language. The focus of these selected articles were experts (31.5%), bases of emergency medical services (26%), injured (16%), data reviews (16%), and employees (10.5%). A majority of the studies (68%) investigated pre-hospital emergency functions and 32% reviewed the pre-hospital emergency structure. The number of studies conducted on pre-hospital emergency services in Iran is limited. To promote public health, consideration of prevention areas, processes to provide pre-hospital emergency services, policymaking, foresight, systemic view, comprehensive research programs and roadmaps, and assessments of research needs in pre-hospital emergency seem necessary.

  12. [Emergency eye care in French university hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, J-L

    2018-03-20

    The patient's request for urgent care in ophthalmology (PRUCO) at health care centers is constantly growing. In France, university hospitals are managing 75% of these cases. We sought to quantify PRUCO referred to French university hospital emergency units as well as to approach the structure and the territorial distribution of emergency eye care provided by French university hospitals. We conducted a quick cross-sectional survey sent to the 32 metropolitan and overseas French university hospitals. It inquired for each hospital whether emergency eye care units were available, whether ophthalmologists were on duty or on call overnight and how many PRUCO were managed in 2016. The 32 university hospitals completed the survey. A total of 398650 PRUCO were managed in French university hospitals in 2016. The emergency unit was exclusively dedicated to eye care for 70% of the hospitals, with 47% (15/32) of them employing an ophthalmologist on duty overnight. Every hospital but one had at least one ophthalmologist on call. The city of Paris set aside, university hospitals took care of an annual mean of 9000 PRUCO (min=500; max=32,250). The 32 French university hospitals are actively responding to patient's requests for urgent care in ophthalmology with very heterogeneous patient volumes and organizational systems. Half of them employ ophthalmologists on duty. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Epidemiologic Profile of an Otolaryngologic Emergency Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prestes, Luciano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction According to current research, the number of patients seen in the emergency room is progressively increasing. There are few studies on the characteristics of ear, nose, and throat diseases treated in the emergency room. Objectives (1 To establish the epidemiologic profile of patients with these complaints treated at a referral emergency hospital in locoregional city Curitiba, and (2 to evaluate the calls that truly required emergency care. Methods This is a contemporary cross-study of urgent and emergency referrals to a hospital with otolaryngologic services during the year 2012. Data were collected and epidemiologic characteristics analyzed. Results We analyzed 1,067 patients: 312 presented in spring, 255 in summer, 253 in autumn, and 247 in winter. We found 17 diseases that were common during the year, with 244 (23.99% upper respiratory tract infections being the most frequent disease. There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of diseases, except that acute otitis media was most common during the summer (p = 0.02; distribution between the sexes was balanced. The predominant age group was adults. We found 9.27% cases were true emergencies. Conclusion Patients were 20 to 40 years, with upper respiratory tract infection the most incident disease; 9.27% of cases were emergencies.

  14. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, 'GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents', which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author)

  15. Financial Services and Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Karreman (Bas)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study addresses the organization and strategy of firms in emerging markets with an explicit application to financial services. Given the relevance of a well-functioning financial system for economic growth, understanding the organization and strategy of firms contributing to the

  16. Differences in the prevalence of hospitalizations and utilization of emergency outpatient services for ambulatory care sensitive conditions between asylum-seeking children and children of the general population: a cross-sectional medical records study (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célina Lichtl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS conditions are established indicators for the availability and quality of ambulatory care. We aimed to assess the differences between asylum-seeking children and children of the general population in a German city with respect to (i the prevalence of ACS hospitalizations, and (ii the utilization of emergency outpatient services for ACS conditions. Methods Using anonymous account data, all children admitted to the University Hospital Heidelberg in 2015 were included in our study. A unique cost unit distinguished asylum seekers residing in a nearby reception center (exposed from the children of the general population. We adapted international lists of ACS conditions and calculated the prevalence of ACS hospitalizations and the utilization of emergency outpatient services for ACS conditions, attributable fractions among the exposed (Afe and the population attributable fraction among total admissions (PAF for each outcome. Differences in the prevalence of each outcome between exposed and controls were analyzed in logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age group and quarterly admission. Results Of the 32,015 admissions in 2015, 19.9% (6287 were from inpatient and 80.1% (25,638 from outpatient care. In inpatient care, 9.8% (622 of all admissions were hospitalizations for ACS conditions. The Afe of ACS hospitalizations was 46.57%, the PAF was 1.12%. Emergency service use for ACS conditions could be identified in 8.3% (3088 of all admissions (Afe: 79.57%, PAF: 5.08%. The odds ratio (OR of asylum-seeking children being hospitalized for ACS conditions in comparison to the control group was 1.81 [95% confidence interval, CI: 1.02; 3.2]. The OR of the asylumseeking population compared to the general population for the utilization of emergency service use for ACS conditions was 4.93 [95% CI: 4.11; 5.91]. Conclusions Asylum-seeking children had significantly higher odds of ACS

  17. Differences in the prevalence of hospitalizations and utilization of emergency outpatient services for ambulatory care sensitive conditions between asylum-seeking children and children of the general population: a cross-sectional medical records study (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtl, Célina; Lutz, Thomas; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan

    2017-11-15

    Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS) conditions are established indicators for the availability and quality of ambulatory care. We aimed to assess the differences between asylum-seeking children and children of the general population in a German city with respect to (i) the prevalence of ACS hospitalizations, and (ii) the utilization of emergency outpatient services for ACS conditions. Using anonymous account data, all children admitted to the University Hospital Heidelberg in 2015 were included in our study. A unique cost unit distinguished asylum seekers residing in a nearby reception center (exposed) from the children of the general population. We adapted international lists of ACS conditions and calculated the prevalence of ACS hospitalizations and the utilization of emergency outpatient services for ACS conditions, attributable fractions among the exposed (Afe) and the population attributable fraction among total admissions (PAF) for each outcome. Differences in the prevalence of each outcome between exposed and controls were analyzed in logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age group and quarterly admission. Of the 32,015 admissions in 2015, 19.9% (6287) were from inpatient and 80.1% (25,638) from outpatient care. In inpatient care, 9.8% (622) of all admissions were hospitalizations for ACS conditions. The Afe of ACS hospitalizations was 46.57%, the PAF was 1.12%. Emergency service use for ACS conditions could be identified in 8.3% (3088) of all admissions (Afe: 79.57%, PAF: 5.08%). The odds ratio (OR) of asylum-seeking children being hospitalized for ACS conditions in comparison to the control group was 1.81 [95% confidence interval, CI: 1.02; 3.2]. The OR of the asylumseeking population compared to the general population for the utilization of emergency service use for ACS conditions was 4.93 [95% CI: 4.11; 5.91]. Asylum-seeking children had significantly higher odds of ACS hospitalization and of utilization of emergency outpatient

  18. Emergency medical services out-of-hospital scene and transport times and their association with mortality in trauma patients presenting to an urban Level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, C Eric; Menchine, Michael; Sampson, Sehra; Anderson, Craig; Kahn, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    We determine the association between emergency medical services (EMS) out-of-hospital times and mortality in trauma patients presenting to an urban Level I trauma center. We conducted a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort registry of trauma patients presenting to a Level I trauma center during a 14-year period (1996 to 2009). Inclusion criteria were patients sustaining traumatic injury who presented to an urban Level I trauma center. Exclusion criteria were extrication, missing or erroneous out-of-hospital times, and intervals exceeding 5 hours. The primary outcome was inhospital mortality. EMS out-of-hospital intervals (scene time and transport time) were evaluated with multivariate logistic regression. There were 19,167 trauma patients available for analysis, with 865 (4.5%) deaths; 16,170 (84%) injuries were blunt, with 596 (3.7%) deaths, and 2,997 (16%) were penetrating, with 269 (9%) deaths. Mean age and sex for blunt and penetrating trauma were 34.5 years (68% men) and 28.1 years (90% men), respectively. Of those with Injury Severity Score less than or equal to 15, 0.4% died, and 26.1% of those with a score greater than 15 died. We analyzed the relationship of scene time and transport time with mortality among patients with Injury Severity Score greater than 15, controlling for age, sex, Injury Severity Score, and Revised Trauma Score. On multivariate regression of patients with penetrating trauma, we observed that a scene time greater than 20 minutes was associated with higher odds of mortality than scene time less than 10 minutes (odds ratio [OR] 2.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09 to 7.74). Scene time of 10 to 19 minutes was not significantly associated with mortality (OR 1.19; 95% CI 0.66 to 2.16). Longer transport times were likewise not associated with increased odds of mortality in penetrating trauma cases; OR for transport time greater than or equal to 20 minutes was 0.40 (95% CI 0.14 to 1.19), and OR for transport time 10 to 19 minutes was

  19. Wilderness Emergency Medical Services Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millin, Michael G; Hawkins, Seth C

    2017-05-01

    Wilderness emergency medical services (WEMS) are designed to provide high quality health care in wilderness environments. A WEMS program should have oversight by a qualified physician responsible for protocol development, education, and quality improvement. The director is also ideally fully trained as a member of that wilderness rescue program, supporting the team with real-time patient care. WEMS providers function with scopes of practice approved by the local medical director and regulatory authority. With a focus on providing quality patient care, it is time for the evolution of WEMS as an integrated element of a local emergency response system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The organizational commitment of emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval de la Torre, A; Bulchand Gidumal, J; Melián González, S

    2016-12-30

    Background. There are not too many studies that deal with the organizational commitment of emergency physicians. This commitment has been shown to impact organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of commitment of the emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals and the factors that may influence it. Method. Online survey using SurveyMonkey to emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals. Results. Two hundred and five questionnaires were received, 162 from physicians and 43 from heads of the emergency service. Results show an intermediate level of commitment, with affective commitment showing the lowest level and continuance commitment showing the highest level. The capabilities of the physician have an influence on their affective commitment; specific training in emergency procedures and seniority has an influence on their continuance commitment; and the opinion they hold about the organization of their service influences affective commitment. Conclusions. Emergency physicians show an average involvement in the hospital in which they work (average 3.8 on a range of 1 to 5), feel an average affection for it (3.4), and have a high intention to keep working there (4.0). The resources the hospital has due to its level do not have an influence on this commitment, while the training and perceptions of the service do have an influence.

  1. Acesso ao serviço de emergência pelos usuários com crise hipertensiva em um hospital de Fortaleza, CE, Brasil Aceso al servicio de urgencia por clientes con crisis de presión alta en un hospital de Fortaleza, CE, Brasil Access to the emergency service by clients with hipertensive crisis in a hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Célia Caetano de Souza

    2009-08-01

    ámetros importantes en la calidad de la atención.A hypertensive crisis is a sudden and symptomatic elevatation of blood pressure at risk of acute deterioration of target organs. Although the prevalence in the literature of the burden is 1%, the risk of complications and death associated with the problem of health in the emergency services have revealed the need for deeper issues related to access to the service of health. It is a quantitative and descriptive research, held in a public hospital Fortaleza city, between April and July of 2006, with 118 patients. The results show that people with hypertensive crisis has sought health services, especially the emergency, in order to get care. The study indicates access as a key element in meeting the needs of users who seek the services of health, and the waiting time, the resolution and the reception, important parameters on the quality of care.

  2. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  3. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  4. [Mission woman: a survey on the perception of the "Service of Welcome and Listening" offered in the Emergency Department at the San Camillo Hospital in Rome by women victims of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Cristian; Zicca, Anna; Parasole, Tiziana; Delle Fratte, Roberta; Battilana, Daniela; Mitello, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    The project Mission Woman was set up to describe how the service offered by the Emergency Department of the Hospital San Camillo-Forlanini in Rome was perceived by women victims ( or supposed to be) of violence. The objective of this investigation is to frame clients' perception about the service offered by staff in terms of sensitivity, recognition and management of the issue. The access to the Emergency Room is the first contact of the client with a helping relationship which goes beyond the simple provision of medical care. A questionnaire devised for the purpose was filled in by women who have asked for help to the Service "Door Woman" . The Service "Door Woman", set up in 2009, aimed to welcome and listen women victims of violence with the collaboration of different operators in the emergency department: nurses, doctors, psychologists and social workers. The project developed within the Hospital S. Camillo-Forlanini is managed by both professionals of the Emergency Department together with the Charity "Be Free". The service is open 24/7, all year, the clients could be women or children and could receive assistance or medical, nursing, psychosocial and legal counselling. The triage nurses are those who through their expertise could first identify the victims of violence and to introduce them in the path. Despite the level of injuries, who access to the Emergency Room for single or repeated events of violence, may have decided to claim in court and not hide seeking.. The research aims to understand what are the theoretical and practical deficiencies of staff in the management of a issue which is not only medical but also social and legal, as well as structural and organizational weaknesses of the service.

  5. Pre-hospital Emergency Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    20 Apr 1974 ... telemetry facilities. This situation in South Africa at present is idealistic in the extreme when one considers the vast number of ambulance services that do not even possess an Ambubag or simple suction apparatus; and, where these are available, there is no guarantee that the staff is able to use them.

  6. Pediatric emergency medical services and their drawbacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Foraih Al-Anazi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To survey the literature on Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (PEMS with an aim to focus its drawbacks and emphasize the means of improvement. Materials and Methods: Published articles selected for inclusion were based on the significance and understanding of literature search on different aspects of PEMS. To meet this criterion, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, Uptodate, Med Line, comprehensive databases, Cochrane library and the Internet (Google, Yahoo were thoroughly searched. Results: PEMS provide out-of-hospital medical care and/or transport the patients to definitive care. The task force represents specialties of ambulance transport, first aid, emergency medical care, life saving, trauma, emergency medicine, water rescue, and extrication. Preliminary care is undertaken to save the patients from different medical exigencies. The techniques and procedures of basic and advanced life-support are employed. A large number of weaknesses are recorded in PEMS system, such as ambulance transport irregularities, deficit equipment, lack of expertise, and ignorance of the pre-hospital care providers. These are discussed with special reference to a few examples of medical exigencies. Conclusions: The appointments in PEMS should be regularized with specific qualifications, experience, and expertise in different areas. Responsibility of PEMS should not be left to pre-hospital care providers, who are non clinicians and lack proper education and training. Pediatricians should be adequately trained to play an active role in PEMS. Meetings should be convened to discuss the lapses and means of improvement. Networks of co-operation between pre-hospital providers and experts in the emergency department should be established.

  7. Evaluation of the triage performed by registered nurses in the Hospital Clínico Universitario «Lozano Blesa» Emergency service (Saragossa, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viñuales, Isabel; Monzón-Fernández, Araceli; Viñuales, Manuel; Sanclemente, Teresa

    2018-02-13

    To evaluate nurses' triage quality and adequacy in Saragossa's Hospital Clínico and to compare the main characteristics of "urgent" and "non-urgent" visits to the Hospital Emergency Department (HED). This exploratory-retrospective research study was carried out over the last 3 months of 2015 (paediatrics, gynaecological and ophthalmologic emergencies were excluded). Data were obtained from the "Puesto Clínico Hospitalario" programme used in the HED. The quality of the triage performed by nurses was assessed using the 4 indexes proposed by Gómez Jimenez and the adequacy of patient classification was established by relating the level of triage assigned with the place of care, length of stay in the HED and type of discharge. Differences between "non-urgent" (seen in outpatient consultations of the HED) and "urgent" visits were analysed, RESULTS: 22,047 individuals were included. Quality indices relating to waiting times were not fully met. Higher severity of triage was associated with being attended in the area of Vital and Medical Care, a longer stay in the HED and a higher proportion of hospital admissions (p<.001), so that triage performed by nursing is considered adequate. "Non-urgent" visits obtained less severity of triage, a shorter stay in HED and a greater proportion of hospital discharges (p<.001). Nursing triage needs to improve quality aspects related to waiting times but is appropriate enough as it discriminates between place of care and type of discharge for each level of triage within the desirable limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-Term Mortality of Emergency Medical Services Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Morten Thingemann; Terkelsen, Christian J; Sørensen, Jan N.

    2017-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Emergency medical services (EMS) provides out-of-hospital care to patients with life-threatening conditions, but the long-term outcomes of EMS patients are unknown. We seek to determine the long-term mortality of EMS patients in Denmark. METHODS: We analyzed linked EMS, hospital...

  9. Rural Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Rural Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Trauma Emergency medical ... injuries treated in emergency departments? How can a rural EMS unit find funding for major equipment, such ...

  10. [Burnout syndrome in pre-hospital and hospital emergency. Cognitive study in two cohorts of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchitti, Chiara; Cannizzaro, Giorgia; Rosi, Fabrizio; Maccaroni, Roberto; Menditto, Vincenzo G

    2014-01-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The emergency department and the pre-hospital healthcare services are highly stressful environments. Little is known about the BOS in critical care nursing staff. The objective of the study is to compare the incidence of BOS and its three domains, namely, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced professional accomplishment, in two cohorts of critical care nurses: a pre-hospital and a hospital emergency service. A survey using a questionnaire (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS), among nurses of two Italian emergency services has been performed: a hospital emergency service (HES, Emergency Department or "Pronto Soccorso") and a pre-hospital emergency service (PHES, territorial healthcare service or "Centrale Operativa 118"). All 60 nurses surveyed (82% female) filled the questionnaires. BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 50% of the nurses in the HES: 50% suffered a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 75% had a medium-high depersonalization and 92.5% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Among the PEHS nurses, BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 60% of the respondents: 60% had a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 70% had a medium-high depersonalization and 95% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Moreover, the likelihood that a nurse has a severe BOS, that is at least one degree of high burnout or ≥2 degrees of medium burnout, is significantly higher in the group of the PHES than in the HES (90% vs 60%, p nursing staff had a severe BOS. The incidence of BOS appeared to be similar among PHES and HES nurses with a higher trend for the former. Further interventional studies are needed to investigate the determinants of BOS among critical care nurses and the potentially preventive strategies.

  11. Improvements in Patient Acceptance by Hospitals Following the Introduction of a Smartphone App for the Emergency Medical Service System: A Population-Based Before-and-After Observational Study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Izawa, Junichi; Gibo, Koichiro; Komukai, Sho; Hayashida, Sumito; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-09-11

    Recently, the number of ambulance dispatches has been increasing in Japan, and it is therefore difficult for hospitals to accept emergency patients smoothly and appropriately because of the limited hospital capacity. To facilitate the process of requesting patient transport and hospital acceptance, an emergency information system using information technology (IT) has been built and introduced in various communities. However, its effectiveness has not been thoroughly revealed. We introduced a smartphone app system in 2013 that enables emergency medical service (EMS) personnel to share information among themselves regarding on-scene ambulances and the hospital situation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of introducing this smartphone app on the EMS system in Osaka City, Japan. This retrospective study analyzed the population-based ambulance records of Osaka Municipal Fire Department. The study period was 6 years, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015. We enrolled emergency patients for whom on-scene EMS personnel conducted hospital selection. The main endpoint was the difficulty experienced in gaining hospital acceptance at the scene. The definition of difficulty was making ≥5 phone calls by EMS personnel at the scene to hospitals until a decision to transport was determined. The smartphone app was introduced in January 2013, and we compared the patients treated from 2010 to 2012 (control group) with those treated from 2013 to 2015 (smartphone app group) using an interrupted time-series analysis to assess the effects of introducing this smartphone app. A total of 600,526 emergency patients for whom EMS personnel selected hospitals were eligible for our analysis. There were 300,131 emergency patients in the control group (50.00%, 300,313/600,526) from 2010 to 2012 and 300,395 emergency patients in the smartphone app group (50.00%, 300,395/600,526) from 2013 to 2015. The rate of difficulty in hospital acceptance was 14.19% (42,585/300,131) in the

  12. Severe Sepsis in Pre-Hospital Emergency Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Thomas D.; Kahn, Jeremy M.; Walkey, Allan J.; Yealy, Donald M.; Angus, Derek C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Severe sepsis is common and highly morbid, yet the epidemiology of severe sepsis at the frontier of the health care system—pre-hospital emergency care—is unknown. Objectives: We examined the epidemiology of pre-hospital severe sepsis among emergency medical services (EMS) encounters, relative to acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Methods: Retrospective study using a community-based cohort of all nonarrest, nontrauma King County EMS encounters from 2000 to 2009 who were transported to a hospital. Measurements and Main Results: Overall incidence rate of hospitalization with severe sepsis among EMS encounters, as well as pre-hospital characteristics, admission diagnosis, and outcomes. Among 407,176 EMS encounters, we identified 13,249 hospitalizations for severe sepsis, of whom 2,596 died in the hospital (19.6%). The crude incidence rate of severe sepsis was 3.3 per 100 EMS encounters, greater than for acute myocardial infarction or stroke (2.3 per 100 and 2.2 per 100 EMS encounters, respectively). More than 40% of all severe sepsis hospitalizations arrived at the emergency department after EMS transport, and 80% of cases were diagnosed on admission. Pre-hospital care intervals, on average, exceeded 45 minutes for those hospitalized with severe sepsis. One-half or fewer of patients with severe sepsis were transported by paramedics (n = 7,114; 54%) or received pre-hospital intravenous access (n = 4,842; 37%). Conclusions: EMS personnel care for a substantial and increasing number of patients with severe sepsis, and spend considerable time on scene and during transport. Given the emphasis on rapid diagnosis and intervention for sepsis, the pre-hospital interval may represent an important opportunity for recognition and care of sepsis. PMID:23087028

  13. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates under

  14. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  15. Emergency and Disaster Information Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boszormenyi, Zsolt

    2010-05-01

    The Hungarian National Association of Radio Distress-Signalling and Infocommunications (RSOE) operates Emergency and Disaster Information Service (EDIS) within the frame of its own website which has the objective to monitor and document all the events on the Earth which may cause disaster or emergency. Our service is using the speed and the data spectrum of the internet to gather information. We are monitoring and processing several foreign organisation's data to get quick and certified information. The EDIS website operated together by the General-Directorate of National Disaster Management (OKF) and RSOE, in co-operation with the Crisis Management Centre of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, provides useful information regarding emergency situations and their prevention. Extraordinary events happening in Hungary, Europe and other areas of the World are being monitored in 24 hours per day. All events processed by RSOE EDIS are displayed real time - for the sake of international compatibility - according to the CAP protocol on a secure website. To ensure clear transparency all events are categorized separately in the RSS directory (e.g. earthquake, fire, flood, landslide, nuclear event, tornado, vulcano). RSOE EDIS also contributes in dissemination of the CAP protocol in Hungary. Beside the official information, with the help of special programs nearly 900-1000 internet press publication will be monitored and the publication containing predefined keywords will be processed. However, these "news" cannot be considered as official and reliable information, but many times we have learnt critical information from the internet press. We are screening the incoming information and storing in a central database sorted by category. After processing the information we are sending it immediately via E-Mail (or other format) for the organisations and persons who have requested it (e.g. National Disaster Management, United Nations etc.). We are aspiring that the processed data

  16. [Service encounters and customer satisfaction in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto; Luce, Fernando Bins

    2004-01-01

    This research is about service encounters and customer satisfaction in hospitals. The study is exploratory and was aimed at identifying the service encounters maintained in hospitals and the satisfaction attributes related to them. The data were collected with hospital professionals and customer, in 2003, by means of interviews using the critical incident technique. The content analysis evidentiated the satisfaction attributes of the service encounters regarding admission, hospitalization and discharge procedures. The results provide important information to hospital service managers, allowing for the planning of customer-focused actions.

  17. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  18. Emergency healthcare process automation using mobile computing and cloud services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2012-10-01

    Emergency care is basically concerned with the provision of pre-hospital and in-hospital medical and/or paramedical services and it typically involves a wide variety of interdependent and distributed activities that can be interconnected to form emergency care processes within and between Emergency Medical Service (EMS) agencies and hospitals. Hence, in developing an information system for emergency care processes, it is essential to support individual process activities and to satisfy collaboration and coordination needs by providing readily access to patient and operational information regardless of location and time. Filling this information gap by enabling the provision of the right information, to the right people, at the right time fosters new challenges, including the specification of a common information format, the interoperability among heterogeneous institutional information systems or the development of new, ubiquitous trans-institutional systems. This paper is concerned with the development of an integrated computer support to emergency care processes by evolving and cross-linking institutional healthcare systems. To this end, an integrated EMS cloud-based architecture has been developed that allows authorized users to access emergency case information in standardized document form, as proposed by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profile, uses the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) standard Emergency Data Exchange Language (EDXL) Hospital Availability Exchange (HAVE) for exchanging operational data with hospitals and incorporates an intelligent module that supports triaging and selecting the most appropriate ambulances and hospitals for each case.

  19. Abortion services at hospitals in Istanbul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Mary Lou

    2017-04-01

    Despite the existence of a liberal law on abortion in Turkey, there is growing evidence that actually securing an abortion in Istanbul may prove difficult. This study aimed to determine whether or not state hospitals and private hospitals that accept state health insurance in Istanbul are providing abortion services and for what indications. Between October and December 2015, a mystery patient telephone survey of 154 hospitals, 43 public and 111 private, in Istanbul was conducted. 14% of the state hospitals in Istanbul perform abortions without restriction as to reason provided in the current law while 60% provide the service if there is a medical necessity. A quarter of state hospitals in Istanbul do not provide abortion services at all. 48.6% of private hospitals that accept the state health insurance also provide for abortion without restriction while 10% do not provide abortion services under any circumstances. State and private hospitals in Istanbul are not providing abortion services to the full extent allowed under the law. The low numbers of state hospitals offering abortions without restriction indicates a de facto privatization of the service. This same trend is also visible in many private hospitals partnering with the state that do not provide abortion care. While many women may choose a private provider, the lack of provision of abortion care at state hospitals and those private hospitals working with the state leaves women little option but to purchase these services from private providers at some times subtantial costs.

  20. Who's boarding in the psychiatric emergency service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A; Joesch, Jutta M; West, Imara I; Pasic, Jagoda

    2014-09-01

    When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a "boarder." The psychiatric emergency service (PES) has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student's t-tests and multivariate regression. 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7%) resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients.

  1. Business Models in Emerging Online Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kelly; Playford, Corrie; Messinger, Paul R.; Niu, Run H.; Stroulia, Eleni

    Due to advances in technology and the rapid growth of online services, a significant number of new and inventive web-based service models and delivery methods have been introduced. Although online resources and services are having an impact on more traditional service delivery mechanisms, it is not yet clear how these emerging mechanisms for online service delivery will result in profitable business models. In this paper, we consider emerging business models for online services and their implications for how services are delivered, used, and paid for.We demonstrate the changing roles of user / consumer and provider / seller. We also discuss the applicability of different business models for various domains.

  2. 76 FR 17485 - Meeting Notice Correction-Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Services; Correction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... and trauma care for adults and children--including medical 9-1-1 and emergency medical dispatch, prehospital emergency medical services (both ground and air), hospital-based emergency care and trauma care... services and emergency and trauma care for adults and children any stakeholder input would be appreciated...

  3. O enfermeiro no gerenciamento à qualidade em serviço hospitalar de emergência: revisão integrativa da literatura La enfermera en la gestión de la calidad en el servicio de urgencia en el hospital: revisión integradora de la literatura Quality management by nurses in hospitals' emergency services: integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Bellucci Júnior

    2011-12-01

    las enfermeras en la Acogida Clasificadora de Riesgo es una estrategia clave para la gestión de calidad en los servicios.This study aimed to analyze publications related to the activities of nurses managing the quality in the Emergency Services of Hospitals. An integrative literature review identified 4780 articles of which 8 were selected considering the criteria: full articles, published from 2000 to 2010; available in Portuguese; indexed in the databases of the Virtual Health Library. All the material was analyzed through Content Analysis. Two themes emerged: Working in the structuring of the nursing staff to the quality of care and Nursing actions managing the quality of care. The conclusion is that the promotion of the quality of care provided in Hospitals' Emergency Services is linked to the actions promoting the humanization of both care and caregivers, and that the role of the nurse in the User Reception with Risk Rating is a key strategy for managing quality in services.

  4. Conceptions of mobile emergency service health professionals concerning psychiatric emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Bonfada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the Brazilian Psychiatric Reformation, assistance to psychological seizures represents a challenge for the emergency services. Therefore, the objective of this paper is the analysis of the conceptions of health professionals who work at the Mobile Emergency Service in Natal on psychiatric emergency care. This paper is, then, a qualitative study that used interviews as tools for collecting information. By using thematic analysis, the speeches were grouped into three categories: the stigma on patients and the professionals' fear of services interventions in psychiatric emergencies; having psychiatric emergencies regarded as harmful to patients and others' security; psychiatric emergencies being taken as patients' aggressiveness or severe depression. The data collected indicate that the interviewed professionals' ideas are supported by elements associated with the ideology that insanity implies social segregation and dangerousness. Thus, the survey prompted reflection on relevant issues to the process of psychiatric reformation implementation.

  5. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving areas in hospitals in Northern Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiro, Keneth; Wallis, Lee; Ogwang, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Limited health service resources must be used in a manner which does "the most for the most". This is partly achieved through the use of a triage system. Whereas efforts have been made to introduce paediatric triage in Uganda such as Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment Plus (ETAT+), it is not clear if hospitals have local protocols for adult triage being used in each setting. To determine the presence of existing hospital triage systems, the cadre of staff undertaking triage and barriers to development/improvement of formal triage systems. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study. Acholi sub-region was randomly selected for the study among the three sub-regions in Northern Uganda. The study was conducted in 6 of the 7 hospitals in the region. It was a written self-administered questionnaire. Thirty-three participants from 6 hospitals consented and participated in the study. Only one hospital (16.7%) of the 6 hospitals surveyed had a formal hospital-based adult triage protocol in place. Only 2 (33.3%) hospitals had an allocated emergency department, the rest receive emergency patients/perform triage from OPD and wards. Lack of training, variation of triage protocols from hospital to another, shortage of staff on duty, absence of national guidelines on triage and poor administrative support were the major barriers to improvement/development of formal triage in all these hospitals. Formal adult hospital-based triage is widely lacking in Northern Uganda and staff do perform subjective "eyeball" judgments to make triage decisions.

  6. Motivation of the nurses in pre-hospital emergency and educational hospitals emergency in the southeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbardsiri, Hojjat; Khademipour, Gholamreza; Nekoei-Moghadam, Mahmoud; Aminizadeh, Mohsen

    2018-01-01

    Nurses, as the largest human resource element of health care systems, have a major role in providing ongoing, high-quality care to patients. Therefore, due to the importance of this issue, this study aimed to determine job motivation of the nurses in pre-hospital and educational hospitals emergency in the southeast of Iran. In this study, a cross-sectional method was used, and it was conducted in educational hospitals and pre-hospital emergencies under supervision of the Kerman University of Medical Sciences in 2017. Using a valid and reliable questionnaire, we assessed job motivation of the nurses using a census method (N = 275). Data were analyzed by implementing descriptive statistics including mean and standard deviation (SD), and analytical statistics such as Kolmogorov-Smirnov, ANOVA, t-test, X2, Pearson, and multivariate regression tests using SPSS 16 and P ≤ 0.05. Among the pre-hospital emergency nurses, the average of the educational factors was 25.33, financial factors was 6.34, psychological factors was 20.07, welfare factors was 0.63, and administrative factors was 8.16. Among the nurses of the educational hospitals emergency, these factors were 25.33, 6.51, 20.34, 16.55, and 8.39, respectively. Two group's nurses were at the intermediate level of the job motivation. Dynamic and predetermined goals of emergency include providing services as soon as possible and stabilizing patient's condition during the golden and vital time of rescue. Findings suggest that national and local policies in Iran may need to examine factors that contribute to the promotion of the motivation as well as focusing on how to improve them. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. [The emergence of Korean modern hospitals: hospitals in the late period of Chosun Dynasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Woo Hyun; Park, Chong Yon; Park, Chun Sun

    2002-06-01

    Hospitals are confronting in the transforming or reforming period to cope with the rapid social and environmental changes worldwide. By the researches in the history of Korean health, we could understand the context of the introduction of Western medicine and institutions to Korea. However there have been few studies on the historical review of hospitals in relations to their roles in the modern medicine. This article is to review the issues around the rise of modern hospitals in Korean history of health affairs. The introduction of Western medicine in Korea was on the road with the establishment of Kwanghyewon, the Royal Hospital, which was possible due to favorable conditions under the Korean socio-political background for the emerging and accepting the entirely new medical system. And also the emergence of modern and transformed the Korean traditional health system from the fundamentals through the corruption of the old dynasty to nowadays. Most national health affairs including medical services, prevention of diseases, health promotion, and the training of health personnels have performed along with the development of modern hospitals, which have the roots in the period after the end of 19th century. Thus the Korean history of health care around the end of 19th century and beginning of 20th century could be defined as a period of emergence of modern hospitals. The hospitals also have played core roles in establishing the Korean modern health system and culture. Compared to the cases of Western countries, Korean modern hospitals were emerged with the exogenous factors in the turbulence of political and cultural changes in the world system. In sum, Korean modern hospitals in the period of late Chosun have the great meaning in that they are the beginning point to shape the current Korean health care system and the driving forces or carriers of this new system.

  8. Some Considerations for the Organization of Health Services Emergency and Disaster

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Nelson; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The huge increase in the incidence and severity of injuries that motivate emergency medical care, high costs and disabling consequences they entail, has driven the evolution of infrastructure, management, human resources and materials for hospital emergency services Latin America and the Caribbean. In the big cities of the region significant efforts to implement Systems Services Emergency Medical Care to ensure integrated operation of central control with hospital networks, pre-hospital servi...

  9. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    To quantify the association between obesity and somatic hospital costs and number of overall somatic hospital contacts--number of inpatient admissions, number of outpatient visits, and number of emergency department visits--based on anthropometric measurements of waist circumference (WC) and info......To quantify the association between obesity and somatic hospital costs and number of overall somatic hospital contacts--number of inpatient admissions, number of outpatient visits, and number of emergency department visits--based on anthropometric measurements of waist circumference (WC...

  10. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  11. Healthcare Service Auditing and Intervention in an Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pre- and post-intevention randomized cross-sectional study was carried out from January to February and April to May 2001, respectively, to audit and intervene in the timeliness of health services delivery in an Emergency Paediatric Unit (EPU) of Jos University Teaching Hospital. A structured questionnaire was used to ...

  12. [Out of hospital emergencies towards a safety culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-del Pozo, M I; Obón-Azuara, B; Valderrama-Rodríguez, M; Revilla-López, C; Brosed-Yuste, C; Fajardo-Trasobares, E; Garcés-Baquero, P; Mateo-Clavería, J; Molina-Estrada, I; Perona-Flores, N; Salcedo-de Dios, S; Tomé-Rey, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the degree of safety culture (CS) among healthcare professional workers of an out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service. Most patient safety studies have been conducted in relation to the hospital rather than pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services. The objective is to analyze the dimensions with lower scores in order to plan futures strategies. A descriptive study using the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered to all healthcare professionals workers of 061 Advanced Life Support Units of Aragón, during the month of August 2013. The response rate was 55%. Main strengths detected: an adequate number of staff (96%), good working conditions (89%), tasks supported from immediate superior (77%), teamwork climate (74%), and non-punitive environment to report adverse events (68%). Areas for improvement: insufficient training in patient safety (53%) and lack of feedback of incidents reported (50%). The opportunities for improvement identified focus on the training of professionals in order to ensure safer care, while extending the safety culture. Also, the implementation of a system of notification and registration of adverse events in the service is deemed necessary. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Waste management in non-hospital emergency units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Milca Severino; Alves, Sergiane Bisinoto; Silva e Souza, Adenicia Custódia; Tipple, Anaclara Ferreira Veiga; de Rezende, Fabiana Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Erika Goulart

    2013-01-01

    to analyze waste management in urgency and emergency non-hospital health care service units. Epidemiological cross-sectional study undertaken at three Non-Hospital Emergency Units. The data were collected using systematic observation, registered daily in a spreadsheet and checklist, and analyzed through descriptive statistics. the generation of waste varied from 0.087 to 0.138 kg per patient per day. Waste management showed inadequacies in all stages, especially in the separation stage. Infectious waste was found together with common waste, preventing recycling, and piercing and cutting objects were mixed with waste from different groups, increasing the risk of occupational accidents. the study reveals the lack of an institutional waste management policy, as demonstrated by the failure of operational stages, involving problems related to management, physical structure, material and human resources at the units. This is relevant for health care units, considering the quality of patient care and its interface with sustainability.

  14. Do hospital service areas and hospital referral regions define discrete health care populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Austin S; Wiebe, Douglas J; Karp, David N; Love, Jennifer; Kallan, Michael J; Carr, Brendan G

    2015-06-01

    Effective measurement of health care quality, access, and cost for populations requires an accountable geographic unit. Although Hospital Service Areas (HSAs) and Hospital Referral Regions (HRRs) have been extensively used in health services research, it is unknown whether these units accurately describe patterns of hospital use for patients living within them. To evaluate the ability of HSAs, HRRs, and counties to define discrete health care populations. Cross-sectional geographic analysis of hospital admissions. All hospital admissions during the year 2011 in Washington, Arizona, and Florida. The main outcomes of interest were 3 metrics that describe patient movement across HSA, HRR, and county boundaries: localization index, market share index, and net patient flow. Regression models tested the association of these metrics with different HSA characteristics. For 45% of HSAs, fewer than half of the patients were admitted to hospitals located in their HSA of residence. For 16% of HSAs, more than half of the treated patients lived elsewhere. There was an equivalent degree of movement across county boundaries but less movement across HRR boundaries. Patients living in populous, urban HSAs with multiple, large, and teaching hospitals tended to remain for inpatient care. Patients admitted through the emergency department tended to receive care at local hospitals relative to other patients. HSAs and HRRs are geographic units commonly used in health services research yet vary in their ability to describe where patients receive hospital care. Geographic models may need to account for differences between emergent and nonemergent care.

  15. Client Experiences of Emergency Assistance Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Goodwin-Smith

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available More people are requiring emergency assistance on a regular basis, placing a significant burden on service providers. However, there is little literature on client perceptions of emergency assistance, and whether their needs are being met. This study aimed to address this gap by interviewing people who had recently sought emergency assistance in South Australia. Sixteen people (nine women aged between 27 and 55 participated in this study. Participants reported that they were seeking assistance (mainly food due to bills, particularly relating to electricity, but also telephone, gas and car registration. Most people had their needs met to some extent, but many said that they had received insufficient or inappropriate food. Recommendations were provided around establishing compulsory service standards and partnerships, and reviewing the types of assistance provided (e.g. providing vouchers and healthy food parcels. Keywords: emergency assistance, emergency relief, social services, wrap around services, social inclusion

  16. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    To quantify the association between obesity and somatic hospital costs and number of overall somatic hospital contacts--number of inpatient admissions, number of outpatient visits, and number of emergency department visits--based on anthropometric measurements of waist circumference (WC...

  17. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  18. Correlation of Pre- and In-Hospital Systolic Blood Pressure in Acute Heart Failure Patients and the Prognostic Implications - Report From the Tokyo Cardiac Care Unit Network Emergency Medical Service Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Kohsaka, Shun; Harada, Kazumasa; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Tanimoto, Shuzou; Iida, Kiyoshi; Sakai, Tetsuro; Miyazaki, Tetsuro; Yagawa, Mayuko; Matsushita, Kenichi; Furihata, Shuta; Sato, Naoki; Fukuda, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Nagao, Ken; Takayama, Morimasa

    2016-11-25

    Systolic blood pressure (SBP) is an important prognostic indicator for patients with acute heart failure (AHF). However, its changes and the effects in the different phases of the acute management process are not well known.Methods and Results:The Tokyo CCU Network prospectively collects on-site information about AHF from emergency medical services (EMS) and the emergency room (ER). The association between in-hospital death and SBP at 2 different time points (on-site SBP [measured by EMS] and in-hospital SBP [measured at the ER; ER-SBP]) was analyzed. From 2010 to 2012, a total of 5,669 patients were registered and stratified into groups according to both their on-site SBP and ER-SBP: >160 mmHg; 100-160 mmHg; and 160 mmHg. Monitoring changes in SBP assisted risk stratification of AHF patients, particularly patients with intermediate ER-SBP measurements. (Circ J 2016; 80: 2473-2481).

