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Sample records for emergency hospital service

  1. The crisis in United States hospital emergency services.

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    Harrison, Jeffrey P; Ferguson, Emily D

    2011-01-01

    Emergency services are critical for high-quality healthcare service provision to support acute illness, trauma and disaster response. The greater availability of emergency services decreases waiting time, improves clinical outcomes and enhances local community well being. This study aims to assess United States (U.S.) acute care hospital staffs ability to provide emergency medical services by evaluating the number of emergency departments and trauma centers. Data were obtained from the 2003 and 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) annual surveys, which included over 5000 US hospitals and provided extensive information on their infrastructure and healthcare capabilities. U.S. acute care hospital numbers decreased by 59 or 1.1 percent from 2003 to 2007. Similarly, U.S. emergency rooms and trauma centers declined by 125, or 3 percent. The results indicate that US hospital staffs ability to respond to traumatic injury and disasters has declined. Therefore, US hospital managers need to increase their investment in emergency department beds as well as provide state-of-the-art clinical technology to improve emergency service quality. These investments, when linked to other clinical information systems and the electronic medical record, support further healthcare quality improvement. This research uses the AHA annual surveys,which represent self-reported data by individual hospital staff. However, the AHA expendssignificant resources to validate reported information and the annual survey data are widely used for hospital research. The declining US emergency rooms and trauma centers have negative implications for patients needing emergency services. More importantly, this research has significant policy implications because it documents a decline in the US emergency healthcare service infrastructure. This article has important information on US emergency service availability in the hospital industry.

  2. Organization structure and the performance of hospital emergency services.

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    Georgopoulos, B S

    1985-07-01

    A comparative study of 30 hospital emergency departments (EDs) and nearly 1,500 individuals associated with them was conducted. Data were obtained from institutional records, physicians, patients, and other sources. The object was to investigate the relationship between the organization and performance of these health service systems. The study assessed the quality of medical care, the quality of nursing care, and the economic efficiency of hospital EDs. The results show substantial interinstitutional differences in these criteria. They also show a significant relationship between medical and nursing care, but not between the quality of care and economic efficiency. Differences in ED performance are related to medical staffing patterns, medical teaching affiliation, personnel training, scope of emergency services, number of patient visits processed, and hospital size and complexity. Not all of these variables, however, correlate positively with all three criteria of performance, nor are they equally important to each.

  3. [Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services].

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    Parra Hidalgo, Pedro; Bermejo Alegría, Rosa María; Más Castillo, Adelia; Hidalgo Montesinos, María Dolores; Gomis Cebrián, Rafael; Calle Urra, José Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public hospitals in 2008 and 2009. The adjusted model including all perceived quality and sociodemographic variables explained 47.1% of the variance (adjusted R(2)). Of all the independent variables included, only eight were significant in predicting the level of patient satisfaction. These variables were related to the patient's opinion of the relationship with medical staff (p = 0.041), nurses' and porters' professionalism (p = 0.010 and 0.022), infrastructure (cleanliness and comfort) (p = 0.033 and 0.008), information received at discharge (p = 0.000), waiting time in the emergency department (p = 0.000) and the perception of treatment-diagnosis without failure (p = 0.028). The variables influencing emergency patients' satisfaction were determined, allowing areas where corrective action could be introduced to be identified. In addition, possible confounding factors that should be controlled for when comparing results among distinct hospitals were identified. The emergency satisfaction questionnaire is a useful instrument to evaluate and improve quality of care. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The 2012 derecho: emergency medical services and hospital response.

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    Kearns, Randy D; Wigal, Mark S; Fernandez, Antonio; Tucker, March A; Zuidgeest, Ginger R; Mills, Michael R; Cairns, Bruce A; Cairns, Charles B

    2014-10-01

    During the early afternoon of June 29, 2012, a line of destructive thunderstorms producing straight line winds known as a derecho developed near Chicago (Illinois, USA). The storm moved southeast with wind speeds recorded from 100 to 160 kilometers per hour (kph, 60 to 100 miles per hour [mph]). The storm swept across much of West Virginia (USA) later that evening. Power outage was substantial as an estimated 1,300,000 West Virginians (more than half) were without power in the aftermath of the storm and approximately 600,000 citizens were still without power a week later. This was one of the worst storms to strike this area and occurred as residents were enduring a prolonged heat wave. The wind damage left much of the community without electricity and the crippling effect compromised or destroyed critical infrastructure including communications, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water and sewer pumps. This report describes utilization of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hospital resources in West Virginia in response to the storm. Also reported is a review of the weather phenomena and the findings and discussion of the disaster and implications.

  5. 14 CFR 135.271 - Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Helicopter hospital emergency medical....271 Helicopter hospital emergency medical evacuation service (HEMES). (a) No certificate holder may... certificate holder may assign a helicopter flight crewmember, and no flight crewmember may accept an...

  6. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil.

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    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, João Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thumé, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-08-22

    Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. The present work can be classified as a cross-sectional ecological study. To carry out the present study, data of all 5843 Brazilian hospitals were categorized among high complexity centers and small hospitals. The geographical access barriers were identified through the use of two-step floating catchment area method. Once concluded the previous step an evaluation using the Getis-Ord-Gi method was performed to identify spatial clusters of municipalities with limited access to high complexity centers but well covered by well-equipped small hospitals. The analysis of accessibility index of high complexity centers highlighted large portions of the country with nearly zero hospital beds by inhabitant. In contrast, it was possible observe a group of 1595 municipalities with high accessibility to small hospitals, simultaneously with a low coverage of high complexity centers. Among the 1595 municipalities with good accessibility to small hospitals, 74% (1183) were covered by small hospitals with at least 60% of minimum emergency service requirements. The spatial clusters analysis aggregated 589 municipalities with high values related to minimum emergency service requirements. Small hospitals in these 589 cities could promote the equity in access to emergency services benefiting more than eight million people. There is a spatial disequilibrium within the country with prominent gaps in the health care network for emergency services. Taking this challenge into consideration, small hospitals could be a possible solution and foster equity in access

  7. Addressing geographic access barriers to emergency care services: a national ecologic study of hospitals in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, N?bia Cristina; Amaral, Pedro Vasconcelos; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Rocha, Jo?o Victor Muniz; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Thum?, Elaine; Thomaz, Erika B?rbara Abreu Fonseca; de Sousa Queiroz, Rejane Christine; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Lopes, Daniel Paulino; Staton, Catherine A.; Vissoci, Jo?o Ricardo Nickenig

    2017-01-01

    Background Unequal distribution of emergency care services is a critical barrier to be overcome to assure access to emergency and surgical care. Considering this context it was objective of the present work analyze geographic access barriers to emergency care services in Brazil. A secondary aim of the study is to define possible roles to be assumed by small hospitals in the Brazilian healthcare network to overcome geographic access challenges. Methods The present work can be classified as a c...

  8. Retrospective evaluation of urological admissions to emergency service of a training and research hospital.

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    Topaktaş, Ramazan; Altın, Selçuk; Aydın, Cemil; Akkoç, Ali; Yılmaz, Yakup

    2014-12-01

    Many patients consult emergency services with urological complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatments of urological emergency cases in a training and research hospital. We retrospectively evaluated urological emergency patients referred to the emergency unit between July 2012 and July 2013 according to age, gender, affected organ, radiological imaging techniques and treatment. Among 141.844 emergency cases, 3.113 (2.19%) were urological emergencies and 53.2% of the patients were male (mean age: 49.1), and 46.8% of them were female (median age: 42.8). The most frequent illness was genitourinary infection constituting 41.2% of the cases followed by renal colic (36.9%). Among the urological emergencies 483 (15.5%) patients were hospitalized and 152 surgical operations were performed. The mostly performed procedure was the placement of a suprapubic catheter in 34 patients constituting (22.3%) of the cases. Totally eight patients were referred to another experienced health center due to different reasons. Most of the urological emergency patients do not require emergency surgical interventions however, timely identification and management of urological emergencies with in-depth clinical evaluation are important to prevent late complications. Therefore the doctors working in emergency services must be heedful of urological emergencies.

  9. Referral to the Hospital And Emergency Ambulance Service Uses Patterns of the Inmates and Convicts

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    Emine Oncu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons for referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses patterns of the inmates and convicts in an E type prison. Material and Method: In this descriptive study, it was evaluated the prison records associated with referral to the hospital and 112 emergency ambulance service uses for one year in 2010- 2011. Of the statistical analysis, descriptive statistics, chi-square test and Fisher%u2019s Exact Test were used. Results: All inmates and convicts were man, the median of age was 30,0 (min 18- max 68 years and substance use was 34,5%. The number of prisoners were referred to the hospital 815, total referrals were 1491; (referrals ranged from one to six and most common in January; and according to frequency, reasons of the referral were eyes problems, musculoskeletal disorders and psychological problems. Emergency medical service was used for in medical causes (78,3%, accident, trauma and injuries (16,4%, suicide (5,3%. Discussion: Findings from the study show that prisoners are more likely to have suffered physical and mental health problems that compared to the rest of society and have significantly high substance use rates.

  10. Service delivery innovation for hospital emergency management using rich organizational modelling.

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    Dhakal, Yogit; Bhuiyan, Moshiur; Prasad, Pwc; Krishna, Aneesh

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and assess service delivery issues within a hospital emergency department and propose an improved model to address them. Possible solutions and options to these issues are explored to determine the one that best fits the context. In this article, we have analysed the emergency department's organizational models through i* strategic dependency and rational modelling technique before proposing updated models that could potentially drive business process efficiencies. The results produced by the models, framework and improved patient journey in the emergency department were evaluated against the statistical data revealed from a reputed government organization related to health, to ensure that the key elements of the issues such as wait time, stay time/throughput, workload and human resource are resolved. The result of the evaluation was taken as a basis to determine the success of the project. Based on these results, the article recommends implementing the concept on actual scenario, where a positive result is achievable.

  11. Assessment of client satisfaction on emergency department services in Hawassa University Referral Hospital, Hawassa, Southern Ethiopia.

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    Worku, Mesfin; Loha, Eskindir

    2017-06-27

    Satisfaction refers to a state of pleasure or contentment with an action, event or service, especially one that was previously desired. Regarding to client, satisfaction is the level of happiness that clients experience having used a service. It therefore reflects the gap between the expected service and the experience of the service, from the client's point of view. Information was unavailable regarding the level of satisfaction of patients towards emergency health care servicesat Hawassa University Referral Hospital thatserve a huge catchment area; and this study addressed this gap. Cross-sectional study was conducted from March 13 to May 15/2014. Systematic sampling method was used to enroll study participants. The data was collected by trained data collectors using pre-structured questionnaire. A total 407 clients were enrolled under this study with respondent rate of 96.9%. Nearly two third of study participants were male, 270 (66.3%). 86.7% of study participants were satisfied by services provided in Emergency Out Patient Department (OPD). The percentage of study satisfaction with physical examination by Doctor, nursing, laboratory and pharmacy services were 95.6%, 89.9%, 84.7% and 67.6%, respectively. Only 31.9% were satisfied with availability of drugs in the pharmacy. Regarding to staff courtesy, 91.7% of study participants were satisfied by the manner shown by the staffs working in Emergency OPD. The vast majority of the participants (97%) were satisfied with the courtesy of Medical laboratory personnel and the least satisfaction (79.4%) was recorded for security guards. This study showed low level of patient satisfaction in pharmacy services specifically due to unavailability of drugs due to lack of sustained supply of drugs.

  12. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

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    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  13. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

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    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  14. Pre-Hospital Emergency Medical Services: An Epidemiological Survey in Mashhad, Iran

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    Mohsen Seyyednozadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Providing appropriate care, in the right place and at the right time, is the main goal of emergency medical services (EMS to save lives. The present study aimed to assess the pre-hospital EMS in Mashhad, the second largest metropolis in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this research, data were extracted from the pre-hospital emergency mission forms, which were collected from the EMS stations in Mashhad and suburbs through systematic random sampling. In addition, supplementary information was obtained from the ambulance dispatch cards and emergency communication center forms. Results:Automobile accidents (33.7% and cardiovascular events (17.8% were the most common causes of contacts to the EMS. In the city and road stations, the mean response time was 2.6 and 1.6 minutes, while the mean time of arrival at the scene was 13.2 and 11.4 minutes, and the mean evacuation time was 13.2 and 11.4 minutes, respectively. Individuals aged 20-29 (25.2% and more than 60 years (23.9% constituted the majority of the cases receiving EMS. Conclusion: According to the results, the ‘golden time’ for emergency care was of great importance in the patients injured in car accidents or affected by cardiovascular events. Furthermore, a significant difference was observed in the time indices of EMS in Mashhad city with the EMS standards due to the lack of human resources or EMS facilities. Some contacts to the EMS were unnecessary, and no expert team aid was needed in some cases. It is recommended that citizens be trained on solving the problems associated with road traffic by implementing mobile emergency, while transfer units must be established for the better provision of emergency care by the EMS in Mashhad.

  15. Emergency department boarding and adverse hospitalization outcomes among patients admitted to a general medical service.

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    Lord, Kito; Parwani, Vivek; Ulrich, Andrew; Finn, Emily B; Rothenberg, Craig; Emerson, Beth; Rosenberg, Alana; Venkatesh, Arjun K

    2018-03-20

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) has been associated with patient harm, yet little is known about the association between ED boarding and adverse hospitalization outcomes. We sought to examine the association between ED boarding and three common adverse hospitalization outcomes: rapid response team activation (RRT), escalation in care, and mortality. We conducted an observational analysis of consecutive patient encounters admitted from the ED to the general medical service between February 2013 and June 2015. This study was conducted in an urban, academic hospital with an annual adult ED census over 90,000. We defined boarding as patients with greater than 4h from ED bed order to ED departure to hospital ward. The primary outcome was a composite of adverse outcomes in the first 24h of admission, including RRT activation, care escalation to intensive care, or in-hospital mortality. A total of 31,426 patient encounters were included of which 3978 (12.7%) boarded in the ED for 4h or more. Adverse outcomes occurred in 1.92% of all encounters. Comparing boarded vs. non-boarded patients, 41 (1.03%) vs. 244 (0.90%) patients experienced a RRT activation, 53 (1.33%) vs. 387 (1.42%) experienced a care escalation, and 1 (0.03%) vs.12 (0.04%) experienced unanticipated in-hospital death, within 24h of ED admission. In unadjusted analysis, there was no difference in the composite outcome between boarding and non-boarding patients (1.91% vs. 1.91%, p=0.994). Regression analysis adjusted for patient demographics, acuity, and comorbidities also showed no association between boarding and the primary outcome. A sensitivity analysis showed an association between ED boarding and the composite outcome inclusive of the entire inpatient hospital stay (5.8% vs. 4.7%, p=0.003). Within the first 24h of hospital admission to a general medicine service, adverse hospitalization outcomes are rare and not associated with ED boarding. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Effect of Emergency Medical Services Use on Hospital Outcomes of Acute Hemorrhagic Stroke.

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    Kim, Sola; Shin, Sang Do; Ro, Young Sun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Lee, Yu Jin; Lee, Eui Jung; Ahn, Ki Ok; Kim, Taeyun; Hong, Ki Jeong; Kim, Yu Jin

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether the use of emergency medical services (EMS) is associated with enhanced survival and decreased disability after hemorrhagic stroke and whether the effect size of EMS use differs according to the length of stay (LOS) in emergency department (ED). Adult patients (19 years and older) with acute hemorrhagic stroke who survived to admission at 29 hospitals between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed, excluding those who had symptom-to-ED arrival time of 3 h or greater, received thrombolysis or craniotomy before inter-hospital transfer, or had experienced cardiac arrest, had unknown information about ambulance use and outcomes. Exposure variable was EMS use. Endpoints were survival at discharge and worsened modified Rankin Scale (W-MRS) defined as 3 or greater points difference between pre- and post-event MRS. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the outcomes were calculated, including potential confounders (demographic, socioeconomic status, clinical parameter, comorbidity, behavior, and time of event) in the final model and stratifying patients by inter-hospital transfer and by time interval from symptom to ED arrival (S2D). ED LOS, classified into short (hemorrhagic strokes were analyzed in which 75.6% were transported by EMS. For outcome measures, 17.4% and 41.4% were dead and had worsened MRS, respectively. AORs (95% CIs) of EMS were 0.67 (0.51-0.89) for death and 0.74 (0.59-0.92) for W-MRS in all patients. The effect size of EMS, however, was different according to LOS in ED. AORs (95% CIs) for death were 0.74 (0.54-1.01) in short LOS and 0.60 (0.44-0.83) in long LOS group. AORs (95% CIs) for W-MRS were 0.76 (0.60-0.97) in short LOS and 0.68 (0.52-0.88) in long LOS group. EMS transport was associated with lower hospital mortality and disability after acute hemorrhagic stroke. Effect size of EMS use for mortality was significant in patients with long ED LOS. Key  words: emergency medical service; hemorrhagic

  17. Services quality in emergency department of Nemazee Hospital: Using SERVQUAL model

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    Maryam Gholami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is crucial to the long-run success in health care center. With regard to the highest patients’ referral to the emergency department and the existing challenges due to the patient’s need to urgent care, we aimed to evaluate health care services quality in this unit to find out whether the patients have different expectations from health care providers and if they perceive some dimensions of care more important than others. Method: The SERVQUAL scale method was used in this cross-sectional study on 100 patients in June 2015. Patient satisfaction questionnaire based on SERVQUAL model was evaluated with high content validity and the reliability was 0.97 and 0.81. The data collected were analyzed using SPSS, version 20.0 (IBM, USA. Statistical analyses included descriptive statistics, paired and independence sample t-test and ANOVA at the significance level 0.05. Results:The results showed that the quality gap in all dimensions was significant (P<0.001. The largest quality gap was related to responsiveness (-1.08 and the lowest belonged to assurance (-0.8. Demographic characteristics were analyzed and the number of referrals was significant in tangibility and assurance dimensions (P = 0.04; also, in all cases the patients’ expectations (total Mean=4.35 were higher than their perception (total Mean = 3.295. Conclusion: In order to improve emergency services, it is recommended that the hospital management should provide appropriate facilities, reduce waiting time, increase in attention to ordering system based on the patients’ condition, and improve the behavior of health care personnel to patient is placed on the agenda of hospital management.

  18. Quality improvement in emergency service delivery: Assessment of knowledge and skills amongst emergency nurses at Connaught Hospital, Sierra Leone

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    Hedda Bøe Nyhus

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: This study has identified key aspects of emergency nursing speciality training to be developed through theoretical and skill-based education provided by the nursing schools and hospital clinical facilities in Sierra Leone.

  19. Characteristics of Emergency Services for the Elderly—A Regional Hospital Example

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    Ching-Lin Huang

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: This study's primary goal was to investigate the most common clinical signs and symptoms of the various diseases most common in elderly patients, who presented to the emergency service, and the care of these patients in Hsinchu County to facilitate a more efficient and useful emergency medical service.

  20. How Multidimensional Health Locus of Control predicts utilization of emergency and inpatient hospital services.

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    Mautner, Dawn; Peterson, Bridget; Cunningham, Amy; Ku, Bon; Scott, Kevin; LaNoue, Marianna

    2017-03-01

    Health locus of control may be an important predictor of health care utilization. We analyzed associations between health locus of control and frequency of emergency department visits and hospital admissions, and investigated self-rated health as a potential mediator. Overall, 863 patients in an urban emergency department completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control instrument, and self-reported emergency department use and hospital admissions in the last year. We found small but significant associations between Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and utilization, all of which were mediated by self-rated health. We conclude that interventions to shift health locus of control may change patients' perceptions of their own health, thereby impacting utilization.

  1. Relationship between organizational climate and burnout syndrome in the emergency service of a hospital Category III-2. Lima, Peru 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Zenaida Solís Chuquiyaur; Luisa Zamudio Eslava; Juan Matzumura Kasano; Hugo Gutiérrez Crespo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between organizational climate and Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals of the Emergency Service in a Hospital Category III-2. Material and methods: quantitative, prospective, correlational cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 43 nurses, using a non-probability sampling for convenience. For analysis and study of the variables, Rensis Likert scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used. Results: The organizational clima...

  2. [Case-Mix of hospital emergencies in the Andalusian Health Service based on the 2012 Minimum Data Set. Spain].

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    Goicoechea Salazar, Juan Antonio; Nieto García, María Adoración; Laguna Téllez, Antonio; Larrocha Mata, Daniel; Canto Casasola, Vicente David; Murillo Cabezas, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of digital health records in emergency departments (ED) in hospitals in the Andalusian Health Service and the development of an automatic encoder for this area have allowed us to establish a Minimum Data Set for Emergencies (MDS-ED). The aim of this article is to describe the case mix of hospital EDs using various dimensions contained in the MDS-ED. 3.235.600 hospital emergency records in 2012 were classified in clinical categories from the ICD-9-CM codes generated by the automatic encoder. Operating rules to obtain response time and length of stay were defined. A descriptive analysis was carried out to obtain demographic and chronological indicators as well as hospitalization, return and death rates and response time and length of stay in the Eds. Women generated 54,26% of all occurrences and their average age (39,98 years) was higher than men's (37,61). Paediatric emergencies accounted for 21,49% of the total. The peak hours were from 10:00 to 13:00 and from 16:00 to 17:00. Patients who did not undergo observation (92,67%) remained in the ED an average of 153 minutes. Injuries and poisoning, respiratory diseases, musculoskeletal diseases and symptoms and signs generated over 50% of all visits. 79.191 cases of chest pain, 28.741 episodes of heart failure and 27.989 episodes of serious infections were identified among the most relevant disorders. The MDS-ED makes it possible to address systematically the analysis of hospital emergencies by identifying the activity developed, the case-mix attended, the response times, the time spent in ED and the quality of the care.

  3. Relationship between organizational climate and burnout syndrome in the emergency service of a hospital Category III-2. Lima, Peru 2015

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    Zenaida Solís Chuquiyaur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between organizational climate and Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals of the Emergency Service in a Hospital Category III-2. Material and methods: quantitative, prospective, correlational cross-sectional study. The sample consisted of 43 nurses, using a non-probability sampling for convenience. For analysis and study of the variables, Rensis Likert scale and Maslach Burnout Inventory were used. Results: The organizational climate was average level (81.4% followed by a high level (18.6% and the Burnout Syndrome corresponds to low level (86% and medium (14% level. The relationship between organizational climate and Burnout Syndrome was low (rho = -0.11. Conclusions: In the Emergency Service, the level of organizational climate was fairly favorable with absence of Burnout Syndrome among nursing professionals. There is not significant relationship between the two variables.

  4. Emergency Medical Services

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    ... need help right away, you should use emergency medical services. These services use specially trained people and ... emergencies, you need help where you are. Emergency medical technicians, or EMTs, do specific rescue jobs. They ...

  5. Pre-hospital intubation by anaesthesiologists in patients with severe trauma: an audit of a Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service

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    Lossius Hans

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesiologists are airway management experts, which is one of the reasons why they serve as pre-hospital emergency physicians in many countries. However, limited data are available on the actual quality and safety of anaesthesiologist-managed pre-hospital endotracheal intubation (ETI. To explore whether the general indications for ETI are followed and what complications are recorded, we analysed the use of pre-hospital ETI in severely traumatised patients treated by anaesthesiologists in a Norwegian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS. Methods A retrospective audit of prospectively registered data concerning patients with trauma as the primary diagnosis and a National Committee on Aeronautics score of 4 - 7 during the period of 1994-2005 from a mixed rural/urban Norwegian HEMS was performed. Results Among the 1255 cases identified, 238 successful pre-hospital ETIs out of 240 attempts were recorded (99.2% success rate. Furthermore, we identified 47 patients for whom ETI was performed immediately upon arrival to the emergency department (ED. This group represented 16% of all intubated patients. Of the ETIs performed in the ED, 43 patients had an initial Glasgow Coma Score (GCS Conclusions We found a very high success rate of pre-hospital ETI and few recorded complications in the studied anaesthesiologist-manned HEMS. However, a substantial number of trauma patients were intubated first on arrival in the ED. This delay may represent a quality problem. Therefore, we believe that more studies are needed to clarify the reasons for and possible clinical consequences of the delayed ETIs.

  6. Efficacy of hospital in the home services providing care for patients admitted from emergency departments: an integrative review.

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    Varney, Jane; Weiland, Tracey J; Jelinek, George

    2014-06-01

    Increases in emergency department (ED) demand may compromise patient outcomes, leading not only to overcrowding in the ED, increased ED waiting times and increased ED length of stay, but also compromising patient safety; the risk of adverse events is known to rise in the presence of overcrowding. Hospital in the home (HiTH) services may offer one means of reducing ED demand. This integrative review sought to assess the efficacy of admission-avoidance HiTH services that admit patients directly from the ED. Papers published between 1995 and 2013 were identified through searches of Medline, CINAHL and Google. English-language studies that assessed the efficacy of a HiTH service and that recruited at least one-third of the participants directly from the ED were included in the review. A HiTH service was considered one that provided health professional support to patients at home for a time-limited period, thus avoiding the need for hospitalization. Twenty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. The interventions were diverse in terms of the clinical interventions delivered, the range and intensity of health professional input and the conditions treated. The studies included in the review found no effect on clinical outcomes, rates of adverse events or complications, although patient satisfaction and costs were consistently and favourably affected by HiTH treatment. Given evidence suggesting that HiTH services which recruit patients directly from the ED contribute to cost-savings, greater patient satisfaction and safety and efficacy outcomes that are at least equivalent to those associated with hospital-based care, the expansion of such programmes might therefore be considered a priority for policy makers.

  7. [Hospital emergency rooms].

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    Tudela, Pere; Mòdol, Josep Maria

    2003-05-17

    Overuse of hospital emergency rooms (HERs) is parallel to their controversy. To understand this problem, some concepts should be first clarified. In HERs, there are some intrinsic aspects which are directly related to the emergency itself and thus cannot be modified (intermittent patient flow, need to prioritize, difficulty to achieve a rapid diagnosis, influence of time on treatment, value of clinical follow up, patient's expectations, impact of HER on the overall hospital working dynamics). On the other hand, there are some extrinsic aspects which indeed are not related to HER itself but are rather historically associated with it (precarious structure, delay on admission, lack of privacy, inadequate triage of cases, lack of professionalization); these latter aspects may be potentially modified and should be reconsidered.

  8. Emergency service: a strategy for hospital-sponsored ambulatory care satellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, D; Klegon, D; Steinhauer, B

    1984-01-01

    This analysis of the overall market position of free-standing emergency care was based on a telephone survey of 300 randomly chosen households in a southeastern metropolitan area. Results show that consumer preferences for cost and convenience create a strong market for free-standing emergency facilities. Emergicare centers are in an ideal situation to capture the market for acute and minor emergency care. To be worthwhile, the emergency room in a more comprehensive ambulatory care facility should serve as a feeder of new patients and be profitable in its own right. However, free-standing emergency facilities must not only attract patients through convenience and price, but they must also maintain patients through assuring quality care and satisfaction.

  9. A lean case study in an oncological hospital: implementation of a telephone triage system in the emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crespo de Carvalho J

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available José Crespo de Carvalho,1 Madalena Ramos,1 Carina Paixão2 1Business School, University Institute of Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 2Instituto Português de Oncologia, Lisbon, Portugal Abstract: Lean practices and thinking have increased substantially in the last few years. Applications of lean practices to health care are found worldwide. Despite that, new contributions are required because the application of lean thinking to hospitals has a long way to go. Lean practices and thinking do not include, in the literature or practice programs, any references to triage systems in health care units. The common triage systems require physical presence, but there are alternative methods to avoid the need to move patients: these alternative triage systems, given their characteristics, may be included in the spectrum of lean practices. Currently, patients that are already known to suffer from cancer are encouraged to go to hospital (public or private, with an oncological focus when facing side effects from chemotherapy or radiation treatments; they are then submitted to a triage system (present themselves to the hospital for examination. The authors of this paper propose the introduction of telephone or email triage for impaired patients as a valid substitute for moving them physically, thereby often avoiding several unnecessary moves. This approach has, in fact, characteristics similar to a lean practice in that it reduces costs and maintains, if done properly, the overall service offered. The proposed 'remote' triage emerged from the results of a large survey sent to patients and also as the outcome of a set of semistructured interviews conducted with hospital nurses. With the results they obtained, the authors felt comfortable proposing this approach both to public and private hospitals, because the study was conducted in the most important, largest, and best-known oncological unit in Spain. As a final result, the health care unit studied is now taking

  10. Profile of motorcycle victims from the emergency service of a university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luís Amim Zabeu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Epidemiological survey of motorcycle accidents occurring in a city with over one million inhabitants and treated at university hospital of reference between the months of July and November 2010. METHODS: Cross sectional study using structured interview (standardized form to document the data collection: age, gender, income, using time and capacity of the motorcycle. RESULTS: From 114 cases, it was observed that the profile of the victim of motorcycle accident treated at this hospital is a young person, male, possessing a driver's license for less than five years, with a monthly income average around one thousand reais (local currency, owner of a motorcycle with low capacity (less than 150 cc and low educational attainment. The accidents occurred predominantly in the urban area, in the afternoons and one third of them were considered work-related accidents, death generated in 3 per cent of cases and open fractures in 11 per cent of them. CONCLUSION: The incidence of motorcycle accidents involved mainly young men with little experience in traffic and low level of education.

  11. Service Robots for Hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    services to maintain the quality of healthcare provided. This thesis and the Industrial PhD project aim to address logistics, which is the most resource demanding service in a hospital. The scale of the transportation tasks is huge and the material flow in a hospital is comparable to that of a factory. We......Hospitals are complex and dynamic organisms that are vital to the well-being of societies. Providing good quality healthcare is the ultimate goal of a hospital, and it is what most of us are only concerned with. A hospital, on the other hand, has to orchestrate a great deal of supplementary...... believe that these transportation tasks, to a great extent, can be and will be automated using mobile robots. This thesis consequently addresses the key technical issues of implementing service robots in hospitals. In simple terms, a robotic system for automating hospital logistics has to be reliable...

  12. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints.

  13. [Financial analysis of a department of general surgery in a French hospital. The new "fee-for-service" reimbursement system results in a high deficit for emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdy, G; Dalban-Sillas, B; Leclerc, C; Bonnaventure, F; Roullet Audy, J-C; Frileux, P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a detailed analysis of income and expense in a department of general surgery in a French hospital under the new system of funding based on a "fee-for-service" principle. All hospital stays of year 2006 were analysed retrospectively. The conditions of admission (elective vs. emergency), the principal diagnosis, and surgical procedures were examined. We determined hospital costs and the reimbursement for every admission. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-five hospitalizations generated an income of 8Meuros with a deficit of 1.3Meuros. The 775 elective admissions generated 50% of the income and 13% of the deficit (178,562euros). Seven hundred and forty-nine emergency admissions generated 45% of the income and 82% of deficit (1.1Meuros). Four hundred and sixty-one admissions for endoscopy generated 5% of the income and 5% of the deficit (67,249euros). Hospital stays of less than two days (the minimum duration of stay for total reimbursement) caused a loss of 122,624euros. Length of hospital stay below the lower limit caused a loss of 42,850euros. Elective surgical activity in digestive surgery can generate a balanced budget provided the length of hospital stay is reduced to the minimum, sometimes to the detriment of patient comfort. Emergency admissions result in a large deficit between cost and reimbursement; this fact may lead hospitals to avoid emergency activity in the future unless appropriate remedial measures are taken.

  14. Serviço de Emergência Psiquiátrica em hospital geral: estudo retrospectivo Servicio de emergencia psiquiátrica en hospital general: estudio retrospectivo Emergency psychiatric service in general hospitals: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Sérgio Pereira de Sousa

    2010-09-01

    SEPHG, 43,45% de tales pacientes fueron derivados al CAPS-ad. Se desprende de los resultados cuán imprescindibles son los servicios de salud mental.The Emergency Psychiatric Service in General Hospitals (SEPHG, acronym in Portuguese is a service included in the psychiatric reform movement. The purpose of the present study was to characterize patients with psychological distress treated at the Dr. Estevam SEPHG, located in Sobral, Ceará state. This exploratory study was performed using documental analyses with a quantitative approach, and involved 191 clients treated at the referred SEPHG from January to December 2007. Data collection was performed using a client register book, which contained information obtained from the patients' medical record. There was a predominance of male patients (70.15%, aged 30-49 years (48.71% and single (74.86%. Most patients were from the city of Sobral (69.64%. In 42.40% of cases, the diagnosis was of alcohol use/abuse. Most clients (66.50% sought the service voluntarily. After being evaluated at the SEPHG, 43.45% of patients were referred to the local Center for Psychosocial Care -Alcohol and other Drugs. The results emphasize the importance of mental health.

  15. The evaluation of the patients who admitted to a regional hospital emergency service with suspect of rabies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurettin Tunç

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rabies is one of the highest mortality ratesinfectious disease. The aim was the evaluation of the patientswho admitted to The Batman Regional State HospitalEmergency Service with suspect of rabies in the datesbetween June 2011 and November 2011.Materials and methods: Totally, 166 cases who admittedto our center was recorded according to the followingdata: place of residence (rural/urban, contact type andwound information, time after the contact, whether vaccineor immunoglobulin is applied or not and also the species,breed and being owned of suspected animal.Results: Our study population consisted of a total of 166cases including 38 women (23%, 128 men (77% withthe mean age of 22.01 ± 17.90 years. Of all subjects, 105(63% lived in urban and 61 (37% lived in rural areas.Eighty-five percent of suspicious animals (51% had anowner, while 81 animals were unattended.Conclusions: Our results showed that all admitted patientswere vaccinated and the ones contacted with petsor had a surface wound were vaccinated with 3 doses.Moreover, since the 49% of our cases were contactedwith animals which cannot be follow-up, our study obviouslyreveals that in our country deficiencies in the controlof waifs still is a public health problem and increases thecost of vaccination. J Clin Exp Invest 2012; 3 (3: 383-386Key words: Rabies, suspected bite, rabies prophylaxis

  16. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  17. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  18. Retrospective analysis of the role and performance of family medicine versus emergency medical services in the pre-hospital management of patients with AMI in Banja Luka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakić, Biljana; Račić, Maja; Vulić, Duško

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in pre-hospital care of patients with acute myocardial infarction between emergency medical services and family medicine. This retrospective descriptive study included patients treated for acute myocardial infarction at the University Clinical Centre of Banja Luka, in the period from 1st January to 31st December 2011. The patients were divided into two groups: patients who received a hospital referral from the family medicine service and those who received one from the emergency medical service. The majority of patients (54.8%) received pre-hospital care from emergency medical services, while in 24.8% of cases the care was provided by family medicine physicians. The analysis showed that the time that passed from the onset of symptoms to the visit to the health institution of first medical contact was shorter in the emergency medical service (pfamily practice was 24 hours, and to the emergency service 2 hours. The patients who established their first medical contact with the emergency service reported more severe symptoms than the ones who visited a family practice over the same period of time. The severity of symptoms affected the patients' decisions to seek help in a timely manner and to choose the facility of first medical contact. Interventions to decrease delay must focus on improving public awareness of acute myocardial infarction symptoms and increasing their knowledge of the benefits of early medical contact and treatment. Continuing education of family practitioners in this field is required. Copyright © 2016 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  19. [Outpatient care in emergency departments and primary care services : A descriptive analysis of secondary data in a rural hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, I; Rupp, P; Naziyok, T; Rölker-Denker, L; Röhrig, R; Hein, A

    2017-09-01

    The use of emergency departments in German hospitals has been increasing in recent years. Emergency care provided by primary care services ("Bereitschaftsdienstpraxis") or a hospital emergency departments (EDs) is the subject of current discussions. The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons that outpatients with lower treatment urgency consult the ED. Further, the effects of the cooperation between primary care services and the ED will be examined. The study was an exploratory secondary data analysis of data from the hospital information system and a quality management survey of a basic and standard care clinic in a rural area. All patients classified as 4 and 5 according to the emergency severity index (ESI), both four weeks before and after the primary care services and ED visit, were included in the study. During the two survey periods, a total of 1565 outpatient cases were treated, of which 962 cases (61%) were triaged ESI 4 or 5. Of these patients, 324 were surveyed (34%). Overall, 276 cases (85%) visited the ED without contacting a physician beforehand, 161 of the cases (50%) reported an emergency as the reason. In 126 cases (39%) the symptoms lasted more than one day. One-third of all outpatient admissions (537 cases, 34%) visited the ED during the opening hours of the general practitioner. More than 80% of the surviving cases visited the ED without physician contact beforehand. The most common reason for attending the ED was, "It is an emergency." The targeted control of the patients by integrating the primary care service into the ED does not lead to an increased number of cases in the primary care service, but to a subjective relief of the ED staff.

  20. Relationship Between Emergency Medical Services Response Time and Bystander Intervention in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yoshikazu; Funada, Akira; Goto, Yumiko

    2018-04-27

    The response time of emergency medical services (EMS) is an important determinant of survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. We sought to identify upper limits of EMS response times and bystander interventions associated with neurologically intact survival. We analyzed the records of 553 426 patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a Japanese registry between 2010 and 2014. The primary study end point was 1-month neurologically intact survival (Cerebral Performance Category scale 1 or 2). Increased EMS response time was associated with significantly decreased adjusted odds of 1-month neurologically intact survival (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] for each 1-minute increase, 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89-0.90), although this relationship was modified by bystander interventions. The bystander interventions and the ranges of EMS response times that were associated with increased adjusted 1-month neurologically intact survival were as follows: bystander defibrillation, from ≤2 minutes (aOR, 3.10 [95% CI, 1.25-7.31]) to 13 minutes (aOR, 5.55 [95% CI, 2.66-11.2]); bystander conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation, from 3 minutes (aOR 1.48 [95% CI, 1.02-2.12]) to 11 minutes (aOR 2.41 [95% CI, 1.61-3.56]); and bystander chest-compression-only cardiopulmonary resuscitation, from ≤2 minutes (aOR 1.57 [95% CI, 1.01-2.25]) to 11 minutes (aOR 1.92 [95% CI, 1.45-2.56]). However, the increase in neurologically intact survival of those receiving bystander interventions became statistically insignificant compared with no bystander interventions when the EMS response time was outside these ranges. The upper limits of the EMS response times associated with improved 1-month neurologically intact survival were 13 minutes when bystanders provided defibrillation (typically with cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and 11 minutes when bystanders provided cardiopulmonary resuscitation without defibrillation. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the

  1. A survey of the quality of nursing services for brain trauma patients in the emergency wards of hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Seyed Ali; Ayoubian, Ali; Mardani, Sheida; Hashemidehaghi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Head trauma is the main cause of disabilities and death among young people, and the side effects of head trauma pose some of the greatest medical challenges. Rapid diagnosis and the use of proper treatments can prevent more severe brain damage. The purpose of this research was to determine the quality of nursing services provided to brain trauma patients in hospitals in Guilan Province, Iran. The study was conducted as a descriptive, cross-sectional study in the emergency wards of selected hospitals in Guilan in 2012. The research population was comprised of all the brain trauma patients in these hospitals. We developed a two-section questionnaire, ascertained its validity, and determined that it had a reliability of 88% (Cronbach's alpha). Subsequently, we used the questionnaire for gathering data. The data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software, and descriptive analysis tests (frequency rate and average) and deductive analyses tests (chi-squared) also were used. The results showed that the quality of health services provided to brain-trauma patients in the emergency ward was at the moderate level of 58.8% of the cases and at a low level in 41.2% of the cases. Based on the results that showed that the services were of moderate quality, the staff members in the emergency ward were required to update their knowledge and use the required measures to minimize or prevent side effects in brain-trauma patients; clearly, mastery of such measures was a real need among the emergency ward's staff.

  2. The emergency room at the Rotunda Hospital: evidence of an improving service over the past 3 years.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Talukdar, S

    2014-12-01

    This is a retrospective review of the Rotunda Hospital Emergency Room (ER) documentation with respect to attendances for a 4-month period (August-November) in both 2009 and 2012. The aim was to quantify the workload and assess the quality of care offered to patients attending the ER over the two time periods and to highlight any improvements in care after changes were implemented following the initial 2009 review.

  3. Hospital emergency preparedness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    to make informed decisions about prioritising hazards in view of limited resources ... contingency plan, for instance, the Oshikoto Regional Council has identified ..... hospital relies on exercises conducted by the Namibia Airports Company (NAC) ... Small scale exercises can also be done in which certain elements of the plan ...

  4. 'The first pulse you take is your own' - but don't forget your colleagues'. Emotion teamwork in pre-hospital emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henckes, Nicolas; Nurok, Michael

    2015-09-01

    This article examines the way that intense emotions, both positive and negative, are collectively regulated at work by pre-hospital emergency teams. We analyse the collective strategies and solutions that are developed in daily medical work by teams and individuals with a view to furthering the action. After a review of the literature on emotion work in work collectives, we discuss the nature of pre-hospital emergency work and the role of emotions in this work. We then examine the collective management of both disruptive and desired emotions by teams during interventions. The last section reflects on the long-term management of emotions at work using Randall Collins' concepts of interaction ritual and emotional energy. This study relies on fieldwork performed in emergency medical services in New York and Paris. © 2015 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  5. Evaluation of pre-hospital administration of adrenaline (epinephrine) by emergency medical services for patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest in Japan: controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Shinji; Tomio, Jun; Takahashi, Hideto; Ichikawa, Masao; Nishida, Masamichi; Morimura, Naoto; Sakamoto, Tetsuya

    2013-12-10

    To evaluate the effectiveness of pre-hospital adrenaline (epinephrine) administered by emergency medical services to patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest. Controlled propensity matched retrospective cohort study, in which pairs of patients with or without (control) adrenaline were created with a sequential risk set matching based on time dependent propensity score. Japan's nationwide registry database of patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest registered between January 2007 and December 2010. Among patients aged 15-94 with out of hospital cardiac arrest witnessed by a bystander, we created 1990 pairs of patients with and without adrenaline with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) and 9058 pairs among those with non-VF/VT. Overall and neurologically intact survival at one month or at discharge, whichever was earlier. After propensity matching, pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services was associated with a higher proportion of overall survival (17.0% v 13.4%; unadjusted odds ratio 1.34, 95% confidence interval 1.12 to 1.60) but not with neurologically intact survival (6.6% v 6.6%; 1.01, 0.78 to 1.30) among those with VF/VT; and higher proportions of overall survival (4.0% v 2.4%; odds ratio 1.72, 1.45 to 2.04) and neurologically intact survival (0.7% v 0.4%; 1.57, 1.04 to 2.37) among those with non-VF/VT. Pre-hospital administration of adrenaline by emergency medical services improves the long term outcome in patients with out of hospital cardiac arrest, although the absolute increase of neurologically intact survival was minimal.

  6. Is hospital care of major importance for outcome after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest? Experience acquired from patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted to one of two hospitals over a 16-year period in the municipality of Göteborg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, J; Abrahamsson, P; Bång, A; Lindqvist, J; Karlsson, T; Herlitz, J

    2000-02-01

    To describe patient characteristics, hospital investigations and interventions and early mortality among patients being hospitalized after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in two hospitals. Municipality of Göteborg, Sweden. All patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who were successfully resuscitated and admitted to hospital between 1 October 1980 and 31 December 1996. All patients were resuscitated by the same Emergency Medical Service and admitted alive to one of the two city hospitals in Göteborg. Of 579 patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital, 253 (44%) were discharged alive and of 459 patients admitted to Ostra Hospital, 152 (33%) were discharged alive (P percentage of patients admitted to Sahlgrenska Hospital underwent coronary angiography (P < 0.001), electrophysiological testing (P < 0.001), Holter recording (P < 0.001), echocardiography (P = 0.004), percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA, P = 0.009), implantation of automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD, P = 0.03) and exercise stress tests (P = 0.003). Inhabitants in the catchment area of Ostra Hospital had a less favourable socio-economic profile. Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest may be affected by the course of hospital management. Other variables that might influence survival are socio-economic factors and cardiorespiratory status on admission to hospital. Further investigation is called for as more patients are being hospitalised alive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

  7. Integrated hospital emergency care improves efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, A A; Robinson, S M; Whitwell, D; Myers, S; Bennett, T J H; Hall, N; Haydock, S; Fritz, Z; Atkinson, P

    2008-02-01

    There is uncertainty about the most efficient model of emergency care. An attempt has been made to improve the process of emergency care in one hospital by developing an integrated model. The medical admissions unit was relocated into the existing emergency department and came under the 4-hour target. Medical case records were redesigned to provide a common assessment document for all patients presenting as an emergency. Medical, surgical and paediatric short-stay wards were opened next to the emergency department. A clinical decision unit replaced the more traditional observation unit. The process of patient assessment was streamlined so that a patient requiring admission was fully clerked by the first attending doctor to a level suitable for registrar or consultant review. Patients were allocated directly to specialty on arrival. The effectiveness of this approach was measured with routine data over the same 3-month periods in 2005 and 2006. There was a 16.3% decrease in emergency medical admissions and a 3.9% decrease in emergency surgical admissions. The median length of stay for emergency medical patients was reduced from 7 to 5 days. The efficiency of the elective surgical services was also improved. Performance against the 4-hour target declined but was still acceptable. The number of bed days for admitted surgical and medical cases rose slightly. There was an increase in the number of medical outliers on surgical wards, a reduction in the number of incident forms and formal complaints and a reduction in income for the hospital. Integrated emergency care has the ability to use spare capacity within emergency care. It offers significant advantages beyond the emergency department. However, improved efficiency in processing emergency patients placed the hospital at a financial disadvantage.

  8. Oiling the gate: a mobile application to improve the admissions process from the emergency department to an academic community hospital inpatient medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Russell; Hyde, Jensen Hart; Davis, Mike

    2018-01-01

    The process of admitting patients from the emergency department (ED) to an academic internal medicine (AIM) service in a community teaching hospital is one fraught with variability and disorder. This results in an inconsistent volume of patients admitted to academic versus private hospitalist services and results in frustration of both ED and AIM clinicians. We postulated that implementation of a mobile application (app) would improve provider satisfaction and increase admissions to the academic service. The app was designed and implemented to be easily accessible to ED physicians, regularly updated by academic residents on call, and a real-time source of the number of open AIM admission spots. We found a significant improvement in ED and AIM provider satisfaction with the admission process. There was also a significant increase in admissions to the AIM service after implementation of the app. We submit that the implementation of a mobile app is a viable, cost-efficient, and effective method to streamline the admission process from the ED to AIM services at community-based hospitals.

  9. Ambulatory care sensitive conditions at out-of-hospital emergence services in Croatia: a longitudinal study based on routinely collected data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanjšek, Diana; Benčić, Miro; Keglević, Mladenka Vrcić

    2014-12-01

    Conditions for which a hospital and emergency utilization can be considered avoidable are often referred as ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs). Until now, there has been no published research related to ACSCs in Croatia. This study was undertaken with the aim of determining the trends relating to ACSCs in out-of-hospital ES from 1995-2012. The study is based on data from the Croatian Health Service Yearbooks. Five chronic and three acute conditions were chosen: diabetes, hypertension, congestive heart failure, angina pectoris, asthma and COPD, bacterial pneumonia, urinary tract infections and skin infections. The results indicate that the ES in Croatia is overused, and consequently ACSCs are over-represented; 23.3% Croatian citizens visited the ES and around 15% of all diagnoses belonged to the ACSCs, with decreased trend. The leading diagnosis is hypertension, followed by asthma and COPD. For a better understanding of the importance of ACSC within the Croatian context, further research is needed.

  10. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  11. Pre-hospital Emergency Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    20 Apr 1974 ... lance services, training programmes that are not geared to the needs of these personnel and, not least, a lack of interest on the part of the medical profession, with a few notable exceptions, in the whole question of emergency care. There is a re- luctance on the part of many doctors to assist in the training of ...

  12. Evaluation of the smoking ban application at the emergency service of the Fundación Alcorcón Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Navarro Ortega

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The law for the prevention of tobacco dependence came into effect on the first of January of 2006. With the application of this law, smoking is not allowed neither in public nor in private work centers. From May 2005, the Real Decreto 192/1998, that forbids smoking in medical centers, has been applied at the emergency service of the Fundación Alcorcon Hospital.Objectives: Describe and analyze the consequences of the application of the rule on smoking and non-smoking nursing personnel at the emergency service, as well as changes in smoking habits, knowledge of tobacco smoke pollution’s (TSP effect on health, tobacco effects and arguments between smokers and non-smokers.Material and methods: Cross descriptive study by means of a questionnaire directed to smoker and non-smoker personnel, with different sections for each of these groups. This questionnaire will be previously validated by a group of experts and a pilot exercise at the Fuenfría Hospital. Statistical analysis of the data will be carried out by SPSS software, establishing the frequency of the answers and comparing the obtained results.The results of this study will be usefully applied to evaluate the way of implementing smoking ban at work, detect and correct weak points in order to achieve the best compliance with the rule, and know its influence in the decrease in tobacco consumption and smoking cessation.