  19. Evaluation of service quality of hospital outpatient department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2011-07-01

    It has become essential for hospital managers to understand and measure consumer perspectives and service quality gaps, so that any perceived gap in delivery of service is identified and suitably addressed. A study was conducted at a peripheral service hospital to ascertain any service gap between consumer expectations and perceptions in respect of the hospital outpatient department (OPD) services. A cross-sectional study was conducted using SERVQUAL as the survey instrument, the instrument being validated for use in the hospital environment. Consumer ratings across 22 items of the survey instrument were collected in paired expectation and perception scores and then service quality gaps were identified and statistically analysed. Service quality gaps were identified to exist across all the five dimensions of the survey instrument, with statistically significant gaps across the dimensions of 'tangibles' and 'responsiveness.' The quality gaps were further validated by a total unweighted SERVQUAL score of (-) 1.63. The study concludes that significant service quality gaps existed in the delivery of the hospital OPD services, which need to be addressed by focused improvement efforts by the hospital management.

  20. [Causes of 72-hour return visits to hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Puente, Alberto; Del Río-Mata, José; Arjona-Huertas, José Luis; Mora-Ordóñez, Begoña; Nieto-de Haro, Lourdes; Lara-Blanquer, Antonio; Martínez-Reina, Alfonso; Martínez Del Campo, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    The return-visit rate has been suggested as a measure of emergency department quality of care. We aimed to identify the reasons for emergency revisits and the percentage of returns related to problems with quality of care in the previous visit. Cross-sectional observational study of clinical records for a random sample of unscheduled returns within 72 hours of discharge from the emergency departments of 3 hospitals attending a population of nearly 3 million in the Spanish province of Malaga. The records were reviewed by 2 data collectors, who assigned a reason for revisits according to a standardized classification. A sample of 1075 emergency revisits were reviewed; 895 met the inclusion criteria. The most common reasons for revisits were the persistence or progression of disease (48.8%), an unrelated new problem (9.3%), and referral from a hospital that did not have the required specialized service (8.6%). Reasons attributable to the patient accounted for 14.5% of the revisits; 15.2% were attributable to health care staff errors, 9.2% to system organization, and 61.1% to the disease process. Most emergency department revisits are related to the progression of the disease that led to the first visit. Only a small percentage can be linked to diagnostic or treatment errors in the previous visit.

  1. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit.

  2. Customer satisfaction measurement in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisma, Markku; Määttä, Teuvo; Hakala, Taisto; Sivula, Tommi; Nousila-Wiik, Maria

    2003-07-01

    The annual patient volume in emergency medical services (EMS) systems is high worldwide. However, there are no comprehensive studies on customer satisfaction for EMS. The authors report how a customer satisfaction survey on EMS patients was conducted, the results, and the possible causes for dissatisfaction. Two prospective customer satisfactions surveys were conducted in an urban EMS system. Consecutive patients treated by EMS received a postal questionnaire approximately two weeks after service. Satisfaction was measured in a scale from 1 (very poor) to 5 (excellent). Neither EMS personnel nor patients were made aware prospectively that patient satisfaction would be measured. Response rates to the surveys were 36.8% (432/1,175) in 2000 and 40.0% (464/1,150) in 2002. The mean general grades for the service were 4.6 and 4.5, respectively. Patients reported the highest degree of dissatisfaction when they were not taken to their hospital of choice, when they perceived that the paramedics were not able to meet their needs, and when paramedics did not introduce themselves or communicate directly with the patient's relatives. In high-volume calls (i.e., frequent chief complaints), the general satisfaction was highest in patients with arrhythmias, breathing difficulties, and hypoglycemia. Patients with drug overdose included the highest proportion of unsatisfied patients. None of the background variables (e.g., gender, transport decision, working shift) was statistically related to general patient satisfaction. This study shows that customer satisfaction surveys can be successfully conducted for EMS. EMS systems should consider routinely using customer satisfaction surveys as a tool for quality measurement and improvement.

  3. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  4. Managing pediatric dental trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Sheller, Barbara; Velan, Elizabeth; Caglar, Derya; Scott, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine types of dental trauma presenting to a hospital emergency department (ED); (2) describe the medical services provided to these patients; and (3) quantify time spent during ED encounters for dental trauma emergencies. Records of 265 patients who presented to the ED with dental trauma over a three-year period were reviewed. Demographics, injury types, triage acuity, pain scores, and dental/medical treatment and times were analyzed. Patient demographics and injury types were similar to previous studies. Eighty-two percent of patients received mid-level triage scores; 41 percent of patients had moderate to severe pain. The most frequently provided medical services were administration of analgesics and/or prescriptions (78 percent). The mean times were: 51 minutes waiting for a physician; 55 minutes with dentists; and 176 minutes total time. Higher triage acuity and pain levels resulted in significantly longer wait times for physician assessment. Dental evaluation, including treatment, averaged 32 percent of time spent at the hospital. A dental clinic is the most efficient venue for treating routine dental trauma. Patients in this study spent the majority of time waiting for physicians and receiving nondental services. Most patients required no medical intervention beyond prescriptions commonly used in dental practice.

  5. Analysis of factors that determine hospitalization of emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Szwamel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Optimization of health care financing under current standards of treatment can be achieved by determining the factors that affect the number of hospital admissions at emergency departments (ED, and their significance. Objectives . Identification of factors determining hospitalizations at emergency department. Material and methods . The study involved 150 emergency department patients in Kedzierzyn-Kozle. An original questionnaire, the Health Behaviors Inventory, and a modified version of the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule (CANSAS were used. Results. At greatest risk of hospitalization are those patients who: take more than 4 drugs (OR 12.17, 95% CI 2.97–73.67; are being treated for chronic diseases (OR 5.37, 95% CI 2.56–11.62; are above 44.5 years of age (OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.54–6.51; are being treated at an outpatient specialist clinic (OR 3.87, 95% CI 1.85–8.32; have a BMI above 27.1 (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.39–5.88; have at most average material status (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.20–0.87; have symptoms of severity greater than 5 (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.11–4.55; and have a low index of unsatisfied needs (a Camberwell index lower than 0.825: OR 0.36, 95% CI 0.17–0.72. Conclusions . Any program to prevent hospitalization should be based on the measurement of health behavior, should focus on promoting knowledge of chronic diseases and the means of preventing them, and should involve patient education on the purpose of emergency departments. It is necessary to strive for increase responsiveness of healthcare to patients’ needs and to support the area of primary-care-oriented services in the field of ‘small surgery’.

  6. Hospital all-risk emergency preparedness in Ghana | Norman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (2) The hospitals' respective abilities to handle large scale RTA's were ... The biggest challenge facing the hospitals in their emergency intervention is the lack of preemergency and emergency preparedness plans as well as the coordination of the hospitals response mechanisms. Conclusion: The paper ended with ...

  7. How Much Time Do Unhospitalized Patients Applying for Emergency Services Stay in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Kürsad Erkuran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The patients applying to a emergency service may stay longer than necessary for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment. This can be due to the inadequacy of the treatment performed in emergency department or to the absence of the required unit in the hospital. In this study, we analyzed the waiting period of the patients who have not been hospitalized. METHODS: The patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 have been studied regarding their application date, the season, and their waiting period in the emergency unit. The data have been analyzed using the statistics software Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, version 17.0 for Windows. The chi-square χ2 test has been used for the determination of the percentage distribution and significance and p<0,05 has been considered significant. RESULTS: 4215 patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 and monitored without hospitalization have been studied. The patients mainly presented during spring (p<0.05. The application occurred more often between 20.00 PM – 23.59 PM (p<0.005. The mean duration of the accept-standby of the patients in emergency unit was 09±12 (minimum 0 minute, maximum 130 minutes. The patients waited 0,26 ±70 minutes in emergency unit examination (minimum 0 minute, maximum 1292 minutes. The total waiting time in emergency unit was 52 ±100 minutes (minimum 10, maximum 1435 minutes. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: In this study, we observed that the duration of the hospitalization in emergency unit is longer than the ideal duration.

  8. [Substance related disorder in emergency services: Which attitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rica, M; Principe, A; Le Reste, J-Y; Guillou Landreat, M

    2017-02-01

    Substance related disorders are more prevalent in emergency services than in the general population, about 20% of individuals in emergency care test positive for alcohol. Emergency services are strategic places to identify alcohol misuse. Attitudes to individuals presenting substance related disorders are important in developing therapeutic relationships and applying interventions. This study explores the attitudes of an emergency staff to these individuals across a range of roles, and evolution in face of an addictology care improvement. Data were gathered from an emergency service sample from the emergency department of a general hospital in Morlaix (France). We used a short questionnaire, adapted from previous similar French studies. Twenty-five persons answered the first questionnaire and 18 the second. A self-administrated attitudes questionnaire showed its interest in our study and helped us to identify attitudes and to initiate a reflection on behaviours in emergency care. Moreover, it helped to change attitudes towards individuals presenting substance related disorders. The daily setting of an addictive disorders specialized unit in emergency changed the point of view on addictive disorders of both physicians and nurses. We showed differences in addictive related disorders prevalence perception among patients attending emergency care between the two evaluations. But we also showed that physicians and nurses stressed that it was more difficult to ask patients in emergency care on the second evaluation, after and despite a daily addictive disorders specialized setting. We showed several limits in emergency staff care relationship with patients with substance related disorders. They identified difficulties to talk about addictive disorders, especially in younger and older patients. Regarding literature, we discuss our study limits and different ways of improving addictology care in emergency services. Copyright © 2015 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by

  9. Assessment of hospital emergency management in the Beijing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantao, Xin

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the number of public health emergencies has increased. Improving hospital emergency management is an important challenge. This is a pilot study intended to assess hospital emergency management in the Beijing area, make recommendations to government health authorities and hospital managers, and offer references for similar studies. This was an observational, cross-sectional survey. Forty-five hospitals in the Beijing area were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as a data collection tool. It comprised of three sections: (1) Section A was the introduction; (2) Section B asked for the respondent's personal information; and (3) Section C comprised the major part of the questionnaire and was intended to gather information regarding the hospital's general emergency management situation. The survey response rate was 44%, accounting for 29% of total hospitals that the study targeted. No hospital had an established emergency management department or full-time staff for emergency management. A total of 15-45% of the hospitals had established a hospital emergency management committee, performed a vulnerability analysis, or evaluated emergency management regularly. Twenty-five percent of respondents thought that the local government health authority had established an integrated hospital incident command system. A total of 40%-55% of hospitals contracted with outside institutions for supplements, backup of key functional systems and professional support. After the occurrence of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, Chinese hospital managers took many measures to improve hospital resilience. However, most of these efforts lacked the guidance of theories, concepts, principles, and methods. An integrated, standardized, operational hospital emergency management model has not been established. Although the survey response rate was relatively low, some clues for further study were discovered, and suggestions to the

  10. Workplace violence against emergency versus non-emergency nurses in Mansoura university hospitals, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-ElWafa, Hala Samir; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Abd-El-Raouf, Samar E; Abd-Elmouty, Samia Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Rabab El-Sayed Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against nurses is a common but neglected problem in Egypt. The objectives are to estimate the prevalence and associated risk factors of different types of violence against nurses working in the emergency hospital compared with those working in non-emergency clinics, circumstances of violence, type of perpetrators, and victims' response. This cross-sectional comparative study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospitals, Egypt, during January 2013. The data were collected through the adapted version of a self-administered questionnaire developed by the International Labor Office/International Council of Nurses/World Health Organization/Public Services International on WPV in the health sector. All types of WPV are common among nurses. Precipitating factors for violent incidents identified by respondents are emergency specialty, having work shift, and younger age. Violent incidents result in work dissatisfaction and consequently impair work productivity. Nurses working in emergency hospital experienced a higher level of different types of WPV. There is an urgent need to formulate and implement a policy for dealing with violent events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. [Football, television and emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, O; Sánchez, M; Borrás, A; Millá, J

    2000-04-15

    To know the influence of televised football on the use of emergency department (ED). We assessed the number, demographic characteristics and acuity of patients attended during the broadcast of football matches played by FC Barcelona during Champions' League (n = 12), and they were compared with days without televised football (n = 12). Televised football was associated with a decrease in visits to ED (-18%; p = 0.002). Such a decrease was observed for all ED units, but only for traumatology unit reached statistical significance (-28%; p = 0.006). Decay of ED visits were mainly due to a decrease of low-acuity consults (-30%; p = 0.04). There is a significant decrease on ED use associated with televised football.

  12. [Structure, organization and capacity problems in emergency medical services, emergency admission and intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, W

    1994-01-01

    Emergency medicine is subjected worldwide to financial stringencies and organizational evaluations of cost-effectiveness. The various links in the chain of survival are affected differently. Bystander assistance or bystander CPR is available in only 30% of the emergencies, response intervals--if at all required by legislation--are observed to only a limited degree or are too extended for survival in cardiac arrest. A single emergency telephone number is lacking. Too many different phone numbers for emergency reporting result in confusion and delays. Organizational realities are not fully overcome and impair efficiency. The position of the emergency physician in the EMS System is inadequately defined, the qualification of too many emergency physicians are unsatisfactory. In spite of this, emergency physicians are frequently forced to answer out-of-hospital emergency calls. Conflicts between emergency physicians and EMTs may be overcome by providing both groups with comparable qualifications as well as by providing an explicit definition of emergency competence. A further source of conflict occurs at the juncture of prehospital and inhospital emergency care in the emergency department. Deficiencies on either side play a decisive role. At least in principle there are solutions to the deficiencies in the EMSS and in intensive care medicine. They are among others: Adequate financial compensation of emergency personnel, availability of sufficient numbers of highly qualified personnel, availability of a central receiving area with an adjacent emergency ward, constant information flow to the dispatch center on the number of available emergency beds, maintaining 5% of all beds as emergency beds, establishing intermediate care facilities. Efficiency of emergency physician activities can be demonstrated in polytraumatized patients or in patients with ventricular fibrillation or acute myocardial infarction, in patients with acute myocardial insufficiency and other emergency

  13. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services for individuals age 65 or older in institutions for...

  14. Awareness about basic life support and emergency medical services and its associated factors among students in a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Akshatha Rao; Saya, Rama Prakash; Attar, Nazir Rahim; Saya, Ganesh Kumar; Ravinanthanan, Manikandan

    2014-07-01

    The knowledge and skills about the basic life support (BLS) and the advanced life support are the most important determining factors of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) success rates. To determine the level of awareness on BLS and skills among undergraduate and postgraduate students of medical and dental profession, as well as nursing students and interns in a tertiary care hospital. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in South India. The awareness level on BLS and factors associated which include age, sex, level of training (undergraduate, internship, and postgraduate groups), course of study (nursing, dental, and medical groups), and previous exposure to BLS were assessed by using a structured questionnaire. The association of these variables with awareness level was assessed by independent t test, analysis of variance, and linear regression analysis. Among 520 study subjects, 229 were students, 171 were interns, and 120 were postgraduate students. The overall mean score of awareness was 4.16 ± 1.40 (score range: 0-10). Age, sex, level of training, course of study, and previous exposure to BLS were significantly associated with awareness level in univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Linear regression model also showed that all the above variables were significantly associated with awareness level (P < 0.05). About 322 (61.9%) subjects attributed lack of awareness about BLS to lack of available professional training. About 479 (92.1%) responded that BLS training should be a part of medical curriculum. Awareness level on BLS is below average indicating the importance of professional training at all levels in a tertiary care health institution.

  15. The influence of the pre-hospital application of non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin in the practice of emergency medical services in multiple and mass casualty incidents (MCI – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gałązkowski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 a fire broke out in the Nursing Home (NH in the Henryszew village 5 km away from the district hospital in Żyrardów. At the time of the incident 52 residents and 16 staff members were present in the building. Due to a large number of casualties, the occurrence was classified as a potentially mass casualty incident (MCI. Troops of the State Fire Brigade, Paramedic Rescue Squads, choppers of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, the Police, and the NH staff took part in the rescue operation. The priority was given to the evacuation of the NH residents carried out by the NH staff and firefighters, extinguishing the fire, as well as to primary and secondary survey triage. Due to the pre-accident health state of the victims, the latter posed a considerable difficulty. A decisive role was played by the need to conduct non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin in all the casualties, which then made it possible to adequately diagnose the patients and implement proper procedures. The rescue operation was correctly followed although it proved to be a serious logistical and technical undertaking for the participating emergency services. The residents were not found to be suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning, therefore 46 of the residents safely returned to the building. The fact that all the Paramedic Rescue Squads were equipped with medical triage sets and were able to conduct non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin made it possible to introduce effective procedures in the cases of suspected carbon monoxide poisoning and abandon costly and complicated organisational procedures when they proved to be unnecessary. Med Pr 2014;65(2:289–295

  16. EZ-IO(®) intraosseous device implementation in a pre-hospital emergency service: A prospective study and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, David; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Yersin, Bertrand; Pasquier, Mathieu

    2013-04-01

    Intraosseous access is increasingly recognised as an effective alternative vascular access to peripheral venous access. We aimed to prospectively study the patients receiving prehospital intraosseous access with the EZ-IO(®), and to compare our results with those of the available literature. Every patient who required an intraosseous access with the EZ-IO from January 1st, 2009 to December 31st, 2011 was included. The main data collected were: age, sex, indication for intraosseous access, localisation of insertion, success rate, drugs and fluids administered, and complications. All published studies concerning the EZ-IO device were systematically searched and reviewed for comparison. Fifty-eight patients representing 60 EZ-IO procedures were included. Mean age was 47 years (range 0.5-91), and the success rate was 90%. The main indications were cardiorespiratory arrest (74%), major trauma (12%), and shock (5%). The anterior tibia was the main route. The main drugs administered were adrenaline (epinephrine), atropine and amiodarone. No complications were reported. We identified 30 heterogeneous studies representing 1603 EZ-IO insertions. The patients' characteristics and success rate were similar to our study. Complications were reported in 13 cases (1.3%). The EZ-IO provides an effective way to achieve vascular access in the pre-hospital setting. Our results were similar to the cumulative results of all studies involving the use of the EZ-IO, and that can be used for comparison for further studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quality of Life in Emergency Medicine Specialists of Teaching Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Amini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quality of life (QOL of emergency medicine specialists can be effective in providing services to patients. The aim of the present study was evaluating the lifestyle of emergency medicine practitioners, understanding their problems, and addressing the solutions to enhance and improve their lifestyles, in teaching hospitals in Iran. Method: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on emergency medicine physicians in 10 teaching hospitals of Iran in 2011. Emergency physicians with at least three years of experience who interested in the study, were enrolled in the project. All participants filled out the consent form and QOL questionnaires, then underwent physical examinations and some medical laboratory tests. Categorical variables were reported as percentages, while continuous variables expressed as means and standard deviations. p <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Totally, 100 subjects participated in the study, of whom 48 were male. The mean and standard deviation of the physicians’ age were 38.7±5.1 years. 43% of physicians had an average QOL, while 37% good. 96% of studied physicians had a good condition regarding habitual history, while 93% of them had a poor condition in performing screening tests. Exercise program and personal health in individuals with normal BMI were correlated with higher levels of QOL. BMI was higher in 40-50 years old subjects than youngers. Hypertension was present in five cases (5%, hypercholesterolemia in six (6%, hypertriglyceridemia in six (6%, increased LDL in four (4%, low HDL in four (4%, and impaired FBS in 4 (4%. Conclusion: The findings showed that 63% of studied emergency physicians had an average level of QOL and other ones good. The majority of physicians had undesirable situation regarding the performance of screening tests.

  18. Internet protocol-based emergency services

    CERN Document Server

    Schulzrinne, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Written by international experts in the field, this book covers the standards, architecture and deployment issues related to IP-based emergency services This book brings together contributions from experts on technical and operational aspects within the international standardisation and regulatory processes relating to routing and handling of IP-based emergency calls.  Readers will learn how these standards work, how various standardization organizations contributed to them and about pilot projects, early deployment and current regulatory situation. Key Featur

  19. Investigating emergency room service quality using lean manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Abdelhakim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate a lean manufacturing metric called Takt time as a benchmark evaluation measure to evaluate a public hospital's service quality. Lean manufacturing is an established managerial philosophy with a proven track record in industry. A lean metric called Takt time is applied as a measure to compare the relative efficiency between two emergency departments (EDs) belonging to the same public hospital. Outcomes guide managers to improve patient services and increase hospital performances. The patient treatment lead time within the hospital's two EDs (one department serves male and the other female patients) are the study's focus. A lean metric called Takt time is used to find the service's relative efficiency. Findings show that the lean manufacturing metric called Takt time can be used as an effective way to measure service efficiency by analyzing relative efficiency and identifies bottlenecks in different departments providing the same services. The paper presents a new procedure to compare relative efficiency between two EDs. It can be applied to any healthcare facility.

  20. Psychiatric service users' experiences of emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Kathrine; Lou, Stina; Jensen, Lotte Groth

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increased clinical and political attention towards integrating general and psychiatric emergency departments (ED). However, research into psychiatric service users’ experiences regarding general EDs is limited. Aim: To identify and summarize current, qualitative evidence rega...... the discomfort. Overall, the results of this review speak in favour of integrated EDs where service users’ needs are more likely to be recognized and accommodated.......Background: There is increased clinical and political attention towards integrating general and psychiatric emergency departments (ED). However, research into psychiatric service users’ experiences regarding general EDs is limited. Aim: To identify and summarize current, qualitative evidence...... regarding service users’ experiences attending EDs. A secondary aim is to apply and test the newly developed CERQual approach to summarizing qualitative review findings. Methods: A systematic literature review of five databases based on PRISMA guidelines yielded 3334 unique entries. Screening by title...

  1. Access to emergency care services: a transversal ecological study about Brazilian emergency health care network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, T A H; da Silva, N C; Amaral, P V; Barbosa, A C Q; Rocha, J V M; Alvares, V; de Almeida, D G; Thumé, E; Thomaz, E B A F; de Sousa Queiroz, R C; de Souza, M R; Lein, A; Toomey, N; Staton, C A; Vissoci, J R N; Facchini, L A

    2017-12-01

    Studies of health geography are important in the planning and allocation of emergency health services. The geographical distribution of health facilities is an important factor in timely and quality access to emergency services; therefore, the present study analyzed the emergency health care network in Brazil, focusing the analysis at the roles of small hospitals (SHs). Cross-sectional ecological study. Data were collected from 9429 hospitals of which 3524 were SHs and 5905 were high-complexity centers (HCCs). For analytical purposes, we considered four specialties when examining the proxies of emergency care capability: adult, pediatrics, neonatal, and obstetric. We analyzed the spatial distribution of hospitals, identifying municipalities that rely exclusively on SHs and the distance of these cities from HCCs. More than 14 and 30 million people were at least 120 km away from HCCs with an adult intensive care unit (ICU) and pediatric ICU, respectively. For neonatal care distribution, 12% of the population was more than 120 km away from a health facility with a neonatal ICU. The maternities situation is different from other specialties, where 81% of the total Brazilian population was within 1 h or less from such health facilities. Our results highlighted a polarization in distribution of Brazilian health care facilities. There is a concentration of hospitals in urban areas more developed and access gaps in rural areas and the Amazon region. Our results demonstrate that the distribution of emergency services in Brazil is not facilitating access to the population due to geographical barriers associated with great distances. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Using ArcGIS software in the pre-hospital emergency medical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, M; Duma, Odetta; Custură, Maria Alexandra; Petrariu, F D; Manole, Alina

    2014-01-01

    To measure the accessibility to healtcare services in order to reveal their quality and to improve the overall coverage, continuity and other features. We used the software ESRI Arc GIS 9.3, the Network Analyst function and data provided by Ambulance Service of Iasi (A.S.I.) with emergencies statistics for the first four months of 2012, processed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010. As examples, we chose "St. Maria" Children's Emergency Hospital and "St. Spiridon" Emergency Hospital. ArcGIS Network Analyst finds the best route to get from one location to another or a route that includes multiple locations. Each route is characterized by three stops. The starting point is always the office of Ambulance Service of Iasi (A.S.I.), a second stop at the case address and the third to the hospital unit chosen according to the patient's diagnosis and age. Spatial distribution of emergency cases for the first four months of 2012 in these two examples is one unequable, with higher concentrations in districts located in two areas of the city. The presented examples highlight the poor coverage of healthcare services for the population of Iasi, Romania, especially the South-West area and its vulnerability in situations of emergency. Implementing such a broad project would lead to more complex analyses that would improve the situation of pre-hospital emergency medical services, with final goal to deserve the population, improve the quality of healthcare and develop the interdisciplinary relationships.

  3. Avaliação dos serviços de urgência e emergência da rede hospitalar de referência no Nordeste Brasileiro Evaluation of urgent and emergency services in the hospital referral system in Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Santos Dubeux

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo avalia o grau de implantação de dez serviços de urgência/emergência hospitalar, que compõem a rede de referência macro e microrregional em Pernambuco, Nordeste brasileiro. Aborda critérios relativos à estrutura (física-organizacional, recursos materiais e humanos e ao processo (atividades de rotina e de referência/contra-referência; classificando os hospitais como satisfatório, aceitável e deficiente. Aponta que a maioria dos hospitais se classifica como deficiente, estando entre estes todas as unidades de referência microrregionais e uma macrorregional. Estas últimas apresentam melhor desempenho quanto ao processo de trabalho; e a dimensão estrutura apresenta-se mais bem implantada nos hospitais microrregionais. Os resultados evidenciam como prioridade a qualificação dos hospitais avaliados, mediante o fortalecimento de políticas descentralizadas de recursos humanos e tecnológicos, direcionados à melhoria das práticas de trabalho consensuais aos contextos regionais do estado.This article evaluates the degree of implementation of ten urgent and emergency hospital services comprising the macro and micro-regional referral system in Pernambuco State, Northeast Brazil. The study analyzes criteria related to structure (physical and organizational, and material and human resources and process (routine and referral/counter-referral activities, classifying the hospitals as satisfactory, acceptable, and deficient. The majority of the hospitals were classified as deficient, including all the micro-regional units and one macro-regional referral unit. Macro-regional units show better performance in the work process, while implementation of the structural dimension is better in the micro-regional hospitals. The results highlight the priority of upgrading these hospitals by strengthening decentralized human resources and technology policies, oriented towards the improvement of work processes in keeping with the State

  4. Application of Lean Six Sigma techniques to optimize hospital laboratory Emergency Department Turnaround time across a multi-hospital system

    OpenAIRE

    Hagg, Heather (Woodward); Scachitti, Susan; Mapa, Lash; Brandford, Lillie; Vanni, Chris; Cox, Catherine

    2007-01-01

    In January 2005, Indiana University, Purdue University at Indianapolis (IUPUI) and Purdue- Calumet were invited to partner with the Alverno Clinical Labs in adapting Lean Six Sigma methodologies for use within healthcare. Our initial project focused on optimization of lab services for the emergency department at the Saint Margaret Mercy Hospitals in Hammond, IN. This project resulted in reduction of lab test report time to the emergency department from 75 minutes to less than 35 minutes. Thes...

  5. Complexity complicates lean: lessons from seven emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzocato, Pamela; Thor, Johan; Bäckman, Ulrika; Brommels, Mats; Carlsson, Jan; Jonsson, Fredrik; Hagmar, Magnus; Savage, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain how different emergency services adopt and adapt the same hospital-wide lean-inspired intervention and how this is reflected in hospital process performance data. A multiple case study based on a realistic evaluation approach to identify mechanisms for how lean impacts process performance and services' capability to learn and continually improve. Four years of process performance data were collected from seven emergency services at a Swedish University Hospital: ear, nose and throat (ENT) (two), pediatrics (two), gynecology, internal medicine, and surgery. Performance patterns were linked with qualitative data collected through realist interviews. The complexity of the care process influenced how improvement in access to care was achieved. For less complex care processes (ENT and gynecology), large and sustained improvement was mainly the result of a better match between capacity and demand. For medicine, surgery, and pediatrics, which exhibit greater care process complexity, sustainable, or continual improvement were constrained because the changes implemented were insufficient in addressing the higher degree of complexity. The variation in process performance and sustainability of results indicate that lean efforts should be carefully adapted to the complexity of the care process and to the educational commitment of healthcare organizations. Ultimately, the ability to adapt lean to a particular context of application depends on the development of routines that effectively support learning from daily practices.

  6. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassen AT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Annmarie T Lassen,1 Henrik Jørgensen,2 Hanne Blæhr Jørsboe,3,4 Annette Odby,5 Mikkel Brabrand,6 Jacob Steinmetz,7 Julie Mackenhauer,8 Hans Kirkegaard,8 Christian Fynbo Christiansen9 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 2Department of Surgery, Hospital of Northern Sjaelland, Hilleroed, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Nykobing F Hospital, 4Department of Hospital Administration, Nykobing F Hospital, Nykøbing Falster, 5The Danish Clinical Registers, Registry Support Centre for Health Quality and Informatics, Aarhus, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Hospital of South West Jutland, Esbjerg, 7Department of Anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 8Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University, 9Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim for database: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts.Study population: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013.Main variables: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators – of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery as well as time for triage and physician judgment. Data are currently gathered from The Danish National Patient Registry, two existing databases (Danish Stroke Register and Danish Database for Emergency Surgery, and will

  7. Patient expectations of emergency dental services: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R

    2004-09-25

    To describe the expectations of walk-in patients seeking emergency dental care out-of-hours. Consecutive patients attending two emergency dental clinics at weekends were interviewed prior to seeing the dentist. The audio-recorded interview transcripts were analysed using the "framework" method of applied qualitative data analysis. Forty-four walk-in emergency dental patients at a community-based dental clinic and a dental hospital emergency clinic at the weekend. In addition to symptom relief, the main desired outcome for emergency dental patients may be informational and psychological--especially reassurance that the problem is not serious, and reduced uncertainty about the cause of the pain. In general, patients' stated expectations for specific treatments (such as antibiotics, or tooth extraction) were not absolute: rather, they implied these expectations were conditional upon the dentist deciding they were necessary. Emergency dental services, some of which are still dominantly treatment-focused, should reflect that many emergency dental attenders want advice and reassurance as much as relief from symptoms. This reinforces the importance of effective and sympathetic dentist-patient communication within emergency or out-of-hours consultations. It also implies that dentists' skills in listening, explaining and reassuring should be captured in any patient satisfaction or outcome measure designed for this patient group.

  8. Utilization of emergency medical transports and hospital admissions among persons with behavioral health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddeback, Gary; Patterson, P Daniel; Moore, Charity Galena; Brice, Jane H

    2010-04-01

    Emergency medical services transport and emergency department misuse among persons with behavioral health conditions is a concern. Administrative data were used to examine medical transports and hospital admissions among persons with behavioral health conditions. Data on 70,126 medical transports to emergency departments in three southeastern counties were analyzed. Compared with general medical transports, fewer behavioral health transports resulted in a hospital admission. Among behavioral health transports, persons with schizophrenia were 2.62 times more likely than those with substance use disorders to be admitted, and persons with mood disorders were 4.36 times more likely than those with substance use disorders to be admitted. Also, among behavioral health transports, rural transports were less likely than more urban transports to result in a hospital admission. More training of emergency medical services personnel and more behavioral health crisis resources, especially targeting rural areas and substance use disorders, are needed.

  9. A seamless ubiquitous emergency medical service for crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shing

    2016-04-01

    In crisis situations, a seamless ubiquitous communication is necessary to provide emergency medical service to save people's lives. An excellent prehospital emergency medicine provides immediate medical care to increase the survival rate of patients. On their way to the hospital, ambulance personnel must transmit real-time and uninterrupted patient information to the hospital to apprise the physician of the situation and provide options to the ambulance personnel. In emergency and crisis situations, many communication channels can be unserviceable because of damage to equipment or loss of power. Thus, data transmission over wireless communication to achieve uninterrupted network services is a major obstacle. This study proposes a mobile middleware for cognitive radio (CR) for improving the wireless communication link. CRs can sense their operating environment and optimize the spectrum usage so that the mobile middleware can integrate the existing wireless communication systems with a seamless communication service in heterogeneous network environments. Eventually, the proposed seamless mobile communication middleware was ported into an embedded system, which is compatible with the actual network environment without the need for changing the original system architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quality of out-of-hospital palliative emergency care depends on the expertise of the emergency medical team--a prospective multi-centre analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Christoph H R; Bartels, Utz E; Marczynska, Karolina; Ruppert, David; Graf, Bernhard M; Hanekop, Gerd G

    2009-12-01

    The number of palliative care patients who live at home and have non-curable life-threatening diseases is increasing. This is largely a result of modern palliative care techniques (e.g. specialised out-of-hospital palliative medical care services), changes in healthcare policy and the availability of home care services. Accordingly, pre-hospital emergency physicians today are more likely to be involved in out-of-hospital emergency treatment of palliative care patients with advanced disease. In a prospective multi-centre study, we analysed all palliative emergency care calls during a 24-month period across four emergency services in Germany. Participating pre-hospital emergency physicians were rated according to their expertise in emergency and palliative care as follows--group 1: pre-hospital emergency physicians with high experience in emergency and palliative medical care, group 2: pre-hospital emergency physicians with high experience in emergency medical care but less experience in palliative medical care and group 3: pre-hospital emergency physicians with low experience in palliative and emergency medical care. During the period of interest, the centres received 361 emergency calls requiring a response to palliative care patients (2.8% of all 12,996 emergency calls). Ten percent of all patients were treated by group 1; 42% were treated by group 2 and 47% were treated by group 3. There was a statistically significant difference in the treatment of palliative care patients (e.g. transfer to hospital, symptom control, end-of-life decision) as a result of the level of expertise of the investigated pre-hospital emergency physicians (pmedical treatment of palliative care patients depends on the expertise in palliative medical care of the pre-hospital emergency physicians who respond to the call. In our investigation, best out-of-hospital palliative medical care was given by pre-hospital emergency physicians who had significant expertise in palliative and emergency

  11. [The Hospital Emergency Plan: Important Tool for Disaster Preparedness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmb, Thomas; Scholtes, Katja; Kolibay, Felix; Rechenbach, Peer; Vogel, Ulrich; Kowalzik, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Hospitals need to be prepared for any kind of disaster. The terrorist attacks and mass shootings that took place in Europe in recent years impressively demonstrated the capability of hospitals to manage such challenging and disastrous events. To be adequately prepared, the hospital emergency plan is a very important tool. In this article we describe the entire process of drafting the emergency plan. We discuss the theoretical background as well as different models of disaster planning and we give important practical hints and tips for those in charge of the hospital disaster planning. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Triage in psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæbye, Ditte; Høegh, Erica Bernt; Knop, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the Australasian triage system, a regional psychiatric triage system was introduced in the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen in 2011. Our aim of the study is to determine the characteristics of the patient according to the defined triage criteria and check if this is in...... of the service in PEUs. The need for PEUs out-of-daytime (when all Community Mental Health Centers are closed) has also been demonstrated....

  13. Determining the Optimum Number of Nursing Staff Is Needed in Kerman Shafa Hospital Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S NooriHekmat

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: The results indicated that the emergency department of the studied hospital is facing with nurse shortage, particularly at night shift. Solutions to fit the number of nurses with patients in this emergency department can be classified in two areas of demand and supply of emergency services at different hours of day. Since only the early hours of the night shift is faced with large numbers of patients, the rational allocation of overtime to the evening shift nursing staff can be helpful. Furthermore, the hospital can correctly implement the triage nursing so that patient with high priority will serve at the best time.

  14. Positive Coping: A Unique Characteristic to Pre-Hospital Emergency Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Froutan, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    It is important to gain a thorough understanding of positive coping methods adopted by medical emergency personnel to manage stressful situations associated with accidents and emergencies. Thus, the purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of positive coping strategies used by emergency medical service providers. This study was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. The study participants included 28 pre-hospital emergency personnel selected from emergency medical service providers in bases located in different regions of the city of Mashhad, Iran, from April to November 2016. The purposive sampling method also was used in this study, which was continued until data saturation was reached. To collect the data, semistructured open interviews, observations, and field notes were used. Four categories and 10 subcategories were extracted from the data on the experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel related to positive coping strategies. The four categories included work engagement, smart capability, positive feedback, and crisis pioneering. All the obtained categories had their own subcategories, which were determined based on their distinctly integrated properties. The results of this study show that positive coping consists of several concepts used by medical emergency personnel, management of stressful situations, and ultimately quality of pre-hospital clinical services. Given the fact that efficient methods such as positive coping can prevent debilitating stress in an individual, pre-hospital emergency authorities should seek to build and strengthen "positive coping" characteristics in pre-hospital medical emergency personnel to deal with accidents, emergencies, and injuries through adopting regular and dynamic policies.

  15. 42 CFR 419.22 - Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective payment system. 419.22 Section 419.22 Public Health CENTERS... PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services...

  16. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  17. Improving European Wildfire Emergency Information Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielski, Conrad; Whitmore, Ceri; O'Brien, Victoria; Zeug, Gunter; Kalas, Milan; Porras, Ignasi; Solé, Josep Maria; Gálvez, Pedro; Navarro, Maria; Nurmi, Pertti; Kilpinen, Juha; Ylinen, Kaisa; Furllanelo, Cesare; Maggio, Valerio; Alikadic, Azra; Dolci, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    European wildfires are a seasonal natural hazard that many regions must battle regularly. However, as European urbanization continues to encroach on natural areas and the climate changes it is likely that the frequency of wildfires will increase likewise the number of areas prone to wildfires. It is therefore paramount not only to increase public awareness of this natural hazard but also to be prepared by improving wildfire hazard forecasting, monitoring, and mapping. As part of the H2020 funded project entitled Improving Resilience to Emergencies through Advanced Cyber Technologies: I-REACT (Grant Agreement #700256) , there is a task with the goal to develop models and implement technologies to improve the support around the entire emergency management cycle with respect to wildfire hazards. Based on operational weather forecasts, pan-European geospatial data as well as regularly acquired Earth Observation imagery through the Copernicus program, and other sources of information such as social media channels a European wildfire service is being developed. This will be achieved by improving on the successes of the European Forest Fire Information Service (EFFIS) and the guidance of emergency managers experienced in wildfire hazards. Part of the research will be to reduce the number of false alarms. However, once a wildfire has been identified, the system focuses on the disaster region to provide situational information to the decision makers applying state-of-the-art approaches to improve disaster response. Post-wildfire information will continue to be produced for damage and recovery assessments. Ultimately, I-REACT expects to reduce wildfire costs to life, property and livelihood. This work will improve wildfire disaster emergency management through the development and integration of new data and technologies respectively as well as the knowledge from emergency managers who not only understand the hazard itself but also can provide insights into the information

  18. Effects of a dedicated regional psychiatric emergency service on boarding of psychiatric patients in area emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Scott; Calma, Nicole; Stone, Ashley

    2014-02-01

    Mental health patients boarding for long hours, even days, in United States emergency departments (EDs) awaiting transfer for psychiatric services has become a considerable and widespread problem. Past studies have shown average boarding times ranging from 6.8 hours to 34 hours. Most proposed solutions to this issue have focused solely on increasing available inpatient psychiatric hospital beds, rather than considering alternative emergency care designs that could provide prompt access to treatment and might reduce the need for many hospitalizations. One suggested option has been the "regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility," which serves to evaluate and treat all mental health patients for a given area, and can accept direct transfers from other EDs. This study sought to assess the effects of a regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility design known at the "Alameda Model" on boarding times and hospitalization rates for psychiatric patients in area EDs. Over a 30-day period beginning in January 2013, 5 community hospitals in Alameda County, California, tracked all ED patients on involuntary mental health holds to determine boarding time, defined as the difference between when they were deemed stable for psychiatric disposition and the time they were discharged from the ED for transfer to the regional psychiatric emergency service. Patients were also followed to determine the percentage admitted to inpatient psychiatric units after evaluation and treatment in the psychiatric emergency service. In a total sample of 144 patients, the average boarding time was approximately 1 hour and 48 minutes. Only 24.8% were admitted for inpatient psychiatric hospitalization from the psychiatric emergency service. The results of this study indicate that the Alameda Model of transferring patients from general hospital EDs to a regional psychiatric emergency service reduced the length of boarding times for patients awaiting psychiatric care by over 80% versus

  19. Hospital disaster emergency preparedness: A study of Onandjokwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explored disaster emergency preparedness at Onandjokwe Lutheran Hospital in Northern Namibia. It utilized quantitative and qualitative research methods, using a self-administered questionnaire, semi-structured key informant interviews, and a hospital disaster plan checklist. A stratified sample of 120 ...