  13. Diagnosis and Transfer of Stroke Patients by Emergency Medical Services: Case of Vali-Asr hospital, Arak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiedeh Bahrampouri

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Currently, volunteer forces are among the main members of the healthcare service body, particularly in the treatment sector, and play a key role in healthcare and treatment services. Since efficient human resources are the greatest and most important assets of all organizations, the organization constantly works to train, retain, and get maximum benefit of these valuable assets. The main objective of this work is to prioritize the Motivational factors and satisfaction of the volunteer forces participating in treatment and health programs in the case of emergencies. Methods: The statistic research community of this work is all volunteers (N=600 in treatment and health programs in Kerman province. Using the Morgan Table, 360 statistical subjects were selected. The data-gathering instrument used in this research was Andam’s questionnaire of motivational factors with reliability of 0.94, and Galindo-Kuhn and Guzley (2001 questionnaire of satisfaction with reliability of 0.92. To determine research data distribution, Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied. Moreover, for data analysis inferential statistics tests of Friedman, Mann–Whitney U, and Kruskal–Wallis were used at significance level of p<0.05. Results: The present research revealed that the most and least important motivational factors in volunteers of treatment and health units are purposeful motivation and financial motivation with average rankings of 5.45 and 1.99, respectively. In addition, among the satisfaction factors, the volunteers reported communication with volunteers and organizational communication as the most and least important satisfaction factors, respectively. The results of this research indicated that the female volunteers participated in volunteer activities with greater occupational, support, progress, and social motivations. In addition, single participants had greater occupational, social, and financial motivations towards participation in these

  14. Integrating hospitals into community emergency preparedness planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Wineman, Nicole V; Finn, Nicole L; Barbera, Joseph A; Schmaltz, Stephen P; Loeb, Jerod M

    2006-06-06

    Strong community linkages are essential to a health care organization's overall preparedness for emergencies. To assess community emergency preparedness linkages among hospitals, public health officials, and first responders and to investigate the influence of community hazards, previous preparation for an event requiring national security oversight, and experience responding to actual disasters. With expert advice from an advisory panel, a mailed questionnaire was used to assess linkage issues related to training and drills, equipment, surveillance, laboratory testing, surge capacity, incident management, and communication. A simple random sample of 1750 U.S. medical-surgical hospitals. Of 678 hospital representatives that agreed to participate, 575 (33%) completed the questionnaire in early 2004. Respondents were hospital personnel responsible for environmental safety, emergency management, infection control, administration, emergency services, and security. Prevalence and breadth of participation in community-wide planning; examination of 17 basic elements in a weighted analysis. In a weighted analysis, most hospitals (88.2% [95% CI, 84.1% to 92.3%]) engaged in community-wide drills and exercises, and most (82.2% [CI, 77.8% to 86.5%]) conducted a collaborative threat and vulnerability analysis with community responders. Of all respondents, 57.3% (CI, 52.1% to 62.5%) reported that their community plans addressed the hospital's need for additional supplies and equipment, and 73.0% (CI, 68.1% to 77.9%) reported that decontamination capacity needs were addressed. Fewer reported a direct link to the Health Alert Network (54.4% [CI, 49.3% to 59.5%]) and around-the-clock access to a live voice from a public health department (40.0% [CI, 35.0% to 45.0%]). Performance on many of 17 basic elements was better in large and urban hospitals and was associated with a high number of perceived hazards, previous national security event preparation, and experience in actual

  15. Initial Management of Poisoned Patients in Emergency Medical Services and Non-poisoning Hospitals in Tehran: The Comparison between Expected and Performed Managements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Hassanian-Moghadam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is no clear data on the adherence of emergency medical services (EMS paramedics and hospital staff rather than those working in poisoning centers to the guidelines for managing acutely poisoned patients in developing countries. Methods: During a 6-month period, all EMS-managed poisoned patients along with those initially managed in a non-poisoning center before being referred to a poisoning hospital in Tehran, Iran, were instructed. Then the indications for administrating the activated charcoal (AC as well as performing gastric lavage (GL and tracheal intubation were studied and compared to the recommended guidelines. Results: A total of 3347 cases, including 1859 males (55.6%, were evaluated. There were significant differences between expected and performed endotracheal intubations in both EMS and other medical centers (P-value = 0.002 and 0.001, respectively as well as the administration of GL and AC in other medical centers (P-values= 0.003 and 0.03, respectively. Conclusion: More extensive educational programs should be established to improve the preliminary management of poisoned patients performed by EMS paramedics and staff of hospitals other than poisoning centers.

  16. Interpreter services in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yu-Feng; Alagappan, Kumar; Rella, Joseph; Bentley, Suzanne; Soto-Greene, Marie; Martin, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    Emergency physicians are routinely confronted with problems associated with language barriers. It is important for emergency health care providers and the health system to strive for cultural competency when communicating with members of an increasingly diverse society. Possible solutions that can be implemented include appropriate staffing, use of new technology, and efforts to develop new kinds of ties to the community served. Linguistically specific solutions include professional interpretation, telephone interpretation, the use of multilingual staff members, the use of ad hoc interpreters, and, more recently, the use of mobile computer technology at the bedside. Each of these methods carries a specific set of advantages and disadvantages. Although professionally trained medical interpreters offer improved communication, improved patient satisfaction, and overall cost savings, they are often underutilized due to their perceived inefficiency and the inconclusive results of their effect on patient care outcomes. Ultimately, the best solution for each emergency department will vary depending on the population served and available resources. Access to the multiple interpretation options outlined above and solid support and commitment from hospital institutions are necessary to provide proper and culturally competent care for patients. Appropriate communications inclusive of interpreter services are essential for culturally and linguistically competent provider/health systems and overall improved patient care and satisfaction. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Weekend admission to hospital has a higher risk of death in the elective setting than in the emergency setting: a retrospective database study of national health service hospitals in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mohammed A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although acute hospitals offer a twenty-four hour seven day a week service levels of staffing are lower over the weekends and some health care processes may be less readily available over the weekend. Whilst it is thought that emergency admission to hospital on the weekend is associated with an increased risk of death, the extent to which this applies to elective admissions is less well known. We investigated the risk of death in elective and elective patients admitted over the weekend versus the weekdays. Methods Retrospective statistical analysis of routinely collected acute hospital admissions in England, involving all patient discharges from all acute hospitals in England over a year (April 2008-March 2009, using a logistic regression model which adjusted for a range of patient case-mix variables, seasonality and admission over a weekend separately for elective and emergency (but excluding zero day stay emergency admissions discharged alive admissions. Results Of the 1,535,267 elective admissions, 91.7% (1,407,705 were admitted on the weekday and 8.3% (127,562 were admitted on the weekend. The mortality following weekday admission was 0.52% (7,276/1,407,705 compared with 0.77% (986/127,562 following weekend admission. Of the 3,105,249 emergency admissions, 76.3% (2,369,316 were admitted on the weekday and 23.7% (735,933 were admitted on the weekend. The mortality following emergency weekday admission was 6.53% (154,761/2,369,316 compared to 7.06% (51,922/735,933 following weekend admission. After case-mix adjustment, weekend admissions were associated with an increased risk of death, especially in the elective setting (elective Odds Ratio: 1.32, 95% Confidence Interval 1.23 to 1.41; vs emergency Odds Ratio: 1.09, 95% Confidence Interval 1.05 to 1.13. Conclusions Weekend admission appears to be an independent risk factor for dying in hospital and this risk is more pronounced in the elective setting. Given the planned

  18. Hospital-Based Emergency Department Visits With Dental Conditions: Impact of the Medicaid Reimbursement Fee for Dental Services in New York State, 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampa, Sankeerth; Wilson, Fernando A; Wang, Hongmei; Wehbi, Nizar K; Smith, Lynette; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2018-06-01

    Hospital-based emergency department (ED) visits for dental problems have been on the rise. The objectives of this study are to provide estimates of hospital-based ED visits with dental conditions in New York State and to examine the impact of Medicaid reimbursement fee for dental services on the utilization of EDs with dental conditions. New York State Emergency Department Database for the year 2009-2013 and Health Resources and Services Administration's Area Health Resource File were used. All ED visits with diagnosis for dental conditions were selected for analysis. The present study found a total of 325,354 ED visits with dental conditions. The mean age of patient was 32.4 years. A majority of ED visits were made by those aged 25-44 years (49%). Whites comprised 52.1% of ED visits. Proportion of Medicaid increased from 22% (in 2009) to 41.3% (in 2013). For Medicaid patients, the mean ED charges and aggregated ED charges were $811.4 and $88.1 million, respectively. Eleven counties had fewer than 4 dentists per 10,000 population in New York State. High-risk groups identified from the study are those aged 25-44 years, uninsured, covered by Medicaid and private insurance, and residing in low-income areas. The study highlights the need for increased Medicaid reimbursement for dentists and improves access to preventive dental care especially for the vulnerable groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Response on Hospital Focusing on Ancillary and Support Services: Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-12

    trauma centers are required to have immediate availability of trauma surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists, nurses , and resuscitation...has emphasized alternative delivery settings, such as outpatient treatments, home health care, and the use of nursing homes. Managed care...hospitals should do to prepare for an influenza pandemic. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism: Biodefense Strategy, Practice, and Science, 4(4), 397-402

  20. Hospital pharmacists' evaluation of drug wholesaler services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W O; Ryan, M R; Roberts, K B

    1983-10-01

    Services provided by drug wholesalers were evaluated by hospital pharmacists. A survey was mailed to 1500 randomly selected pharmacy directors. Respondents indicated availability and use of 26 customer services. Pharmacists rated the services that they used on the basis of importance of the service and satisfaction with the service. The 644 returned questionnaires indicated that most services were available to a large majority of respondents. Most services used were rated as important or essential. Most respondents were satisfied with wholesaler services; the service with which the most respondents were dissatisfied was stocking of pharmaceuticals in single-unit packaging. Of other services that were widely used and rated important, prompt crediting for delivery errors, few out-of-stock items, frequent pickup of return merchandise, and stocking of injectable pharmaceuticals received low satisfaction ratings. Same-day delivery service and emergency delivery of prescription items were unavailable to more than 40% of respondents. Hospital pharmacists were generally satisfied with services provided by drug wholesalers. Wholesalers should be aware of the particular service needs of hospital pharmacists, and further studies of these needs should be conducted.

  1. Characterization of sexual abuse cases valued in the emergency services and outpatient consultation of a first-level hospital institution in the department of Cauca, 2007 - 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Cerón Hernández

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sexual abuse affects millions of children and adolescents and it impacts on their physical and mental health. Objective: To characterize the cases of sexual abuse valued in the emergency services and external consultation of a hospital institution of first level in the department of Cauca between 2007 and 2015. Materials and methods: A descriptive, retrospective study of victims of sexual abuse attended in external consultation/emergencies was made. Temporal and sociodemographic variables of the victim/aggressor and the context where the event occurred were selected. The analysis was done in Epi Info. Measures of central tendency, dispersion, proportions and reasons were calculated. The relationship between variables was assessed by using the Fischer test. Results: 77% of the victims were women, 23% men, at ages between 2 to 16 years and 100% were students. The act was committed by a single aggressor. Besides, in 93.0% of the cases, the act was perpetrated by acquaintances, of whom 42.9% were family members. Conclusions: Despite the control and regulation measures, the results suggest that sexual abuse takes place at very early ages. The aggressor is almost always a commonly known person with consanguineous bond, which facilitates the perpetuation of the act towards the family nucleus through deceit, blackmail or threat.

  2. Factores relacionados con la satisfacción del paciente en los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios Factors related to patient satisfaction with hospital emergency services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Parra Hidalgo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conocer las variables de calidad percibida que se relacionan con la satisfacción e identificar la influencia de los factores sociodemográficos en el grado de satisfacción del usuario de las urgencias hospitalarias. Métodos: Encuesta telefónica con cuestionario de elaboración propia a una muestra de 3600 usuarios de los servicios de urgencias de nueve hospitales públicos durante los años 2008 y 2009. Resultados: El modelo ajustado que incluye todas las variables de calidad percibida y las variables sociodemográficas explicó el 47,1% de la varianza (R² corregida. De todas las variables independientes incluidas, sólo ocho resultaron significativas para predecir la satisfacción del paciente. Estas variables hacen referencia al trato del personal médico (p = 0,041, la profesionalidad del personal de enfermería (p = 0,010 y del celador (p = 0,022, la infraestructura (limpieza y confort (p = 0,033 y 0,008, la información recibida al alta (p = 0,000, el tiempo pasado en urgencias (p = 0,000 y la percepción de tratamiento-diagnóstico sin fallos (p = 0,028. Conclusiones: Los resultados obtenidos con la aplicación del cuestionario permitieron identificar las áreas donde implantar acciones correctoras mediante la identificación de las variables que influyen en la satisfacción del paciente de urgencias, así como la identificación de posibles factores de confusión a controlar para su utilización en la comparación de resultados entre diferentes hospitales. El cuestionario de satisfacción en urgencias es un instrumento útil para evaluar y mejorar la calidad asistencial.Objectives: To determine the perceived quality variables related to satisfaction and to identify the influence of sociodemographic factors on user satisfaction with hospital emergencies. Methods: A telephone survey was conducted with a specifically designed questionnaire for use in a sample of 3,600 users of hospital emergency services in nine public

  3. Hospital Service Area File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file is derived from the calendar year inpatient claims data. The records contain number of discharges, length of stay, and total charges summarized by provider...

  4. Variabilidad en la utilización de los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios del Sistema Nacional de Salud Variability in Spanish National Health System hospital emergency services utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Peiró

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Los objetivos de este estudio fueron estimar las tasas de frecuentación a los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios (SUH del Sistema Nacional de Salud (SNS por áreas de salud, el porcentaje de ingresos, las razones estandarizadas de utilización de urgencias y analizar la relación con los recursos hospitalarios. Métodos: Estudio ecológico combinando información de diversas fuentes (Encuesta de Establecimientos Sanitarios con Régimen de Internado 2006 y Conjunto Mínimo de Datos Básicos 2006 para estimar la frecuentación a los SUH y el porcentaje de ingresos asociado en 164 áreas de salud de 14 comunidades autónomas (CC.AA.. Resultados: Los 35,3 millones de habitantes de las 164 áreas de salud incluidas realizaron 16,2 millones de visitas (45,7 por 100 habitantes a los SUH del SNS, y de ellos ingresaron algo más de 2 millones (12,6%. Excluyendo el 5% de áreas extremas por cada cola, la frecuentación osciló entre 31,6 y 78,7 urgencias/100 habitantes y el porcentaje de ingresos entre el 7,6% y el 27,9%. Estas diferencias apenas se atenuaron al estandarizar. El factor CC.AA. explicó un 29% de la varianza en frecuentación y un 82% en ingresos. La frecuentación no se asoció al volumen poblacional de camas o médicos de plantilla, aunque sí al de médicos de urgencias, hospitales de menor tamaño y no docentes. Conclusiones: Las áreas de salud del SNS mantienen una gran variabilidad en frecuentación a urgencias e ingresos por urgencias, que parece asociarse a un uso diferencial por problemas de menor entidad.Objective: The aims of this study were to estimate the rate of hospital emergency services (HES visits per health area, the associated percentage of admissions and the standardized HES utilization ratio, and to analyze their relationship with hospital resources. Methods: We performed an ecological study that combined information from distinct sources (Survey of Health Care Hospitalization Establishments 2006 and

  5. ¿Por qué los pacientes utilizan los servicios de urgencias hospitalarios por iniciativa propia? Why do patients use hospital emergency services on their own initiative?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M Aranaz Andrés

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Se pretende describir el perfil de usuario y determinar su motivación para visitar el servicio de urgencias hospitalario (SUH por iniciativa propia. Método: Se elaboró un cuestionario ad hoc que se aplicó por selección consecutiva a los pacientes que podían esperar asistencia (nivel 1 del triage durante una semana de noviembre de 2002. Resultados: Respondieron el cuestionario 348 pacientes, acudiendo por iniciativa propia el 82,5%. De éstos, el 17,7% desconocía el funcionamiento de atención primaria respecto a urgencias; el 18,8% consultó con su centro de salud; el 55,0% refirió preferencia por el SUH y el 13,5% acudió por demora en otros niveles asistenciales. El 50,5% era menor de 40 años y el 9,2%, extranjero. Conclusiones: Los cambios en el patrón de consumo de servicios sanitarios pueden comprometer la organización del Sistema Nacional de Salud, si no se adapta la oferta a la necesidad expresada y/o se interviene modulando el uso racional de los recursos sanitarios.Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine the reasons why patients use hospital emergency services (HES on their own initiative and the characteristics of these users. Method: An ad hoc questionnaire was designed and applied by consecutive selection to patients who could have waited for medical care (level 1 triage over a 1-week period in November 2002. Results: A total of 348 patients completed the questionnaire; 82.5% attended on their own initiative; of these, 17.7% reported they did not know how Primary Care worked in relation to the Emergency Services; 18.8% consulted a Primary Care physician; 55.0% preferred the HES and 13.5% attended because of a delay in another health care setting. Half the patients (50.5% were younger than 40 years old and 9.2% were foreigners. Conclusions: Changes in health services' consumption patterns could jeopardize the public health system unless supply is adapted to the demand expressed and

  6. Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — EMS Locations in Kansas The EMS stations dataset consists of any location where emergency medical services (EMS) personnel are stationed or based out of, or where...

  7. Use of the TAC in the investigation of the migraine in the service of emergencies of the Hospital San Juan de Dios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina Umana, M. V.

    2000-01-01

    The cephalalgia constitutes one of the symptoms that with more frequency in our days is evaluated in practices it prescribes daily. He prescribe faces every day to this suffering in emergencies services of our hospitals and the great affluence of patient for different causes is not possible to deepen in the study of patient with migraine. We know that many cephalalgia is caused by primary dysfunctions, but the one differential diagnoses they of 300 types and causes being one of the longest in medicine. The origin or type of many migraines can be necessary for careful amanuenses, taking into account family History, 'particular history', supplemented by a general and neurological exhaustive exploration to guide an presumptive diagnose. Among the justifications to request neuroimagenology studies find diverse. Those are strictly prescribe when we are in presence of a T.C.E. or when later to the patient's appropriate boarding we suspect a subaracnoidea hemorrhage, rupture of an aneurysm or a intracranial tumor. We also find just in case the famous one due to an inadequate boarding of the pathology, the anguish of patient and their relatives, aspect prescribes - legal and, at last but not less important requested of practices prescribes aberrant. The positive imagenology studies in the evaluation of patient with this migraine and normal data in the neurological exploration are very few [es

  8. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iram Fatima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients’ perspective. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality instrument was administered to determine patient’s expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Results: Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant (p < 0.003; p < 0.037, respectively as well as in perception of communication (p < 0.026. Other dimensions and overall hospital expected and perceived quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness (p < 0.005, but the perception of each dimension was significantly different in different educational categories (assurance: p < 0.001; empathy: p < 0.001; reliability: p < 0.001; tangibility: p < 0.001; responsiveness: p < 0.001; communication: p < 0.001; and for overall service quality: p < 0.001. Age and service departments showed no relationship with any of the perceived or expected dimension of service quality of hospitals. Conclusions: Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients’ expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their

  9. The Obstetrics Gynecology and Children's Hospital Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    The efficiency of emergency rooms is becoming increasingly important and has been addressed by legislation. Prompt emergency room service is expected when patients present to an emergency room with urgent health problems. However, depending on various factors, the wait times for access to health services can be ...

  10. Hospital services and casemix in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrie, Delia; Boldy, Duncan

    2002-01-01

    The Health Department of WA currently operates as a single integrated funder and purchaser of health services for the State. Health Service Agreements defining the level of health provision are negotiated with the various health services in WA. During the latter part of the 1990s, the funding of public hospitals for acute inpatient care moved away from a historical basis to output-based funding using a casemix approach based on Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs). Other hospital services are still mainly purchased using historical funding levels, negotiated block funding or bedday payments, with output-based funding mechanisms under investigation. WA has developed its own approach to classifying admitted patients that recognises differences in complexity of care among episodes grouped to the same DRG. WA also has a unique cost estimation model for calculating DRG cost weights, which is based on a linear estimate of the relationship between nights of stay in hospital and the cost of hospital care for each DRG. Another emerging trend in the provision of public hospital services in WA has been the greater involvement of the private sector through the contracting of private providers to operate public hospitals. While no close examination has been undertaken of the outcomes of these changes in terms of their effect on efficiency or other relevant indicators of hospital performance, current purchasing arrangements are being reviewed following recommendations made in a report by the Health Administrative Review Committee. No decision has yet been made as to future changes to the funding policy of WA public hospitals.

  11. How Do Patients Perceive and Expect Quality of Surgery, Diagnostics, and Emergency Services in Tertiary Care Hospitals? An Evidence of Gap Analysis From Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Iram; Humayun, Ayesha; Anwar, Muhammad Imran; Iftikhar, Adil; Aslam, Muhammad; Shafiq, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    Service quality is one of the important gears to appraise services and determine the gray areas that need improvement. In countries with a resource-poor health system, the first step of measuring quality is yet to be taken. This study seeks to inform policy makers in developing contextual service quality models by identifying service quality gaps in tertiary care teaching hospitals using patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was performed using multistage cluster sampling, and a modified version of the SERVQUAL (SERV-service, QUAL-quality) instrument was administered to determine patient's expectations and perceptions. A total of 817 completed questionnaires were obtained from patients and/or their attendants using convenience sampling. Data analysis revealed statistically significant negative quality gaps between expectations and perceptions of tangibility, reliability, empathy, assurance, responsiveness, and communication. The difference in mean expectation and perception for responsiveness across the sexes was significant ( p quality were independent of sex. Educational status showed significant difference in expectation and perception in responsiveness ( p quality: p quality of hospitals. Tertiary care hospitals failed to meet patients' expectations in all major areas of service quality, posing a question of how hospitals implement and evaluate their quality assurance policy.

  12. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  13. Health Services Utilization Patterns Associated with Emergency Department Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Enemark, Ulrika; Foldspang, Anders

    2011-01-01

    , 1997-2003. Data were extracted from administrative registries including information on individual use of emergency services and other hospital care, contact with GPs and socioeconomic background. Health services' use by the Morsø population was measured before reduction in emergency room opening hours...... of substitute health services. By contrast, Morsø women compared to the rest of Viborg county reduced their use of GP services in terms of face-to-face visits (β = -0.08, P = 0.020), telephone consultations (β = -0.11, P = 0.007), home visits (β = -0.48, P = 0.009), and their inpatient hospital utilization (β...... = -0.12, P = 0.022) during the period when emergeny services were only available in the daytime. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency services at neighbouring hospitals (40 kilometres distance) were able to compensate, in part, for the decreased local emergency service provision. Concurrent changes in health care...

  14. Payment of hospital cardiac services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, W J

    1991-01-01

    This report describes how acute-care community hospitals in the United States get paid for services when their patients either are entitled to Medicare or Medicaid benefits or subscribe to a Blue Cross or Blue Shield plan, a commercial insurance plan, a health maintenance organization, a preferred provider organization, or some other third-party payment mechanism. The focus of this report is on cardiac services, which are the most common type of inpatient services provided by acute-care community hospitals. Over the past three decades, extraordinary advances in medical and surgical technologies as well as healthier life-styles have cut the annual death rate for coronary heart disease in half. Despite this progress, cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of hospitalization. On average nationwide, diseases and disorders of the circulatory system are the primary reason for 17 percent of all patient admissions, and among the nation's 35 million Medicare beneficiaries they are the primary reason for 25 percent of all admissions. In the United States heart disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of morbidity. Its diagnosis and treatment are often complex and costly, often requiring multiple hospitalizations and years of medical management. To focus management attention and resources on the immense cardiology marketplace, many hospitals have hired individuals with strong clinical backgrounds to manage their cardiology programs. These "front-line" managers play a key role in coordinating a hospital's services for patients with cardiovascular disease. Increasingly, these managers are being asked to become active participants in the reimbursement process. This report was designed to meet their needs. Because this report describes common reimbursement principles and practices applicable to all areas of hospital management and because it provides a "tool kit" of analytical, planning, and forecasting techniques, it could also be useful to hospital

  15. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, C [Social Data Research Ltd./The Flett Consulting Group, Inc., Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, `GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents`, which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author).

  16. Survey of Canadian hospitals radiation emergency plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, C.

    1996-02-01

    This report documents the findings of a survey of Canadian hospitals conducted by Social Data Research Ltd. during the Spring and Summer, 1995. The main objective of the survey was to determine the state of readiness of Canadian hospitals in respect of radiation emergency planning. In addition, the AECB was interested in knowing the extent to which a report by the Group of Medical Advisors, 'GMA-3: Guidelines on Hospital Emergency Plans for the Management of Minor Radiation Accidents', which was sponsored and distributed in 1993, was received and was useful to hospital administrators and emergency personnel. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 598 acute care hospitals, and 274 responses were received. The main conclusion of this study is that, with the exception of a few large institutions, hospitals generally do not have specific action plans to handle minor radiation accidents. (author)

  17. The effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in the management of patients presenting to rural hospitals with chest pain: a multisite prospective longitudinal nested cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Tina E; Gardner, Glenn; Jack, Leanne

    2017-06-27

    Health reforms in service improvement have included the use of nurse practitioners. In rural emergency departments, nurse practitioners work to the full scope of their expanded role across all patient acuities including those presenting with undifferentiated chest pain. Currently, there is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of emergency nurse practitioner service in rural emergency departments. Inquiry into the safety and quality of the service, particularly regarding the management of complex conditions is a priority to ensure that this service improvement model meets health care needs of rural communities. This study used a prospective, longitudinal nested cohort study of rural emergency departments in Queensland, Australia. Sixty-one consecutive adult patients with chest pain who presented between November 2014 and February 2016 were recruited into the study cohort. A nested cohort of 41 participants with suspected or confirmed acute coronary syndrome were identified. The primary outcome was adherence to guidelines and diagnostic accuracy of electrocardiograph interpretation for the nested cohort. Secondary outcomes included service indicators of waiting times, diagnostic accuracy as measured by unplanned representation rates, satisfaction with care, quality-of-life, and functional status. Data were examined and compared for differences for participants managed by emergency nurse practitioners and those managed in the standard model of care. The median waiting time was 8.0 min (IQR 20) and length-of-stay was 100.0 min (IQR 64). Participants were 2.4 times more likely to have an unplanned representation if managed by the standard service model. The majority of participants (91.5%) were highly satisfied with the care that they received, which was maintained at 30-day follow-up measurement. In the evaluation of quality of life and functional status, summary scores for the SF-12 were comparable with previous studies. No differences were

  18. Differences in the prevalence of hospitalizations and utilization of emergency outpatient services for ambulatory care sensitive conditions between asylum-seeking children and children of the general population: a cross-sectional medical records study (2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célina Lichtl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive (ACS conditions are established indicators for the availability and quality of ambulatory care. We aimed to assess the differences between asylum-seeking children and children of the general population in a German city with respect to (i the prevalence of ACS hospitalizations, and (ii the utilization of emergency outpatient services for ACS conditions. Methods Using anonymous account data, all children admitted to the University Hospital Heidelberg in 2015 were included in our study. A unique cost unit distinguished asylum seekers residing in a nearby reception center (exposed from the children of the general population. We adapted international lists of ACS conditions and calculated the prevalence of ACS hospitalizations and the utilization of emergency outpatient services for ACS conditions, attributable fractions among the exposed (Afe and the population attributable fraction among total admissions (PAF for each outcome. Differences in the prevalence of each outcome between exposed and controls were analyzed in logistic regression models adjusted for sex, age group and quarterly admission. Results Of the 32,015 admissions in 2015, 19.9% (6287 were from inpatient and 80.1% (25,638 from outpatient care. In inpatient care, 9.8% (622 of all admissions were hospitalizations for ACS conditions. The Afe of ACS hospitalizations was 46.57%, the PAF was 1.12%. Emergency service use for ACS conditions could be identified in 8.3% (3088 of all admissions (Afe: 79.57%, PAF: 5.08%. The odds ratio (OR of asylum-seeking children being hospitalized for ACS conditions in comparison to the control group was 1.81 [95% confidence interval, CI: 1.02; 3.2]. The OR of the asylumseeking population compared to the general population for the utilization of emergency service use for ACS conditions was 4.93 [95% CI: 4.11; 5.91]. Conclusions Asylum-seeking children had significantly higher odds of ACS

  19. Identifying barriers to emergency care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannoodt, Luk; Mock, Charles; Bucagu, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to present a review of published evidence of barriers to emergency care, with attention towards both financial and other barriers. With the keywords (financial) accessibility, barriers and emergency care services, citations in PubMed were searched and further selected in the context of the objective of this article. Forty articles, published over a period of 15 years, showed evidence of significant barriers to emergency care. These barriers often tend to persist, despite the fact that the evidence was published many years ago. Several publications stressed the importance of the financial barriers in foregoing or delaying potentially life-saving emergency services, both in poor and rich countries. Other publications report non-financial barriers that prevent patients in need of emergency care (pre-hospital and in-patient care) from seeking care, from arriving in the proper emergency department without undue delay or from receiving proper treatment when they do arrive in these departments. It is clear that timely access to life-saving and disability-preventing emergency care is problematic in many settings. Yet, low-cost measures can likely be taken to significantly reduce these barriers. It is time to make an inventory of these measures and to implement the most cost-effective ones worldwide. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Financial Services and Emerging Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Karreman (Bas)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study addresses the organization and strategy of firms in emerging markets with an explicit application to financial services. Given the relevance of a well-functioning financial system for economic growth, understanding the organization and strategy of firms contributing to the

  1. The organizational commitment of emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval de la Torre, A; Bulchand Gidumal, J; Melián González, S

    2016-12-30

    Background. There are not too many studies that deal with the organizational commitment of emergency physicians. This commitment has been shown to impact organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyse the degree of commitment of the emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals and the factors that may influence it. Method. Online survey using SurveyMonkey to emergency physicians in Spanish public hospitals. Results. Two hundred and five questionnaires were received, 162 from physicians and 43 from heads of the emergency service. Results show an intermediate level of commitment, with affective commitment showing the lowest level and continuance commitment showing the highest level. The capabilities of the physician have an influence on their affective commitment; specific training in emergency procedures and seniority has an influence on their continuance commitment; and the opinion they hold about the organization of their service influences affective commitment. Conclusions. Emergency physicians show an average involvement in the hospital in which they work (average 3.8 on a range of 1 to 5), feel an average affection for it (3.4), and have a high intention to keep working there (4.0). The resources the hospital has due to its level do not have an influence on this commitment, while the training and perceptions of the service do have an influence.

  2. Acesso ao serviço de emergência pelos usuários com crise hipertensiva em um hospital de Fortaleza, CE, Brasil Aceso al servicio de urgencia por clientes con crisis de presión alta en un hospital de Fortaleza, CE, Brasil Access to the emergency service by clients with hipertensive crisis in a hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Célia Caetano de Souza

    2009-08-01

    ámetros importantes en la calidad de la atención.A hypertensive crisis is a sudden and symptomatic elevatation of blood pressure at risk of acute deterioration of target organs. Although the prevalence in the literature of the burden is 1%, the risk of complications and death associated with the problem of health in the emergency services have revealed the need for deeper issues related to access to the service of health. It is a quantitative and descriptive research, held in a public hospital Fortaleza city, between April and July of 2006, with 118 patients. The results show that people with hypertensive crisis has sought health services, especially the emergency, in order to get care. The study indicates access as a key element in meeting the needs of users who seek the services of health, and the waiting time, the resolution and the reception, important parameters on the quality of care.

  3. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

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    Marco Bo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  4. Emergency Contraception: a survey of Hospital Emergency Departments Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization defines emergency contraception (EC as a means to prevent unwanted pregnancy. In countries where EC is dispensed behind the counter, emergency departments are a preferred point of care for its prescription and dispensing. In light of this situation and as no studies on emergency contraception in emergency departments in Italy have been conducted to date, this study was designed with a view to analyze the responses of emergency room physicians in relation to their prescribing habits and knowledge about the drug and in relation to frequency and profile of women arriving for care at hospital emergency departments in Piedmont and requesting prescription for the morning-after pill. This cross-sectional survey involved 29 hospital emergency departments in Piedmont where no gynecologists are on active duty. The survey instrument was a 24-item questionnaire. Analysis of responses revealed that in the physicians’ opinion the vast majority of requests came from Italian nationals (97% ranging in age from 18 to 30 years (76%, single and not cohabiting with a partner (60%, and nulliparous (64.0%. Women mostly request EC for first-time and the most common reasons were condom breakage or slippage. Just over half the physicians (52% stated that emergency contraception prescription was not an appropriate part of care provided at an emergency department and 72% stated they felt uneasy about prescribing emergency contraception. The survey also revealed gaps in physician knowledge about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of emergency contraception pills.

  5. [Mission woman: a survey on the perception of the "Service of Welcome and Listening" offered in the Emergency Department at the San Camillo Hospital in Rome by women victims of violence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Cristian; Zicca, Anna; Parasole, Tiziana; Delle Fratte, Roberta; Battilana, Daniela; Mitello, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    The project Mission Woman was set up to describe how the service offered by the Emergency Department of the Hospital San Camillo-Forlanini in Rome was perceived by women victims ( or supposed to be) of violence. The objective of this investigation is to frame clients' perception about the service offered by staff in terms of sensitivity, recognition and management of the issue. The access to the Emergency Room is the first contact of the client with a helping relationship which goes beyond the simple provision of medical care. A questionnaire devised for the purpose was filled in by women who have asked for help to the Service "Door Woman" . The Service "Door Woman", set up in 2009, aimed to welcome and listen women victims of violence with the collaboration of different operators in the emergency department: nurses, doctors, psychologists and social workers. The project developed within the Hospital S. Camillo-Forlanini is managed by both professionals of the Emergency Department together with the Charity "Be Free". The service is open 24/7, all year, the clients could be women or children and could receive assistance or medical, nursing, psychosocial and legal counselling. The triage nurses are those who through their expertise could first identify the victims of violence and to introduce them in the path. Despite the level of injuries, who access to the Emergency Room for single or repeated events of violence, may have decided to claim in court and not hide seeking.. The research aims to understand what are the theoretical and practical deficiencies of staff in the management of a issue which is not only medical but also social and legal, as well as structural and organizational weaknesses of the service.

  6. Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educators Search English Español Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services KidsHealth / For Parents / Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services What's in this article? Giving Birth at ...

  7. Evaluation of factors associated with the difficulty in finding receiving hospitals for traffic accident patients at the scene treated by emergency medical services: a population-based study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Hayashida, Sumito; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    Although the prolongation of the time between injury and hospital arrival of traffic accident patients can influence their prognosis, factors associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance of these patients have not been sufficiently evaluated in Japan. We retrospectively analyzed the population-based ambulance records of all traffic accident patients for whom the Osaka Municipal Fire Department (Osaka City, Japan) dispatched an ambulance in 2013. We defined "cases with difficulty in hospital acceptance" as cases that required ≥4 calls by emergency medical service personnel at the scene before receiving hospital acceptance. We included patient characteristics (age, sex, coma status, and trauma severity judged by emergency medical service personnel), time factors (day/night or weekday/holiday and weekends), and accident location for multivariable logistic regression analysis to assess factors associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance. Among 13,427 traffic accident patients, 2,033 (15.1%) were cases with difficulty in hospital acceptance. Pediatric patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.265; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.060-1.509), male sex (adjusted OR, 1.260; 95% CI, 1.135-1.398), moderate-grade trauma (adjusted OR, 2.241; 95% CI, 1.972-2.547), severe-grade trauma (adjusted OR, 2.057; 95% CI, 1.249-3.388), holidays and weekends (adjusted OR, 1.702; 95% CI, 1.539-1.882), and night-time (adjusted OR, 2.720; 95% CI, 2.443-3.027) were positively associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance. Using population-based ambulance records from a large urban community in Japan, we showed that the difficulty in hospital acceptance of patients at the scene of traffic accidents was positively associated with several prehospital factors.

  8. Hand hygiene in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teter, Jonathan; Millin, Michael G; Bissell, Rick

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) affect millions of patients annually (World Health Organization. Guidelines on Hand Hygiene in Healthcare. Geneva: WHO Press; 2009). Hand hygiene compliance of clinical staff has been identified by numerous studies as a major contributing factor to HAIs around the world. Infection control and hand hygiene in the prehospital environment can also contribute to patient harm and spread of infections. Emergency medical services (EMS) practitioners are not monitored as closely as hospital personnel in terms of hand hygiene training and compliance. Their ever-changing work environment is less favorable to traditional hospital-based aseptic techniques and education. This study aimed to determine the current state of hand hygiene practices among EMS providers and to provide recommendations for improving practices in the emergency health services environment. This study was a prospective, observational prevalence study and survey, conducted over a 2-month period. We selected participants from visits to three selected hospital emergency departments in the mid-Atlantic region. There were two data components to the study: a participant survey and hand swabs for pathogenic cultures. This study recruited a total sample of 62 participants. Overall, the study revealed that a significant number of EMS providers (77%) have a heavy bacterial load on their hands after patient care. All levels of providers had a similar distribution of bacterial load. Survey results revealed that few providers perform hand hygiene before (34%) or in between patients (24%), as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. This study demonstrates that EMS providers are potential vectors of microorganisms if proper hand hygiene is not performed properly. Since EMS providers treat a variety of patients and operate in a variety of environments, providers may be exposed to potentially pathogenic organisms, serving as vectors for the exposure of

  9. [Burnout syndrome in pre-hospital and hospital emergency. Cognitive study in two cohorts of nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchitti, Chiara; Cannizzaro, Giorgia; Rosi, Fabrizio; Maccaroni, Roberto; Menditto, Vincenzo G

    2014-01-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) associated with stress has been documented in health care professionals in many specialties. The emergency department and the pre-hospital healthcare services are highly stressful environments. Little is known about the BOS in critical care nursing staff. The objective of the study is to compare the incidence of BOS and its three domains, namely, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced professional accomplishment, in two cohorts of critical care nurses: a pre-hospital and a hospital emergency service. A survey using a questionnaire (the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, MBI-GS), among nurses of two Italian emergency services has been performed: a hospital emergency service (HES, Emergency Department or "Pronto Soccorso") and a pre-hospital emergency service (PHES, territorial healthcare service or "Centrale Operativa 118"). All 60 nurses surveyed (82% female) filled the questionnaires. BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 50% of the nurses in the HES: 50% suffered a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 75% had a medium-high depersonalization and 92.5% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Among the PEHS nurses, BOS-related symptoms have been identified in at least 60% of the respondents: 60% had a medium-high emotional exhaustion, 70% had a medium-high depersonalization and 95% had a medium-high reduced professional accomplishment. Moreover, the likelihood that a nurse has a severe BOS, that is at least one degree of high burnout or ≥2 degrees of medium burnout, is significantly higher in the group of the PHES than in the HES (90% vs 60%, p nursing staff had a severe BOS. The incidence of BOS appeared to be similar among PHES and HES nurses with a higher trend for the former. Further interventional studies are needed to investigate the determinants of BOS among critical care nurses and the potentially preventive strategies.

  10. Improvements in Patient Acceptance by Hospitals Following the Introduction of a Smartphone App for the Emergency Medical Service System: A Population-Based Before-and-After Observational Study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Yusuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Iwami, Taku; Kawamura, Takashi; Izawa, Junichi; Gibo, Koichiro; Komukai, Sho; Hayashida, Sumito; Kiguchi, Takeyuki; Ohnishi, Mitsuo; Ogura, Hiroshi; Shimazu, Takeshi

    2017-09-11

    Recently, the number of ambulance dispatches has been increasing in Japan, and it is therefore difficult for hospitals to accept emergency patients smoothly and appropriately because of the limited hospital capacity. To facilitate the process of requesting patient transport and hospital acceptance, an emergency information system using information technology (IT) has been built and introduced in various communities. However, its effectiveness has not been thoroughly revealed. We introduced a smartphone app system in 2013 that enables emergency medical service (EMS) personnel to share information among themselves regarding on-scene ambulances and the hospital situation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of introducing this smartphone app on the EMS system in Osaka City, Japan. This retrospective study analyzed the population-based ambulance records of Osaka Municipal Fire Department. The study period was 6 years, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015. We enrolled emergency patients for whom on-scene EMS personnel conducted hospital selection. The main endpoint was the difficulty experienced in gaining hospital acceptance at the scene. The definition of difficulty was making ≥5 phone calls by EMS personnel at the scene to hospitals until a decision to transport was determined. The smartphone app was introduced in January 2013, and we compared the patients treated from 2010 to 2012 (control group) with those treated from 2013 to 2015 (smartphone app group) using an interrupted time-series analysis to assess the effects of introducing this smartphone app. A total of 600,526 emergency patients for whom EMS personnel selected hospitals were eligible for our analysis. There were 300,131 emergency patients in the control group (50.00%, 300,313/600,526) from 2010 to 2012 and 300,395 emergency patients in the smartphone app group (50.00%, 300,395/600,526) from 2013 to 2015. The rate of difficulty in hospital acceptance was 14.19% (42,585/300,131) in the

  11. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  12. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  13. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  14. Service philosophies for hospital admission planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adan, I.J.B.F.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Vissers, J.M.H.; Beech, R.

    2005-01-01

    The ‘traditional’ service philosophy underlying hospital admission planning has been one of optimising the use of scarce hospital resources without paying much attention to the level of service offered to patients. As patients nowadays do not accept long waiting times for hospital admission, it

  15. The Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David C; Carr, Brendan G; Smith, Tony E; Tran, Van C; Polsky, Daniel; Branas, Charles C

    2015-12-01

    Emergency visits are rising nationally, whereas the number of emergency departments is shrinking. However, volume has not increased uniformly at all emergency departments. It is unclear what factors account for this variability in emergency volume growth rates. The objective of this study was to test the association of hospital and population characteristics and the effect of hospital closures with increases in emergency department volume. The study team analyzed emergency department volume at New York State hospitals from 2004 to 2010 using data from cost reports and administrative databases. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate characteristics associated with emergency volume growth. Spatial analytics and distances between hospitals were used in calculating the predicted impact of hospital closures on emergency department use. Among the 192 New York hospitals open from 2004 to 2010, the mean annual increase in emergency department visits was 2.7%, but the range was wide (-5.5% to 11.3%). Emergency volume increased nearly twice as fast at tertiary referral centers (4.8%) and nonurban hospitals (3.7% versus urban at 2.1%) after adjusting for other characteristics. The effect of hospital closures also strongly predicted variation in growth. Emergency volume is increasing faster at specific hospitals: tertiary referral centers, nonurban hospitals, and those near hospital closures. This study provides an understanding of how emergency volume varies among hospitals and predicts the effect of hospital closures in a statewide region. Understanding the impact of these factors on emergency department use is essential to ensure that these populations have access to critical emergency services.

  16. Emergency healthcare process automation using mobile computing and cloud services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulymenopoulou, M; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2012-10-01

    Emergency care is basically concerned with the provision of pre-hospital and in-hospital medical and/or paramedical services and it typically involves a wide variety of interdependent and distributed activities that can be interconnected to form emergency care processes within and between Emergency Medical Service (EMS) agencies and hospitals. Hence, in developing an information system for emergency care processes, it is essential to support individual process activities and to satisfy collaboration and coordination needs by providing readily access to patient and operational information regardless of location and time. Filling this information gap by enabling the provision of the right information, to the right people, at the right time fosters new challenges, including the specification of a common information format, the interoperability among heterogeneous institutional information systems or the development of new, ubiquitous trans-institutional systems. This paper is concerned with the development of an integrated computer support to emergency care processes by evolving and cross-linking institutional healthcare systems. To this end, an integrated EMS cloud-based architecture has been developed that allows authorized users to access emergency case information in standardized document form, as proposed by the Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise (IHE) profile, uses the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) standard Emergency Data Exchange Language (EDXL) Hospital Availability Exchange (HAVE) for exchanging operational data with hospitals and incorporates an intelligent module that supports triaging and selecting the most appropriate ambulances and hospitals for each case.

  17. Emergency and Disaster Information Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boszormenyi, Zsolt

    2010-05-01

    The Hungarian National Association of Radio Distress-Signalling and Infocommunications (RSOE) operates Emergency and Disaster Information Service (EDIS) within the frame of its own website which has the objective to monitor and document all the events on the Earth which may cause disaster or emergency. Our service is using the speed and the data spectrum of the internet to gather information. We are monitoring and processing several foreign organisation's data to get quick and certified information. The EDIS website operated together by the General-Directorate of National Disaster Management (OKF) and RSOE, in co-operation with the Crisis Management Centre of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, provides useful information regarding emergency situations and their prevention. Extraordinary events happening in Hungary, Europe and other areas of the World are being monitored in 24 hours per day. All events processed by RSOE EDIS are displayed real time - for the sake of international compatibility - according to the CAP protocol on a secure website. To ensure clear transparency all events are categorized separately in the RSS directory (e.g. earthquake, fire, flood, landslide, nuclear event, tornado, vulcano). RSOE EDIS also contributes in dissemination of the CAP protocol in Hungary. Beside the official information, with the help of special programs nearly 900-1000 internet press publication will be monitored and the publication containing predefined keywords will be processed. However, these "news" cannot be considered as official and reliable information, but many times we have learnt critical information from the internet press. We are screening the incoming information and storing in a central database sorted by category. After processing the information we are sending it immediately via E-Mail (or other format) for the organisations and persons who have requested it (e.g. National Disaster Management, United Nations etc.). We are aspiring that the processed data

  18. An organizational metamodel for hospital emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptan, Kubilay

    2014-10-01

    I introduce an organizational model describing the response of the hospital emergency department. The hybrid simulation/analytical model (called a "metamodel") can estimate a hospital's capacity and dynamic response in real time and incorporate the influence of damage to structural and nonstructural components on the organizational ones. The waiting time is the main parameter of response and is used to evaluate the disaster resilience of health care facilities. Waiting time behavior is described by using a double exponential function and its parameters are calibrated based on simulated data. The metamodel covers a large range of hospital configurations and takes into account hospital resources in terms of staff and infrastructures, operational efficiency, and the possible existence of an emergency plan; maximum capacity; and behavior both in saturated and overcapacitated conditions. The sensitivity of the model to different arrival rates, hospital configurations, and capacities and the technical and organizational policies applied during and before a disaster were investigated. This model becomes an important tool in the decision process either for the engineering profession or for policy makers.

  19. Ocular emergencies presenting to Menelik II Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Dereje; Bejiga, Abebe

    2011-01-01

    Ocular conditions such as trauma, painful red eye of any cause, painless sudden visual loss and others are commonly seen as ocular emergencies, and can lead to ocular morbidity and visual loss. To determine types and causes of ocular emergencies seen at Menelik II hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to October, 2007. Consecutive patients who presented with ocular emergencies at any time of the day were prospectively evaluated and registered on a formatted questionnaire. Evaluation of the patients included history of presenting illness, visual acuity testing intraocular pressure measurement on non-perforated and non-infected eyes, and complete eye examination in order to arrive at the diagnosis. A total of 26,400 patients attended Menelik II hospital during the study period. Of these, 758 (3%) were persons with an ocular emergency. The majority of patients (n=551; 72.7%) were male, with a male to female ratio of 2.7:1. The age group of 16 to 30 years was the most affected (47.9%), followed by those aged 15 years or younger (27.3%). Ocular trauma and ocular infections accounted for 75.6% and 13.1% of cases, respectively. Of the total ocular emergencies, open globe injuries constituted 171 (22.6%), corneal foreign bodies and abrasion 125 (16.5%), and open adnexal injuries 119 (15.7%). Metal and wood were the commonest work-related causes of ocular injuries in adults, with both together accounting for 60% of all ocular injuries. Children, on the other hand, sustained ocular injury while playing with others in 128 (22.3%) of cases. This study was able to provide a more complete picture to improve understanding of the nature and circumstances of ocular emergencies in Ethiopia. Ocular emergencies were dominated by ocular trauma, particularly affecting males and working-age adults. Public education and use of protective safety measures are recommended to alleviate the problem.

  20. Who's boarding in the psychiatric emergency service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A; Joesch, Jutta M; West, Imara I; Pasic, Jagoda

    2014-09-01

    When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a "boarder." The psychiatric emergency service (PES) has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student's t-tests and multivariate regression. 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7%) resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients.

  1. O enfermeiro no gerenciamento à qualidade em serviço hospitalar de emergência: revisão integrativa da literatura La enfermera en la gestión de la calidad en el servicio de urgencia en el hospital: revisión integradora de la literatura Quality management by nurses in hospitals' emergency services: integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Aparecido Bellucci Júnior

    2011-12-01

    las enfermeras en la Acogida Clasificadora de Riesgo es una estrategia clave para la gestión de calidad en los servicios.This study aimed to analyze publications related to the activities of nurses managing the quality in the Emergency Services of Hospitals. An integrative literature review identified 4780 articles of which 8 were selected considering the criteria: full articles, published from 2000 to 2010; available in Portuguese; indexed in the databases of the Virtual Health Library. All the material was analyzed through Content Analysis. Two themes emerged: Working in the structuring of the nursing staff to the quality of care and Nursing actions managing the quality of care. The conclusion is that the promotion of the quality of care provided in Hospitals' Emergency Services is linked to the actions promoting the humanization of both care and caregivers, and that the role of the nurse in the User Reception with Risk Rating is a key strategy for managing quality in services.

  2. PREVALENCE OF ALCOHOLISM IN HOSPITALIZATIONS OF PSYCHIATRIC EMERGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robsmeire Calvo Melo Zurita

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The psychiatric emergency is used to treat people with mental disordersworking 24 hours followed the new model of mental health care recommended by theMinistry of Health, creating care options, with a focus centered on reintegration of the patientto their social and family. The study aimed to characterize the hospitalizations of patients inthe Psychiatric Emergency Municipal Hospital of Maringa in the period January 2009 to June2010. Were selected and included a total of 1548 hospitalizations, behavioral disorder due toalcohol use. Predominance in male admissions with 88.6%, the predominant age group inboth sexes was 41-51 years with 59.75%, with the majority of hospitalizations of patientsliving in Maringá. Referred to the Psychiatric Hospital were46.18% of hospitalizations,diagnosed mostly in mental and behavioral disorders due to alcohol use,CID-10 F10, with720 (46.51% of admissions. The legal framework of the Psychiatric Reform, ratified,guaranteeing the universal right to access and assistance as well as to its completeness;decentralization of the service model, configuring networks care more attentive toinequalities, setting fair and democratic way of their actions to needs of the population

  3. Hospital emergency on-call coverage: is there a doctor in the house?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Ann S; Draper, Debra A; Felland, Laurie E

    2007-11-01

    The nation's community hospitals face increasing problems obtaining emergency on-call coverage from specialist physicians, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. The diminished willingness of specialist physicians to provide on-call coverage is occurring as hospital emergency departments confront an ever-increasing demand for services. Factors influencing physician reluctance to provide on-call coverage include decreased dependence on hospital admitting privileges as more services shift to non-hospital settings; payment for emergency care, especially for uninsured patients; and medical liability concerns. Hospital strategies to secure on-call coverage include enforcing hospital medical staff bylaws that require physicians to take call, contracting with physicians to provide coverage, paying physicians stipends, and employing physicians. Nonetheless, many hospitals continue to struggle with inadequate on-call coverage, which threatens patients' timely access to high-quality emergency care and may raise health care costs.

  4. Emergency Health Services Selected Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Bethesda, MD.

    This annotated bibliography contains books, journal articles, visual aids, and other documents pertaining to emergency health care, which are organized according to: (1) publications dealing with day-to-day health emergencies that occur at home, work, and play, (2) documents that will help communities prepare for emergencies, including natural…

  5. Conceptions of mobile emergency service health professionals concerning psychiatric emergency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Bonfada

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Under the Brazilian Psychiatric Reformation, assistance to psychological seizures represents a challenge for the emergency services. Therefore, the objective of this paper is the analysis of the conceptions of health professionals who work at the Mobile Emergency Service in Natal on psychiatric emergency care. This paper is, then, a qualitative study that used interviews as tools for collecting information. By using thematic analysis, the speeches were grouped into three categories: the stigma on patients and the professionals' fear of services interventions in psychiatric emergencies; having psychiatric emergencies regarded as harmful to patients and others' security; psychiatric emergencies being taken as patients' aggressiveness or severe depression. The data collected indicate that the interviewed professionals' ideas are supported by elements associated with the ideology that insanity implies social segregation and dangerousness. Thus, the survey prompted reflection on relevant issues to the process of psychiatric reformation implementation.

  6. Service quality for facilities management in hospitals

    CERN Document Server

    Sui Pheng, Low

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the Facilities Management (FM) of hospitals and healthcare facilities, which are among the most complex, costly and challenging kind of buildings to manage. It presents and evaluates the FM service quality standards in Singapore’s hospitals from the patient’s perspective, and provides recommendations on how to successfully improve FM service quality and achieve higher patient satisfaction. The book also features valuable supplementary materials, including a checklist of 32 key factors for successful facilities management and another checklist of 24 service attributes for hospitals to achieve desirable service quality in connection with facilities management. The book adopts a unique approach of combining service quality and quality theory to provide a more holistic view of how FM service quality can be achieved in hospitals. It also integrates three instruments, namely the SERVQUAL model, the Kano model and the QFD model to yield empirical results from surveys for implementation in hosp...

  7. [Out of hospital emergencies towards a safety culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-del Pozo, M I; Obón-Azuara, B; Valderrama-Rodríguez, M; Revilla-López, C; Brosed-Yuste, C; Fajardo-Trasobares, E; Garcés-Baquero, P; Mateo-Clavería, J; Molina-Estrada, I; Perona-Flores, N; Salcedo-de Dios, S; Tomé-Rey, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to measure the degree of safety culture (CS) among healthcare professional workers of an out-of-hospital Emergency Medical Service. Most patient safety studies have been conducted in relation to the hospital rather than pre-hospital Emergency Medical Services. The objective is to analyze the dimensions with lower scores in order to plan futures strategies. A descriptive study using the AHRQ (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality) questionnaire. The questionnaire was delivered to all healthcare professionals workers of 061 Advanced Life Support Units of Aragón, during the month of August 2013. The response rate was 55%. Main strengths detected: an adequate number of staff (96%), good working conditions (89%), tasks supported from immediate superior (77%), teamwork climate (74%), and non-punitive environment to report adverse events (68%). Areas for improvement: insufficient training in patient safety (53%) and lack of feedback of incidents reported (50%). The opportunities for improvement identified focus on the training of professionals in order to ensure safer care, while extending the safety culture. Also, the implementation of a system of notification and registration of adverse events in the service is deemed necessary. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Emergency Response of Iranian Hospitals Against Disasters: A Practical Framework for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janati, Ali; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Hasanpoor, Edris; Sokhanvar, Mobin; HaghGoshyie, Elaheh; Salehi, Abdollah

    2018-04-01

    Hospital emergency management is a continuous process that requires monolithic integration of planning and response attempts with local and national schemes. The aim of the current study is to evaluate emergency response by hospitals against potential disasters in Tabriz, north-west Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the city of Tabriz, in Iran, in 2016. The study population included all hospitals in Tabriz. A total of 18 hospitals were assessed. The hospital emergency response checklist was used to collect data. Tool components included command and control, communication, safety and security, triage, surge capacity, continuity of essential services, human resources, logistics and supply management, and post-disaster recovery. Data entry and analysis were carried out using SPSS software (version 20). The results showed that the emergency response rate of hospitals was 54.26% in Tabriz. The lowest response rates were for Shafaa hospital (18.89%) and the highest response rates were for Razi Hospital (91.67%). The components of hospital emergency response were assessed to be between 48.07% (surge capacity) and 58.95% (communication). On the basis of the World Health Organization checklist, the emergency response rate for hospitals in Tabriz was only 54.26%. Therefore, hospital emergency responses against disasters have to be improved and must be made to reach 100%. It is essential to design a comprehensive framework for hospital emergency response. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2018;12:166-171).

  9. Fire Service Emergency Management Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Adapted from Formulating Public Policy in Emergency Management Course Book and ResourceMRanual for Public OTTicials, ILMA Emergency Management Institute...659-2447 (202) 785-2757 Christian Reformed World Relief Presbyterian Church in U.S. Committee General Assemby Mission Board C. Neil Molenaar 341 Ponce...Healer, Mind as Slayer. New York: Delta Books , 1977. 86B:6 B-45 4) Mitchell, J.T., & Resnik, HLP: Emergency Response to Crisis: A Crisis Intervention

  10. Healthcare Service Auditing and Intervention in an Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pre- and post-intevention randomized cross-sectional study was carried out from January to February and April to May 2001, respectively, to audit and intervene in the timeliness of health services delivery in an Emergency Paediatric Unit (EPU) of Jos University Teaching Hospital. A structured questionnaire was used to ...

  11. Emergency Medical Services - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Well-Being 11 - Emergency Room - Amarɨñña / አማርኛ (Amharic) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Arabic (العربية) Expand Section ... Well-Being 11 - Emergency Room - myanma bhasa (Burmese) MP3 Siloam Family Health Center Dari (دری) Expand Section ...

  12. Obesity, hospital services use and costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folmann, Nana Bro; Bossen, Kristine Skovgaard; Willaing, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    To quantify the association between obesity and somatic hospital costs and number of overall somatic hospital contacts--number of inpatient admissions, number of outpatient visits, and number of emergency department visits--based on anthropometric measurements of waist circumference (WC) and info......) and information from The National Patient Registry and The Danish Case-Mix System (DRG)....

  13. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths - United States, 2001 – 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  14. [Causes of 72-hour return visits to hospital emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Puente, Alberto; Del Río-Mata, José; Arjona-Huertas, José Luis; Mora-Ordóñez, Begoña; Nieto-de Haro, Lourdes; Lara-Blanquer, Antonio; Martínez-Reina, Alfonso; Martínez Del Campo, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    The return-visit rate has been suggested as a measure of emergency department quality of care. We aimed to identify the reasons for emergency revisits and the percentage of returns related to problems with quality of care in the previous visit. Cross-sectional observational study of clinical records for a random sample of unscheduled returns within 72 hours of discharge from the emergency departments of 3 hospitals attending a population of nearly 3 million in the Spanish province of Malaga. The records were reviewed by 2 data collectors, who assigned a reason for revisits according to a standardized classification. A sample of 1075 emergency revisits were reviewed; 895 met the inclusion criteria. The most common reasons for revisits were the persistence or progression of disease (48.8%), an unrelated new problem (9.3%), and referral from a hospital that did not have the required specialized service (8.6%). Reasons attributable to the patient accounted for 14.5% of the revisits; 15.2% were attributable to health care staff errors, 9.2% to system organization, and 61.1% to the disease process. Most emergency department revisits are related to the progression of the disease that led to the first visit. Only a small percentage can be linked to diagnostic or treatment errors in the previous visit.

  15. Evaluation of service quality of hospital outpatient department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2011-07-01

    It has become essential for hospital managers to understand and measure consumer perspectives and service quality gaps, so that any perceived gap in delivery of service is identified and suitably addressed. A study was conducted at a peripheral service hospital to ascertain any service gap between consumer expectations and perceptions in respect of the hospital outpatient department (OPD) services. A cross-sectional study was conducted using SERVQUAL as the survey instrument, the instrument being validated for use in the hospital environment. Consumer ratings across 22 items of the survey instrument were collected in paired expectation and perception scores and then service quality gaps were identified and statistically analysed. Service quality gaps were identified to exist across all the five dimensions of the survey instrument, with statistically significant gaps across the dimensions of 'tangibles' and 'responsiveness.' The quality gaps were further validated by a total unweighted SERVQUAL score of (-) 1.63. The study concludes that significant service quality gaps existed in the delivery of the hospital OPD services, which need to be addressed by focused improvement efforts by the hospital management.

  16. Characteristics of out-of-hospital paediatric emergencies attended by ambulance- and helicopter-based emergency physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eich, Christoph; Russo, Sebastian G.; Heuer, Jan F.; Timmermann, Arnd; Gentkow, Uta; Quintel, Michael; Roessler, Markus

    Background: In Germany, as in many other countries, for the vast majority of cases, critical out-of-hospital (OOH) paediatric emergencies are attended by non-specialised emergency physicians (EPs). As it is assumed that this may lead to deficient service we aimed to gather robust data on the

  17. Food production and service in UK hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Jones, Eleri; Redmond, Elizabeth; Hewedi, Mahmoud; Wingert, Andreas; Gad El Rab, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply value stream mapping holistically to hospital food production/service systems focused on high-quality food. Multiple embedded case study of three (two private-sector and one public-sector) hospitals in the UK. The results indicated various issues affecting hospital food production including: the menu and nutritional considerations; food procurement; food production; foodservice; patient perceptions/expectations. Value stream mapping is a new approach for food production systems in UK hospitals whether private or public hospitals. The paper identifies opportunities for enhancing hospital food production systems. The paper provides a theoretical basis for process enhancement of hospital food production and the provision of high-quality hospital food.

  18. Hospital clinical pharmacy services in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, Hieu T; Nguyen, Huong T L; Pham, Van T T; Ba, Hai L; Dong, Phuong T X; Cao, Thao T B; Nguyen, Hanh T H; Brien, Jo-Anne

    2018-04-07

    Background Clinical pharmacy is key to the quality use of medicines. While there are different approaches in different countries, international perspectives may inform health service development. The Vietnamese Ministry of Health introduced a legal regulation of clinical pharmacy services in December 2012. Objective To describe the services, and to explore reported barriers and facilitators in implementing clinical pharmacy activities in Vietnamese hospitals after the introduction of Vietnamese Ministry of Health legal regulation. Setting Thirty-nine hospitals in Hanoi, Vietnam, including 22 provincial and 17 district hospitals. Method A mixed methods study was utilized. An online questionnaire was sent to the hospitals. In-depth interviews were conducted with pairs of nominated pharmacists at ten of these hospitals. The questionnaire focused on four areas: facilities, workforce, policies and clinical pharmacy activities. Main outcome measure Proportion of clinical pharmacy activities in hospitals. Themes in clinical pharmacy practice. Results 34/39 (87%) hospitals had established clinical pharmacy teams. Most activities were non-patient-specific (87%) while the preliminary patient-specific clinical pharmacy services were available in only 8/39 hospitals (21%). The most common non-patient-specific activities were providing medicines information (97%), reporting adverse drug reactions (97%), monitoring medication usage (97%). The patient specific activities varied widely between hospitals and were ad hoc. The main challenges reported were: lack of workforce and qualified clinical pharmacists. Conclusion While most hospitals had hospital-based pharmacy activities, the direct patient care was limited. Training, education and an expanded work forces are needed to improve clinical pharmacy services.

  19. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi; Sun, Ying; Kadri, Farid; Chaabane, Sondes; Tahon, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  20. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  1. Managing pediatric dental trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Sheller, Barbara; Velan, Elizabeth; Caglar, Derya; Scott, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine types of dental trauma presenting to a hospital emergency department (ED); (2) describe the medical services provided to these patients; and (3) quantify time spent during ED encounters for dental trauma emergencies. Records of 265 patients who presented to the ED with dental trauma over a three-year period were reviewed. Demographics, injury types, triage acuity, pain scores, and dental/medical treatment and times were analyzed. Patient demographics and injury types were similar to previous studies. Eighty-two percent of patients received mid-level triage scores; 41 percent of patients had moderate to severe pain. The most frequently provided medical services were administration of analgesics and/or prescriptions (78 percent). The mean times were: 51 minutes waiting for a physician; 55 minutes with dentists; and 176 minutes total time. Higher triage acuity and pain levels resulted in significantly longer wait times for physician assessment. Dental evaluation, including treatment, averaged 32 percent of time spent at the hospital. A dental clinic is the most efficient venue for treating routine dental trauma. Patients in this study spent the majority of time waiting for physicians and receiving nondental services. Most patients required no medical intervention beyond prescriptions commonly used in dental practice.

  2. Hospital all-risk emergency preparedness in Ghana | Norman ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (2) The hospitals' respective abilities to handle large scale RTA's were ... The biggest challenge facing the hospitals in their emergency intervention is the lack of preemergency and emergency preparedness plans as well as the coordination of the hospitals response mechanisms. Conclusion: The paper ended with ...

  3. Adolescents and Dual Diagnosis in a Psychiatric Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matali, José Luis; Andión, Oscar; Pardo, Marta; Iniesta, Raquel; Serrano, Eduard; San, Luis

    2016-03-02

    In recent years, both the prevalence of drug use and related child and adolescent psychiatric emergencies have risen sharply. There are few studies about the impact on child and adolescent emergency services. This study has a twofold aim. The first is to describe the prevalence of substance use disorders, mental disorders and dual diagnosis (substance use problems plus mental disorder) in adolescents in psychiatric emergency service. The second is to analyze clinical and healthcare differences between patients with dual diagnosis and patients with a mental disorder without substance use disorder.We retrospectively reviewed 4012 discharge forms for emergencies treated at the psychiatric emergency department during the period 2007-2009. We obtained a sample of 1795 visits. This sample was divided into two groups: the dual diagnosis group (n = 477) and the psychiatric disorder group (n = 1318).The dual diagnosis group accounted for 26.5% of psychiatric emergencies analyzed. Compared to the psychiatric disorder group,the dual diagnosis group had significantly more conduct disorders, social problems, involuntariness in the visit, less hospital admissions and less connection with the healthcare network.Adolescents with a dual diagnosis account for a high percentage of visits at child and adolescent psychiatric emergency services. This patient group requires specialized care both at emergency services and in specific units. Accordingly, these units should play a triple role when handling dual diagnosis: detection, brief treatment and referral to a specialised unit.

  4. Customer satisfaction measurement in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuisma, Markku; Määttä, Teuvo; Hakala, Taisto; Sivula, Tommi; Nousila-Wiik, Maria

    2003-07-01

    The annual patient volume in emergency medical services (EMS) systems is high worldwide. However, there are no comprehensive studies on customer satisfaction for EMS. The authors report how a customer satisfaction survey on EMS patients was conducted, the results, and the possible causes for dissatisfaction. Two prospective customer satisfactions surveys were conducted in an urban EMS system. Consecutive patients treated by EMS received a postal questionnaire approximately two weeks after service. Satisfaction was measured in a scale from 1 (very poor) to 5 (excellent). Neither EMS personnel nor patients were made aware prospectively that patient satisfaction would be measured. Response rates to the surveys were 36.8% (432/1,175) in 2000 and 40.0% (464/1,150) in 2002. The mean general grades for the service were 4.6 and 4.5, respectively. Patients reported the highest degree of dissatisfaction when they were not taken to their hospital of choice, when they perceived that the paramedics were not able to meet their needs, and when paramedics did not introduce themselves or communicate directly with the patient's relatives. In high-volume calls (i.e., frequent chief complaints), the general satisfaction was highest in patients with arrhythmias, breathing difficulties, and hypoglycemia. Patients with drug overdose included the highest proportion of unsatisfied patients. None of the background variables (e.g., gender, transport decision, working shift) was statistically related to general patient satisfaction. This study shows that customer satisfaction surveys can be successfully conducted for EMS. EMS systems should consider routinely using customer satisfaction surveys as a tool for quality measurement and improvement.

  5. Physiological scoring: an aid to emergency medical services transport decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challen, Kirsty; Walter, Darren

    2010-01-01

    Attendance at UK emergency departments is rising steadily despite the proliferation of alternative unscheduled care providers. Evidence is mixed on the willingness of emergency medical services (EMS) providers to decline to transport patients and the safety of incorporating such an option into EMS provision. Physiologically based Early Warning Scores are in use in many hospitals and emergency departments, but not yet have been proven to be of benefit in the prehospital arena. The use of a physiological-social scoring system could safely identify patients calling EMS who might be diverted from the emergency department to an alternative, unscheduled, care provider. This was a retrospective, cohort study of patients with a presenting complaint of "shortness of breath" or "difficulty breathing" transported to the emergency department by EMS. Retrospective calculation of a physiological social score (PMEWS) based on first recorded data from EMS records was performed. Outcome measures of hospital admission and need for physiologically stabilizing treatment in the emergency department also were performed. A total of 215 records were analyzed. One hundred thirty-nine (65%) patients were admitted from the emergency department or received physiologically stabilizing treatment in the emergency department. Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (AUROC) for hospital admission was 0.697 and for admission or physiologically stabilizing treatment was 0.710. No patient scoringemergency department to alternative, unscheduled, care providers.

  6. eServices for Hospital Equipment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, M.; Van der Linden, W.P.M.; Willems, H.X.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we explore the idea that by combining different sources of information in a hospital environment, valuable e-services canbe developed that may help in reducing cost and improving quality of service. Companies, like Philips Medical Systems, may have a compe-titive advantage, because

  7. Assessment of hospital emergency management in the Beijing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantao, Xin

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the number of public health emergencies has increased. Improving hospital emergency management is an important challenge. This is a pilot study intended to assess hospital emergency management in the Beijing area, make recommendations to government health authorities and hospital managers, and offer references for similar studies. This was an observational, cross-sectional survey. Forty-five hospitals in the Beijing area were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as a data collection tool. It comprised of three sections: (1) Section A was the introduction; (2) Section B asked for the respondent's personal information; and (3) Section C comprised the major part of the questionnaire and was intended to gather information regarding the hospital's general emergency management situation. The survey response rate was 44%, accounting for 29% of total hospitals that the study targeted. No hospital had an established emergency management department or full-time staff for emergency management. A total of 15-45% of the hospitals had established a hospital emergency management committee, performed a vulnerability analysis, or evaluated emergency management regularly. Twenty-five percent of respondents thought that the local government health authority had established an integrated hospital incident command system. A total of 40%-55% of hospitals contracted with outside institutions for supplements, backup of key functional systems and professional support. After the occurrence of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, Chinese hospital managers took many measures to improve hospital resilience. However, most of these efforts lacked the guidance of theories, concepts, principles, and methods. An integrated, standardized, operational hospital emergency management model has not been established. Although the survey response rate was relatively low, some clues for further study were discovered, and suggestions to the

  8. How Much Time Do Unhospitalized Patients Applying for Emergency Services Stay in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Kürsad Erkuran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The patients applying to a emergency service may stay longer than necessary for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment. This can be due to the inadequacy of the treatment performed in emergency department or to the absence of the required unit in the hospital. In this study, we analyzed the waiting period of the patients who have not been hospitalized. METHODS: The patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 have been studied regarding their application date, the season, and their waiting period in the emergency unit. The data have been analyzed using the statistics software Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, version 17.0 for Windows. The chi-square χ2 test has been used for the determination of the percentage distribution and significance and p<0,05 has been considered significant. RESULTS: 4215 patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 and monitored without hospitalization have been studied. The patients mainly presented during spring (p<0.05. The application occurred more often between 20.00 PM – 23.59 PM (p<0.005. The mean duration of the accept-standby of the patients in emergency unit was 09±12 (minimum 0 minute, maximum 130 minutes. The patients waited 0,26 ±70 minutes in emergency unit examination (minimum 0 minute, maximum 1292 minutes. The total waiting time in emergency unit was 52 ±100 minutes (minimum 10, maximum 1435 minutes. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: In this study, we observed that the duration of the hospitalization in emergency unit is longer than the ideal duration.

  9. Workplace violence against emergency versus non-emergency nurses in Mansoura university hospitals, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-ElWafa, Hala Samir; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Abd-El-Raouf, Samar E; Abd-Elmouty, Samia Mahmoud; El-Sayed, Rabab El-Sayed Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against nurses is a common but neglected problem in Egypt. The objectives are to estimate the prevalence and associated risk factors of different types of violence against nurses working in the emergency hospital compared with those working in non-emergency clinics, circumstances of violence, type of perpetrators, and victims' response. This cross-sectional comparative study was carried out at Mansoura University Hospitals, Egypt, during January 2013. The data were collected through the adapted version of a self-administered questionnaire developed by the International Labor Office/International Council of Nurses/World Health Organization/Public Services International on WPV in the health sector. All types of WPV are common among nurses. Precipitating factors for violent incidents identified by respondents are emergency specialty, having work shift, and younger age. Violent incidents result in work dissatisfaction and consequently impair work productivity. Nurses working in emergency hospital experienced a higher level of different types of WPV. There is an urgent need to formulate and implement a policy for dealing with violent events. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Psychiatric service users' experiences of emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Kathrine; Lou, Stina; Jensen, Lotte Groth

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is increased clinical and political attention towards integrating general and psychiatric emergency departments (ED). However, research into psychiatric service users’ experiences regarding general EDs is limited. Aim: To identify and summarize current, qualitative evidence rega...... the discomfort. Overall, the results of this review speak in favour of integrated EDs where service users’ needs are more likely to be recognized and accommodated....

  11. [Structure, organization and capacity problems in emergency medical services, emergency admission and intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, W

    1994-01-01

    Emergency medicine is subjected worldwide to financial stringencies and organizational evaluations of cost-effectiveness. The various links in the chain of survival are affected differently. Bystander assistance or bystander CPR is available in only 30% of the emergencies, response intervals--if at all required by legislation--are observed to only a limited degree or are too extended for survival in cardiac arrest. A single emergency telephone number is lacking. Too many different phone numbers for emergency reporting result in confusion and delays. Organizational realities are not fully overcome and impair efficiency. The position of the emergency physician in the EMS System is inadequately defined, the qualification of too many emergency physicians are unsatisfactory. In spite of this, emergency physicians are frequently forced to answer out-of-hospital emergency calls. Conflicts between emergency physicians and EMTs may be overcome by providing both groups with comparable qualifications as well as by providing an explicit definition of emergency competence. A further source of conflict occurs at the juncture of prehospital and inhospital emergency care in the emergency department. Deficiencies on either side play a decisive role. At least in principle there are solutions to the deficiencies in the EMSS and in intensive care medicine. They are among others: Adequate financial compensation of emergency personnel, availability of sufficient numbers of highly qualified personnel, availability of a central receiving area with an adjacent emergency ward, constant information flow to the dispatch center on the number of available emergency beds, maintaining 5% of all beds as emergency beds, establishing intermediate care facilities. Efficiency of emergency physician activities can be demonstrated in polytraumatized patients or in patients with ventricular fibrillation or acute myocardial infarction, in patients with acute myocardial insufficiency and other emergency

  12. [Football, television and emergency services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, O; Sánchez, M; Borrás, A; Millá, J

    2000-04-15

    To know the influence of televised football on the use of emergency department (ED). We assessed the number, demographic characteristics and acuity of patients attended during the broadcast of football matches played by FC Barcelona during Champions' League (n = 12), and they were compared with days without televised football (n = 12). Televised football was associated with a decrease in visits to ED (-18%; p = 0.002). Such a decrease was observed for all ED units, but only for traumatology unit reached statistical significance (-28%; p = 0.006). Decay of ED visits were mainly due to a decrease of low-acuity consults (-30%; p = 0.04). There is a significant decrease on ED use associated with televised football.

  13. Emergency Medical Service (EMS): Rotorcraft Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchspies, J. S.; Adams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A lead organization on the national level should be designated to establish concepts, locations, and the number of shock trauma air medical services. Medical specialists desire a vehicle which incorporates advances in medical technology trends in health care. Key technology needs for the emergency medical services helicopter of the future include the riding quality of fixed wing aircraft (reduced noise and vibration), no tail rotor, small rotor, small rotor diameter, improved visibility, crashworthy vehicle, IFR capability, more affordability high reliability, fuel efficient, and specialized cabins to hold medical/diagnostic and communications equipment. Approaches to a national emergency medical service are discussed.

  14. Awareness about basic life support and emergency medical services and its associated factors among students in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshatha Rao Aroor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The knowledge and skills about the basic life support (BLS and the advanced life support are the most important determining factors of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR success rates. Objectives: To determine the level of awareness on BLS and skills among undergraduate and postgraduate students of medical and dental profession, as well as nursing students and interns in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in South India. The awareness level on BLS and factors associated which include age, sex, level of training (undergraduate, internship, and postgraduate groups, course of study (nursing, dental, and medical groups, and previous exposure to BLS were assessed by using a structured questionnaire. The association of these variables with awareness level was assessed by independent t test, analysis of variance, and linear regression analysis. Results: Among 520 study subjects, 229 were students, 171 were interns, and 120 were postgraduate students. The overall mean score of awareness was 4.16 ± 1.40 (score range: 0-10. Age, sex, level of training, course of study, and previous exposure to BLS were significantly associated with awareness level in univariate analysis (P < 0.05. Linear regression model also showed that all the above variables were significantly associated with awareness level (P < 0.05. About 322 (61.9% subjects attributed lack of awareness about BLS to lack of available professional training. About 479 (92.1% responded that BLS training should be a part of medical curriculum. Conclusion: Awareness level on BLS is below average indicating the importance of professional training at all levels in a tertiary care health institution.

  15. Awareness about basic life support and emergency medical services and its associated factors among students in a tertiary care hospital in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroor, Akshatha Rao; Saya, Rama Prakash; Attar, Nazir Rahim; Saya, Ganesh Kumar; Ravinanthanan, Manikandan

    2014-07-01

    The knowledge and skills about the basic life support (BLS) and the advanced life support are the most important determining factors of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) success rates. To determine the level of awareness on BLS and skills among undergraduate and postgraduate students of medical and dental profession, as well as nursing students and interns in a tertiary care hospital. This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in South India. The awareness level on BLS and factors associated which include age, sex, level of training (undergraduate, internship, and postgraduate groups), course of study (nursing, dental, and medical groups), and previous exposure to BLS were assessed by using a structured questionnaire. The association of these variables with awareness level was assessed by independent t test, analysis of variance, and linear regression analysis. Among 520 study subjects, 229 were students, 171 were interns, and 120 were postgraduate students. The overall mean score of awareness was 4.16 ± 1.40 (score range: 0-10). Age, sex, level of training, course of study, and previous exposure to BLS were significantly associated with awareness level in univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Linear regression model also showed that all the above variables were significantly associated with awareness level (P < 0.05). About 322 (61.9%) subjects attributed lack of awareness about BLS to lack of available professional training. About 479 (92.1%) responded that BLS training should be a part of medical curriculum. Awareness level on BLS is below average indicating the importance of professional training at all levels in a tertiary care health institution.

  16. Doctors' service orientation in public, private, and foreign hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andaleeb, Syed Saad; Siddiqui, Nazlee; Khandakar, Shahjahan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a doctors' service orientation (DSO) scale and uses it to compare the services received in public, private and foreign hospitals in a developing country from the patient's perspective. The scale was derived from the service quality literature and qualitative research. A questionnaire was designed next. Data were collected from patients who had used the services of doctors in a hospital. The scale demonstrated appropriate psychometric properties. Two clear patterns emerge from the study results: on 10 out of 12 measures of doctors' service orientation, there was no significant difference in their perceived behaviors between public and private hospitals and foreign doctors were "always" rated significantly higher. This study focused on one major city because of time and resource constraints. The findings are thus not generalizable to hospitals across the country. Also, because of translation and retranslation issues, the scale ought to be further tested for wider use. The scale may be used periodically in a comprehensive quality assurance program to exhort doctors to become more service oriented and to improve their performance over time.

  17. [Analysis on workload for hospital DOTS service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Yoko; Urakawa, Minako; Kobayashi, Noriko; Kato, Seiya

    2014-04-01

    A directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) trial was launched in Japan in the late 1990s and targeted patients with social depression at urban areas. Based on these findings, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare established the Japanese DOTS Strategy in 2003, which is a comprehensive support service ensuring the adherence of tuberculosis patients to drug administration. DOTS services are initially provided at the hospital to patients with infectious tuberculosis who are hospitalized according to the Infectious Diseases Control Law. After being discharged from the hospital, the patients are referred to a public health center. However, a survey conducted in 2008 indicated that all the patients do not receive appropriate DOTS services at some hospitals. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the protocols and workload of DOTS at hospitals that are actively involved in tuberculosis medical practice, including DOTS, to assess whether the hospital DOTS services were adequate. We reviewed a series of articles on hospital DOTS from a Japanese journal on nursing for tuberculosis patients and identified 25 activities regarding the hospital DOTS service. These 25 items were then classified into 3 categories: health education to patients, support for adherence, and coordination with the health center. In total, 20 hospitals that had > 20 authorized tuberculosis beds were selected--while considering the geographical balance, schedule of this survey, etc.--from 33 hospitals where an ex-trainee of the tuberculosis control expert training program in the Research Institute of Tuberculosis (RIT) was working and 20 hospitals that had collaborated with our previous survey on tuberculosis medical facilities. All the staff associated with the DOTS service were asked to record the total working time as well as the time spent for each activity. The data were collected and analyzed at the RIT. The working times for each activity of the DOTS service for nurses, pharmacists

  18. Rural emergency medical technician pre-hospital electrocardiogram transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, A M; Halon, J M; Nelson, J

    2014-01-01

    Emergent care of the acute heart attack patient continues to be at the forefront of quality and cost reduction strategies throughout the healthcare industry. Although the average cardiac door-to-balloon (D2B) times have decreased substantially over the past few years, there are still vast disparities found in D2B times in populations that reside in rural areas. Such disparities are mostly related to prolonged travel time and subsequent delays in cardiac catherization lab team activation. Urban ambulance companies that are routinely staffed with paramedic level providers have been successful in the implementation of pre-hospital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) protocols as a strategy to reduce D2B times. The authors sought to evaluate the evidence related to the risk and benefits associated with the replication of an ECG transmission protocol in a small rural emergency medical service. The latter is staffed with emergency medical technician-basics (EMT-B), emergency medical technician-advanced (EMT-A), and emergency medical technician-intermediate (EMT-I) level. The evidence reviewed was limited to studies with relevant data regarding the challenges and complexities of the ECG transmission process, the difficulties associated with ECG transmission in rural settings, and ECG transmission outcomes by provider level. The evidence supports additional research to further evaluate the feasibility of ECG transmission at the non-paramedic level. Multiple variables must be investigated including equipment cost, utilization, and rural transmission capabilities. Clearly, pre-hospital ECG transmission and early activation of the cardiac catheterization laboratory are critical components to successfully decreasing D2B times.

  19. [The influence of the pre-hospital application of non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin in the practice of emergency medical services in multiple and mass casualty incidents (MCI)--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałazkowski, Robert; Wejnarski, Arkadiusz; Baumberg, Ignacy; Świeżewski, Stanisław; Timler, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 a fire broke out in the Nursing Home (NH) in the Henryszew village 5 km away from the district hospital in Zyrardów. At the time of the incident 52 residents and 16 staff members were present in the building. Due to a large number of casualties, the occurrence was classified as a potentially mass casualty incident (MCI). Troops of the State Fire Brigade, Paramedic Rescue Squads, choppers of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, the Police, and the NH staff took part in the rescue operation. The priority was given to the evacuation of the NH residents carried out by the NH staff and firefighters, extinguishing the fire, as well as to primary and secondary survey triage. Due to the pre-accident health state of the victims, the latter posed a considerable difficulty. A decisive role was played by the need to conduct non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin in all the casualties, which then made it possible to adequately diagnose the patients and implement proper procedures. The rescue operation was correctly followed although it proved to be a serious logistical and technical undertaking for the participating emergency services. The residents were not found to be suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning, therefore 46 of the residents safely returned to the building. The fact that all the Paramedic Rescue Squads were equipped with medical triage sets and were able to conduct non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin made it possible to introduce effective procedures in the cases of suspected carbon monoxide poisoning and abandon costly and complicated organisational procedures when they proved to be unnecessary.

  20. The influence of the pre-hospital application of non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin in the practice of emergency medical services in multiple and mass casualty incidents (MCI – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gałązkowski

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 a fire broke out in the Nursing Home (NH in the Henryszew village 5 km away from the district hospital in Żyrardów. At the time of the incident 52 residents and 16 staff members were present in the building. Due to a large number of casualties, the occurrence was classified as a potentially mass casualty incident (MCI. Troops of the State Fire Brigade, Paramedic Rescue Squads, choppers of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, the Police, and the NH staff took part in the rescue operation. The priority was given to the evacuation of the NH residents carried out by the NH staff and firefighters, extinguishing the fire, as well as to primary and secondary survey triage. Due to the pre-accident health state of the victims, the latter posed a considerable difficulty. A decisive role was played by the need to conduct non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin in all the casualties, which then made it possible to adequately diagnose the patients and implement proper procedures. The rescue operation was correctly followed although it proved to be a serious logistical and technical undertaking for the participating emergency services. The residents were not found to be suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning, therefore 46 of the residents safely returned to the building. The fact that all the Paramedic Rescue Squads were equipped with medical triage sets and were able to conduct non-invasive measurements of carboxyhemoglobin made it possible to introduce effective procedures in the cases of suspected carbon monoxide poisoning and abandon costly and complicated organisational procedures when they proved to be unnecessary. Med Pr 2014;65(2:289–295

  1. [New possibilities in emergency medical transportation and emergency services of Polish Medical Air Rescue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gałazkowski, Robert

    2010-01-01

    In Poland, two types of medical services are accomplished by the Medical Air Rescue (MAR) operating all over the country: emergency transport from the incident scene to hospital and inter-hospital transport. Helicopters or planes are used for this purpose. In 2009, helicopters performed 4359 flights to incidents and 1537 inter-hospital transports whereas planes performed 589 inter-hospital ambulance and 196 rescue flights. MAR operates from 17 bases of the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) and one airbase. Helicopters are mainly used when medical transport is emergent, within the operational region of a given base whereas planes when the distance between the present and target airports exceeds 250 km. In 2008, new modern aircraft were introduced to HEMS-helicopters EC 135. They fulfil all requirements of air transport regulations and are adjusted to visual (VFR) and instrumental (IFR) flights rules, at day and night. The medical cabin of EC 135 is ergonomic and functional considering the majority of rescue activities under life-saving circumstances. It is equipped with ventilator, defibrillator, infusion pumps etc. Defibrillators have 12-lead ECG, E(T)CO2, SpO2, NIBP, and IBP modules. Transport ventilators can work in a variety of ventilation modes including CMV, SIMV, SVV, BILEVEL, PCV, ASB, PPV and CPAP. The purchase of helicopters with modern avionic and medical configuration ensures high quality services of MAR for many years to come.

  2. Assessment of hospital-based adult triage at emergency receiving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted in 6 of the 7 hospitals in the region. ... gency department, the rest receive emergency patients/perform triage from .... gional Referral Hospital (government facility) with emer- ... sionals who were involved in daily initial management of ..... for receiving emergency cases can be complex especially.

  3. Investigating emergency room service quality using lean manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Abdelhakim

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate a lean manufacturing metric called Takt time as a benchmark evaluation measure to evaluate a public hospital's service quality. Lean manufacturing is an established managerial philosophy with a proven track record in industry. A lean metric called Takt time is applied as a measure to compare the relative efficiency between two emergency departments (EDs) belonging to the same public hospital. Outcomes guide managers to improve patient services and increase hospital performances. The patient treatment lead time within the hospital's two EDs (one department serves male and the other female patients) are the study's focus. A lean metric called Takt time is used to find the service's relative efficiency. Findings show that the lean manufacturing metric called Takt time can be used as an effective way to measure service efficiency by analyzing relative efficiency and identifies bottlenecks in different departments providing the same services. The paper presents a new procedure to compare relative efficiency between two EDs. It can be applied to any healthcare facility.

  4. Internet protocol-based emergency services

    CERN Document Server

    Schulzrinne, Henning

    2013-01-01

    Written by international experts in the field, this book covers the standards, architecture and deployment issues related to IP-based emergency services This book brings together contributions from experts on technical and operational aspects within the international standardisation and regulatory processes relating to routing and handling of IP-based emergency calls.  Readers will learn how these standards work, how various standardization organizations contributed to them and about pilot projects, early deployment and current regulatory situation. Key Featur

  5. Using ArcGIS software in the pre-hospital emergency medical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manole, M; Duma, Odetta; Custură, Maria Alexandra; Petrariu, F D; Manole, Alina

    2014-01-01

    To measure the accessibility to healtcare services in order to reveal their quality and to improve the overall coverage, continuity and other features. We used the software ESRI Arc GIS 9.3, the Network Analyst function and data provided by Ambulance Service of Iasi (A.S.I.) with emergencies statistics for the first four months of 2012, processed by Microsoft Office Excel 2010. As examples, we chose "St. Maria" Children's Emergency Hospital and "St. Spiridon" Emergency Hospital. ArcGIS Network Analyst finds the best route to get from one location to another or a route that includes multiple locations. Each route is characterized by three stops. The starting point is always the office of Ambulance Service of Iasi (A.S.I.), a second stop at the case address and the third to the hospital unit chosen according to the patient's diagnosis and age. Spatial distribution of emergency cases for the first four months of 2012 in these two examples is one unequable, with higher concentrations in districts located in two areas of the city. The presented examples highlight the poor coverage of healthcare services for the population of Iasi, Romania, especially the South-West area and its vulnerability in situations of emergency. Implementing such a broad project would lead to more complex analyses that would improve the situation of pre-hospital emergency medical services, with final goal to deserve the population, improve the quality of healthcare and develop the interdisciplinary relationships.

  6. Emergency service admissions of patients with burn injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiye Yolcu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the propertiesof burn injured patients who admitted to our hospitalemergency service.Methods: Patients were detected from the hospital recordsof emergency service during six months period andwere divided into five groups according to their ages (60 years. Age, gender totalbody surface area (TBSA, mechanism of injury and theoutcome of emergency evaluation were recorded.Results: Totally 111619 patients admitted to our emergencyservice between 01.07.2011 and 31.12.2011. Duringsix months, 2349 males and 1960 females totally4309 patients were burn injured patients. 1773 patientswere between 0-10 years, 1083 patients were 11-20years, 735 patients were between 21 and 40, 361 patientswere between 41 and 60 and 357 patients were over 60years. Most of the patients were treated in the emergencyservice (90.1%. 0-10% TBSA patients constituted 94.2%.This ratio for burn area >40% was 0.6%. Hot liquid burn(vapored water, milk etc. was 60.2%. There was a significantrelation between mechanism of burn injury andage groups (p<0.05. No corrosive and sunburn injuriesdetermined in females. Age groups were related with hospitalization(p<0.05. The highest intensive care unit admissionwas found in the 0-10 age group (1.3%.Conclusion: Emergency service is the first admission departmentof burn injury patients. Knowing the propertiesof burn injury patients, would help hard-working emergencydoctors in triage of these patients. Also, reportingthe data of emergency service burn injury patients wouldbe helpful for further studies. J Clin Exp Invest 2013; 4(3: 285-288Key words: Burn injury, emergency service, total body surface area

  7. Access to emergency care services: a transversal ecological study about Brazilian emergency health care network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, T A H; da Silva, N C; Amaral, P V; Barbosa, A C Q; Rocha, J V M; Alvares, V; de Almeida, D G; Thumé, E; Thomaz, E B A F; de Sousa Queiroz, R C; de Souza, M R; Lein, A; Toomey, N; Staton, C A; Vissoci, J R N; Facchini, L A

    2017-12-01

    Studies of health geography are important in the planning and allocation of emergency health services. The geographical distribution of health facilities is an important factor in timely and quality access to emergency services; therefore, the present study analyzed the emergency health care network in Brazil, focusing the analysis at the roles of small hospitals (SHs). Cross-sectional ecological study. Data were collected from 9429 hospitals of which 3524 were SHs and 5905 were high-complexity centers (HCCs). For analytical purposes, we considered four specialties when examining the proxies of emergency care capability: adult, pediatrics, neonatal, and obstetric. We analyzed the spatial distribution of hospitals, identifying municipalities that rely exclusively on SHs and the distance of these cities from HCCs. More than 14 and 30 million people were at least 120 km away from HCCs with an adult intensive care unit (ICU) and pediatric ICU, respectively. For neonatal care distribution, 12% of the population was more than 120 km away from a health facility with a neonatal ICU. The maternities situation is different from other specialties, where 81% of the total Brazilian population was within 1 h or less from such health facilities. Our results highlighted a polarization in distribution of Brazilian health care facilities. There is a concentration of hospitals in urban areas more developed and access gaps in rural areas and the Amazon region. Our results demonstrate that the distribution of emergency services in Brazil is not facilitating access to the population due to geographical barriers associated with great distances. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassen AT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Annmarie T Lassen,1 Henrik Jørgensen,2 Hanne Blæhr Jørsboe,3,4 Annette Odby,5 Mikkel Brabrand,6 Jacob Steinmetz,7 Julie Mackenhauer,8 Hans Kirkegaard,8 Christian Fynbo Christiansen9 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Odense University Hospital, Odense, 2Department of Surgery, Hospital of Northern Sjaelland, Hilleroed, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Nykobing F Hospital, 4Department of Hospital Administration, Nykobing F Hospital, Nykøbing Falster, 5The Danish Clinical Registers, Registry Support Centre for Health Quality and Informatics, Aarhus, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Hospital of South West Jutland, Esbjerg, 7Department of Anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, 8Research Center for Emergency Medicine, Aarhus University, 9Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark Aim for database: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts.Study population: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013.Main variables: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators – of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used to compute these indicators include among others day and time of hospital contact, vital status, ST-elevation myocardial infarction diagnosis, date and time of relevant procedure (percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary angiography, X-ray of wrist, and gastrointestinal surgery as well as time for triage and physician judgment. Data are currently gathered from The Danish National Patient Registry, two existing databases (Danish Stroke Register and Danish Database for Emergency Surgery, and will

  9. Emergency response planning in hospitals, United States: 2003-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2007-08-20

    This study presents baseline data to determine which hospital characteristics are associated with preparedness for terrorism and natural disaster in the areas of emergency response planning and availability of equipment and specialized care units. Information from the Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Preparedness Supplements to the 2003 and 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys was used to provide national estimates of variations in hospital emergency response plans and resources by residency and medical school affiliation, hospital size, ownership, metropolitan statistical area status, and Joint Commission accreditation. Of 874 sampled hospitals with emergency or outpatient departments, 739 responded for an 84.6 percent response rate. Estimates are presented with 95 percent confidence intervals. About 92 percent of hospitals had revised their emergency response plans since September 11, 2001, but only about 63 percent had addressed natural disasters and biological, chemical, radiological, and explosive terrorism in those plans. Only about 9 percent of hospitals had provided for all 10 of the response plan components studied. Hospitals had a mean of about 14 personal protective suits, 21 critical care beds, 12 mechanical ventilators, 7 negative pressure isolation rooms, and 2 decontamination showers each. Hospital bed capacity was the factor most consistently associated with emergency response planning and availability of resources.

  10. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.20 Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services. (a) Outpatient hospital... services that are not generally furnished by most hospitals in the State. (b) Rural health clinic services... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital services and rural health...

  11. Utilization of emergency medical transports and hospital admissions among persons with behavioral health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddeback, Gary; Patterson, P Daniel; Moore, Charity Galena; Brice, Jane H

    2010-04-01

    Emergency medical services transport and emergency department misuse among persons with behavioral health conditions is a concern. Administrative data were used to examine medical transports and hospital admissions among persons with behavioral health conditions. Data on 70,126 medical transports to emergency departments in three southeastern counties were analyzed. Compared with general medical transports, fewer behavioral health transports resulted in a hospital admission. Among behavioral health transports, persons with schizophrenia were 2.62 times more likely than those with substance use disorders to be admitted, and persons with mood disorders were 4.36 times more likely than those with substance use disorders to be admitted. Also, among behavioral health transports, rural transports were less likely than more urban transports to result in a hospital admission. More training of emergency medical services personnel and more behavioral health crisis resources, especially targeting rural areas and substance use disorders, are needed.

  12. [The Hospital Emergency Plan: Important Tool for Disaster Preparedness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurmb, Thomas; Scholtes, Katja; Kolibay, Felix; Rechenbach, Peer; Vogel, Ulrich; Kowalzik, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Hospitals need to be prepared for any kind of disaster. The terrorist attacks and mass shootings that took place in Europe in recent years impressively demonstrated the capability of hospitals to manage such challenging and disastrous events. To be adequately prepared, the hospital emergency plan is a very important tool. In this article we describe the entire process of drafting the emergency plan. We discuss the theoretical background as well as different models of disaster planning and we give important practical hints and tips for those in charge of the hospital disaster planning. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Patient expectations of emergency dental services: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R

    2004-09-25

    To describe the expectations of walk-in patients seeking emergency dental care out-of-hours. Consecutive patients attending two emergency dental clinics at weekends were interviewed prior to seeing the dentist. The audio-recorded interview transcripts were analysed using the "framework" method of applied qualitative data analysis. Forty-four walk-in emergency dental patients at a community-based dental clinic and a dental hospital emergency clinic at the weekend. In addition to symptom relief, the main desired outcome for emergency dental patients may be informational and psychological--especially reassurance that the problem is not serious, and reduced uncertainty about the cause of the pain. In general, patients' stated expectations for specific treatments (such as antibiotics, or tooth extraction) were not absolute: rather, they implied these expectations were conditional upon the dentist deciding they were necessary. Emergency dental services, some of which are still dominantly treatment-focused, should reflect that many emergency dental attenders want advice and reassurance as much as relief from symptoms. This reinforces the importance of effective and sympathetic dentist-patient communication within emergency or out-of-hours consultations. It also implies that dentists' skills in listening, explaining and reassuring should be captured in any patient satisfaction or outcome measure designed for this patient group.

  14. A seamless ubiquitous emergency medical service for crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bor-Shing

    2016-04-01

    In crisis situations, a seamless ubiquitous communication is necessary to provide emergency medical service to save people's lives. An excellent prehospital emergency medicine provides immediate medical care to increase the survival rate of patients. On their way to the hospital, ambulance personnel must transmit real-time and uninterrupted patient information to the hospital to apprise the physician of the situation and provide options to the ambulance personnel. In emergency and crisis situations, many communication channels can be unserviceable because of damage to equipment or loss of power. Thus, data transmission over wireless communication to achieve uninterrupted network services is a major obstacle. This study proposes a mobile middleware for cognitive radio (CR) for improving the wireless communication link. CRs can sense their operating environment and optimize the spectrum usage so that the mobile middleware can integrate the existing wireless communication systems with a seamless communication service in heterogeneous network environments. Eventually, the proposed seamless mobile communication middleware was ported into an embedded system, which is compatible with the actual network environment without the need for changing the original system architecture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Positive Coping: A Unique Characteristic to Pre-Hospital Emergency Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Abbas; Froutan, Razieh

    2017-01-01

    It is important to gain a thorough understanding of positive coping methods adopted by medical emergency personnel to manage stressful situations associated with accidents and emergencies. Thus, the purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of positive coping strategies used by emergency medical service providers. This study was conducted using a qualitative content analysis method. The study participants included 28 pre-hospital emergency personnel selected from emergency medical service providers in bases located in different regions of the city of Mashhad, Iran, from April to November 2016. The purposive sampling method also was used in this study, which was continued until data saturation was reached. To collect the data, semistructured open interviews, observations, and field notes were used. Four categories and 10 subcategories were extracted from the data on the experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel related to positive coping strategies. The four categories included work engagement, smart capability, positive feedback, and crisis pioneering. All the obtained categories had their own subcategories, which were determined based on their distinctly integrated properties. The results of this study show that positive coping consists of several concepts used by medical emergency personnel, management of stressful situations, and ultimately quality of pre-hospital clinical services. Given the fact that efficient methods such as positive coping can prevent debilitating stress in an individual, pre-hospital emergency authorities should seek to build and strengthen "positive coping" characteristics in pre-hospital medical emergency personnel to deal with accidents, emergencies, and injuries through adopting regular and dynamic policies.

  16. Barriers to emergency obstetric care services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echoka, Elizabeth; Makokha, Anselimo; Dubourg, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pregnancy-related mortality and morbidity in most low and middle income countries can be reduced through early recognition of complications, prompt access to care and appropriate medical interventions following obstetric emergencies. We used the three delays framework to explore...... barriers to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services by women who experienced life threatening obstetric complications in Malindi District, Kenya. Methods: A facility-based qualitative study was conducted between November and December 2010. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 women who experienced...... decision to seek care and in reaching an appropriate care facility. The "first" delay was due to lack of birth preparedness, including failure to identify a health facility for delivery services regardless of antenatal care and to seek care promptly despite recognition of danger signs. The "second" delay...

  17. Evaluating Emergency Department Asthma Management Practices in Florida Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Carretta, Henry J; Dudley, Julie K; Forrest, Jamie R; Folsom, Abbey N

    2016-01-01

    To assess gaps in emergency department (ED) asthma management at Florida hospitals. Survey instrument with open- and closed-ended questions. Topics included availability of specific asthma management modalities, compliance with national guidelines, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and efforts toward performance improvement. Emergency departments at 10 large hospitals in the state of Florida. Clinical care providers and health administrators from participating hospitals. Compliance with national asthma care guideline standards, provision of specific recommended treatment modalities and resources, employment of specialized asthma care personnel, and engagement in performance improvement efforts. Our results suggest inconsistency among sampled Florida hospitals' adherence to national standards for treatment of asthma in EDs. Several hospitals were refining their emergency care protocols to incorporate guideline recommendations. Despite a lack of formal ED protocols in some hospitals, adherence to national guidelines for emergency care nonetheless remained robust for patient education and medication prescribing, but it was weaker for formal care planning and medical follow-up. Identified deficiencies in emergency asthma care present a number of opportunities for strategic mitigation of identified gaps. We conclude with suggestions to help Florida hospitals achieve success with ED asthma care reform. Team-based learning activities may offer an optimal strategy for sharing and implementing best practices.

  18. The Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Annmarie T; Jørgensen, Henrik; Jørsboe, Hanne Blæhr

    2016-01-01

    AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute a...... and emergency hospital contacts in Denmark. The database includes specific outcome and process health care quality indicators as well as demographic and other basic information with the purpose to be used for enhancement of quality of acute care.......AIM FOR DATABASE: Aim of the Danish database for acute and emergency hospital contacts (DDAEHC) is to monitor the quality of care for all unplanned hospital contacts in Denmark (acute and emergency contacts). STUDY POPULATION: The DDAEHC is a nationwide registry that completely covers all acute...... and emergency somatic hospital visits at individual level regardless of presentation site, presenting complaint, and department designation since January 1, 2013. MAIN VARIABLES: The DDAEHC includes ten quality indicators - of which two are outcome indicators and eight are process indicators. Variables used...

  19. Hospital disaster emergency preparedness: A study of Onandjokwe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explored disaster emergency preparedness at Onandjokwe Lutheran Hospital in Northern Namibia. It utilized quantitative and qualitative research methods, using a self-administered questionnaire, semi-structured key informant interviews, and a hospital disaster plan checklist. A stratified sample of 120 ...

  20. Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

  1. [Quality indicators for the assessment of ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) networks. How hospital discharge records could be integrated with Emergency medical services data: the Emilia-Romagna STEMI network experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Pier Camillo; Guastaroba, Paolo; Casella, Gianni; Berti, Elena; De Palma, Rossana; Di Bartolomeo, Stefano; Di Pasquale, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    The assessment of the regional network for ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI) is fundamental for quality assurance. Since 2011 all Italian Health Authorities, in addition to hospital discharge records (HDR), must provide a standardized information flow (ERD) about emergency department (ED) and emergency medical system (EMS) activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether data integration of ERD with HDR may allow the development of appropriate quality indicators. Patients admitted to coronary care units (CCU) for STEMI between January 1 to December 31, 2013, were identified from the regional HDR database. All data were linked to those of the regional ERD database. Four quality indicators were defined: 1) rates of EMS activation, 2) rates of EMS direct transfer to the catheterization laboratory (Cath-lab), 3) transfer rates from a Spoke to a Hub hospital with angioplasty facilities, and 4) median time spent in ED. In 2013, 2793 patients with STEMI were admitted to the CCU. Of these, 1684 patients (60%) activated EMS and were transported to Spoke or Hub hospitals; 955 (57%) entered directly in CCU/Cath-lab; 677 were transferred directly to a Hub hospital ED without being admitted to a Spoke hospital. The median ED time in Hub hospital was 47 min (IQR 24-136) and in Spoke hospital 53 min (IQR 30-131). The integration among administrative data banks (i.e., HDR with ERD) allowed the assessment of the regional STEMI network and the identification of potentially useful quality indicators. Their easy availability should enable comparisons with local, national and international standards, and may favor quality improvement.