  20. AN INFORMATION SERVICE MODEL FOR REMOTE SENSING EMERGENCY SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method on the semantic access environment, which can solve the problem about how to identify the correct natural disaster emergency knowledge and return to the demanders. The study data is natural disaster knowledge text set. Firstly, based on the remote sensing emergency knowledge database, we utilize the sematic network to extract the key words in the input documents dataset. Then, using the semantic analysis based on words segmentation and PLSA, to establish the sematic access environment to identify the requirement of users and match the emergency knowledge in the database. Finally, the user preference model was established, which could help the system to return the corresponding information to the different users. The results indicate that semantic analysis can dispose the natural disaster knowledge effectively, which will realize diversified information service, enhance the precision of information retrieval and satisfy the requirement of users.

  1. Emergency peripartum hysterectomy: The experience of a tertiary referral hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Mesbah; A. Ragab; E. Fialla; R. Barakat; A. Badawy; Ahmed Ragab

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to review the frequency, indication, associated risk factors, rates of maternal morbidity and mortality as well as neonatal outcome after emergency peripartum hysterectomy at a tertiary care referral hospital. Study design: A retrospective observational study carried out from November 2008 to 2011. Patients and methods: The study comprised of 29 patients at Mansoura University Hospitals a tertiary referral hospital Egypt. Frequency, indications, a...

  2. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  3. Emergency medical service systems in Sri Lanka: problems of the past, challenges of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalaratne, Kelum; Lee, Jeong Il; Lee, Kang Hyun; Lee, Hee Young; Lee, Jung Hun; Kang, In Hye

    2017-12-01

    The concept of emergency medical services (EMS) is new to Sri Lanka. This article describes the development, delivery, and future ideas for EMS in Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka also faces frequent natural hazards that justify the establishment of an EMS service. Data and information regarding emergency medical care in Sri Lanka were collected and reviewed from resources including websites and research papers. Currently, there are no qualified emergency medical physicians in Sri Lanka. However, a specialist training program for emergency physicians was initiated in 2012. There is no formal system to train emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Sri Lankans usually use taxies or their private vehicles to get to the hospital in the case of an emergency. All of the hospitals have ambulances that they can use to transport patients between hospitals. Most hospitals have emergency treatment units. Those at larger hospitals tend to be better than those at smaller hospitals. Although there is a disaster management system, it is not focused on emergency medical needs. Many aspects of the EMS system in Sri Lanka need improvement. To start, the emergency telephone number should cover the entire country. Training programs for EMTs should be conducted regularly. In addition, ambulances should be allocated for prehospital care. In the process of these developmental changes, public awareness programs are essential to improve the function of the EMS system. Despite many current shortcomings, Sri Lanka is capable of developing a successful EMS system.

  4. Bacteriemias de origen comunitario en pacientes adultos que acuden al servicio de urgencias de un hospital universitario Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel J Artico

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La bacteriemia es causa importante de morbimortalidad. Nuestro objetivo es describir una serie de episodios de bacteriemia de origen comunitario en adultos, registrados en el hospital de Clínicas de Córdoba. Entre enero de 2005 y diciembre de 2009 se estudiaron 271 episodios. La rentabilidad diagnóstica del hemocultivo fue 13,5 %. El 52 % de los pacientes eran varones y el 48 % mujeres, la edad promedio fue de 60 años. Las comorbilidades prevalentes fueron diabetes (21 %, neoplasia (18 %, cardiopatía (11 % e infección por HIV (8 %. Los focos que se pudieron establecer fueron el respiratorio (21 %, el urinario (15 %, el cutáneo (9 % y otros (13 %. Predominaron las bacterias gram positivas (51,4 %. Los microorganismos más frecuentes fueron Escherichia coli (25 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae (22,9 % y Staphylococcus aureus (12,3 %. La bacteriemia fue polimicrobiana en el 7 % de los casos. El 33 % de los aislamientos de E. coli presentó resistencia a la ciprofloxacina y el 6 % a la ceftacidima. El 14 % de los aislamientos de S. aureus fue resistente a la oxacilina. Solo el 7 % de los aislamientos de S. pneumoniae expresó altos niveles de resistencia a la penicilina según el criterio poblacional, con CIM = 2 ug/ml.Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %, neoplasia (18 %, cardiopathy (11 %, and HIV infection (8 %. The focus was- respiratory (21 %, urinary (15 %, cutaneous (9 %, and others (13 %. Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%. The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %, and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %. Bacteremia

  5. Cost of Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes in Prenda Hospital Medicine Service, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Zangulo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes has a major impact on morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that by 2040, about 642 million people are affected worldwide, of which, 34.2 million are from sub-Saharan countries. The direct annual cost of diabetes health care worldwide is estimated at about 153 billion dollars. These patients represent 30% to 40% of all admissions to emergency services, leading to high values of hospital expenditure. We aim to evaluate the cost of treatment of patients with diabetes admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012. Methods: Retrospective analytical observational study, with data collected from the clinical processes of medical service (age and gender, length of hospitalization, resources consumed, cost of treatment per patient and discharge. Results: Out of 121 patients, the majority was female (n = 70, 57.9%. The age group of 36 to 45 years old was the most frequent among these patients (n = 26, 21.5%. November was the month that recorded the largest number of admissions (n = 17, 14%. About 45.5% were hospitalized during five to eight days, on average for nine days. The majority (76.9% was discharged due to health condition improvement. The price of materials used for treatment of the disease had high variation, and 31 550.15 kwanzas was spent to acquire them. The direct cost per patient per day was 4170.11 kwanzas and the estimated annual cost of care of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital was 45 525 490.9 kwanzas in 2012. Discussion and Conclusion: These results are in accordance with other studies, indicating a relevant cost of treatment of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012.

  6. Hospitality and service: leading real change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2009-01-01

    A patient's decision to recommend a health care organization and the patient's loyalty scores are largely determined by the interaction patients and their families have with the nurses. Hospitality is how the delivery of that product makes the person feel and is a dialogue that requires the server to be "on the guest's side" throughout the experience. The challenge for health care is to help our patients and their families transcend the usual routine care of our health care world and to experience an emotional connection that provides that sense of affiliation and emotional kinship with the organization and the staff. Moving from the service mindset in health care to the hospitality mindset that engages people positively and emotionally is what healing is all about.

  7. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Annmarie T; Jørgensen, Henrik; Jørsboe, Hanne Blæhr

    2016-01-01

    AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute...... and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013. MAIN VARIABLES: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators - of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used...... to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery) as well as time...

  8. Automated external defibrillator use for in-hospital emergency management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huschak, G; Dünnebier, A; Kaisers, U X; Huschens, B; Bercker, S

    2016-05-01

    The in-hospital spread of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) is aimed to allow for a shock-delivery within three minutes. However, it has to be questioned if the implementation of AED alone really contributes to a 'heart-safe hospital'. We performed a cohort study of 1008 in-hospital emergency calls in a university tertiary care hospital, analysing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) cases with and without AED use. In total, 484 patients (48%) had cardiac arrest and received CPR. Response time of the emergency team was 4.3 ± 4.0 minutes. Only 8% percent of the CPR cases had a shockable rhythm. In three of 43 placements a shock was delivered by the AED. There were no differences in survival between patients with CPR only and CPR with AED use. Our data do not support the use of an AED for in-hospital CPR if a professional response team is rapidly available.

  9. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  10. Relationship between risk stratification, mortality and length of stay in a Emergency Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Caroline Gonçales

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To evaluate the relationship between risk stratification, mortality and hospital length of stay in emergency medical services. Methodology. A prospective cohort study that used the information in the ALERTÒ database of the HOSPUB to know the evolution of patients classified by nurses using the Manchester Risk Classification Triage System in the emergency medical services, of the Belo Horizonte Municipal Hospital - MG, Brazil. Results. 147,167 patients were analyzed, 5.9% were female. The most common risk classification was yellow (47.4%, followed by green (36.5%, orange (14.2%, blue (1.3% and red (0.6%. The mean length of stay was less than one day in 95.4% of patients who were discharged from the hospital. Thirty percent of the patients classified as red, 2% of those classified as orange, and 0.3% of those classified as yellow died. There was direct a relationship between the severity of patient classification and the length of hospital stay. Conclusion. The risk classification system used by nurses in the hospital was a good predictor of death and hospital length of stay for patients admitted to the emergency medical services

  11. 47 CFR 97.407 - Radio amateur civil emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Radio amateur civil emergency service. 97.407... SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE Providing Emergency Communications § 97.407 Radio amateur civil emergency... may be the control operator of an amateur station transmitting in RACES unless that person holds a FCC...

  12. 76 FR 15044 - Federal Interagency Committee on Emergency Medical Service (FICEMS) Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... stakeholders and develop an options paper by May 15, 2011. FICEMS is interested in any stakeholder input about..., prehospital emergency medical services (both ground and air), hospital-based emergency care and trauma care... Administrator for Research and Program Development. [FR Doc. 2011-6379 Filed 3-17-11; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4910...

  13. User violence towards nursing professionals in mental health services and emergency units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé Llor-Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is present in many work sectors, but in the area of mental health, nurses have a higher risk due to the close relationship they have with users. This study analyzed hostile user statements against nursing professionals of Mental Health Services and Emergency Units in Health Service (MHS hospitals in Murcia, Spain, and determined the frequency of exposure to the different violent user behaviors. The study was carried out with a sample of 518 nursing professionals from four hospital services: Mental Health, Emergency Units, Medical Hospitalization, and Maternal-and-Child. The nursing staff of Mental Health and Emergency Units was the most exposed to violence. Non-physical violence was more frequent in Emergency Units, whereas physical violence was more frequent in Mental Health. Among the consequences of exposure to non-physical violence are workers’ emotional exhaustion and the presence of psychological distress.

  14. Poor Self-Rated Health Influences Hospital Service Use in Hospitalized Inpatients With Chronic Conditions in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Vivian; McLachlan, Craig S; Baune, Bernhard T; Huang, Chun-Ta; Wu, Chia-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the association between self-rated health (SRH) and use of hospital services (ie, medical outpatient department, emergency department, and general ward. admissions). Cross-sectional study data were collected from 230 consecutive patients admitted to medical departments of a 2000-bed academic medical center in Taiwan using standardized operating procedures for data collection of SRH (ie, a single-item question inquiring overall perceived health status), medical disorders, depressive symptoms, and combined service utilization over a 1-year period (ie, number of visits to outpatient department, number of visits to emergency department, and number of hospitalizations). Electronic medical records were retrieved, with self-reported external medical visits added to in-hospital frequencies of service use to provide better estimation of health service utilization. Fifty-two percent of study patients rated their health as poor or very poor. Poor SRH was associated with more visits to medical outpatient department, emergency department, and hospital admission. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated an independent association between poor SRH and services utilization after adjustment for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, metastatic cancer, number of chronic illness, life-threatening event, life-time suicidal ideation, and depression. SRH may be a useful research tool to model medical service use for inpatients with chronic conditions.

  15. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates dos; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; Costa, Fernanda Marques da; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself.

  16. Triage in an adult emergency service: patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyane Liliane Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Assess the degree of patient satisfaction with triage in the adult emergency service of a public hospital. METHOD Exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Three hundred patients were interviewed and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics based on sociodemographic variables and those related to patient satisfaction. RESULTS There was a predominance of women, with elementary education and a mean age of 41 years. Most of the interviewees reported being satisfied in regard to the following items: timely service, embracement, trust, environment (comfort, cleanliness and signage, humanization (courtesy, respect, and interest, timely referral/scheduling of appointments and care expectations. CONCLUSION There was a high level of patient satisfaction, evidenced by the strong association of user satisfaction with the items investigated.

  17. International emergency medical services: assessment of developing prehospital systems abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanRooyen, M J; Thomas, T L; Clem, K J

    1999-01-01

    Many developing countries are experiencing a greater need for prehospital systems because of urbanization and changing population demographics, leading to greater death rates from trauma and cardiac illnesses. While emergency medical services (EMS) systems may take a variety of forms, they usually contain some system components similar to those found in the United States. In evaluating EMS abroad, it may be useful to compare the developing system type to one of five models of EMS delivery: hospital-based, municipal, private, volunteer, and complex. Using community-based services and available health providers can enable a developing system to function within a primary health network without overtaxing scarce resources. Developing such an approach can lead to creative and effective solutions for prehospital care in developing countries.

  18. Gerenciamento do cuidado: ações dos enfermeiros em um serviço hospitalar de emergência Gerenciamiento del cuidado: acciones de los enfermeros en un servicio hospitalario de emergencia Care management: nurses' actions in a hospital emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Guedes dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    del trabajo y distribución de los profesionales de enfermería y recursos materiales. El liderazgo favorece la planificación del cuidado, coordinación del equipo de enfermería y delegación de las actividades.This study aimed to analyze care management actions performed by nurses in a hospital emergency service. This is a qualiative research of the case study type, carried out with nurses from the Emergency Service of a University Hospital in southern Brazil. The data were collected through participant observation and semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The results show nurses' actions in care planning, forecasting and provisioning of resources, supervision, leadership and training of the nursing team. In care planning, there is the execution of the nursing process and the control of the realization of laboratory and radiological tests. The actions of forecasting and provisioning of resources were: elaboration of the monthly schedule of employees, daily distribution of the staff and the management of material resources. Leadership encourages the planning of care, the coordination of the nursing staff and the delegation of activities.

  19. Computerized system for hospital engineering service management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno, C A; Gonzalez, E A; Cagnolo, F J; Olmos, C E

    2007-01-01

    When a Hospital Engineering Service (HES) is implemented within a health care environment, the idea is to improve service conditions and costs as well as to provide timely responses to equipment preventive maintenance and infrastructure requirements. An HES must, within the shortest possible period of time, meet the above requirements at the cost necessary to provide the service quality sought. In many cases there is a lack of minimal materials and staff who are qualified to attain the objectives that have been set. Therefore, external assistance becomes necessary. In this context, actions are often taken which, because they are not recorded, cannot be assessed in order to evaluate the HES. Since all action taken is appraised from the purely economic point of view, in the final analysis the contributions from staff remain invisible. This situation works against the possibility of quantifying the convenience of possessing an internal HES. The software support system we have developed here is oriented toward providing all the necessary data to address this issue

  20. Computerized system for hospital engineering service management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Centeno, C A; Gonzalez, E A; Cagnolo, F J; Olmos, C E [Clinical Engineering Group, National Technological University, Cordoba Regional Faculty, Maestro M Lopez St and Cruz Roja Argentina St, Cordoba (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    When a Hospital Engineering Service (HES) is implemented within a health care environment, the idea is to improve service conditions and costs as well as to provide timely responses to equipment preventive maintenance and infrastructure requirements. An HES must, within the shortest possible period of time, meet the above requirements at the cost necessary to provide the service quality sought. In many cases there is a lack of minimal materials and staff who are qualified to attain the objectives that have been set. Therefore, external assistance becomes necessary. In this context, actions are often taken which, because they are not recorded, cannot be assessed in order to evaluate the HES. Since all action taken is appraised from the purely economic point of view, in the final analysis the contributions from staff remain invisible. This situation works against the possibility of quantifying the convenience of possessing an internal HES. The software support system we have developed here is oriented toward providing all the necessary data to address this issue.

  1. [Creation of emergency care services in developing countries: luxury or necessity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobli, M; Massougbodji-D'Almeida, M; Agboton, H; Sanou, J; Madougou, M; Assouto, P

    2002-01-01

    Organization of emergency care services prior to hospital admission has progressed at a satisfactory pace in developed countries. A performance model in this field is the French emergency service called service d'aide médicale d'urgence (SAMU). Socioeconomic conditions prevailing in developing countries have pushed authorities to give priority to preventive medicine. However numerous patients especially young people and women during childbirth die as a result of inadequate facilities for transportation from hospitals and dwellings in outlying areas to major medical centers where the best medical equipment and staff are available. As a result, it may be asked if emergency care services is really a luxury. The authors base their conclusion on analysis of the conditions and outcome of emergency patient care in three African countries in which it is essentially a requirement.

  2. Temporary emergency pacing-an orphan in district hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Knut; Johansen, Jens Brock; Gadler, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    This editorial discusses a report on the 1 year experience with temporary pacing, especially in the emergency setting, in several Norwegian district hospitals. The vast majority of the patients received transvenous temporary pacing, and the majority of leads were placed by noncardiologists. The p...... to a hospital with more available competence. Ideally, those who need pacing immediately, including those who need permanent pacing, should be offered permanent implantation on a 24 hours/7 days per week base....

  3. Three essays on hospitality management in emerging markets

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Esta tesis contiene artículos de investigación en anexo. This dissertation is composed of three essays on the hospitality management practices in the hotel and airline sectors of emerging markets. The three essays address the issues of loyalty programs, environmental innovations, and electronic word of mouth in hospitality management. The first essay analyzes the factors contributing to the popularity of airline and hotel companies’ loyalty programs. The results show that facto...

  4. Innovations in health service delivery: the corporatization of public hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harding, April; Preker, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    ... hospitals play a critical role in ensuring delivery of health services, less is known about how to improve the efficiency and quality of care provided. Much can be learned in this respect from the experiences of hospital reforms initiated during the 1990s. Innovations in Health Service Delivery: The Corporatization of Public Hospitals is an a...

  5. Perception of stroke symptoms and utilization of emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano A. Hawkes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lack of stroke awareness and slow activation of emergency medical services (EMS are frequently reported reasons for delayed arrival to the hospital. We evaluated these variables in our population. Methods Review of hospital records and structured telephone interviews of 100 consecutive stroke patients. Forward stepwise logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. Results Seventy patients (75% arrived at the hospital 4.5 hours after stroke symptoms onset. The use of EMS did not improve arrival times. Most patients who recognized their symptoms did not use EMS (p < 0.02. Nineteen patients (20% were initially misdiagnosed. Eighteen of them were first assessed by non-neurologist physicians (p < 0.001. Conclusions Our population showed a low level of stroke awareness. The use of EMS did not improve arrival times at the hospital and the non-utilization of the EMS was associated with the recognition of stroke symptoms. There was a concerning rate of misdiagnosis, mostly by non-neurologist medical providers.

  6. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  7. Urological Emergency Admissions to a Community Hospital: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sam O.

    1983-01-01

    A one-year study was conducted on the impact of emergency admissions to the 125-bed Southwest Community Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. During the study in 1979, 70 urological emergency room admissions were made, of which 44 (62.8 percent) were males and 26 (37.2 percent) were females. In comparison, 93 admissions were made directly from the private office. The study considered the timeliness of diagnosis and treatment, surgical procedures performed, impact on urological emergency room nursing and medical personnel, physician response to notification, cost containment, and implied legal ramifications and organization structure. Thus, an immediate close scrutiny of urological emergency admission at the nonuniversity affiliated Southwest Community Hospital was permitted. PMID:6876189

  8. Registry of emergency airways arriving at combat hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bruce D; Cuniowski, Peter A; Muck, Andrew; De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2008-06-01

    Prehospital Emergency Medical Services have demonstrated variable success with regards to prehospital airway management in U.S. civilian settings. We attempted to identify the incidence of successful prehospital endotracheal intubations in the modern combat environment. This was a prospective, observational study. Data collection occurred at Combat Support Hospitals (CSH) within Operation Iraqi Freedom locations between January 2005 and March 2007. Military trauma physicians systematically examined casualties presenting to the CSH that received advanced prehospital airway management. Correct endotracheal tube (ETT) positioning was verified using an explicit combination of clinical findings and colorimetric end-tidal carbon dioxide detection. The primary outcome was correct placement of the ETTs by combat prehospital providers. A total of 6,875 combat casualties presented to participating CSHs during the study period, of which there were 293 (4.2%) advanced prehospital airways, of which 282 (97.3%) were trauma patients. Prehospital airway management included: 253 endotracheal intubations (86.6%); 23 supraglottic airways (7.5%), and 17 cricothyrotomies (5.8%). Of the ETTs, upon arrival to the CSH, 242 (95.7%) were determined to be correctly placed. There were 11 incorrectly placed ETTs: 10 were in the right mainstem bronchus, and 1 was found to be dislodged in the hypopharynx. There were no unrecognized battlefield esophageal intubations. Under combat conditions, the overall rate of correctly placed ETTs performed by military prehospital providers was comparable with that of published U.S. civilian paramedic data.

  9. Hazard perception in emergency medical service responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, K A; Scialfa, C T

    2016-10-01

    The perception of on-road hazards is critically important to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals, the patients they transport and the general public. This study compared hazard perception in EMS and civilian drivers of similar age and personal driving experience. Twenty-nine EMS professionals and 24 non-professional drivers were given a dynamic hazard perception test (HPT). The EMS group demonstrated an advantage in HPT that was independent of simple reaction time, another indication of the validity of the test. These results are also consistent with the view that professional driving experience results in changes in the ability to identify and respond to on-road hazards. Directions for future research include the development of a profession-specific hazard perception tool for both assessment and training purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Implementation of the Mobile Emergency Medical Service in Brazil: action strategies and structural dimension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Gisele; Konder, Mariana Teixeira; Reciputti, Luciano Pereira; Macedo, Cesar; Lopes, Monica Guimarães Macau

    2017-08-07

    The Mobile Emergency Medical Service (SAMU) was the first component of the National Policy for Emergency Care implemented in Brazil in the early 2000. The article analyzed the implementation of mobile pre-hospital emergency care in Brazil. The methods included document analysis, interviews with state emergency care coordinators, and an expert panel. The theoretical reference was the strategic conduct analysis from Giddens' Structuration Theory. The results showed uneven implementation of the SAMU between states and regions of Brazil, identifying six patterns of implementation, considering the states' capacity to expand the population coverage and regionalize the service. Structural difficulties included physician retention, poorly equipped dispatch centers, and shortage of ambulances. The North and Northeast were the country's most heavily affected regions. SAMU is formatted as a structuring strategy in the emergency care network, but its performance suffered the impact of limited participation by primary care in the emergency network and especially the lack of hospital beds.

  11. Cloud based emergency health care information service in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N; Sukanesh, R

    2012-12-01

    A hospital is a health care organization providing patient treatment by expert physicians, surgeons and equipments. A report from a health care accreditation group says that miscommunication between patients and health care providers is the reason for the gap in providing emergency medical care to people in need. In developing countries, illiteracy is the major key root for deaths resulting from uncertain diseases constituting a serious public health problem. Mentally affected, differently abled and unconscious patients can't communicate about their medical history to the medical practitioners. Also, Medical practitioners can't edit or view DICOM images instantly. Our aim is to provide palm vein pattern recognition based medical record retrieval system, using cloud computing for the above mentioned people. Distributed computing technology is coming in the new forms as Grid computing and Cloud computing. These new forms are assured to bring Information Technology (IT) as a service. In this paper, we have described how these new forms of distributed computing will be helpful for modern health care industries. Cloud Computing is germinating its benefit to industrial sectors especially in medical scenarios. In Cloud Computing, IT-related capabilities and resources are provided as services, via the distributed computing on-demand. This paper is concerned with sprouting software as a service (SaaS) by means of Cloud computing with an aim to bring emergency health care sector in an umbrella with physical secured patient records. In framing the emergency healthcare treatment, the crucial thing considered necessary to decide about patients is their previous health conduct records. Thus a ubiquitous access to appropriate records is essential. Palm vein pattern recognition promises a secured patient record access. Likewise our paper reveals an efficient means to view, edit or transfer the DICOM images instantly which was a challenging task for medical practitioners in the

  12. Contextual factors associated with hospitals' decision to operate freestanding emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Nitish; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; O'Connor, Stephen J; Sen, Bisakha; Trimm, J M Mickey; Camargo, Carlos A

    Freestanding emergency departments (FSEDs) are fast growing entities in health care, delivering emergency care outside of hospitals. Hospitals may benefit in several ways by opening FSEDs. The study used the resource dependence theory as a means to analyze the relationship between market and organizational factors and the likelihood of hospitals to operate FSEDs. All acute care hospitals in 14 states with FSEDs present during the study period from 2002 to 2011. Data on FSEDs were merged with American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Cost Reports, and Area Resource File data. The outcome variable consists of whether or not the hospital operates an FSED. Independent variables include per capita income, percent population over age of 65 years, primary care and specialist physicians per capita, urban location, change in the unemployment rate, change in the population, change in poverty level, market competition, total satellite and autonomous FSEDs in the market, Medicare-managed care penetration rate, hospital beds, total margin, and system membership. We used logistic regression analysis with state and year fixed effects. Standard errors in the regression were clustered by hospital. The number of hospitals operating satellite FSEDs increased from 32 (2.33%) in 2002 to 91 (5.76%) hospitals in 2011 among the 14 states included in the study sample. The results support the hypothesis that hospitals located in munificent environments and more competitive environments (presence of other FSEDs) are more likely to operate an FSED. Organizational level factors such as bed size and system membership are associated with a hospital operating an FSED. The findings may be used by policy makers in developing regulations for hospitals opening FSEDs. Also, study findings of this study may be used by hospitals to make informed decisions when formulating strategies regarding FSEDs.

  13. [Mental Health in the General Hospital: Results of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in Four Hospital Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Camacho, Leonidas; Escobar, Juan Manuel; Sáenz-Moncaleano, Camilo; Delgado-Barrera, Lucía; Aparicio-Turbay, Soraya; Molano, Juan Carlos; Noguera, Efraín

    2012-03-01

    Few individuals have access to mental health services due in part to underdetection. As it is more likely to consult for medical conditions, primary care may be a useful gateway for early detection of mental health problems. Detection of the frequency of mental health problems in four hospital services at the Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá: Outpatient unit, hospitalization, emergency department, and primary care through a brief detection questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Cross-sectional study of patients seen at the four services who answered a Demographic Data Questionnaire and the PHQ together with information gathered about current medical diagnosis, history of visits, and hospitalizations during the last year. 1094 patients seen at the four hospital services between September 2010 and May 2011 were selected at random. A mental health problem was detected in 36.7% of the total sample. Major depressive disorder (7.3%), alcohol abuse (14.4%), and any anxiety disorder (7.7%) showed the highest prevalence with the emergency department showing the highest frequency of detection. The usefulness of a brief detection questionnaire such as the PHQ in hospital settings is demonstrated and implications in the design of mental health programs in the general hospital are discussed. The need to replicate this study in other settings and to undertake further research is outlined. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  14. [Development and application of hospital customer service center platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minya; Zheng, Konglin; Xia, Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction and application of the platform of client service center in the general hospital and discusses how to provide patients with an entire service including service before clinic, on clinic and after clinic. It can also provide references for a new service mode for clinic service.

  15. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  16. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the eThekwini district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. PR Newton, R Naidoo, P Brysiewicz. Abstract. Introduction. Emergency medical services (EMS) are sometimes required to respond to cases that are later found not to be emergencies, resulting in high ...

  17. The Etiology of Syncope in an Emergency Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bădilă Elisabeta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Syncope is a commonly encountered problem in an emergency hospital. Global cerebral hypoperfusion is the final pathway common to all presentations of syncope, but this symptom presentation has a broad differential diagnosis. It is important to identify patients for whom syncope is a symptom of a potentially life-threatening condition.

  18. Intervenções para solucionar a superlotação nos serviços de emergência hospitalar: uma revisão sistemática Interventions to solve overcrowding in hospital emergency services: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto José Bittencourt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisão discute as intervenções voltadas para solucionar o problema da superlotação dos Serviços de Emergência Hospitalar (SEH, como evidência de baixa efetividade organizacional. Em bases de dados eletrônicas de livre acesso e acesso restrito, os descritores buscados foram "superlotação; emergência; medicina; pronto-socorro". O levantamento identificou 66 citações de intervenções, agrupadas em 47 intervenções afins. A maioria dos trabalhos teve como desenho os estudos observacionais que avaliaram os resultados das intervenções antes e depois. As mais citadas: implantação da unidade de observação dos pacientes graves; implantação do serviço de enfermagem dedicado à admissão, alta e transferência do paciente; instituição de protocolos de saturação operacional e implantação da unidade de pronto-atendimento. Na análise das 21 intervenções para solucionar a superlotação nos SEH, que tiveram resultados favoráveis no evento principal - tempo de permanência no SEH -, 15 tinham relação com a melhoria do fluxo no próprio SEH ou nos setores do hospital, interferindo ativa e positivamente no fluxo interno dos pacientes. As intervenções que aumentaram as barreiras de acesso aos SEH, ou que apenas melhoram a estrutura dos SEH não foram efetivas.This review discusses interventions aimed at solving the problem of overcrowding in hospital emergency services (HES, characteristic of low organizational effectiveness. In free-access and restricted-access databases, the target descriptors were "overcrowding; emergency; medicine; first aid". The survey identified 66 citations of interventions, grouped in 47 related interventions. The majority of the studies used observational designs that evaluated the results before and after interventions. Of the 47 related interventions, 34 had results for organizational performance. Four were the most frequently cited: implementation of an observation unit for patients already

  19. Idling Reduction for Emergency and Other Service Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-05-07

    This is a fact sheet about reducing idling for emergency and service vehicles. Emergency vehicles, such as police cars, ambulances, and fire trucks, along with other service vehicles such as armored cars, are often exempt from laws that limit engine idling. However, these vehicles can save fuel and reduce emissions with technologies that allow them to perform vital services without idling.

  20. Wireless Emergency Alerts Commercial Mobile Service Provider (CMSP) Cybersecurity Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-16

    Wireless Emergency Alerts Commercial Mobile Service Provider (CMSP) Cybersecurity Guidelines Christopher Alberts Audrey Dorofee Carol Woody...Technology Direc- torate. The WEA capability provides a valuable service , disseminating emergency alerts to users of capable mobile devices if they are... mobile service providers (CMSPs)—commercial wireless carriers that broadcast WEA messages to a designated geographic area 4. Alert recipients—the

  1. Sociodemographic profile and hospitalization process of elderly assisted at a emergency hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luciene Nobre Coutinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to investigate the sociodemographic profile and the process of hospitalization of elderly assisted in an emergency hospital. Methods: descriptive epidemiological study conducted at an emergency hospital with 300 elderly patients using a form with hospitalization process and sociodemographic variables. Results: there was a predominance of females (56.0%, between 80 and 89 years old (45.4%, illiterate or with elementary education (86.7%, married or living in stable union (42.6%, with non-communicable chronic disease (54.7% and regular use of medications. The main reason for hospitalization was fall (54.7% at home and in the morning hours (42.4%, with admission in the afternoon, transported by ambulance. Conclusion: the findings contribute to the development of strategies directed to assist and care of the healthy elderly and in vulnerable situations.

  2. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A.; Joesch, Jutta M.; West, Imara I.; Pasic, Jagoda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES) has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7%) resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. PMID:25247041

  3. Facilitators of and barriers to emergency medical service use by acute ischemic stroke patients: A retrospective survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha-Nam Shin

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The use of emergency medical services reduced prehospital delay and increased the likelihood of patient arrival at hospital within 3 h. Given that experiencing typical stroke symptoms was a facilitator of emergency medical service use yet failure to recognize the urgency of symptoms was a barrier, public awareness should be raised as regards stroke symptoms and the benefits of using emergency medical services.

  4. [Injuries in children and adolescents in emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffing, T; Danko, S; Danko, T; Henzler, T; Winkler, H; Muhm, M

    2016-08-01

    A differentiated knowledge of trauma in children and adolescents is essential for the treatment of injured minors. The aim of this study was to present the focus of treatment in trauma emergency services. Over a period of 2 years all acutely injured children and adolescents (n = 4784) in the emergency service were analyzed prospectively. The data were analyzed according to sex, age, date of examination, indications for x-ray imaging, diagnosis and therapy. Seasonal differences in the treatment spectrum were detected. In total 34.4 % of the patients presented with bruises/contusions, 23 % wounds, 19.9 % fractures, 14.9 % sprains/strains/ligament ruptures, 4.1 % craniocerebral trauma, 1.5 % dislocations, 1.1 % muscle/tendon injuries and 0.9 % burns. Of the patients 60 % underwent an x-ray examination and 8.3 % were hospitalized. Different injuries were found in the different age groups. Most fractures (25.7 %) were found at the distal forearm and most osteosyntheses (22.5 %) were also carried out at this anatomical location. Knowledge of the frequency and age dynamics is essential for competent treatment of injuries in children and adolescents. Analysis of the reality of the treatment in emergency services allows a much better evaluation of the requirements with respect to this clientele. The collected data can serve as a basis for the development of major capability foci, training concepts, treatment algorithms as well as prevention measures.

  5. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Bucher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS workers, respectively. Methods: We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. Results: There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003. Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Conclusion: Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  6. Telehone consultations: At the emergency service, Copenhagen County: Analysis of doctor-patient communication patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge; Risør, Ole

    1997-01-01

    Communications patterns, emergency service, out-of-hours service, telehpone consultations, video-supervision......Communications patterns, emergency service, out-of-hours service, telehpone consultations, video-supervision...

  7. A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communicable diseases, in particular aspects of the organisation of services, and indirect indicators of patient care. Design. A postal survey of services for asthma, epilepsy, diabetes and hypertension at nine hospitals. Assessment over 1 week of ...

  8. Goldratt’s Theory Applied to the Problems Associated with an Emergency Department at a Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Nayak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare costs continue to increase dramatically, while quality remains a significant problem. Reform measures initiated by the government will drive expansion of these costs, further stressing taxpayers and employers, and forcing hospitals to adopt fundamental changes as they try to adjust to increased demands for services and to lessening reimbursements from all payers. This struggle is best seen at the point of entry for many at a hospital: the emergency department (ED. It is at the emergency department that patients’ expectations regarding staff communication with patients, wait times, the triage process, capacity and payment will determine a significant part of a hospital’s revenue. Using Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt’s Thinking Process, we will determine what core problem(s are causing a 362-bed regional West Texas hospital emergency department to lose revenue. Evaluation of the current emergency department will determine the Undesirable Effects (UDE. Using that information will lead to the construction of the Current Reality Tree (CRT, which will bring focus to the core problem(s. To break the constraints, which are the core problem(s, an Evaporative Cloud (EC is generated. And, the end result will be to construct a Future Reality Tree (FRT, which will validate the idea(s generated in the EC. It was determined that there are ten major UDE’s that affected this hospital’s emergency department. They were focused around staff communication, wait times, triage process, information management, service provided and bill collections. A conclusion was made that the core problem dealt with triaging patients and utilization of the services provided by the hospital. Since the reimbursement rate is affected by the patient’s satisfaction, the areas to focus on would be: triage, education, communication and retention. Although it may be neither feasible nor desirable to meet all the patient’s expectations, increased focus on those areas may

  9. Service Robots for Hospitals: A Case Study of Transportation Tasks in a Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Fan, Zhun; Dawids, Steen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the need for automated transportation systems for hospitals is investigated. Among other alternatives, mobile robots stand out as the most prominent means of automation of transportation tasks in hospitals. Existing transportation routines of a hospital are analyzed in order to ver...... for implementing mobile service robots for transportation tasks in hospitals....

  10. Pre-hospital critical care by anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, A J; Lossius, H M; Mikkelsen, S

    2013-01-01

    All Scandinavian countries provide anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services. Little is known of the incidence of critical illness or injury attended by these services. We aimed to investigate anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia with special emphasis on incidence...

  11. Theatre and emergency services rendered by generalist medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    services to be provided.1 This range of services demands that a district hospital medical officer be equipped with a broad body of knowledge and a wide proficiency of technical skills. The district hospital practitioner needs clinical skills, surgical skills, community health skills, management skills, as well as the ability to train ...

  12. Factors associated with inappropriate utilisation of emergency department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selasawati, H G; Naing, L; Wan Aasim, W A; Winn, T; Rusli, B N

    2007-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the associated factors and the reasons for inappropriate utilisation of Emergency Department (ED) services at Universiti Sains Malaysia Hospital. A case-control study was conducted with 170 cases from ED and 170 controls from the Outpatient Department (OPD). A self-administered questionnaire was designed and used to obtain sociodemographic data, knowledge on the functions of ED and OPD, health seeking attitude and behaviour, and reasons for seeking treatment at ED. The study found that gender, marital status, family size, shift work, perceived illness, and knowledge on the role and functions of ED and OPD were significant associated factors. The three most common reasons for inappropriate utilisation of ED were as follows: "due to severity of illness" (85%), "can't go to OPD during office hours" (42%), and "ED near my house" (27%).

  13. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event

  14. Psychological consequences of aggression in pre-hospital emergency care: cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaldo-De-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Gómez, M Mar; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care is a particularly vulnerable setting for workplace violence. However, there is no literature available to date on the psychological consequences of violence in pre-hospital emergency care. To evaluate the psychological consequences of exposure to workplace violence from patients and those accompanying them in pre-hospital emergency care. A retrospective cross-sectional study. 70 pre-hospital emergency care services located in Madrid region. A randomized sample of 441 health care workers (135 physicians, 127 nurses and 179 emergency care assistants). Data were collected from February to May 2012. The survey was divided into four sections: demographic/professional information, level of burnout determined by Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), mental health status using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and frequency and type of violent behaviour experienced by staff members. The health care professionals who had been exposed to physical and verbal violence presented a significantly higher percentage of anxiety, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and burnout syndrome compared with those who had not been subjected to any aggression. Frequency of verbal violence (more than five times) was related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Type of violence (i.e. physical aggression) is especially related to high anxiety levels and frequency of verbal aggression is associated with burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization). Psychological counselling should be made available to professional staff who have been subjected to physical aggression or frequent verbal violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  16. Transport accidents among children and adolescents at the emergency service of a teaching hospital in the southern zone of the city of São Paulo☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorios, Carlos; de Souza, Renata Maia; Gerolla, Viviane; Maso, Bruno; Rodrigues, Cintia Leci; Armond, Jane de Eston

    2014-01-01

    Objective to describe the victim profile and circumstances of transport accidents involving children and adolescents who were attended at a teaching hospital in the southern zone of the city of São Paulo. Methods this was an individual observational case series study among patients up to the age of 19 years who were attended at a hospital in the southern zone of the city of São Paulo, state of São Paulo, Brazil, due to traffic accidents. The files notifying suspected or confirmed cases of violence and accidents (SIVVA files) covering January to December 2012 were analyzed. Results among the 149 cases notified, 64.4% related to males and 35.6% to females. The transport accidents were predominantly among males, irrespective of age. The main injury diagnoses were superficial head trauma (24.8%) followed by multiple non-specified trauma (36.4%), in both sexes. Conclusion transport accidents among children and adolescents occurred more often among males. The main transport accidents among the children and adolescents attended as emergency cases were caused by motor vehicles and motorcycles. Among the accident victims, the largest proportion was attended because of being run over. PMID:26229833

  17. 78 FR 44523 - Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service RIN 0596-AC73 Burned Area Emergency Response, Forest Service AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of interim directive; Correction and extension of comment period. SUMMARY: The Forest Service is correcting a notice of interim directive that appeared in...

  18. [Competence of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Segura, Estrella; Lleixà-Fortuño, Mar; Salvadó-Usach, Teresa; Solà-Miravete, Elena; Adell-Lleixà, Mireia; Chanovas-Borrás, Manel R; March-Pallarés, Gemma; Mora-López, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    To identify associations between sociodemographic characteristics variables and competence levels of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments. Descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments in the southwestern area of Catalonia (Ebre River territory). We used an instrument for evaluating competencies (the COM_VA questionnaire) and recording sociodemographic variables (age, sex, total work experience, emergency department experience, training in critical patient care and triage) and perceived confidence when performing triage. We then analyzed the association between these variables and competency scores. Competency scores on the COM_VA questionnaire were significantly higher in nurses with training in critical patient care (P=.001) and triage (P=0.002) and in those with longer emergency department experience (P<.0001). Perceived confidence when performing triage increased with competency score (P<.0001) and training in critical patient care (P<.0001) and triage (P=.045). The competence of triage nurses and their perception of confidence when performing triage increases with emergency department experience and training.