  2. Hospital-based ocular emergencies: epidemiology, treatment, and visual outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Cindy A; Rogers-Martel, Melanie; Golas, Liliya; Chepurny, Anna; Martel, James B; Martel, Joseph R

    2014-03-01

    Ocular trauma is recognized as the leading cause of unilateral blindness. However, few studies to date have focused on the clinical features of hospital-based ocular emergencies. Effectiveness of trauma centers in treating ocular emergencies was compared with treatment in traditional community hospital emergency departments. Demographics, causes, and nature of ocular emergencies, as well as visual outcome in community hospitals emergency departments and trauma centers, were also examined. Records of 1027 patients with ocular emergencies seen between July 2007 and November 2010 at 3 community hospitals emergency departments and 2 hospitals with level II trauma centers were retrospectively examined. Unpaired t test and Pearson χ(2) test were used to determine statistical significance. The incidence of patients requiring ophthalmic intervention was 77.2 per 100 000 in the community hospitals and 208.9 per 100 000 in the trauma centers. Rates of ocular emergencies were higher in middle-aged, white men. Orbital fractures were found in 86% of all orbital contusion cases in trauma centers, whereas 66.7% of patients with fall injuries and open globe diagnoses resulted in legal blindness. The middle-aged, white men are more vulnerable to ocular injuries caused mainly by motor vehicle accidents. The ability of trauma centers to provide comparable increases in vision outcomes, despite treating more severe ocular emergencies, demonstrates the effectiveness of trauma centers. Patients diagnosed as having orbital contusions or who have fall injuries deserve careful evaluation because they are more likely to have more severe sight-threatening injuries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of a dedicated regional psychiatric emergency service on boarding of psychiatric patients in area emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, Scott; Calma, Nicole; Stone, Ashley

    2014-02-01

    Mental health patients boarding for long hours, even days, in United States emergency departments (EDs) awaiting transfer for psychiatric services has become a considerable and widespread problem. Past studies have shown average boarding times ranging from 6.8 hours to 34 hours. Most proposed solutions to this issue have focused solely on increasing available inpatient psychiatric hospital beds, rather than considering alternative emergency care designs that could provide prompt access to treatment and might reduce the need for many hospitalizations. One suggested option has been the "regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility," which serves to evaluate and treat all mental health patients for a given area, and can accept direct transfers from other EDs. This study sought to assess the effects of a regional dedicated emergency psychiatric facility design known at the "Alameda Model" on boarding times and hospitalization rates for psychiatric patients in area EDs. Over a 30-day period beginning in January 2013, 5 community hospitals in Alameda County, California, tracked all ED patients on involuntary mental health holds to determine boarding time, defined as the difference between when they were deemed stable for psychiatric disposition and the time they were discharged from the ED for transfer to the regional psychiatric emergency service. Patients were also followed to determine the percentage admitted to inpatient psychiatric units after evaluation and treatment in the psychiatric emergency service. In a total sample of 144 patients, the average boarding time was approximately 1 hour and 48 minutes. Only 24.8% were admitted for inpatient psychiatric hospitalization from the psychiatric emergency service. The results of this study indicate that the Alameda Model of transferring patients from general hospital EDs to a regional psychiatric emergency service reduced the length of boarding times for patients awaiting psychiatric care by over 80% versus

  4. Cost of Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Diabetes in Prenda Hospital Medicine Service, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Zangulo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes has a major impact on morbidity and mortality today. It is estimated that by 2040, about 642 million people are affected worldwide, of which, 34.2 million are from sub-Saharan countries. The direct annual cost of diabetes health care worldwide is estimated at about 153 billion dollars. These patients represent 30% to 40% of all admissions to emergency services, leading to high values of hospital expenditure. We aim to evaluate the cost of treatment of patients with diabetes admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012. Methods: Retrospective analytical observational study, with data collected from the clinical processes of medical service (age and gender, length of hospitalization, resources consumed, cost of treatment per patient and discharge. Results: Out of 121 patients, the majority was female (n = 70, 57.9%. The age group of 36 to 45 years old was the most frequent among these patients (n = 26, 21.5%. November was the month that recorded the largest number of admissions (n = 17, 14%. About 45.5% were hospitalized during five to eight days, on average for nine days. The majority (76.9% was discharged due to health condition improvement. The price of materials used for treatment of the disease had high variation, and 31 550.15 kwanzas was spent to acquire them. The direct cost per patient per day was 4170.11 kwanzas and the estimated annual cost of care of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital was 45 525 490.9 kwanzas in 2012. Discussion and Conclusion: These results are in accordance with other studies, indicating a relevant cost of treatment of diabetic patients admitted to Prenda Hospital Medicine Service in 2012.

  5. Bacteriemias de origen comunitario en pacientes adultos que acuden al servicio de urgencias de un hospital universitario Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel J Artico

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available La bacteriemia es causa importante de morbimortalidad. Nuestro objetivo es describir una serie de episodios de bacteriemia de origen comunitario en adultos, registrados en el hospital de Clínicas de Córdoba. Entre enero de 2005 y diciembre de 2009 se estudiaron 271 episodios. La rentabilidad diagnóstica del hemocultivo fue 13,5 %. El 52 % de los pacientes eran varones y el 48 % mujeres, la edad promedio fue de 60 años. Las comorbilidades prevalentes fueron diabetes (21 %, neoplasia (18 %, cardiopatía (11 % e infección por HIV (8 %. Los focos que se pudieron establecer fueron el respiratorio (21 %, el urinario (15 %, el cutáneo (9 % y otros (13 %. Predominaron las bacterias gram positivas (51,4 %. Los microorganismos más frecuentes fueron Escherichia coli (25 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae (22,9 % y Staphylococcus aureus (12,3 %. La bacteriemia fue polimicrobiana en el 7 % de los casos. El 33 % de los aislamientos de E. coli presentó resistencia a la ciprofloxacina y el 6 % a la ceftacidima. El 14 % de los aislamientos de S. aureus fue resistente a la oxacilina. Solo el 7 % de los aislamientos de S. pneumoniae expresó altos niveles de resistencia a la penicilina según el criterio poblacional, con CIM = 2 ug/ml.Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %, neoplasia (18 %, cardiopathy (11 %, and HIV infection (8 %. The focus was- respiratory (21 %, urinary (15 %, cutaneous (9 %, and others (13 %. Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%. The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %, Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %, and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %. Bacteremia

  6. A 2-year retrospective study of pediatric dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chia-Pei; Tsai, Aileen I; Chen, Ching-Ming

    2016-06-01

    There is a paucity of information regarding pediatric dental emergencies in Taiwan. This study investigates the prevalence and characteristics of the pediatric dental emergency services provided at a medical center. This study included a retrospective chart review of patients under 18 years of age with dental complaints who visited the Emergency Department (ED) of Linkou Medical Center of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital from January 2012 to December 2013. Information regarding age, gender, time/day/month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up was collected and analyzed. Statistical analysis included descriptive statistics and Pearson's Chi-square test with the significance level set as p dental emergencies in the medical center ED were predominantly related to orodental trauma (47.1%) and pulpal pain (29.9%). Most patients were male (p management for dental emergencies was prescribing medication for pulp-related problems and orodental trauma. The follow-up rate of orodental trauma was the highest (p dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan. While dental emergencies are sometimes unforeseeable or unavoidable, developing community awareness about proper at-home care as well as regular dental preventive measures can potentially reduce the number of emergency visits. Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Hospitality and service: leading real change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2009-01-01

    A patient's decision to recommend a health care organization and the patient's loyalty scores are largely determined by the interaction patients and their families have with the nurses. Hospitality is how the delivery of that product makes the person feel and is a dialogue that requires the server to be "on the guest's side" throughout the experience. The challenge for health care is to help our patients and their families transcend the usual routine care of our health care world and to experience an emotional connection that provides that sense of affiliation and emotional kinship with the organization and the staff. Moving from the service mindset in health care to the hospitality mindset that engages people positively and emotionally is what healing is all about.

  8. PRE-HOSPITAL EMERGENCY CARE IN SWEDEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulf BJÖRNSTIG

    2004-01-01

    In Sweden (9 million inhabitants, a sparsely populated country with sometimes long transportation distances to the nearest trauma hospital, 800 ambulances, 7 ambulance helicopters and 3–5 fixed wing ambulance aircraft are the available transport resources. In case of a mass casualty or disaster situation, inside or outside the country, a governmental project (Swedish National Medevac aims to convert a passenger aircraft from Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS to a qualified medical resource for long distance transport, with capacity to nurse six intensive care patients and an additional 6–20 lieing or seated patients during transport.

  9. AN INFORMATION SERVICE MODEL FOR REMOTE SENSING EMERGENCY SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method on the semantic access environment, which can solve the problem about how to identify the correct natural disaster emergency knowledge and return to the demanders. The study data is natural disaster knowledge text set. Firstly, based on the remote sensing emergency knowledge database, we utilize the sematic network to extract the key words in the input documents dataset. Then, using the semantic analysis based on words segmentation and PLSA, to establish the sematic access environment to identify the requirement of users and match the emergency knowledge in the database. Finally, the user preference model was established, which could help the system to return the corresponding information to the different users. The results indicate that semantic analysis can dispose the natural disaster knowledge effectively, which will realize diversified information service, enhance the precision of information retrieval and satisfy the requirement of users.

  10. Minor emergency clinic: key to the future of successful hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, S; Kathawala, Y; Elmuti, D

    1992-01-01

    This project set out to determine whether there is a relationship between the minor emergency facility an individual uses and their choice of a hospital for in-patient care. In studying this relationship, the factors that are important to persons choosing a clinic or hospital facility, as well as the influence of a physician, were also identified. A structured, undisguised telephone survey was used for interviewing a randomly selected sample population of 189 San Angelo residents. Analysis of the survey data indicated that dependency does exist between minor emergency clinic use and the hospital chosen for in-patient care. The results of this study also suggested that hospitals' marketing strategy should shift the emphasis of their advertising from the hospital itself to their physician association and clinics. In addition, a number of other interesting observations concerning the relative importance of various medical factors to the participants was also explored.

  11. Studying the Factors for Selecting Public or Private Hospitals by Non Emergent Patients of Ardabil District in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadat Jalili

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: At the present time, health care services have been increasingly transformed to a competitive issue and many factors influence usage of hospital services and selection of a hospital by the patients. This study has been performed for surveying effective factors on selecting a public or private hospital among non-emergent patients of Ardabil hospitals in 2012.   Method: This research was a cross-sectional descriptive-correlational study and the statistical population was non emergent patients of four public and two private hospitals of Ardabil in 2012. The samples (598 patients were collected by stratified random sampling method. Data-gathering tool was a researcher-made questionnaire and data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, frequency [distribution] tables, and logistic regression analysis.   Results: The results depicted a direct interdependence between selecting a hospital (public or private and the three factors of social elements, hospital services, and hospital facilities with a confidence coefficient of 92%. Based on logistic regression analysis and Exp(B coefficient, the patients’ priorities for hospital choosing were hospital services, social elements, and hospital facilities with Exp(B of 1.932, 1.332, and 0.338, respectively.   Conclusion: The most important factor for choosing public hospitals was lower cost of services and for private hospitals was physician’s recommendation. The strong effects of these two factors have overshadowed other variables.

  12. The 'unnecessary' use of emergency departments by older people: findings from hospital data, hospital staff and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Debbie; Law, Julia

    2015-11-01

    Increasing demands are being placed on emergency departments in Australia and there is a view that older Australians are more likely than other age groups to attend for non-urgent conditions. The objective of this paper is to compare and contrast administrative data with the views of hospital staff and older people with regard to their presentation at two emergency departments in metropolitan Adelaide and how this aligns with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare definition of 'potentially avoidable general practitioner-type presentations'. The study used three sources of data from two emergency departments: hospital data for the financial year 2010-11 for patients aged 65 years and over and identified as triage category four or five; three focus groups with medical, nursing and allied staff from these two hospitals; and interviews with 58 older people who presented at the two emergency departments over a two-week period. The hospital administrative data provided a very limited insight into why older people attended the emergency department, other than the medical diagnosis. Professional staff identified individual determinants, societal determinants and the health services system as explanations. Older people attended the emergency department for a range of reasons that may not necessarily reflect the opinions of health professionals. For many older people the emergency department was an appropriate place to attend considering their condition, though some presentations could be circumvented with appropriate and increased services in the community. However, as many older people suffer comorbidities, careful consideration needs to be given as to the best possible practices to achieve this.

  13. 42 CFR 410.28 - Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... or under arrangements made by a participating hospital or participating CAH, except in the case of an...). (d) Rules on emergency services furnished to outpatients by nonparticipating hospitals are set forth... supervision” means the definition specified in § 410.32(b)(3)(ii). (f) The rules for clinical diagnostic...

  14. Challenge of hospital emergency preparedness: analysis and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, Joseph A; Yeatts, Dale J; Macintyre, Anthony G

    2009-06-01

    In the United States, recent large-scale emergencies and disasters display some element of organized medical emergency response, and hospitals have played prominent roles in many of these incidents. These and other well-publicized incidents have captured the attention of government authorities, regulators, and the public. Health care has assumed a more prominent role as an integral component of any community emergency response. This has resulted in increased funding for hospital preparedness, along with a plethora of new preparedness guidance.Methods to objectively measure the results of these initiatives are only now being developed. It is clear that hospital readiness remains uneven across the United States. Without significant disaster experience, many hospitals remain unprepared for natural disasters. They may be even less ready to accept and care for patient surge from chemical or biological attacks, conventional or nuclear explosive detonations, unusual natural disasters, or novel infectious disease outbreaks.This article explores potential reasons for inconsistent emergency preparedness across the hospital industry. It identifies and discusses potential motivational factors that encourage effective emergency management and the obstacles that may impede it. Strategies are proposed to promote consistent, reproducible, and objectively measured preparedness across the US health care industry. The article also identifies issues requiring research.

  15. Cancer patients, emergencies service and provision of palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To describe the clinical and sociodemographic profile of cancer patients admitted to the Emergency Center for High Complexity Oncologic Assistance, observing the coverage of palliative and home care. Method: Cross sectional study including adult cancer patients admitted to the emergency service (September-December/2011 with a minimum length of hospital stay of two hours. Student’s t-test and Pearson chi-square test were used to compare the means. Results: 191 patients were enrolled, 47.6% elderly, 64.4% women, 75.4% from the city of Recife and greater area. The symptom prevalent at admission was pain (46.6%. 4.2% of patients were linked to palliative care and 2.1% to home care. The most prevalent cancers: cervix (18.3%, breast (13.6% and prostate (10.5%; 70.7% were in advanced stages (IV, 47.1%; 39.4% without any cancer therapy. Conclusion: Patients sought the emergency service on account of pain, probably due to the incipient coverage of palliative and home care. These actions should be included to oncologic therapy as soon as possible to minimize the suffering of the patient/family and integrate the skills of oncologists and emergency professionals.

  16. A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A survey of hospital outpatient services for chronic diseases in Gauteng. ... aspects of the organisation of services, and indirect indicators of patient care. Design. A postal survey of services for asthma, epilepsy, diabetes and hypertension at ...

  17. User violence towards nursing professionals in mental health services and emergency units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartolomé Llor-Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Workplace violence is present in many work sectors, but in the area of mental health, nurses have a higher risk due to the close relationship they have with users. This study analyzed hostile user statements against nursing professionals of Mental Health Services and Emergency Units in Health Service (MHS hospitals in Murcia, Spain, and determined the frequency of exposure to the different violent user behaviors. The study was carried out with a sample of 518 nursing professionals from four hospital services: Mental Health, Emergency Units, Medical Hospitalization, and Maternal-and-Child. The nursing staff of Mental Health and Emergency Units was the most exposed to violence. Non-physical violence was more frequent in Emergency Units, whereas physical violence was more frequent in Mental Health. Among the consequences of exposure to non-physical violence are workers’ emotional exhaustion and the presence of psychological distress.

  18. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... other than psychiatric hospitals. (a) Content of certification and recertification. Medicare Part A pays for inpatient hospital services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals only if a physician...

  19. How a hospital must face a massive emergency: the case of Martini Hospital, Turin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Morra

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The terms “disaster” or “surge capability”, referred to hospitals, are often used to define a massive casualty admission. This may be a misleading concept, because emergency may as well arise from inside hospitals, and the last years high figures related to fires in the about 2,000 italian hospitals should suggest a different point of view. In this article the authors describe their experience in hospital preparedness at Ospedale Martini in Turin. Hospital operators regularly attend basic (GOM and advanced (HDM© courses about disaster response and organization, and a specific course is dedicated to operators involved in internal safety (fire emergency. In this courses, computer simulations are widely used, associated with conventional didactic. If education is one of the two cornerstones of disaster preparedness at Ospedale Martini, well designed emergency plans and an effective disaster management are the other one. The Internal Emergency Plan (Fire and Evacuation is aimed to give a proper response to fires and other events arising from inside the hospital and potentially requiring its partial or total evacuation. The Massive Casualties Admission Emergency Plan increases the surge capability of the hospital allowing to take care of a great number of injured people, and at the same time avoiding a dramatic fall in the treatment quality. The “Hospital Disaster Management©” system, created by the authors, is an organizational scheme based on team work. Its aim is to “put order in chaos” when hospitals are facing a disaster. Properly trained physicians and nurses, assigned to key positions, act in this system as Hospital Disaster Managers: their tasks are to coordinate the teams, to manage critical resources and to use the emergency plans as powerful instruments.

  20. Computerized system for hospital engineering service management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centeno, C A; Gonzalez, E A; Cagnolo, F J; Olmos, C E

    2007-01-01

    When a Hospital Engineering Service (HES) is implemented within a health care environment, the idea is to improve service conditions and costs as well as to provide timely responses to equipment preventive maintenance and infrastructure requirements. An HES must, within the shortest possible period of time, meet the above requirements at the cost necessary to provide the service quality sought. In many cases there is a lack of minimal materials and staff who are qualified to attain the objectives that have been set. Therefore, external assistance becomes necessary. In this context, actions are often taken which, because they are not recorded, cannot be assessed in order to evaluate the HES. Since all action taken is appraised from the purely economic point of view, in the final analysis the contributions from staff remain invisible. This situation works against the possibility of quantifying the convenience of possessing an internal HES. The software support system we have developed here is oriented toward providing all the necessary data to address this issue

  1. Innovations in health service delivery: the corporatization of public hospitals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harding, April; Preker, Alexander S

    2003-01-01

    ... hospitals play a critical role in ensuring delivery of health services, less is known about how to improve the efficiency and quality of care provided. Much can be learned in this respect from the experiences of hospital reforms initiated during the 1990s. Innovations in Health Service Delivery: The Corporatization of Public Hospitals is an a...

  2. Urological Emergency Admissions to a Community Hospital: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Sam O.

    1983-01-01

    A one-year study was conducted on the impact of emergency admissions to the 125-bed Southwest Community Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia. During the study in 1979, 70 urological emergency room admissions were made, of which 44 (62.8 percent) were males and 26 (37.2 percent) were females. In comparison, 93 admissions were made directly from the private office. The study considered the timeliness of diagnosis and treatment, surgical procedures performed, impact on urological emergency room nursing and medical personnel, physician response to notification, cost containment, and implied legal ramifications and organization structure. Thus, an immediate close scrutiny of urological emergency admission at the nonuniversity affiliated Southwest Community Hospital was permitted. PMID:6876189

  3. Hospital epidemiology of emergent cervical necrotizing fasciitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Necrotizing fasciitis (NF is a surgical emergency. It is a rapidly progressing infection of the fascia and subcutaneous tissue and could be fatal if not diagnosed early and treated properly. NF is common in the groin, abdomen, and extremities but rare in the neck and the head. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF is an aggressive infection of the neck and the head, with devastating complications such as airway obstruction, pneumonia, pulmonary abscess, jugular venous thrombophlebitis, mediastinitis, and septic shock associated with high mortality. Aim : To assess the presentation, comorbidities, type of infection, severity of disease, and intensive care outcome of CNF. Methods : Medical records of the patients treated for NF in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU from January 1995 to February 2005 were reviewed retrospectively. Results : Out of 94 patients with NF, 5 (5.3% had CNF. Four patients were male. The mean age of our patients was 41.2 ± 14.8 years. Sixty percent of patients had an operative procedure as the predisposing factor and 80% of patients received nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The only comorbidity associated was diabetes mellitus (DM in 3 patients (60%. Sixty percent of the cases had type1 NF. Mean sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA score on admission to the ICU was 8.8 ± 3.6. All patients had undergone debridement at least two times. During the initial 24 h our patients received 5.8 ± 3.0 l of fluid, 2.0 ± 1.4 units of packed red blood cells (PRBC, 4.8 ± 3.6 units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP, and 3.0 ± 4.5 units of platelet concentrate. The mean number of days patients were intubated was 5.2 ± 5.1 days and the mean ICU stay was 6.4 ± 5.2 days. Sixty percent of cases had multiorgan dysfunction (MODS and one patient died, resulting in a mortality rate of 20%. Conclusion : According to our study, CNF represents around 5% of NF patients. CNF was higher among male patients and in

  4. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A. Simpson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods: We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results: 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7% resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/ seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion: Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:669-674

  5. [Humanization through the art of environment of children's emergency in a hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullán, Ana M; Fernández, Esperanza; Belver, Manuel H

    2011-09-01

    This article aims to present and discuss a case-study of human betterment through the arts applied to a children's hospital. The experience related to the betterment of these environments took place in the Children's Emergency Service of the University Hospital in Salamanca. After describing the context of the case-study some attention will be devoted to the phases of the process, emphasizing those aspects linked to children's care culture and their families as well as the symbolic dimension of the space and the participation of different professionals in the experience. The case-study is assessed from different standpoints but special importance is given to parents' opinions. 51 parents of children in the emergency unit were interweaved during a month. Parents valued positively the service and stated that artists' intervention had been beneficial for the children's emotional state. The article concludes with a debate about the meaning of the hospital environment and the quality associated with its physical premises.

  6. Triage in an adult emergency service: patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyane Liliane Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE Assess the degree of patient satisfaction with triage in the adult emergency service of a public hospital. METHOD Exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional study with a quantitative approach. Three hundred patients were interviewed and the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics based on sociodemographic variables and those related to patient satisfaction. RESULTS There was a predominance of women, with elementary education and a mean age of 41 years. Most of the interviewees reported being satisfied in regard to the following items: timely service, embracement, trust, environment (comfort, cleanliness and signage, humanization (courtesy, respect, and interest, timely referral/scheduling of appointments and care expectations. CONCLUSION There was a high level of patient satisfaction, evidenced by the strong association of user satisfaction with the items investigated.

  7. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates dos; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; Costa, Fernanda Marques da; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself.

  8. Impact of interventions for patients refusing emergency medical services transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicandro, J; Hollander, J E; Henry, M C; Sciammarella, J; Stapleton, E; Gentile, D

    1995-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of a documentation checklist and on-line medical control contact on ambulance transport of out-of-hospital patients refusing medical assistance. Consecutive patients served by four suburban ambulance services who initially refused emergency medical services (EMS) transport to the hospital were prospectively enrolled. In phase 1 (control phase), all patients who initially refused medical attention or transport had an identifying data card completed. In phase 2 (documentation phase), out-of-hospital providers completed a similar data card that contained a checklist of high-risk criteria for a poor outcome if not transported. In phase 3 (intervention phase), a data card similar to that used in phase 2 was completed, and on-line medical control was contacted for all patients with high-risk criteria who refused transport. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients transported to the hospital. A total of 361 patients were enrolled. Transport rate varied by phase: control, 17 of 144 (12%); documentation, 11 of 150 (7%); and intervention, 12 of 67 (18%) (chi-square, p = 0.023). Transport of high-risk patients improved with each intervention: control, two of 60 (3%); documentation, seven of 70 (10%); and intervention, 12 of 34 (35%) (chi-square, p = 0.00003). Transport of patients without high-risk criteria decreased with each intervention: control, 15 of 84 (18%); documentation, four of 80 (5%); and intervention, 0 of 33 (0%) (p = 0.0025). Of the 28 patients for whom medical control was contacted, 12 (43%) were transported to the hospital, and only three of these 12 patients (25%) were released from the ED. Contact with on-line medical control increased the likelihood of transport of high-risk patients who initially refused medical assistance. The appropriateness of the decreased transport rate of patients not meeting high-risk criteria needs further evaluation.

  9. Contextual factors associated with hospitals' decision to operate freestanding emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Nitish; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; O'Connor, Stephen J; Sen, Bisakha; Trimm, J M Mickey; Camargo, Carlos A

    Freestanding emergency departments (FSEDs) are fast growing entities in health care, delivering emergency care outside of hospitals. Hospitals may benefit in several ways by opening FSEDs. The study used the resource dependence theory as a means to analyze the relationship between market and organizational factors and the likelihood of hospitals to operate FSEDs. All acute care hospitals in 14 states with FSEDs present during the study period from 2002 to 2011. Data on FSEDs were merged with American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Cost Reports, and Area Resource File data. The outcome variable consists of whether or not the hospital operates an FSED. Independent variables include per capita income, percent population over age of 65 years, primary care and specialist physicians per capita, urban location, change in the unemployment rate, change in the population, change in poverty level, market competition, total satellite and autonomous FSEDs in the market, Medicare-managed care penetration rate, hospital beds, total margin, and system membership. We used logistic regression analysis with state and year fixed effects. Standard errors in the regression were clustered by hospital. The number of hospitals operating satellite FSEDs increased from 32 (2.33%) in 2002 to 91 (5.76%) hospitals in 2011 among the 14 states included in the study sample. The results support the hypothesis that hospitals located in munificent environments and more competitive environments (presence of other FSEDs) are more likely to operate an FSED. Organizational level factors such as bed size and system membership are associated with a hospital operating an FSED. The findings may be used by policy makers in developing regulations for hospitals opening FSEDs. Also, study findings of this study may be used by hospitals to make informed decisions when formulating strategies regarding FSEDs.

  10. Perception of stroke symptoms and utilization of emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano A. Hawkes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Lack of stroke awareness and slow activation of emergency medical services (EMS are frequently reported reasons for delayed arrival to the hospital. We evaluated these variables in our population. Methods Review of hospital records and structured telephone interviews of 100 consecutive stroke patients. Forward stepwise logistic regression was used for the statistical analysis. Results Seventy patients (75% arrived at the hospital 4.5 hours after stroke symptoms onset. The use of EMS did not improve arrival times. Most patients who recognized their symptoms did not use EMS (p < 0.02. Nineteen patients (20% were initially misdiagnosed. Eighteen of them were first assessed by non-neurologist physicians (p < 0.001. Conclusions Our population showed a low level of stroke awareness. The use of EMS did not improve arrival times at the hospital and the non-utilization of the EMS was associated with the recognition of stroke symptoms. There was a concerning rate of misdiagnosis, mostly by non-neurologist medical providers.

  11. [Mental Health in the General Hospital: Results of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in Four Hospital Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Camacho, Leonidas; Escobar, Juan Manuel; Sáenz-Moncaleano, Camilo; Delgado-Barrera, Lucía; Aparicio-Turbay, Soraya; Molano, Juan Carlos; Noguera, Efraín

    2012-03-01

    Few individuals have access to mental health services due in part to underdetection. As it is more likely to consult for medical conditions, primary care may be a useful gateway for early detection of mental health problems. Detection of the frequency of mental health problems in four hospital services at the Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá: Outpatient unit, hospitalization, emergency department, and primary care through a brief detection questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Cross-sectional study of patients seen at the four services who answered a Demographic Data Questionnaire and the PHQ together with information gathered about current medical diagnosis, history of visits, and hospitalizations during the last year. 1094 patients seen at the four hospital services between September 2010 and May 2011 were selected at random. A mental health problem was detected in 36.7% of the total sample. Major depressive disorder (7.3%), alcohol abuse (14.4%), and any anxiety disorder (7.7%) showed the highest prevalence with the emergency department showing the highest frequency of detection. The usefulness of a brief detection questionnaire such as the PHQ in hospital settings is demonstrated and implications in the design of mental health programs in the general hospital are discussed. The need to replicate this study in other settings and to undertake further research is outlined. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Specialty and full-service hospitals: a comparative cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2008-10-01

    To compare the costs of physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical single specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospital competitors. The primary data sources are the Medicare Cost Reports for 1998-2004 and hospital inpatient discharge data for three of the states where single specialty hospitals are most prevalent, Texas, California, and Arizona. The latter were obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Additional data comes from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. We identified all physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical specialty hospitals in these three states as well as all full-service acute care hospitals serving the same market areas, defined using Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions. We estimated a hospital cost function using stochastic frontier regression analysis, and generated hospital specific inefficiency measures. Application of t-tests of significance compared the inefficiency measures of specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospitals to make general comparisons between these classes of hospitals. Results do not provide evidence that specialty hospitals are more efficient than the full-service hospitals with whom they compete. In particular, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals appear to have significantly higher levels of cost inefficiency. Cardiac hospitals, however, do not appear to be different from competitors in this respect. Policymakers should not embrace the assumption that physician-owned specialty hospitals produce patient care more efficiently than their full-service hospital competitors.

  13. Telemental health evaluations enhance access and efficiency in a critical access hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southard, Erik P; Neufeld, Jonathan D; Laws, Stephanie

    2014-07-01

    Mentally ill patients in crisis presenting to critical access hospital emergency rooms often face exorbitant wait times to be evaluated by a trained mental health provider. Patients may be discharged from the hospital before receiving an evaluation or boarded in a hospital bed for observation, reducing quality and increasing costs. This study examined the effectiveness of an emergency telemental health evaluation service implemented in a rural hospital emergency room. Retrospective data collection was implemented to consider patients presenting to the emergency room for 212 days prior to telemedicine interventions and for 184 days after. The study compared measures of time to treatment, length of stay (regardless of inpatient or outpatient status), and door-to-consult time. There were 24 patients seen before telemedicine was implemented and 38 seen using telemedicine. All patients had a mental health evaluation ordered by a physician and completed by a mental health specialist. Significant reductions in all three time measures were observed. Mean and median times to consult were reduced from 16.2 h (standard deviation=13.2 h) and 14.2 h, respectively, to 5.4 h (standard deviation =6.4 h) and 2.6 h. Similar reductions in length of stay and door-to-consult times were observed. By t tests, use of telemedicine was associated with a statistically significant reduction in all three outcome measures. Telemedicine appears to be an effective intervention for mentally ill patients by providing more timely access to mental health evaluations in rural hospital emergency departments.

  14. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  15. Emergence of Mobility Services in Urban China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Francois Doulet

    2010-01-01

    This article points out the limits of top-down strategies in China rooted in the construction of large-scale transportation facilities, primarily road networks. It helps to identify emerging trends that show a shift from a "hardware" approach, which focuses mainly on heavy in- frastructure investments, to a "software" approach, which rather relies on improving travel conditions. Based on the description of three existing mobility services that won awards in the 2010 "Better Mobility, Better Life" Prize for Innovative Urban Mobility Solutions, this article assesses these bottom-up, multi-participation strategies, and the effects of these "soft strategies" on improving travel conditions, reducing car dependency, building communities, etc. Finally, it concludes that these soft measures can contribute to the building of a harmonious society and low-carbon cities, and should receive more attention and support.

  16. [Development and application of hospital customer service center platform].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minya; Zheng, Konglin; Xia, Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction and application of the platform of client service center in the general hospital and discusses how to provide patients with an entire service including service before clinic, on clinic and after clinic. It can also provide references for a new service mode for clinic service.

  17. Sociodemographic profile and hospitalization process of elderly assisted at a emergency hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luciene Nobre Coutinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to investigate the sociodemographic profile and the process of hospitalization of elderly assisted in an emergency hospital. Methods: descriptive epidemiological study conducted at an emergency hospital with 300 elderly patients using a form with hospitalization process and sociodemographic variables. Results: there was a predominance of females (56.0%, between 80 and 89 years old (45.4%, illiterate or with elementary education (86.7%, married or living in stable union (42.6%, with non-communicable chronic disease (54.7% and regular use of medications. The main reason for hospitalization was fall (54.7% at home and in the morning hours (42.4%, with admission in the afternoon, transported by ambulance. Conclusion: the findings contribute to the development of strategies directed to assist and care of the healthy elderly and in vulnerable situations.

  18. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-10-01

    Objective: The study explored the views of the emergency nurse students regarding the value of rotating through the pre-hospital learning environment during an emergency nursing programme. Methods: A qualitative, explorative, descriptive and contextual research design using an Appreciative Inquiry approach was used to collect the data. Through purposive sampling a total of 45 emergency nursing students participated. Data was collected by means of selfreported Appreciative Inquiry interview guides and individual Appreciative Inquiry interviews.The data was analysed using content analysis. Results: Four major themes were identified: an unpredictable environment, role players in emergency medical services, team work, and competencies. Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the prehospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  19. Cloud based emergency health care information service in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, N; Sukanesh, R

    2012-12-01

    A hospital is a health care organization providing patient treatment by expert physicians, surgeons and equipments. A report from a health care accreditation group says that miscommunication between patients and health care providers is the reason for the gap in providing emergency medical care to people in need. In developing countries, illiteracy is the major key root for deaths resulting from uncertain diseases constituting a serious public health problem. Mentally affected, differently abled and unconscious patients can't communicate about their medical history to the medical practitioners. Also, Medical practitioners can't edit or view DICOM images instantly. Our aim is to provide palm vein pattern recognition based medical record retrieval system, using cloud computing for the above mentioned people. Distributed computing technology is coming in the new forms as Grid computing and Cloud computing. These new forms are assured to bring Information Technology (IT) as a service. In this paper, we have described how these new forms of distributed computing will be helpful for modern health care industries. Cloud Computing is germinating its benefit to industrial sectors especially in medical scenarios. In Cloud Computing, IT-related capabilities and resources are provided as services, via the distributed computing on-demand. This paper is concerned with sprouting software as a service (SaaS) by means of Cloud computing with an aim to bring emergency health care sector in an umbrella with physical secured patient records. In framing the emergency healthcare treatment, the crucial thing considered necessary to decide about patients is their previous health conduct records. Thus a ubiquitous access to appropriate records is essential. Palm vein pattern recognition promises a secured patient record access. Likewise our paper reveals an efficient means to view, edit or transfer the DICOM images instantly which was a challenging task for medical practitioners in the

  20. Intervenções para solucionar a superlotação nos serviços de emergência hospitalar: uma revisão sistemática Interventions to solve overcrowding in hospital emergency services: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto José Bittencourt

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisão discute as intervenções voltadas para solucionar o problema da superlotação dos Serviços de Emergência Hospitalar (SEH, como evidência de baixa efetividade organizacional. Em bases de dados eletrônicas de livre acesso e acesso restrito, os descritores buscados foram "superlotação; emergência; medicina; pronto-socorro". O levantamento identificou 66 citações de intervenções, agrupadas em 47 intervenções afins. A maioria dos trabalhos teve como desenho os estudos observacionais que avaliaram os resultados das intervenções antes e depois. As mais citadas: implantação da unidade de observação dos pacientes graves; implantação do serviço de enfermagem dedicado à admissão, alta e transferência do paciente; instituição de protocolos de saturação operacional e implantação da unidade de pronto-atendimento. Na análise das 21 intervenções para solucionar a superlotação nos SEH, que tiveram resultados favoráveis no evento principal - tempo de permanência no SEH -, 15 tinham relação com a melhoria do fluxo no próprio SEH ou nos setores do hospital, interferindo ativa e positivamente no fluxo interno dos pacientes. As intervenções que aumentaram as barreiras de acesso aos SEH, ou que apenas melhoram a estrutura dos SEH não foram efetivas.This review discusses interventions aimed at solving the problem of overcrowding in hospital emergency services (HES, characteristic of low organizational effectiveness. In free-access and restricted-access databases, the target descriptors were "overcrowding; emergency; medicine; first aid". The survey identified 66 citations of interventions, grouped in 47 related interventions. The majority of the studies used observational designs that evaluated the results before and after interventions. Of the 47 related interventions, 34 had results for organizational performance. Four were the most frequently cited: implementation of an observation unit for patients already

  1. Implementation of nutrition care service development plan at Banning Memorial Hospital: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Oumlil, A; Rao, C P

    1992-01-01

    Health care service markets in general and hospital care service markets in particular are characterized by many competitive developments. Hence, hospital marketing managers are forced to respond to these emerging competitive pressures. However, in formulating appropriate marketing management strategies, hospital managers need to have detailed knowledge about consumers and their behaviors in the marketplace. This paper focuses on the Nutrition Care division of the Department of Nutrition Service at a hospital and its venture into new service development. This case study is intended to emphasize the significance of acquiring adequate knowledge of customers in the health care services industry. It particularly emphasizes the critical role that this type of information concerning customer behavior plays in the development and implementation of an appropriate business expansion strategy. Furthermore, the aim of this case study is to help the reader to relate the acquired marketing information to the problem at hand, and make the appropriate marketing management decision.

  2. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the eThekwini district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. PR Newton, R Naidoo, P Brysiewicz. Abstract. Introduction. Emergency medical services (EMS) are sometimes required to respond to cases that are later found not to be emergencies, resulting in high ...

  3. [Hypertensive emergencies at the University Hospital Center in Brazzaville, Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenga, Mbolla B F; Gombet, T R; Mahoungou, Guimbi K C; Otiobanda, G F; Ossou, Nguiet P M; Ikama, M S; Kimbally-Kaky, G; Etitiele, F

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study conducted in the emergency department of the University Hospital Center in Brazzaville, Congo was to determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of hypertensive emergencies. With a total of 76 patients admitted during the study period, the prevalence of hypertensive emergency was 4%. The sex ratio was 1 and mean patient age was 57.3 years (range, 30 to 80 years). Risk factors included obesity in 62 cases (81.6%), history of hypertension in 65 (85.5%) and low socioeconomic level in 58 (76.3%). Mean delay for consultation was 50 hours (range, 1 to 240 hours). The disease underlying the hypertensive emergency was stroke with 38 cases (50%), heart failure in 20 (26.3%), hypertensive encephalopathy in 11 (14.4%), malignant hypertension in 9 (11.8%), and renal failure in 10 (13.1%). The mean length of emergency treatment was 14.7 hours (range, 5 to 48 hours). Eight deaths (10.5%) occurred during hospitalization in the emergency department.

  4. Access to primary care and the route of emergency admission to hospital: retrospective analysis of national hospital administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Thomas E; Harris, Matthew; Watt, Hilary; Soljak, Michael; Richards, Emma; Gunning, Elinor; Bottle, Alex; Macinko, James; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-06-01

    likely to have been admitted via a GP (vs an A and E department). This furthers evidence suggesting that access to general practice is related to use of emergency hospital services in England. The relative merits of the two admission routes remain unclear. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Goldratt’s Theory Applied to the Problems Associated with an Emergency Department at a Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Nayak

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare costs continue to increase dramatically, while quality remains a significant problem. Reform measures initiated by the government will drive expansion of these costs, further stressing taxpayers and employers, and forcing hospitals to adopt fundamental changes as they try to adjust to increased demands for services and to lessening reimbursements from all payers. This struggle is best seen at the point of entry for many at a hospital: the emergency department (ED. It is at the emergency department that patients’ expectations regarding staff communication with patients, wait times, the triage process, capacity and payment will determine a significant part of a hospital’s revenue. Using Dr. Eliyahu M. Goldratt’s Thinking Process, we will determine what core problem(s are causing a 362-bed regional West Texas hospital emergency department to lose revenue. Evaluation of the current emergency department will determine the Undesirable Effects (UDE. Using that information will lead to the construction of the Current Reality Tree (CRT, which will bring focus to the core problem(s. To break the constraints, which are the core problem(s, an Evaporative Cloud (EC is generated. And, the end result will be to construct a Future Reality Tree (FRT, which will validate the idea(s generated in the EC. It was determined that there are ten major UDE’s that affected this hospital’s emergency department. They were focused around staff communication, wait times, triage process, information management, service provided and bill collections. A conclusion was made that the core problem dealt with triaging patients and utilization of the services provided by the hospital. Since the reimbursement rate is affected by the patient’s satisfaction, the areas to focus on would be: triage, education, communication and retention. Although it may be neither feasible nor desirable to meet all the patient’s expectations, increased focus on those areas may

  6. Who’s Boarding in the Psychiatric Emergency Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Scott A.; Joesch, Jutta M.; West, Imara I.; Pasic, Jagoda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction When a psychiatric patient in the emergency department requires inpatient admission, but no bed is available, they may become a “boarder.” The psychiatric emergency service (PES) has been suggested as one means to reduce psychiatric boarding, but the frequency and characteristics of adult PES boarders have not been described. Methods We electronically extracted electronic medical records for adult patients presenting to the PES in an urban county safety-net hospital over 12 months. Correlative analyses included Student’s t-tests and multivariate regression. Results 521 of 5363 patient encounters (9.7%) resulted in boarding. Compared to non-boarding encounters, boarding patient encounters were associated with diagnoses of a primary psychotic, anxiety, or personality disorder, or a bipolar manic/mixed episode. Boarders were also more likely to be referred by family, friends or providers than self-referred; arrive in restraints; experience restraint/seclusion in the PES; or be referred for involuntary hospitalization. Boarders were more likely to present to the PES on the weekend. Substance use was common, but only tobacco use was more likely associated with boarding status in multivariate analysis. Conclusion Boarding is common in the PES, and boarders have substantial psychiatric morbidity requiring treatment during extended PES stays. We question the appropriateness of PES boarding for seriously ill psychiatric patients. PMID:25247041

  7. 42 CFR 485.618 - Condition of participation: Emergency services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Boards of Medicine and Nursing about issues related to access to and the quality of emergency services in... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Emergency services. 485.618 Section 485.618 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  8. Pre-hospital critical care by anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, A J; Lossius, H M; Mikkelsen, S

    2013-01-01

    All Scandinavian countries provide anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services. Little is known of the incidence of critical illness or injury attended by these services. We aimed to investigate anaesthesiologist-staffed pre-hospital services in Scandinavia with special emphasis on incidence...

  9. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dainiak, Nicholas; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event

  10. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Bucher

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS workers, respectively. Methods: We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. Results: There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003. Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Conclusion: Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  11. Hand Washing Practices Among Emergency Medical Services Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Joshua; Donovan, Colleen; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; McCoy, Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Hand hygiene is an important component of infection control efforts. Our primary and secondary goals were to determine the reported rates of hand washing and stethoscope cleaning in emergency medical services (EMS) workers, respectively. We designed a survey about hand hygiene practices. The survey was distributed to various national EMS organizations through e-mail. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items (responses on a Likert scale) and subpopulations of survey respondents to identify relationships between variables. We used analysis of variance to test differences in means between the subgroups. There were 1,494 responses. Overall, reported hand hygiene practices were poor among pre-hospital providers in all clinical situations. Women reported that they washed their hands more frequently than men overall, although the differences were unlikely to be clinically significant. Hygiene after invasive procedures was reported to be poor. The presence of available hand sanitizer in the ambulance did not improve reported hygiene rates but improved reported rates of cleaning the stethoscope (absolute difference 0.4, p=0.0003). Providers who brought their own sanitizer were more likely to clean their hands. Reported hand hygiene is poor amongst pre-hospital providers. There is a need for future intervention to improve reported performance in pre-hospital provider hand washing.

  12. Psychological consequences of aggression in pre-hospital emergency care: cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaldo-De-Quirós, Mónica; Piccini, Ana T; Gómez, M Mar; Cerdeira, Jose C

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital emergency care is a particularly vulnerable setting for workplace violence. However, there is no literature available to date on the psychological consequences of violence in pre-hospital emergency care. To evaluate the psychological consequences of exposure to workplace violence from patients and those accompanying them in pre-hospital emergency care. A retrospective cross-sectional study. 70 pre-hospital emergency care services located in Madrid region. A randomized sample of 441 health care workers (135 physicians, 127 nurses and 179 emergency care assistants). Data were collected from February to May 2012. The survey was divided into four sections: demographic/professional information, level of burnout determined by Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), mental health status using General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and frequency and type of violent behaviour experienced by staff members. The health care professionals who had been exposed to physical and verbal violence presented a significantly higher percentage of anxiety, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and burnout syndrome compared with those who had not been subjected to any aggression. Frequency of verbal violence (more than five times) was related to emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Type of violence (i.e. physical aggression) is especially related to high anxiety levels and frequency of verbal aggression is associated with burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization). Psychological counselling should be made available to professional staff who have been subjected to physical aggression or frequent verbal violence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Telehone consultations: At the emergency service, Copenhagen County: Analysis of doctor-patient communication patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan-Helge; Risør, Ole

    1997-01-01

    Communications patterns, emergency service, out-of-hours service, telehpone consultations, video-supervision......Communications patterns, emergency service, out-of-hours service, telehpone consultations, video-supervision...

  14. HOSPITAL IMAGE AS A MODERATING VARIABLE ON THE EFFECT OF HOSPITAL SERVICE QUALITY ON THE CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE, CUSTOMER TRUST AND CUSTOMER LOYALTY IN HOSPITAL SERVICES

    OpenAIRE

    Indrianawati Usman

    2017-01-01

    This is an explanatory research, analyzing the hospital image as a moderating variable on the effect of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and trust. Research was conducted at several hospitals in Surabaya Indonesia, especially to outpatients. Data was collected by survey to the outpatients of the hospitals. The purpose of this research was empirically examining the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust, examine eff...

  15. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  16. Temporary emergency pacing-an orphan in district hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesdal, Knut; Johansen, Jens Brock; Gadler, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    This editorial discusses a report on the 1 year experience with temporary pacing, especially in the emergency setting, in several Norwegian district hospitals. The vast majority of the patients received transvenous temporary pacing, and the majority of leads were placed by noncardiologists....... The procedure times were long and complications were frequent. The organization of emergency pacing is discussed, and we suggest that unless qualified physicians can establish transvenous pacing, the patients who need that should be transferred with transcutaneous pacing as back-up during transport...

  17. The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The labour ward analgesic service at King Edward VIII. Hospital, Durban. D. A. ROCKE, C. C. ROUT, H. D. RUSSELL, S. SINGH. Abstract The provision of analgesic services to the labour ward at King Edward VIII Hospital was studied during a I-week period. Of249 patients, 113 (45%) received no analgesia whatsoever.

  18. Study of Marketing Components Affecting Health Care Services in Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Akbarian Bafghi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospitals, in extreme competition, have accepted principles of marketing designed for industrial goods and customers. One of the important factors in health services marketing is the type of services. Organizations, including health centers, require meeting the clients' needs in order to survive and try to promote the way of providing services effectively. The present study aims to identify effective components in providing clinical services in hospitals. Methods: This was a practical and cross-sectional study. Data were collected using a questionnaire completed through random sampling after confirming the validity and reliability. Data were analyzed by SPSS 21 and Lisrel 8.50 using descriptive statistics and factor analysis. Results: The results of this study indicated that nine components had the highest impact on providing health services. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the quality of providing services in the hospital, offering distinctive services compared with other hospitals, and considering quality of service beyond the patient's expectation had the greatest impact on marketing services in the hospital. Conclusion: Providing quality and distinctive services beyond the patient's expectation enables hospitals to improve their marketing activities and, beside higher level of patient satisfaction, develop their clinical services market share.

  19. The use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a university hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Botelho,Renata Maria de Oliveira; Campanharo,Cássia Regina Vancini; Lopes,Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno,Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Góis,Aécio Flávio Teixeira de; Batista,Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to compare the rate of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and death after cardiac arrest, with and without the use of a metronome during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Method: case-control study nested in a cohort study including 285 adults who experienced cardiac arrest and received CPR in an emergency service. Data were collected using In-hospital Utstein Style. The control group (n=60) was selected by matching patients considering their neurological condit...

  20. Analyzing patient's waiting time in emergency & trauma department in public hospital - A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslan, Shazwa; Tahir, Herniza Md; Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Zaharudin, Zati Aqmar

    2014-09-01

    Emergency and Trauma Department (ETD) is an important element for a hospital. It provides medical service, which operates 24 hours a day in most hospitals. However overcrowding is not exclusion for ETD. Overflowing occurs due to affordable services provided by public hospitals, since it is funded by the government. It is reported that a patient attending ETD must be treated within 90 minutes, in accordance to achieve the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, due to overcrowd situations, most patients have to wait longer than the KPI standard. In this paper, patient's average waiting time is analyzed. Using Chi-Square Test of Goodness, patient's inter arrival per hour is also investigated. As conclusion, Monday until Wednesday was identified as the days that exceed the KPI standard while Chi-Square Test of Goodness showed that the patient's inter arrival is independent and random.

  1. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  2. [Loyal frequent users of hospital emergency departments: the FIDUR project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Alonso, Cesáreo; Romero Pareja, Rodolfo; Rivas García, Aristides; Jiménez Gallego, Rosa; Majo Carbajo, Yolanda; Aguilar Mulet, Juan Mariano

    2016-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of frequent users of hospital emergency departments and analyze whether characteristics varied in relation to how revisits were distributed over the course of the year studied. Retrospective study of patients over the age of 14 years who were treated in a hospital emergency department at least 10 times in 2013. Patients were identified in 17 public hospitals in the Spanish autonomous community of Madrid. Data related to the first and successive visits were gathered and analyzed by quarter year. We included 2340 patients with a mean (SD) age of 54 (21) years. A total of 1361 (58.%) were women, 1160 (50%) had no concomitant diseases, 1366 (58.2%) were substance abusers, and 25 (1.1%) were homeless. During the first visit, 2038 (87.1%) complained of a recent health problem, and 289 (12.4%) were admitted. Sixty (2.6%) patients concentrated their revisits in a single quarters 335 (14.3%) in 2 quarters, 914 (39.1%) in 3, and 1005 (42.9%) in 4. Patients whose revisits were distributed over more quarters were older (> 65 years), had more concomitant conditions, were on more medications (P women (P = .012) and more likely to have a specific diagnosis (P loyally comes to the same emergency department over the course of a year. Patients whose revisits are dispersed over a longer period have more complex problems and use more resources during their initial visit.

  3. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  4. Frequency and risk factors associated with emergency medical readmissions in Galway University Hospitals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, J

    2010-06-01

    Unplanned readmissions of medical hospital patients have been increasing in recent years. We examined the frequency and associates of emergency medical readmissions to Galway University Hospitals (GUH).

  5. Association of emergency department and hospital characteristics with elopements and length of stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Daniel A; Fu, Rongwei; Vu, Eugene; Augustine, James J; Hsia, Renee Y; Shufflebarger, Charles M; Sun, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    As the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) core measures in 2013 compare Emergency Department (ED) treatment time intervals, it is important to identify ED and hospital characteristics associated with these metrics to facilitate accurate comparisons. The objective of this study is to assess differences in operational metrics by ED and hospital characteristics. ED-level characteristics included annual ED volume, percentage of patients admitted, percentage of patients presenting by ambulance, and percentage of pediatric patients. Hospital-level characteristics included teaching hospital status, trauma center status, hospital ownership (nonprofit or for-profit), inpatient bed capacity, critical access status, inpatient bed occupancy, and rural vs. urban location area. Data from the ED Benchmarking Alliance from 2004 to 2009 were merged with the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey Database to include hospital characteristics that may impact ED throughput. Overall median length of stay (LOS) and left before treatment is complete (LBTC) were the primary outcome variables, and a linear mixed model was used to assess the association between outcome variables and ED and hospital characteristics, while accounting for correlations among multiple observations within each hospital. All data were at the hospital level on a yearly basis. There were 445 EDs included in the analysis, from 2004 to 2009, with 850 observations over 6 years. Higher-volume EDs were associated with higher rates of LBTC and LOS. For-profit hospitals had lower LBTC and LOS. Higher inpatient bed occupancies were associated with a higher LOS. Increasing admission percentages were positively associated with overall LOS for EDs, but not with rates of LBTC. Higher-volume EDs are associated with higher LBTC and LOS, and for-profit hospitals appear more favorably in these metrics compared with their nonprofit counterparts. It is important to appreciate that hospitals have different baselines

  6. Pre-hospital electrocardiogram triage with tele-cardiology support is associated with shorter time-to-balloon and higher rates of timely reperfusion even in rural areas: data from the Bari- Barletta/Andria/Trani public emergency medical service 118 registry on primary angioplasty in ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Natale Daniele; Di Pietro, Gaetano; Aquilino, Ambrogio; Bruno, Angela I; Dellegrottaglie, Giulia; Di Giuseppe, Giuseppe; Lopriore, Claudio; De Gennaro, Luisa; Lanzone, Saverio; Caldarola, Pasquale; Antonelli, Gianfranco; Di Biase, Matteo

    2014-09-01

    We report the preliminary data from a regional registry on ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients treated with primary angioplasty in Apulia, Italy; the region is covered by a single public health-care service, a single public emergency medical service (EMS), and a single tele-medicine service provider. Two hundred and ninety-seven consecutive patients with STEMI transferred by regional free public EMS 1-1-8 for primary-PCI were enrolled in the study; 123 underwent pre-hospital electrocardiograms (ECGs) triage by tele-cardiology support and directly referred for primary-PCI, those remaining were just transferred by 1-1-8 ambulances for primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (diagnosis not based on tele-medicine ECG; already hospitalised patients, emergency-room without tele-medicine support). Time from first ECG diagnostic for STEMI to balloon was recorded; a time-to-balloon primary-PCI). Pre-hospital triage with tele-cardiology ECG in an EMS registry from an area with more than one and a half million inhabitants was associated with shorter time-to-balloon and higher rates of timely treated patients, even in 'rural' areas. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  7. Measuring service line competitive position. A systematic methodology for hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, J

    1991-01-01

    To mount a broad effort aimed at improving their competitive position for some service or group of services, hospitals have begun to pursue product line management techniques. A few hospitals have even reorganized completely under the product line framework. The benefits include focusing accountability for operations and results, facilitating coordination between departments and functions, stimulating market segmentation, and promoting rigorous examination of new and existing programs. As part of its strategic planning process, a suburban Baltimore hospital developed a product line management methodology with six basic steps: (1) define the service lines (which they did by grouping all existing diagnosis-related groups into 35 service lines), (2) determine the contribution of each service line to total inpatient volume, (3) determine trends in service line volumes (by comparing data over time), (4) derive a useful comparison group (competing hospitals or groups of hospitals with comparable size, scope of services, payer mix, and financial status), (5) review multiple time frames, and (6) summarize the long- and short-term performance of the hospital's service lines to focus further analysis. This type of systematic and disciplined analysis can become part of a permanent strategic intelligence program. When hospitals have such a program in place, their market research, planning, budgeting, and operations will be tied together in a true management decision support system.

  8. Customer Contribution to improving Service Quality in the Hospitality Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dragos Constantin Vasile

    2009-01-01

    The actors on the today business stage have no more well-defined roles with clear and rigid borders between them. Hospitality industry in particular is a good example how it has been blurred the roles that customers play in dealing with service providers. The study reveals that customers can influence the quality of hospitality service through performing a qualitycontrol function. This involves a series of activities to be achieved by them: (1) on-the-spot quality control, (2) service failure...

  9. Reassurance as a key outcome valued by emergency ambulance service users: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togher, Fiona J; O'Cathain, Alicia; Phung, Viet-Hai; Turner, Janette; Siriwardena, Aloysius Niroshan

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing need to assess the performance of emergency ambulance services using measures other than the time taken for an ambulance to arrive on scene. In line with government policy, patients and carers can help to shape new measures of ambulance service performance. To investigate the aspects of emergency ambulance service care valued by users. Qualitative interview study. One of 11 ambulance services in England. Twenty-two users and eight of their spouses (n = 30). Users of the emergency ambulance service, experiencing different types of ambulance service response, valued similar aspects of their pre-hospital care. Users were often extremely anxious about their health, and the outcome they valued was reassurance provided by ambulance service staff that they were receiving appropriate advice, treatment and care. This sense of being reassured was enhanced by the professional behaviour of staff, which instilled confidence in their care; communication; a short wait for help; and continuity during transfers. A timely response was valued in terms of allaying anxiety quickly. The ability of the emergency ambulance service to allay the high levels of fear and anxiety felt by users is crucial to the delivery of a high quality service. Measures developed to assess and monitor the performance of emergency ambulance services should include the proportion of users reporting feeling reassured by the response they obtained. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. [Out-of-hospital pediatric emergencies. Perception and assessment by emergency physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, C; Roessler, M; Timmermann, A; Heuer, J F; Gentkow, U; Albrecht, B; Russo, S G

    2009-09-01

    Out-of-hospital (OOH) pediatric emergencies have a relatively low prevalence. In Germany the vast majority of cases are attended by non-specialized emergency physicians (EPs) for whom these are not routine procedures. This may lead to insecurity and fear. However, it is unknown how EPs perceive and assess pediatric emergencies and how they could be better prepared for them. All active EPs (n=50) of the Department of Anaesthesiology, Emergency and Intensive Care Medicine at the University Medical Centre of Göttingen were presented with a structured questionnaire in order to evaluate their perception and assessment of OOH pediatric emergencies. The 43 participating EPs made highly detailed statements on the expected characteristics of OOH pediatric emergencies. Their confidence level grew with the children's age (pemergencies. They felt the greatest deficits were in the care of infrequent but life-threatening emergencies. Three educational groups can be differentiated: knowledge and skills to be gained with children in hospital, clinical experience from adult care also applicable in children and rare diagnoses and interventions to be trained with manikins or simulators.

  11. Patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital emergency care: a multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumayr, Agnes; Gnirke, André; Schaeuble, Joerg C; Ganter, Michael T; Sparr, Harald; Zoll, Adolf; Schinnerl, Adolf; Nuebling, Matthias; Heidegger, Thomas; Baubin, Michael

    2016-10-01

    There is only limited information on patient satisfaction with emergency medical services (EMS). The aim of this multicentre survey was to evaluate patient satisfaction in five out-of-hospital physician-based EMS in Austria and Switzerland. The psychometrically tested and standardized questionnaire 'patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital emergency care' was used for this survey. The recruitment of the patients was carried out on the basis of inclusion and exclusion criteria. All questionnaires were sent together with an invitation letter and a prepaid return envelope, followed by a reminder 2 weeks later. The descriptive statistical analysis was carried out by an external organization to maintain anonymity. The response rate of all EMS was 46.7%. High satisfaction rates were achieved for the four quality scales 'emergency call, emergency treatment, transport and hospital admission'. A significant difference was found between the Swiss and the Austrian dispatch centres in the judgement of the call takers' social skills. Patient satisfaction with the emergency treatment, for example, reduction of pain, was high in all EMS, independent of whether the EMS is physician (Austria) or physician and emergency medical assistant based (Switzerland). Lowest satisfaction rates were found for items of social skills. Patient satisfaction in out-of-hospital physician-based EMS is generally high. There is room for improvement in areas such as the social skills of dispatchers and EMS-team members and the comfort of the patients during transport. A checklist should be developed for basic articles that patients should take along to hospital and for questions on responsibilities for children, dependent people or pets.

  12. Development of pediatric emergency medicine at Addis Ababa University/Tikuranbessa Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefera, Muluwork; Bacha, Tigist; Butteris, Sabrina; Teshome, Getachew; Ross, Joshua; Hagen, Scott; Svenson, Jim; Busse, Heidi; Tefera, Girma

    2014-07-01

    In the world emergencies occur everywhere, and each day they consume ressources regardless of whether there are systems capable of achieving good outcomes. Low-income countries suffer the most highest rates of every category of injury--from traffic and the highest rates of acute complications of communicable diseases including tuberculosis, malaria and HIV. To describe the development of pediatrics emergency medicine at Tikur Anbesa Specialized Hospital A twinning partnership model was used in developing a pediatric emergency medicine training program helps in development of pediatrics emergency system. Strengthening the capacity of Addis Ababa University (AAU), Tikur Anbessa Hospital (TASH) to provide pediatric emergency medical services through improved organization of the pediatrics emergency department and strengthening of continuing education opportunities for faculty and staff capacity building by this improving quality of care in pediatrics patients in the country. The Addis Ababa University, University of Wiscosin and People to People partners intend to continue working together to strengthening and developing effetive systems to deliver quality pediatrics emergency medicine care troughout all regions of Ethiopia.

  13. Mobile emergency, an emergency support system for hospitals in mobile devices: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, Pierfrancesco; Boncinelli, Sergio; Grossi, Francesco; Mangini, Marco; Nesi, Paolo; Sequi, Leonardo

    2013-05-23

    Hospitals are vulnerable to natural disasters, man-made disasters, and mass causalities events. Within a short time, hospitals must provide care to large numbers of casualties in any damaged infrastructure, despite great personnel risk, inadequate communications, and limited resources. Communications are one of the most common challenges and drawbacks during in-hospital emergencies. Emergency difficulties in communicating with personnel and other agencies are mentioned in literature. At the moment of emergency inception and in the earliest emergency phases, the data regarding the true nature of the incidents are often inaccurate. The real needs and conditions are not yet clear, hospital personnel are neither efficiently coordinated nor informed on the real available resources. Information and communication technology solutions in health care turned out to have a great positive impact both on daily working practice and situations. The objective of this paper was to find a solution that addresses the aspects of communicating among medical personnel, formalizing the modalities and protocols and the information to guide the medical personnel during emergency conditions with a support of a Central Station (command center) to cope with emergency management and best practice network to produce and distribute intelligent content made available in the mobile devices of the medical personnel. The aim was to reduce the time needed to react and to cope with emergency organization, while facilitating communications. The solution has been realized by formalizing the scenarios, extracting, and identifying the requirements by using formal methods based on unified modeling language (UML). The system and was developed using mobile programming under iOS Apple and PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor My Structured Query Language (PHP MySQL). Formal questionnaires and time sheets were used for testing and validation, and a control group was used in order to estimate the reduction of time needed

  14. Trends in diagnostic patterns and mortality in emergency ambulance service patients in 2007-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Larsen, Thomas Mulvad

    2017-01-01

    ) to allow comparison by year, with 2007 as reference year. RESULTS: The annual number of emergency ambulance service patients increased from 24.3 in 2007 to 40.2 in 2014 per 1000 inhabitants. The proportions of women increased from 43.1% to 46.4% and of patients aged 60+ years from 39.9% to 48......: Population-based cohort study with linkage of Danish national registries. SETTING: The North Denmark Region in 2007-2014. PARTICIPANTS: Cohort of 148 757 patients transported to hospital by ambulance after calling emergency services. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of emergency ambulance service patients......, the incidence of emergency ambulance service patients, the proportion of women, elderly, and non-specific diagnoses increased. The level of comorbidity increased substantially, whereas the 1-day and 30-day mortality decreased....

  15. Trends in diagnostic patterns and mortality in emergency ambulance service patients in 2007-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erika Frischknecht; Bendtsen, Mette Dahl; Larsen, Thomas Mulvad

    ) to allow comparison by year, with 2007 as reference year. RESULTS: The annual number of emergency ambulance service patients increased from 24.3 in 2007 to 40.2 in 2014 per 1000 inhabitants. The proportions of women increased from 43.1% to 46.4% and of patients aged 60+ years from 39.9% to 48......: Population-based cohort study with linkage of Danish national registries. SETTING: The North Denmark Region in 2007-2014. PARTICIPANTS: Cohort of 148 757 patients transported to hospital by ambulance after calling emergency services. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number of emergency ambulance service patients......, the incidence of emergency ambulance service patients, the proportion of women, elderly, and non-specific diagnoses increased. The level of comorbidity increased substantially, whereas the 1-day and 30-day mortality decreased....

  16. Cost Burden for Accessing Paediatric Emergency Services at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    modalities and economic impacts for accessing paediatric ... Descriptive analysis of the data was done using SPSS ... being discharged home from the emergency ... their homes to the hospital. ..... respondents could be affected by recall bias.

  17. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care in Gambia's main referral hospital: women-users' testimonies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundby Johanne

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduction of maternal mortality ratio by two-thirds by 2015 is an international development goal with unrestricted access to high quality emergency obstetric care services promoted towards the attainment of that goal. The objective of this qualitative study was to assess the availability and quality of emergency obstetric care services in Gambia's main referral hospital. Methods From weekend admissions a group of 30 women treated for different acute obstetric conditions including five main diagnostic groups: hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders, dystocia, sepsis and anemia were purposively selected. In-depth interviews with the women were carried out at their homes within two weeks of discharge. Results Substantial difficulties in obtaining emergency obstetric care were uncovered. Health system inadequacies including lack of blood for transfusion, shortage of essential medicines especially antihypertensive drugs considerably hindered timely and adequate treatment for obstetric emergencies. Such inadequacies also inflated the treatment costs to between 5 and 18 times more than standard fees. Blood transfusion and hypertensive treatment were associated with the largest costs. Conclusion The deficiencies in the availability of life-saving interventions identified are manifestations of inadequate funding for maternal health services. Substantial increase in funding for maternal health services is therefore warranted towards effective implementation of emergency obstetric care package in The Gambia.

  18. Cloud Service Platform: Hospital Information eXchange(HIX)

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Zhiyuan; Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Health Information eXchange (HIX) is a part of Happiness Cloud Service Platform of Happiness Guangdong in Guangdong Province of China based on innovation of cloud-based business model. This article illustrates the hospital health care business services system based on cloud computing. major business functions of HIX includes integrated mobile medical information services, and mobile health information services. Key cloud service platform capabilities include appointment of HIX registration, d...

  19. Transformation of nursing services in selected Gauteng hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Cur. It is explicit that the change in the South African government since 1994 accompanied by the transformation of nursing services with its new policies and practices is inevitable, and poses challenges for the nursing service managers in Gauteng hospitals. The transformation of nursing services can be a difficult process creating a period of fear, uncertainty, stress and role ambiguity for the nursing service managers. The transformation has been so extensive that the nursing service ...

  20. Trends in hospital librarianship and hospital library services: 1989 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Patricia L; Funk, Carla J

    2009-10-01

    The research studied the status of hospital librarians and library services to better inform the Medical Library Association's advocacy activities. The Vital Pathways Survey Subcommittee of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians distributed a web-based survey to hospital librarians and academic health sciences library directors. The survey results were compared to data collected in a 1989 survey of hospital libraries by the American Hospital Association in order to identify any trends in hospital libraries, roles of librarians, and library services. A web-based hospital library report form based on the survey questions was also developed to more quickly identify changes in the status of hospital libraries on an ongoing basis. The greatest change in library services between 1989 and 2005/06 was in the area of access to information, with 40% more of the respondents providing access to commercial online services, 100% more providing access to Internet resources, and 28% more providing training in database searching and use of information resources. Twenty-nine percent (n = 587) of the 2005/06 respondents reported a decrease in staff over the last 5 years. Survey data support reported trends of consolidation of hospitals and hospital libraries and additions of new services. These services have likely required librarians to acquire new skills. It is hoped that future surveys will be undertaken to continue to study these trends.

  1. Servant Leadership Theory and the Emergency Services Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Eric James

    2014-01-01

    This present case study explores the influence a servant leadership class had on a group of emergency service students' understanding of the roles and characteristics of a leader. The setting for the study was a state university in the Western United States. The six participants were undergraduate emergency services majors that underwent a 15-week…

  2. Duration of patients’ visits to the hospital emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaca Zeynal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Length of stay is an important indicator of quality of care in Emergency Departments (ED. This study explores the duration of patients’ visits to the ED for which they are treated and released (T&R. Methods Retrospective data analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to investigate the duration of T&R ED visits. Duration for each visit was computed by taking the difference between admission and discharge times. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD for 2008 were used in the analysis. Results The mean duration of T&R ED visit was 195.7 minutes. The average duration of ED visits increased from 8 a.m. until noon, then decreased until midnight at which we observed an approximately 70-minute spike in average duration. We found a substantial difference in mean duration of ED visits (over 90 minutes between Mondays and other weekdays during the transition time from the evening of the day before to the early morning hours. Black / African American patients had a 21.4-minute longer mean duration of visits compared to white patients. The mean duration of visits at teaching hospitals was substantially longer than at non-teaching hospitals (243.8 versus 175.6 minutes. Hospitals with large bed size were associated with longer duration of visits (222.2 minutes when compared to hospitals with small bed size (172.4 minutes or those with medium bed size (166.5 minutes. The risk-adjusted results show that mean duration of visits on Mondays are longer by about 4 and 9 percents when compared to mean duration of visits on non-Monday workdays and weekends, respectively. Conclusions The duration of T&R ED visits varied significantly by admission hour, day of the week, patient volume, patient characteristics, hospital characteristics and area characteristics.

  3. Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameryoun, Ahmad; Najafi, Seyedvahid; Nejati-Zarnaqi, Bayram; Khalilifar, Seyed Omid; Ajam, Mahdi; Ansarimoghadam, Ahmad

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension's influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor's impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named "trust in services" was found using EFA, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. The approach was applied to assess the hospital's service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. "Trust in services" has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by "tangibles," "assurance," "empathy," and "responsiveness," respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors' impact on customer perception. Originality/value The procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.

  4. Relationship of Services Utility with Patients Tending to Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Nasiripour

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & purpose: In the health sector, in addition to the important consequence of treatment, health system should meet the expectations regarding the desirability of services. Expectations and perceptions of patients about the desirability of services play an important role in selecting hospitals, their loyalty to the organization & replanning to purchase. Thus the present study has been done with the aim to determine the relationship between services desirability and patients’ tendency to public or private hospitals in Sari. Materials & Methods: This study is a descriptive and analytical type done in 2012 in four private and public hospitals located in Sari. The study population consists of hospitalized patients that have been subjected to inquiry by using 361stratified random samples. The survey tool was questionnaire that its validity was judged and approved by the teachers and its reliability was obtained by alpha Cronbach as 0.972. The collected data was analyzed by SPSS software, independent t-test, t-sample test and descriptive statistics. Results: Findings show that in services cost indexes, there are not any significant differences between public and private hospitals while in the other services desirability indexes such as accessibility, availability, speed, quality, and complete package of services and …, there is a significant difference between public and private hospitals. Conclusion: In patients’ tendency to hospitals, utility service indicators satisfy a significant impact. So, codified planning to improve these indexes in order to absorb more patients by authorities is required.

  5. [Estimating emergency hospital admissions to gauge short-term effects of air pollution: evaluation of health data quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bois de Fer, Béatrice; Host, Sabine; Chardon, Benoît; Chatignoux, Edouard; Beaujouan, Laure; Brun-Ney, Dominique; Grémy, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    The study of the short-term effects and health impact of air pollution is carrier out by the ERPURS regional surveillance program which utilizes hospitalization data obtained from the French hospital information system (PMSI) to determine these links. This system does not permit the distinction between emergency hospital admissions from scheduled ones, which cannot be related to short term changes in air pollution levels. This study examines how scheduled admissions affect the quality of the health indicators used to estimate air pollution effects. This indicator is compared to three new emergency hospitalisation indicators reconstructed based on data from the public hospitals in Paris, partly from the PMSI data and partly with data from an on-line emergency network that regroups all of the computerized emergency services. According to the pathology, scheduled admissions present a difficulty which affects the capacity to highlight the weakest risks with any precision.

  6. Implementation of a High-Performance Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol at a Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefos, Kathryn A.; Nable, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue. Although OHCA occurs relatively infrequently in the collegiate environment, educational institutions with on-campus emergency medical services (EMS) agencies are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality resuscitation care in an expedient fashion. Georgetown University's…

  7. [Suicidal behaviour and attempted suicide occurring during assessment by the outreach psychiatric emergency service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, R F P; de Groot, M H; van Dassen, M; Deen, M L; de Beurs, D P

    The outreach emergency psychiatric service plays an important role in recognising, arranging interventions and preventing suicide and suicidal behaviour. However, little is known about the assessments that members of the emergency team make when faced with patients showing suicidal behaviour. AIM: To describe the relationships that are revealed between patient characteristics, suicidal thoughts and attempted suicide during assessments made by the emergency psychiatric service in The Hague. METHOD: The emergency service kept a detailed record of 14,705 consultations. We compared the characteristics of patients who had suicidal thoughts with those of patients who had no such thoughts and we also compared the characteristics of patients who had attempted to commit suicide with those of patients who had not. We drew these comparisons by using logistic regression models, adjusting for clustering. RESULTS: 32.2% of the patients showed signs of suicidal behaviour and 9.2 % appeared likely to attempt suicide. Suicidal behaviour occurred most often in patients with depression. Suicidal patients were more often admitted to hospital than were non-suicidal patients and they were more likely to have been referred by a general practitioner or a general hospital. Medication was the most frequent means employed in attempts to commit suicide. CONCLUSION: In about one third of the consultations of the outreach emergency psychiatric service, the patient showed suicidal behaviour. The actions and the policy of the emergency psychiatric service with regard to suicidal behaviour were diverse and dependent on factors that could change over the course of time.

  8. The Role of Emergency Medical Service in CBR Incidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castulik, P.

    2007-01-01

    Majority of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) have daily extensive experience with rescue of casualties having trauma injuries, resulting from conventional incidents. In the case of non-conventional incidents involving chemical, bacteriological or radiological (CBR) hazardous materials operational scene for all responders is begin to be more complicated due contamination of casualties, equipment and environment. Especially EMS personnel and receiving staff at the hospital have to work under very demanding condition due to burden of personal protective equipment (PPE) and awareness to avoiding cross-contamination during handling casualties. Those conditions require significantly different approaches for search and rescue of victims from incident site, through transportation and effective treatment at medical facilities. In cases when chemicals will be major hazard materials, the speed of rescue and treatment of victims is a major challenge. Each minute matter, and any delay of response could seriously complicated saving of lives and successful recovery of exposed victims. Success in rescue victims is finally measured thorough the ability of the first responders to save people... ALIVE..., no matter what surrounding condition is. The presentation is providing a view and suggestions on more rapid immediate medical response during non-conventional incidents. It names basic concept based on preparedness, early identification of CBR hazards through signs and symptoms of casualties, priorities of rescue procedures and care on-site, needs of decontamination, rapid evacuation casualties from a scene and immediate hospital response.(author)

  9. [Pre-hospital management of adults with life-threatening emergencies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattel, Francis; Dubois, François

    2012-01-01

    , fewer voluntary firemen, hospital reorganization, tight funding, difficulties of medical dispatching, and the varying skills of "first-on-the-scene "emergency workers. Grievances include late emergency responses, inappropriate medical care, and dispatching to the wrong facility. This raises the question of equal opportunity for all in a country with widely varying geographic features and population density. Improvement in the system's efficiency will require a series of objectives to be met in varied and complementary--Enhanced functional coordination, by speeding up the deployment of the ANTARES digital radio-frequency transmission network (Adaptation Nationale des Transmissions Aux Risques Et aux Secours).--Implementation of a network of emergency services with varying degrees of emergency healthcare management related to the technical nature of the facilities. Three levels of emergency healthcare must be made available: level 1 is provided by local hospitals, level 2 includes support facilities available in general hospitals (not necessarily the nearest hospital), and level 3 provides specialized healthcare in large and/or training hospitals with specialized departments. Life-threatening emergency situations are to be handled by level 2 or 3 facilities. Specific facilities must be selected as reference centers. In France, the ARS (Agences Régionales de Santé) is in charge of this procedure, as it provide funding for healthcare continuity--Reducing inequalities in access to emergency care. This will involve improving the network of SDIS brigades, making local medical facilities more responsive, delegating more medical procedures, on-site telemedicine, providing more helicopters equipped with healthcare facilities, more automated external defibrillators, and more dedicated neuro-vascular units.--First aid training must be made widely available. The French National Academy of Medicine has approved ten recommendations regarding organization and facilities.

  10. THE PREDICTOR FACTORS OF EMERGENCY NURSES' PERFORMANCES TO THE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES EXCELLENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Annisa

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Emergency nurses’ performances remains long standing determinates of quality services rendered for patients admitted to get emergency treatments in the hospitals. It has been viewed as a dimension of professional services excellence. The purpose of this study focused on the predictive correlation of five predictors; namely human resources management, transformational leadership, incentives, hospital structure, and job rotation on the emergency nurses’ performance. This descriptive quantitative study used total sampling technique of 100 nurses in the Emergency Department, in four Government Hospital in Banjarmasin, Bajarbaru, and Martapura. All data obtained by administering questionnaires to the participances. The analytical procedure of multiple linear regression was utilized to determine the predicting strength correlation between the dependent and the independent variables. The result of Pearson product‑moment correlation coefficients revealed that positive correlation established between emergency nurses’ performances and human resources management, transformational leadership, incentives, hospital structure, and job rotation, as the independent variables. The summary of multiple linear regression analysis of all independent variables indicated that incentives was the most strongly predictor to the emergency nurses’ performances.

  11. Inovasi Manajemen Pelayanan Publik Tim Emergency Service Kabupaten Bantaeng

    OpenAIRE

    Tamimi, Zindar

    2015-01-01

    Bantaeng an area that small territory, small population, small local revenues, frequent natural disasters, and frequent cases of fatal such as maternal mortality. To overcome this situation Local Government made Emergency Service Team. Emergency Service Teams provide services in new ways, namely by finding and serving the community in a proactive and integrated. This study uses exploratif qualitative method. Data collection techniques in research using interviews, observation, and documentati...

  12. Factors Associated With the Likelihood of Hospitalization Following Emergency Department Visits for Behavioral Health Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jane E; Desai, Pratikkumar V; Hoot, Nathan R; Gearing, Robin E; Jeong, Shin; Meyer, Thomas D; Soares, Jair C; Begley, Charles E

    2016-11-01

    Behavioral health-related emergency department (ED) visits have been linked with ED overcrowding, an increased demand on limited resources, and a longer length of stay (LOS) due in part to patients being admitted to the hospital but waiting for an inpatient bed. This study examines factors associated with the likelihood of hospital admission for ED patients with behavioral health conditions at 16 hospital-based EDs in a large urban area in the southern United States. Using Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use for guidance, the study examined the relationship between predisposing (characteristics of the individual, i.e., age, sex, race/ethnicity), enabling (system or structural factors affecting healthcare access), and need (clinical) factors and the likelihood of hospitalization following ED visits for behavioral health conditions (n = 28,716 ED visits). In the adjusted analysis, a logistic fixed-effects model with blockwise entry was used to estimate the relative importance of predisposing, enabling, and need variables added separately as blocks while controlling for variation in unobserved hospital-specific practices across hospitals and time in years. Significant predisposing factors associated with an increased likelihood of hospitalization following an ED visit included increasing age, while African American race was associated with a lower likelihood of hospitalization. Among enabling factors, arrival by emergency transport and a longer ED LOS were associated with a greater likelihood of hospitalization while being uninsured and the availability of community-based behavioral health services within 5 miles of the ED were associated with lower odds. Among need factors, having a discharge diagnosis of schizophrenia/psychotic spectrum disorder, an affective disorder, a personality disorder, dementia, or an impulse control disorder as well as secondary diagnoses of suicidal ideation and/or suicidal behavior increased the likelihood of hospitalization

  13. [The characteristics of medical technologies in emergency medical care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakhovskiĭ, A G; Babenko, A I; Bravve, Iu I; Tataurova, E A

    2013-01-01

    The article analyzes the implementation of major 12 diagnostic and 17 treatment technologies applied during medical care of patients with 12 key nosology forms of diseases in departments of the emergency medical care hospital No 2 of Omsk. It is established that key groups of technologies in the implementation of diagnostic process are the laboratory clinical diagnostic analyses and common diagnostic activities at reception into hospital and corresponding departments. The percentage of this kind of activities is about 78.3% of all diagnostic technologies. During the realization of treatment process the priority technologies are common curative and rehabilitation activities, intensive therapy activities and clinical diagnostic monitoring activities. All of them consist 80.1% of all curative technologies.

  14. Hospital Supply Expenses: An Important Ingredient in Health Services Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulsalam, Yousef; Schneller, Eugene

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to shed light on hospital supply expenses, which form the second largest expense category after payroll and hold more promise for improving cost-efficiency compared to payroll. However, limited research has rigorously scrutinized this cost category, and it is rarely given specific consideration across cost-focused studies in health services publications. After reviewing previously cited estimates, we examine and independently validate supply expense data (collected by the American Hospital Association) for over 3,500 U.S. hospitals. We find supply expenses to make up 15% of total hospital expenses, on average, but as high as 30% or 40% in hospitals with a high case-mix index, such as surgery-intensive hospitals. Future research can use supply expense data to better understand hospital strategies that aim to manage costs, such as systemization, physician-hospital arrangements, and value-based purchasing.

  15. Hospital emergency preparedness and response during Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a report by the HHS Office of Inspector General (OIG) on the performance of 172 Medicare-certified hospitals in the New York Metropolitan Area before, during, and after Sandy. It makes recommendations on how to close gaps that were found in emergency planning and execution for a disaster of this magnitude. To download the complete 40-page report and a Podcast based on it, go to http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/ reports/oei-06-13-00260. asp.

  16. Frailty in Older Adults Using Pre-hospital Care and the Emergency Department: A Narrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Judah P; Andrew, Melissa K; Travers, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    Older adults use more health-care services per capita than younger age groups and the older adult population varies greatly in its needs. Evidence suggests that there is a critical distinction between relative frailty and fitness in older adults. Here, we review how frailty is described in the pre-hospital literature and in the broader emergency medicine literature. PubMed was used as the primary database, but was augmented by searches of CINAHL and EMBASE. Articles were included if they focused on patients 60 years and older and implemented a definition of frailty or risk screening tool in the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) or Emergency Department setting. IN THE BROAD CLINICAL LITERATURE, THREE TYPES OF MEASURES CAN BE IDENTIFIED: frailty index measures, frailty scales, and a phenotypic definition. Each offers advantages and disadvantages for the EMS stakeholder. We identified no EMS literature on frailty conceptualization or management, although some risk measures from emergency medicine use terms that overlap with the frailty literature. There is a paucity of research on frailty in the Emergency Medical Services literature. No research was identified that specifically addressed frailty conceptualization or management in EMS patients. There is a compelling need for further research in this area.

  17. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournane, S; Conway, R; Creagh, D; Byrne, D G; Sheehy, N; Silke, B

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010-2014 were evaluated. The 50(th), 75(th), and 90(th) centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of Service Quality Scale for Surgical Hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-I Teng

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: The SQSH has sufficient usefulness, reliability and validity. Future research on service quality can apply the SQSH scale to link with utilization intention and patient loyalty and attempt to develop a hospitalization quality scale for other departments.

  19. Health science library and information services in the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeley, P J; Marshall, S B; Foster, E C

    1985-01-01

    In an increasingly information-based society, hospitals need a variety of information for multiple purposes--direct patient care, staff development and training, continuing education, patient and community education, and administrative decision support. Health science library and information services play a key role in providing broad-based information support within the hospital. This guide identifies resources that will help administrators plan information services that are appropriate to their needs.

  20. Utilisation of Antenatal Services at the Provincial Hospital, Mongomo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilisation of Antenatal Services at the Provincial Hospital, Mongomo, Guinea Equatoria. AAG Jimoh. Abstract. This prospective study was carried out to evaluate the utilisation of antenatal care at the Provincial Specialist Hospital, Mongomo, Guinea Equatoria, paying close attention to the confounding factors affecting ...

  1. [Current situation of pediatric emergency in tertiary and teaching hospitals in 15 provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions in China Mainland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Pre-hospital care, emergency department and critical care medicine are the key components of emergency medical service system. Two investigations about the pediatric critical care medicine in China mainland showed great progress. In recent years, most hospitals in China mainland have established emergency department, hardware configuration and staff status were gradually standardized. But most of the emergency departments mainly provide service to adult patients and pediatric emergency medicine lags behind. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the current situation and main problems of pediatric emergency in China mainland. A questionnaire developed by the Subspecialty Group of Pediatrics, Chinese Society of Emergency Medicine and the Subspecialty Group of Emergency Medicine, Chinese Society of Pediatrics was e-mailed to the members of the above-mentioned two subspecialty groups. The contents of the questionnaire included 46 items which were divided into 5 categories: the general situation of the hospital, the pediatric emergency setting and composition, key equipments and techniques, staff status, training program and running data from 2011 to 2012. Sixty-three questionnaires were delivered and 27 (42.9%) hospitals responded which located in 15 different provinces, municipalities and autonomous regions. Among the 27 hospitals, 10 (37.0%) had no pediatric resuscitation room; 25 (92.6%) had no equipments for cardiac output monitor and gastric lavage; 13 (48.1%) had no bedside fibrolaryngoscope or fiberbronchoscope; 5 (18.5%) had no blood gas analyzer; 4 (14.8%) without respirator, defibrillator, bedside radiography or ultrasonic equipment; 2 (7.4%) had no neonatal incubator; 9 (33.3%) could not do intraossous infusion. The average ratio of professional emergency pediatricians to all physicians was 43.5%. Twenty hospitals incompletely filled in the pediatric emergency running data. The main problems existing in pediatric emergency include: imperfect

  2. A 2-year retrospective study of pediatric dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Pei Jung

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: For children, trauma and toothache constituted the most common reasons for dental emergency visits at a hospital emergency center in Taiwan. While dental emergencies are sometimes unforeseeable or unavoidable, developing community awareness about proper at-home care as well as regular dental preventive measures can potentially reduce the number of emergency visits.

  3. Assessing the physical service setting: a look at emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    To determine the attributes of the physical setting that are important for developing a positive service climate within emergency departments and to validate a measure for assessing physical service design. The design of the physical setting is an important and contributing factor for creating a service climate in organizations. Service climate is defined as employee perceptions of the practices, procedures, and behaviors that get rewarded, supported, and expected with regard to customer service and customer service quality. There has been research conducted which identifies antecedents within organization that promotes a positive service climate which in turn creates service-oriented behaviors by employees toward clients. The antecedent of the physical setting and its impact on perceptions of service climate has been less commonly explored. Using the concept of the physical service setting (which may be defined as aspects of the physical, built environment that facilitate the delivery of quality service), attributes of the physical setting and their relationship with service climate were explored by means of a quantitative paper survey distributed to emergency nurses (n = 180) throughout a province in Canada. The results highlight the validity and reliability of six scales measuring the physical setting and its relation to service. Respondents gave low ratings to the physical setting of their departments, in addition to low ratings of service climate. Respondents feel that the design of the physical setting in the emergency departments where they work is not conducive to providing quality service to clients. Certain attributes of the physical setting were found to be significant in influencing perceptions of service climate, hence service quality, within the emergency department setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. System for radiation emergency medicine. Activities of tertiary radiation emergency hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Kenji; Tanigawa, Koichi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2011-01-01

    Japanese system for radiation emergency medicine is primarily built up by Cabinet Nuclear Safety Commission in 2001 based on previous Tokai JCO Accident (1999) and is composed from the primary, secondary and tertiary medical organizations. This paper describes mainly about roles and actions of the tertiary facilities at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident and tasks to be improved in future. The primary and secondary organizations in the system above are set up in the prefectures with or neighboring the nuclear facility, and tertiary ones, in two parts of western and eastern Japan. The western organization is in Hiroshima University having its cooperating 7 hospitals, and is responsible for such patients as exposed to high dose external radiation, having serious complication, and difficult to treat in the primary/secondary hospitals. The eastern is in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) with 6 cooperating hospitals and responsible for patients with internal radiation exposure difficult to treat, with contaminated body surface with difficulty in decontamination and/or with causable of secondary contamination, and difficult to treat in the secondary hospitals. The tertiary organizations have made efforts for the education and training of medical staff, for network construction among the primary, secondary and other medicare facilities, for establishment of transferring system of patients, and for participation to the international network by global organizations like Response Assistance Network (RANET) in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Radiation Emergency Preparedness and Network (REMPAN) in World Health Organization (WHO). At the Fukushima Accident, staffs of the two tertiary hospitals began to conduct medicare on site (Mar. 12-) and learned following tasks to be improved in future: the early definition of medicare and its network system, and Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ); urgent evacuation of residents weak to disaster like elderly

  5. Availability of resources for emergency care at a second-level hospital in Ghana: A mixed methods assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy B. Japiong

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: This study identified opportunities to improve the care of patients with emergency conditions at the Police Hospital in Ghana. Low-cost improvements in training, organization and planning could improve item and service availability, such as: developing a continuing education curriculum for staff in all areas of the emergency centre; holding in-service training on existing protocols for triage and emergency care; adding checklists to guide appropriate triage and safe transfer of patients; and perform a root cause analysis of item non-availability to develop targeted interventions.

  6. Triage in psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sæbye, Ditte; Høegh, Erica Bernt; Knop, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Inspired by the Australasian triage system, a regional psychiatric triage system was introduced in the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen in 2011. Our aim of the study is to determine the characteristics of the patient according to the defined triage criteria and check...

  7. Pharmacy services at admission and discharge in adult, acute, public hospitals in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Grimes, Tamasine

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: to describe hospital pharmacy involvement in medication management in Ireland, both generally and at points of transfer of care, and to gain a broad perspective of the hospital pharmacy workforce. METHODS: a survey of all adult, acute, public hospitals with an accident and emergency (A&E) department (n = 36), using a semi-structured telephone interview. KEY FINDINGS: there was a 97% (n = 35) response rate. The majority (n = 25, 71.4%) of hospitals reported delivery of a clinical pharmacy service. On admission, pharmacists were involved in taking or verifying medication histories in a minority (n = 15, 42.9%) of hospitals, while few (n = 6,17.1%) deployed staff to the A&E\\/acute medical admissions unit. On discharge, the majority (n = 30,85.7%) did not supply any take-out medication, a minority (n =5,14.3%) checked the discharge prescription, 51.4% (n = 18) counselled patients, 42.9% (n = 15) provided medication compliance charts and one hospital (2.9%) communicated with the patient\\'s community pharmacy. The number of staff employed in the pharmacy department in each hospital was not proportionate to the number of inpatient beds, nor the volume of admissions from A&E. There were differences identified in service delivery between hospitals of different type: urban hospitals with a high volume of admissions from A&E were more likely to deliver clinical pharmacy. CONCLUSIONS: the frequency and consistency of delivering pharmacy services to facilitate medication reconciliation at admission and discharge could be improved. Workforce constraints may inhibit service expansion. Development of national standards of practice may help to eliminate variation between hospitals and support service development.

  8. Otorhinolaryngology Services at Muhimbili National Hospital and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epistaxis is the commonest ear, nose and throat emergency. It's mostly self-limited but it may be severe such that medical attention is sought and in such cases it may be life threatening. There is paucity of data on the prevalence and management options for epistaxis in Tanzania and at Muhimbili National ...

  9. Returns to Scale in the Production of Hospital Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Ralph E.

    1967-01-01

    The primary purpose of this article is to investigate whether or not economies of scale exist in the production of hospital services. In previous studies the results have implied the existence of economies of scale, but the question has not been satisfactorily resolved. The factor most responsible for clouding the issue is the overwhelming prevalence of product differences in the outputs of hospitals. In this study a method which avoids the problem of product differentiation is developed. The analysis strongly supports the conclusion that hospital services are produced subject to economies of scale. PMID:6054380

  10. Action Research on Development and Application of Internet of Things Services in Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Arum; Chang, Hyejung; Lee, Kyoung Jun

    2017-01-01

    Services based on the Internet of Things (IoT) technologies have emerged in various business environments. To enhance health service quality and maximize benefits, this study applied an IoT technology based on NFC and iBeacon as an omni-channel service for patient care in hospitals. Application of the IoT technology based on NFC and iBeacon was conducted in a general hospital during August 2015 through June 2016, and the development and evaluation results were aligned to an action research framework. The five phases in the action research included diagnosing, planning action, taking action, evaluating action, and specifying learning phases. During the first two phases, problems of functional operations in a hospital were diagnosed and eight service models were designed by using iBeacon and NFC to solve the problems. Service models were applied to the hospital by installing beacons, wearable beacons, beacon scanners, and NFC tags during the third phase. During the fourth and fifth phases, the roles and benefits of stakeholders participating in the service models were evaluated, and issues and knowledge of the whole application process were derived and summarized from technological, economic, social and legal perspectives, respectively. From an action research perspective, IoT-based healthcare services were developed and verified. IoT-based services enable the hospital to acquire lifelog data for precision medicine and ultimately be able to go one step closer to precision medical care. The derived service models could provide patients more enhanced healthcare services and improve the work efficiency and effectiveness of the hospital.

  11. Service Robots for Hospitals: A Case Study of Transportation Tasks in a Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Fan, Zhun; Dawids, Steen

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the need for automated transportation systems for hospitals is investigated. Among other alternatives, mobile robots stand out as the most prominent means of automation of transportation tasks in hospitals. Existing transportation routines of a hospital are analyzed in order...... to verify the need for automation and identify possible areas of improvement. The analysis shows that most of the existing transportation is carried out manually, and hospitals can greatly benefit from automated transportation. Based on the results of the analysis, three alternatives are derived...... for implementing mobile service robots for transportation tasks in hospitals....

  12. Cluster analysis of medical service resources at district hospitals in Taiwan, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shu-Fang; Lee, Tian-Shyug; Deng, Chung-Yeh

    2015-12-01

    A vast amount of the annual/national budget has been spent on the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. However, the market for district hospitals has become increasingly competitive, and district hospitals are under pressure to optimize the use of health service resources. Therefore, we employed a clustering method to explore variations in input and output service volumes, and investigate resource allocation and health care service efficiency in district hospitals. Descriptive and cluster analyses were conducted to examine the district hospitals included in the Ministry of Health and Welfare database during 2007-2011. The results, according to the types of hospital ownership, suggested that the number of public hospitals has decreased and that of private hospitals increased; the largest increase in the number of district hospitals occurred when Taichung City was merged into Taichung County. The descriptive statistics from 2007 to 2011 indicated that 43% and 36.4% of the hospitals had 501-800 occupied beds and 101-200 physicians, respectively, and > 401 medical staff members. However, the number of outpatients and discharged patients exceeded 6001 and 90,001, respectively. In addition, the highest percentage of hospitals (43.9%) had 30,001-60,000 emergency department patients. In 2010, the number of patients varied widely, and the analysis of variance cluster results were nonsignificant (p > 0.05). District hospitals belonging to low-throughput and low-performance groups were encouraged to improve resource utilization for enhancing health care service efficiency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  13. Air ambulance services--integrated emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinand, M

    1994-10-01

    In the name of cost-conscious care, air ambulance program directors and service contractors are seeing the dawn of integrated networks as a boon to their business. As integrated networks form, facilities will become increasingly specialized in the types of services they provide. Patients will need to be moved around the system, resulting in more frequent patient transport and more points of transfer. Many programs are considering aircraft replacement and additions, rather than leasing. Financial benefits could come on depreciation and the high resale value of aircraft. Unless reimbursement levels increase, more program mergers and affiliations may take place to spread and reduce cost. Air ambulance services will increasingly become part of a facility's strategic plan.

  14. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    OpenAIRE

    Langabeer, James R.; Gonzalez, Michael; Alqusairi, Diaa; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Jackson, Adria; Mikhail, Jennifer; Persse, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED), affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. T...

  15. Patient Awareness and Expectations of Pharmacist Services During Hospital Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Philip K; Martin, Steven J; Betka, Eric M

    2017-10-01

    There are insufficient data in the United States regarding patient awareness and expectations of hospital pharmacist availability and services. The objective of this research is to assess patient awareness and expectations of hospital pharmacist services and to determine whether a marketing campaign for pharmacist services increases patient awareness and expectations. Eligible inpatients were surveyed before and after implementation of a hospital-wide pharmacist services marketing campaign (12 items; Likert scale of 1 [strongly disagree] to 4 [strongly agree]; maximum total score of 48) regarding awareness of pharmacist services. The primary outcome was the change in median total survey scores from baseline. Other outcomes included the frequency of patient requests for pharmacists. Similar numbers of patients completed the survey before and after the campaign (intervention, n = 140, vs control, n = 147). Awareness of pharmacist availability and services was increased (41 [interquartile ranges, IQRs: 36-46] vs 37 [IQR 31-43]; P marketing campaign implementation. Awareness among inpatients of pharmacist services is low. Marketing pharmacist availability and services to patients in the hospital improves awareness and expectations for pharmacist-provided care and increases the frequency of patient-initiated interaction between pharmacists and patients. This could improve patient outcomes as pharmacists become more integrally involved in direct patient care.

  16. How to give the gift of hospitality. Great customer service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechter, M

    1994-08-01

    Whether it takes the form of greeting customers with a smile, redressing a diner's grievance or conducting special kitchen tours, providing customer service has become the number-one priority in foodservices coast to coast. Operators share tips & training methods that are helping staffs provide the hospitable services today's customers are demanding.

  17. Project reconversion Service Hospital Radiation Oncology Clinics-Medical School

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quarneti, A.; Levaggi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The Health Sector operates within the framework of Social Policy and it is therefore one of the ways of distribution of public benefit, like Housing, Education and Social Security. While public spending on health has grown in recent years, its distribution has been uneven and the sector faces funding and management problems. The Service Hospital Radiation Oncology has reduced its health care liavility , lack technological development and unsufficient human resources and training. Aim: developing an inclusive reform bill Service Hospital Radiation Oncology .Material and Methods: This project tends to form a network institutional, introducing concepts of evidence-based medicine, risk models, cost analysis, coding systems, system implementation of quality management (ISO-9000 Standards). Proposes redefining radiotherapy centers and their potential participation in training resource development goals humanos.Promueve scientific research of national interest. Separate strictly administrative function, management and teaching. The project takes into account the characteristics of demand, the need to order it and organize around her, institutional network system and within the Hospital das Clinicas own related services related to Service Hospital Radiation Oncology , Encourages freedom of choice, and confers greater equity in care. The project would managed by the Hospital Clínicas. Conclusions: We believe this proposal identifies problems and opportunities, Service Hospital Radiation Oncology proposes the development of institutional network under one management model

  18. Service quality of private hospitals: the Iranian patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Asghar; Arab, Mohammad; Froushani, Abbas Rahimi; Rashidian, Arash; Ghazi Tabatabaei, S Mahmoud

    2012-02-02

    Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  19. "Telemarketing" hospital services: benefits, pitfalls and the planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafer, J C

    1984-01-01

    "Telemarketing" is an innovative concept used by many firms to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of product delivery efforts. It can be used by hospitals to benefit both patients and physicians. Further, it can be a tool that, if used properly, can improve the image of the hospital and assist in positioning the organization uniquely among its competitors. This paper discusses the exploratory nature, potential problems, and benefits of telemarketing hospital services and offers pre- and post-implementation considerations. This paper also provides an outline of a sample marketing plan that could serve as an initial model for hospitals that might consider this unique marketing approach.

  20. The appropriateness of emergency medical service responses in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-10

    Oct 10, 2015 ... in the eThekwini district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa ... Rescue, Faculty of Health Sciences, Durban University of Technology, South Africa ... Emergency medical services (EMS) are sometimes required to respond to cases ...

  1. Achievements in emergency medical rescue service, North-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-28

    Aug 28, 2006 ... In North-West province this process of provincialisation took place in ... Emergency Medical Rescue Service, Department of Health, North-West. Victor R .... recovery after CPR treatment should be started as soon as possible ...

  2. NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIOSH Mobile Emergency Medical Service (EMS) Work Environment Laboratory is a 2005 Wheeled Coach Type III ambulance mounted on a Ford E-450 cut-away van chassis....

  3. SERVICE MARKETING MIX OF INDIAN HOSPITALS: A CRITICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh, MOTWANI

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sreenivas, Srinivasarao and Srinivasa (2013 said that “The health care market has become consumer centered and expecting high quality care at a reasonable price. The mushroomed development of corporate hospitals in India, competition is also bringing massive changes in industry structure. In this context, hospital services’ marketing is slowly and surely coming of age and is being woven into the fabric of hospitals planning and public relations programmes.” The essence of any marketing activity is marketing mix, and the central theme of the present paper revolves around the contemporary service marketing mix offered by Indian hospitals. In this paper author has critically reviewed 51 papers to describe elements of hospital service marketing mix; product, price, place, promotion, people, process and physical evidence.

  4. Psychiatric emergency services in Copenhagen 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moltke, Katinka; Høegh, Erica B; Sæbye, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since the first publication of the psychiatric emergency units (PEUs) in Copenhagen 1985, outpatient facilities have undergone considerable changes. Our aim is to examine how these changes have influenced the activities in the PEUs in the same catchment area. METHODS: We conducted...... the 27-year follow-up period. In 1985, 20.7% of the visits ended up without any referrals, compared with 4.8% in 2012. The rate of acute admissions into a psychiatric ward was 60.8% in 2012 compared with 35.65% in 1985. CONCLUSION: The extension of the psychiatric outpatients' facilities since 1985 has...... reduced the number of visits in the PEUs considerably. The results have shown a change of diagnostic distribution and more severe conditions requiring acute admissions for emergency treatment. Close collaboration with the patients' families, GPs, social authorities and specialized psychiatric outpatient...

  5. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-02-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified.

  6. Outsourcing to increase service capacity in a New Zealand hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, C; Palmer, E

    1999-01-01

    Service firms manage variability using both demand-side tactics (levelling customer demand), and supply-side tactics (increasing available capacity). One popular way of increasing available capacity is the outsourcing of non-core services. This article uses a case study to examine the impact of an outsourced non-core service on a hospital's overall service system. Findings show that the outsourced service provides access to more sophisticated technology, increases in-house capacity and saves capital expenditure. However, the outsourcing also increases the scheduling problems that the hospital faces. These problems are largely due to communication delays from the involvement of more than one organisation. These delays decrease the response time available to match changes in demand for the outsourced service. Given the obvious benefits of such outsourcing, the article concludes that management should pay close attention to the communication pathways between organisations, in order to minimise the end effects identified in this study.