  19. HOSPITAL IMAGE AS A MODERATING VARIABLE ON THE EFFECT OF HOSPITAL SERVICE QUALITY ON THE CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE, CUSTOMER TRUST AND CUSTOMER LOYALTY IN HOSPITAL SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Indrianawati Usman

    2017-01-01

    This is an explanatory research, analyzing the hospital image as a moderating variable on the effect of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and trust. Research was conducted at several hospitals in Surabaya Indonesia, especially to outpatients. Data was collected by survey to the outpatients of the hospitals. The purpose of this research was empirically examining the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust, examine eff...

  20. Study of Marketing Components Affecting Health Care Services in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Akbarian Bafghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals, in extreme competition, have accepted principles of marketing designed for industrial goods and customers. One of the important factors in health services marketing is the type of services. Organizations, including health centers, require meeting the clients' needs in order to survive and try to promote the way of providing services effectively. The present study aims to identify effective components in providing clinical services in hospitals. Methods: This was a practical and cross-sectional study. Data were collected using a questionnaire completed through random sampling after confirming the validity and reliability. Data were analyzed by SPSS 21 and Lisrel 8.50 using descriptive statistics and factor analysis. Results: The results of this study indicated that nine components had the highest impact on providing health services. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the quality of providing services in the hospital, offering distinctive services compared with other hospitals, and considering quality of service beyond the patient's expectation had the greatest impact on marketing services in the hospital. Conclusion: Providing quality and distinctive services beyond the patient's expectation enables hospitals to improve their marketing activities and, beside higher level of patient satisfaction, develop their clinical services market share.

  1. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  2. Hospital Factors Associated With Care Discontinuity Following Emergency General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Joaquim M; Olufajo, Olubode A; Tsai, Thomas C; Jiang, Wei; Columbus, Alexandra B; Nitzschke, Stephanie L; Cooper, Zara; Salim, Ali

    2017-03-01

    Although there is evidence that changes in clinicians during the continuum of care (care discontinuity) are associated with higher mortality and complications among surgical patients, little is known regarding the drivers of care discontinuity among emergency general surgery (EGS) patients. To identify hospital factors associated with care discontinuity among EGS patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of the 100% Medicare inpatient claims file, from January 1, 2008, to November 30, 2011, and matched patient details to hospital information in the 2011 American Hospital Association Annual Survey database. We selected patients aged 65 years and older who had the most common procedures associated with the previously defined American Association for the Surgery of Trauma EGS diagnosis categories and survived to hospital discharge across the United States. The current analysis was conducted from February 1, 2016, to March 24, 2016. Care discontinuity defined as readmission within 30 days to nonindex hospitals. There were 109 443 EGS patients readmitted within 30 days of discharge and 20 396 (18.6%) were readmitted to nonindex hospitals. Of the readmitted patients, 61 340 (56%) were female. Care discontinuity was higher among patients who were male (19.5% vs 18.0%), those younger than 85 years old (19.0% vs 16.6%), and those who lived 12.8 km (8 miles) or more away from the index hospitals (23.7% vs 14.8%) (all P < .001). Care discontinuity was independently associated with mortality (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08-1.25). Hospital factors associated with care discontinuity included bed size of 200 or more (aOR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.36-1.54), safety-net status (aOR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.27-1.43), and teaching status (aOR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.09-1.28). Care discontinuity was significantly lower among designated trauma centers (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.94) and highest among hospitals in the Midwest (aOR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05-1.26). Nearly 1 in 5 older EGS

  3. Hospital service duplication: evidence on the medical arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Hanh Q; Begun, James W; Luke, Roice D

    2008-01-01

    Hospital administrators face challenging decisions about whether to maintain, cut, or add services in response to changes in consumer demand or managed-care pressures. The challenge is heightened for services that are also offered by other hospitals in the local community. This study provides evidence on the financial effects of providing services that are also provided by other hospitals in the same county. Its purpose is to help guide administrators and policy makers in assessing the wisdom of service duplication at the local level. The unit of analysis is the individual hospital. The study reports data from the 2,204 general acute care hospitals located in counties with more than one hospital. A longitudinal path model is constructed for the years 1998, 2000, and 2002, with environmental and organizational factors from 1998 affecting service duplication in 2000, which in turn affects financial performance in 2002. Maximum likelihood estimation in linear structural relations is used to evaluate the path model and its coefficients. Hospital competition is associated with higher levels of duplication of inpatient, ancillary, and high-tech services. Duplication of inpatient services is associated with higher costs but also with higher operating margin. Duplication of ancillary services is associated with higher return on assets. Duplicated high-tech services are financial losers for hospitals. Higher levels of duplicated high-tech services are associated with higher cost per day, higher cost per discharge, and lower operating margin. From the standpoint of financial impact on the hospital, administrators should reexamine the costs and benefits of offering high-tech services that are offered by other providers in the local area. The higher costs may not be offset by revenues. Duplicated ancillary and inpatient services, on the other hand, produce some positive financial returns.

  4. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Limited health service resources must be used in a manner which does “the most for the most”. This is partly achieved through the use of a triage system. Whereas efforts have been made to introduce paediatric triage in Uganda such as Emergency Triage Assessment and Treatment Plus (ETAT+), it is not clear ...

  5. THE PRE-HOSPITAL TRAUMA AND EMERGENCY DOCTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    tion, to protect both casualties and res- cuers. The engine should be kept run- ning as lights and radio usage can rapidly drain power. Safety is the next consideration. Note hazards such as fire, electricity, mov- ing or collapsing vehicles, chemicals. These must be avoided, with guidance from emergency services. In the case.

  6. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho,Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo,Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes,Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno,Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis,Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista,Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condit...

  7. The Fort McMurray, Alberta wildfires: Emergency and recovery management of healthcare services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matear, David

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest wildfires in Canadian history raged through northern Alberta in May to July 2016, and prompted the largest emergency air evacuation in Canadian history. Central to the challenges were the evacuation of a regional hospital, and the emergency and recovery management associated with healthcare services. This paper describes multiple phases of emergency and recovery management, which employed and adapted the Incident Command System to healthcare services. There were no injuries reported throughout the medical evacuation and recovery of medical services. The leadership and management of healthcare services achieved the goals of evacuating patients and staff effectively, supporting emergency first responders and the re-entry of the population to Fort McMurray.

  8. The impact of an enhanced interpreter service intervention on hospital costs and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Sadowski, Laura S; Rathouz, Paul J

    2007-11-01

    Many health care providers do not provide adequate language access services for their patients who are limited English-speaking because they view the costs of these services as prohibitive. However, little is known about the costs they might bear because of unaddressed language barriers or the costs of providing language access services. To investigate how language barriers and the provision of enhanced interpreter services impact the costs of a hospital stay. Prospective intervention study. Public hospital inpatient medicine service. Three hundred twenty-three adult inpatients: 124 Spanish-speakers whose physicians had access to the enhanced interpreter intervention, 99 Spanish-speakers whose physicians only had access to usual interpreter services, and 100 English-speakers matched to Spanish-speaking participants on age, gender, and admission firm. Patient satisfaction, hospital length of stay, number of inpatient consultations and radiology tests conducted in the hospital, adherence with follow-up appointments, use of emergency department (ED) services and hospitalizations in the 3 months after discharge, and the costs associated with provision of the intervention and any resulting change in health care utilization. The enhanced interpreter service intervention did not significantly impact any of the measured outcomes or their associated costs. The cost of the enhanced interpreter service was $234 per Spanish-speaking intervention patient and represented 1.5% of the average hospital cost. Having a Spanish-speaking attending physician significantly increased Spanish-speaking patient satisfaction with physician, overall hospital experience, and reduced ED visits, thereby reducing costs by $92 per Spanish-speaking patient over the study period. The enhanced interpreter service intervention did not significantly increase or decrease hospital costs. Physician-patient language concordance reduced return ED visit and costs. Health care providers need to examine all the

  9. [Loyal frequent users of hospital emergency departments: the FIDUR project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Alonso, Cesáreo; Romero Pareja, Rodolfo; Rivas García, Aristides; Jiménez Gallego, Rosa; Majo Carbajo, Yolanda; Aguilar Mulet, Juan Mariano

    2016-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of frequent users of hospital emergency departments and analyze whether characteristics varied in relation to how revisits were distributed over the course of the year studied. Retrospective study of patients over the age of 14 years who were treated in a hospital emergency department at least 10 times in 2013. Patients were identified in 17 public hospitals in the Spanish autonomous community of Madrid. Data related to the first and successive visits were gathered and analyzed by quarter year. We included 2340 patients with a mean (SD) age of 54 (21) years. A total of 1361 (58.%) were women, 1160 (50%) had no concomitant diseases, 1366 (58.2%) were substance abusers, and 25 (1.1%) were homeless. During the first visit, 2038 (87.1%) complained of a recent health problem, and 289 (12.4%) were admitted. Sixty (2.6%) patients concentrated their revisits in a single quarters 335 (14.3%) in 2 quarters, 914 (39.1%) in 3, and 1005 (42.9%) in 4. Patients whose revisits were distributed over more quarters were older (> 65 years), had more concomitant conditions, were on more medications (P women (P = .012) and more likely to have a specific diagnosis (P loyally comes to the same emergency department over the course of a year. Patients whose revisits are dispersed over a longer period have more complex problems and use more resources during their initial visit.

  10. Customers' satisfaction about prehospital emergency medical services in Lorestan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Heshmatolah; Kamran, Aziz; Zali, Morad Esmaiel; Novinmehr, Nasser; Safari, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    Patient's satisfaction with health care in ambulance services is an important quality indicator and a helpful tool for managers of prehospital emergency services. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with health provided by prehospital emergency medical services (EMS) in Lorestan, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients (n=450) transferred by EMS to hospitals of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences in a two-year period (2013-2014). Data collection was performed by patient questionnaire, which is a standard LKFR tool. Validity and reliability of the instrument was confirmed by scientific method. Collected data were analyzed by SPSS Version 19. Descriptive and inferential statistics such as Chi-square, paired-samples t-test, independent-samples t-test, ANOVA, Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient, and Fisher's exact test were used. One hundred ninety-two (42.8%) and 257 (57.2%) patients were female and male, respectively (mean: 41 years, r: 37-83). Patient satisfaction of the dispatcher was good, and satisfaction level in regards to the technicians' performance, physical situation, and facilities inside the ambulance was moderate. The Wilcoxon test did not show any significant difference between pain severity before and after arriving EMS in the cardiac and respiratory patients (p=0.691), but severity of pain in orthopedic patients after arriving EMS was decreased (p=0.001). Cardiac and respiratory patients had low satisfaction of EMS, and the Chi-square test was significant (p=0.001). Orthopedic patients had the most satisfaction of EMS. Generally, patients' satisfaction of EMS was low. Satisfaction with pain relief in orthopedic patients was better than pain relief in cardiac and respiratory patients. It is recommended to take necessary actions to improve the level of patient satisfaction of EMS.

  11. Usage of psychiatric emergency services by asylum seekers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reko, Amra; Bech, Per; Wohlert, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asylum seekers are found to be at high risk of mental health problems. Little is known about the use of acute psychiatric emergency services by asylum seekers. AIM: To describe the usage of an inpatient/outpatient psychiatric emergency service in Denmark by adult asylum seekers...

  12. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  13. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  14. Customer Contribution to improving Service Quality in the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Constantin Vasile

    2009-01-01

    The actors on the today business stage have no more well-defined roles with clear and rigid borders between them. Hospitality industry in particular is a good example how it has been blurred the roles that customers play in dealing with service providers. The study reveals that customers can influence the quality of hospitality service through performing a qualitycontrol function. This involves a series of activities to be achieved by them: (1) on-the-spot quality control, (2) service failure...

  15. [Suicidal behaviour and attempted suicide occurring during assessment by the outreach psychiatric emergency service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, R F P; de Groot, M H; van Dassen, M; Deen, M L; de Beurs, D P

    The outreach emergency psychiatric service plays an important role in recognising, arranging interventions and preventing suicide and suicidal behaviour. However, little is known about the assessments that members of the emergency team make when faced with patients showing suicidal behaviour. AIM: To describe the relationships that are revealed between patient characteristics, suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide during assessments made by the emergency psychiatric service in The Hague. METHOD: The emergency service kept a detailed record of 14,705 consultations. We compared the characteristics of patients who had suicidal thoughts with those of patients who had no such thoughts and we also compared the characteristics of patients who had attempted to commit suicide with those of patients who had not. We drew these comparisons by using logistic regression models, adjusting for clustering. RESULTS: 32.2% of the patients showed signs of suicidal behaviour and 9.2 % appeared likely to attempt suicide. Suicidal behaviour occurred most often in patients with depression. Suicidal patients were more often admitted to hospital than were non-suicidal patients and they were more likely to have been referred by a general practitioner or a general hospital. Medication was the most frequent means employed in attempts to commit suicide. CONCLUSION: In about one third of the consultations of the outreach emergency psychiatric service, the patient showed suicidal behaviour. The actions and the policy of the emergency psychiatric service with regard to suicidal behaviour were diverse and dependent on factors that could change over the course of time.

  16. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care in Gambia's main referral hospital: women-users' testimonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundby Johanne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction of maternal mortality ratio by two-thirds by 2015 is an international development goal with unrestricted access to high quality emergency obstetric care services promoted towards the attainment of that goal. The objective of this qualitative study was to assess the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care services in Gambia's main referral hospital. Methods From weekend admissions a group of 30 women treated for different acute obstetric conditions including five main diagnostic groups: hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, dystocia, sepsis and anemia were purposively selected. In-depth interviews with the women were carried out at their homes within two weeks of discharge. Results Substantial difficulties in obtaining emergency obstetric care were uncovered. Health system inadequacies including lack of blood for transfusion, shortage of essential medicines especially antihypertensive drugs considerably hindered timely and adequate treatment for obstetric emergencies. Such inadequacies also inflated the treatment costs to between 5 and 18 times more than standard fees. Blood transfusion and hypertensive treatment were associated with the largest costs. Conclusion The deficiencies in the availability of life-saving interventions identified are manifestations of inadequate funding for maternal health services. Substantial increase in funding for maternal health services is therefore warranted towards effective implementation of emergency obstetric care package in The Gambia.

  17. Patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital emergency care: a multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayr, Agnes; Gnirke, André; Schaeuble, Joerg C; Ganter, Michael T; Sparr, Harald; Zoll, Adolf; Schinnerl, Adolf; Nuebling, Matthias; Heidegger, Thomas; Baubin, Michael

    2016-10-01

    There is only limited information on patient satisfaction with emergency medical services (EMS). The aim of this multicentre survey was to evaluate patient satisfaction in five out-of-hospital physician-based EMS in Austria and Switzerland. The psychometrically tested and standardized questionnaire 'patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital emergency care' was used for this survey. The recruitment of the patients was carried out on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. All questionnaires were sent together with an invitation letter and a prepaid return envelope, followed by a reminder 2 weeks later. The descriptive statistical analysis was carried out by an external organization to maintain anonymity. The response rate of all EMS was 46.7%. High satisfaction rates were achieved for the four quality scales 'emergency call, emergency treatment, transport and hospital admission'. A significant difference was found between the Swiss and the Austrian dispatch centres in the judgement of the call takers' social skills. Patient satisfaction with the emergency treatment, for example, reduction of pain, was high in all EMS, independent of whether the EMS is physician (Austria) or physician and emergency medical assistant based (Switzerland). Lowest satisfaction rates were found for items of social skills. Patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital physician-based EMS is generally high. There is room for improvement in areas such as the social skills of dispatchers and EMS-team members and the comfort of the patients during transport. A checklist should be developed for basic articles that patients should take along to hospital and for questions on responsibilities for children, dependent people or pets.

  18. The Role of Emergency Medical Service in CBR Incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castulik, P.

    2007-01-01

    Majority of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) have daily extensive experience with rescue of casualties having trauma injuries, resulting from conventional incidents. In the case of non-conventional incidents involving chemical, bacteriological or radiological (CBR) hazardous materials operational scene for all responders is begin to be more complicated due contamination of casualties, equipment and environment. Especially EMS personnel and receiving staff at the hospital have to work under very demanding condition due to burden of personal protective equipment (PPE) and awareness to avoiding cross-contamination during handling casualties. Those conditions require significantly different approaches for search and rescue of victims from incident site, through transportation and effective treatment at medical facilities. In cases when chemicals will be major hazard materials, the speed of rescue and treatment of victims is a major challenge. Each minute matter, and any delay of response could seriously complicated saving of lives and successful recovery of exposed victims. Success in rescue victims is finally measured thorough the ability of the first responders to save people... ALIVE..., no matter what surrounding condition is. The presentation is providing a view and suggestions on more rapid immediate medical response during non-conventional incidents. It names basic concept based on preparedness, early identification of CBR hazards through signs and symptoms of casualties, priorities of rescue procedures and care on-site, needs of decontamination, rapid evacuation casualties from a scene and immediate hospital response.(author)

  19. Hospitableness: the new service metaphor? Developing an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Whilst it has been possible to describe the behaviour of hospitable individuals, there has not been until now an instrument to measure the strength of genuine hospitality in individuals. This paper describes the development of a suite of questions designed to measure these qualities in individuals. This paper describes the ...

  20. Cost Burden for Accessing Paediatric Emergency Services at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    financial expenditures during emergency episode as well as .... of Management, hospital management committee (HMC) and ... Specialist Hospital). Necessary revisions were effected before it was used in the main study. Parents whose children had been discharged home from the unit were approached by members of the ...

  1. assessment of emergency medical services in the ashanti region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-01

    Sep 1, 2015 ... of Ghana Ministry of Health, Accra, Ghana, 4Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Accident and Emergency. Centre, Kumasi, Ghana, 5Kwame ... lines, research and quality assurance processes. Conclusions: The Ashanti ... operated out of approximately twelve Ashanti Region district hospitals for conducting.

  2. Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameryoun, Ahmad; Najafi, Seyedvahid; Nejati-Zarnaqi, Bayram; Khalilifar, Seyed Omid; Ajam, Mahdi; Ansarimoghadam, Ahmad

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension's influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor's impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named "trust in services" was found using EFA, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. The approach was applied to assess the hospital's service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. "Trust in services" has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by "tangibles," "assurance," "empathy," and "responsiveness," respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors' impact on customer perception. Originality/value The procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.

  3. Trends in hospital librarianship and hospital library services: 1989 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Patricia L; Funk, Carla J

    2009-10-01

    The research studied the status of hospital librarians and library services to better inform the Medical Library Association's advocacy activities. The Vital Pathways Survey Subcommittee of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians distributed a web-based survey to hospital librarians and academic health sciences library directors. The survey results were compared to data collected in a 1989 survey of hospital libraries by the American Hospital Association in order to identify any trends in hospital libraries, roles of librarians, and library services. A web-based hospital library report form based on the survey questions was also developed to more quickly identify changes in the status of hospital libraries on an ongoing basis. The greatest change in library services between 1989 and 2005/06 was in the area of access to information, with 40% more of the respondents providing access to commercial online services, 100% more providing access to Internet resources, and 28% more providing training in database searching and use of information resources. Twenty-nine percent (n = 587) of the 2005/06 respondents reported a decrease in staff over the last 5 years. Survey data support reported trends of consolidation of hospitals and hospital libraries and additions of new services. These services have likely required librarians to acquire new skills. It is hoped that future surveys will be undertaken to continue to study these trends.

  4. Continuity of Primary Care and Emergency Hospital Admissions Among Older Patients in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammes, Peter; Purdy, Sarah; Salisbury, Chris; MacKichan, Fiona; Lasserson, Daniel; Morris, Richard W

    2017-11-01

    Secondary health care services have been under considerable pressure in England as attendance rates increase, resulting in longer waiting times and greater demands on staff. This study's aim was to examine the association between continuity of care and risk of emergency hospital admission among older adults. We analyzed records from 10,000 patients aged 65 years and older in 2012 within 297 English general practices obtained from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink and linked with Hospital Episode Statistics. We used the Bice and Boxerman (BB) index and the appointed general practitioner index (last general practitioner consulted before hospitalization) to quantify patient-physician continuity. The BB index was used in a prospective cohort approach to assess impact of continuity on risk of admission. Both indices were used in a separate retrospective nested case-control approach to test the effect of changing physician on the odds of hospital admission in the following 30 days. In the prospective cohort analysis, the BB index showed a graded, non-significant inverse relationship of continuity of care with risk of emergency hospital admission, although the hazard ratio for patients experiencing least continuity was 2.27 (95% CI, 1.37-3.76) compared with those having complete continuity. In the retrospective nested case-control analysis, we found a graded inverse relationship between continuity of care and emergency hospital admission for both BB and appointed general practitioner indices: for the latter, the odds ratio for those experiencing least continuity was 2.32 (95% CI, 1.48-3.63) relative to those experiencing most continuity. Marked discontinuity of care might contribute to increased unplanned hospital admissions among patients aged 65 years and older. Schemes to enhance continuity of care have the potential to reduce hospital admissions. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  5. THE PREDICTOR FACTORS OF EMERGENCY NURSES' PERFORMANCES TO THE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES EXCELLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Annisa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency nurses’ performances remains long standing determinates of quality services rendered for patients admitted to get emergency treatments in the hospitals. It has been viewed as a dimension of professional services excellence. The purpose of this study focused on the predictive correlation of five predictors; namely human resources management, transformational leadership, incentives, hospital structure, and job rotation on the emergency nurses’ performance. This descriptive quantitative study used total sampling technique of 100 nurses in the Emergency Department, in four Government Hospital in Banjarmasin, Bajarbaru, and Martapura. All data obtained by administering questionnaires to the participances. The analytical procedure of multiple linear regression was utilized to determine the predicting strength correlation between the dependent and the independent variables. The result of Pearson product‑moment correlation coefficients revealed that positive correlation established between emergency nurses’ performances and human resources management, transformational leadership, incentives, hospital structure, and job rotation, as the independent variables. The summary of multiple linear regression analysis of all independent variables indicated that incentives was the most strongly predictor to the emergency nurses’ performances.

  6. Queueing and Service Patterns in a University Teaching Hospital FO

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ABSTRACT: Analysis of queueing and service times is essential for designing effective congestion control at a service point. The objective of this is to be able to offer satisfactory service to waiting customers with minimum delay. In this study, using University of Abuja Teaching Hospital as a case study, we compared the ...

  7. Satisfaction with outpatient health services at Jimma Hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Satisfaction with outpatient health services at. Jimma Hospital, South West Ethiopia. Lemessa Oljira, Solomon Gebre-Selassie. Abstract. Background: The opinions of users about the health care services and the degree of their satisfaction may indicate the efficiency of the services. Objective: To assess consumer satisfaction ...

  8. Duration of patients’ visits to the hospital emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Zeynal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Length of stay is an important indicator of quality of care in Emergency Departments (ED. This study explores the duration of patients’ visits to the ED for which they are treated and released (T&R. Methods Retrospective data analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to investigate the duration of T&R ED visits. Duration for each visit was computed by taking the difference between admission and discharge times. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD for 2008 were used in the analysis. Results The mean duration of T&R ED visit was 195.7 minutes. The average duration of ED visits increased from 8 a.m. until noon, then decreased until midnight at which we observed an approximately 70-minute spike in average duration. We found a substantial difference in mean duration of ED visits (over 90 minutes between Mondays and other weekdays during the transition time from the evening of the day before to the early morning hours. Black / African American patients had a 21.4-minute longer mean duration of visits compared to white patients. The mean duration of visits at teaching hospitals was substantially longer than at non-teaching hospitals (243.8 versus 175.6 minutes. Hospitals with large bed size were associated with longer duration of visits (222.2 minutes when compared to hospitals with small bed size (172.4 minutes or those with medium bed size (166.5 minutes. The risk-adjusted results show that mean duration of visits on Mondays are longer by about 4 and 9 percents when compared to mean duration of visits on non-Monday workdays and weekends, respectively. Conclusions The duration of T&R ED visits varied significantly by admission hour, day of the week, patient volume, patient characteristics, hospital characteristics and area characteristics.

  9. Homelessness and housing crises among individuals accessing services within a Canadian emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forchuk, C; Reiss, J P; Mitchell, B; Ewen, S; Meier, A

    2015-08-01

    Studies have indicated that individuals who are homeless access hospital emergency departments more frequently and may have different needs than individuals who are housed. Successful interventions have been developed and tested to reduce discharge to homelessness for psychiatric inpatients but have not been similarly tested for discharge from emergency departments. This study was developed to provide baseline data on this issue to inform future emergency department interventions. Findings from the current study suggest that discharge from emergency departments to homelessness happens frequently in London, Canada. Participants are unlikely to spontaneously disclose their housing/homelessness issue when first entering the emergency department, which may result in services that do not adequately meet their complex needs. Screening for housing issues is necessary within emergency departments and psychiatric crisis teams as housing issues may be a reason for accessing care or contribute to the presenting condition. Nurses are in an ideal position to evaluate housing needs among emergency department patients. Services outside of the emergency department are also needed to address housing issues, particularly outside of regular office hours. Individuals who have mental health issues and are homeless or in housing crisis have been found to access emergency departments more frequently than individuals with stable housing. While emergency departments primarily focus on medical issues, homeless individuals may require psychosocial support as well. This study examined issues around housing crises and emergency department use for individuals with mental illness in Canada. Collecting baseline data about these issues is important to inform subsequent interventions. Administrative data from a hospital emergency department and psychiatric crisis service were collected, and five individuals accessing the emergency department for psychiatric reasons were interviewed. Results

  10. Emergency department and inpatient health care utilization among patients who require interpreter services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Jacobson, Debra J; Ebbert, Jon O; Takahashi, Paul Y; Fan, Chun; Wieland, Mark L

    2015-05-29

    Limited English proficiency is associated with health disparities and suboptimal health outcomes. Although Limited English proficiency is a barrier to effective health care, its association with inpatient health care utilization is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the association between patients with limited English proficiency, and emergency department visits and hospital admissions. We compared emergency department visits and hospitalizations in 2012 between patients requiring interpreter services and age-matched English-proficient patients (who did not require interpreters), in a retrospective cohort study of adult patients actively empanelled to a large primary health care network in a medium-sized United States city (n = 3,784). Patients who required interpreter services had significantly more Emergency Department visits (841 vs 620; P ≤ .001) and hospitalizations (408 vs 343; P ≤ .001) than patients who did not require interpreter services. On regression analysis the risk of a first Emergency Department visit was 60% higher for patients requiring interpreter services than those who did not (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-1.9; P interpreter services had higher rates of inpatient health care utilization compared with patients who did not require an interpreter. Further research is required to understand factors associated with this utilization and to develop sociolinguistically tailored interventions to facilitate appropriate health care provision for this population.

  11. Clinical pharmacy services in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sofie Rahman; Acquisto, Nicole M; Coralic, Zlatan; Basalyga, Vicki; Campbell, Matthew; Kelly, John J; Langkiet, Kevin; Pearson, Claire; Sokn, Erick; Phelan, Michael

    2018-01-31

    The emergency department (ED) is a fast-paced, high-risk, and often overburdened work environment. Formal policy statements from several notable organizations, including the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), have recognized the importance of clinical pharmacists in the emergency medicine (EM) setting. EM clinical pharmacists work alongside emergency physicians and nurses at the bedside to optimize pharmacotherapy, improve patient safety, increase efficiency and cost-effectiveness of care, facilitate antibiotic stewardship, educate patients and clinicians, and contribute to scholarly efforts. This paper examines the history of EM clinical pharmacists and associated training programs, the diverse responsibilities and roles of EM clinical pharmacists, their impact on clinical and financial outcomes, and proposes a conceptual model for EM clinical pharmacist integration into ED patient care. Finally, barriers to implementing EM clinical pharmacy programs and limitations are considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 76 FR 4151 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to the U.S. DOT's NHTSA.... NHTSA-2011-0003] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting AGENCY... Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Teleconference Meeting. ACTION: National Emergency Medical...

  13. Stakeholders' experiences with US hospital emergency preparedness: Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliuso, Nicholas V

    This study examined, via qualitative pheno-menology, important stakeholders' experiences with US hospital emergency preparedness, finding that their experiences varied from positive and effective to frustrating, time-consuming and inefficient. The findings centred on four themes: the importance of funding; collaboration, communication and coordination; the government's role; and hospital leadership buy-in. Together, these findings suggest that issues such as a lack of performance metrics, insufficient funding, inadequate surge capacity, confusing federal guidelines and accreditation requirements and an overall lack of coordination in hospitals' abilities to manage emergency incidents continue to plague the US healthcare system. Exploring and understanding these experiences can support the field in maintaining elements that work and recognising and applying solutions to its shortcomings. This is the first of two papers on the subject, providing background on the topic, the study's purpose, research design and a review of salient literature. The second paper, in a forthcoming issue of this journal, will examine the study's methodological approach, data analysis, main results and implications for practice.

  14. [Spanish nurses' survey on triage in hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Bermejo, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    To describe the opinions of Spanish nurses on hospital emergency department (ED) triage and to compare their level of satisfaction with different triage systems. Descriptive survey-based study of the opinions of nurses working in Spanish EDs. The online questionnaire was self-administered by the respondents. Items covered demographic data, degrees of experience and training, level of satisfaction, and aspects related to triage in general and to the type of triage used in the respondent's hospital. Valid responses were received from 833 of the 857 nurses contacted (97.2% response rate); the nurses worked at 161 hospitals. Eighty hospitals (49.7%) used the Andorran Triage System adapted as the Spanish Triage System (ATM-STS) and 49 (30.4%) used the Manchester Triage System (MTS). The mean (SD) age of respondents was 38.5 (7.8) years; 652 (78.3%) of the respondents were women. Nurses were responsible for triage in 140 (87%) of the hospitals. Four hundred nurses (48.0%) believed triage is a full-team responsibility and 367 (44.0%) believed it was a nursing responsibility. Six hundred three (77.2%) had received specific training in triage. Seven hundred nine (85.1%) believed that triage always or almost always ensures better care for patients with the most serious emergencies, 681 (81.7%) believed that the triage nurse's opinion is taken into consideration, and 663 (79.6%) believed that patients are seen by a physician according to the assigned triage level. Nurses feel supported and generally respected by other nurses. Two hundred thirty (26.7%) would change the triage system they use, but only 100 (43.5%) could name a system they would switch to. Triage is performed by nurses in most of the hospitals, although nearly half of the respondents believe this responsibility should be shared with doctors. Nurses have a good opinion of triage and are generally satisfied with it, but there is variation according to the system implemented in their hospital.

  15. Hospital Supply Expenses: An Important Ingredient in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Yousef; Schneller, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to shed light on hospital supply expenses, which form the second largest expense category after payroll and hold more promise for improving cost-efficiency compared to payroll. However, limited research has rigorously scrutinized this cost category, and it is rarely given specific consideration across cost-focused studies in health services publications. After reviewing previously cited estimates, we examine and independently validate supply expense data (collected by the American Hospital Association) for over 3,500 U.S. hospitals. We find supply expenses to make up 15% of total hospital expenses, on average, but as high as 30% or 40% in hospitals with a high case-mix index, such as surgery-intensive hospitals. Future research can use supply expense data to better understand hospital strategies that aim to manage costs, such as systemization, physician-hospital arrangements, and value-based purchasing.

  16. Hospital emergency preparedness and response during Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a report by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) on the performance of 172 Medicare-certified hospitals in the New York Metropolitan Area before, during, and after Sandy. It makes recommendations on how to close gaps that were found in emergency planning and execution for a disaster of this magnitude. To download the complete 40-page report and a Podcast based on it, go to http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/ reports/oei-06-13-00260. asp.

  17. Manchester System: time spent on risk classification and priority of care at an emergency medical service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anziliero, Franciele; Dal Soler, Bárbara Elis; Silva, Bárbara Amaral da; Tanccini, Thaíla; Beghetto, Mariur Gomes

    2017-02-23

    To assess the time before and time spent on risk classification, priority of care, and destination of patients within 24 hours after their admission to an emergency medical service. Retrospective cohort study that included adults classified by the Manchester Triage System at the largest emergency medical service in the south of the country in 2012. The data were made available in the form of an electronic sheet and analyzed according to their characteristics and distribution. Of the 139,556 admissions, half of the patients arrived at classification within the time recommended (7; IQR: 2-20 minutes), and were classified within two (IQR: 1-3) minutes. Lower priority classifications and hospital discharges (88.4%) were more frequent than hospitalizations (11.4%) and deaths (0.2%). The time involved in activities that precede the first medical care remained within the recommendation. The proportion of lower priority classifications and hospital discharges within 24 hours after classification was high.

  18. Veterinary Teaching Hospital to launch small animal outpatient imaging service

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Christy

    2009-01-01

    Beginning in June 2009, the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech's Veterinary Teaching Hospital will introduce a new outpatient advanced imaging service for surrounding small animal veterinarian practices.

  19. Development of Service Quality Scale for Surgical Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-I Teng

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: The SQSH has sufficient usefulness, reliability and validity. Future research on service quality can apply the SQSH scale to link with utilization intention and patient loyalty and attempt to develop a hospitalization quality scale for other departments.

  20. Optimal assignment of workers to supporting services in a hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawik, Bartosz; Mikulik, Jerzy

    2008-01-01

    Supporting services play an important role in health care institutions such as hospitals. This paper presents an application of operations research model for optimal allocation of workers among supporting services in a public hospital. The services include logistics, inventory management, financial management, operations management, medical analysis, etc. The optimality criterion of the problem is to minimize operations costs of supporting services subject to some specific constraints. The constraints represent specific conditions for resource allocation in a hospital. The overall problem is formulated as an integer program in the literature known as the assignment problem, where the decision variables represent the assignment of people to various jobs. The results of some computational experiments modeled on a real data from a selected Polish hospital are reported.

  1. Psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltke, Katinka; Høegh, Erica B; Sæbye, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the first publication of the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen 1985, outpatient facilities have undergone considerable changes. Our aim is to examine how these changes have influenced the activities in the PEUs in the same catchment area. METHODS: We conducted a f...

  2. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Makokha, Anselimo; Dubourg, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity in most low and middle income countries can be reduced through early recognition of complications, prompt access to care and appropriate medical interventions following obstetric emergencies. We used the three delays framework to explore bar...

  3. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Conway, R; Creagh, D; Byrne, D G; Sheehy, N; Silke, B

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010-2014 were evaluated. The 50(th), 75(th), and 90(th) centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Health science library and information services in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeley, P J; Marshall, S B; Foster, E C

    1985-01-01

    In an increasingly information-based society, hospitals need a variety of information for multiple purposes--direct patient care, staff development and training, continuing education, patient and community education, and administrative decision support. Health science library and information services play a key role in providing broad-based information support within the hospital. This guide identifies resources that will help administrators plan information services that are appropriate to their needs.

  5. Utilisation of Antenatal Services at the Provincial Hospital, Mongomo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilisation of Antenatal Services at the Provincial Hospital, Mongomo, Guinea Equatoria. AAG Jimoh. Abstract. This prospective study was carried out to evaluate the utilisation of antenatal care at the Provincial Specialist Hospital, Mongomo, Guinea Equatoria, paying close attention to the confounding factors affecting ...

  6. The quality of hospital services in eastern Ethiopia: Patient's

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rate and hence meeting patient satisfaction improves the utilization of health services. Methodology. In Harari region there are two secondary (Zonal) hospitals under the Regional Health Bureau, which act as major referral hospitals for the whole of the eastern part of Ethiopia. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in.

  7. [Children with injuries treated in hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestrović, Julije; Milunović, Pjer; Skelin, Ana; Carija, Robert; Catipović, Tatjana; Mestrović, Marija; Mujkić, Aida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of injuries of children admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) of University Hospital Split, and also to define the mechanisms of injuries, as well as the type and severity of injuries. We evaluated 3,221 children with injuries treated in the ED of the University Hospital of Split in the period from January to July 2009. The following indicators were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic distribution of injuries, mechanism, Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the need for hospital and intensive care admission. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests were used in order to determine statistical relevance of the results. Boys were more often injured than girls (65.6%), and most of the injured children were older than 13 years (41.7%). The majority of patients (96%) had minor injuries (ISS injuries were caused by falls (71.3%), and limbs were the most frequently injured body region (67.1%). However, road traffic accidents (RTA) required hospitalization more often than any other mechanism (25% of patients), and the leading injury in RTA victims was head injury (38% of patients). Older children were more susceptible to RTAs (64.5%), and the majority of children were injured as passengers in cars (36.4%). Children with head injuries, and those injured in RTAs, were more often hospitalized and more often admitted to intensive care unit than other patients. The most frequently injured body region in children treated in ED are limbs, and the most frequent mechanism of injury is fall. However, the most severe are head injuries, and the majority of severe injuries are caused by RTAs. These data are important for programs of injury prevention.

  8. Reporting Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in Major Incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattah, Sabina; Johnsen, Anne Siri; Sollid, Stephen J M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in major incidents is predominately based on case descriptions reported in a heterogeneous fashion. Uniform data reported with a consensus-based template could facilitate the collection, analysis, and exchange of experiences...

  9. NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory is a 2005 Wheeled Coach Type III ambulance mounted on a Ford E-450 cut-away van chassis....

  10. System for radiation emergency medicine. Activities of tertiary radiation emergency hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Tanigawa, Koichi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Japanese system for radiation emergency medicine is primarily built up by Cabinet Nuclear Safety Commission in 2001 based on previous Tokai JCO Accident (1999) and is composed from the primary, secondary and tertiary medical organizations. This paper describes mainly about roles and actions of the tertiary facilities at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident and tasks to be improved in future. The primary and secondary organizations in the system above are set up in the prefectures with or neighboring the nuclear facility, and tertiary ones, in two parts of western and eastern Japan. The western organization is in Hiroshima University having its cooperating 7 hospitals, and is responsible for such patients as exposed to high dose external radiation, having serious complication, and difficult to treat in the primary/secondary hospitals. The eastern is in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with 6 cooperating hospitals and responsible for patients with internal radiation exposure difficult to treat, with contaminated body surface with difficulty in decontamination and/or with causable of secondary contamination, and difficult to treat in the secondary hospitals. The tertiary organizations have made efforts for the education and training of medical staff, for network construction among the primary, secondary and other medicare facilities, for establishment of transferring system of patients, and for participation to the international network by global organizations like Response Assistance Network (RANET) in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Radiation Emergency Preparedness and Network (REMPAN) in World Health Organization (WHO). At the Fukushima Accident, staffs of the two tertiary hospitals began to conduct medicare on site (Mar. 12-) and learned following tasks to be improved in future: the early definition of medicare and its network system, and Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ); urgent evacuation of residents weak to disaster like elderly

  11. Older adolescent presentations to a children's hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Shweta; Ng, Elaine Yu Ching; Foo, Feng; Noori, Omar; McCaskill, Mary; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2016-08-01

    To describe the characteristics, diagnoses and outcomes of older adolescents, aged 16-19 years, presenting to a paediatric ED. A retrospective review of total ED presentations by older adolescents to a tertiary paediatric hospital between 2010 and 2012, inclusive, was undertaken to determine if behavioural or mental health problems were common. A total of 1184 ED presentations by 730 older adolescents were identified. Injury and abdominal pain were the most common complaints for presentations by older adolescents to the ED. The median length of stay in ED was 241 (range: 0-3873) min. More than 60% of the older adolescent ED presentations were triaged urgent or semi-urgent, and 39% of all these presentations resulted in hospital admission. Two-thirds of these older adolescents had a chronic illness, which accounted for 77% of all ED presentations by older adolescents. The history of chronic illness was considered related or relevant in the evaluation and management of over 80% of older adolescents. Of all the ED presentations by older adolescents with chronic illness, only one quarter had transition planning documentation. A high prevalence of chronic illness was found in older adolescents attending the paediatric ED. There was no evidence that behavioural and mental health issues dominated. These findings reflect admission policy. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  12. Action Research on Development and Application of Internet of Things Services in Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Arum; Chang, Hyejung; Lee, Kyoung Jun

    2017-01-01

    Services based on the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies have emerged in various business environments. To enhance health service quality and maximize benefits, this study applied an IoT technology based on NFC and iBeacon as an omni-channel service for patient care in hospitals. Application of the IoT technology based on NFC and iBeacon was conducted in a general hospital during August 2015 through June 2016, and the development and evaluation results were aligned to an action research framework. The five phases in the action research included diagnosing, planning action, taking action, evaluating action, and specifying learning phases. During the first two phases, problems of functional operations in a hospital were diagnosed and eight service models were designed by using iBeacon and NFC to solve the problems. Service models were applied to the hospital by installing beacons, wearable beacons, beacon scanners, and NFC tags during the third phase. During the fourth and fifth phases, the roles and benefits of stakeholders participating in the service models were evaluated, and issues and knowledge of the whole application process were derived and summarized from technological, economic, social and legal perspectives, respectively. From an action research perspective, IoT-based healthcare services were developed and verified. IoT-based services enable the hospital to acquire lifelog data for precision medicine and ultimately be able to go one step closer to precision medical care. The derived service models could provide patients more enhanced healthcare services and improve the work efficiency and effectiveness of the hospital.

  13. Otorhinolaryngology Services at Muhimbili National Hospital and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epistaxis is the commonest ear, nose and throat emergency. It's mostly self-limited but it may be severe such that medical attention is sought and in such cases it may be life threatening. There is paucity of data on the prevalence and management options for epistaxis in Tanzania and at Muhimbili National ...

  14. In-hospital organization of primary care of patients presenting a life-threatening emergency: A French national survey in 32 university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Hervé; Severac, Mathilde; Martin, Claude; Ichai, Carole

    2015-08-01

    The development of specialized units dedicated to life-threatening management has demonstrated to improve the prognosis of patients requiring such treatments. However, apart those focused on trauma and stroke, networks are still lacking in France. Despite, the implementation of standardisation of practices and guidelines, particularly in prehospital care, in-hospital clinical practices at admission remain heterogenous. This survey aimed to assess the structural and human organization of teaching hospitals in France concerning the primary in-hospital care for critically ill patients. A questionnaire of 45 items was sent by e-mail to 32 teaching hospitals between January and March 2013. It included information related to the description of the emergency department, of ICUs, and both structural and human organizations for primary in-hospital care of life-threatening patients. Seventy-five percent of teaching hospitals answered to the survey. Seven hundred to 1400 patients were admitted to emergency units per week and among them 10 to 20 were admitted for critically ill conditions. These latter were addressed in a specialized room of the emergency unit (Service d'admission des urgences vitales [SAUV]) in 40% of hospitals and in specialized room in ICU in 18% of cases. Intensivists were involved in 50% of hospitals, emergency physicians in 26% and it was mixed in 24% of hospitals. This survey is the first to assess the in-hospital organization of primary care for instable and life-threatening patients in France. Our results confirmed the extreme heterogeneity of structural and human organizations for primary in-hospital care of patients presenting at least one organ failure. Thus, a consensus is probably needed to homogenize and improve our practices. Copyright © 2015 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  16. Epidemiology of acute organophosphate poisoning in hospital emergency room patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Chandrabhan; Jaga, Kushik

    2005-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) poisoning is a major health issue in developing countries. Organophosphate insecticides inhibit cholinesterase (ChE) enzymatic activity, thereby eliciting cholinergic signs and symptoms. Victims of OP poisoning require immediate hospital emergency room (ER) treatment to prevent a fatal outcome. We present an epidemiologic review of acute OP poisoning in hospital ER patients. Areas of interest include countries with acute OP poisoning, nature of exposure, gender and age of patients, clinical cholinergic features, ChE activity, and health outcome, including recovery rate, case fatality rate, and post-ER complications. The review comprises case reports, hospital surveys, and clinical studies on acute OP poisoning. More studies were conducted in developed than in developing countries. Suicidal and occupational OP poisoning in agricultural workers was prevalent in developing countries, whereas accidental OP poisoning was prevalent in developed countries. Healthcare workers in the ER were also affected by OP poisoning. Both males and females were affected. Children accounted for 35% of the OP-poisoned victims. Patients presented with a classic cholinergic syndrome and serum ChE depresssion, with a recovery rate above 90%. Neurologic impairment was the most frequent complication. Preventing environmental OP exposure and increasing the awareness of pesticide toxicity would reduce acute OP poisoning and protect human health.

  17. Medical review and the newly revised emergency care obligations of Medicare hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K C

    1990-08-01

    The "anti-dumping" provisions under Section 1867 of the Social Security Act have been clarified and strengthened by recent amendments. Medicare-participating hospitals must post signs informing the public of their obligation to examine, treat, and appropriately transfer individuals who request emergency services in the emergency department. Inquiries about an individual's method of payment or insurance source may not delay examination or treatment. Qualified personnel must perform medical screening of all emergency patients, and those to be transferred with emergency medical conditions which have not been stabilized must receive treatment to minimize the risk of transfer. There are stepped-up requirements for informed patient consent and documentation that the medical benefits of a transfer outweigh the risks. In physician-initiated transfers, the receiving hospital must be sent certification by a physician that the benefits of transfer outweigh the risks. Since there is evidence that medically appropriate transfers of persons with emergency medical conditions may actually be underutilized, particularly in rural settings, medical reviewers should avoid an anti-transfer bias.

  18. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  19. [Teamwork in a paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tison-Chambellan, Camille; Daussac, Élisabeth; Barnet, Lucile; Sirven, Sabine; Bambou, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    A paediatric mobile emergency and intensive care service team comprises several professionals with complementary skills. The cohesion of a team, as well as the listening and communication skills of each of its members, allow it to respond in the best possible way to emergency situations. Feedback sessions on practice and simulation exercises enhance teamwork. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. The Etiology of Syncope in an Emergency Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bădilă, Elisabeta; Negrea, Claudia; Rîpă, Alina; Weiss, Emma; Bartoş, Daniela; Tîrziu, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Syncope is a commonly encountered problem in an emergency hospital. Global cerebral hypoperfusion is the final pathway common to all presentations of syncope, but this symptom presentation has a broad differential diagnosis. It is important to identify patients for whom syncope is a symptom of a potentially life-threatening condition. We identified adult patients presenting with syncope to the Emergency Department of our hospital from January 2012 to June 2014. Of 590 patients found in the hospital database we further selected 217 patients who met our criteria, namely having a positive diagnosis of syncope (being clearly distinguished from other TLOCs) and an etiology of the disease. Thus, definite diagnosis was established retrospectively by reviewing medical records. The demographics of our group shows a slightly different distribution between men and women (49% men and 51% women) and a majority of the urban population (67%). As for the age range, most of our patients were in the age group of 70-80 years (30%), 29% were > 80 years old, and the percentage decreases significantly in the 60-70 years range (17%). The most frequent causes of syncope were cardiac (32%), vasovagal (23%) and due to orthostatic hypotension (12%), but we have also found various cases of mixt or iatrogenic causes. The incidence of syncope increases sharply after 70 years of age and poses special consideration in light of multiple comorbid conditions, age-related changes, atypical presentation, and concomitant medication use. The most common causes of syncope in this population are cardiac causes, orthostatic hypotension and carotid sinus hypersensitivity. Often, root cause of syncope remains undiagnosed, despite exhaustive diagnostic testing.

  1. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital outpatient services subject to the... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Categories of Hospitals and Services Subject to and Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.21 Hospital outpatient services...

  2. Nursing service innovation: A case study examining emergency nurse practitioner service sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Amanda; Gardner, Glenn; Osborne, Sonya

    2018-02-01

    This research aimed to explore factors that influence sustainability of health service innovation, specifically emergency nurse practitioner service. Planning for cost effective provision of healthcare services is a concern globally. Reform initiatives are implemented often incorporating expanding scope of practice for health professionals and innovative service delivery models. Introducing new models is costly in both human and financial resources and therefore understanding factors influencing sustainability is imperative to viable service provision. This research used case study methodology (Yin, ). Data were collected during 2014 from emergency nurse practitioners, emergency department multidisciplinary team members and documents related to nurse practitioner services. Collection methods included telephone and semi-structured interviews, survey and document analysis. Pattern matching techniques were used to compare findings with study propositions. In this study, emergency nurse practitioner services did not meet factors that support health service sustainability. Multidisciplinary team members were confident that emergency nurse practitioner services were safe and helped to meet population health needs. Organizational support for integration of nurse practitioner services was marginal and led to poor understanding of service capability and underuse. This research provides evidence informing sustainability of nursing service models but more importantly raises questions about this little explored field. The findings highlight poor organizational support, excessive restrictions and underuse of the service. This is in direct contrast to contemporary expanding practice reform initiatives. Organizational support for integration is imperative to future service sustainability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Cluster analysis of medical service resources at district hospitals in Taiwan, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Fang; Lee, Tian-Shyug; Deng, Chung-Yeh

    2015-12-01

    A vast amount of the annual/national budget has been spent on the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. However, the market for district hospitals has become increasingly competitive, and district hospitals are under pressure to optimize the use of health service resources. Therefore, we employed a clustering method to explore variations in input and output service volumes, and investigate resource allocation and health care service efficiency in district hospitals. Descriptive and cluster analyses were conducted to examine the district hospitals included in the Ministry of Health and Welfare database during 2007-2011. The results, according to the types of hospital ownership, suggested that the number of public hospitals has decreased and that of private hospitals increased; the largest increase in the number of district hospitals occurred when Taichung City was merged into Taichung County. The descriptive statistics from 2007 to 2011 indicated that 43% and 36.4% of the hospitals had 501-800 occupied beds and 101-200 physicians, respectively, and > 401 medical staff members. However, the number of outpatients and discharged patients exceeded 6001 and 90,001, respectively. In addition, the highest percentage of hospitals (43.9%) had 30,001-60,000 emergency department patients. In 2010, the number of patients varied widely, and the analysis of variance cluster results were nonsignificant (p > 0.05). District hospitals belonging to low-throughput and low-performance groups were encouraged to improve resource utilization for enhancing health care service efficiency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  4. How to give the gift of hospitality. Great customer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, M

    1994-08-01

    Whether it takes the form of greeting customers with a smile, redressing a diner's grievance or conducting special kitchen tours, providing customer service has become the number-one priority in foodservices coast to coast. Operators share tips & training methods that are helping staffs provide the hospitable services today's customers are demanding.

  5. Emergency department use and hospitalizations among homeless adults with substance dependence and mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Adrienne; Somers, Julian M; Moniruzzaman, Akm; Patterson, Michelle; Frankish, Charles J; Krausz, Michael; Palepu, Anita

    2015-08-05

    Homelessness, substance use, and mental disorders each have been associated with higher rates of emergency department (ED) use and hospitalization. We sought to understand the correlation between ED use, hospital admission, and substance dependence among homeless individuals with concurrent mental illness who participated in a 'Housing First' (HF) intervention trial. The Vancouver At Home study consisted of two randomized controlled trials addressing homeless individuals with mental disorders who have "high" or "moderate" levels of need. Substance dependence was determined at baseline prior to randomization, using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview diagnostic tool, version 6.0. To assess health service use, we reviewed the number of ED visits and the number of hospital admissions based on administrative data for six urban hospitals. Negative binomial regression modeling was used to test the independent association between substance dependence and health service use (ED use and hospitalization), adjusting for HF intervention, age, gender, ethnicity, education, duration of lifetime homelessness, mental disorders, chronic health conditions, and other variables that were selected a priori to be potentially associated with use of ED services and hospital admission. Of the 497 homeless adults with mental disorders who were recruited, we included 381 participants in our analyses who had at least 1 year of follow-up and had a personal health number that could be linked to administrative health data. Of this group, 59% (n = 223) met criteria for substance dependence. We found no independent association between substance dependence and ED visits or hospital admissions [rate ratio (RR) = 0.85; 95% CI 0.62-1.17 and RR = 1.21; 95% CI 0.83-1.77, respectively]. The most responsible diagnoses (defined as the diagnosis that accounts for the length of stay) for hospital admissions were schizo-affective disorder, schizophrenia-related disorder, or bipolar affective

  6. Project reconversion Service Hospital Radiation Oncology Clinics-Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarneti, A.; Levaggi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The Health Sector operates within the framework of Social Policy and it is therefore one of the ways of distribution of public benefit, like Housing, Education and Social Security. While public spending on health has grown in recent years, its distribution has been uneven and the sector faces funding and management problems. The Service Hospital Radiation Oncology has reduced its health care liavility , lack technological development and unsufficient human resources and training. Aim: developing an inclusive reform bill Service Hospital Radiation Oncology .Material and Methods: This project tends to form a network institutional, introducing concepts of evidence-based medicine, risk models, cost analysis, coding systems, system implementation of quality management (ISO-9000 Standards). Proposes redefining radiotherapy centers and their potential participation in training resource development goals humanos.Promueve scientific research of national interest. Separate strictly administrative function, management and teaching. The project takes into account the characteristics of demand, the need to order it and organize around her, institutional network system and within the Hospital das Clinicas own related services related to Service Hospital Radiation Oncology , Encourages freedom of choice, and confers greater equity in care. The project would managed by the Hospital Clínicas. Conclusions: We believe this proposal identifies problems and opportunities, Service Hospital Radiation Oncology proposes the development of institutional network under one management model

  7. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei Asghar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2 and 4.02(SD = 0.6, respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  8. Service quality of private hospitals: the Iranian patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Asghar; Arab, Mohammad; Froushani, Abbas Rahimi; Rashidian, Arash; Ghazi Tabatabaei, S Mahmoud

    2012-02-02

    Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  9. Concentrating Emergency Rooms: Penny-Wise and Pound-Foolish? An Empirical Research on Scale Economies and Chain Economies in Emergency Rooms in Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart L; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of whether it is economically advantageous to concentrate emergency rooms (ERs) in large hospitals. Besides identifying economies of scale of ERs, we also focus on chain economies. The latter term refers to the effects on a hospital's costs of ER patients who also need follow-up inpatient or outpatient hospital care. We show that, for each service examined, product-specific economies of scale prevail indicating that it would be beneficial for hospitals to increase ER services. However, this seems to be inconsistent with the overall diseconomies of scale for the hospital as a whole. This intuitively contradictory result is indicated as the economies of scale paradox. This scale paradox also explains why, in general, hospitals are too large. There are internal (departmental) pressures to expand certain services, such as ER, in order to benefit from the product-specific economies of scale. However, the financial burden of this expansion is borne by the hospital as a whole. The policy implications of the results are that concentrating ERs seems to be advantageous from a product-specific perspective, but is far less advantageous from the hospital perspective. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Predictors of language service availability in U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiaffino, Melody K; Al-Amin, Mona; Schumacher, Jessica R

    2014-10-01

    Hispanics comprise 17% of the total U.S. population, surpassing African-Americans as the largest minority group. Linguistically, almost 60 million people speak a language other than English. This language diversity can create barriers and additional burden and risk when seeking health services. Patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) for example, have been shown to experience a disproportionate risk of poor health outcomes, making the provision of Language Services (LS) in healthcare facilities critical. Research on the determinants of LS adoption has focused more on overall cultural competence and internal managerial decision-making than on measuring LS adoption as a process outcome influenced by contextual or external factors. The current investigation examines the relationship between state policy, service area factors, and hospital characteristics on hospital LS adoption. We employ a cross-sectional analysis of survey data from a national sample of hospitals in the American Hospital Association (AHA) database for 2011 (N= 4876) to analyze hospital characteristics and outcomes, augmented with additional population data from the American Community Survey (ACS) to estimate language diversity in the hospital service area. Additional data from the National Health Law Program (NHeLP) facilitated the state level Medicaid reimbursement factor. Only 64% of hospitals offered LS. Hospitals that adopted LS were more likely to be not-for-profit, in areas with higher than average language diversity, larger, and urban. Hospitals in above average language diverse counties had more than 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS than less language diverse areas [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 2.26, Phospitals with a strategic orientation toward diversity had nearly 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS (AOR: 1.90, Psystem level factors have a place in disparities research and warrant further analysis; additional spatial methods could enhance our understanding of population factors

  11. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-02-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified.

  12. Frequent Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations Among Homeless People With Medicaid: Implications for Medicaid Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wen-Chieh; Bharel, Monica; Zhang, Jianying; O'Connell, Elizabeth; Clark, Robin E

    2015-11-01

    We examined factors associated with frequent hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits among Medicaid members who were homeless. We included 6494 Massachusetts Medicaid members who received services from a health care for the homeless program in 2010. We used negative binomial regression to examine variables associated with frequent utilization. Approximately one third of the study population had at least 1 hospitalization and two thirds had 1 or more ED visits. More than 70% of hospitalizations and ED visits were incurred by only 12% and 21% of these members, respectively. Homeless individuals with co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders were at greatest risk for frequent hospitalizations and ED visits (e.g., incidence rate ratios [IRRs] = 2.9-13.8 for hospitalizations). Individuals living on the streets also had significantly higher utilization (IRR = 1.5). Despite having insurance coverage, homeless Medicaid members experienced frequent hospitalizations and ED visits. States could consider provisions under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (e.g., Medicaid expansion and Health Homes) jointly with housing programs to meet the needs of homeless individuals, which may improve the quality and cost effectiveness of care.

  13. [Communicative process in the mobile emergency service (SAMU/192)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Maria Claudia; Bernardes, Andrea; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Evora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla Rossi

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to characterize the communication process among nursing assistants who work in vehicles of the basic life support of the mobile emergency service, in the coordination of this service, and in the unified medical regulation service in a city of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. This descriptive and qualitative research used the thematic content analysis for data analysis. Semi-structured interviews were used for the data collection, which was held in January, 2010. Results show diffculties in communication with both the medical regulation service and the coordination. Among the most highlighted aspects are failures during the radio transmission, lack of qualified radio operators, difficult access to the coordination and lack of supervision by nurses. However, it was possible to detect solutions that aim to improve the communication ana consequently, the service offered by the mobile emergency service.

  14. Simulation of operational processes in hospital emergency units as lean healthcare tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Macedo Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Lean philosophy is gaining importance due to a competitive environment, which increases the need to reduce costs. Lean practices and tools have been applied to manufacturing, services, supply chain, startups and, the next frontier is healthcare. Most lean techniques can be easily adapted to health organizations. Therefore, this paper intends to summarize Lean practices and tools that are already being applied in health organizations. Among the numerous techniques and lean tools used, this research highlights the Simulation. Therefore, in order to understand the use of Simulation as a Lean Healthcare tool, this research aims to analyze, through the simulation technique, the operational dynamics of the service process of a fictitious hospital emergency unit. Initially a systematic review of the literature on the practices and tools of Lean Healthcare was carried out, in order to identify the main techniques practiced. The research highlighted Simulation as the sixth most cited tool in the literature. Subsequently, a simulation of a service model of an emergency unit was performed through the Arena software. As a main result, it can be highlighted that the attendants of the built model presented a degree of idleness, thus, they are able to atend a greater demand. As a last conclusion, it was verified that the emergency room is the process with longer service time and greater overload.

  15. Failing hospitals: mission statements to drive service improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Annabel; Sarfraz, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to consider whether the hospital mission statement can be used as a management tool to improve service provision in failing hospitals. A literature search into the potential value and harm of hospital mission statements was done, followed by a survey of initial attitudes within a failing hospital. Do they indicate likely success of the tool? Mission statement is a potentially valuable leadership tool in the hospital environment. The success of its implementation is broadly dependent on its being developed with the support of stakeholders and its real application to all management decisions and questions of asset allocation. The potential danger lies in the fact that it can be seen as an expensive expression of politically correct platitudes which leads to cynical alienation of stakeholders. This was a small study within a single UK failing hospital, and extending its range will help to clarify whether its findings are typical of attitudes within such institutions. The likely success of the hospital mission statement as a management tool within a failing hospital is significantly limited by initial attitudes and preconceptions. Our research suggests that implementation is likely to be detrimental without preparatory involvement of the local community and hospital staff at all levels. Hospital management cannot be divorced from the local community where patient confidence must be maintained. This paper complements previous research, which has looked at mission statement acceptance among the upper echelons of hospital management.

  16. [Social aspects of emergency calls in the rescue service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völker, Maria Theresa; Jahn, Nora; Kaisers, Udo; Laudi, Sven; Knebel, Lars; Bercker, Sven

    2015-04-01

    Many missions in the preclinical emergency services seem to be triggered by false indications as defined by the Federal State Rescue Act. These emergency calls are often a result of or associated with social issues. Emergency rescue personnel are confronted with social problems and as a result often feel left alone with the problem. This article promotes the understanding of emergency service personnel for the associations between social problems and health. Solution strategies for frequent social emergencies are described. This article demonstrates the associations between socioeconomic status, health and disease. Typical indications for missions in which social aspects play an important role are presented and solution strategies for the approach are suggested. A discussion is presented on how to deal with cases of child abuse and domestic violence. Three classical psychiatric problem areas with common social components are explained: psychomotor state of excitation, suicide and alcohol-associated incidents and special attention is paid to danger to third parties and aggressive patients. In addition to the treatment of medical conditions, social problems play an important role particularly for the elderly and chronically ill patients. Emergency personnel have only limited options for dealing with such problems; however, it is important to be aware of regional structures and non-medical organizations, which might be of help in such situations. These include social services, youth welfare services, crisis interventions teams and social psychiatric services.

  17. The perceived impact of an emergency department immediate reporting service: An exploratory survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaith, Beverly; Hardy, Maryann

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immediate reporting, commonly referred to as a ‘hot reporting’, has been advocated as a method of effectively supporting clinical decision making. However, its implementation nationally has been limited with poor understanding of its value in practice. Method: A cross sectional attitudinal survey was distributed to emergency department clinicians (medical and nursing staff) and radiographers to explore perceptions of an immediate reporting service in terms of its influence on professional role and autonomy, patient care and service quality. Results: A total of 87 (n = 87/155; 56.1%) completed questionnaires were returned. The findings suggest that significant support for immediate reporting exists. Immediate reporting is believed to improve service quality, reduce clinical errors and provide opportunity for image interpretation skills development. However, responses were not consistent across clinical professions and staff grades. Conclusion: The immediate reporting of emergency department images is perceived to benefit patient, emergency department clinicians and hospital organisation

  18. Integrating emergency services in an urban health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radloff, D; Blouin, A S; Larsen, L; Kripp, M E

    2000-03-01

    When planning for growth and management efficiency across urban health systems, economic and market factors present significant service line challenges and opportunities. This article describes the evolutionary integration of emergency services in St John Health System, a large, religious-sponsored health care system located in Detroit, Michigan. Critical business elements, including the System's vision, mission, and economic context, are defined as the framework for site-specific and System-wide planning. The impact of managed care and market changes prompted St John's clinicians and executives to explore how integrating emergency services could create a competitive market advantage.

  19. Production layout improvement in emergency services: a participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Mateus; Amaral, Fernando Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Volunteer fire department is a service that responds emergency situations in places where there are no military emergency services. These services need to respond quickly, because time is often responsible for the operation success besides work environment and setup time interfere with the prompt response to these calls and care efficiency. The layout design is one factor that interferes with the quick setup. In this case, the spaces arrangement can result in excessive or unnecessary movements; also the equipment provision may hinder the selection and collection of these or even create movement barriers for the workers. This work created a new layout for the emergency assistance service, considering the human factors related to work through the task analysis and workers participation on the alternatives of improvement. The results showed an alternate layout with corridors and minimization of unusable sites, allowing greater flexibility and new possibilities of requirements.

  20. Barriers to the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at Portuguese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazinha, Isabel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    In some countries, such as Portugal, clinical pharmacy services in the hospital setting may be implemented to a lower extent than desirable. Several studies have analysed the perceived barriers to pharmacy service implementation in community pharmacy. To identify the barriers towards the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at a hospital level in Portugal, using medication follow-up as an example. Hospital pharmacies in Portugal. A qualitative study based on 20 face-to-face semi-structured interviews of strategists and hospital pharmacists. The interview guide was based on two theoretical frameworks, the Borum's theory of organisational change and the Social Network Theory, and then adapted for the Portuguese reality and hospital environments. A constant comparison process with previously analysed interviews, using an inductive approach, was carried out to allow themes to emerge. Themes were organised following the Leavitt's Organizational Model: functions and objectives; hospital pharmacist; structure of pharmacy services; environment; technology; and medication follow-up based on the study topic. Barriers towards practice change. Medication follow-up appeared not to be a well-known service in Portuguese hospital pharmacies. The major barriers at the pharmacist level were their mind-set, resistance to change, and lack of readiness. Lack of time, excessive bureaucratic and administrative workload, reduced workforce, and lack of support from the head of the service and other colleagues were identified as structural barriers. Lack of access to patients' clinical records and cumbersome procedures to implement medication follow-up were recognised as technological barriers. Poor communication with other healthcare professionals, and lack of support from professional associations were the major environmental barriers. Few of the barriers identified by Portuguese hospital pharmacists were consistent with previous reports from community pharmacy. The mind

  1. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C; Johansen, Jakob Kjersgaard; Zwisler, Stine; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2017-12-06

    Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed in proportion to a known tone of 94 dB. Before and after episodes of noise exposure, the physicians underwent a hearing test indicating whether the noise had had any impact on the function of the outer sensory hair cells. This was accomplished by measuring the amplitude level shifts of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions. Furthermore, the prehospital personnels' hearing was investigated using pure-tone audiometry to reveal any occupational hearing loss. All prehospital personnel were compared to ten in-hospital controls. Our results indicate high-noise exposure levels of ≥80 dB(A) during use of sirens on the MECU and during HEMS operations compared to in-hospital controls (70 dB(A)). We measured an exposure up to ≥90 dB(A) under the helmet for HEMS crew. No occupational hearing loss was identified with audiometry. A significant level shift of the Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions at 4 kHz for HEMS crew compared to MECU physicians was found indicating that noise affected the outer hair cell function of the inner ear, thus potentially reducing the hearing ability of the HEMS crew. Further initiatives to prevent noise exposure should be taken, such as active noise reduction or custom-made in-ear protection with communication system for HEMS personnel. Furthermore, better insulation of MECU and ambulances is warranted. We found that the exposure levels exceeded the

  2. 76 FR 64174 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to DOT's NHTSA...-0149] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council. SUMMARY: The...

  3. 77 FR 46802 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-06

    ... consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to DOT's NHTSA...-0100] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council. SUMMARY: The...

  4. 76 FR 51122 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to...-0115] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory... Transportation (DOT). Title: National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal...

  5. 77 FR 27278 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to DOT's NHTSA...-0050] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting notice--National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council. SUMMARY: The...

  6. 77 FR 14590 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Correction to the Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-12

    ... emergency medical services (EMS) representatives and consumers to provide advice and recommendations...-0021] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Correction to the Notice of.... Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Correction to notice of the National Emergency Medical Services...

  7. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Pre-hospital Medical Emergencies Early Warning Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimian, Abbasali; Masoumi, Gholamreza; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz; Seyedin, Hesam

    2017-04-01

    The number of requests for emergency medical services (EMSs) has increased during the past decade. However, most of the transports are not essential. Therefore, it seems crucial to develop an instrument to help EMS staff accurately identify patients who need pre-hospital care and transportation. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Pre-hospital Medical Emergencies Early Warning Scale (Pre-MEWS). This mixed-method study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, a qualitative content analysis study was conducted to identify the predictors of medical patients' need for pre-hospital EMS and transportation. In the second phase, the face and the content validity as well as the internal consistency of the scale were evaluated. Finally, the items of the scale were scored and scoring system was presented. The final version of the scale contained 22 items and its total score ranged from 0 to 54. Pre-MEWS helps EMS staffs properly understand medical patients' conditions in pre-hospital environments and accurately identify their need for EMS and transportation.

  8. Patients' satisfaction of service quality in Saudi hospitals: a SERVQUAL analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Borie, Hussein M; Damanhouri, Amal M Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabian hospital performance, vis-á-vis patient satisfaction with service provision, has emerged as a key policy and planning concern. Keeping in view public and private hospital service quality, this article seeks to provide guidelines to the on-going Saudi Arabian health service reorganization, which emphasizes decentralization, bed-capacity expansion, research-based policymaking and initiatives in the health insurance sector. The article outlines an empirical study that compares patient satisfaction with service quality in Saudi Arabian public and private sector hospitals. The authors employ a stratified random sample (1,000 inpatients) from five Saudi Arabian public and five private hospitals. Data were collected through questionnaire using the SERVQUAL scale. For reducing the language bias the questionnaire was translated into Arabic. The response rate was 74.9 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS and appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Cronbach's alpha for five service-quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, safety and empathy) were high and the SERVQUAL instrument proved to be reliable, valid and appropriate. The results showed that sex, education, income and occupation were statistically significant in influencing inpatients' satisfaction, and all the null hypotheses were rejected. Only inpatient age was not significant. The study highlights service quality influence in the design of broader healthcare strategies for Saudi Arabian public and private hospitals. It demands that management researchers and analysts must identify regional service quality consistencies and related inpatient demographic indicators. The study offers some insights into, and guidance for, hospital quality assurance in Saudi Arabia in general and the urban hospital setting in the Middle-East in particular.

  9. Emergency pre-hospital care of burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlberger, Thomas; Ottomann, Christian; Toman, Nidal; Daigeler, Adrien; Lehnhardt, Marcus

    2010-04-01

    Intensive care and the surgical therapy of burn injuries have made significant advancements. The immediate care on the scene of the accident, however, is not uniform. There is no 'golden hour' which will decide the further clinical process. The acute estimate of the percentage of the extent of the burns is of little relevance and does not facilitate the admission to a burn unit. The emergency calculation of the volume of intravenous infusion is not advisable. The choice of transport has no discernible impact on the prognosis of the patient. Avoiding hypothermia and perceiving associated trauma can be of crucial prognostic importance in the pre-hospital care of burn patients. Detailed knowledge about the circumstances of the injury is of exceeding importance. Copyright 2009 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia: a survey of Norwegian pre-hospital services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hypothermia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in trauma patients and poses a challenge in pre-hospital treatment. The aim of this study was to identify equipment to prevent, diagnose, and treat hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services. Method In the period of April-August 2011, we conducted a survey of 42 respondents representing a total of 543 pre-hospital units, which included all the national ground ambulance services, the fixed wing and helicopter air ambulance service, and the national search and rescue service. The survey explored available insulation materials, active warming devices, and the presence of protocols describing wrapping methods, temperature monitoring, and the use of warm i.v. fluids. Results Throughout the services, hospital duvets, cotton blankets and plastic “bubble-wrap” were the most common insulation materials. Active warming devices were to a small degree available in vehicle ambulances (14%) and the fixed wing ambulance service (44%) but were more common in the helicopter services (58-70%). Suitable thermometers for diagnosing hypothermia were lacking in the vehicle ambulance services (12%). Protocols describing how to insulate patients were present for 73% of vehicle ambulances and 70% of Search and Rescue helicopters. The minority of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (42%) and Fixed Wing (22%) units was reported to have such protocols. Conclusion The most common equipment types to treat and prevent hypothermia in Norwegian pre-hospital services are duvets, plastic “bubble wrap”, and cotton blankets. Active external heating devices and suitable thermometers are not available in most vehicle ambulance units. PMID:23938145

  11. Triage in an adult emergency service: patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pollyane Liliane; Paiva, Luciana; Faria, Veridiana Bernardes; Ohl, Rosali Isabel Barduchi; Chavaglia, Suzel Regina Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Assess the degree of patient satisfaction with triage in the adult emergency service of a public hospital. Exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Three hundred patients were interviewed and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics based on sociodemographic variables and those related to patient satisfaction. There was a predominance of women, with elementary education and a mean age of 41 years. Most of the interviewees reported being satisfied in regard to the following items: timely service, embracement, trust, environment (comfort, cleanliness and signage), humanization (courtesy, respect, and interest), timely referral/scheduling of appointments and care expectations. There was a high level of patient satisfaction, evidenced by the strong association of user satisfaction with the items investigated. Avaliar o grau de satisfação dos usuários no setor de Acolhimento com Classificação de Risco do Pronto-Socorro Adulto de um hospital público. Pesquisa exploratória, descritiva e transversal com abordagem quantitativa. Foram entrevistados 300 usuários e os dados foram analisados por meio de estatística descritiva a partir de variáveis sociodemográficas e as relacionadas à satisfação do usuário. Houve predominância do sexo feminino, nível de escolaridade fundamental e idade média de 41 anos. A maioria dos entrevistados respondeu estar satisfeito em relação aos itens: agilidade no atendimento; acolhimento; confiança; ambiência (conforto, limpeza, sinalização), humanização (educação, respeito e interesse); agilidade no encaminhamento/agendamento de consulta e expectativa sobre o serviço. Verificou-se elevado grau de satisfação dos usuários, evidenciada pela forte associação da satisfação do usuário com os itens investigados.

  12. Maternity Care Services Provided by Family Physicians in Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A

    The purpose of this study was to describe how many rural family physicians (FPs) and other types of providers currently provide maternity care services, and the requirements to obtain privileges. Chief executive officers of rural hospitals were purposively sampled in 15 geographically diverse states with significant rural areas in 2013 to 2014. Questions were asked about the provision of maternity care services, the physicians who perform them, and qualifications required to obtain maternity care privileges. Analysis used descriptive statistics, with comparisons between the states, community rurality, and hospital size. The overall response rate was 51.2% (437/854). Among all identified hospitals, 44.9% provided maternity care services, which varied considerably by state (range, 17-83%; P maternity care, a mean of 271 babies were delivered per year, 27% by cesarean delivery. A mean of 7.0 FPs had privileges in these hospitals, of which 2.8 provided maternity care and 1.8 performed cesarean deliveries. The percentage of FPs who provide maternity care (mean, 48%; range, 10-69%; P maternity care who are FPs (mean, 63%; range, 10-88%; P maternity care services in US rural hospitals, including cesarean deliveries. Some family medicine residencies should continue to train their residents to provide these services to keep replenishing this valuable workforce. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  13. Adolescent presentations to an adult hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Omar; Batra, Shweta; Shetty, Amith; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2017-10-01

    Age-related policies allow adolescents to access paediatric and adult EDs. Anecdotally, paediatric and adult EDs report challenges when caring for older and younger adolescents, respectively. Our aim was to describe the characteristics of an adolescent population attending an adult ED, co-located with a tertiary paediatric ED. The Westmead Hospital ED database was accessed for 14.5-17.9 years old presentations between January 2010 and December 2012. Patient diagnosis coding (SNOMED) was converted to ICD-10. De-identified data were transferred into Microsoft Excel with analysis performed using spss V22. There were 5718 presentations made to the Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia ED by 4450 patients, representing 3.3% (95% CI 3.2-3.4) of total visits from all patients 14.5 years and above. The mean age of the sample was 16.6 years (male 51.8%). Presentations triaged as level 4 or 5 represented 61.0% (95% CI 58.7-61.3) of visits. The proportion of patients who did not wait to receive care was 13.8% (95% CI 12.9-14.7), which was significantly higher than adult rates (P < 0.01). There were 279 unscheduled return visits (visits made <72 h of discharge) representing 4.9% (95% CI 4.4-5.8) of all presentations. Injury was the most common diagnosis (30.2%, 95% CI 28.8-31.6). Chronic physical illness and alcohol-related visits comprised 2.1% (95% CI 1.7-2.5) and 0.8% (95% CI 0.6-1.0) of adolescent presentations, respectively. Contrary to reported staff perceptions, adolescent chronic physical illness presentations were not a major burden. Alcohol was likely under-recorded as a contributing factor to presentations. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  14. The reflection of the Syrian civil war on the emergency department and assessment of hospital costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuş, Ali; Yengil, Erhan; Akkücük, Seçkin; Cevik, Cengiz; Zeren, Cem; Uruc, Vedat

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to assess the demographics, clinical features, and treatment costs of cases referred to our hospital after the Syrian civil war. Of 1355 Syrian civil war victims referred to our hospital during the 14-month period between June 2011 and July 2012, 482 cases presenting to the emergency department were included in the study. The electronic data of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. Of 482 cases, 428 were male (88.8%) and 54 (11.2%) were female, with a mean age of 30.4±14.9 years (1-79 years). The mean age was 30.8±17.2 years (1-79 years) in males and 27.3±16.9 years (1.5-66 years) in females. There was a significant difference in terms of sex (p=0.007). It was found that the majority of the cases (41.1%) were aged 21-30 years. The highest number of admissions was recorded in June 2011 (159 patients, 33%), whereas the lowest number of admissions was in September 2011 (5 patients, 1%). All cases were transported to our hospital from nearby district hospitals and camps by emergency medical services. The most frequent presenting complaint was gunshot injury (338 cases, 70.1%). The most common diagnosis was extremity injury (153 cases, 31.7%). The number of forensic cases was found as 364 (75.5%). Of all the cases, 136 cases (28.2%) were managed in the emergency service, and the remaining cases were admitted to other services. They were most frequently admitted to the orthopedics ward (146 cases, 30.3%). The mean length of the hospital stay was 9.9 days (1-141).Overall, 456 cases (94.6%) were discharged, 22 cases died, and 4 cases were transferred to other facilities. The mean cost per case was estimated as 3723Turkish lira (TL) (15-69556). A positive correlation was found between cost and length of hospital stay. Among all Syrian cases, the majorities of young males and gunshot injuries was striking. Most of the cases were discharged after appropriate management. Preventive measures can avoid these negative outcomes and so

  15. Language disparities in patients transported by emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, N R; Weiss, S J; Tate, R; Oglesbee, S; Ernst, A A

    2015-12-01

    The population of the United States continues to diversify with an increasing percentage of residents with limited English proficiency (LEP). A major concern facing emergency medical services (EMS) providers is increasing scene and transport times. We hypothesized that there would be a significant difference in EMS scene and transport times when comparing LEP and English-speaking (ES) patients and there would be a difference in care, both in and out of hospital. This is a retrospective case-control study with patient data extracted from hospital records and EMS run reports from a 911 emergency ambulance service. Patients were only included if they were transported to our level I trauma center. Inclusion in the LEP group was based on a field in EMS run reports that claimed language barrier as the sole reason for no patient signature. All LEP patients from July 1, 2012, to November 1, 2012, were reviewed. A random comparison sampling of ES patients from the same period was evaluated. The patients' demographic data, pain scores, interventions, medications, transport times, and scene times were analyzed. Patients were followed up from emergency department (ED) management through to disposition. Percentages were compared using 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Bivariate analysis used the Student t test and χ(2) test. A multivariable logistic regression model was created to determine predictive variables. A 5% random sampling was compared by 2 investigators for interrater agreement. Data were collected from a total of 101 ES and 100 LEP patients. Interrater agreement was 94% between extractors. Limited English proficiency patients were significantly older (56 ± 20 years old) than ES patients (41 ± 21 years old) and more likely to be female (odds ratio [OR], 2; 95% CI, 1.1-3.3). Limited English proficiency patients had a greater mean EMS transport time of 2.2 minutes (95% CI, 0.04-4.0). The odds of LEP patients receiving electrocardiograms were greater both in the

  16. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  17. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  18. Evaluation of a radioisotope service in a general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateil, P.-Y.