  7. Simulation of operational processes in hospital emergency units as lean healthcare tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Macedo Gomes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Lean philosophy is gaining importance due to a competitive environment, which increases the need to reduce costs. Lean practices and tools have been applied to manufacturing, services, supply chain, startups and, the next frontier is healthcare. Most lean techniques can be easily adapted to health organizations. Therefore, this paper intends to summarize Lean practices and tools that are already being applied in health organizations. Among the numerous techniques and lean tools used, this research highlights the Simulation. Therefore, in order to understand the use of Simulation as a Lean Healthcare tool, this research aims to analyze, through the simulation technique, the operational dynamics of the service process of a fictitious hospital emergency unit. Initially a systematic review of the literature on the practices and tools of Lean Healthcare was carried out, in order to identify the main techniques practiced. The research highlighted Simulation as the sixth most cited tool in the literature. Subsequently, a simulation of a service model of an emergency unit was performed through the Arena software. As a main result, it can be highlighted that the attendants of the built model presented a degree of idleness, thus, they are able to atend a greater demand. As a last conclusion, it was verified that the emergency room is the process with longer service time and greater overload.

  8. 47 CFR 25.284 - Emergency Call Center Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mobile satellite service to end-user customers (part 25, subparts A-D) must provide Emergency Call Center... Center personnel must determine the emergency caller's phone number and location and then transfer or otherwise redirect the call to an appropriate public safety answering point. Providers of mobile satellite...

  9. MEMBANGUN SERVICE QUALITY UNTUK MENCAPAI KEPUASAN KONSUMEN DI INDUSTRI HOSPITALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sienny Thio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Service quality is necessary especially in the hospitality industry, remembering that consumers have expectations that must be fulfilled and satisfied. Consumers often expect to get maximal service from the service providers and wish to be treated professionally and as a unique individual. This paper seeks to give a further idea about service quality which can be developed and done by service providers with the hope of fulfilling consumer expectations and finally to satisfy all consumers, both internal and external to the company. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Service Quality sangat dibutuhkan terutama di industri hospitality mengingat konsumen yang mempunyai ekspektasi yang selalu ingin dipenuhi dan dipuaskan. Konsumen selalu mengharapkan untuk mendapatkan service yang maksimal dari para penyedia jasa dalam hal ingin diperlakukan secara professional, dan diperlakukan sebagai individu yang unik. Tulisan ini dimaksudkan untuk memberikan gambaran yang lebih jauh mengenai service quality yang dapat dibangun dan dilakukan oleh para penyedia jasa yang diharapkan dapat memenuhi ekspektasi dari konsumen yang pada akhirnya dapat memuaskan eksternal konsumen maupun internal konsumen. Kata kunci: hospitality, service quality, ekspektasi, kepuasan, penyedia jasa.

  10. Nursing service innovation: A case study examining emergency nurse practitioner service sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Amanda; Gardner, Glenn; Osborne, Sonya

    2018-02-01

    This research aimed to explore factors that influence sustainability of health service innovation, specifically emergency nurse practitioner service. Planning for cost effective provision of healthcare services is a concern globally. Reform initiatives are implemented often incorporating expanding scope of practice for health professionals and innovative service delivery models. Introducing new models is costly in both human and financial resources and therefore understanding factors influencing sustainability is imperative to viable service provision. This research used case study methodology (Yin, ). Data were collected during 2014 from emergency nurse practitioners, emergency department multidisciplinary team members and documents related to nurse practitioner services. Collection methods included telephone and semi-structured interviews, survey and document analysis. Pattern matching techniques were used to compare findings with study propositions. In this study, emergency nurse practitioner services did not meet factors that support health service sustainability. Multidisciplinary team members were confident that emergency nurse practitioner services were safe and helped to meet population health needs. Organizational support for integration of nurse practitioner services was marginal and led to poor understanding of service capability and underuse. This research provides evidence informing sustainability of nursing service models but more importantly raises questions about this little explored field. The findings highlight poor organizational support, excessive restrictions and underuse of the service. This is in direct contrast to contemporary expanding practice reform initiatives. Organizational support for integration is imperative to future service sustainability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Barriers to the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at Portuguese hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazinha, Isabel; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2014-10-01

    In some countries, such as Portugal, clinical pharmacy services in the hospital setting may be implemented to a lower extent than desirable. Several studies have analysed the perceived barriers to pharmacy service implementation in community pharmacy. To identify the barriers towards the implementation of advanced clinical pharmacy services at a hospital level in Portugal, using medication follow-up as an example. Hospital pharmacies in Portugal. A qualitative study based on 20 face-to-face semi-structured interviews of strategists and hospital pharmacists. The interview guide was based on two theoretical frameworks, the Borum's theory of organisational change and the Social Network Theory, and then adapted for the Portuguese reality and hospital environments. A constant comparison process with previously analysed interviews, using an inductive approach, was carried out to allow themes to emerge. Themes were organised following the Leavitt's Organizational Model: functions and objectives; hospital pharmacist; structure of pharmacy services; environment; technology; and medication follow-up based on the study topic. Barriers towards practice change. Medication follow-up appeared not to be a well-known service in Portuguese hospital pharmacies. The major barriers at the pharmacist level were their mind-set, resistance to change, and lack of readiness. Lack of time, excessive bureaucratic and administrative workload, reduced workforce, and lack of support from the head of the service and other colleagues were identified as structural barriers. Lack of access to patients' clinical records and cumbersome procedures to implement medication follow-up were recognised as technological barriers. Poor communication with other healthcare professionals, and lack of support from professional associations were the major environmental barriers. Few of the barriers identified by Portuguese hospital pharmacists were consistent with previous reports from community pharmacy. The mind

  12. Emergency mobile care service: trauma epidemiology in prehospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Kist Ibiapino

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to characterize trauma victims assisted by the Mobile Emergency Care Service (SAMU 192 in the city of Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil. Method: this is a descriptive and retrospective study in which 1,588 records of traumatic events were analyzed from the following variables: sex, age, day of the week, period of the day, trauma mechanism, topography and type of injuries, revised trauma score, type of mobile unit used, professional responsible for care, time to hospital care, procedures performed and deaths. Results: there was a predominance of male victims (69.5% and age between 18 and 37 (46.5%. Occurrences were concentrated at weekends (37.8% and in the evening (52.0%. It revealed traffic accidents (41.3% as the main mechanism of trauma, among which prevailed the involvement of motorcycles (73.0%. Regarding the topographic distribution of lesions, the majority affected the limbs (58.2%. The most adopted conducts in prehospital care were immobilization (26.3% and compression dressing (25.9%. The deaths accounted for 2.7% of the total sample. Conclusion: The population most affected by traumatic events in Ilhéus shown to be composed of young men involved in traffic accidents, mainly motorcyclists, during the weekends.

  13. Patients' satisfaction of service quality in Saudi hospitals: a SERVQUAL analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Borie, Hussein M; Damanhouri, Amal M Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabian hospital performance, vis-á-vis patient satisfaction with service provision, has emerged as a key policy and planning concern. Keeping in view public and private hospital service quality, this article seeks to provide guidelines to the on-going Saudi Arabian health service reorganization, which emphasizes decentralization, bed-capacity expansion, research-based policymaking and initiatives in the health insurance sector. The article outlines an empirical study that compares patient satisfaction with service quality in Saudi Arabian public and private sector hospitals. The authors employ a stratified random sample (1,000 inpatients) from five Saudi Arabian public and five private hospitals. Data were collected through questionnaire using the SERVQUAL scale. For reducing the language bias the questionnaire was translated into Arabic. The response rate was 74.9 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS and appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Cronbach's alpha for five service-quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, safety and empathy) were high and the SERVQUAL instrument proved to be reliable, valid and appropriate. The results showed that sex, education, income and occupation were statistically significant in influencing inpatients' satisfaction, and all the null hypotheses were rejected. Only inpatient age was not significant. The study highlights service quality influence in the design of broader healthcare strategies for Saudi Arabian public and private hospitals. It demands that management researchers and analysts must identify regional service quality consistencies and related inpatient demographic indicators. The study offers some insights into, and guidance for, hospital quality assurance in Saudi Arabia in general and the urban hospital setting in the Middle-East in particular.

  14. Assessing the efficiency of hospital pharmacy services in Thai public district hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanachotphanit, Thananan; Limwattananon, Chulaporn; Limwattananon, Supon; Johns, Jeff R; Schommer, Jon C; Brown, Lawrence M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficiency of hospital pharmacy services and to determine the environmental factors affecting pharmacy service efficiency. The technical efficiency of a hospital pharmacy was assessed to evaluate the hospital's ability to use pharmacy manpower in order to produce the maximum output of the pharmacy service. Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) was used as an efficiency measurement. The two labor inputs were pharmacists and support personnel and the ten outputs were from four pharmacy activities: drug dispensing, drug purchasing and inventory control, patient-oriented activities, and health consumer protection services. This was used to estimate technical efficiency. A Tobit regression model was used to determine the effect of the hospital size, location, input mix of pharmacy staff, working experience of pharmacists at the study hospitals, and use of technology on the pharmacy service efficiency. Data for pharmacy service input and output quantities were obtained from 155 respondents. Nineteen percent were found to have full efficiency with a technical efficiency score of 1.00. Thirty-six percent had a technical efficiency score of 0.80 or above and 27% had a low technical efficiency score (location were significantly associated with pharmacy service efficiency.

  15. Forecasting Hospitalization and Emergency Department Visit Rates for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. A Time-Series Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Andrea; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Moineddin, Rahim; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Hwee, Jeremiah; To, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Knowing trends in and forecasting hospitalization and emergency department visit rates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can enable health care providers, hospitals, and health care decision makers to plan for the future. We conducted a time-series analysis using health care administrative data from the Province of Ontario, Canada, to determine previous trends in acute care hospitalization and emergency department visit rates for COPD and then to forecast future rates. Individuals aged 35 years and older with physician-diagnosed COPD were identified using four universal government health administrative databases and a validated case definition. Monthly COPD hospitalization and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 people with COPD were determined from 2003 to 2014 and then forecasted to 2024 using autoregressive integrated moving average models. Between 2003 and 2014, COPD prevalence increased from 8.9 to 11.1%. During that time, there were 274,951 hospitalizations and 290,482 emergency department visits for COPD. After accounting for seasonality, we found that monthly COPD hospitalization and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 individuals with COPD remained stable. COPD prevalence was forecasted to increase to 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.4-14.1) by 2024, whereas monthly COPD hospitalization and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 people with COPD were forecasted to remain stable at 2.7 (95% CI, 1.6-4.4) and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.3-5.6), respectively. Forecasted age- and sex-stratified rates were also stable. COPD hospital and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 people with COPD have been stable for more than a decade and are projected to remain stable in the near future. Given increasing COPD prevalence, this means notably more COPD health service use in the future.

  16. Maternity Care Services Provided by Family Physicians in Rural Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard A

    The purpose of this study was to describe how many rural family physicians (FPs) and other types of providers currently provide maternity care services, and the requirements to obtain privileges. Chief executive officers of rural hospitals were purposively sampled in 15 geographically diverse states with significant rural areas in 2013 to 2014. Questions were asked about the provision of maternity care services, the physicians who perform them, and qualifications required to obtain maternity care privileges. Analysis used descriptive statistics, with comparisons between the states, community rurality, and hospital size. The overall response rate was 51.2% (437/854). Among all identified hospitals, 44.9% provided maternity care services, which varied considerably by state (range, 17-83%; P maternity care, a mean of 271 babies were delivered per year, 27% by cesarean delivery. A mean of 7.0 FPs had privileges in these hospitals, of which 2.8 provided maternity care and 1.8 performed cesarean deliveries. The percentage of FPs who provide maternity care (mean, 48%; range, 10-69%; P maternity care who are FPs (mean, 63%; range, 10-88%; P maternity care services in US rural hospitals, including cesarean deliveries. Some family medicine residencies should continue to train their residents to provide these services to keep replenishing this valuable workforce. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  17. The perceived impact of an emergency department immediate reporting service: An exploratory survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snaith, Beverly; Hardy, Maryann

    2013-01-01

    Background: Immediate reporting, commonly referred to as a ‘hot reporting’, has been advocated as a method of effectively supporting clinical decision making. However, its implementation nationally has been limited with poor understanding of its value in practice. Method: A cross sectional attitudinal survey was distributed to emergency department clinicians (medical and nursing staff) and radiographers to explore perceptions of an immediate reporting service in terms of its influence on professional role and autonomy, patient care and service quality. Results: A total of 87 (n = 87/155; 56.1%) completed questionnaires were returned. The findings suggest that significant support for immediate reporting exists. Immediate reporting is believed to improve service quality, reduce clinical errors and provide opportunity for image interpretation skills development. However, responses were not consistent across clinical professions and staff grades. Conclusion: The immediate reporting of emergency department images is perceived to benefit patient, emergency department clinicians and hospital organisation

  18. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  19. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  20. Evaluation of a radioisotope service in a general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateil, P.-Y.

    1978-12-01

    The value of radioisotopes in medicine has become increasingly apparent over the last few years. Nuclear medicine however recent, has nevertheless reached adult hood and doctors appreciate its substantial contribution in the field of diagnosis especially. So far nuclear medicine has been confined to University Hospital Centres, mainly for legal reasons. However the considerable help offered by this discipline is now taken for granted in the medical world and the wholly experimental stage is long past. While this aspect of nuclar medicine still exists, and is still dealt with by the services of University Hospital Centres, radioisotopes are now used to a large extend and on a day-to-day basis in pathology. Owing to pressure of work it is difficult for UH Centres to meet all request for examinations, so would the presence of nuclear medicine Service be justified in general Hospitals. The existence of one such service at the Bayonne HC might help to answer this question. For this reason the activity of the Bayonne HC Nuclear Medicine Service during its first year of practice is examined here. For a better understanding of the position this report first presents the Bayonne Hospital and the place occupied by a nuclear Medicine service in such an establishment. The activity of this service during its first year is then studied and the situation weighed up generally [fr

  1. Identifying key hospital service quality factors in online health communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain; Kim, Minki

    2015-04-07

    The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. We defined social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea's two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and

  2. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cournane, S.; Conway, R.; Creagh, D.; Byrne, D.G.; Sheehy, N.; Silke, B.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. Materials and methods: All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010–2014 were evaluated. The 50"t"h, 75"t"h, and 90"t"h centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. Results: For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. Conclusion: CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. - Highlights: • There are differing clinical complexities for patients depending on the modality. • A predictive risk model, incorporating advanced imaging, was devised. • Inpatients delays in radiology imaging associated with longer LOS. • Inpatients who underwent radiology imaging associated with increased hospital costs.

  3. Patient-perceived hospital service quality: an empirical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T; Pai, Rashmi Yogesh

    2018-02-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to appraise Pai and Chary's (2016) conceptual framework for measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality (HSQ). Design/methodology/approach A structured questionnaire was used to obtain data from teaching, public and corporate hospital patients. Several tests were conducted to assess the instrument's reliability and validity. Pai and Chary's (2016) nine dimensions for measuring HSQ were examined in this paper. Findings The tests confirm that Pai and Chary's (2016) conceptual framework is reliable and valid. The study also establishes that the nine dimensions measure HSQ. Practical implications The framework empowers managers to assess service quality in any hospital settings, corporate, public and teaching, using an approach that is superior to the existing HSQ scales. Originality/value This paper helps researchers and practitioners to assess HSQ from patient perspectives in any hospital setting.

  4. Production layout improvement in emergency services: a participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Mateus; Amaral, Fernando Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Volunteer fire department is a service that responds emergency situations in places where there are no military emergency services. These services need to respond quickly, because time is often responsible for the operation success besides work environment and setup time interfere with the prompt response to these calls and care efficiency. The layout design is one factor that interferes with the quick setup. In this case, the spaces arrangement can result in excessive or unnecessary movements; also the equipment provision may hinder the selection and collection of these or even create movement barriers for the workers. This work created a new layout for the emergency assistance service, considering the human factors related to work through the task analysis and workers participation on the alternatives of improvement. The results showed an alternate layout with corridors and minimization of unusable sites, allowing greater flexibility and new possibilities of requirements.

  5. Emergency Department (ED, ED Observation, Day Hospital, and Hospital Admissions for Adults with Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Silva

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Use of alternative venues to manage uncomplicated vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC, such as a day hospital (DH or ED observation unit, for patients with sickle cell anemia, may significantly reduce admission rates, which may subsequently reduce 30-day readmission rates. Methods: In the context of a two-institution quality improvement project to implement best practices for management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD VOC, we prospectively compared acute care encounters for utilization of 1 emergency department (ED; 2 ED observation unit; 3 DH, and 4 hospital admission, of two different patient cohorts with SCD presenting to our two study sites. Using a representative sample of patients from each institution, we also tabulated SCD patient visits or admissions to outside hospitals within 20 miles of the patients’ home institutions. Results: Over 30 months 427 patients (297 at Site 1 and 130 at Site 2 initiated 4,740 institutional visits, totaling 6,627 different acute care encounters, including combinations of encounters. The range of encounters varied from a low of 0 (203 of 500 patients [40.6%] at Site 1; 65 of 195 patients [33.3%] at Site 2, and a high of 152 (5/month acute care encounters for one patient at Site 2. Patients at Site 2 were more likely to be admitted to the hospital during the study period (88.4% vs. 74.4%, p=0.0011 and have an ED visit (96.9% vs. 85.5%, p=0.0002. DH was used more frequently at Site 1 (1.207 encounters for 297 patients at Site 1, vs. 199 encounters for 130 patients at Site 2, and ED observation was used at Site 1 only. Thirty-five percent of patients visited hospitals outside their home academic center. Conclusion: In this 30-month assessment of two sickle cell cohorts, healthcare utilization varied dramatically between individual patients. One cohort had more hospital admissions and ED encounters, while the other cohort had more day hospital encounters and used a sickle cell disease

  6. Using the critical incident survey to assess hospital service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, B; Connor, G; Barnhart, T

    1993-01-01

    This survey was designed to determine "standards of excellence" in hospital services as defined by (a) former patients, (b) physicians, (c) hospital employees, and (d) corporate insurance subscribers. One hundred forty-seven (147) patients, 188 employees, and 20 corporate subscribers were interviewed by telephone, and 52 physicians were interviewed in their offices. The interview consisted of a single question: "Can you think of a time when, as a patient/employee/employer/physician, you had a particularly satisfying or dissatisfying experience with a local hospital?" Reported incidents were reviewed, and 239 "critical incidents" were identified. These incidents were classified into 12 descriptive categories relating to the underlying factors in the incident reports. Six focus groups were later held with participants segregated by the population pool they represented. These groups were asked to develop definitions of "excellence" in hospital service quality and standards for service which would "exceed expectations." The focus groups created 122 standards of excellence, which were classified into 43 categories. Overall, the largest percentages of corporate, physician, and employee critical incidents were classified as "Administrative Policy" issues. Patients most often reported "Nurturing" incidents as critical to their perceptions of hospital service quality.

  7. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty.

  8. 'Being a conduit' between hospital and home: stakeholders' views and perceptions of a nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasalu, Munikumar Ramasamy; Clarke, Amanda; Atkinson, Joanne

    2015-06-01

    To explore and critically examine stakeholders' views and perceptions concerning the nurse-led Palliative Care Discharge Service in an acute hospital setting and to inform sustainability, service development and future service configuration. The drive in policy and practice is to enable individuals to achieve their preferred place of care during their last days of life. However, most people in UK die in acute hospital settings against their wishes. To facilitate individuals' preferred place of care, a large acute hospital in northeast England implemented a pilot project to establish a nurse-led Macmillan Palliative Care Discharge Facilitator Service. A pluralistic evaluation design using qualitative methods was used to seek stakeholders' views and perceptions of this service. In total, 12 participants (five bereaved carers and seven health professionals) participated in the evaluation. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with bereaved carers who used this service for their relatives. A focus group and an individual interview were undertaken with health professionals who had used the service since its inception. Individual interviews were also conducted with the Discharge Facilitator and service manager. Analysis of all data was guided by Framework Analysis. Four key themes emerged relating to the role of the Discharge Facilitator Service: achieving preferred place of care; the Discharge Facilitator as the 'conduit' between hospital and community settings; delays in hospital discharge and stakeholders' perceptions of the way forward for the service. The Discharge Facilitator Service acted as a reliable resource and support for facilitating the fast-tracking of end-of-life patients to their preferred place of care. Future planning for hospital-based palliative care discharge facilitating services need to consider incorporating strategies that include: increased profile of the service, expansion of service provision and the Discharge Facilitator's earlier

  9. Availability of software services for a hospital information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, N

    1998-03-01

    Hospital information systems (HISs) are becoming more important and covering more parts in daily hospital operations as order-entry systems become popular and electronic charts are introduced. Thus, HISs today need to be able to provide necessary services for hospital operations for a 24-h day, 365 days a year. The provision of services discussed here does not simply mean the availability of computers, in which all that matters is that the computer is functioning. It means the provision of necessary information for hospital operations by the computer software, and we will call it the availability of software services. HISs these days are mostly client-server systems. To increase availability of software services in these systems, it is not enough to just use system structures that are highly reliable in existing host-centred systems. Four main components which support availability of software services are network systems, client computers, server computers, and application software. In this paper, we suggest how to structure these four components to provide the minimum requested software services even if a part of the system stops to function. The network system should be double-protected in stratus using Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) as its base network. Client computers should be fat clients with as much application logic as possible, and reference information which do not require frequent updates (master files, for example) should be replicated in clients. It would be best if all server computers could be double-protected. However, if that is physically impossible, one database file should be made accessible by several server computers. Still, at least the basic patients' information and the latest clinical records should be double-protected physically. Application software should be tested carefully before introduction. Different versions of the application software should always be kept and managed in case the new version has problems. If a hospital

  10. Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Services in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Han, X.; Zhou, Y.; Yue, P.; Wang, X.; Lu, J.; Jiang, W.; Li, J.; Tang, H.; Wang, F.; Li, X.; Fan, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service(DIMERS) project was kicked off in 2017 in China, with the purpose to improve timely responsive service of the institutions involved in the management of natural disasters and man-made emergency situations with the timely and high-quality products derived from Space-based, Air-based and the in-situ Earth observation. The project team brought together a group of top universities and research institutions in the field of Earth observations as well as the operational institute in typical disaster services at national level. The project will bridge the scientific research and the response services of massive catastrophe in order to improve the emergency response capability of China and provide scientific and technological support for the implementation of the national emergency response strategy. In response to the call for proposal of "Earth Observation and Navigation" of 2017 National Key R&D Program of China, Professor Wu Jianjun, the deputy chairman of Faculty of Geographical Science of Beijing Normal University, submitted the Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service (DIMERS) project, jointly with the experts and scholars from Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan University, China Institute of Earthquake Forecasting of China Earthquake Administration and China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Science. After two round evaluations, the proposal was funded by Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  11. The social determinants of emergency department and hospital use by injection drug users in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palepu, A; Strathdee, S A; Hogg, R S; Anis, A H; Rae, S; Cornelisse, P G; Patrick, D M; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Schechter, M T

    1999-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and human immunodeficiency (HIV) status of a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs) on their self-reported health service utilization. Interviewer-administered questionnaire. IDUs who had injected illicit drugs within the previous month were recruited through street outreach. They underwent serology for HIV-1 and questionnaires on demographics, drug using behaviors, housing status, and health service utilization (hospitalization overnight and emergency department visits) in the previous 6 months. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent associations with the use of health services. Of 1,103 cohort participants, 65% were male, 63% were white, and 23% were HIV positive. Cocaine was the most frequently injected drug used. Almost half (47%) had used health services in the previous 6 months. The following variables were associated independently with health service utilization (adjusted odds ratio; 95% confidence interval): unstable housing, defined as living primarily in a hotel, boarding room, or transition house or on the street in the past 6 months (1.44; 1.11-1.86); female gender (1.45; 1.11-1.89); HIV-positive status (1.43; 1.06-1.92); injection of cocaine (1.50; 1.12-2.02); and primary care I physician visit in past 6 months (1.91; 1.39-2.64). IDUs with unstable housing were more likely to report emergency department and hospital use, which may be a reflection of their disorganized lifestyle or poorer health status. Further studies are required to assess the effect on the health status and health care use of IDUs of interventions that increase the availability of safe, affordable housing.

  12. Factors associated with the difficulty in hospital acceptance among elderly emergency patients: A population-based study in Osaka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Katayama, Yusuke; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Hayashida, Sumito; Kawamura, Takashi; Iwami, Taku; Ohta, Bon

    2017-12-01

    We aimed to investigate prehospital factors associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance among elderly emergency patients. We reviewed ambulance records in Osaka City from January 2013 through December 2014, and enrolled all elderly emergency patients aged ≥65 years who were transported by on-scene emergency medical service personnel to a hospital that the personnel had selected. The definition of difficulty in hospital acceptance was to the requirement for ≥4 phone calls to hospitals by emergency medical service personnel before receiving a decision from the destination hospitals. Prehospital factors associated with difficulty in hospital acceptance were examined through logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 72 105 elderly patients were included, and 13 332 patients (18.5%) experienced difficulty in hospital acceptance. In the simple linear regression model, hospital selection time increased significantly with an increasing number of phone calls (R 2  = 0.774). In the multivariable analysis, older age (P for trend emergency-related symptoms and difficulty in hospital acceptance among elderly patients with symptoms of internal disease (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.53-1.91). In Japan, which has a rapidly aging population, a comprehensive strategy for elderly emergency patients, especially for advanced age groups or nursing home residents, is required. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 2441-2448. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  13. [Characteristics of the emergency health service demand in Southern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carret, Maria Laura Vidal; Fassa, Anaclaudia Gastal; Paniz, Vera Maria Vieira; Soares, Patrícia Carret

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the demand of emergency health service. It was performed a descriptive analyses of 1647 adults that consulted at emergency public service of Pelotas, Brazil. Older subjects, non white skin color, lower schooling, without partner, and smokers presented higher prevalence of consultations at this service when compared with the general population. Individuals waited, on average, 15 minutes to have their consultations, exams were requested in more than 40% of the visits, and intravenous medication were administered in one third of the visits. Elderly waited longer before searching the service, but they had lowest awaiting time after arriving at emergency service and had higher percentage of regular doctor and social support. Elderly had more diagnosis related to circulatory system, while among the youngest, external causes were the most frequent. The low waiting average for consultation suggest this service provide an immediate care while the great number of ill-defined signs or symptoms indicate that the provided care is provisional. It is necessary to train emergency professionals to reduce the number of tests requested and to assure that either professional as the population is conscious about the importance of a continuity of care.

  14. Impact of Superstorm Sandy on Medicare Patients’ Utilization of Hospitals and Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Stryckman

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: National health security requires that healthcare facilities be prepared to provide rapid, effective emergency and trauma care to all patients affected by a catastrophic event. We sought to quantify changes in healthcare utilization patterns for an at-risk Medicare population before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy’s 2012 landfall in New Jersey (NJ. Methods: This study is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries impacted by Superstorm Sandy. We compared hospital emergency department (ED and healthcare facility inpatient utilization in the weeks before and after Superstorm Sandy landfall using a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries continuously enrolled in 2011 and 2012 (N=224,116. Outcome measures were pre-storm discharges (or transfers, average length of stay, service intensity weight, and post-storm ED visits resulting in either discharge or hospital admission. Results: In the pre-storm week, hospital transfers from skilled nursing facilities (SNF increased by 39% and inpatient discharges had a 0.3 day decreased mean length of stay compared to the prior year. In the post-storm week, ED visits increased by 14% statewide; of these additional “surge” patients, 20% were admitted to the hospital. The increase in ED demand was more than double the statewide average in the most highly impacted coastal regions (35% versus 14%. Conclusion: Superstorm Sandy impacted both pre- and post-storm patient movement in New Jersey; post-landfall ED surge was associated with overall storm impact, which was greatest in coastal counties. A significant increase in the number and severity of pre-storm transfer patients, in particular from SNF, as well as in post-storm ED visits and inpatient admissions, draws attention to the importance of collaborative regional approaches to healthcare in large-scale events.

  15. Impact of Superstorm Sandy on Medicare Patients' Utilization of Hospitals and Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryckman, Benoit; Walsh, Lauren; Carr, Brendan G; Hupert, Nathaniel; Lurie, Nicole

    2017-10-01

    National health security requires that healthcare facilities be prepared to provide rapid, effective emergency and trauma care to all patients affected by a catastrophic event. We sought to quantify changes in healthcare utilization patterns for an at-risk Medicare population before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy's 2012 landfall in New Jersey (NJ). This study is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries impacted by Superstorm Sandy. We compared hospital emergency department (ED) and healthcare facility inpatient utilization in the weeks before and after Superstorm Sandy landfall using a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries continuously enrolled in 2011 and 2012 (N=224,116). Outcome measures were pre-storm discharges (or transfers), average length of stay, service intensity weight, and post-storm ED visits resulting in either discharge or hospital admission. In the pre-storm week, hospital transfers from skilled nursing facilities (SNF) increased by 39% and inpatient discharges had a 0.3 day decreased mean length of stay compared to the prior year. In the post-storm week, ED visits increased by 14% statewide; of these additional "surge" patients, 20% were admitted to the hospital. The increase in ED demand was more than double the statewide average in the most highly impacted coastal regions (35% versus 14%). Superstorm Sandy impacted both pre- and post-storm patient movement in New Jersey; post-landfall ED surge was associated with overall storm impact, which was greatest in coastal counties. A significant increase in the number and severity of pre-storm transfer patients, in particular from SNF, as well as in post-storm ED visits and inpatient admissions, draws attention to the importance of collaborative regional approaches to healthcare in large-scale events.

  16. Impact of Superstorm Sandy on Medicare Patients’ Utilization of Hospitals and Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryckman, Benoit; Walsh, Lauren; Carr, Brendan G.; Hupert, Nathaniel; Lurie, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Introduction National health security requires that healthcare facilities be prepared to provide rapid, effective emergency and trauma care to all patients affected by a catastrophic event. We sought to quantify changes in healthcare utilization patterns for an at-risk Medicare population before, during, and after Superstorm Sandy’s 2012 landfall in New Jersey (NJ). Methods This study is a retrospective cohort study of Medicare beneficiaries impacted by Superstorm Sandy. We compared hospital emergency department (ED) and healthcare facility inpatient utilization in the weeks before and after Superstorm Sandy landfall using a 20% random sample of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries continuously enrolled in 2011 and 2012 (N=224,116). Outcome measures were pre-storm discharges (or transfers), average length of stay, service intensity weight, and post-storm ED visits resulting in either discharge or hospital admission. Results In the pre-storm week, hospital transfers from skilled nursing facilities (SNF) increased by 39% and inpatient discharges had a 0.3 day decreased mean length of stay compared to the prior year. In the post-storm week, ED visits increased by 14% statewide; of these additional “surge” patients, 20% were admitted to the hospital. The increase in ED demand was more than double the statewide average in the most highly impacted coastal regions (35% versus 14%). Conclusion Superstorm Sandy impacted both pre- and post-storm patient movement in New Jersey; post-landfall ED surge was associated with overall storm impact, which was greatest in coastal counties. A significant increase in the number and severity of pre-storm transfer patients, in particular from SNF, as well as in post-storm ED visits and inpatient admissions, draws attention to the importance of collaborative regional approaches to healthcare in large-scale events. PMID:29085534

  17. Predictors of Language Service Availability in U.S. Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody K. Schiaffino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Hispanics comprise 17% of the total U.S. population, surpassing African-Americans as the largest minority group. Linguistically, almost 60 million people speak a language other than English. This language diversity can create barriers and additional burden and risk when seeking health services. Patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP for example, have been shown to experience a disproportionate risk of poor health outcomes, making the provision of Language Services (LS in healthcare facilities critical. Research on the determinants of LS adoption has focused more on overall cultural competence and internal managerial decision-making than on measuring LS adoption as a process outcome influenced by contextual or external factors. The current investigation examines the relationship between state policy, service area factors, and hospital characteristics on hospital LS adoption. Methods We employ a cross-sectional analysis of survey data from a national sample of hospitals in the American Hospital Association (AHA database for 2011 (N= 4876 to analyze hospital characteristics and outcomes, augmented with additional population data from the American Community Survey (ACS to estimate language diversity in the hospital service area. Additional data from the National Health Law Program (NHeLP facilitated the state level Medicaid reimbursement factor. Results Only 64%of hospitals offered LS. Hospitals that adopted LS were more likely to be not-for-profit, in areas with higher than average language diversity, larger, and urban. Hospitals in above average language diverse counties had more than 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS than less language diverse areas [Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR: 2.26, P< 0.01]. Further, hospitals with a strategic orientation toward diversity had nearly 2-fold greater odds of adopting LS (AOR: 1.90, P< 0.001. Conclusion Our findings support the importance of structural and contextual factors as they relate to

  18. Mobile information and communication in the hospital outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Chen; Hung, Ming-Chien; Li, Yu-Chuan; Chi, Y P

    2007-08-01

    Most healthcare providers provide mobile service for their medical staff; however, few healthcare providers provide mobile service as part of their outpatient service. The mobile outpatient service system (MOSS) focuses on illness treatment, illness prevention and patient relation management for outpatient service users. Initiated in a local hospital in Taiwan, the MOSS pilot project was developed to improve outpatient service quality and pursue higher patient safety. This study focuses on the development of the MOSS. The workflow, architecture and target users of the MOSS are delineated. In addition, there were two surveys conducted as part of this study. After a focus group of medical staff identified areas in which outpatient services might be improved by the MOSS, the first survey was administered to outpatients to confirm the focus group's intuitions. The second administration of the survey explored outpatient satisfaction after they used the MOSS service. With regard to outpatient attitudes, about 93% of participants agreed that the mobile outpatient service improved outpatient service quality. In the area of outpatient satisfaction, about 89% of participants indicated they were satisfied with the mobile outpatient service. Supported by our study finding, we propose that more diverse mobile outpatient services can be provided in the future.

  19. Spending on Hospital Care and Pediatric Psychology Service Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Meghan E; Peugh, James L; Brown, Gabriella A; Pai, Ahna L H

    2017-10-01

    To examine the relationship between need-based pediatric psychology service use and spending on hospital care among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Billing data were obtained from 48 AYAs with cancer receiving need-based pediatric psychology services and a comparison cohort of 48 AYAs with cancer not receiving services. A factorial analysis of covariance examined group differences in spending for hospital care. Pending significant findings, a multivariate analysis of covariance was planned to examine the relationship between need-based pediatric psychology service use and spending for inpatient admissions, emergency department (ED) visits, and outpatient visits. Spending for hospital care was higher among AYAs receiving need-based pediatric psychology services than in the comparison cohort (p psychology services. The behavioral and psychosocial difficulties warranting need-based pediatric psychology services may predict higher health care spending. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Common geriatric emergencies in a rural hospital in South‑Eastern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common geriatric emergencies in a rural hospital in South‑Eastern Nigeria. ... by emergency health conditions that predispose them to higher risk of disability and ... The geriatric patients seen within the study period who met the selection ...

  1. An overview of the construction of emergency and pre-hospital first aid platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To further improve the ability of pre-hospital and in-hospital collaborative treatment, strengthen emergency multidisciplinary cooperation and construct a scientific, rational and efficient emergency system, under the support of former chairman Yu Xue-zhong, Dr. Li Chun-sheng and numerous colleagues in the industry, the Emergency Medicine Society of the Chinese Medical Association appeal to us to draft Construction of Emergency and Pre-hospital Platform. Based on this background, the platform of emergency and pre-hospital first aid helps to build a “one horizontal and one Longitudinal” treatment model, using the horizontal and longitudinal patterns to integrate emergency medical resources to satisfy the automatic information integration and intelligent analysis sharing, realizing the emergency management visualization and medical information digitization, simplifying the medical process and establishing a perfect standard for the emergent diseases, thereby ultimately achieving efficient diagnosis and scientific treatment.

  2. The value of the pre-hospital learning environment as part of the emergency nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonett van Wyk

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: The research findings support the value and continuation of utilising the pre-hospital clinical learning environment for placing post-basic emergency nursing students when enrolled in the emergency nursing programme.

  3. Differences in emergency colorectal surgery in Medicaid and uninsured patients by hospital safety net status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Sabik, Lindsay M

    2015-02-01

    We examined whether safety net hospitals reduce the likelihood of emergency colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients. If these patients have better access to care through safety net providers, they should be less likely to undergo emergency resection relative to similar patients at non- safety net hospitals. Using population-based data, we estimated the relationship between safety net hospitals, patient insurance status, and emergency CRC surgery. We extracted inpatient admission data from the Virginia Health Information discharge database and matched them to the Virginia Cancer Registry for patients aged 21 to 64 years who underwent a CRC resection between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005 (n = 5488). We differentiated between medically defined emergencies and those that originated in the emergency department (ED). For each definition of emergency surgery, we estimated the linear probability models of the effects of being treated at a safety net hospital on the probability of having an emergency resection. Safety net hospitals reduce emergency surgeries among uninsured and Medicaid CRC patients. When defining an emergency resection as those that involved an ED visit, these patients were 15 to 20 percentage points less likely to have an emergency resection when treated in a safety net hospital. Our results suggest that these hospitals provide a benefit, most likely through the access they afford to timely and appropriate care, to uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients relative to hospitals without a safety net mission.

  4. Instrument for assessing the quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care: content validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Assis Neves Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To validate an instrument to assess quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care. METHOD A methodological study where 20 professionals gave their opinions on the items of the proposed instrument. The analysis was performed using Kappa test (K and Content Validity Index (CVI, considering K> 0.80 and CVI ≥ 0.80. RESULTS Three items were excluded from the instrument: Professional Compensation; Job Satisfaction and Services Performed. Items that obtained adequate K and CVI indexes and remained in the instrument were: ambulance conservation status; physical structure; comfort in the ambulance; availability of material resources; user/staff safety; continuous learning; safety demonstrated by the team; access; welcoming; humanization; response time; costumer privacy; guidelines on care; relationship between professionals and costumers; opportunity for costumers to make complaints and multiprofessional conjunction/actuation. CONCLUSION The instrument to assess quality of care has been validated and may contribute to the evaluation of pre-hospital care in mobile emergency services.

  5. Outcomes of patients calling emergency medical services for suspected acute cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Sejersten, Maria Sejersten; Baber, Usman

    2015-01-01

    Adequate health care is increasingly dependent on prehospital systems and cardiovascular (CV) disease remains the most common cause for hospital admission. However the prevalence of CV dispatches of emergency medical services (EMS) is not well reported and survival data described in clinical trials......, this study emphasizes the need for an efficient prehospital phase with focus on CV disease and proper triage of patients suitable for invasive evaluation if the outcomes of acute heart disease are to be improved further in the current international context of hospitals merging into highly specialized...

  6. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest during emergency calls - a systematic review of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viereck, Søren; Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Rothman, Josephine Philip

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The medical dispatcher plays an essential role as part of the first link in the Chain of Survival, by recognising the out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) during the emergency call, dispatching the appropriate first responder or emergency medical services response, performing...... in compliance with the PRISMA guidelines. We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library on 4 November 2015. Observational studies, reporting the proportion of clinically confirmed OHCAs that was recognised during the emergency call, were included. Two authors independently screened...

  7. Determinants of Demand in the Public Dental Emergency Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Maria Sa; Gatti, Marcia An; de Conti, Marta Hs; de Ap Simeão, Sandra F; de Oliveira Braga Franzolin, Solange; Marta, Sara N

    2017-02-01

    Although dental emergencies are primarily aimed at pain relief, in practice, dental emergency services have been overwhelmed by the massive inflow of patients with less complex cases, which could be resolved at basic levels of health care. They frequently become the main gateway to the system. We investigated the determinant factors of demand at the Central Dental Emergency Unit in Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil. The questionnaire was applied to 521 users to evaluate sociodemographic profile; factors that led users to seek the service at the central dental emergency; perception of service offered. About 80.4% of users went directly to the central dental emergency, even before seeking basic health units. The reasons were difficulty to be attended (34.6%) and incompatible time (9.8%). To the perception of the necessity of the service, responses were problem as urgent (78.3%) and pain was the main complaint (69.1%). The profile we found was unmarried (41.5%), male (52.2%), white (62.8%), aged 30 to 59 (52.2%), incomplete basic education (41.6%), family income up to 2 minimum wages (47.4%), and no medical/dental plan (88.9%). It was concluded that the users of central dental emergency come from all sectors of the city, due to difficult access to basic health units; they consider their complaint urgent; and they are satisfied with the service offered. To meet the profile of the user urgency's service so that it is not overloaded with demand that can be fulfilled in basic health units.

  8. Emergency medical service systems in Japan : Past, present, and future

    OpenAIRE

    Tanigawa, Koichi; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2006-01-01

    Emergency medical services are provided by the fire defense headquarter of the local government in Japan. We have a one-tiered EMS system. The ambulance is staffed by three crews trained in rescue, stabilization, transportation, and advanced care of traumatic and medical emergencies. There are three levels of care provided by ambulance personnel including a basic-level ambulance crew (First Aid Class one, FAC-1), a second level (Standard First Aid Class, SFAC), and the highest level (Emergenc...

  9. Otorhinolaryngological Emergencies in a Tertiary Hospital in Port ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-05-22

    May 22, 2017 ... 2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters ... This includes referrals from the accident and emergency as well as the ... presented as emergencies, however only 2160 cases were real emergencies.

  10. Theatre and emergency services rendered by generalist medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 27 district hospitals were staffed by 147 full time, part-time and community service practitioners at the time of the study. The part-time practitioners had statistically significant more experience. Fifty percent of the respondents had done an ATLS or equivalent course, whilst only 5% were qualified family physicians.

  11. HOSPITAL IMAGE AS A MODERATING VARIABLE ON THE EFFECT OF HOSPITAL SERVICE QUALITY ON THE CUSTOMER PERCEIVED VALUE, CUSTOMER TRUST AND CUSTOMER LOYALTY IN HOSPITAL SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrianawati Usman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This is an explanatory research, analyzing the hospital image as a moderating variable on the effect of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and trust. Research was conducted at several hospitals in Surabaya Indonesia, especially to outpatients. Data was collected by survey to the outpatients of the hospitals. The purpose of this research was empirically examining the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust, examine effects of customer perceived value and customer trust on customer loyalty. Moreover This research also examined the variable of hospital image as a moderating variable in the effects of hospital service quality on customer perceived value and customer trust. The result of this research gave a perspective to hospital management about the importance of building patient trust, since trust is very important, even more important than satisfaction level. Further studies with more emphasis on identifying the factors building patient trust to the hospital in order to raise customer loyalty should be conducted.

  12. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  13. A proposed simulation optimization model framework for emergency department problems in public hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ireen Munira; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Bakar, Sakhinah Abu; Ahmad, Norazura; Najmuddin, Ahmad Farid

    2015-12-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is a very complex system with limited resources to support increase in demand. ED services are considered as good quality if they can meet the patient's expectation. Long waiting times and length of stay is always the main problem faced by the management. The management of ED should give greater emphasis on their capacity of resources in order to increase the quality of services, which conforms to patient satisfaction. This paper is a review of work in progress of a study being conducted in a government hospital in Selangor, Malaysia. This paper proposed a simulation optimization model framework which is used to study ED operations and problems as well as to find an optimal solution to the problems. The integration of simulation and optimization is hoped can assist management in decision making process regarding their resource capacity planning in order to improve current and future ED operations.

  14. Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations." It is divided into four units: recreational resources for education, employment, and professional opportunities; barbering and cosmetology; mortuary science; hotel-motel management. Each unit is…

  15. Effects of Ramadan on Forensic Cases Presenting to Emergency Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sarı Doğan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The term "forensic case" is defined as disruption of physical and/or mental health of an individual due to external factors. Forensic cases are most frequently encountered in emergency services. Ramadan, the ninth month of Islamic calendar, is a month of fasting throughout which Muslims from all around the world worship by observing fasting. There are many studies focusing on the effects of fasting on health. The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of Ramadan on forensic cases presenting to emergency service.

  16. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  17. Helicopter emergency medical services response to equestrian accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard M; Macauley, Ben; Richardson, Sarah; de Coverly, Richard; Russell, Malcolm

    2015-04-01

    Horse riding is a common leisure activity associated with a significant rate of injury. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) may be called to equestrian accidents. Accurate HEMS tasking is important to ensure appropriate use of this valuable medical resource. We sought to review HEMS response to equestrian accidents and identify factors associated with the need for HEMS intervention or transport of the patient to a major trauma centre. Retrospective case review of all missions flown by Kent, Surrey & Sussex Air Ambulance Trust over a 1-year period (1 July 2011 to 1 July 2012). All missions were screened for accidents involving a horse. Call details, patient demographics, suspected injuries, clinical interventions and patient disposition were all analysed. In the 12-month data collection period there were 47 equestrian accidents, representing ∼3% of the total annual missions. Of the 42 cases HEMS attended, one patient was pronounced life extinct at the scene. In 15 (36%) cases the patient was airlifted to hospital. In four (10%) cases, the patient underwent prehospital anaesthesia. There were no specific predictors of HEMS intervention. Admission to a major trauma centre was associated with the rider not wearing a helmet, a fall onto their head or the horse falling onto the rider. Equestrian accidents represent a significant proportion of HEMS missions. The majority of patients injured in equestrian accidents do not require HEMS intervention, however, a small proportion have life-threatening injuries, requiring immediate critical intervention. Further research is warranted, particularly regarding HEMS dispatch, to further improve accuracy of tasking to equestrian accidents.

  18. Guidelines for Induction and Intubation Sequence Fast in Emergency Service

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Perilla, Patricia; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Moreno Carrillo, Atilio; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio; Gempeler Rueda, Fritz E.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Hospital Universitario San Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    The rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is a procedure designed to minimize the time spent in securing the airway by endotracheal tube placement in emergency situations in patients at high risk of aspiration. Being clear about this situation, it is unquestionable the importance of education and training related to rapid sequence intubation to be made to the physicians responsible for the recovery rooms, emergency services and paramedics responsible for managing emergencies and disasters field . T...

  19. An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Abrams, Stephen; Kunze, John; Loy, David

    2010-01-01

    In order better to meet the needs of its diverse University of California (UC) constituencies, the California Digital Library UC Curation Center is re-envisioning its approach to digital curation infrastructure by devolving function into a set of granular, independent, but interoperable micro-services. Since each of these services is small and self-contained, they are more easily developed, deployed, maintained, and enhanced; at the same time, complex curation function can emerge from the str...

  20. Caracterização de crianças e adolescentes atendidos por maus tratos em um hospital de emergência no município de Fortaleza-CE Characterization of maltreated children and adolescents taken into a paediatric emergency health care service in Fortaleza-CE-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcelina Maria da Silva

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar o perfil da criança e adolescente maltratados e atendidos em um hospital de emergência, no Município de Fortaleza, Ceará. Utilizou-se a pesquisa documental retrospectiva com análise dos formulários da Comissão de Maus Tratos à Infância e Adolescência. Os resultados revelaram que o sexo masculino e a faixa etária de 1 a 5 anos foram os mais atingidos; o principal agressor é o pai biológico e os tipos de violência mais freqüentes foram o hematoma, o abuso sexual e as lesões por objetos cortantes. Conclui-se que o tema requer estudos aprofundados que modifiquem o ambiente em que a criança, adolescente e famílias estão inseridos.This study aimed to characterise the profile of the child and the adolescent who were maltreated and taken into paediatric emergency care in a hospital, in Fortaleza, Ceará. It was used a documented retrospective evaluation. The results showed that the children in the age group of 1-5 years were the most victimised as well as the children of the male sex. The main perpetrator was a biological father and the most frequent kind of violence were hematomas, sexual abuse and wounds by slashing objects. In conclusion, this subject needs to be more investigated for providing changes within the' environment where a child, adolescent and families were inserted.

  1. Who killed Rambhor?: The state of emergency medical services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh H Garg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In India, the healthcare delivery system starts up from the sub-center at the village level and reaches up to super specialty medical centers providing state of the art emergency medical services (EMS. These highest centers, located in big cities, are considered the last referral points for the patients from nearby cities and states. As the incidents of rail and road accidents have increased in recent years, the role of EMS becomes critical in saving precious lives. But when the facilities and management of these emergency centers succumbs before the patient, then the question arises regarding the adequate availability and quality of EMS. The death of an unknown common man, Rambhor, for want of EMS in three big hospitals in the national capital of India put a big question on the "health" of the emergency health services in India. The emergency services infrastructure seems inadequate and quality and timely provision of EMS to critical patients appears unsatisfactory. There is lack of emergency medicine (EM specialists in India and also the postgraduation courses in EM have not gained foot in our medical education system. Creation of a Centralized Medical Emergency Body, implementation of management techniques, modification of medical curriculum, and fixing accountability are some of the few steps which are required to improve the EMS in India.

  2. Barriers to formal emergency obstetric care services' utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essendi, Hildah; Mills, Samuel; Fotso, Jean-Christophe

    2011-06-01

    Access to appropriate health care including skilled birth attendance at delivery and timely referrals to emergency obstetric care services can greatly reduce maternal deaths and disabilities, yet women in sub-Saharan Africa continue to face limited access to skilled delivery services. This study relies on qualitative data collected from residents of two slums in Nairobi, Kenya in 2006 to investigate views surrounding barriers to the uptake of formal obstetric services. Data indicate that slum dwellers prefer formal to informal obstetric services. However, their efforts to utilize formal emergency obstetric care services are constrained by various factors including ineffective health decision making at the family level, inadequate transport facilities to formal care facilities and insecurity at night, high cost of health services, and inhospitable formal service providers and poorly equipped health facilities in the slums. As a result, a majority of slum dwellers opt for delivery services offered by traditional birth attendants (TBAs) who lack essential skills and equipment, thereby increasing the risk of death and disability. Based on these findings, we maintain that urban poor women face barriers to access of formal obstetric services at family, community, and health facility levels, and efforts to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality among the urban poor must tackle the barriers, which operate at these different levels to hinder women's access to formal obstetric care services. We recommend continuous community education on symptoms of complications related to pregnancy and timely referral. A focus on training of health personnel on "public relations" could also restore confidence in the health-care system with this populace. Further, we recommend improving the health facilities in the slums, improving the services provided by TBAs through capacity building as well as involving TBAs in referral processes to make access to services timely. Measures can also be

  3. Satisfaction Analysis of Outpatient Services to National Health Insurance Program in the Pratama Hospitals Supiori District Papua Province

    OpenAIRE

    Dominggus N. Sani; A. L. Rantetampang; Agus Zainuri

    2017-01-01

    Improved access for the public in order to ensure that the efforts of personal health services that provide inpatient, outpatient, emergency, and other supporting services. To get health insurance better and thorough, the government issued a health insurance, so that it can be felt by all walks of life and can improve patient satisfaction. Hospitals type D Primaries only provide care services Grade 3 (three) to increase access for the public in order to guarantee health care efforts and a pro...