    1978-12-01

    The value of radioisotopes in medicine has become increasingly apparent over the last few years. Nuclear medicine however recent, has nevertheless reached adult hood and doctors appreciate its substantial contribution in the field of diagnosis especially. So far nuclear medicine has been confined to University Hospital Centres, mainly for legal reasons. However the considerable help offered by this discipline is now taken for granted in the medical world and the wholly experimental stage is long past. While this aspect of nuclar medicine still exists, and is still dealt with by the services of University Hospital Centres, radioisotopes are now used to a large extend and on a day-to-day basis in pathology. Owing to pressure of work it is difficult for UH Centres to meet all request for examinations, so would the presence of nuclear medicine Service be justified in general Hospitals. The existence of one such service at the Bayonne HC might help to answer this question. For this reason the activity of the Bayonne HC Nuclear Medicine Service during its first year of practice is examined here. For a better understanding of the position this report first presents the Bayonne Hospital and the place occupied by a nuclear Medicine service in such an establishment. The activity of this service during its first year is then studied and the situation weighed up generally [fr

  19. Do either early warning systems or emergency response teams improve hospital patient survival? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, G; Bryden, D

    2013-12-01

    For critical care to be effective it must have a system in place to achieve optimal care for the deteriorating ward patient. To systematically review the available literature to assess whether either early warning systems or emergency response teams improve hospital survival. In the event of there being a lack of evidence regarding hospital survival, secondary outcome measures were considered (unplanned ICU admissions, ICU mortality, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, cardiac arrest rates). The Ovid Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Cochrane library and NHS databases were searched in September 2012 along with non-catalogued resources for papers examining the effect of early warning systems or emergency response teams on hospital survival. Inclusion criteria were original clinical trials and comparative studies in adult inpatients that assessed either an early warning system or emergency response team against any of the predefined outcome measures. Exclusion criteria were previous systematic reviews, non-English abstracts and studies incorporating paediatric data. Studies were arranged in to sections focusing on the following interventions: Early warning systems - Single parameter systems - Aggregate weighted scoring systems (AWSS) Emergency response teams - Medical emergency teams - Multidisciplinary outreach services . In each section an appraisal of the level of evidence and a recommendation has been made using the SIGN grading system. 43 studies meeting the review criteria were identified and included for analysis. 2 studies assessed single parameter scoring systems and 4 addressed aggregate weighted scoring systems. A total of 20 studies examined medical emergency teams and 22 studies examined multidisciplinary outreach teams. The exclusion of non English studies and those including paediatric patients does limit the applicability of this review. Much of the available evidence is of poor quality. It is clear that a 'whole system' approach

  20. Evaluating psychiatric readmissions in the emergency department of a large public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris DW

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available David W Morris,1 Subroto Ghose,1,2 Ella Williams,1,2 Kevin Brown,1,2 Fuad Khan1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas, TX, USA Introduction: Hospital emergency departments (EDs around the country are being challenged by an ever-increasing volume of patients seeking psychiatric services. This manuscript describes a study performed to identify internal and external factors contributing to repeated psychiatric patient admissions to the hospital main ED. Methods: Data from ED visits of patients who were admitted to the Parkland Memorial Hospital ED (the community hospital for Dallas County, TX, USA with a psychiatric complaint more than once within a 30-day period were evaluated (n=202. A 50-item readmission survey was used to collect information on demographic and clinical factors associated with 30-day readmission, as well as to identify quality improvement opportunities by assessing related moderating factors. An analysis of acute readmission visits (occurring within 3 days of previous discharge was also performed. Results: Patients readmitted to the ED commonly present with a combination of acute psychiatric symptoms, substance use (especially in the case of acute readmission, and violent or suicidal behavior. The vast majority of cases reviewed found that readmitted patients had difficulties coordinating care outside the ED. A number of moderating factors were identified and targeted for quality improvement including additional support for filling prescriptions, transportation, communication with family and outside providers, drug and alcohol treatment, intensive case management, and housing. Conclusion: Many of the resources necessary to reduce psychiatric patient visits to hospital EDs are available within the community. There is no formal method of integrating and insuring the continuity of community services that may

  1. Identifying key hospital service quality factors in online health communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain; Kim, Minki

    2015-04-07

    The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. We defined social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea's two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and

  2. [Psychiatric Emergencies in the Preclinical Emergency Medicine Service in Ulm, Germany in 2000 and 2010, and Practical Consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Gahr, Maximilian; Schütz, Stefan; Lang, Dirk; Pajonk, Frank Gerald Bernhard; Connemann, Bernhard J; Muth, Claus-Martin; Freudenmann, Roland W

    2017-07-01

    Background  Psychiatric emergencies (PE) in preclinical emergency medical services are about 5 - 10 % of all emergencies and represent often a source of difficulties in handling for the non-psychiatric professional helpers that deal with them. Studies informing about quantitative and qualitative changes of PEs in preclinical emergency medicine in Germany are scarce. Methods  Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study of PE in a preclinical emergency medical service based on the protocols of the emergency ambulance of the Section for Emergency Medicine at the University Hospital Ulm comparing the years 2000 and 2010. Results  We observed a significant increase of PEs from 8.8 % in the year 2000 (n = 285, from a total of n = 3227) to 10.3 % in 2010 (n = 454, from a total of n = 4425). In both years intoxications were the most common PE [2000: n = 116 (44.4 %); 2010: n = 171 (37.7 %)], followed by suicide-related behavior [2000: n = 59 (22.6 %); 2010: n = 78 (17.2 %)] and acute anxiety disorders [2000: n = 37 (13 %); 2010: n = 105 (23.1 %)]. The mentioned three conditions accounted for about 80 % of all PE. Most frequently PE occurred at the weekend and with the highest density in the evening and at night (18 - 24 h) in both years. Patients with PE were predominantly men, but the rate of women causing PE increased between 2000 and 2010. Discussion/Conclusion  This study provides preliminary data on current trends in PEs in preclinical emergency medicine in Germany and has implications for improving the medical care provided. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The Lesotho Hospital PPP experience: catalyst for integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carla Faustino; O'Farrell, Catherine Commander

    2011-01-01

    For many years, Lesotho urgently needed to replace its main public hospital, Queen Elizabeth II. The project was initially conceived as a single replacement hospital, but eventually included the design and construction of a new 425 bed public hospital and adjacent primary care clinic, the renovation and expansion of three strategically located primary care clinics in the region and the management of all facilities, equipment and delivery of all clinical services in the health network by a private operator under contract for 18 years. The project's design was influenced by the recognition that a new facility alone would not address the underlying issues in service provision. The creation of this PPP health network and the contracting mechanism has increased accountability for service quality, shifted Government to a more strategic role and may also benefit other public facilities and providers in Lesotho. The county is considering the PPP approach for other health facilities.

  4. [Characteristics of the emergency health service demand in Southern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carret, Maria Laura Vidal; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Soares, Patrícia Carret

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the demand of emergency health service. It was performed a descriptive analyses of 1647 adults that consulted at emergency public service of Pelotas, Brazil. Older subjects, non white skin color, lower schooling, without partner, and smokers presented higher prevalence of consultations at this service when compared with the general population. Individuals waited, on average, 15 minutes to have their consultations, exams were requested in more than 40% of the visits, and intravenous medication were administered in one third of the visits. Elderly waited longer before searching the service, but they had lowest awaiting time after arriving at emergency service and had higher percentage of regular doctor and social support. Elderly had more diagnosis related to circulatory system, while among the youngest, external causes were the most frequent. The low waiting average for consultation suggest this service provide an immediate care while the great number of ill-defined signs or symptoms indicate that the provided care is provisional. It is necessary to train emergency professionals to reduce the number of tests requested and to assure that either professional as the population is conscious about the importance of a continuity of care.

  5. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournane, S.; Conway, R.; Creagh, D.; Byrne, D.G.; Sheehy, N.; Silke, B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. Materials and methods: All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010–2014 were evaluated. The 50 th , 75 th , and 90 th centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. Results: For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. Conclusion: CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. - Highlights: • There are differing clinical complexities for patients depending on the modality. • A predictive risk model, incorporating advanced imaging, was devised. • Inpatients delays in radiology imaging associated with longer LOS. • Inpatients who underwent radiology imaging associated with increased hospital costs.

  6. Emergency medical service systems research: problems of the past, challenges of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaite, D W; Criss, E A; Valenzuela, T D; Guisto, J

    1995-08-01

    Out-of-hospital emergency care was designed around the concept of a system of interrelated events that combine to offer a patient the best care possible outside the hospital. However, in contrast to the actual operations of emergency medical service (EMS) systems, research has not typically used systems-based models as the method for evaluation. In this discussion we outline the weaknesses of component-based research models in EMS evaluation and attempt to provide a "systems-analysis" framework that can be used for future research. Incorporation of this multidiscipline approach into EMS research is essential if there is to be any hope of finding answers to many of the important questions that remain in the arena of out-of-hospital health care.

  7. Language services in hospitals: discordance in availability and staff use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschurtz, Brette A; Koss, Richard G; Kupka, Nancy J; Williams, Scott C

    2011-01-01

    Despite efforts to advance effective patient-provider communication, many patients' language needs continue to be unmet or inappropriately addressed by healthcare providers (Wielawski 2010; Patek et al. 2009; Wilson-Stronks and Galvez 2007). This study presents a picture of the language resources currently provided by hospitals and those resources practitioners actually use. Questionnaire data were collected from 14 hospitals in Florida's Palm Beach, St. Lucie, and Martin counties on availability, staff awareness, and staff use of linguistic resources and services. Inconsistencies were identified between the language tools, services, and resources hospitals provide and those staff use. In addition, a large majority of staff respondents still rely upon someone accompanying the patient for communication with patients who have limited English proficiency, despite evidence that this practice contributes to miscommunication and serious medical errors (Flores et al. 2003; Flores 2005; HHS OMH 2001; Patek et al. 2009). Hospitals that use bilingual staff as interpreters often do not test the competency of these staff, nor do they assess the utilization or effectiveness of the tools and resources they provide. Hospitals can improve the cultural and linguistic care they provide if they (1) address the practice of using ad hoc interpreters, (2) effectively disseminate information to hospital staff regarding how and when to access available resources, and (3) collect patient population data and use it to plan for and evaluate the language services they provide to their patients.

  8. Magnitude of non-operative surgical emergency admissions; service implications for surgical and radiological practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, R M; Reynolds, I; Ryan, R S; Khan, I; Khan, W; Waldron, R; Barry, K

    2017-02-01

    Financial sustainability is an area of sharp ongoing focus across the broad spectrum of the Irish Health Service. Recent attention has been drawn to the financial implications of non-operative surgical admissions, suggesting that some of these may be unnecessary. In this study, we aim to determine the volume of emergency surgical admissions to Mayo University Hospital (MUH), in particular, to identify the scale of non-operative admissions and to assess the wider inherent implications for acute hospital services. An electronic handover system for emergency surgical admissions was introduced in MUH in September 2014. All surgical admissions from September 1st 2014 to August 31st 2015 were identified from this prospectively maintained database. HIPE (Hospital Inpatient Enquiry) data were not used in this study. Theatre logbooks confirmed those patients who required operative intervention. 1466 patients were admitted as emergencies during the study period. 58 % (850) were male and median age was 48 years (0-100). Average length of stay was 5 days (range 1-125). 327 patients (22.3 %) required operative intervention. The most commonly performed procedure was appendicectomy (52.5 %). 48 (3.3 %) patients were transferred to other hospitals. 131 (8.9 %) admissions related to the acute urological conditions. Of the 1466 admissions, 546 underwent a CT scan, while 342 patients proceeded to ultrasound. Almost 80 % of all surgical emergency admissions were discharged without undergoing a formal operative procedure while generating a significant workload for the radiology department. Changes in working practices and hospital network structures will be required to reduce the burden of non-operative emergency admissions.

  9. 'Being a conduit' between hospital and home: stakeholders' views and perceptions of a nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasalu, Munikumar Ramasamy; Clarke, Amanda; Atkinson, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    To explore and critically examine stakeholders' views and perceptions concerning the nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Service in an acute hospital setting and to inform sustainability, service development and future service configuration. The drive in policy and practice is to enable individuals to achieve their preferred place of care during their last days of life. However, most people in UK die in acute hospital settings against their wishes. To facilitate individuals' preferred place of care, a large acute hospital in northeast England implemented a pilot project to establish a nurse-led Macmillan Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service. A pluralistic evaluation design using qualitative methods was used to seek stakeholders' views and perceptions of this service. In total, 12 participants (five bereaved carers and seven health professionals) participated in the evaluation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with bereaved carers who used this service for their relatives. A focus group and an individual interview were undertaken with health professionals who had used the service since its inception. Individual interviews were also conducted with the Discharge Facilitator and service manager. Analysis of all data was guided by Framework Analysis. Four key themes emerged relating to the role of the Discharge Facilitator Service: achieving preferred place of care; the Discharge Facilitator as the 'conduit' between hospital and community settings; delays in hospital discharge and stakeholders' perceptions of the way forward for the service. The Discharge Facilitator Service acted as a reliable resource and support for facilitating the fast-tracking of end-of-life patients to their preferred place of care. Future planning for hospital-based palliative care discharge facilitating services need to consider incorporating strategies that include: increased profile of the service, expansion of service provision and the Discharge Facilitator's earlier

  10. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty.

  11. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  12. Emergency Department (ED, ED Observation, Day Hospital, and Hospital Admissions for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of alternative venues to manage uncomplicated vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC, such as a day hospital (DH or ED observation unit, for patients with sickle cell anemia, may significantly reduce admission rates, which may subsequently reduce 30-day readmission rates. Methods: In the context of a two-institution quality improvement project to implement best practices for management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD VOC, we prospectively compared acute care encounters for utilization of 1 emergency department (ED; 2 ED observation unit; 3 DH, and 4 hospital admission, of two different patient cohorts with SCD presenting to our two study sites. Using a representative sample of patients from each institution, we also tabulated SCD patient visits or admissions to outside hospitals within 20 miles of the patients’ home institutions. Results: Over 30 months 427 patients (297 at Site 1 and 130 at Site 2 initiated 4,740 institutional visits, totaling 6,627 different acute care encounters, including combinations of encounters. The range of encounters varied from a low of 0 (203 of 500 patients [40.6%] at Site 1; 65 of 195 patients [33.3%] at Site 2, and a high of 152 (5/month acute care encounters for one patient at Site 2. Patients at Site 2 were more likely to be admitted to the hospital during the study period (88.4% vs. 74.4%, p=0.0011 and have an ED visit (96.9% vs. 85.5%, p=0.0002. DH was used more frequently at Site 1 (1.207 encounters for 297 patients at Site 1, vs. 199 encounters for 130 patients at Site 2, and ED observation was used at Site 1 only. Thirty-five percent of patients visited hospitals outside their home academic center. Conclusion: In this 30-month assessment of two sickle cell cohorts, healthcare utilization varied dramatically between individual patients. One cohort had more hospital admissions and ED encounters, while the other cohort had more day hospital encounters and used a sickle cell disease

  13. The social determinants of emergency department and hospital use by injection drug users in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palepu, A; Strathdee, S A; Hogg, R S; Anis, A H; Rae, S; Cornelisse, P G; Patrick, D M; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Schechter, M T

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and human immunodeficiency (HIV) status of a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs) on their self-reported health service utilization. Interviewer-administered questionnaire. IDUs who had injected illicit drugs within the previous month were recruited through street outreach. They underwent serology for HIV-1 and questionnaires on demographics, drug using behaviors, housing status, and health service utilization (hospitalization overnight and emergency department visits) in the previous 6 months. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent associations with the use of health services. Of 1,103 cohort participants, 65% were male, 63% were white, and 23% were HIV positive. Cocaine was the most frequently injected drug used. Almost half (47%) had used health services in the previous 6 months. The following variables were associated independently with health service utilization (adjusted odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): unstable housing, defined as living primarily in a hotel, boarding room, or transition house or on the street in the past 6 months (1.44; 1.11-1.86); female gender (1.45; 1.11-1.89); HIV-positive status (1.43; 1.06-1.92); injection of cocaine (1.50; 1.12-2.02); and primary care I physician visit in past 6 months (1.91; 1.39-2.64). IDUs with unstable housing were more likely to report emergency department and hospital use, which may be a reflection of their disorganized lifestyle or poorer health status. Further studies are required to assess the effect on the health status and health care use of IDUs of interventions that increase the availability of safe, affordable housing.

  14. Pre-hospital electrocardiogram triage with tele-cardiology support is associated with shorter time-to-balloon and higher rates of timely reperfusion even in rural areas: data from the Bari- Barletta/Andria/Trani public emergency medical service 118 registry on primary angioplasty in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Di Pietro, Gaetano; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Bruno, Angela I; Dellegrottaglie, Giulia; Di Giuseppe, Giuseppe; Lopriore, Claudio; De Gennaro, Luisa; Lanzone, Saverio; Caldarola, Pasquale; Antonelli, Gianfranco; Di Biase, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    We report the preliminary data from a regional registry on ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated with primary angioplasty in Apulia, Italy; the region is covered by a single public health-care service, a single public emergency medical service (EMS), and a single tele-medicine service provider. Two hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients with STEMI transferred by regional free public EMS 1-1-8 for primary-PCI were enrolled in the study; 123 underwent pre-hospital electrocardiograms (ECGs) triage by tele-cardiology support and directly referred for primary-PCI, those remaining were just transferred by 1-1-8 ambulances for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (diagnosis not based on tele-medicine ECG; already hospitalised patients, emergency-room without tele-medicine support). Time from first ECG diagnostic for STEMI to balloon was recorded; a time-to-balloon <1 h was considered as optimal and patients as timely treated. Mean time-to-balloon with pre-hospital triage and tele-cardiology ECG was significantly shorter (0:41 ± 0:17 vs 1:34 ± 1:11 h, p<0.001, -0:53 h, -56%) and rates of patients timely treated higher (85% vs 35%, p<0.001, +141%), both in patients from the 'inner' zone closer to PCI catheterisation laboratories (0:34 ± 0:13 vs 0:54 ± 0:30 h, p<0.001; 96% vs 77%, p<0.01, +30%) and in the 'outer' zone (0:52 ± 0:17 vs 1:41 ± 1:14 h, p<0.001; 69% vs 29%, p<0.001, +138%). Results remained significant even after multivariable analysis (odds ratio for time-to-balloon 0.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63-0.80, p<0.001; 1.39, 95% CI 1.25-1.55, p<0.001, for timely primary-PCI). Pre-hospital triage with tele-cardiology ECG in an EMS registry from an area with more than one and a half million inhabitants was associated with shorter time-to-balloon and higher rates of timely treated patients, even in 'rural' areas. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  15. Variability of emergency color codes for critical events between hospitals in Riyadh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Isa; El Dali, AbdelMoneim; ElDeib, Omar; Altoub, AbdulAziz; Pasha, Farooq; Butt, Taimur

    2015-01-01

    Emergency color codes were developed to alert healthcare personnel in a hospital to critical situations. They are often developed independently by each hospital, leading to variability. This could be a source of confusion to healthcare personnel, who move frequently between hospitals and may work at multiple hospitals. This study evaluated the variability of emergency codes for different critical events in hospitals in Riyadh. A prospective, cross-sectional survey was carried out on a representative sample of hospitals. Twenty-four of 28 hospitals took part in the study. Semi-structured questionnaires were completed by the Quality/Safety Department of each hospital, on general hospital characteristics, emergency department characteristics, code-response mock-up, code determination, emergency codes used and code meanings. Thirty-four different codes were used across hospitals. The codes used most variably were yellow (10 meanings), orange, black, green (7 meanings each), and gray (5 meanings), while the most consistently used code was 'Code Red' for 'Fire' in 75% of hospitals. Another source of variability was the use of non-color codes, representing 7.7% of total codes. There is large variability in the type and meaning of emergency codes between hospitals in Riyadh City, reflecting a lack of standardization. Hospitals use color and non-color emergency codes, which could cause confusion to responders and mitigate the effectiveness and speed of response in critical events.

  16. Effects of Ramadan on Forensic Cases Presenting to Emergency Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sarı Doğan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "forensic case" is defined as disruption of physical and/or mental health of an individual due to external factors. Forensic cases are most frequently encountered in emergency services. Ramadan, the ninth month of Islamic calendar, is a month of fasting throughout which Muslims from all around the world worship by observing fasting. There are many studies focusing on the effects of fasting on health. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Ramadan on forensic cases presenting to emergency service.

  17. Psychiatric disorders among patients admitted to a French medical emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliou, Veronique; Fichelle, Anika; McLoughlin, Mary; Thauvin, Isabelle; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among a population of patients examined in the emergency service of a French general hospital. They compared patients with and without psychiatric disorders. They also compared patients where the primary motive of emergency was psychiatric to those whose psychiatric disorders were secondarily diagnosed by a systematic assessment. Five hundred consecutive patients admitted to the emergency service of Bichat Claude Bernard Hospital (Paris, France) were interviewed with standardized questionnaires. Demographic details were collected along with information on current and past contacts with emergencies and psychiatric services. Psychiatric disorders were identified using a structured psychiatric interview, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Domestic violence was identified with a specific checklist validated for this purpose. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders was 38% (189 patients). Forty (8%) patients were primary psychiatric cases referred to the emergency department for psychiatric reasons, while 149 (30%) were secondary psychiatric cases, as revealed by a systematic assessment of their mental state. Psychiatric patients, primary or secondary, were more often homeless (13.6% vs.1.95%). They had been more often referred to the emergency department after an aggressive (7.4% vs.3.5%) or violent behavior (5.8% vs.0.9%) and less often after an accident (8.4% vs.14.3%). Psychiatric patients were more often examined after an episode of domestic violence (21.7% vs. 6.8%). Psychiatric diagnoses, according to the DSM-IV criteria, were depression (80 cases), generalized anxiety disorder (34 cases) acute alcohol intoxication (21 cases), alcohol dependence (20 cases), schizophrenia (16 cases), posttraumatic stress disorder (14 cases), drug abuse (4 cases), agoraphobia (4 cases), alcohol abuse (3 cases), anorexia nervosa (3 cases), mania (2 cases) and obsessive compulsive disorder (2 cases). The

  18. Mobile information and communication in the hospital outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Chen; Hung, Ming-Chien; Li, Yu-Chuan; Chi, Y P

    2007-08-01

    Most healthcare providers provide mobile service for their medical staff; however, few healthcare providers provide mobile service as part of their outpatient service. The mobile outpatient service system (MOSS) focuses on illness treatment, illness prevention and patient relation management for outpatient service users. Initiated in a local hospital in Taiwan, the MOSS pilot project was developed to improve outpatient service quality and pursue higher patient safety. This study focuses on the development of the MOSS. The workflow, architecture and target users of the MOSS are delineated. In addition, there were two surveys conducted as part of this study. After a focus group of medical staff identified areas in which outpatient services might be improved by the MOSS, the first survey was administered to outpatients to confirm the focus group's intuitions. The second administration of the survey explored outpatient satisfaction after they used the MOSS service. With regard to outpatient attitudes, about 93% of participants agreed that the mobile outpatient service improved outpatient service quality. In the area of outpatient satisfaction, about 89% of participants indicated they were satisfied with the mobile outpatient service. Supported by our study finding, we propose that more diverse mobile outpatient services can be provided in the future.

  19. Theatre and emergency services rendered by generalist medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 27 district hospitals were staffed by 147 full time, part-time and community service practitioners at the time of the study. The part-time practitioners had statistically significant more experience. Fifty percent of the respondents had done an ATLS or equivalent course, whilst only 5% were qualified family physicians.

  20. Survey of Emergency and Essential Surgical, Obstetric and Anaesthetic Services Available in Bangladeshi Government Health Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, Jonathan; Sachdev, Sonal P; Cherian, Meena N; Katayama, Francisco; Akhtaruzzaman, A K M; Thomas, Joe; Huda, N; Faragher, E Brian; Johnson, Walter D

    2017-07-01

    Evaluate the capacity of government-run hospitals in Bangladesh to provide emergency and essential surgical, obstetric and anaesthetic services. Cross-sectional survey of 240 Bangladeshi Government healthcare facilities using the World Health Organisation Situational Analysis Tool to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (SAT). This tool evaluates the ability of a healthcare facility to provide basic surgical, obstetric and anaesthetic care based on 108 queries that detail the infrastructure and population demographics, human resources, surgical interventions and reason for referral, and available surgical equipment and supplies. For this survey, the Bangladeshi Ministry of Health sent the SAT to sub-district, district/general and teaching hospitals throughout the country in April 2013. Responses were received from 240 healthcare facilities (49.5% response rate): 218 sub-district and 22 district/general hospitals. At the sub-district level, caesarean section was offered by 55% of facilities, laparotomy by 7% and open fracture repair by 8%. At the district/general hospital level, 95% offered caesarean section, 86% offered laparotomy and 77% offered open fracture treatment. Availability of anaesthesia services, general equipment and supplies reflected this trend, where district/general hospitals were better equipped than sub-district hospitals, though equipment and infrastructure shortages persist. There has been overall impressive progress by the Bangladeshi Government in providing essential surgical services. Areas for improvement remain across all key areas, including infrastructure, human resources, surgical interventions offered and available equipment. Investment in surgical services offers a cost-effective opportunity to continue to improve the health of the Bangladeshi population and move the country towards universal healthcare coverage.

  1. Impact of Superstorm Sandy on Medicare Patients’ Utilization of Hospitals and Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Stryckman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: National health security requires that healthcare facilities be prepared to provide rapid, effective emergency and trauma care to all patients affected by a catastrophic event. We sought to quantify changes in healthcare utilization patterns for an at-risk Medicare population before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy’s 2012 landfall in New Jersey (NJ. Methods: This study is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries impacted by Superstorm Sandy. We compared hospital emergency department (ED and healthcare facility inpatient utilization in the weeks before and after Superstorm Sandy landfall using a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries continuously enrolled in 2011 and 2012 (N=224,116. Outcome measures were pre-storm discharges (or transfers, average length of stay, service intensity weight, and post-storm ED visits resulting in either discharge or hospital admission. Results: In the pre-storm week, hospital transfers from skilled nursing facilities (SNF increased by 39% and inpatient discharges had a 0.3 day decreased mean length of stay compared to the prior year. In the post-storm week, ED visits increased by 14% statewide; of these additional “surge” patients, 20% were admitted to the hospital. The increase in ED demand was more than double the statewide average in the most highly impacted coastal regions (35% versus 14%. Conclusion: Superstorm Sandy impacted both pre- and post-storm patient movement in New Jersey; post-landfall ED surge was associated with overall storm impact, which was greatest in coastal counties. A significant increase in the number and severity of pre-storm transfer patients, in particular from SNF, as well as in post-storm ED visits and inpatient admissions, draws attention to the importance of collaborative regional approaches to healthcare in large-scale events.

  2. Impact of Superstorm Sandy on Medicare Patients' Utilization of Hospitals and Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryckman, Benoit; Walsh, Lauren; Carr, Brendan G; Hupert, Nathaniel; Lurie, Nicole

    2017-10-01

    National health security requires that healthcare facilities be prepared to provide rapid, effective emergency and trauma care to all patients affected by a catastrophic event. We sought to quantify changes in healthcare utilization patterns for an at-risk Medicare population before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy's 2012 landfall in New Jersey (NJ). This study is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries impacted by Superstorm Sandy. We compared hospital emergency department (ED) and healthcare facility inpatient utilization in the weeks before and after Superstorm Sandy landfall using a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries continuously enrolled in 2011 and 2012 (N=224,116). Outcome measures were pre-storm discharges (or transfers), average length of stay, service intensity weight, and post-storm ED visits resulting in either discharge or hospital admission. In the pre-storm week, hospital transfers from skilled nursing facilities (SNF) increased by 39% and inpatient discharges had a 0.3 day decreased mean length of stay compared to the prior year. In the post-storm week, ED visits increased by 14% statewide; of these additional "surge" patients, 20% were admitted to the hospital. The increase in ED demand was more than double the statewide average in the most highly impacted coastal regions (35% versus 14%). Superstorm Sandy impacted both pre- and post-storm patient movement in New Jersey; post-landfall ED surge was associated with overall storm impact, which was greatest in coastal counties. A significant increase in the number and severity of pre-storm transfer patients, in particular from SNF, as well as in post-storm ED visits and inpatient admissions, draws attention to the importance of collaborative regional approaches to healthcare in large-scale events.

  3. Impact of Superstorm Sandy on Medicare Patients’ Utilization of Hospitals and Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryckman, Benoit; Walsh, Lauren; Carr, Brendan G.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Lurie, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Introduction National health security requires that healthcare facilities be prepared to provide rapid, effective emergency and trauma care to all patients affected by a catastrophic event. We sought to quantify changes in healthcare utilization patterns for an at-risk Medicare population before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy’s 2012 landfall in New Jersey (NJ). Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries impacted by Superstorm Sandy. We compared hospital emergency department (ED) and healthcare facility inpatient utilization in the weeks before and after Superstorm Sandy landfall using a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries continuously enrolled in 2011 and 2012 (N=224,116). Outcome measures were pre-storm discharges (or transfers), average length of stay, service intensity weight, and post-storm ED visits resulting in either discharge or hospital admission. Results In the pre-storm week, hospital transfers from skilled nursing facilities (SNF) increased by 39% and inpatient discharges had a 0.3 day decreased mean length of stay compared to the prior year. In the post-storm week, ED visits increased by 14% statewide; of these additional “surge” patients, 20% were admitted to the hospital. The increase in ED demand was more than double the statewide average in the most highly impacted coastal regions (35% versus 14%). Conclusion Superstorm Sandy impacted both pre- and post-storm patient movement in New Jersey; post-landfall ED surge was associated with overall storm impact, which was greatest in coastal counties. A significant increase in the number and severity of pre-storm transfer patients, in particular from SNF, as well as in post-storm ED visits and inpatient admissions, draws attention to the importance of collaborative regional approaches to healthcare in large-scale events. PMID:29085534

  4. Predictors of Language Service Availability in U.S. Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody K. Schiaffino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Hispanics comprise 17% of the total U.S. population, surpassing African-Americans as the largest minority group. Linguistically, almost 60 million people speak a language other than English. This language diversity can create barriers and additional burden and risk when seeking health services. Patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP for example, have been shown to experience a disproportionate risk of poor health outcomes, making the provision of Language Services (LS in healthcare facilities critical. Research on the determinants of LS adoption has focused more on overall cultural competence and internal managerial decision-making than on measuring LS adoption as a process outcome influenced by contextual or external factors. The current investigation examines the relationship between state policy, service area factors, and hospital characteristics on hospital LS adoption. Methods We employ a cross-sectional analysis of survey data from a national sample of hospitals in the American Hospital Association (AHA database for 2011 (N= 4876 to analyze hospital characteristics and outcomes, augmented with additional population data from the American Community Survey (ACS to estimate language diversity in the hospital service area. Additional data from the National Health Law Program (NHeLP facilitated the state level Medicaid reimbursement factor. Results Only 64%of hospitals offered LS. Hospitals that adopted LS were more likely to be not-for-profit, in areas with higher than average language diversity, larger, and urban. Hospitals in above average language diverse counties had more than 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS than less language diverse areas [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR: 2.26, P< 0.01]. Further, hospitals with a strategic orientation toward diversity had nearly 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS (AOR: 1.90, P< 0.001. Conclusion Our findings support the importance of structural and contextual factors as they relate to

  5. Social deprivation and hospital admission rates, length of stay and readmissions in emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, Seán; Byrne, Declan; Conway, Richard; O'Riordan, Deirdre; Coveney, Seamus; Silke, Bernard

    2015-12-01

    Patients from deprived backgrounds have a higher in-patient mortality following an emergency medical admission. How deprivation relates to the admission or readmission incidence rates, episode length of stay (LOS) and ancillary resource utilization is less clear. All emergency medical admissions (66,861 episodes in 36,214 patients) between 2002 and 2013, categorized by quintile of Irish National Deprivation Index were assessed against admission or readmission incidence rates (/1000 local population by electoral division), LOS and utilization of five ancillary services. Univariate and multi-variable risk estimates (odds ratios (OR) or incidence rate ratios (IRR)) were calculated, using truncated Poisson regression. The deprivation index quintile was strongly correlated with the emergency medical admission rate with IRR (as compared with quintile 1) as follows: Q2 1.99 (95% CI: 1.96, 2.01), Q3 3.45 (95% CI: 3.41, 3.49), Q4 3.27 (95% CI: 3.23, 3.31) and Q5 4.29 (95% CI: 4.23, 4.35). LOS was not influenced by deprivation status; although increasing deprivation resulted in increased utilization of social services (OR 1.04: 95% CI: 1.03, 1.06), with a lower requirement for occupational therapy (OR 0.94: 95% CI: 0.93, 0.96) and speech/language services (OR 0.83: 95% CI: 0.80, 0.86). There was a rather decreased use of ancillary services with increasing deprivation; however, the readmission rate was strongly predicted by deprivation status. Deprivation status strongly influenced the admission and readmission rates for medical patients admitted as emergencies; however, ancillary resource utilization was not increased. Deprivation index will increase demand on hospital resources due to the aggregate effect on both admission and readmission incidence rates. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Instrument for assessing the quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care: content validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Assis Neves Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To validate an instrument to assess quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care. METHOD A methodological study where 20 professionals gave their opinions on the items of the proposed instrument. The analysis was performed using Kappa test (K and Content Validity Index (CVI, considering K> 0.80 and CVI ≥ 0.80. RESULTS Three items were excluded from the instrument: Professional Compensation; Job Satisfaction and Services Performed. Items that obtained adequate K and CVI indexes and remained in the instrument were: ambulance conservation status; physical structure; comfort in the ambulance; availability of material resources; user/staff safety; continuous learning; safety demonstrated by the team; access; welcoming; humanization; response time; costumer privacy; guidelines on care; relationship between professionals and costumers; opportunity for costumers to make complaints and multiprofessional conjunction/actuation. CONCLUSION The instrument to assess quality of care has been validated and may contribute to the evaluation of pre-hospital care in mobile emergency services.

  7. Factors contributing to frequent attendance to the emergency department of a remote Northern Territory hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Simon; Shannon, Geordan; Yao, Anthony; Sargent, William; McVeigh, Michael F

    2016-02-15

    To determine the clinical and environmental variables associated with frequent presentations by adult patients to a remote Australian hospital emergency department (ED) for reasons other than chronic health conditions. Unmatched case-control study of all adult patients attending Katherine Hospital ED between 1 January and 31 December 2012. Cases were defined as frequent attenders (FAs) without a chronic health condition who presented to the ED six or more times during the 12-month period. A single presentation was randomly selected for data collection. Controls were patients who presented on only one occasion. Basic demographic data were collected, including clinical outcomes, Indigenous status, living arrangements, and whether alcohol and violence contributed to the presentation. Environmental variables were extracted from the Bureau of Meteorology database and mapped to each presentation. FAs were much more likely to be homeless (odds ratio [OR], 16.4; P homelessness and the involvement of alcohol, but alcohol was more likely to contribute to presentation by non-Aboriginal FAs who had stable living conditions. FAs and non-FAs had similar needs for emergency medical care, with strikingly higher death rates than the national average in both groups. As a result of this study, Katherine Hospital has initiated a Frequent Attender Pathway that automatically triggers a dedicated ED service for those at greatest clinical risk. Homelessness is a serious problem in the Northern Territory, and is associated with poor health outcomes.

  8. Factors Affecting Staff Perceptions of Tele-ICU Service in Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Marcia M; Ullrich, Fred; Potter, Andrew J; MacKinney, A Clinton; Kappel, Sarah; Mueller, Keith J

    2015-06-01

    Telemedicine is designed to increase access to specialist care, especially in settings distant from tertiary-care centers. One of the more established telemedicine applications in hospitals is the tele-intensive care unit (tele-ICU). Perceptions of tele-ICU users are not well studied. Thus, we undertook a study focused on assessing staff acceptance at multiple hospitals that had implemented a tele-ICU system. We designed a survey instrument that gathered perceptions on multiple facets of tele-ICU use and administered it to clinical and administrative staff at 28 hospitals that had implemented a tele-ICU system. We also conducted interviews at half of these hospitals to gain a deeper understanding of factors affecting staff perceptions of tele-ICU services. The 145 survey respondents were generally positive about all facets of the service. Analyses found no significant differences in comparisons between critical access and larger hospitals or between clinical and administrative/managerial respondents, although a few differences between providers and nurses emerged. Respondents at hospitals averaging more tele-ICU use and that had implemented it longer were significantly (phospitals retained critical care patients during special circumstances and when the tele-ICU hub could monitor patients to provide relief for local providers and nurses. Tele-ICU can aid rural hospitals, but multiple delivery models are warranted to meet disparate needs.

  9. [Extended medical services to the inpatient sector--"medical services on individual demand" in the hospital. General legal conditions, 10 basic rules, and practical examples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, Thomas; Pillokat, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Today, extended medical services--previously known in the context of ambulant healthcare provision or plastic surgery only--are increasingly being offered by hospitals. Hospitals have started to offer these services with good reason: in times of budgetary restraints they want to exploit this emerging new market due to economic necessities and they try to meet rising demands from patients. It is not easy to draw the line between special (extended) medical services and general hospital services. These different categories need to be kept apart, though. Special contracts for these specific extended medical services have to be entered into by hospital and patient in any case where the hospital wants to charge him later on. Different preconditions are to be considered with patients insured by statutory health insurance companies and privately insured patients. The price of extended medical services must be carefully calculated and, in particular, has to be related to the price charged from patients insured via statutory health insurance. Attention should also be paid to other aspects such as taxes, liability law, and hospital subsidisation. The present article presents some basic rules for offering extra medical services in a hospital.

  10. Who killed Rambhor?: The state of emergency medical services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh H Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the healthcare delivery system starts up from the sub-center at the village level and reaches up to super specialty medical centers providing state of the art emergency medical services (EMS. These highest centers, located in big cities, are considered the last referral points for the patients from nearby cities and states. As the incidents of rail and road accidents have increased in recent years, the role of EMS becomes critical in saving precious lives. But when the facilities and management of these emergency centers succumbs before the patient, then the question arises regarding the adequate availability and quality of EMS. The death of an unknown common man, Rambhor, for want of EMS in three big hospitals in the national capital of India put a big question on the "health" of the emergency health services in India. The emergency services infrastructure seems inadequate and quality and timely provision of EMS to critical patients appears unsatisfactory. There is lack of emergency medicine (EM specialists in India and also the postgraduation courses in EM have not gained foot in our medical education system. Creation of a Centralized Medical Emergency Body, implementation of management techniques, modification of medical curriculum, and fixing accountability are some of the few steps which are required to improve the EMS in India.

  11. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract The provision of analgesic services to the labour ward at King Edward VIII Hospital was studied during a I-week period. Of249 patients, 113 (45%) received no analgesia whatsoever. Intramuscular pethidine was the commonest form of analgesia and was used in 97 patients (39%). Thirty-six patients (14%) received ...

  12. Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations." It is divided into four units: recreational resources for education, employment, and professional opportunities; barbering and cosmetology; mortuary science; hotel-motel management. Each unit is…

  13. Community-oriented services in a psychiatric hospital. Effort to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    “Yaba apa osi” (Yaba to the left side). Consequently, in the year 2000 the hospital stepped up its efforts on destigmatization through public enlightenment programmes and provision of commercial /social as well as general health care services in the institution that would bring or attract the citizenry to its facilities. We carried ...

  14. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  15. Frequent visits to a French psychiatric emergency service: diagnostic variability in psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Laurent; Dassa, Daniel; Belzeaux, Raoul; Henry, Jean-Marc; Samuelian, Jean-Claude; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Lancon, Christophe

    2011-08-01

    This study examined characteristics of frequent visitors to a psychiatric emergency service in a French public teaching hospital over six years. Diagnostic variability of psychotic disorders was documented. A retrospective review of the service's administrative and medical databases identified 1,285 patients with more than one visit during the period who were given at least one diagnosis of a psychotic disorder. A total of 317 patients with six or more visits (frequent visitors) were compared with 968 patients with between two and five visits (occasional visitors). Frequent visitors were significantly more likely to be single and homeless and to have diagnostic variability, substance use disorders, and personality disorders. A total of 177 patients experienced diagnostic variability, which was found mainly in three diagnostic categories: schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder with psychotic features. Future studies should further examine the link between increased use of emergency services and diagnostic variability.

  16. HOSPITAL IMAGE AS A MODERATING VARIABLE ON THE EFFECT OF HOSPITAL SERVICE QUALITY ON THE CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE, CUSTOMER TRUST AND CUSTOMER LOYALTY IN HOSPITAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrianawati Usman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an explanatory research, analyzing the hospital image as a moderating variable on the effect of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and trust. Research was conducted at several hospitals in Surabaya Indonesia, especially to outpatients. Data was collected by survey to the outpatients of the hospitals. The purpose of this research was empirically examining the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust, examine effects of customer perceived value and customer trust on customer loyalty. Moreover This research also examined the variable of hospital image as a moderating variable in the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust. The result of this research gave a perspective to hospital management about the importance of building patient trust, since trust is very important, even more important than satisfaction level. Further studies with more emphasis on identifying the factors building patient trust to the hospital in order to raise customer loyalty should be conducted.

  17. Medical Emergency Workload of a Regional UK HEMS Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Carl; Crombie, Nick; Cormack, Stef; Wheaton, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Regionalized trauma networks have been established in England to centralize specialist care at dedicated centers of excellence throughout the country. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in the West Midlands region have been redesigned to form an integrated component of such systems. The continued use of such valuable and scarce resources for medical emergencies requires evaluation. A retrospective review of mission data for a regional Air Ambulance Service in England over a two year period. Medical emergencies continue to contribute a large proportion of the overall workload of the service. Requirement for advanced interventions at the scene was rare, with less than 10% of patients attended by HEMS teams having care needs that fall beyond the scope of standard paramedic practice. Dynamic solutions are needed to ensure that HEMS support for cases of medical emergency are appropriately targeted to incidents in which clinical benefit is conferred to the patient. Intelligent tasking of appropriate resources has the potential to improve the HEMS response to medical emergencies while optimizing the availability of resources to respond to other incidents, most notably cases of major trauma. Copyright © 2015 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Caracterização de crianças e adolescentes atendidos por maus tratos em um hospital de emergência no município de Fortaleza-CE Characterization of maltreated children and adolescents taken into a paediatric emergency health care service in Fortaleza-CE-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcelina Maria da Silva

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar o perfil da criança e adolescente maltratados e atendidos em um hospital de emergência, no Município de Fortaleza, Ceará. Utilizou-se a pesquisa documental retrospectiva com análise dos formulários da Comissão de Maus Tratos à Infância e Adolescência. Os resultados revelaram que o sexo masculino e a faixa etária de 1 a 5 anos foram os mais atingidos; o principal agressor é o pai biológico e os tipos de violência mais freqüentes foram o hematoma, o abuso sexual e as lesões por objetos cortantes. Conclui-se que o tema requer estudos aprofundados que modifiquem o ambiente em que a criança, adolescente e famílias estão inseridos.This study aimed to characterise the profile of the child and the adolescent who were maltreated and taken into paediatric emergency care in a hospital, in Fortaleza, Ceará. It was used a documented retrospective evaluation. The results showed that the children in the age group of 1-5 years were the most victimised as well as the children of the male sex. The main perpetrator was a biological father and the most frequent kind of violence were hematomas, sexual abuse and wounds by slashing objects. In conclusion, this subject needs to be more investigated for providing changes within the' environment where a child, adolescent and families were inserted.

  19. Achievements in emergency medical care service, North-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To analyse the performance of the Emergency Medical Rescue Service (EMRS) in North-West province. Design. A prospective study of the activity of the EMRS. Setting. North-West province, 2002 - 2004. Results. During this period the EMRS response time tended to decrease (reduction of 8 minutes for rural and ...

  20. [Analysis of life quality of medical emergency rescue service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, D S; Poteriaeva, E L; Nikiforova, N G

    2008-01-01

    The authors evaluated life quality of doctors and paramedics in emergency rescue service. Finding is lower life quality of this occupational category in comparison with inpatient medical personnel. The most unfavorable parameters were seen among nurses, females and individuals aged 41-50.

  1. Availability and Utilization of Emergency Obstetric Care Services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maternal mortality ratios often reflect on the quality and availability of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services. Ten health facilities in Kaduna State were assessed to determine their capacity to provide EmOC. Each community had the recommended number of both primary and secondary health facilities per population.

  2. Assessment of emergency medical services in the Ashanti region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deficient areas in need of development are governance, reliable revenue, public access, community integration, clinical care guidelines, research and quality assurance processes. Conclusions: The Ashanti Region has a growing and thriving emergency medical services system. Although many essential areas for ...

  3. Participatory Design in Emergency Medical Service: Designing for Future Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Margit; Kyng, Morten; Palen, Leysia Ann

    2006-01-01

    We describe our research—its approach, results and prod-ucts—on Danish emergency medical service (EMS) field or “pre-hospital” work in minor and major incidents. We dis-cuss how commitments to participatory design and attention to the qualitative differences between minor and major incidents...

  4. The effect of emergency medical services response on outcome of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of emergency medical services response on outcome of trauma laparotomy at a Level 1 Trauma Centre in South Africa. ... Results: A total of 118 patients were admitted to the trauma surgery ward following abdominal trauma. The mechanism was penetrating 101 (85.6%) [stab wounds in 67 (56.8%) and gunshot in ...

  5. Case Study – Idling Reduction Technologies for Emergency Service Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Owens, Russell J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores the use of idle reduction technologies (IRTs) on emergency service vehicles in police, fire, and ambulance applications. Various commercially available IRT systems and approaches can decrease, or ultimately eliminate, engine idling. Fleets will thus save money on fuel, and will also decrease their criteria pollutant emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and noise.

  6. Three Types of Memory in Emergency Medical Services Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines memory and distributed cognition involved in the writing practices of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Results from a 16-month study indicate that EMS professionals rely on distributed cognition and three kinds of memory: individual, collaborative, and professional. Distributed cognition and the three types of…

  7. The restoration of abortion services at Cook County Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, P

    1993-01-01

    Chicago's Cook County Hospital is the first public hospital in the US to ban, then reinstate, abortion services. After the 1973 legalization of abortion in the US, Cook County Hospital's Voluntary Interruption of Pregnancy Clinic performed 3000-3500 procedures annually for low-income women. The clinic was closed abruptly in October 1980 by George Dunne, president of the hospital's Board of Commissioners. Dunne maintained the ban was consistent with a 1977 Illinois law restricting state funding to abortions essential to save a woman's life. The ban was lifted in 1992, after a series of competing lawsuits and restraining orders, by the next Board president, Richard Phelan. Given the 12-year hiatus in abortion provision, the hospital had to acquire equipment, recruit staff, conduct training, and develop medical protocols. Doctors and nurses already employed in the hospital's obstetrics and gynecology department volunteered to staff the service and abortion procedures were scheduled for off-peak hours to minimize overwhelming of the outpatient facility. Planned Parenthood provided equipment as well as consultation. Abortions are limited to Cook County residents and a minimum fee of US$50 is required, even from Medical Assistance recipients. Although the restoration of abortion services is hailed by pro-choice advocates as a legal victory, there remain serious concerns about the adequacy of the Cook County program. A maximum of 30 abortions are performed a week, meaning that not all abortion seekers can be served, and 2nd-trimester abortions are limited to women whose health would be affected by carrying a pregnancy to term and rape or incest victims. Also problematic has been the 24-hour waiting period between medical examination and counseling and the abortion procedure Finally, pro-choice groups are concerned that the hospital is not training residents to perform abortions.

  8. [Regional Study of Patient Safety Incidents (ERIDA) in the Emergency Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Martínez, J; Aranaz-Andrés, J M; Martínez-Ros, C; Moreno-Reina, S; Escobar-Álvaro, L; Ortega-Liarte, J V

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the patient safety incidents that occur in the emergency departments of our region. Observational study conducted in all the hospital emergency departments in the Regional Health Service of Murcia. After systematic random sampling, data were collected during care and a week later by telephone survey. Health professionals of each service were trained and collected the information, following the methodology of the National Study of Adverse Events Related to Hospitalization -ENEAS- and the Adverse Events Related to Spanish Hospital Emergency Department Care -EVADUR-. A total of 393 samples were collected, proportional to the cases treated in each hospital. In 10 cases (3.1%) the complaint was a previous safety incident. At least one incident was detected in 47 patients (11.95%; 8.7 to 15.1%). In 3 cases there were 2 incidents, bringing the number of incidents to 50. Regarding the impact, the 51% of incidents caused harm to the patients. The effects more frequent in patients were the need for repeat visits (9 cases), and mismanagement of pain (8 cases). In 24 cases (51.1%) health care was not affected, although 3 cases required an additional test, 11 cases required further consultation, and led to hospitalisation in 2 cases. The most frequent causal factors of these incidents were medication (14) and care (12). The incidents were considered preventable in 60% of cases. A rate of incidents in the emergency departments, representative of the region, has been obtained. The implications of the results for the population means that 12 out of every 100 patients treated in emergency departments have an adverse event, and 7 of these are avoidable. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Perceived nursing service quality in a tertiary care hospital, Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashrath, Mariyam; Akkadechanunt, Thitinut; Chontawan, Ratanawadee

    2011-12-01

    The present study explored nurses' and patients' expectations of nursing service quality, their perception of performance of nursing service quality performed by nurses, and compared nursing service quality, as perceived by nurses and patients. The sample consisted of 162 nurses and 383 patients from 11 inpatient wards/units in a tertiary care hospital in the Maldives. Data were collected using the Service Quality scale, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The results indicated that the highest expected dimension and perceived dimension for nursing service quality was Reliability. The Responsiveness dimension was the least expected dimension and the lowest performing dimension for nursing service quality as perceived by nurses and patients. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing service quality perceived by nurses and patients. The study results could be used by nurse administrators to develop strategies for improving nursing service quality so that nursing service delivery process can be formulated in such a way as to reduce differences of perception between nurses and patients regarding nursing service quality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. The role of bystanders, first responders, and emergency medical service providers in timely defibrillation and related outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Results from a statewide registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Carolina Malta; Kragholm, Kristian; Granger, Christopher B; Pearson, David A; Tyson, Clark; Monk, Lisa; Corbett, Claire; Nelson, R Darrell; Dupre, Matthew E; Fosbøl, Emil L; Strauss, Benjamin; Fordyce, Christopher B; McNally, Bryan; Jollis, James G

    2015-11-01

    Defibrillation by bystanders and first responders has been associated with increased survival, but limited data are available from non-metropolitan areas. We examined time from 911-call to defibrillation (according to who defibrillated patients) and survival in North Carolina. Through the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival, we identified 1732 defibrillated out-of-hospital cardiac arrests from counties with complete case capture (population 2.7 million) from 2010 to 2013. Most patients (60.9%) were defibrillated in > 10 min. A minority (8.0%) was defibrillated defibrillated by first responders (51.8%) and bystanders (33.1%), independent of location of arrest (residential or public). Bystanders initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in 49.0% of cases and defibrillated 13.4% of those. Survival decreased with increasing time to defibrillation ( 10 min: 13.2%). Odds of survival with favorable neurologic outcome adjusted for age, sex, and bystander CPR improved with faster defibrillation ( 10 min: reference). Bystanders and first responders were mainly responsible for defibrillation within 5 min, independent of location of arrest. Bystanders initiated CPR in half of the cardiac arrest cases but only defibrillated a minority of those. Timely defibrillation and defibrillation by bystanders and/or first responders were strongly associated with increased survival. Strategic efforts to increase bystander and first-responder defibrillation are warranted to increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An analysis of reimbursement for outpatient medical care in an urban hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saywell, R M; Nyhuis, A W; Cordell, W H; Crockett, C R; Woods, J R; Rodman, G H

    1992-01-01

    The investigators examined the demographic and clinical factors associated with the collection experience in a series of 786 patients who were treated in an urban hospital emergency department (ED) but not admitted to the hospital. They found that 57% of the total net charge of $150,489 had been paid within 180 days. This rate can be compared with an average inpatient collection rate of 85% at 180 days. Seven factors were found to account for the collection rate variation, making up 38.4% of the total variation. Age, gender, primary diagnosis, season of visit, time of arrival, and residence were not found to be main contributors. Insufficient collection rates may be an indication that EDs increasingly are becoming a financial risk to hospitals. The hospital's collection experience will become more important as an indicator of financial risk if the costs of operating EDs continue to escalate and collection rates do not improve. Both the costs of providing a service and the amount of the charge actually collected are valid concerns to those operating EDs.

  12. Availability of emergency contraception: a survey of hospital emergency department gynaecologists and emergency physicians in Piedmont, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Marco; Casagranda, Ivo; Charrier, Lorena; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2012-10-01

    To compare the knowledge and the willingness of emergency physicians and gynaecologists caring for women in Italian emergency departments (EDs) to prescribe levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills (LNG-EC pills). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009; anonymous postal questionnaires were mailed to the medical staff working at the 30 EDs located in Piedmont (Italy). Emergency physicians and gynaecologists have similar knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LNG-EC pills, but do not feel at ease in prescribing these and consider the prescription of LNG-EC pills an inappropriate activity for ED staff. In Italy, unlike in most other European countries, LNG-EC pills are still prescription drugs. Thus it may be useful to further investigate the reasons why Italian ED medical staff do not feel the prescription of LNG-EC pills should be within their remit and whether women can successfully obtain the prescription from physicians working in other services that can be accessed around the clock.

  13. National and Regional Representativeness of Hospital Emergency Department Visit Data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program, United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Ralph J; Pérez, Alejandro; Baer, Atar; Zhou, Hong; English, Roseanne; Coletta, Michael; Dey, Achintya

    2016-08-01

    We examined the representativeness of the nonfederal hospital emergency department (ED) visit data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP). We used the 2012 American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database, other databases, and information from state and local health departments participating in the NSSP about which hospitals submitted data to the NSSP in October 2014. We compared ED visits for hospitals submitting data with all ED visits in all 50 states and Washington, DC. Approximately 60.4 million of 134.6 million ED visits nationwide (~45%) were reported to have been submitted to the NSSP. ED visits in 5 of 10 regions and the majority of the states were substantially underrepresented in the NSSP. The NSSP ED visits were similar to national ED visits in terms of many of the characteristics of hospitals and their service areas. However, visits in hospitals with the fewest annual ED visits, in rural trauma centers, and in hospitals serving populations with high percentages of Hispanics and Asians were underrepresented. NSSP nonfederal hospital ED visit data were representative for many hospital characteristics and in some geographic areas but were not very representative nationally and in many locations. Representativeness could be improved by increasing participation in more states and among specific types of hospitals. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:562-569).

  14. Can a partnership between general practitioners and ambulance services reduce conveyance to emergency care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Manuel; Leach, Jonathan; Ngianga-Bakwin, Kandala; Dale, Jeremy

    2017-07-01

    Emergency services are facing increasing workload pressures, and new models of care are needed. We evaluate the impact of a service development involving a partnership between emergency ambulance crews and general practitioners (GPs) on reducing conveyance rates to the Hospital Emergency Department(ED) . The service model was implemented in the West Midlands of England. Call handlers identified patients with needs that could be addressed by a GP using locally agreed criteria. GPs supported the assessment of such patients either at scene or by telephone. Routine data were collected from October 2012 to November 2013, from the ambulance service computer-aided dispatch system. Logistic regression models were used to determine the likelihood for patients being transported to ED. Of 23 395 emergency contacts during the evaluation period, 1903 (8.1 %) patients were triaged to GP supported assessment. Mean age (SD) was 61.8 (27.9) years; 42.9 % were aged 75 years and over. 1221 (64.2%) had face-to-face GP assessment and 682 (35.8%) via telephone. 1500 (78%) of those who received GP support were not transported to hospital. After controlling for confounders, those aged greater than 75 years (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.52 to 0.86), and females (OR 0.64; 95% CI 0.51 to 0.82) were less likely to be transported, while those who received GP telephone input rather than face-to-face assessment were more likely to be transferred to an ED (OR 2.14; 95% CI 1.69 to 2.72). Support of the paramedic service by GPs enabled patients to avoid transfer to an ED, potentially avoiding subsequent hospital admission, reducing costs and improving quality of care for patients that are not in need of hospital services. However, use of services in the days following the call was not assessed, and hence the overall impact and safety requires further evaluation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  15. Identification of service demand and Occupational Therapy service implementation in a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryam Bonadiu Pelosi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The occupational therapist acts as a promoter of health and quality of occupational life in the hospital context. To implement the Occupational Therapy Service in a hospital, it may need to adopt and articulate different strategies. Objective: To characterize the main requests and therapeutic services developed by the Occupational Therapy residents during the demand analysis process to implement the service. Method: This is a quantitative and qualitative research approach. We analyzed 151 assessment requests received for the Occupational Therapy service of patients treated at a university hospital, from June 2012 to June 2013. Data were submitted to descriptive and content analysis. Results: During the study period, the Occupational Therapy developed actions involving hospitalized patients, their caregivers, and staff. Patients referred for care were aged between 14 and 88 years and had difficulties mainly related to emotional regulation and the hospitalization process. The service was provided through individual and group approaches, and among them, the most requested were welcoming and orientation to the patient, family, caregivers and professional. Conclusion: The results of this study add knowledge to the factors related to the demand analysis for of Occupational Therapy and reinforce the need for these professionals focus their attention on the requirements essential to implement the services.

  16. Refusal of medical treatment in the pediatric emergency service: analysis of reasons and aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ramiz Coşkun; Halil, Halit; Gürsoy, Cüneyt; Çifci, Atilla; Özgün, Seher; Kodaman, Tuğba; Sönmez, Mehtap

    2014-01-01

    Refusal of treatment for acutely ill children is still an important problem in the emergency service. When families refuse medical treatment for their acutely ill children, healthcare professionals may attempt to provide information and negotiate with the family concerning treatment refusal and its possible adverse outcomes, and request consent for refusal of medical treatment. There is insufficient data about refusal of treatment in our country. The purpose of this study was to analyze the causes of treatment refusal in the pediatric emergency service. We collected data recorded on informed consent forms. During a 2-year-study period, 215 patients refused treatment recommended by acute health care professionals. The majorty of patients were in the 0-2 year age group. Hospitalization was the type of treatment most commonly refused; restrictions regarding family members staying with their children during hospitalization and admission to another hospital were the major reasons for refusal of treatment. Clarifying the reasons for treatment refusal may help us to overcome deficiencies, improve conditions, resolve problems and build confidence between healthcare providers and service users, increasing users' satisfaction in the future.

  17. Literature Study: The Nature of Service, The Nature of Hospitality, The Nature of Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Esselink, P. (Priscilla)

    2010-01-01

    In this report the concepts services, hospitality and experiences will be discussed. The goal of this report is to provide insight in what is written in literature about services, hospitality and experiences and to help defining the concept hospitality services for the Research Centre of the Saxion Hospitality Business School. Important concepts which are related to hospitality are services and experiences. These three domains are the centre of this report.

  18. Payment segment differences in hospital and physician charges for inpatient and emergency room procedures: cost shifting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegji, Charles E; Self, Donald R; Self, Robin M

    2010-04-01

    A study of hospital facility and physician charges relative to payments, as affected by source of payment is provided. Charges relative to payment source are studied for both emergency room visits and inpatient hospital stays using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey for 2003. We present evidence that hospitals are more flexible when billing inpatient stays than emergency room visits, where flexibility is measured in terms of charges relative to expected payments. There was little difference, however, between physician charges relative to payment for inpatient stays and emergency room visits. Finally, we found that ethnicity may have an effect on hospitals' expected payments.

  19. Investigating the impact of an emergency information system on patient's length of stay in the emergency department of a tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bawazir, Warda; Saddik, Basema; El-Masri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    The emergency department has a crucial role in saving patient's lives. Efficient and reliable information through reliable information systems contribute to effective communication in these situations and ultimately shorter lengths of stay (LOS). This exploratory, cross-sectional study evaluates a current legacy emergency system in a tertiary hospital and investigates its impact on patient's length of stay (LOS) in the emergency department. A significantly shorter LOS was found between patients whose information was available and was communicated effectively in comparison to patients whose data were not available. Furthermore, longer LOS was associated with patients who required clinical services (pathology, radiology) due to the manual retrieval of results. This study has found that future implementation of a comprehensive electronic information system will facilitate effective communication workflow and timely access to patient data in the emergency department.

  20. Hospitals - HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN: Hospitals and Clinics in Indiana, Derived from HAZUS (Federal Emergency Management Agency, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN is a point shapefile that shows locations of hospitals and clinics in Indiana. HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN was derived from the shapefile named "HOSPITAL."...

  1. Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users\\' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.

  2. The State of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Dixon, Julia M; Sefa, Nana; Yancey, Arthur; Hollong, Bonaventure G; Hagahmed, Mohamed; Ginde, Adit A; Wallis, Lee A

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Little is known about the existence, distribution, and characteristics of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa, or the corresponding epidemiology of prehospital illness and injury. A survey was conducted between 2013 and 2014 by distributing a detailed EMS system questionnaire to experts in paper and electronic versions. The questionnaire ascertained EMS systems' jurisdiction, operations, finance, clinical care, resources, and regulatory environment. The discovery of respondents with requisite expertise occurred in multiple phases, including snowball sampling, a review of published scientific literature, and a rigorous search of the Internet. The survey response rate was 46%, and data represented 49 of 54 (91%) African countries. Twenty-five EMS systems were identified and distributed among 16 countries (30% of African countries). There was no evidence of EMS systems in 33 (61%) countries. A total of 98,574,731 (8.7%) of the African population were serviced by at least one EMS system in 2012. The leading causes of EMS transport were (in order of decreasing frequency): injury, obstetric, respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal complaints. Nineteen percent of African countries had government-financed EMS systems and 26% had a toll-free public access telephone number. Basic emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and Basic Life Support (BLS)-equipped ambulances were the most common cadre of provider and ambulance level, respectively (84% each). Emergency Medical Services systems exist in one-third of African countries. Injury and obstetric complaints are the leading African prehospital conditions. Only a minority (system. Most systems were predominantly BLS, government operated, and fee-for-service. Mould-Millman NK , Dixon JM , Sefa N , Yancey A , Hollong BG , Hagahmed M , Ginde AA , Wallis LA . The state of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(3):273-283.

  3. 42 CFR 410.28 - Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.28 Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients...

  4. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...... in two steps; registry data were merged with electronically registered emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch centres in the two regions. Cases with missing or non-OHCA dispatch codes were analysed further by auditing emergency call recordings using a uniform data collection template...

  5. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinia, Shahrokh; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Maddah, Sadat Seyed Bagher; Negarandeh, Reza

    2015-10-01

    Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents. The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure, Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries.

  6. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinia, Shahrokh; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Maddah, Sadat Seyed Bagher; Negarandeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents. The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure, Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries. PMID:26448954

  7. Barriers of Pre-Hospital Services in Road Traffic Injuries in Tehran: The Viewpoint of Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Alinia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Iran is one of the countries with considerable road traffic injuries. Pre-hospital interventions have an important role in preventing mortalities and disabilities caused by traffic accidents.The present study aimed to explore the barriers of pre-hospital care in traffic injuries in Tehran, Iran. Methods: A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted based on 21 semi-structured interviews with 18 participants. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, and then data condensing, labeling, coding and defining categories were performed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main barriers including 4 main categories and 13 subcategories emerged; they included Barriers related to people, Barriers related to metropolitan infrastructure,Barriers related to the profession and Barriers related to managerial issues. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, pre-hospital service barriers in traffic accidents have many dimensions including cultural, structural and managerial domains. Policy makers in health system can use these findings to promote the quality of pre-hospital services, especially in the field of traffic injuries.

  8. Factors associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance among elderly emergency patients: A population-based study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Katayama, Yusuke; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Hayashida, Sumito; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku; Ohta, Bon

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to investigate prehospital factors associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance among elderly emergency patients. We reviewed ambulance records in Osaka City from January 2013 through December 2014, and enrolled all elderly emergency patients aged ≥65 years who were transported by on-scene emergency medical service personnel to a hospital that the personnel had selected. The definition of difficulty in hospital acceptance was to the requirement for ≥4 phone calls to hospitals by emergency medical service personnel before receiving a decision from the destination hospitals. Prehospital factors associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance were examined through logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 72 105 elderly patients were included, and 13 332 patients (18.5%) experienced difficulty in hospital acceptance. In the simple linear regression model, hospital selection time increased significantly with an increasing number of phone calls (R 2  = 0.774). In the multivariable analysis, older age (P for trend Japan, which has a rapidly aging population, a comprehensive strategy for elderly emergency patients, especially for advanced age groups or nursing home residents, is required. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2441-2448. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. Potentially preventable use of emergency services: the role of low health literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Jessica R; Hall, Allyson G; Davis, Terry C; Arnold, Connie L; Bennett, Robert D; Wolf, Michael S; Carden, Donna L

    2013-08-01

    Limited health literacy is a barrier for understanding health information and has been identified as a risk factor for overuse of the emergency department (ED). The association of health literacy with access to primary care services in patients presenting to the ED has not been fully explored. To examine the relationship between health literacy, access to primary care, and reasons for ED use among adults presenting for emergency care. Structured interviews that included health literacy assessment were performed involving 492 ED patients at one Southern academic medical center. Unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression models assessed the relationship between health literacy and (1) access to a personal physician; (2) doctor office visits; (3) ED visits; (4) hospitalizations; and (5) potentially preventable hospital admissions. After adjusting for sociodemographic and health status, those with limited health literacy reported fewer doctor office visits [odds ratio (OR)=0.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.4-1.0], greater ED use, (OR=1.6; 95% CI, 1.0-2.4), and had more potentially preventable hospital admissions (OR=1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-2.7) than those with adequate health literacy. After further controlling for insurance and employment status, fewer doctor office visits remained significantly associated with patient health literacy (OR=0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9). Patients with limited health literacy reported a preference for emergency care, as the services were perceived as better. Among ED patients, limited health literacy was independently associated with fewer doctor office visits and a preference for emergency care. Policies to reduce ED use should consider steps to limit barriers and improve attitudes toward primary care services.

  10. Development of a Work Climate Scale in Emergency Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sanduvete-Chaves

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate work climate fosters productivity in organizations and increases employee satisfaction. Workers in emergency health services (EHS have an extremely high degree of responsibility and consequent stress. Therefore, it is essential to foster a good work climate in this context. Despite this, scales with a full study of their psychometric properties (i.e., validity evidence based on test content, internal structure and relations to other variables, and reliability are not available to measure work climate in EHS specifically. For this reason, our objective was to develop a scale to measure the quality of work climates in EHS. We carried out three studies. In Study 1, we used a mixed-method approach to identify the latent conceptual structure of the construct work climate. Thus, we integrated the results found in (a a previous study, where a content analysis of seven in-depth interviews obtained from EHS professionals in two hospitals in Gibraltar Countryside County was carried out; and (b the factor analysis of the responses given by 113 EHS professionals from these same centers to 18 items that measured the work climate in health organizations. As a result, we obtained 56 items grouped into four factors (work satisfaction, productivity/achievement of aims, interpersonal relationships, and performance at work. In Study 2, we presented validity evidence based on test content through experts' judgment. Fourteen experts from the methodology and health fields evaluated the representativeness, utility, and feasibility of each of the 56 items with respect to their factor (theoretical dimension. Forty items met the inclusion criterion, which was to obtain an Osterlind index value greater than or equal to 0.5 in the three aspects assessed. In Study 3, 201 EHS professionals from the same centers completed the resulting 40-item scale. This new instrument produced validity evidence based on the internal structure in a second-order factor model with

  11. Development of a Work Climate Scale in Emergency Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana; Lozano-Lozano, José A; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Holgado-Tello, Francisco P

    2018-01-01

    An adequate work climate fosters productivity in organizations and increases employee satisfaction. Workers in emergency health services (EHS) have an extremely high degree of responsibility and consequent stress. Therefore, it is essential to foster a good work climate in this context. Despite this, scales with a full study of their psychometric properties (i.e., validity evidence based on test content, internal structure and relations to other variables, and reliability) are not available to measure work climate in EHS specifically. For this reason, our objective was to develop a scale to measure the quality of work climates in EHS. We carried out three studies. In Study 1, we used a mixed-method approach to identify the latent conceptual structure of the construct work climate . Thus, we integrated the results found in (a) a previous study, where a content analysis of seven in-depth interviews obtained from EHS professionals in two hospitals in Gibraltar Countryside County was carried out; and (b) the factor analysis of the responses given by 113 EHS professionals from these same centers to 18 items that measured the work climate in health organizations. As a result, we obtained 56 items grouped into four factors (work satisfaction, productivity/achievement of aims, interpersonal relationships, and performance at work). In Study 2, we presented validity evidence based on test content through experts' judgment. Fourteen experts from the methodology and health fields evaluated the representativeness, utility, and feasibility of each of the 56 items with respect to their factor (theoretical dimension). Forty items met the inclusion criterion, which was to obtain an Osterlind index value greater than or equal to 0.5 in the three aspects assessed. In Study 3, 201 EHS professionals from the same centers completed the resulting 40-item scale. This new instrument produced validity evidence based on the internal structure in a second-order factor model with four

  12. Deinstitutionalisation--from hospital closure to service development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornicroft, G; Bebbington, P

    1989-12-01

    The necessary components of a comprehensive service of local non-institutional forms of care for the seriously mentally ill have been researched separately in pilot trials, but not within integrated programmes for defined populations. Reported outcomes are at least as favourable as for traditional long-term hospital care, but alternative provisions are no less costly. A case manager system may allow co-ordinated formal and informal services to meet the individual needs of chronically ill patients. Poorly integrated programmes will expose discharged patients to disadvantages.

  13. Outcomes of patients calling emergency medical services for suspected acute cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Sejersten, Maria Sejersten; Baber, Usman

    2015-01-01

    Adequate health care is increasingly dependent on prehospital systems and cardiovascular (CV) disease remains the most common cause for hospital admission. However the prevalence of CV dispatches of emergency medical services (EMS) is not well reported and survival data described in clinical trials.......1%) carried 80% short-term mortality. Noninvasive management of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was common (37.9%) and associated with an increased adjusted long-term mortality hazard (hazard ratio 4.17 [2.51 to 8.08], p hospital cardiac arrest patients (13......, this study emphasizes the need for an efficient prehospital phase with focus on CV disease and proper triage of patients suitable for invasive evaluation if the outcomes of acute heart disease are to be improved further in the current international context of hospitals merging into highly specialized...

  14. [Quality assurance of cooked food in conventional hospital food service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giusti, Maria; Tufi, Daniela; Tassoni, Alessandra; Del Cimmuto, Angela; Villari, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the hospital food service of the Azienda in preserving microbiological quality and temperature of cooked foods during the distribution to the different wards of the hospital. During three years, microbiological parameters and temperatures were monitored in the central kitchen before distribution (T0), in the first (T1) and in the last ward (T2) of the distribution route during a three-year period for a total of 337 analytical determinations. Temperature values before distribution improved during the study period, whereas the capacity of keeping adequate temperature values during the distribution decreased over time, in spite of the introduction of a new technology after the first year of the study. No significant deteriorations of the microbiological quality of the cooked foods were detected. The results of the study clearly indicate that an integrated approach involving new technology, work organization and personnel training is needed in preserving food quality in hospitals.

  15. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  16. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS)....... initiatives. Although no hearing loss was demonstrated in the personnel of the ground-based units, a reduced function of the outer sensory hair cells was found in the HEMS group following missions.......BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS......). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. METHODS: Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed...

  18. In a niche of time: do specialty hospitals outperform general services hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, LeJon; Davis, Jullet A; Gunby, Norris W

    2013-01-01

    Niche hospitals represent a growing segment in the health care industry. Niche facilities are primarily engaged in the treatment of cardiac or orthopedic conditions. The effectiveness of this strategy is of interest because niche hospitals focus on only the most profitable services. The purpose of this research was to assess the financial effectiveness of the niche strategy. We theorize that firm and market-level factors concomitantly with the strategy of the hospital-niche versus traditional-are associated with financial performance. This research used 2 data sources, the 2003 Medicare Cost Report and the 2003 Area Resource File. The sample was limited to only for-profit, urban, nongovernmental hospitals (n = 995). The data were analyzed using hierarchical least squares regression. Financial performance was operationalized using the hospital's return on assets. The principal finding of this project is that niche hospitals had significantly higher performance than traditional facilities. From the organizational perspective, the niche strategy leads to better financial performance. From a societal perspective, the niche strategy provides increased focus and efficiencies through repetition. Despite the limited focus of this strategy, patients who can access these providers may experience better outcomes than patients in more traditional hospitals.

  19. Emergency Medical Services Capacity for Prehospital Stroke Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-05

    In this audio podcast, lead author and Preventing Chronic Disease’s 2013 Student Research Contest Winner, Mehul D. Patel, talks about his article on stroke care and emergency medical services.  Created: 9/5/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/5/2013.

  20. [Factors related to lack of autonomous mobility during out-of-hospital emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero García, Antonio; Morales Asencio, José Miguel; Trujillo Illescas, Juan Alfonso; Martí, Celia

    2016-10-01

    To explore the frequency of lack of autonomous mobility and factors related to it in patients requiring prehospital emergency services. Cross-sectional, observational, retrospective analysis. We identified a stratified random sample of patients attended by the public health emergency service of Andalusia in 2011. The sample included 280 patients with a mean age of 56 years; 63.9% were men. The majority were attended in homes and streets or other public spaces. Most were transported to a hospital in a mobile intensive care unit. The reasons for calling the service were most often related to chest pain or injuries. Loss of autonomous mobility was seen more often in men, when care was required in a public area, when there were injuries or altered vital signs, and when the patient required transport in a mobile intensive care unit. Dependence on others was significantly associated with the presence of a prior condition before the patient required transport (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% CI, 1.60-6.33), the use of immobilization strategies (OR, 7.71; 95% CI, 1.7-34.96], and the use of ambulance transport (OR, 4.35; 95% CI, 1.63-11.60]. The following 2 variables were at the limit of significance: pain during the care process (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.99-1.29) and age (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01). The profile we identified for patients and situations in which patients cannot move autonomously during prehospital emergency care can be used to plan preventive strategies to ensure patient safety.

  1. Willingness to pay for municipality hospital services in rural Japan: a contingent valuation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Toshihito

    2011-06-01

    hospital, which nearly equalled the amount that the K town government provided to the municipality hospital to cover its annual deficit. K town residents had come to expect not only general clinical practice, but also emergency medical services and night practice provided by their own town's municipality hospital. WTP can be used as a measure of hospital evaluation because it reflects the importance of the hospital to the residents in its region.

  2. Occupational injury rates in personnel of emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gałązkowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [i][/i][b]Introduction and objectives. [/b]The system of emergency medical services (EMS in Poland was established in 2006. The risk of occupational injuries to EMS personnel is very high, irrespective of the country where they operate, as they face many hazards in their everyday work. The aim of this study is to describe the type, incidence and consequences of occupational accidents among the personnel of the National Emergency Medical Services in Poland (NEMS – land and air ambulance crews in 2008–2012. [b]Material and methods:[/b] The study reviewed all occupational accidents among the EMS personnel reported to the National Labour Inspectorate in 2008–2012. [b]Results[/b]: In the period reported, the number of accidents decreased from 32 in 2008 to just 6 in 2012. Traffic accidents predominated and most of the victims were male paramedics under 30 years of age. The most common injuries included multiple organ injuries and injuries of the cervical spine, chest and trunk. [b]Conclusions:[/b] The growing professional experience of the EMS personnel has a beneficial effect on occupational injury rates as they tend to decrease with longer employment. Occupational accidents are definitely more common among ambulance crews than in the personnel of other organizational units of the National Emergency Medical Services.

  3. Nurses' perception about risk classification in an emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Chaves de Souza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Get to know how nurses perceive the accomplishment of risk classification in an emergency service. Methodology. In this qualitative study, 11 nurses were included with at least two months of experience in the risk classification of patients who visited the emergency service. Semistructured interviews were used to collect the information. The data were collected between August and December 2011. For data analysis, Bardin's theoretical framework was used. Results. The nurses in the study consider the risk classification as a work organization instruments that permits closer contact between nurses and patients. The nursing skills needed for risk classification were identified: knowledge about the scale used, clinical perspective, patience and agility. The availability of risk classification scales was the main facilitator of this work. The main difficulties were the disorganization of the care network and the health team's lack of knowledge of the protocol. Conclusion. Risk classification offers an opportunity for professional autonomy to the extent that it is the main responsible for regulating care at the entry door of the emergency services.

  4. Utilization of the Emergency Department and Predicting Factors Associated With Its Use at the Saudi Ministry of Health General Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawoud, Sundus O; Ahmad, Alaeddin Mohammad K; Alsharqi, Omar Z; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M

    2015-05-17

    Overuse of emergency rooms (ER) is a public health problem. To investigate this issue, a cross-sectional survey was conducted at the ERs of King Abdul-Aziz Hospital, King Fahd Hospital, and Al-Thaghor Hospital in November 2013 with the aims of estimating emergency service utilization for non-urgent cases, identifying the predictors of ER utilization for non-urgent cases, and measuring patients' knowledge of primary healthcare centers (PHCCs). Patients were interviewed using a structured questionnaire and the data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. We recruited 300 patients; males comprised 50.7% of the sample. A higher proportion of patients with non-urgent cases visited the ER three to four times a year (P=0.001). A higher proportion of patients without emergencies had not attempted to visit an outpatient clinic before the ER (P=0.003). Most patients without emergencies thought the ER was the first place to consult in case of illness. Most patients who visited the ER were single, singlehood, and low incomes. Policy makers and health providers have a challenging task to control ER overuse. We recommend developing strategies to implement policies aimed at reducing non-urgent ER use as well as making healthcare services more available to the population.

  5. Sala de emergência em pediatria: casuística de um hospital universitário Pediatric emergency room: experience at a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Gut L. Riccetto

    2007-06-01

    : demographical and clinical characacteristics, diagnostic hypotheses, need of tracheal intubation, deaths, transfers and need of hospitalization of children between zero and 14 years old. Patients were divided in four groups: no deaths; deaths 24 hours; transfers to other hospitals after initial care. RESULTS: 203 children were treated: 59.1% boys; mean age of 3.4 years; 65% previously healthy. The most common diagnosis was respiratory failure (31.1%. Of the 22 deaths, 3.5% took place during the first 24 hours and 7.4% after this; 172 children (84.7% were discharged after a mean hospital length of stay of 19.2 days. Nine children (4.4% were transferred to other hospitals. Among the 203 children, 50 children (24.6% were intubated after admission and 86 children (42.4% had to be admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit. CONCLUSIONS: The patients who died early were younger and mainly shock victims. Girls who suffered from previous diseases and respiratory failure were predominant among the patients who died 24 hours after initial care. Patients who survived the emergency crisis were mainly males, older and also presented respiratory diseases. The need for invasive procedures (tracheal intubation and hospitalization in intensive care units was significant in this population, underscoring the need for adequate equipment and specialized professionals in the emergency pediatric hospital services.

  6. Innovations in Emergency Nursing: Transforming Emergency Care Through a Novel Nurse-Driven Emergency Department Telehealth Express Care Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Catherine; Krinsky, Rhonda; Sharma, Rahul

    2018-04-06

    Emergency department overcrowding and acuity are significant challenges to patients and staff. Low-acuity patients have extended wait times, and decreased satisfaction can have a negative effect on patient flow. A multidisciplinary ED team developed and launched the first ED-based Telehealth Express Care Service, where patients who present to the emergency department with minor complaints are offered a "virtual visit" with a board-certified emergency physician located remotely. More than 6 months into the program, more than 1,300 patients have been treated. These patients experienced decreased length of stay (2.5 hours to 38 minutes) and increased satisfaction. The program is very well received by staff members who appreciate its efficiency. Telehealth has the potential to optimize ED efficiency, increase patient satisfaction, and promote safe, high-quality provision of care. Copyright © 2018 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    settings, study participants (all cadres - nurses, physician assistants and doctors) hospitals included (both private and public) and distribution of this hospitals in the re- gion. Study limitations. Desirability bias and hurried response at time of data col- lection could have potentially affected the quality of data collected. However ...

  8. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2012-02-20

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the

  9. Life Saving Apps: Linking Cardiac Arrest Victims to Emergency Services and Volunteer Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim Choi Keung, Sarah N; Khan, Mohammed O; Smith, Christopher; Perkins, Gavin; Murphy, Paddie; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2016-01-01

    In cases of emergency, such as out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the first few minutes are crucial for victims to receive care and have a positive outcome. However, emergency services often arrive on scene after those first few minutes, making any bridging solutions key. Finding a defibrillator or accessing a trained volunteer responder are some of the technological solutions that are being developed to support the chain of survival. This paper looks at technologies, in particular those linked to mobile apps that have been used to locate defibrillators and responder apps that enable responders to attend to nearby emergencies. We review a selection of apps and also assess the challenges and considerations for such apps.