  4. Collective response to public health emergencies and large-scale disasters: putting hospitals at the core of community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturas, James L; Smith, Deborah; Smith, Stewart; Albanese, Joseph

    2010-07-01

    Healthcare organisations are a critical part of a community's resilience and play a prominent role as the backbone of medical response to natural and manmade disasters. The importance of healthcare organisations, in particular hospitals, to remain operational extends beyond the necessity to sustain uninterrupted medical services for the community, in the aftermath of a large-scale disaster. Hospitals are viewed as safe havens where affected individuals go for shelter, food, water and psychosocial assistance, as well as to obtain information about missing family members or learn of impending dangers related to the incident. The ability of hospitals to respond effectively to high-consequence incidents producing a massive arrival of patients that disrupt daily operations requires surge capacity and capability. The activation of hospital emergency support functions provides an approach by which hospitals manage a short-term shortfall of hospital personnel through the reallocation of hospital employees, thereby obviating the reliance on external qualified volunteers for surge capacity and capability. Recent revisions to the Joint Commission's hospital emergency preparedness standard have impelled healthcare facilities to participate actively in community-wide planning, rather than confining planning exclusively to a single healthcare facility, in order to harmonise disaster management strategies and effectively coordinate the allocation of community resources and expertise across all local response agencies.

  5. ABC estimation of unit costs for emergency department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, R L; Schroeder, R E

    1996-04-01

    Rapid evolution of the health care industry forces managers to make cost-effective decisions. Typical hospital cost accounting systems do not provide emergency department managers with the information needed, but emergency department settings are so complex and dynamic as to make the more accurate activity-based costing (ABC) system prohibitively expensive. Through judicious use of the available traditional cost accounting information and simple computer spreadsheets. managers may approximate the decision-guiding information that would result from the much more costly and time-consuming implementation of ABC.

  6. Availability of emergency contraception: a survey of hospital emergency department gynaecologists and emergency physicians in Piedmont, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Marco; Casagranda, Ivo; Charrier, Lorena; Gianino, Maria Michela

    2012-10-01

    To compare the knowledge and the willingness of emergency physicians and gynaecologists caring for women in Italian emergency departments (EDs) to prescribe levonorgestrel-only emergency contraceptive pills (LNG-EC pills). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2009; anonymous postal questionnaires were mailed to the medical staff working at the 30 EDs located in Piedmont (Italy). Emergency physicians and gynaecologists have similar knowledge of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of LNG-EC pills, but do not feel at ease in prescribing these and consider the prescription of LNG-EC pills an inappropriate activity for ED staff. In Italy, unlike in most other European countries, LNG-EC pills are still prescription drugs. Thus it may be useful to further investigate the reasons why Italian ED medical staff do not feel the prescription of LNG-EC pills should be within their remit and whether women can successfully obtain the prescription from physicians working in other services that can be accessed around the clock.

  7. National and Regional Representativeness of Hospital Emergency Department Visit Data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program, United States, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Ralph J.; Pérez, Alejandro; Baer, Atar; Zhou, Hong; English, Roseanne; Coletta, Michael; Dey, Achintya

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined the representativeness of the nonfederal hospital emergency department (ED) visit data in the National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP). Methods We used the 2012 American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database, other databases, and information from state and local health departments participating in the NSSP about which hospitals submitted data to the NSSP in October 2014. We compared ED visits for hospitals submitting 15 data with all ED visits in all 50 states and Washington, DC. Results Approximately 60.4 million of 134.6 million ED visits nationwide (~45%) were reported to have been submitted to the NSSP. ED visits in 5 of 10 regions and the majority of the states were substantially underrepresented in the NSSP. The NSSP ED visits were similar to national ED visits in terms of many of the characteristics of hospitals and their service areas. However, visits in hospitals with the fewest annual ED visits, in rural trauma centers, and in hospitals serving populations with high percentages of Hispanics and Asians were underrepresented. Conclusions NSSP nonfederal hospital ED visit data were representative for many hospital characteristics and in some geographic areas but were not very representative nationally and in many locations. Representativeness could be improved by increasing participation in more states and among specific types of hospitals. PMID:26883318

  8. Nurse scheduling in a hospital emergency department: A case study at a Thai university hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aussadavut Dumrongsiri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Common problems of Thai nurses are low quality of life, working long hours, and a high turnover rate. The workload imbalance among nurses also worsens the turnover rate. With careful schedule planning, nurses do not have to work in consecutive shifts and can rest more. We interviewed and collected data from an emergency department at a hospital administered by a Thai university, related to objectives and constraints of monthly nurse scheduling, and actual monthly schedules. A multi-objective mathematical model was developed using the open source “OpenSolver” software in MS-Excel for nurse schedulers to freely use. We tested the model using actual data collected from the department and found that the schedules created by the model tended to provide more balanced workloads and more days off compared to the schedules created manually by a real scheduler. The model also suggested an easy policy to increase the number of nurses for future expansion.

  9. [Regional Study of Patient Safety Incidents (ERIDA) in the Emergency Services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Martínez, J; Aranaz-Andrés, J M; Martínez-Ros, C; Moreno-Reina, S; Escobar-Álvaro, L; Ortega-Liarte, J V

    2016-01-01

    Evaluate the patient safety incidents that occur in the emergency departments of our region. Observational study conducted in all the hospital emergency departments in the Regional Health Service of Murcia. After systematic random sampling, data were collected during care and a week later by telephone survey. Health professionals of each service were trained and collected the information, following the methodology of the National Study of Adverse Events Related to Hospitalization -ENEAS- and the Adverse Events Related to Spanish Hospital Emergency Department Care -EVADUR-. A total of 393 samples were collected, proportional to the cases treated in each hospital. In 10 cases (3.1%) the complaint was a previous safety incident. At least one incident was detected in 47 patients (11.95%; 8.7 to 15.1%). In 3 cases there were 2 incidents, bringing the number of incidents to 50. Regarding the impact, the 51% of incidents caused harm to the patients. The effects more frequent in patients were the need for repeat visits (9 cases), and mismanagement of pain (8 cases). In 24 cases (51.1%) health care was not affected, although 3 cases required an additional test, 11 cases required further consultation, and led to hospitalisation in 2 cases. The most frequent causal factors of these incidents were medication (14) and care (12). The incidents were considered preventable in 60% of cases. A rate of incidents in the emergency departments, representative of the region, has been obtained. The implications of the results for the population means that 12 out of every 100 patients treated in emergency departments have an adverse event, and 7 of these are avoidable. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Medical Emergency Workload of a Regional UK HEMS Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQueen, Carl; Crombie, Nick; Cormack, Stef; Wheaton, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Regionalized trauma networks have been established in England to centralize specialist care at dedicated centers of excellence throughout the country. Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in the West Midlands region have been redesigned to form an integrated component of such systems. The continued use of such valuable and scarce resources for medical emergencies requires evaluation. A retrospective review of mission data for a regional Air Ambulance Service in England over a two year period. Medical emergencies continue to contribute a large proportion of the overall workload of the service. Requirement for advanced interventions at the scene was rare, with less than 10% of patients attended by HEMS teams having care needs that fall beyond the scope of standard paramedic practice. Dynamic solutions are needed to ensure that HEMS support for cases of medical emergency are appropriately targeted to incidents in which clinical benefit is conferred to the patient. Intelligent tasking of appropriate resources has the potential to improve the HEMS response to medical emergencies while optimizing the availability of resources to respond to other incidents, most notably cases of major trauma. Copyright © 2015 Air Medical Journal Associates. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Helicopter emergency medical service patient transport safe at night?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.H.; Wageningen, B. van; Hoogerwerf, N.; Biert, J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Dutch helicopter emergency medical services are available 24/7. Working without daylight brings additional challenges, both in patient care and in-flight operation. We retrospectively evaluated the safety of this nighttime helicopter transportation of patients. METHODS: Our helicopter

  12. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: effects, costs and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Ringburg (Akkie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced prehospital medical care with air transport was introduced in the Netherlands in May 1995. The fi rst helicopter Mobile Medical Team, also called Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was a joint venture initiative of the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam and the Algemene

  13. Three Types of Memory in Emergency Medical Services Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Elizabeth L.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines memory and distributed cognition involved in the writing practices of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Results from a 16-month study indicate that EMS professionals rely on distributed cognition and three kinds of memory: individual, collaborative, and professional. Distributed cognition and the three types of…

  14. 75 FR 27917 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... enhancing our country's preparedness and resilience. During Emergency Medical Services Week, we recommit to... physicians. From rural regions of our Nation to our busiest urban centers, EMS teams provide access to... to arrive at the scene of a crisis. These heroic professionals, volunteers, and citizens form a...

  15. Assessment of emergency medical services in the Ashanti region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Deficient areas in need of development are governance, reliable revenue, public access, community integration, clinical care guidelines, research and quality assurance processes. Conclusions: The Ashanti Region has a growing and thriving emergency medical services system. Although many essential areas for ...

  16. Benchmarking online dispatch algorithms for Emergency Medical Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagtenberg, C.J.; Berg, P.L.; van der Mei, R.D.

    2016-01-01

    Providers of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) face the online ambulance dispatch problem, in which they decide which ambulance to send to an incoming incident. Their objective is to minimize the fraction of arrivals later than a target time. Today, the gap between existing solutions and the optimum

  17. Case Study – Idling Reduction Technologies for Emergency Service Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Owens, Russell J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This case study explores the use of idle reduction technologies (IRTs) on emergency service vehicles in police, fire, and ambulance applications. Various commercially available IRT systems and approaches can decrease, or ultimately eliminate, engine idling. Fleets will thus save money on fuel, and will also decrease their criteria pollutant emissions, greenhouse gas emissions, and noise.

  18. 78 FR 30727 - Emergency Medical Services Week, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-22

    .... During Emergency Medical Services Week, we pause to offer our gratitude to these remarkable men and women, whose dedication is fundamental to our society's well-being. In recent weeks, we have again seen the... thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty...

  19. Hospitals - HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN: Hospitals and Clinics in Indiana, Derived from HAZUS (Federal Emergency Management Agency, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN is a point shapefile that shows locations of hospitals and clinics in Indiana. HOSPITALS_HAZUS_IN was derived from the shapefile named "HOSPITAL."...

  20. Mobile phone use for contacting emergency services in life-threatening circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Olivia; Briggs, Andrew; Kemp, Tom; Gray, Alastair; MacIntyre, Kate; Rowley, Jack; Willett, Keith

    2012-03-01

    The potential health benefits of mobile phone use have not been widely studied, except for telemedicine-type applications. This study seeks to determine whether initial contact with emergency services via a mobile phone in life-threatening situations is associated with potential health benefits when compared to contact via a landline. A record-linkage study was carried out in which data from all emergency dispatches for immediately life-threatening events from a United Kingdom county ambulance service were linked to the Patient Admission System at two major local hospitals. Mortality (at the scene, at the emergency department [ED], and during hospitalization); transfer to the ED; admission (inpatient care, and intensive care unit); and length of stay were analyzed for calls classified as Code Red (immediately life-threatening) by initial exposure (mobile phone vs. landline), while controlling for potential confounding variables. Of 354,199 ambulances dispatched to attend emergency incidents, 66% transported patients to the hospital while 2% stood down due to death at the scene. Mobile phone compared to landline reporting of emergencies resulted in significant reductions in the risk of death at the scene (odds ratio [OR] 0.77), but not for death in the ED or during inpatient admission. The risk of being transferred to the ED and subsequent inpatient admission were significantly lower with reporting from mobile phones compared to landline (OR 0.93 and OR 0.82, respectively). In this study, evidence of statistical association was demonstrated between the use of mobile phones to alert ambulance services in life-threatening situations and improved outcomes for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of emergency department nursing services and patient satisfaction of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaoğlu, Mukadder; Çelik, Pelin

    2016-10-01

    To identify nursing services and assess patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department. Emergency nursing care is a significant determinant of patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction is often regarded as a reliable indicator of the quality of services provided in the emergency department. This is a descriptive study. Eighty-four patients who presented to the university emergency department were included in the study. The study data were collected by the Patient Information Form and the Satisfaction Level Form. Emergency nursing services, including history taking, assessing vital signs, preparing the patient for an emergency intervention, oxygen therapy, drug delivery and blood-serum infusion were shown to be more commonly provided compared with other services such as counselling the patients and the relatives about their care or delivering educational and psychosocial services. However, 78·6% of the patients were satisfied with their nursing services. The highest satisfaction rates were observed in the following sub-dimensions of the Satisfaction Level Form: availability of the nurse (82·1%), behaviour of the nurse towards the patient (78·6%) and the frequency of nursing rounds (77·4%). The most common practices performed by nurses in the emergency department were physical nursing services. Patient satisfaction was mostly associated with the availability of nurses when they were needed. Our results suggest that in addition to the physical care, patients should also receive education and psychosocial care in the emergency department. We believe that this study will contribute to the awareness and understanding of principles and concepts of emergency nursing, extend the limits of nursing knowledge and abilities, and improve and maintain the quality of clinical nursing education and practice to train specialist nurses with high levels of understanding in ethical, intellectual, administrative, investigative and professional issues.

  2. 'The hospital was just like a home': self, service and the 'McCord Hospital Family'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Vanessa; Parle, Julie

    2014-04-01

    For more than a century, McCord Hospital, a partly private and partly state-subsidised mission hospital has provided affordable health-care services, as well as work and professional training opportunities for thousands of people in Durban, a city on the east coast of South Africa. This article focuses on one important aspect of the hospital's longevity and particular character, or 'organisational culture': the ethos of a 'McCord Family', integral to which were faith and a commitment to service. While recognising that families - including 'hospital families' like that at McCord - are contentious social constructs, with deeply embedded hierarchies and inequalities based on race, class and gender, we also consider however how the notion of 'a McCord family' was experienced and shared in complex ways. Indeed, during the twentieth century, this ethos was avidly promoted by the hospital's founders and managers and by a wide variety of employees and trainees. It also extended to people at a far geographical remove from Durban. Moreover, this ethos became so powerful that many patients felt that it shaped their convalescence experience positively. This article considers how this 'family ethos' was constructed and what made it so attractive to this hospital's staff, trainees and patients. Furthermore, we consider what 'work' it did for this mission hospital, especially in promoting bonds of multi-racial unity in the contexts of segregation and apartheid society. More broadly, it suggests that critical histories of the ways in which individuals, hospitals, faith and 'families' intersect may be of value for the future of hospitals as well as of interest in their past.

  3. Managers' perceptions of customers' satisfactions with their hospital cafeteria services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C M; Upton, E M

    1991-01-01

    It is important that hospital cafeterias deliver products that create customer satisfaction so that financial objectives are met. An exploratory descriptive survey of 12 selected hospital cafeterias used a self-administered questionnaire to determine how satisfied customers were with services provided. It also asked cafeteria managers to give their perceptions of their customers' relative satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the service. Principal components analysis, followed by varimax rotation, identified four underlying constructs of the 15 pre-selected foodservice characteristics used to measure relative satisfaction. A multiple regression model, controlling for country, hospital size and customer demographics, in which the dependent variable was overall rating, found that the independent variables, the underlying rating constructs--food and service--made a much greater impact on overall rating than environment and accessibility. Most cafeteria managers' predictions about their customers' satisfaction were within two standard deviations of their customers' mean scores of satisfaction. While the managers' close association with their service may have accounted for this, it does not necessarily follow that they have the power to implement policy and product improvements.

  4. Literature Study: The Nature of Service, The Nature of Hospitality, The Nature of Experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Esselink, P. (Priscilla)

    2010-01-01

    In this report the concepts services, hospitality and experiences will be discussed. The goal of this report is to provide insight in what is written in literature about services, hospitality and experiences and to help defining the concept hospitality services for the Research Centre of the Saxion Hospitality Business School. Important concepts which are related to hospitality are services and experiences. These three domains are the centre of this report.

  5. An Emergent Micro-Services Approach to Digital Curation Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Abrams

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In order better to meet the needs of its diverse University of California (UC constituencies, the California Digital Library UC Curation Center is re-envisioning its approach to digital curation infrastructure by devolving function into a set of granular, independent, but interoperable micro-services. Since each of these services is small and self-contained, they are more easily developed, deployed, maintained, and enhanced; at the same time, complex curation function can emerge from the strategic combination of atomistic services. The emergent approach emphasizes the persistence of content rather than the systems in which that content is managemed, thus the paradigmatic archival culture is not unduly coupled to any particular technological context. This results in a curation environment that is comprehensive in scope, yet flexible with regard to local policies and practices and sustainable despite the inevitability of disruptive change in technology and user expectation.

  6. Best Practices for Financial Sustainability of Healthy Food Service Guidelines in Hospital Cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie; Schwartz, Brittany; Graham, John; Warnock, Amy Lowry; Mojica, Angelo; Marziale, Erin; Harris, Diane

    2018-05-17

    In February and March 2017 we examined barriers and facilitators to financial sustainability of healthy food service guidelines and synthesized best practices for financial sustainability in retail operations. We conducted qualitative, in-depth interviews with 8 hospital food service directors to learn more about barriers and facilitators to financial sustainability of healthy food service guidelines in retail food service operations. Analysts organized themes around headers in the interview guide and also made note of emerging themes not in the original guide. They used the code occurrence and co-occurrence features in Dedoose version 7.0.23 (SocioCultural Research Consultants) independently to analyze patterns across the interviews and to pull illustrative quotes for analysis. Two overarching themes emerged, related to 1) the demand for and sales of healthy foods and beverages, and 2) the production and supply of healthy foods and beverages. Our study provides insights into how hospital food service directors can maximize revenue and remain financially viable while selling healthier options in on-site dining facilities.

  7. Hospital pharmacy services in teaching hospitals in Nepal: Challenges and the way forward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ravi Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Nepal, a developing country in South Asia, hospital pharmacies in teaching hospitals faces a number of challenges. Design and location of the pharmacy is inadequate, the pharmacy is often rented out to private parties, there may be a lack of separation of outpatient and inpatient pharmacy services, medicines are not selected based on objective criteria, too many brands are stocked, pharmaceutical care services are not provided, and pharmaceutical promotion is not regulated within the hospital premises. Furthermore, there is often a lack of pharmacy management software to help dispensing, continuing pharmacy education is not provided, medicines are not compounded or packaged in house, there are problems with medicines availability and medicine quality, and drug utilization studies are not linked with initiatives to promote the rational use of medicines. In this article, the authors examine these challenges and put forward possible solutions.

  8. A cost effective small hospital in Bangladesh: what it can mean for emergency obstetric care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, C; Chowdhury, Q

    2003-04-01

    home treatment, or 2 for tetanus immunization of pregnant women. Sixty-two percent of the DALYS saved came from emergency obstetric care (EmOC) related activities. We conclude that cost effective basic hospital service can be added to immunization, family planning and other basic health services now available in countries like Bangladesh with a very low increase in total cost and that the benefits which would accrue, particularly for maternal and perinatal mortality, would be great.

  9. Performance indicators for quality in surgical and laboratory services at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH) in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbembati, Naboth A; Mwangu, Mugwira; Muhondwa, Eustace P Y; Leshabari, Melkizedek M

    2008-04-01

    Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), a teaching and national referral hospital, is undergoing major reforms to improve the quality of health care. We performed a retrospective descriptive study using a set of performance indicators for the surgical and laboratory services of MNH in years 2001 and 2002, to help monitor and evaluate the impact of reforms on the quality of health care during and after the reform process. Hospital records were reviewed and information recorded for planned and postponed operations, laboratory equipment, reagents, laboratory tests and quality assurance programmes. In the year 2001 a total of 4332 non-emergency operations were planned, 3313 operations were performed and 1019 (23.5%) operations were postponed. In the year 2002, 4301 non-emergency operations were planned, 3046 were performed and 1255 (29%) were postponed. The most common reasons for operation postponement were "time-barred", interference by emergency operations, no show of patients and inoperable anaesthetic machines. Equipment problems and supply and staff shortages together accounted for one quarter of postponements. In the laboratory, a lack of equipment prevented some tests, but quality assurance was performed for most tests. Current surgical services at MNH are inadequate; operating theatres require modern, functioning equipment and adequate supplies of consumables to provide satisfactory care.

  10. Service users' perceptions about their hospital admission elicited by service user-researchers or by clinicians.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donoghue, Brian

    2013-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Service users may express positive, ambivalent, or negative views of their hospital admission. The objective of this study was to determine whether the background of the interviewer-service user-researcher or clinician-influences the information elicited. The primary outcome was the level of perceived coercion on admission, and secondary outcomes were perceived pressures on admission, procedural justice, perceived necessity for admission, satisfaction with services, and willingness to consent to participate in the study. METHODS Participants voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to three hospitals in Ireland were randomly allocated to be interviewed at hospital discharge by either a service user-researcher or a clinician. Interviewers used the MacArthur Admission Experience Survey and the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire. RESULTS A total of 161 participants were interviewed. No differences by interviewer status or by admission status (involuntary or voluntary) were found in levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures, procedural justice, perceived necessity, or satisfaction with services. Service users were more likely to decline to participate if their consent was sought by a service user-researcher (24% versus 8%, p=.003). CONCLUSIONS Most interviewees gave positive accounts of their admission regardless of interviewer status. The findings indicate that clinicians and researchers can be more confident that service users\\' positive accounts of admissions are not attributable to a response bias. Researchers can also feel more confident in directly comparing the results of studies undertaken by clinicians and by service user-researchers.

  11. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals. Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Findings Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i) being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii) failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii) practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv) the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v) connection to the community. Conclusions Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes. PMID:21401923

  12. Not just bricks and mortar: planning hospital cancer services for Aboriginal people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durey Angela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal people in Australia experience higher mortality from cancer compared with non-Aboriginal Australians, despite an overall lower incidence. A notable contributor to this disparity is that many Aboriginal people do not take up or continue with cancer treatment which almost always occurs within major hospitals. Thirty in-depth interviews with urban, rural and remote Aboriginal people affected by cancer were conducted between March 2006 and September 2007. Interviews explored participants' beliefs about cancer and experiences of cancer care and were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two researchers. NVivo7 software was used to assist data management and analysis. Information from interviews relevant to hospital services including and building design was extracted. Findings Relationships and respect emerged as crucial considerations of participants although many aspects of the hospital environment were seen as influencing the delivery of care. Five themes describing concerns about the hospital environment emerged: (i being alone and lost in a big, alien and inflexible system; (ii failure of open communication, delays and inefficiency in the system; (iii practicalities: costs, transportation, community and family responsibilities; (iv the need for Aboriginal support persons; and (v connection to the community. Conclusions Design considerations and were identified but more important than the building itself was the critical need to build trust in health services. Promotion of cultural safety, support for Aboriginal family structures and respecting the importance of place and community to Aboriginal patients are crucial in improving cancer outcomes.

  13. Recognition of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by medical dispatchers in emergency medical dispatch centres in two countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Andréll, Cecilia; Viereck, Søren

    2016-01-01

    in two steps; registry data were merged with electronically registered emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch centres in the two regions. Cases with missing or non-OHCA dispatch codes were analysed further by auditing emergency call recordings using a uniform data collection template......INTRODUCTION: Survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) remains low. Early recognition by emergency medical dispatchers is essential for an effective chain of actions, leading to early cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of an automated external defibrillator and rapid dispatching...... of the emergency medical services. AIM: To analyse and compare the accuracy of OHCA recognition by medical dispatchers in two countries. METHOD: An observational register-based study collecting data from national cardiac arrest registers in Denmark and Sweden during a six-month period in 2013. Data were analysed...

  14. Refusal of medical treatment in the pediatric emergency service: analysis of reasons and aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Ramiz Coşkun; Halil, Halit; Gürsoy, Cüneyt; Çifci, Atilla; Özgün, Seher; Kodaman, Tuğba; Sönmez, Mehtap

    2014-01-01

    Refusal of treatment for acutely ill children is still an important problem in the emergency service. When families refuse medical treatment for their acutely ill children, healthcare professionals may attempt to provide information and negotiate with the family concerning treatment refusal and its possible adverse outcomes, and request consent for refusal of medical treatment. There is insufficient data about refusal of treatment in our country. The purpose of this study was to analyze the causes of treatment refusal in the pediatric emergency service. We collected data recorded on informed consent forms. During a 2-year-study period, 215 patients refused treatment recommended by acute health care professionals. The majorty of patients were in the 0-2 year age group. Hospitalization was the type of treatment most commonly refused; restrictions regarding family members staying with their children during hospitalization and admission to another hospital were the major reasons for refusal of treatment. Clarifying the reasons for treatment refusal may help us to overcome deficiencies, improve conditions, resolve problems and build confidence between healthcare providers and service users, increasing users' satisfaction in the future.

  15. Emergency medical service providers' experiences with traffic congestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Russell; McGwin, Gerald

    2013-02-01

    The population's migration from urban to suburban areas has resulted in a more dispersed population and has increased traffic flow, possibly resulting in longer emergency response times. Although studies have examined the effect of response times on time to definitive care and survival, no study has addressed the possible causes of slowed response time from the point of view of emergency medical services (EMS) first responders. To assess the variables most commonly associated with increased emergency response time as described by the opinions and views of EMS first responders. A total of 500 surveys were sent to randomly selected individuals registered as first responders with the Alabama Department of Public Health, and 112 surveys were returned completed. The survey included questions regarding roadway design, response to emergency calls, in-vehicle technology aimed at decreasing travel time, and public education regarding emergency response. Respondents reported traveling on city streets most often during emergency calls, and encountering traffic more often on interstates and national highways. Traffic congestion, on average, resulted in nearly 10min extra response time. Most agreed that the most effective in-vehicle technology for reducing response time was a pre-emptive green light device; however, very few reported availability of this device in their emergency vehicles. Public education regarding how to react to approaching emergency vehicles was stated as having the greatest potential impact on reducing emergency response time. The results of the survey suggest that the best methods for reducing emergency response times are those that are easy to implement (e.g., public education). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Initiation of a medical toxicology consult service at a tertiary care children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, George Sam; Monte, Andrew; Hatten, Benjamin; Brent, Jeffrey; Buchanan, Jennie; Heard, Kennon J

    2015-05-01

    Currently, only 10% of board-certified medical toxicologists are pediatricians. Yet over half of poison center calls involve children toxicology consultation is not common at children's hospitals. In collaboration with executive staff from Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, regional poison center, and our toxicology fellowship, we established a toxicology consulting service at our tertiary-care children's hospital. There were 139 consultations, and the service generated 13 consultations in the first month; median of 11 consultations per month thereafter (range 8-16). The service increased pediatric cases seen by the fellowship program from 30 to 94. The transition to a consult service required a culture change. Historically, call center advice was the mainstay of consulting practice and the medical staff was not accustomed to the availability of bedside medical toxicology consultations. However, after promotion of the service and full attending and fellowship coverage, consultations increased. In collaboration with toxicologists from different departments, a consultation service can be rapidly established. The service filled a clinical need that was disproportionately utilized for high acuity patients, immediately utilized by the medical staff and provided a robust pediatric population for the toxicology fellowship.

  17. The emergency to home project: impact of an emergency department care coordinator on hospital admission and emergency department utilization among seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Christopher Matthew; Freiheit, Elizabeth A; Podruzny, Lesley; Kingsly, Alianu Akawakun; Wang, Dongmei; Davenport, Jamie; Gutscher, Abram; Askin, Cathy; Taylor, Allison; Lee, Vivian; Choo, Queenie; Lang, Eddy Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Seniors comprise 14% to 21% of all emergency department (ED) visits, yet are disproportionately larger users of ED and inpatient resources. ED care coordinators (EDCCs) target seniors at risk for functional decline and connect them to home care and other community services in hopes of avoiding hospitalization. The goal of this study was to measure the association between the presence of EDCCs and admission rates for seniors aged ≥ 65. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, recidivism at 30 days, and revisit resulting in admission at 30 days. This was a matched pairs study using administrative data from eight EDs in six Alberta cities. Four of these hospitals were intervention sites, in which patients were seen by an EDCC, while the other four sites had no EDCC presence. All seniors aged ≥ 65 with a discharge diagnosis of fall or musculoskeletal pathology were included. Cases were matched by CTAS category, age, gender, mode of arrival, and home living environment. McNemar's test for matched pairs was used to compare admission and recidivism rates at EDCC and non-EDCC hospitals. A paired t-test was used to compare length of stay between groups. There were no statistically significant differences for baseline admission rate, revisit rate at 30 days, and readmission rate at 30 days between EDCC and non-EDCC patients. This study showed no reduction in senior patients' admission rates, recidivism at 30 days, or hospital length of stay when comparing seniors seen by an EDCC with those not seen by an EDCC.

  18. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Provision of general paediatric surgical services in a regional hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Zgraj, O

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: In Ireland, specialist paediatric surgery is carried out in paediatric hospitals in Dublin. General surgeons\\/consultants in other surgical specialities provide paediatric surgical care in regional centres. There has been a failure to train general surgeons with paediatric skills to replace these surgeons upon retirement. AIM: To assess paediatric surgical workload in one regional centre to focus the debate regarding the future provision of general paediatric surgery in Ireland. METHODS: Hospital in-patient enquiry (HIPE) system was used to identify total number of paediatric surgical admissions and procedures. Cases assessed requiring hospital transfer. RESULTS: Of 17,478 surgical patients treated, 2,584 (14.8%) were under 14 years. A total of 2,154 procedures were performed. CONCLUSION: Regional centres without dedicated paediatric surgeons deliver care to large numbers of paediatric patients. The demand for care highlights the need for formal paediatric services\\/appropriate surgical training for general surgical trainees.

  20. In a niche of time: do specialty hospitals outperform general services hospitals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, LeJon; Davis, Jullet A; Gunby, Norris W

    2013-01-01

    Niche hospitals represent a growing segment in the health care industry. Niche facilities are primarily engaged in the treatment of cardiac or orthopedic conditions. The effectiveness of this strategy is of interest because niche hospitals focus on only the most profitable services. The purpose of this research was to assess the financial effectiveness of the niche strategy. We theorize that firm and market-level factors concomitantly with the strategy of the hospital-niche versus traditional-are associated with financial performance. This research used 2 data sources, the 2003 Medicare Cost Report and the 2003 Area Resource File. The sample was limited to only for-profit, urban, nongovernmental hospitals (n = 995). The data were analyzed using hierarchical least squares regression. Financial performance was operationalized using the hospital's return on assets. The principal finding of this project is that niche hospitals had significantly higher performance than traditional facilities. From the organizational perspective, the niche strategy leads to better financial performance. From a societal perspective, the niche strategy provides increased focus and efficiencies through repetition. Despite the limited focus of this strategy, patients who can access these providers may experience better outcomes than patients in more traditional hospitals.

  1. The State of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Systems in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould-Millman, Nee-Kofi; Dixon, Julia M; Sefa, Nana; Yancey, Arthur; Hollong, Bonaventure G; Hagahmed, Mohamed; Ginde, Adit A; Wallis, Lee A

    2017-06-01

    Introduction Little is known about the existence, distribution, and characteristics of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa, or the corresponding epidemiology of prehospital illness and injury. A survey was conducted between 2013 and 2014 by distributing a detailed EMS system questionnaire to experts in paper and electronic versions. The questionnaire ascertained EMS systems' jurisdiction, operations, finance, clinical care, resources, and regulatory environment. The discovery of respondents with requisite expertise occurred in multiple phases, including snowball sampling, a review of published scientific literature, and a rigorous search of the Internet. The survey response rate was 46%, and data represented 49 of 54 (91%) African countries. Twenty-five EMS systems were identified and distributed among 16 countries (30% of African countries). There was no evidence of EMS systems in 33 (61%) countries. A total of 98,574,731 (8.7%) of the African population were serviced by at least one EMS system in 2012. The leading causes of EMS transport were (in order of decreasing frequency): injury, obstetric, respiratory, cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal complaints. Nineteen percent of African countries had government-financed EMS systems and 26% had a toll-free public access telephone number. Basic emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and Basic Life Support (BLS)-equipped ambulances were the most common cadre of provider and ambulance level, respectively (84% each). Emergency Medical Services systems exist in one-third of African countries. Injury and obstetric complaints are the leading African prehospital conditions. Only a minority (<9.0%) of Africans have coverage by an EMS system. Most systems were predominantly BLS, government operated, and fee-for-service. Mould-Millman NK , Dixon JM , Sefa N , Yancey A , Hollong BG , Hagahmed M , Ginde AA , Wallis LA . The state of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) systems in Africa. Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(3):273-283.

  2. Willingness to pay for municipality hospital services in rural Japan: a contingent valuation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamura Toshihito

    2011-06-01

    hospital, which nearly equalled the amount that the K town government provided to the municipality hospital to cover its annual deficit. K town residents had come to expect not only general clinical practice, but also emergency medical services and night practice provided by their own town's municipality hospital. WTP can be used as a measure of hospital evaluation because it reflects the importance of the hospital to the residents in its region.

  3. [Factors related to lack of autonomous mobility during out-of-hospital emergency care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero García, Antonio; Morales Asencio, José Miguel; Trujillo Illescas, Juan Alfonso; Martí, Celia

    2016-10-01

    To explore the frequency of lack of autonomous mobility and factors related to it in patients requiring prehospital emergency services. Cross-sectional, observational, retrospective analysis. We identified a stratified random sample of patients attended by the public health emergency service of Andalusia in 2011. The sample included 280 patients with a mean age of 56 years; 63.9% were men. The majority were attended in homes and streets or other public spaces. Most were transported to a hospital in a mobile intensive care unit. The reasons for calling the service were most often related to chest pain or injuries. Loss of autonomous mobility was seen more often in men, when care was required in a public area, when there were injuries or altered vital signs, and when the patient required transport in a mobile intensive care unit. Dependence on others was significantly associated with the presence of a prior condition before the patient required transport (odds ratio [OR], 3.27; 95% CI, 1.60-6.33), the use of immobilization strategies (OR, 7.71; 95% CI, 1.7-34.96], and the use of ambulance transport (OR, 4.35; 95% CI, 1.63-11.60]. The following 2 variables were at the limit of significance: pain during the care process (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 0.99-1.29) and age (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.97-1.01). The profile we identified for patients and situations in which patients cannot move autonomously during prehospital emergency care can be used to plan preventive strategies to ensure patient safety.

  4. Development of a Work Climate Scale in Emergency Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana; Lozano-Lozano, José A; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Holgado-Tello, Francisco P

    2018-01-01

    An adequate work climate fosters productivity in organizations and increases employee satisfaction. Workers in emergency health services (EHS) have an extremely high degree of responsibility and consequent stress. Therefore, it is essential to foster a good work climate in this context. Despite this, scales with a full study of their psychometric properties (i.e., validity evidence based on test content, internal structure and relations to other variables, and reliability) are not available to measure work climate in EHS specifically. For this reason, our objective was to develop a scale to measure the quality of work climates in EHS. We carried out three studies. In Study 1, we used a mixed-method approach to identify the latent conceptual structure of the construct work climate . Thus, we integrated the results found in (a) a previous study, where a content analysis of seven in-depth interviews obtained from EHS professionals in two hospitals in Gibraltar Countryside County was carried out; and (b) the factor analysis of the responses given by 113 EHS professionals from these same centers to 18 items that measured the work climate in health organizations. As a result, we obtained 56 items grouped into four factors (work satisfaction, productivity/achievement of aims, interpersonal relationships, and performance at work). In Study 2, we presented validity evidence based on test content through experts' judgment. Fourteen experts from the methodology and health fields evaluated the representativeness, utility, and feasibility of each of the 56 items with respect to their factor (theoretical dimension). Forty items met the inclusion criterion, which was to obtain an Osterlind index value greater than or equal to 0.5 in the three aspects assessed. In Study 3, 201 EHS professionals from the same centers completed the resulting 40-item scale. This new instrument produced validity evidence based on the internal structure in a second-order factor model with four

  5. Development of a Work Climate Scale in Emergency Health Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sanduvete-Chaves

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate work climate fosters productivity in organizations and increases employee satisfaction. Workers in emergency health services (EHS have an extremely high degree of responsibility and consequent stress. Therefore, it is essential to foster a good work climate in this context. Despite this, scales with a full study of their psychometric properties (i.e., validity evidence based on test content, internal structure and relations to other variables, and reliability are not available to measure work climate in EHS specifically. For this reason, our objective was to develop a scale to measure the quality of work climates in EHS. We carried out three studies. In Study 1, we used a mixed-method approach to identify the latent conceptual structure of the construct work climate. Thus, we integrated the results found in (a a previous study, where a content analysis of seven in-depth interviews obtained from EHS professionals in two hospitals in Gibraltar Countryside County was carried out; and (b the factor analysis of the responses given by 113 EHS professionals from these same centers to 18 items that measured the work climate in health organizations. As a result, we obtained 56 items grouped into four factors (work satisfaction, productivity/achievement of aims, interpersonal relationships, and performance at work. In Study 2, we presented validity evidence based on test content through experts' judgment. Fourteen experts from the methodology and health fields evaluated the representativeness, utility, and feasibility of each of the 56 items with respect to their factor (theoretical dimension. Forty items met the inclusion criterion, which was to obtain an Osterlind index value greater than or equal to 0.5 in the three aspects assessed. In Study 3, 201 EHS professionals from the same centers completed the resulting 40-item scale. This new instrument produced validity evidence based on the internal structure in a second-order factor model with

  6. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celestin Hategeka

    Full Text Available Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+-a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program-in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children.A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children.Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services. However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated.Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies to enhance the capacity of

  7. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoveller, Jean; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+)–a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program–in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children. Results Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services). However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated. Conclusions Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies

  8. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  9. Noise exposure during prehospital emergency physicians work on Mobile Emergency Care Units and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Christian Tofte; Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Brøchner, Anne C

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS)....... initiatives. Although no hearing loss was demonstrated in the personnel of the ground-based units, a reduced function of the outer sensory hair cells was found in the HEMS group following missions.......BACKGROUND: Prehospital personnel are at risk of occupational hearing loss due to high noise exposure. The aim of the study was to establish an overview of noise exposure during emergency responses in Mobile Emergency Care Units (MECU), ambulances and Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS......). A second objective was to identify any occupational hearing loss amongst prehospital personnel. METHODS: Noise exposure during work in the MECU and HEMS was measured using miniature microphones worn laterally to the auditory canals or within the earmuffs of the helmet. All recorded sounds were analysed...

  10. Measuring disaster preparedness of local emergency medical services agencies

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Ross W.

    2010-01-01

    CHDS State/Local Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Emergency Medical Services (EMS) plays a key role in disaster response. Yet, determining how much preparedness is enough to achieve an acceptable level of preparedness is challenging. After conducting an extensive literature review, it is evident no nationally accepted method exists to evaluate an EMS system's level of disaster preparedness systematically. Research was conducted to define the skills and equipmen...

  11. Emergency Medical Services Capacity for Prehospital Stroke Care

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-05

    In this audio podcast, lead author and Preventing Chronic Disease’s 2013 Student Research Contest Winner, Mehul D. Patel, talks about his article on stroke care and emergency medical services.  Created: 9/5/2013 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/5/2013.

  12. Is mobile teleconsulting equivalent to hospital-based telestroke services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audebert, Heinrich J; Boy, Sandra; Jankovits, Ralf; Pilz, Philipp; Klucken, Jochen; Fehm, Nando P; Schenkel, Johannes

    2008-12-01

    Telemedicine is increasingly used to provide acute stroke expertise for hospitals without full-time neurological services. Teleconsulting through mobile laptop computers may offer more flexibility compared with hospital-based services, but concerns about quality and technical reliability remain. We conducted a controlled trial, allocating hospital-based or mobile teleconsulting in a shift-by-shift sequence and evaluating technical parameters, acceptability, and impact on immediate clinical decisions. Both types of telemedicine workstations were equipped with DICOM (Digital-Imaging-and-Communications-in-Medicine) viewer and videoconference software. The laptop connected by asymmetrical broadband UMTS (Universal-Mobile-Telecommunication-Systems) technology with a one-way spoke-to-hub video transmission, whereas the hospital-based device used landline symmetrical telecommunication, including a 2-way videoconference. One hundred twenty-seven hospital-based and 96 mobile teleconsultations were conducted within 2 months without any technical breakdown. The rates per allocated time were similar with 3.8 and 4.0 per day. No significant differences were found for durations of videoconference (mean: 11+/-3 versus 10+/-3 minutes, P=0.07), DICOM download (3+/-3 versus 4+/-3 minutes, P=0.19), and total duration of teleconsultations (44+/-19 versus 45+/-21 minutes, P=0.98). Technical quality of mobile teleconsultations was rated worse on both sides, but this did not affect the ability to make remote clinical decisions like initiating thrombolysis (17% versus 13% of all, P=0.32). Teleconsultation using a laptop workstation and broadband mobile telecommunication was technically stable and allowed remote clinical decision-making. There remain disadvantages regarding videoconference quality on the hub side and lack of video transmission to the spoke side.

  13. Public-private implementation of integrated emergency response services: Case study of GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute in Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Veena M; Gururaj, Gopalkrishna; Hyder, Adnan A

    2017-12-01

    Emergency medical services are important to the functioning of health systems, but these services tend to be neglected in low- and middle-income countries, such as India. In recent years, several models of pre-hospital emergency medical services have emerged in India. Research on these models holds important lessons for existing and future emergency medical service programs in low- and middle-income countries. Our objective was to provide a comprehensive description of the organizational structure and service delivery model of a public-private partnership in the southern Indian state of Karnataka, GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute, with a particular focus on its operations in Bengaluru. A case study methodology was used to explore systematically the organizational model of GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute in Karnataka. Qualitative data were collected through an in-person site visit to GVK Emergency Management and Research Institute headquarters in Bengaluru in July 2013. Three sources were used: in-depth, semistructured interviews, document review, and nonparticipant observation. Data were analyzed according to the health system "building blocks" proposed by the World Health Organization. The organization follows a standardized model across the states and union territories where they have contractual arrangements, including Karnataka. Processes for fleet maintenance, information systems/information technology and training, and deployment were well structured at the organizational level. The public-private partnership appears pro-poor in orientation; however, further demand-side research is required on the perspective of patients. Our study reveals a functional structure at the organizational level, which provides a key service at no cost to users. Detailed analyses of this nature can help inform global efforts for the development and strengthening of emergency medical services systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Wait Time for Treatment in Hospital Emergency Departments: 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Care Survey: 2003 emergency department summary. Advance data from vital and health statistics; no 358. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2005. Burt CW, McCaig LF, Valverde RH. Analysis of ambulance diversions in U.S. emergency departments. Ann ...

  15. Nurses' perception about risk classification in an emergency service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Chaves de Souza

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Get to know how nurses perceive the accomplishment of risk classification in an emergency service. Methodology. In this qualitative study, 11 nurses were included with at least two months of experience in the risk classification of patients who visited the emergency service. Semistructured interviews were used to collect the information. The data were collected between August and December 2011. For data analysis, Bardin's theoretical framework was used. Results. The nurses in the study consider the risk classification as a work organization instruments that permits closer contact between nurses and patients. The nursing skills needed for risk classification were identified: knowledge about the scale used, clinical perspective, patience and agility. The availability of risk classification scales was the main facilitator of this work. The main difficulties were the disorganization of the care network and the health team's lack of knowledge of the protocol. Conclusion. Risk classification offers an opportunity for professional autonomy to the extent that it is the main responsible for regulating care at the entry door of the emergency services.

  16. Occupational injury rates in personnel of emergency medical services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gałązkowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available [i][/i][b]Introduction and objectives. [/b]The system of emergency medical services (EMS in Poland was established in 2006. The risk of occupational injuries to EMS personnel is very high, irrespective of the country where they operate, as they face many hazards in their everyday work. The aim of this study is to describe the type, incidence and consequences of occupational accidents among the personnel of the National Emergency Medical Services in Poland (NEMS – land and air ambulance crews in 2008–2012. [b]Material and methods:[/b] The study reviewed all occupational accidents among the EMS personnel reported to the National Labour Inspectorate in 2008–2012. [b]Results[/b]: In the period reported, the number of accidents decreased from 32 in 2008 to just 6 in 2012. Traffic accidents predominated and most of the victims were male paramedics under 30 years of age. The most common injuries included multiple organ injuries and injuries of the cervical spine, chest and trunk. [b]Conclusions:[/b] The growing professional experience of the EMS personnel has a beneficial effect on occupational injury rates as they tend to decrease with longer employment. Occupational accidents are definitely more common among ambulance crews than in the personnel of other organizational units of the National Emergency Medical Services.

  17. Life Saving Apps: Linking Cardiac Arrest Victims to Emergency Services and Volunteer Responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim Choi Keung, Sarah N; Khan, Mohammed O; Smith, Christopher; Perkins, Gavin; Murphy, Paddie; Arvanitis, Theodoros N

    2016-01-01

    In cases of emergency, such as out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, the first few minutes are crucial for victims to receive care and have a positive outcome. However, emergency services often arrive on scene after those first few minutes, making any bridging solutions key. Finding a defibrillator or accessing a trained volunteer responder are some of the technological solutions that are being developed to support the chain of survival. This paper looks at technologies, in particular those linked to mobile apps that have been used to locate defibrillators and responder apps that enable responders to attend to nearby emergencies. We review a selection of apps and also assess the challenges and considerations for such apps.

  18. Designing smartphone mental health applications for emergency service workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deady, M; Peters, D; Lang, H; Calvo, R; Glozier, N; Christensen, H; Harvey, S B

    2017-08-01

    Emergency service workers are often exposed to trauma and have increased risk of a range of mental health (MH) conditions. Smartphone applications have the potential to provide this group with effective psychological interventions; however, little is known about the acceptability and preferences regarding such initiatives. To describe the preferences and opinions of emergency service workers regarding the use of smartphone MH applications and to examine the impact of age on these preferences. Participants were recruited from four metropolitan Fire and Rescue NSW stations and responded to questionnaire items covering three key domains: current smartphone use, potential future use and preferences for design and content as well as therapeutic techniques. Overall, approximately half the sample (n = 106) claimed they would be interested in trying a tailored emergency-worker MH smartphone application. There were few differences between age groups on preferences. The majority of respondents claimed they would use an app for mental well-being daily and preferred terms such as 'well-being' and 'mental fitness' for referring to MH. Confidentiality, along with a focus on stress, sleep, exercise and resiliency were all considered key features. Behavioural therapeutic techniques were regarded most favourably, compared with other therapies. Emergency workers were interested in utilizing smartphone applications focused on MH, but expressed clear preferences regarding language used in promotion, features required and therapeutic techniques preferred. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. (Non-)utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietzmann, Diana; Knuth, Daniela; Schmidt, Silke

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to explore the utilization and non-utilization of pre-hospital emergency care by migrants and non-migrants, and the factors that influence this behaviour. A cross-sectional representative German survey was conducted in a sample of 2.175 people, 295 of whom had a migration background. An additional sample of 50 people with Turkish migration background was conducted, partially in the Turkish language. Apart from socio-demographics, the utilization of emergency services and the reasons for non-utilization were assessed. Migrants had a higher utilization rate of pre-hospital emergency care (RR = 1.492) than non-migrants. Furthermore, migrants who were not born in Germany had a lower utilization rate (RR = 0.793) than migrants who were born in Germany. Regarding non-utilization, the most frequently stated reasons belonged to the categories initial misjudgment of the emergency situation and acting on one's own behalf, with the latter stated more frequently by migrants than by non-migrants. To prevent over-, under-, and lack of supply, it is necessary to transfer knowledge about the functioning of the medical emergency services, including first aid knowledge.

  20. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D. (Decision and Information Sciences)

    2012-02-20

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the

  1. Systematic review of frequent users of emergency departments in non-US hospitals: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tiel, Sofie; Rood, Pleunie P M; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Erasmus, Vicky; Haagsma, Juanita; van Beeck, Ed; Patka, Peter; Polinder, Suzanne

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on frequent users (FUs) of the emergency department (ED). Elucidation of the characteristics of frequent ED users will help to improve healthcare services. A systematic review of the literature (from 1999 onwards) on frequent ED users in non-US hospitals was performed. Twenty-two studies were included. FUs are responsible for a wide variety of 1-31% of ED visits depending on the FU definition used. They have a mean age between 40 and 50 years and are older than nonfrequent users. Chronic physical and mental diseases seem to be the main reasons for frequent ED visits. In terms of social characteristics, lacking a partner is more frequently reported among FUs in some studies. The absence of a universal definition for FUs complicates the determination of the burden on emergency healthcare services. FUs are a heterogeneous group of patients with genuine medical needs and high consumption of other healthcare services.

  2. Distribution and predictors of emergency department charges: the case of a tertiary hospital in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Shadi; Mourad, Yara; Dimassi, Hani; Hitti, Eveline

    2016-03-18

    As health care costs continue to increase worldwide, health care systems, and more specifically hospitals are facing continuous pressure to operate more efficiently. One service within the hospital sector whose cost structure has been modestly investigated is the Emergency Department (ED). The study aims to report on the distribution of ED resource use, as expressed in charges, and to determine predictors of/contributors to total ED charges at a major tertiary hospital in Lebanon. The study used data extracted from the ED discharge database for visits between July 31, 2012 and July 31, 2014. Patient visit bills were reported under six major categories: solutions, pharmacy, laboratory, physicians, facility, and radiology. Characteristics of ED visits were summarized according to patient gender, age, acuity score, and disposition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with total charges as the dependent variable. Findings revealed that the professional fee (40.9 %) followed by facility fee (26.1 %) accounted for the majority of the ED charges. While greater than 80 % of visit charges went to physician and facility fee for low acuity cases, these contributed to only 52 and 54 % of the high acuity presentations where ancillary services and solutions' contribution to the total charges increased. The total charges for males were $14 higher than females; age was a predictor of higher charges with total charges of patients greater than 60 years of age being around $113 higher than ages 0-18 after controlling for all other variables. Understanding the components and determinants of ED charges is essential to developing cost-containment interventions. Institutional modeling of charging patterns can be used to offer price estimates to ED patients who request this information and ultimately help create market competition to drive down costs.

  3. Are hospitals ready to response to disasters? Challenges, opportunities and strategies of Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Atighechian, Golrokh; Shams, Lida; Haghshenas, Abbas

    2011-08-01

    Applying an effective management system in emergency incidents provides maximum efficiency with using minimum facilities and human resources. Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) is one of the most reliable emergency incident command systems to make hospitals more efficient and to increase patient safety. This research was to study requirements, barriers, and strategies of HEICS in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS). This was a qualitative research carried out in Isfahan Province, Iran during 2008-09. The study population included senior hospital managers of IUMS and key informants in emergency incident management across Isfahan Province. Sampling method was in non-random purposeful form and snowball technique was used. The research instrument for data collection was semi-structured interview; collected data was analyzed by Colaizzi Technique. Findings of study were categorized into three general categories including requirements (organizational and sub-organizational), barriers (internal and external) of HEICS establishment, and providing short, mid and long term strategies. These categories are explained in details in the main text. Regarding the existing barriers in establishment of HEICS, it is recommended that responsible authorities in different levels of health care system prepare necessary conditions for implementing such system as soon as possible via encouraging and supporting systems. This paper may help health policy makers to get reasonable framework and have comprehensive view for establishing HEICS in hospitals. It is necessary to consider requirements and viewpoints of stakeholders before any health policy making or planning.