  10. Epidemiology of hospital-based emergency department visits due to sports injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Anderson, Ingrid M; Lee, Min Kyeong; Rampa, Sankeerth; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Allareddy, Veerajalandhar

    2014-08-01

    Sports-related injuries in adolescents incur a significant amount of hospital resources. Sports-related injuries are not an uncommon cause of ED visit; however, national estimates of such injuries in teenagers are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize emergency department (ED) visits that result from sports-related injuries among teenagers across the United States. This study describes the outcomes associated with sports-related injuries necessitating ED visits among teenagers at a national level. This is a descriptive epidemiology study. The 2008 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample data set, the largest all-payer health care database in the United States, was used to identify ED visits with external cause of injury related to sports occurring in patients aged 13 through 19 years. Outcomes examined included discharge status after the ED visit and presence of concomitant injuries. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the estimates. Nationwide representative estimates were computed using the discharge weight variable. There were 432,609 ED visits by those between the ages of 13 and 19 years who experienced sports-related injuries, with total charges close to $447.4 million, with a mean total per-visit charge of $1205. The male patients accounted for 76.8% of the total ED visits. The most frequently occurring injuries were superficial injury or contusion (n = 118,250 ED visits); sprains and strains (n = 105,476); fracture of the upper limb (n = 63,151); open wounds of the head, the neck, and the trunk (n = 46,176); as well as intracranial injury (n = 30,726). Close to 29% of all ED visits occurred among those residing in geographical areas with median household income levels of greater than $64,000. After the ED visit, 1.6% were admitted to the same hospital, with a mean length of stay of 2.4 days and a mean hospital charge for ED visit and inpatient services of $22,703. The male patients composed 87.5% of the hospitalizations. The

  11. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoveller, Jean; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+)–a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program–in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children. Results Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services). However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated. Conclusions Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies

  12. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestin Hategeka

    Full Text Available Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+-a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program-in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children.A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children.Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services. However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated.Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies to enhance the capacity of

  13. General surgical services at an urban teaching hospital in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Elizabeth; Amado, Vanda; Jacobe, Mário; Sacks, Greg D; Bruzoni, Matias; Mapasse, Domingos; DeUgarte, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    As surgery becomes incorporated into global health programs, it will be critical for clinicians to take into account already existing surgical care systems within low-income countries. To inform future efforts to expand the local system and systems in comparable regions of the developing world, we aimed to describe current patterns of surgical care at a major urban teaching hospital in Mozambique. We performed a retrospective review of all general surgery patients treated between August 2012 and August 2013 at the Hospital Central Maputo in Maputo, Mozambique. We reviewed emergency and elective surgical logbooks, inpatient discharge records, and death records to report case volume, disease etiology, and mortality. There were 1598 operations (910 emergency and 688 elective) and 2606 patient discharges during our study period. The most common emergent surgeries were for nontrauma laparotomy (22%) followed by all trauma procedures (18%), whereas the most common elective surgery was hernia repair (31%). The majority of lower extremity amputations were above knee (69%). The most common diagnostic categories for inpatients were infectious (31%), trauma (18%), hernia (12%), neoplasm (10%), and appendicitis (5%). The mortality rate was 5.6% (146 deaths), approximately half of which were related to sepsis. Our data demonstrate the general surgery caseload of a large, academic, urban training and referral center in Mozambique. We describe resource limitations that impact operative capacity, trauma care, and management of amputations and cancer. These findings highlight challenges that are applicable to a broad range of global surgery efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospitality and hospitableness | Lashley | Research in Hospitality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Not long after the word hospitality emerged as a collective noun to describe the commercial provision of services associated with accommodation, drinking and eating, some academics began to investigate the meanings of hospitality and hospitableness. Whilst most academic programme provision related to developing ...

  15. Is mobile teleconsulting equivalent to hospital-based telestroke services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich J; Boy, Sandra; Jankovits, Ralf; Pilz, Philipp; Klucken, Jochen; Fehm, Nando P; Schenkel, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Telemedicine is increasingly used to provide acute stroke expertise for hospitals without full-time neurological services. Teleconsulting through mobile laptop computers may offer more flexibility compared with hospital-based services, but concerns about quality and technical reliability remain. We conducted a controlled trial, allocating hospital-based or mobile teleconsulting in a shift-by-shift sequence and evaluating technical parameters, acceptability, and impact on immediate clinical decisions. Both types of telemedicine workstations were equipped with DICOM (Digital-Imaging-and-Communications-in-Medicine) viewer and videoconference software. The laptop connected by asymmetrical broadband UMTS (Universal-Mobile-Telecommunication-Systems) technology with a one-way spoke-to-hub video transmission, whereas the hospital-based device used landline symmetrical telecommunication, including a 2-way videoconference. One hundred twenty-seven hospital-based and 96 mobile teleconsultations were conducted within 2 months without any technical breakdown. The rates per allocated time were similar with 3.8 and 4.0 per day. No significant differences were found for durations of videoconference (mean: 11+/-3 versus 10+/-3 minutes, P=0.07), DICOM download (3+/-3 versus 4+/-3 minutes, P=0.19), and total duration of teleconsultations (44+/-19 versus 45+/-21 minutes, P=0.98). Technical quality of mobile teleconsultations was rated worse on both sides, but this did not affect the ability to make remote clinical decisions like initiating thrombolysis (17% versus 13% of all, P=0.32). Teleconsultation using a laptop workstation and broadband mobile telecommunication was technically stable and allowed remote clinical decision-making. There remain disadvantages regarding videoconference quality on the hub side and lack of video transmission to the spoke side.

  16. Patient Perception Influence on the Food Service Quality of the Image of Jayapura Regional General Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Gustiani Pakendek; A. L. Rantetampang; Arry Pongtiku

    2017-01-01

    Competition strict hospital competitiveness requires high hospital. One way is to improve the quality of food service. The quality of hospital food service will affect the image of the hospital. This study was to analyze the effect of perceived quality food service consisting of quality food menu, quality of food appearance, taste quality of food, quality of food presenter, timeliness of presentation of the food on the image of the hospital. This study was descriptive quantitative approach cr...

  17. Otorhinolaryngological Emergencies in a Tertiary Hospital in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... Background: Emergencies are not uncommon in a typical otorhinolaryngological. (ORL) clinic. The knowledge of the profile and prevalence of these emergencies will go a long way in helping to equip as well as aid proper and prompt management of these conditions so as to reduce their morbidity and ...

  18. Gynaecological emergencies seen in a referral hospital in Northwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sexual assault occurred in 5% of the patients, with 47.8% occurring in individuals aged below 10 years. The least common gynaecological emergency was coital laceration which accounted for 0.5%. The prevalence of mortality from gynaecological emergencies was 3.7%. The most common cause of mortality from a ...

  19. Wait Time for Treatment in Hospital Emergency Departments: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Care Survey: 2003 emergency department summary. Advance data from vital and health statistics; no 358. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2005. Burt CW, McCaig LF, Valverde RH. Analysis of ambulance diversions in U.S. emergency departments. Ann ...

  20. A profile of resuscitations at the Kalafong hospital emergency unit

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bart L. Drinking and driving – deadly mix. Trauma and Emergency Medicine. 2000;Feb:20-3. 4. Ankney RN, Vizza J, Coil JA, Kurek S,. Defrehn R, Somo H. Cofactors of alcohol- related trauma at a rural trauma centre. American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 1998:16(3):228-31. 5. Demetriades D, Chahwan S, Gomez H,.

  1. (Non-)utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzmann, Diana; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the utilization and non-utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants, and the factors that influence this behaviour. A cross-sectional representative German survey was conducted in a sample of 2.175 people, 295 of whom had a migration background. An additional sample of 50 people with Turkish migration background was conducted, partially in the Turkish language. Apart from socio-demographics, the utilization of emergency services and the reasons for non-utilization were assessed. Migrants had a higher utilization rate of pre-hospital emergency care (RR = 1.492) than non-migrants. Furthermore, migrants who were not born in Germany had a lower utilization rate (RR = 0.793) than migrants who were born in Germany. Regarding non-utilization, the most frequently stated reasons belonged to the categories initial misjudgment of the emergency situation and acting on one's own behalf, with the latter stated more frequently by migrants than by non-migrants. To prevent over-, under-, and lack of supply, it is necessary to transfer knowledge about the functioning of the medical emergency services, including first aid knowledge.

  2. [The Asahi Model-Regional Mental Health Services at Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The Asahi model, Psychiatric Services of Department of Psychiatry and Child Psychiatry, Asahi General Hospital, is characterized by multiple dimensions of mental health services, such as multidisciplinary team approach, medical cooperation, specialized psychiatric treatment of acute care, clozapine and modified ECT, outreach services of home nursing and assertive community treatment, and the close and mutual coordination with housing services and social welfare services. The Asahi Model makes it possible to be deinstitutionalized, to improve patients satisfaction, to shorten hospitalization, to decrease psychiatric emergency visits and to be of service in a natural disaster. It also might prevent the relapse of schizophrenics within twelve months after discharge and improve the quality of mental health staffs trainings to support patients better. In the future, we will need to work on providing sectorized care, early psychosis intervention programs, to construct networking systems of clozapine and modified ECT, to strengthen growth of home nursing, and to take place mental health anti-stigma campaigns.

  3. Effect of Surgeon and Hospital Volume on Emergency General Surgery Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambar; Efron, David T; Canner, Joseph K; Dultz, Linda; Xu, Tim; Jones, Christian; Haut, Elliott R; Higgins, Robert S D; Sakran, Joseph V

    2017-11-01

    Emergency general surgery (EGS) contributes to half of all surgical mortality nationwide, is associated with a 50% complication rate, and has a 15% readmission rate within 30 days. We assessed associations between surgeon and hospital EGS volume with these outcomes. Using Maryland's Health Services Cost Review Commission database, we identified nontrauma EGS procedures performed by general surgeons among patients 20 years or older, who were admitted urgently or emergently, from July 2012 to September 2014. We created surgeon and hospital volume categories, stratified EGS procedures into simple (mortality ≤ 0.5%) and complex (>0.5%) procedures, and assessed postoperative mortality, complications, and 30-day readmissions. Multivariable logistic regressions both adjusted for clinical factors and accounted for clustering by individual surgeons. We identified 14,753 procedures (61.5% simple EGS, 38.5% complex EGS) by 252 (73.3%) low-volume surgeons (≤25 total EGS procedures/year), 63 (18.3%) medium-volume surgeons (26 to 50/year), and 29 (8.4%) high-volume surgeons (>50/year). Low-volume surgeons operated on one-third (33.1%) of all patients. For simple procedures, the very low rate of death (0.2%) prevented a meaningful regression with mortality; however, there were no associations between low-volume surgeons and complications (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.07; 95% CI 0.81 to 1.41) or 30-day readmissions (aOR 0.80; 95% CI 0.64 to 1.01) relative to high-volume surgeons. Among complex procedures, low-volume surgeons were associated with greater mortality (aOR 1.64; 95% CI 1.12 to 2.41) relative to high-volume surgeons, but not complications (aOR 1.06; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.32) or 30-day readmission (aOR 0.99; 95% CI 0.80 to 1.22). Low-volume hospitals (≤125 total EGS procedures/year) relative to high-volume hospitals (>250/year) were not associated with mortality, complications, or 30-day readmissions for simple or complex procedures. We found evidence that surgeon EGS

  4. Working styles of medicine professionals in emergency medical service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Marija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transactional analysis is a personality and communication theory established by psychiatrist Eric Berne, at the end of the fifties. Counter script is the way of life in accordance with parental imperative. The person with a counter-script has a compulsion to fulfill the required task in order to avoid the disaster of ban. There are five drivers that are considered essential, and these are: 'Be perfect!', 'Be strong!', 'Hurry up!', 'Please others!' and 'Work hard!' Objective: a Determination of the most dominant driver in this medical service. b Because of the specifics of this job which requires speed and humanity, the emphasis will be on doublet: 'Hurry up!' and 'Please others!' Method: The study was conducted on a group of subjects employed in a general service with medical emergency. The instrument used in the study was Julie Hay's questionnaire for diagnosing the working styles. Results: Statistical research was conducted on a sample of 30 subjects employed in the emergency medical service. Availability of all afore mentioned drivers was tested. The research hypotheses were formulated as follows: H0: The driver is not present among the employees in this service; H1: The driver is present among the employees in this service. Calculated value of the t-statistics for the driver 'Hurry up!' is 1.398; for the driver 'Be perfect!' 3.616; for the driver 'Please others!' 11.693; for the driver 'Work hard!' -0.673; and for the driver 'Be strong!' 3.880. Since the realizable value of the t-statistics for the drivers: 'Be perfect!' and 'Please others!' and 'Be strong!' is bigger than the critical value 1.699, and p<0.05 we reject the null hypothesis and we accept the alternative hypothesis on the significance level of 95%. For the drivers 'Hurry up!' and 'Work hard!' the values of t-statistics are lower than the critical value 1.699 for significance level of 95%, so the alternative hypothesis are not acceptable. Conclusion: The results of

  5. 26 CFR 31.3121(b)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern... 1954) General Provisions § 31.3121(b)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services... before 1966 as an intern (as distinguished from a resident doctor), in the employ of a hospital are...

  6. Literature Study : The Nature of Service, The Nature of Hospitality, The Nature of Experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, P. (Priscilla)

    2010-01-01

    In this report the concepts services, hospitality and experiences will be discussed. The goal of this report is to provide insight in what is written in literature about services, hospitality and experiences and to help defining the concept hospitality services for the Research Centre of the Saxion

  7. Protocol for assessing alcohol withdrawal syndrome by nursing professionals in emergency services: a pilot test

    OpenAIRE

    Luis,Margarita Antonia Villar; Lunetta,Ana Carolina Fuza; Ferreira,Paulo Sérgio

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This work speaks of a pilot test administered in four public services with emergency care (one at a hospital and three at community clinics) in the city of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, to test an assessment protocol for Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome. Involved were auxiliaries, technicians and soon-to-be-nurses. The object was to evaluate the protocol´s potential as a guide to nursing care, and to test whether it was adequate in terms of comprehension and applicability. METHODS: A prot...

  8. Do health checks for adults with intellectual disability reduce emergency hospital admissions? Evaluation of a natural experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Iain M; Hosking, Fay J; Harris, Tess; DeWilde, Stephen; Beighton, Carole; Shah, Sunil M; Cook, Derek G

    2017-01-01

    Annual health checks for adults with intellectual disability (ID) have been incentivised by National Health Service (NHS) England since 2009, but it is unclear what impact they have had on important health outcomes such as emergency hospitalisation. An evaluation of a 'natural experiment', incorporating practice and individual-level designs, to assess the effectiveness of health checks for adults with ID in reducing emergency hospital admissions using a large English primary care database. For practices, changes in admission rates for adults with ID between 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 were compared in 126 fully participating versus 68 non-participating practices. For individuals, changes in admission rates before and after the first health check for 7487 adults with ID were compared with 46 408 age-sex-practice matched controls. Incident rate ratios (IRRs) comparing changes in admission rates are presented for: all emergency, preventable emergency (for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs)) and elective emergency. Practices with high health check participation showed no change in emergency admission rate among patients with ID over time compared with non-participating practices (IRR=0.97, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.19), but emergency admissions for ACSCs did fall (IRR=0.74, 0.58 to 0.95). Among individuals with ID, health checks had no effect on overall emergency admissions compared with controls (IRR=0.96, 0.87 to 1.07), although there was a relative reduction in emergency admissions for ACSCs (IRR=0.82, 0.69 to 0.99). Elective admissions showed no change with health checks in either analysis. Annual health checks in primary care for adults with ID did not alter overall emergency admissions, but they appeared influential in reducing preventable emergency admissions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert Langabeer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  10. Adverse drug events leading to emergency department visits at an eye hospital: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Safa; Mohebbi, Niayesh; Gholami, Kheirollah; Jabbarvand, Mahmoud

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate adverse drug events (ADEs) resulting in emergency department visits in an eye hospital. Emergency department visits at Farabi Eye Hospital were assessed for a 7-day period. The patients' eye disorders and drug history were evaluated to detect ADEs. Of 1631 emergency visits, 5 (0.3%, 95% CI: 0.13-0.71%) were drug related. Tetracaine eye drops accounted for 4 (80%, 95% CI: 38-96%) cases with corneal involvement. The other case was an intense conjunctival injection due to naphazoline eye drops. ADEs should be considered in differential diagnosis of ocular emergency problems and preventive measure should be considered.

  11. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all psurgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p surgery and general surgery, whereas transplant had fewer. Emergency general surgery patients have increased ICU needs in terms of length of stay, ventilator usage, and continuous renal replacement therapy usage compared with other services, perhaps due to the higher percentage of transfers and emergent surgery required. These patients represent a distinct population. Understanding their resource needs

  12. The association between hospital overcrowding and mortality among patients admitted via Western Australian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprivulis, Peter C; Da Silva, Julie-Ann; Jacobs, Ian G; Frazer, Amanda R L; Jelinek, George A

    2006-03-06

    To examine the relationship between hospital and emergency department (ED) occupancy, as indicators of hospital overcrowding, and mortality after emergency admission. Retrospective analysis of 62 495 probabilistically linked emergency hospital admissions and death records. Three tertiary metropolitan hospitals between July 2000 and June 2003. All patients 18 years or older whose first ED attendance resulted in hospital admission during the study period. Deaths on days 2, 7 and 30 were evaluated against an Overcrowding Hazard Scale based on hospital and ED occupancy, after adjusting for age, diagnosis, referral source, urgency and mode of transport to hospital. There was a linear relationship between the Overcrowding Hazard Scale and deaths on Day 7 (r=0.98; 95% CI, 0.79-1.00). An Overcrowding Hazard Scale>2 was associated with an increased Day 2, Day 7 and Day 30 hazard ratio for death of 1.3 (95% CI, 1.1-1.6), 1.3 (95% CI, 1.2-1.5) and 1.2 (95% CI, 1.1-1.3), respectively. Deaths at 30 days associated with an Overcrowding Hazard Scale>2 compared with one of overcrowding is associated with increased mortality. The Overcrowding Hazard Scale may be used to assess the hazard associated with hospital and ED overcrowding. Reducing overcrowding may improve outcomes for patients requiring emergency hospital admission.

  13. AUDIT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCY AT LAHORE GENERAL HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Sadaf; Bhatti, Afsar Ali; Burhanulhuq

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes through systematic review of care against explicit criteria and the review of change. Objective of this study was to report the patterns of admissions in our surgical emergency and the comparison of results with the available data. All the patients presented in the surgical emergency of Unit III from April to December 2014. Detail of all surgical patients admitted during the period was recorded from the emergency entry register maintained by the staff nurse. Demographic data, mode of admission, diagnosis and outcomes were recorded on a pro forma. Total number of patients were 11140, out of which 5998 (53.8%) were males and 5142 (46%) were females, mostly were between 18-56 years of age. Emergency surgeries were performed in 650 of our cases whereas the rest of the patients were managed conservatively, treated at minor operation theatre (MOT), referred to their concerned emergencies or discharged. The most common presentation was road traffic accidents followed by trauma, urological emergencies and intestinal obstruction. Overall mortality was estimated as 1.5%. Surgical audit should be made a regular practice to serve as an important and effective tool of accountibilty on clinical outcomes and self evaluation and in improving the quality of our health care system.

  14. Effects of an emergency medical services-based resource access program on frequent users of health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Anthony S; Castillo, Edward M; Chan, Theodore C; Jensen, Anne Marie; Patel, Ekta; Watts, Kerin; Dunford, James V

    2012-01-01

    A small group of adults disproportionately and ineffectively use acute services including emergency medical services (EMS) and emergency departments (EDs). The resulting episodic, uncoordinated care is of lower quality and higher cost and simultaneously consumes valuable public safety and acute care resources. To address this issue, we measured the impact of a pilot, EMS-based case management and referral intervention termed the San Diego Resource Access Program (RAP) to reduce EMS, ED, and inpatient (IP) visits. This was a historical cohort study of RAP records and billing data of EMS and one urban hospital for 51 individuals sequentially enrolled in the program. The study sample consisted of adults with ≥ 10 EMS transports within 12 months and others reported by prehospital personnel with significant recent increases in transports. Data were collected over a 31-month time period from December 2006 to June 2009. Data were collected for equal pre- and postenrollment time periods based on date of initial RAP contact, and comparisons were made using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Overall use for subjects is reported. The majority of subjects were male (64.7%), homeless (58.8%), and 40 to 59 years of age (72.5%). Between the pre and post periods, EMS encounters declined 37.6% from 736 to 459 (p = 0.001), resulting in a 32.1% decrease in EMS charges from $689,743 to $468,394 (p = 0.004). The EMS task time and mileage decreased by 39.8% and 47.5%, respectively, accounting for 262 (p = 0.008) hours and 1,940 (p = 0.006) miles. The number of ED encounters at the one participating hospital declined 28.1% from 199 to 143, which correlated with a 12.7% decrease in charges from $413,410 to $360,779. The number of IP admissions declined by 9.1% from 33 to 30, corresponding to a 5.9% decrease in IP charges from $687,306 to $646,881. Hospital length of stay declined 27.9%, from 122 to 88 days. Across all services, total charges declined by $314,406. This pilot study

  15. Mental disorders among homeless people admitted to a French psychiatric emergency service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Jean-Marc; Boyer, Laurent; Belzeaux, Raoul; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Samuelian, Jean-Claude

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to identify factors associated with homelessness status among patients admitted to the psychiatric emergency ward of a French public teaching hospital over a six-year study period (2001-2006). The study was based on a retrospective review of the psychiatric emergency ward's administrative and medical computer databases. Each emergency care episode had accompanying data that included demographic, financial, clinical, and management information. During this six-year study, the psychiatric service recorded 16,754 care episodes for 8,860 different patients, of which 591 were homeless (6.7%) and 8,269 were nonhomeless (93.3%). The mean+/-SD number of visits to the psychiatric emergency service was higher for homeless patients (4.9+/-12.3) than for nonhomeless patients (1.7+/-2.4) (phomeless patients (56.0%) had more than one care episode, whereas 2,180 (26.4%) of nonhomeless patients had more than one care episode. Factors associated with homelessness included being male, being single, and receiving financial assistance through government social programs. Schizophrenia (43.7%) and substance use disorders (31.0%) were the most common disorders among homeless patients. Aggressive behavior and violence were reported equally among homeless patients (3.5%) and nonhomeless patients (3.2%). Homeless patients were less likely than nonhomeless patients to be hospitalized after receiving care in the emergency ward (47.8% versus 51.1%) (p=.002). Although there is near-universal access to free mental health care in France, study findings suggest that the quality and adequacy of subsequent care are not guaranteed. Multidisciplinary and collaborative solutions are needed to improve the management of mental health care for homeless patients.

  16. Association between prepayment systems and emergency medical services use among patients with acute chest discomfort syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, David B; Mann, N Clay; Hedges, Jerris R; Daya, Mohamud R

    2000-06-01

    Cost concerns may inhibit emergency medical services (EMS) use. Novel tax-based and subscription prepayment programs indemnify patients against the cost of EMS treatment and transport. We determine whether the presence of (or enrollment in) prepayment plans increase EMS use among patients with acute chest discomfort, particularly those residing in low-income areas, those lacking private insurance, or both. This study uses a subset of baseline data from the REACT trial, a multicenter, randomized controlled community trial designed, in part, to increase EMS use. The sample includes 860 consecutive noninstitutionalized patients (>30 years old) presenting with nontraumatic chest discomfort to hospital emergency departments in 4 Oregon/Washington communities. The association between prepayment systems and EMS use was analyzed using multivariable logistic regression. Overall EMS use was 52% (n=445). Among EMS users, 338 (75%) were subsequently admitted to the hospital and 110 (25%) were released from the ED. Prepayment was not associated with increased EMS use in the overall patient sample. However, patients residing in low-income census block groups (median annual income higher-income block group residents. Among low-income block group residents lacking private insurance, prepayment systems were associated with 3.8 times (95% CI 1.2 to 13.4) greater EMS usage. Economic considerations may affect EMS system utilization among underinsured and low-income patients experiencing a cardiac event. Prepayment systems may increase EMS utilization among these groups. [Seipmann DB, Mann NC, Hedges JR, Daya MR, for the Rapid Early Action for Coronary Treatment (REACT) Study. Association between prepayment systems and emergency medical services use among patients with acute chest discomfort syndrome. Ann Emerg Med. June 2000;35:573-578.]. Copyright © 2000 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services: accounts of survivors of life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Makokha, Anselimo; Dubourg, Dominique; Kombe, Yeri; Nyandieka, Lillian; Byskov, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity in most low and middle income countries can be reduced through early recognition of complications, prompt access to care and appropriate medical interventions following obstetric emergencies. We used the three delays framework to explore barriers to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services by women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya. A facility-based qualitative study was conducted between November and December 2010. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 women who experienced obstetric "near miss" at the only public hospital with capacity to provide comprehensive EmOC services in the district. Findings indicate that pregnant women experienced delays in making decision to seek care and in reaching an appropriate care facility. The "first" delay was due to lack of birth preparedness, including failure to identify a health facility for delivery services regardless of antenatal care and to seek care promptly despite recognition of danger signs. The "second" delay was influenced by long distance and inconvenient transport to hospital. These two delays resulted in some women arriving at the hospital too late to save the life of the unborn baby. Delays in making the decision to seek care when obstetric complications occur, combined with delays in reaching the hospital, contribute to ineffective treatment upon arrival at the hospital. Interventions to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity must adequately consider the pre-hospital challenges faced by pregnant women in order to influence decision making towards addressing the three delays.

  18. A Comprehensive Information System for Emergency Medical Services

    OpenAIRE

    Anne, A.; Spyker, D.; Edlich, R.; Attinger, E. O.

    1981-01-01

    As part of the implementation of a comprehensive Emergency Medical Services System for Planning District 10 in Central Virginia, we have developed a computerized data base with the double objective of being able to continuously assess the performance of the overall systems and to serve as a resource for consultation. The information system which has been implemented on a time sharing minicomputer PDP 11/70 has now been in operation for 4 years. It contains 2 large data bases: more than 120,00...

  19. Effect of a housing and case management program on emergency department visits and hospitalizations among chronically ill homeless adults: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Laura S; Kee, Romina A; VanderWeele, Tyler J; Buchanan, David

    2009-05-06

    Homeless adults, especially those with chronic medical illnesses, are frequent users of costly medical services, especially emergency department and hospital services. To assess the effectiveness of a case management and housing program in reducing use of urgent medical services among homeless adults with chronic medical illnesses. Randomized controlled trial conducted at a public teaching hospital and a private, nonprofit hospital in Chicago, Illinois. Participants were 407 social worker-referred homeless adults with chronic medical illnesses (89% of referrals) from September 2003 until May 2006, with follow-up through December 2007. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Housing offered as transitional housing after hospitalization discharge, followed by placement in long-term housing; case management offered on-site at primary study sites, transitional housing, and stable housing sites. Usual care participants received standard discharge planning from hospital social workers. Hospitalizations, hospital days, and emergency department visits measured using electronic surveillance, medical records, and interviews. Models were adjusted for baseline differences in demographics, insurance status, prior hospitalization or emergency department visit, human immunodeficiency virus infection, current use of alcohol or other drugs, mental health symptoms, and other factors. The analytic sample (n = 405 [n = 201 for the intervention group, n = 204 for the usual care group]) was 78% men and 78% African American, with a median duration of homelessness of 30 months. After 18 months, 73% of participants had at least 1 hospitalization or emergency department visit. Compared with the usual care group, the intervention group had unadjusted annualized mean reductions of 0.5 hospitalizations (95% confidence interval [CI], -1.2 to 0.2), 2.7 fewer hospital days (95% CI, -5.6 to 0.2), and 1.2 fewer emergency department visits (95% CI, -2.4 to 0.03). Adjusting for baseline covariates

  20. Humanização da saúde em um serviço de emergência de um hospital público: comparação sobre representações sociais dos profissionais antes e após a capacitação Humanization health at emergency service in a public hospital: comparison on social representation of professional before and after training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angélica Carvalho Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta os resultados de um estudo do tipo antes e depois da capacitação em acolhimento com classificação de risco, que comparou as representações sociais de humanização da saúde entre 111 profissionais de saúde em uma unidade hospitalar de urgência e emergência. A coleta de dados foi realizada por meio da técnica de evocações livres e a análise pelo software EVOC. Os resultados mostraram modificação no significado simbólico atribuído aos termos indutores na direção da incorporação da perspectiva do direito na representação do Sistema Único de Saúde, na tradução da humanização na saúde como acolhimento e progressão da compreensão do acolhimento, do foco humanístico para a qualificação dos processos de atendimento da demanda dos usuários nas urgências e emergências. Os resultados indicam que as diferenças encontradas no núcleo central antes e após a capacitação foram decorrentes de uma aprendizagem que, ancorada em elementos periféricos, foi capaz de questionar o núcleo central e intercambiar elementos entre o sistema central e periférico, constatando a complementaridade funcional entre estes dois sistemas e as relações entre representações e práticas. Contudo, o método utilizado não permite afirmar a persistência de tais mudanças nas representações sociais dos objetos estudados, nem medir em profundidade as mudanças nas práticas cotidianas.This article presents the results of a study of the type before and after training in Shelter with Risk classification compared to the humanization of social representations of health among 111 health professionals in an emergency hospital. Data collection was performed using the technique of free evocation and analysis was done using the EVOC software. The results showed changes in the symbolic meaning attributed to terms inducers towards incorporation of the right perspective in the representation of the Unified Health System, the

  1. An effective support system of emergency medical services with tablet computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kosuke C; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro

    2015-02-27

    There were over 5,000,000 ambulance dispatches during 2010 in Japan, and the time for transportation has been increasing, it took over 37 minutes from dispatch to the hospitals. A way to reduce transportation time by ambulance is to shorten the time of searching for an appropriate facility/hospital during the prehospital phase. Although the information system of medical institutions and emergency medical service (EMS) was established in 2003 in Saga Prefecture, Japan, it has not been utilized efficiently. The Saga Prefectural Government renewed the previous system in an effort to make it the real-time support system that can efficiently manage emergency demand and acceptance for the first time in Japan in April 2011. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the new system promotes efficient emergency transportation for critically ill patients and provides valuable epidemiological data. The new system has provided both emergency personnel in the ambulance, or at the scene, and the medical staff in each hospital to be able to share up-to-date information about available hospitals by means of cloud computing. All 55 ambulances in Saga are equipped with tablet computers through third generation/long term evolution networks. When the emergency personnel arrive on the scene and discern the type of patient's illness, they can search for an appropriate facility/hospital with their tablet computer based on the patient's symptoms and available medical specialists. Data were collected prospectively over a three-year period from April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013. The transportation time by ambulance in Saga was shortened for the first time since the statistics were first kept in 1999; the mean time was 34.3 minutes in 2010 (based on administrative statistics) and 33.9 minutes (95% CI 33.6-34.1) in 2011. The ratio of transportation to the tertiary care facilities in Saga has decreased by 3.12% from the year before, 32.7% in 2010 (regional average) and 29.58% (9085

  2. [Assessment of quality indicators in pediatric poisoning in an emergency service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Roca, C; Martínez Sánchez, L; Calzada Baños, Y; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, V; Quintilla Martínez, J M; Luaces Cubells, C

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of quality indicators allows clinicians to evaluate clinical assistance with a standard, to detect deficiencies and to improve medical assistance. Patients who came to emergency services of a tertiary level hospital for suspicion of poisoning from January 2011 to June 2012 were assessed using 20 quality indicators of pediatric poisoning. Data collection was performed by retrospective review of clinical reports. A total of 393 patients were admitted for suspicion of poisoning (0.3% of all admissions).The standard was reached in 11 indicators and not reached in 6: administration of activated charcoal within 2hours of poison ingestion (standard=90%, result=83.5%); attention within the first 15minutes of arriving in the emergency service (standard=90%, result=60.4%); start of gastrointestinal decontamination within 20minutes of arrival in emergency services (standard=90%, result=29.7%); performing of electrocardiogram on the patients poisoned with cardiotoxic substances (standard=95%, result=87%); judicial communication of cases of poisoning that could conceal a crime (standard=95%, result=31.3%), and collection of the minimal set of information of poisoned patients (standard=90%, result=1.9%). Three indicators could not be evaluated as a consequence of the limited number of cases where they could be applied (de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of the polytrauma victim by the nursing staff in an emergency service of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Sanceverino Mattos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the actions developed by the nursing staff of a private hospital emergency service in the southern Santa Catarina (SC, related to primary and secondary evaluation of polytrauma victims. Methods: Research of a qualitative approach, the type of case study, performed with twelve nurses. Sample has been characterized as non-probabilistic intentional. Data collection has been performed using the techniques of semi-structured interview and participant observation. Data analysis has been developed using the technique of content analysis. Results: Analysis of nurses’ testimonies and the results of observation have showed that most participants comprehend the importance of adopting the ABCDE rule in primary evaluation - A (Air Way - airway permeability with safe administration of cervical collar; B (Breathing; C (Circulation - search for bleeding and control; D (Disability - neurological evaluation; e E (Exposure - patient’s body exposition seeking missed injuries - and the need of meticulous secondary evaluation of polytrauma victim. However, due to demand of urgency and agility in emergencies of this nature, the rule is not followed in a systematic way. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated the nursing staff’s concern over the following aspects: agility of service; immediate performance of examinations; communication between emergency service professionals; adequate perception of the general condition of the victim; and the reception to victim and family.

  4. Energy, emissions and emergency medical services: Policy matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lawrence H.; Blanchard, Ian E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the energy consumption and emissions associated with health services is important for minimizing their environmental impact and guiding their adaptation to a low-carbon economy. In this post-hoc analysis, we characterize the energy burden of North American emergency medical services (EMS) agencies and estimate the potential marginal damage costs arising from their emissions as an example of how and why health services matter in environmental and energy policy, and how and why environmental and energy policy matter to health services. We demonstrate EMS systems are energy intensive, and that vehicle fuels represent 80% of their energy burden while electricity and natural gas represent 20%. We also demonstrate that emissions from EMS operations represent only a small fraction of estimated health sector emissions, but for EMS systems in the United States the associated marginal damage costs are likely between $2.7 million and $9.7 million annually. Significant changes in the supply or price of energy, including changes that arise from environmental and energy policy initiatives designed to constrain fossil fuel consumption, could potentially affect EMS agencies and other health services. We encourage cross disciplinary research to proactively facilitate the health system's adaptation to a low-carbon economy. - Highlights: ► Estimated EMS-related emissions less than 1% of health sector emissions. ► Damage costs of U.S. EMS-related emissions estimated at $2.7 to $9.7 million. ► EMS energy burden is approximately 442 MJ per ambulance response. ► Approximately 80% of EMS energy burden is vehicle fuels. ► Energy supply, price and policy could impact EMS (and other health) services. ► Research needed to facilitate health services’ adaptation to a low carbon economy.

  5. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(13)-1 - Services of student nurse or hospital intern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services of student nurse or hospital intern...) § 31.3306(c)(13)-1 Services of student nurse or hospital intern. (a) Services performed as a student...' training school is chartered or approved pursuant to State law. (b) Services performed as an intern (as...

  6. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  7. 75 FR 71791 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-24

    ... consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to the U.S. DOT's.... NHTSA-2010-0155] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council Meeting Notice AGENCY: National... Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY...

  8. 76 FR 22166 - Renewal of Charter for the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ...: Notice. SUMMARY: The Secretary of Transportation announces the renewal of the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council to provide advice and recommendations regarding emergency medical services (EMS.... NHTSA-2011-0048] Renewal of Charter for the National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC...

  9. 76 FR 15043 - National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... consumers to provide advice and recommendations regarding Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to the U.S. DOT's.... NHTSA-2011-0038] National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council (NEMSAC); Notice of Federal... Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice--National Emergency Medical Services Advisory Council. SUMMARY...

  10. Comparison of emergency medical services systems across Pan-Asian countries: a Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Do; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Tanaka, Hideharu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Alsakaf, Omer; Karim, Sarah Abdul; Khunkhlai, Nalinas; Lin, Chih-Hao; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Tham, Lai Peng; Cone, David C

    2012-01-01

    There are great variations in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival outcomes among different countries and different emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The impact of different systems and their contribution to enhanced survival are poorly understood. This paper compares the EMS systems of several Asian sites making up the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS) network. Some preliminary cardiac arrest outcomes are also reported. This is a cross-sectional descriptive survey study addressing population demographics, service levels, provider characteristics, system operations, budget and finance, medical direction (leadership), and oversight. Most of the systems are single-tiered. Fire-based EMS systems are predominant. Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur have hospital-based systems. Service level is relatively low, from basic to intermediate in most of the communities. Korea, Japan, Singapore, and Bangkok have intermediate emergency medical technician (EMT) service levels, while Taiwan and Dubai have paramedic service levels. Medical direction and oversight have not been systemically established, except in some communities. Systems are mostly dependent on public funding. We found variations in available resources in terms of ambulances and providers. The number of ambulances is 0.3 to 3.2 per 100,000 population, and most ambulances are basic life support (BLS) vehicles. The number of human resources ranges from 4.0 per 100,000 population in Singapore to 55.7 per 100,000 population in Taipei. Average response times vary between 5.1 minutes (Tainan) and 22.5 minutes (Kuala Lumpur). We found substantial variation in 11 communities across the PAROS EMS systems. This study will provide the foundation for understanding subsequent studies arising from the PAROS effort.

  11. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  12. A prospective audit of emergency urology activity in a university teaching hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2014-06-01

    Urology cover is commonly available out-of-hours in most teaching hospitals. However, increased pressure to reduce hospital expenditure has forced many institutions to consider removing middle grade cover outside of normal working hours. The aim of this study was to audit the emergency urology activity in our institution over a 12-month period.

  13. Composition of emergency medical services teams and the problem of specialisation of emergency medical services physicians in the opinions of occupationally active paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rębak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine includes prevention, prehospital care, specialised treatment, rehabilitation, and education. Aim of the research: The objective of the analysis was to determine the opinions of paramedics concerning the problem of the composition of emergency medical services (EMS teams and specialisation of EMS system physicians according to their education level and sense of coherence. Material and methods: The study was conducted among 336 occupationally active paramedics working in EMS teams delivering prehospital care in selected units in Poland. The study was conducted at Ambulance Stations and in Hospital Emergency Departments, which within their structure had an out-of-hospital EMS team. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey, and the research instrument was the Orientation to Life Questionnaire SOC-29 and a questionnaire designed by the author. Results: The respondents who had licentiate education relatively more frequently indicated paramedics with licentiate education level as persons most suitable to undertake medical actions (26.32% rather than physicians (21.05%. Paramedics with 2-year post-secondary school education relatively more often mentioned physicians (33.07% than those with licentiate education (17.32%. As many as 89.58% of the paramedics reported the need for a physician in the composition of the EMS team delivering prehospital care, while only 10.42% of them expressed an opinion that there should be teams composed of paramedics only. According to 30.65% of respondents, EMS team delivering prehospital care should include a physician with the specialty in emergency medicine, whereas 8.04% of respondents reported the need for a physician, irrespective of specialisation. However, 42.56% of the paramedics expressed an opinion that a physician is needed only in a specialist team with a specialisation in emergency medicine. The opinions of the paramedics concerning the need for a

  14. Motorcycle crash-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations for traumatic brain injury in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Katherine J; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Naumann, Rebecca B; Waller, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    To examine statewide emergency department (ED) visit data for motorcycle crash morbidity and healthcare utilization due to traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and non-TBIs. North Carolina ED data (2010-2012) and hospital discharge data (2009-2011). Statewide ED visits and hospitalizations due to injuries from traffic-related motorcycle crashes stratified by TBI status. Descriptive study. Descriptive statistics include age, sex, mode of transport, disposition, expected source of payment, hospital length of stay, and hospital charges. Over the stu