  4. The Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service: High Frequency of Nontransported Calls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherwin E. Phillips

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. There are no published studies on the Barbados Emergency Ambulance Service and no assessment of the calls that end in nontransported individuals. We describe reasons for the nontransport of potential clients. Methods. We used the Emergency Medical Dispatch (Medical Priority Dispatch System instrument, augmented with five local call types, to collect information on types of calls. The calls were categorised under 7 headings. Correlations between call types and response time were calculated. Results. Most calls were from the category medical (54%. Nineteen (19% percent of calls were in the non-transported category. Calls from call type Cancelled accounted for most of these and this was related to response time, while Refused service was inversely related (. Conclusions. The Barbados Ambulance Service is mostly used by people with a known illness and for trauma cases. One-fifth of calls fall into a category where the ambulance is not used often due to cancellation which is related to response time. Other factors such as the use of alternative transport are also important. Further study to identify factors that contribute to the non-transported category of calls is necessary if improvements in service quality are to be made.

  5. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, James R; Gonzalez, Michael; Alqusairi, Diaa; Champagne-Langabeer, Tiffany; Jackson, Adria; Mikhail, Jennifer; Persse, David

    2016-11-01

    Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED), affecting the entire emergency care system's capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN) program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  6. Innovative Home Visit Models Associated With Reductions In Costs, Hospitalizations, And Emergency Department Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sarah; Snyder, Lynne Page; Rotondo, Christina; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Colligan, Erin Murphy; Giuriceo, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    While studies of home-based care delivered by teams led by primary care providers have shown cost savings, little is known about outcomes when practice-extender teams-that is, teams led by registered nurses or lay health workers-provide home visits with similar components (for example, care coordination and education). We evaluated findings from five models funded by Health Care Innovation Awards of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Each model used a mix of different components to strengthen connections to primary care among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions; these connections included practice-extender home visits. Two models achieved significant reductions in Medicare expenditures, and three models reduced utilization in the form of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or both for beneficiaries relative to comparators. These findings present a strong case for the potential value of home visits by practice-extender teams to reduce Medicare expenditures and service use in a particularly vulnerable and costly segment of the Medicare population. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Hospital discharge summary scorecard: a quality improvement tool used in a tertiary hospital general medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G; Harvey, R; Dyne, A; Said, A; Scott, I

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the impact of completion and feedback of discharge summary scorecards on the quality of discharge summaries written by interns in a general medicine service of a tertiary hospital. The scorecards significantly improved summary quality in the first three rotations of the intern year and could be readily adopted by other units as a quality improvement intervention for optimizing clinical handover to primary care providers. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  8. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries § 17.35 Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries. The Secretary may furnish hospital care and... associated with and held to be aggravating a service-connected disability; (b) If the care is furnished to a...

  9. Literature Study : The Nature of Service, The Nature of Hospitality, The Nature of Experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esselink, P. (Priscilla)

    2010-01-01

    In this report the concepts services, hospitality and experiences will be discussed. The goal of this report is to provide insight in what is written in literature about services, hospitality and experiences and to help defining the concept hospitality services for the Research Centre of the Saxion

  10. Gynaecological emergencies seen in a referral hospital in Northwest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017 Tropical Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. Address for ... gynaecological emergencies giving an institutional prevalence of 43.8%. The highest (44.5%) ..... Reported Sexual violence among.

  11. Audit of surgical emergency at lahore general hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, S.; Bhatti, A.A.; Burhanulhuq, A.

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes through systematic review of care against explicit criteria and the review of change. Objective of this study was to report the patterns of admissions in our surgical emergency and the comparison of results with the available data Methods: All the patients presented in the surgical emergency of Unit III from April to December 2014. Detail of all surgical patients admitted during the period was recorded from the emergency entry register maintained by the staff nurse. Demographic data mode of admission, diagnosis and outcomes were recorded on proforma. Results: Results: Total number of patients were 11140, out of which 5998 (53.8%) were males and 5142 (46%) were females, mostly were between 18-56 years of age. Emergency surgeries were performed in 650 of our cases whereas the rest of the patients were managed conservatively, treated at minor operation theatre (MOT), referred to their concerned emergencies or discharged. The most common presentation was road traffic accidents followed by trauma, urological emergencies and intestinal obstruction. Overall mortality was estimated as 1.5%. Conclusions: Surgical audit should be made a regular practice to serve as an important and effective tool of accountibilty on clinical outcomes and self evaluation and in improving the quality of our health care system. (author)

  12. AUDIT OF SURGICAL EMERGENCY AT LAHORE GENERAL HOSPITAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Sadaf; Bhatti, Afsar Ali; Burhanulhuq

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a quality improvement process that seeks to improve patient care and outcomes through systematic review of care against explicit criteria and the review of change. Objective of this study was to report the patterns of admissions in our surgical emergency and the comparison of results with the available data. All the patients presented in the surgical emergency of Unit III from April to December 2014. Detail of all surgical patients admitted during the period was recorded from the emergency entry register maintained by the staff nurse. Demographic data, mode of admission, diagnosis and outcomes were recorded on a pro forma. Total number of patients were 11140, out of which 5998 (53.8%) were males and 5142 (46%) were females, mostly were between 18-56 years of age. Emergency surgeries were performed in 650 of our cases whereas the rest of the patients were managed conservatively, treated at minor operation theatre (MOT), referred to their concerned emergencies or discharged. The most common presentation was road traffic accidents followed by trauma, urological emergencies and intestinal obstruction. Overall mortality was estimated as 1.5%. Surgical audit should be made a regular practice to serve as an important and effective tool of accountibilty on clinical outcomes and self evaluation and in improving the quality of our health care system.

  13. Medication reconciliation service in Tan Tock Seng Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sia Beng; Shan, Janice Chan Pei; Hong, Goh Lay

    2013-01-01

    Medication reconciliation is integral to every hospital. Approximately 60 percent of all hospital medication errors occur at admission, intra-hospital transfer or discharge. Effectively and consistently performing medication reconciliation at care-interfaces continues to be a challenge. Tan Tock Seng Hospital (TTSH) averages 4,700 admissions monthly. Many patients are elderly (> 65 years old) at risk from poly-pharmacy. As part of a medication safety initiative, pharmacy staff started a medication reconciliation service in 2007, which expanded to include all patients in October 2009. This article aims to describe the TTSH medication reconciliation system and to highlight common medication errors occurring following incomplete medication reconciliation. Where possible, patients admitted into TTSH are seen by pharmacy staff within 24 hours of admission. A form was created to document their medications, which is filed into the case sheets for referencing purposes. Any discrepancies in medicines are brought to doctors' attention. Patients are also counseled about changes to their medications. Errors picked up were captured in an Excel database. The most common medication error was prescribers missing out medications. The second commonest was recording different doses and regimens. The reason was mainly due to doctors transcribing medications inaccurately. This is a descriptive study and no statistical tests were carried out. Data entry was done by different pharmacy staff, and not a dedicated person; hence, data might be under-reported. The findings demonstrate the importance of medication reconciliation on admission. Accurate medication reconciliation can help to reduce transcription errors and improve service quality. The article highlights medication reconciliation's importance and has implications for healthcare professionals in all countries.

  14. Working styles of medicine professionals in emergency medical service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Marija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Transactional analysis is a personality and communication theory established by psychiatrist Eric Berne, at the end of the fifties. Counter script is the way of life in accordance with parental imperative. The person with a counter-script has a compulsion to fulfill the required task in order to avoid the disaster of ban. There are five drivers that are considered essential, and these are: 'Be perfect!', 'Be strong!', 'Hurry up!', 'Please others!' and 'Work hard!' Objective: a Determination of the most dominant driver in this medical service. b Because of the specifics of this job which requires speed and humanity, the emphasis will be on doublet: 'Hurry up!' and 'Please others!' Method: The study was conducted on a group of subjects employed in a general service with medical emergency. The instrument used in the study was Julie Hay's questionnaire for diagnosing the working styles. Results: Statistical research was conducted on a sample of 30 subjects employed in the emergency medical service. Availability of all afore mentioned drivers was tested. The research hypotheses were formulated as follows: H0: The driver is not present among the employees in this service; H1: The driver is present among the employees in this service. Calculated value of the t-statistics for the driver 'Hurry up!' is 1.398; for the driver 'Be perfect!' 3.616; for the driver 'Please others!' 11.693; for the driver 'Work hard!' -0.673; and for the driver 'Be strong!' 3.880. Since the realizable value of the t-statistics for the drivers: 'Be perfect!' and 'Please others!' and 'Be strong!' is bigger than the critical value 1.699, and p<0.05 we reject the null hypothesis and we accept the alternative hypothesis on the significance level of 95%. For the drivers 'Hurry up!' and 'Work hard!' the values of t-statistics are lower than the critical value 1.699 for significance level of 95%, so the alternative hypothesis are not acceptable. Conclusion: The results of

  15. French hospital response to an emergency radioactive situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telion, C.; Carli, P.

    2006-01-01

    Anticipating exceptional risks and training to deal with serious and violent events which are given massive media coverage is a very real challenge for hospital staff, and one that AP-HP decided to face. The R*53 exercise involved dealing with radiation contaminated victims requiring organisation of a specific, protected care circuit within the hospital. It was designed as a pedagogical exercise as part of a collective learning process with the aim of providing data which could be used as the basis for subsequent training. (authors)

  16. Helicopter versus ground emergency medical services for the transportation of traumatically injured children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Camille L; Metzger, Ryan R; Pyle, Laura; Darmofal, Joe; Scaife, Eric; Moulton, Steven L

    2015-02-01

    Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) are a common mode of transportation for pediatric trauma patients. We hypothesized that HEMS improve outcomes for traumatically injured children compared to ground emergency medical services (GEMS). We queried trauma registries of two level 1 pediatric trauma centers for children 0-17 years, treated from 2003 to 2013, transported by HEMS or GEMS, with known transport starting location and outcome. A geocoding service estimated travel distance and time. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to adjust for injury severity variables and travel distance/time. We identified 14,405 traumatically injured children; 3870 (26.9%) transported by HEMS and 10,535 (73.1%) transported by GEMS. Transport type was not significantly associated with survival, ICU length of stay, or discharge disposition. Transport by GEMS was associated with a 68.6%-53.1% decrease in hospital length of stay, depending on adjustment for distance/time. Results were similar for children with severe injuries, and with propensity score matched cohorts. Of note, 862/3850 (22.3%) of HEMS transports had an ISS<10 and hospitalization<1 day. HEMS do not independently improve outcomes for traumatically injured children, and 22.3% of children transported by HEMS are not significantly injured. These factors should be considered when requesting HEMS for transport of traumatically injured children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Glass injuries seen in the emergency department of a South African district hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Nzaumvila, Doudou; Govender, Indiran; Kramer, Efraim B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital frequently manages patients with glass-related injuries. This study assessed these injuries and the glass that caused them in more detail. AIM: The objectives of our study included determining the type of glass causing these injuries and describing the circumstances associated with different types of glass injuries. SETTING: The emergency department of Embhuleni Hospital in Elukwatini, Mpumalanga province, South Africa. METHODS: This ...

  18. Sociodemografic and Clinical Characteristics of Suicidal Cases who Attempted to Emergency Services in Ankara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma ERCAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study is to determine the sociodemografic and clinical characteristics of suicide attempted cases who were admitted to the emergency departments of the hospitals in the first six months of 2010 in Ankara. Methods: Data were obtained by examining the suicide attempted registration forms that were filled out in the emergency services of hospitals working for the Ministry of Health retrospectively. Results: The incidence of suicide attempts in women (76.5% is higher than men (23.5%. Suicide attempts are high in 15-24 group of age (59.3 %. The rate of suicide attempts is high in patients who were single (57.9 % and students who were in education level of secondary (44.6 % and high school (40.2 %. The most common hospitals that were applied are Ankara Training and Researsch Hospital (29.8% and Kecioren Training and Research Hospital (12.4%. Also Mamak (19.7% and Kecioren (17.2% are towns that cases were seen mostly. The most applied method of suicide attempted is the usage of drugs and toxic substances with the 96.2%. The increment ratio of the suicide attempts is seen paticularly from January to June. Family (16.0% and psychiatric disorder (15.2% are mainly stressors leading to suicide attempted. Discussion: All attempted suicide patients who applied to Emergency Department should be directed to Crisis Intervention Unit immediately and following-up the cases with psychiatric consultation must become obligatory as well as medical treatments. The findings have been discussed with the literature. [JCBPR 2016; 5(1.000: 5-12

  19. A research proposition for using high definition video in emergency medical services

    OpenAIRE

    Weerakkody, Vishanth; Molnar, Andreea; Irani, Zahir; El-Haddadeh, Ramzi

    2013-01-01

    In emergency situations, communication between the ambulance crew and an emergency department in the hospital can be crucial in determining the best decision for a patient's health. Currently, when an ambulance crew reports at an emergency, paramedics use voice communication from scene of emergency to the hospital. In critical life threatening situations, use of high quality visual images and live video streaming can allow paramedics on the scene of an emergency to take better informed decisi...

  20. Syndromic surveillance: hospital emergency department participation during the Kentucky Derby Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, Ruth; Goss, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Electronic syndromic surveillance may have value in detecting emerging pathogens or a biological weapons release. Hospitals that have an agile process to evaluate chief complaints of patients seeking emergency care may be able to more quickly identify subtle changes in the community's health. An easily adaptable prototype system was developed to monitor emergency department patient visits during the Kentucky Derby Festival in Louisville, Kentucky, from April 16-May 14, 2002. Use of the system was continued during the same festival periods in 2003 and 2004. Twelve area hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, participated in a prospective analysis of the chief symptoms of patients who sought care in the emergency department during the Kentucky Derby Festival during 2002. Six hospitals were classified as computer record groups (CRG) and used their existing computerized record capabilities. The other 6 hospitals used a personal digital assistant (PDA) with customized software (PDA group). Data were evaluated by the health department epidemiologist using SaTScan, a modified version of a cancer cluster detection program, to look for clusters of cases above baseline over time and by Zip code. All 12 hospitals were able to collect and provide data elements during the study period. The 6 CRG hospitals were able to perform daily data transmission; however, 3 CRG hospitals were unable to interpret their data because it was transmitted in pure text format. In contrast, data from all 6 PDA group hospitals were interpretable. Real-time data analysis was compared with post-event data, and it was found that the real-time evaluation correctly identified no unusual disease activity during the study period. The 12 hospitals participating in this study demonstrated that community-wide surveillance using computerized data was possible and that the 6 study hospitals using a PDA could quickly interpret emergency department patients' chief complaints. The emergency department chief complaints

  1. AFEM Consensus Conference, 2013. AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup Consensus Paper: Advancing Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care in Africa-Advocacy and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K. Mould-Millman

    2014-06-01

    Future directions of the AFEM Out-of-Hospital Emergency Care Workgroup include creating an online Toolkit. This will serve as a repository of template documents to guide implementation and development of clinical care, education, transportation, public access, policy and governance.

  2. Provision of an emergency theatre in tertiary hospitals is cost ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cancellations of planned elective surgical operations increase financial cost to the patient and the hospital. Objectives. To determine the rate and reasons for cancellations, estimate the cost incurred by such cancellations and recommend possible solutions. Methods. We did a prospective descriptive study of ...

  3. Increased ICU resource needs for an academic emergency general surgery service*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Galvagno, Samuel M; Rock, Peter; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh; Spencer, Heather; Hong, Caron; Diaz, Jose J

    2014-04-01

    ICU needs of nontrauma emergency general surgery patients are poorly described. This study was designed to compare ICU utilization of emergency general surgery patients admitted to an acute care emergency surgery service with other general surgery patients. Our hypothesis is that tertiary care emergency general surgery patients utilize more ICU resources than other general surgical patients. Retrospective database review. Academic, tertiary care, nontrauma surgical ICU. All patients admitted to the surgical ICU over age 18 between March 2004 and June 2012. None. Six thousand ninety-eight patients were evaluated: 1,053 acute care emergency surgery, 1,964 general surgery, 1,491 transplant surgery, 995 facial surgery/otolaryngology, and 595 neurosurgery. Acute care emergency surgery patients had statistically significantly longer ICU lengths of stay than other groups: acute care emergency surgery (13.5 ± 17.4 d) versus general surgery (8.7 ± 12.9), transplant (7.8 ± 11.6), oral-maxillofacial surgery (5.5 ± 4.2), and neurosurgery (4.47 ± 9.8) (all psurgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 73.4% versus general surgery 64.9%, transplant 63.3%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 58.4%, and neurosurgery 53.1% (all p surgery patients: acute care emergency surgery 10.8% versus general surgery 4.3%, transplant 6.6%, oral-maxillofacial surgery 0%, and neurosurgery 0.5% (all p surgery patients were more likely interhospital transfers for tertiary care services than general surgery or transplant (24.5% vs 15.5% and 8.3% respectively, p surgery (13.7% vs 6.7% and 3.5%, all p surgery and general surgery, whereas transplant had fewer. Emergency general surgery patients have increased ICU needs in terms of length of stay, ventilator usage, and continuous renal replacement therapy usage compared with other services, perhaps due to the higher percentage of transfers and emergent surgery required. These patients represent a distinct population. Understanding their resource needs

  4. Telehealth-Enabled Emergency Medical Services Program Reduces Ambulance Transport to Urban Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert Langabeer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Emergency medical services (EMS agencies transport a significant majority of patients with low acuity and non-emergent conditions to local emergency departments (ED, affecting the entire emergency care system’s capacity and performance. Opportunities exist for alternative models that integrate technology, telehealth, and more appropriately aligned patient navigation. While a limited number of programs have evolved recently, no empirical evidence exists for their efficacy. This research describes the development and comparative effectiveness of one large urban program. Methods The Houston Fire Department initiated the Emergency Telehealth and Navigation (ETHAN program in 2014. ETHAN combines telehealth, social services, and alternative transportation to navigate primary care-related patients away from the ED where possible. Using a case-control study design, we describe the program and compare differences in effectiveness measures relative to the control group. Results During the first 12 months, 5,570 patients participated in the telehealth-enabled program, which were compared against the same size control group. We found a 56% absolute reduction in ambulance transports to the ED with the intervention compared to the control group (18% vs. 74%, P<.001. EMS productivity (median time from EMS notification to unit back in service was 44 minutes faster for the ETHAN group (39 vs. 83 minutes, median. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality or patient satisfaction. Conclusion We found that mobile technology-driven delivery models are effective at reducing unnecessary ED ambulance transports and increasing EMS unit productivity. This provides support for broader EMS mobile integrated health programs in other regions.

  5. Police referrals at the psychiatric emergency service in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Pang; Wu, Chia-Yi; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Tsu-Hui; Liu, Tzong-Hsien; Chou, Pesus

    2015-12-01

    The police are the frontline workers in crisis situations involving patients with severe mental illness and act as a primary referral source for psychiatric emergency services (PES) in the community. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution and characteristics of police referral among psychiatric patients in Taiwan. The study cohort consisted of patients who visited the PES of Taipei City Psychiatric Center from January 2009 to December 2010. The associations between the factors of demographics, clinical characteristics, and psychiatric service utilization and police referral were evaluated. Among the 7656 psychiatric emergency visits, 3029 (39.6%) were referred by the police. These patients referred by police were more likely to be male and aged between 30 to 49 years. Clinical factors related to police referrals including a higher triage assessment level, chief problems included violence, disturbance, substance use, less anxiety, and a diagnosis of unspecified psychosis. The triage assessment level and chief problems assessed by nurses were major predictors. These patients tended to be referred from the catchment area and during the nighttime shift, were discharged during the daytime shift, and stayed longer in the PES. Disposition arrangements such as discharge against medical advice and involuntary admission were also associated with police referrals. Patients referred by the police to the PES were those with more severe psychiatric problems and illnesses assessed by psychiatric nurses and psychiatrists. They tended to have more complex service utilization at the PES. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Mobile Integrated Health Care and Community Paramedicine: An Emerging Emergency Medical Services Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bryan Y; Blumberg, Charles; Williams, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine are models of health care delivery that use emergency medical services (EMS) personnel to fill gaps in local health care infrastructure. Community paramedics may perform in an expanded role and require additional training in the management of chronic disease, communication skills, and cultural sensitivity, whereas other models use all levels of EMS personnel without additional training. Currently, there are few studies of the efficacy, safety, and cost-effectiveness of mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine programs. Observations from existing program data suggest that these systems may prevent congestive heart failure readmissions, reduce EMS frequent-user transports, and reduce emergency department visits. Additional studies are needed to support the clinical and economic benefit of mobile integrated health care and community paramedicine. Copyright © 2015 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors Influencing Quality of Pain Management in a Physician Staffed Helicopter Emergency Medical Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberholzer, Nicole; Kaserer, Alexander; Albrecht, Roland; Seifert, Burkhardt; Tissi, Mario; Spahn, Donat R; Maurer, Konrad; Stein, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    Pain is frequently encountered in the prehospital setting and needs to be treated quickly and sufficiently. However, incidences of insufficient analgesia after prehospital treatment by emergency medical services are reported to be as high as 43%. The purpose of this analysis was to identify modifiable factors in a specific emergency patient cohort that influence the pain suffered by patients when admitted to the hospital. For that purpose, this retrospective observational study included all patients with significant pain treated by a Swiss physician-staffed helicopter emergency service between April and October 2011 with the following characteristics to limit selection bias: Age > 15 years, numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain documented at the scene and at hospital admission, NRS > 3 at the scene, initial Glasgow coma scale > 12, and National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics score helicopter emergency service associated with insufficient pain management. A total of 778 patients were included in the analysis. Insufficient pain management (NRS > 3 at hospital admission) was identified in 298 patients (38%). Factors associated with insufficient pain management were higher National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics scores, high NRS at the scene, nontrauma patients, no analgesic administration, and treatment by a female physician. In 16% (128 patients), despite ongoing pain, no analgesics were administered. Factors associated with this untreated persisting pain were short time at the scene (below 10 minutes), secondary missions of helicopter emergency service, moderate pain at the scene, and nontrauma patients. Sufficient management of severe pain is significantly better if ketamine is combined with an opioid (65%), compared to a ketamine or opioid monotherapy (46%, P = .007). In the studied specific Swiss cohort, nontrauma patients, patients on secondary missions, patients treated only for a short time at the scene before transport, patients who receive no

  8. Effects of an emergency medical services-based resource access program on frequent users of health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Anthony S; Castillo, Edward M; Chan, Theodore C; Jensen, Anne Marie; Patel, Ekta; Watts, Kerin; Dunford, James V

    2012-01-01

    A small group of adults disproportionately and ineffectively use acute services including emergency medical services (EMS) and emergency departments (EDs). The resulting episodic, uncoordinated care is of lower quality and higher cost and simultaneously consumes valuable public safety and acute care resources. To address this issue, we measured the impact of a pilot, EMS-based case management and referral intervention termed the San Diego Resource Access Program (RAP) to reduce EMS, ED, and inpatient (IP) visits. This was a historical cohort study of RAP records and billing data of EMS and one urban hospital for 51 individuals sequentially enrolled in the program. The study sample consisted of adults with ≥ 10 EMS transports within 12 months and others reported by prehospital personnel with significant recent increases in transports. Data were collected over a 31-month time period from December 2006 to June 2009. Data were collected for equal pre- and postenrollment time periods based on date of initial RAP contact, and comparisons were made using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Overall use for subjects is reported. The majority of subjects were male (64.7%), homeless (58.8%), and 40 to 59 years of age (72.5%). Between the pre and post periods, EMS encounters declined 37.6% from 736 to 459 (p = 0.001), resulting in a 32.1% decrease in EMS charges from $689,743 to $468,394 (p = 0.004). The EMS task time and mileage decreased by 39.8% and 47.5%, respectively, accounting for 262 (p = 0.008) hours and 1,940 (p = 0.006) miles. The number of ED encounters at the one participating hospital declined 28.1% from 199 to 143, which correlated with a 12.7% decrease in charges from $413,410 to $360,779. The number of IP admissions declined by 9.1% from 33 to 30, corresponding to a 5.9% decrease in IP charges from $687,306 to $646,881. Hospital length of stay declined 27.9%, from 122 to 88 days. Across all services, total charges declined by $314,406. This pilot study

  9. Association Between Helicopter vs Ground Emergency Medical Services and Survival for Adults With Major Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvagno, Samuel M.; Haut, Elliott R.; Zafar, S. Nabeel; Millin, Michael G.; Efron, David T.; Koenig, George J.; Baker, Susan P.; Bowman, Stephen M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Haider, Adil H.

    2012-01-01

    Context Helicopter emergency medical services and their possible effect on outcomes for traumatically injured patients remain a subject of debate. Because helicopter services are a limited and expensive resource, a methodologically rigorous investigation of its effectiveness compared with ground emergency medical services is warranted. Objective To assess the association between the use of helicopter vs ground services and survival among adults with serious traumatic injuries. Design, Setting, and Participants Retrospective cohort study involving 223 475 patients older than 15 years, having an injury severity score higher than 15, and sustaining blunt or penetrating trauma that required transport to US level I or II trauma centers and whose data were recorded in the 2007–2009 versions of the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Data Bank. Interventions Transport by helicopter or ground emergency services to level I or level II trauma centers. Main Outcome Measures Survival to hospital discharge and discharge disposition. Results A total of 61 909 patients were transported by helicopter and 161 566 patients were transported by ground. Overall, 7813 patients (12.6%) transported by helicopter died compared with 17 775 patients (11%) transported by ground services. Before propensity score matching, patients transported by helicopter to level I and level II trauma centers had higher Injury Severity Scores. In the propensity score–matched multivariable regression model, for patients transported to level I trauma centers, helicopter transport was associated with an improved odds of survival compared with ground transport (odds ratio [OR], 1.16; 95% CI, 1.14–1.17; P<.001; absolute risk reduction [ARR], 1.5%). For patients transported to level II trauma centers, helicopter transport was associated with an improved odds of survival (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.13–1.17; P < .001; ARR, 1.4%). A greater proportion (18.2%) of those transported to level I trauma centers

  10. A prospective audit of emergency urology activity in a university teaching hospital

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2014-06-01

    Urology cover is commonly available out-of-hours in most teaching hospitals. However, increased pressure to reduce hospital expenditure has forced many institutions to consider removing middle grade cover outside of normal working hours. The aim of this study was to audit the emergency urology activity in our institution over a 12-month period.

  11. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  12. Emergency medical service in the stroke chain of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenaitia, Hichem; Lefevre, Oriane; Ho, Vanessa; Squarcioni, Christian; Pradel, Vincent; Fournier, Marc; Toesca, Richard; Michelet, Pierre; Auffray, Jean Pierre

    2013-02-01

    The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) play a primordial role in the early management of adults with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the role and effectiveness of the EMS in the stroke chain of survival in Marseille. A retrospective observational study was conducted in patients treated for AIS or transient ischaemic attack in three emergency departments and at the Marseille stroke centre over a period of 12 months. In 2009, of 1034 patients ultimately presenting a diagnosis of AIS or transient ischaemic attack, 74% benefited from EMS activation. Dispatchers correctly diagnosed 57% of stroke patients. The symptoms most frequently reported included limb weakness, speech problems and facial paresis. Elements resulting in misdiagnosis by dispatchers were general discomfort, chest pain, dyspnoea, fall or vertigo. Stroke patients not diagnosed by emergency medical dispatchers but calling within 3 h of symptom onset accounted for 20% of cases. Our study demonstrates that public intervention programmes must stress the urgency of recognizing stroke symptoms and the importance of calling EMS through free telephone numbers. Further efforts are necessary to disseminate guidelines for healthcare providers concerning stroke recognition and the new therapeutic possibilities in order to increase the likelihood of acute stroke patients presenting to a stroke team early enough to be eligible for acute treatment. In addition, EMS dispatchers should receive further training about atypical stroke symptoms, and 'Face Arm Speech Test' tests must be included in the routine questionnaires used in emergency medical calls concerning elderly persons.

  13. Motorcycle crash-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations for traumatic brain injury in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Katherine J; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Naumann, Rebecca B; Waller, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    To examine statewide emergency department (ED) visit data for motorcycle crash morbidity and healthcare utilization due to traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and non-TBIs. North Carolina ED data (2010-2012) and hospital discharge data (2009-2011). Statewide ED visits and hospitalizations due to injuries from traffic-related motorcycle crashes stratified by TBI status. Descriptive study. Descriptive statistics include age, sex, mode of transport, disposition, expected source of payment, hospital length of stay, and hospital charges. Over the study period, there were 18 780 ED visits and 3737 hospitalizations due to motorcycle crashes. Twelve percent of ED visits for motorcycle crashes and 26% of hospitalizations for motorcycle crashes had a diagnosis of TBI. Motorcycle crash-related hospitalizations with a TBI diagnosis had median hospital charges that were nearly $9000 greater than hospitalizations without a TBI diagnosis. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to motorcycle crashes with a TBI diagnosis consumed more healthcare resources than motorcycle crash-related ED visits and hospitalizations without a TBI diagnosis. Increased awareness of motorcyclists by other road users and increased use of motorcycle helmets are 2 strategies to mitigate the incidence and severity of motorcycle crash injuries, including TBIs.

  14. 42 CFR 412.20 - Hospital services subject to the prospective payment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment systems. 412.20 Section 412.20 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital Services Subject to and Excluded From the Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatient...

  15. Developing a Mass Casualty Surge Capacity Protocol for Emergency Medical Services to Use for Patient Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shartar, Samuel E; Moore, Brooks L; Wood, Lori M

    2017-12-01

    Metropolitan areas must be prepared to manage large numbers of casualties related to a major incident. Most US cities do not have adequate trauma center capacity to manage large-scale mass casualty incidents (MCIs). Creating surge capacity requires the distribution of casualties to hospitals that are not designated as trauma centers. Our objectives were to extrapolate MCI response research into operational objectives for MCI distribution plan development; formulate a patient distribution model based on research, hospital capacities, and resource availability; and design and disseminate a casualty distribution tool for use by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel to distribute patients to the appropriate level of care. Working with hospitals within the region, we refined emergency department surge capacity for MCIs and developed a prepopulated tool for EMS providers to use to distribute higher-acuity casualties to trauma centers and lower-acuity casualties to nontrauma hospitals. A mechanism to remove a hospital from the list of available resources, if it is overwhelmed with patients who self-transport to the location, also was put into place. The number of critically injured survivors from an MCI has proven to be consistent, averaging 7% to 10%. Moving critically injured patients to level 1 trauma centers can result in a 25% reduction in mortality, when compared with care at nontrauma hospitals. US cities face major gaps in the surge capacity needed to manage an MCI. Sixty percent of "walking wounded" casualties self-transport to the closest hospital(s) to the incident. Directing critically ill patients to designated trauma centers has the potential to reduce mortality associated with the event. When applied to MCI responses, damage-control principles reduce resource utilization and optimize surge capacity. A universal system for mass casualty triage was identified and incorporated into the region's EMS. Flagship regional coordinating hospitals were designated

  16. An effective support system of emergency medical services with tablet computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kosuke C; Inoue, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Yuichiro

    2015-02-27

    There were over 5,000,000 ambulance dispatches during 2010 in Japan, and the time for transportation has been increasing, it took over 37 minutes from dispatch to the hospitals. A way to reduce transportation time by ambulance is to shorten the time of searching for an appropriate facility/hospital during the prehospital phase. Although the information system of medical institutions and emergency medical service (EMS) was established in 2003 in Saga Prefecture, Japan, it has not been utilized efficiently. The Saga Prefectural Government renewed the previous system in an effort to make it the real-time support system that can efficiently manage emergency demand and acceptance for the first time in Japan in April 2011. The objective of this study was to evaluate if the new system promotes efficient emergency transportation for critically ill patients and provides valuable epidemiological data. The new system has provided both emergency personnel in the ambulance, or at the scene, and the medical staff in each hospital to be able to share up-to-date information about available hospitals by means of cloud computing. All 55 ambulances in Saga are equipped with tablet computers through third generation/long term evolution networks. When the emergency personnel arrive on the scene and discern the type of patient's illness, they can search for an appropriate facility/hospital with their tablet computer based on the patient's symptoms and available medical specialists. Data were collected prospectively over a three-year period from April 1, 2011 to March 31, 2013. The transportation time by ambulance in Saga was shortened for the first time since the statistics were first kept in 1999; the mean time was 34.3 minutes in 2010 (based on administrative statistics) and 33.9 minutes (95% CI 33.6-34.1) in 2011. The ratio of transportation to the tertiary care facilities in Saga has decreased by 3.12% from the year before, 32.7% in 2010 (regional average) and 29.58% (9085

  17. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  18. Emergence of ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium in Danish hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lester, Camilla H; Sandvang, Dorthe; Olsen, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates are reported in increasing numbers in many European hospitals. The clonal complex 17 (CC17) characterized by ampicillin resistance has been associated with nosocomial E. faecium outbreaks and infections in five continents. The aim...... in the number of infections caused by enterococci was observed from 2002 through 2006. The increase was mainly caused by E. faecium isolates, which tripled, whereas the number of E. faecalis isolates increased by only 23% during the same period. There was also a significant increase in the number of ampicillin......-resistant E. faecium isolates. MLST showed that 98% of the tested ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates belonged to CC17. PFGE showed eight different clusters and we found indications of clonal spread within the hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Ampicillin-resistant E. faecium isolates have increased in frequency...

  19. Trends and Weekly Cycles in a Large Swiss Emergency Centre: A 10 Year Period at the University Hospital of Bern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T. Braun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Popular demand for high quality care has increased in recent years. This is also the case for medical services and support at all times of the day and night is nowadays required. During the last ten years, there has been a marked increase in the demands on hospital emergency hospitals, particularly in the Western industrialized countries. The present retrospective study investigates how the demands on a large Swiss university centre have changed over a period of 10 years. Patient numbers are differentiated by age, gender, nationality, weekday and mode of referral. A retrospective analysis was performed of the data of the patients admitted to the Emergency Centre of Bern University Medical Hospital (Inselspital during the ten-year period from 2004 up to and including 2013 and who were treated as emergencies. A total of 264,272 patients were included in the study. It was shown that there was an uninterrupted annual increase from 23,555 patients in 2004 to 34,918 patients in 2013 (+48%. Most patients came to the Emergency Centre on Mondays, followed by Fridays. Because of the marked increase in life expectancy and the resulting demographic changes, there has been a marked increase in the number of older patients coming to the Emergency Centre for acute medical care. It was found that there were disproportionately high numbers of patients aged 20 to 49 years who were not Swiss citizens. In contrast, most patients over 60 were Swiss. In the coming years, emergency centres will have to adapt to the continued increase in patient numbers. This trend will continue, so that it is essential to consider the sociodemographic structure of a region when planning the availability of emergency medical care.

  20. Simulation of robotic courier deliveries in hospital distribution services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, M D; Felder, R A; Kumar, A

    2000-06-01

    Flexible automation in the form of robotic couriers holds the potential for decreasing operating costs while improving delivery performance in hospital delivery systems. This paper discusses the use of simulation modeling to analyze the costs, benefits, and performance tradeoffs related to the installation and use of a fleet of robotic couriers within hospital facilities. The results of this study enable a better understanding of the delivery and transportation requirements of hospitals. Specifically, we examine how a fleet of robotic couriers can meet the performance requirements of the system while maintaining cost efficiency. We show that for clinical laboratory and pharmaceutical deliveries a fleet of six robotic couriers can achieve significant performance gains in terms of turn-around time and delivery variability over the current system of three human couriers per shift or 13 FTEs. Specifically, the simulation results indicate that using robotic couriers to perform both clinical laboratory and pharmaceutical deliveries would result in a 34% decrease in turn-around time, and a 38% decrease in delivery variability. In addition, a break-even analysis indicated that a positive net present value occurs if nine or more FTEs are eliminated with a resulting ROI of 12%. This analysis demonstrates that simulation can be a valuable tool for examining health care distribution services and indicates that a robotic courier system may yield significant benefits over a traditional courier system in this application.

  1. Reporting Helicopter Emergency Medical Services in Major Incidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattah, Sabina; Johnsen, Anne Siri; Sollid, Stephen J M

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Research on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) in major incidents is predominately based on case descriptions reported in a heterogeneous fashion. Uniform data reported with a consensus-based template could facilitate the collection, analysis, and exchange of experiences...... variables were determined by consensus. These variables were formatted in a template with 4 main categories: HEMS background information, the major incident characteristics relevant to HEMS, the HEMS response to the major incident, and the key lessons learned. CONCLUSION: Based on opinions from European...

  2. Usage of psychiatric emergency services by asylum seekers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reko, Amra; Bech, Per; Wohlert, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    predominantly male and married. The group consisted primarily (61%) of failed asylum seekers. Most patients (81%) presented with relevant mental health problems. The main reasons for presenting to the acute psychiatric emergency service were suicidal ideation and/or behaviour (60%). The most frequent diagnosis...... by asylum seekers in Denmark shows some of the acute mental health needs asylum seekers present with. The findings of high levels of suicidal ideation and possible diagnostic difficulties are discussed, as well as possible improvements of the referral and psychiatric evaluation processes....

  3. Occupational exposure in services of Oncological Hospital of Camaguey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreras, C.A.; Brigido, F.O.; Naranjo, L.A.; Sanches, M.P.; Lasserra, S.O.; Hernandez, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Nuclear Medicine Service of the Cancer Hospital at Camaguey presents data on the occupationally exposure workers, during 1990-1999, obtained from film dosimetry. The outcomes show that: the average of annual effective equivalent dose for nuclear medical personnel was 2.47 mSv, while 2.13 mSv were to represent radiotherapy and 1.11 mSv were to represent the personnel tied to the others radiodiagnostic services, in the same period; 88,3% of the nuclear medicine personnel and the 94.9% of the radiotherapy personnel have received doses inferior to 3 mSv/year; the total collective dose for the studied period were 212.5, 189.8 and 22.3 mSv.man for nuclear medicine and radiotherapy and other medical users respectively. In this work, the annual behavior of the total collective doses is described based on the evaluation of the contribution of different radiodiagnostic procedures carried out at the Hospital. Others aspects related to biological radiation effects of occupational exposure and some outcomes are compared with those from the data of the other countries

  4. 77 FR 5213 - Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA): Applicability to Hospital...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... [CMS-1350-NC] RIN 0938-AQ51 Medicare Program; Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA... the applicability of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) to hospital inpatients... available to persons without Federal government identification, commenters are encouraged to leave their...

  5. [Classification and monitoring of the appropriateness of emergency admissions in a tertiary hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo Ferrer, J J; Tomás García, N; Cubillana Herrero, J D; Gómez Company, J A; de Dios Cánovas García, J

    2014-01-01

    To measure the appropriateness of hospital admissions, to classify its Clinical Services (CS) according to the level of inappropriateness, and to determine the usefulness of applying rapid assessment techniques (lot quality assurance sampling) in these types of measurements. A descriptive, retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital to assess the clinical records of emergency admissions to the 12 CS with a higher volume of admissions, using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP). A four-level («A» to «D») increasingly inadequate admissions scale was constructed setting both standard and threshold values in every stratum. Every CS was classified in one of them using lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS). A total of 156 cases (13 cases from every CS) were assessed. The assessment effort (devoted time) was also estimated. There were 22.4±6.3% of inadequate admissions. In the CS classification, 9 (75%) got a good or acceptable appropriateness level, and only 1 (8%) got an inacceptable level. The time devoted was estimated at 17 hours. AEP is useful to assess the admission appropriateness and may be included in the «Emergencies» process management, although its variability prevents the use for external comparisons. If both LQAS and the appropriateness classification level and the global estimation (by unifying lot samples) are combined, the monitoring is affordable without a great effort. To extend these tools to other quality indicators requiring direct observation or clinical records, manual assessment could improve the monitoring efficiency. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the polytrauma victim by the nursing staff in an emergency service of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Sanceverino Mattos

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the actions developed by the nursing staff of a private hospital emergency service in the southern Santa Catarina (SC, related to primary and secondary evaluation of polytrauma victims. Methods: Research of a qualitative approach, the type of case study, performed with twelve nurses. Sample has been characterized as non-probabilistic intentional. Data collection has been performed using the techniques of semi-structured interview and participant observation. Data analysis has been developed using the technique of content analysis. Results: Analysis of nurses’ testimonies and the results of observation have showed that most participants comprehend the importance of adopting the ABCDE rule in primary evaluation - A (Air Way - airway permeability with safe administration of cervical collar; B (Breathing; C (Circulation - search for bleeding and control; D (Disability - neurological evaluation; e E (Exposure - patient’s body exposition seeking missed injuries - and the need of meticulous secondary evaluation of polytrauma victim. However, due to demand of urgency and agility in emergencies of this nature, the rule is not followed in a systematic way. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated the nursing staff’s concern over the following aspects: agility of service; immediate performance of examinations; communication between emergency service professionals; adequate perception of the general condition of the victim; and the reception to victim and family.

  7. [Assessment of quality indicators in pediatric poisoning in an emergency service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez Roca, C; Martínez Sánchez, L; Calzada Baños, Y; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, V; Quintilla Martínez, J M; Luaces Cubells, C

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of quality indicators allows clinicians to evaluate clinical assistance with a standard, to detect deficiencies and to improve medical assistance. Patients who came to emergency services of a tertiary level hospital for suspicion of poisoning from January 2011 to June 2012 were assessed using 20 quality indicators of pediatric poisoning. Data collection was performed by retrospective review of clinical reports. A total of 393 patients were admitted for suspicion of poisoning (0.3% of all admissions).The standard was reached in 11 indicators and not reached in 6: administration of activated charcoal within 2hours of poison ingestion (standard=90%, result=83.5%); attention within the first 15minutes of arriving in the emergency service (standard=90%, result=60.4%); start of gastrointestinal decontamination within 20minutes of arrival in emergency services (standard=90%, result=29.7%); performing of electrocardiogram on the patients poisoned with cardiotoxic substances (standard=95%, result=87%); judicial communication of cases of poisoning that could conceal a crime (standard=95%, result=31.3%), and collection of the minimal set of information of poisoned patients (standard=90%, result=1.9%). Three indicators could not be evaluated as a consequence of the limited number of cases where they could be applied (de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementation of an acute care emergency surgical service: a cost analysis from the surgeon's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantha, Ram Venkatesh; Parry, Neil; Vogt, Kelly; Jain, Vipan; Crawford, Silvie; Leslie, Ken

    2014-04-01

    Acute care surgical services provide comprehensive emergency general surgical care while potentially using health care resources more efficiently. We assessed the volume and distribution of emergency general surgery (EGS) procedures before and after the implementation of the Acute Care and Emergency Surgery Service (ACCESS) at a Canadian tertiary care hospital and its effect on surgeon billings. This single-centre retrospective case-control study compared adult patients who underwent EGS procedures between July and December 2009 (pre-ACCESS), to those who had surgery between July and December 2010 (post-ACCESS). Case distribution was compared between day (7 am to 3 pm), evening (3 pm to 11 pm) and night (11 pm to 7 am). Frequencies were compared using the χ(2) test. Pre-ACCESS, 366 EGS procedures were performed: 24% during the day, 55% in the evening and 21% at night. Post-ACCESS, 463 operations were performed: 55% during the day, 36% in the evening and 9% at night. Reductions in night-time and evening EGS were 57% and 36% respectively (p cost-modelling analysis, post-ACCESS surgeon billing for appendectomies, segmental colectomies, laparotomies and cholecystectomies all declined by $67 190, $125 215, $66 362, and $84 913, respectively (p Cost-modelling analysis demonstrates that these services have cost-savings potential for the health care system without reducing overall surgeon billing.

  9. Understanding the value of mixed methods research: the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew; O'Brien, Kerth; Meckler, Garth; Chang, Anna Marie; Guise, Jeanne-Marie

    2016-07-01

    Mixed methods research has significant potential to broaden the scope of emergency care and specifically emergency medical services investigation. Mixed methods studies involve the coordinated use of qualitative and quantitative research approaches to gain a fuller understanding of practice. By combining what is learnt from multiple methods, these approaches can help to characterise complex healthcare systems, identify the mechanisms of complex problems such as medical errors and understand aspects of human interaction such as communication, behaviour and team performance. Mixed methods approaches may be particularly useful for out-of-hospital care researchers because care is provided in complex systems where equipment, interpersonal interactions, societal norms, environment and other factors influence patient outcomes. The overall objectives of this paper are to (1) introduce the fundamental concepts and approaches of mixed methods research and (2) describe the interrelation and complementary features of the quantitative and qualitative components of mixed methods studies using specific examples from the Children's Safety Initiative-Emergency Medical Services (CSI-EMS), a large National Institutes of Health-funded research project conducted in the USA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. [Emergency care in the autonomous regions of Spain. Improvement in pre-hospital emergency care and welfare coordination. SESPAS Report 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel García, Félix; Fernández Quintana, Ana Isabel; Díaz Prats, Amadeo

    2012-03-01

    The present article describes the general organization of pre-hospital emergency care in the autonomous regions and provides data on activity corresponding to 2010, drawn from the information available in the Primary Care Information System of the Ministry of Health, Social Policy and Equality. Emergency care is provided through various organizational structures covering 24-hour periods. Family medicine attended 17.8 million emergency consultations and nursing attended 10.2 million (year 2010, 14 autonomous communities, 79.7% of the National Health System population). Emergency department utilization ranged between 0.11 and 0.83 urgent family physician consultations per inhabitant/year and between 0.05 and 0.57 nursing consultations per inhabitant/year. Any reform in the management of pre-hospital emergency care will involve organizational changes and aims to produce measurable improvements in healthcare coordination. In the new organizational designs, most of the responsibility lies with human resources in order to achieve the new goals for the future aims to be presented in an operational teamwork structure. Undoubtedly, the main challenge is to achieve optimal coordination with other welfare levels, including the police, social services, nursing homes, etc. If optimal care of the population needs to count on the efforts of all these groups, mobility, individual differences, consistent achievement of high standards, and -most of all- the use of these services by citizens will determine the final result. The results can be quantified in various ways, but evaluation should concentrate on the resources used, the degree of satisfaction among all the parties involved and optimal management of demand, which will help to disseminate the need for a rational resource use. Copyright © 2011 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of performance quality of an advanced scope physiotherapy role in a hospital emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available J Morris,1 K Vine,1 K Grimmer21Physiotherapy Department, The Canberra Hospital, Cnr Hindmarsh Dr & Yamba Dr, Garran, ACT, 2International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, City East Campus, Adelaide, SA, AustraliaBackground: Physiotherapists working in advanced and extended scope roles internationally make a difference to workflow, performance targets, and patient satisfaction in areas traditionally served by medicine and nursingAim: To assess the impact of an advanced scope of practice physiotherapist (ASoP-PT service in a large Australian hospital emergency department (ED by measuring national service and triage category indicators, patient and staff satisfactionMethods: Consecutive patients consulting the ASoP-PT were recruited over 53 weeks following service inception. Descriptions of ASoP-PT activities and patients were collected. Performance was assessed against national ED indicators for length of stay and wait. Patient and staff perspectives were assessed independently by semi-structured interviews. The physiotherapist was formally trained to extended scope of practice including competency in medicines, prescription and application. The legislation prevented him from applying these skills, therefore he worked in an ASoP-PT role in EDResults: The ASoP-PT treated on average, 72 patients per month in ten shifts per fortnight, consulting patients aged from 1 to 88 years. Patients largely presented with musculoskeletal problems in triage Categories 4 and 5. There were shorter length of wait and length of stay, when the ASoP-PT was on shift. However overall compliance with national performance targets was similar with and without the ASoP-PT. Staff and patient satisfaction was high, particularly valuing the ASoP-PT's expertise in musculoskeletal injuries.Conclusion: The ASoP-PT performed at least as well as other ED health care providers in meeting national triage targets. Had the legislation permitted his

  12. Energy, emissions and emergency medical services: Policy matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Lawrence H.; Blanchard, Ian E.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the energy consumption and emissions associated with health services is important for minimizing their environmental impact and guiding their adaptation to a low-carbon economy. In this post-hoc analysis, we characterize the energy burden of North American emergency medical services (EMS) agencies and estimate the potential marginal damage costs arising from their emissions as an example of how and why health services matter in environmental and energy policy, and how and why environmental and energy policy matter to health services. We demonstrate EMS systems are energy intensive, and that vehicle fuels represent 80% of their energy burden while electricity and natural gas represent 20%. We also demonstrate that emissions from EMS operations represent only a small fraction of estimated health sector emissions, but for EMS systems in the United States the associated marginal damage costs are likely between $2.7 million and $9.7 million annually. Significant changes in the supply or price of energy, including changes that arise from environmental and energy policy initiatives designed to constrain fossil fuel consumption, could potentially affect EMS agencies and other health services. We encourage cross disciplinary research to proactively facilitate the health system's adaptation to a low-carbon economy. - Highlights: ► Estimated EMS-related emissions less than 1% of health sector emissions. ► Damage costs of U.S. EMS-related emissions estimated at $2.7 to $9.7 million. ► EMS energy burden is approximately 442 MJ per ambulance response. ► Approximately 80% of EMS energy burden is vehicle fuels. ► Energy supply, price and policy could impact EMS (and other health) services. ► Research needed to facilitate health services’ adaptation to a low carbon economy.

  13. Comparison of emergency medical services systems across Pan-Asian countries: a Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Do; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Tanaka, Hideharu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Alsakaf, Omer; Karim, Sarah Abdul; Khunkhlai, Nalinas; Lin, Chih-Hao; Song, Kyoung Jun; Ryoo, Hyun Wook; Ryu, Hyun Ho; Tham, Lai Peng; Cone, David C

    2012-01-01

    There are great variations in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival outcomes among different countries and different emergency medical services (EMS) systems. The impact of different systems and their contribution to enhanced survival are poorly understood. This paper compares the EMS systems of several Asian sites making up the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcomes Study (PAROS) network. Some preliminary cardiac arrest outcomes are also reported. This is a cross-sectional descriptive survey study addressing population demographics, service levels, provider characteristics, system operations, budget and finance, medical direction (leadership), and oversight. Most of the systems are single-tiered. Fire-based EMS systems are predominant. Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur have hospital-based systems. Service level is relatively low, from basic to intermediate in most of the communities. Korea, Japan, Singapore, and Bangkok have intermediate emergency medical technician (EMT) service levels, while Taiwan and Dubai have paramedic service levels. Medical direction and oversight have not been systemically established, except in some communities. Systems are mostly dependent on public funding. We found variations in available resources in terms of ambulances and providers. The number of ambulances is 0.3 to 3.2 per 100,000 population, and most ambulances are basic life support (BLS) vehicles. The number of human resources ranges from 4.0 per 100,000 population in Singapore to 55.7 per 100,000 population in Taipei. Average response times vary between 5.1 minutes (Tainan) and 22.5 minutes (Kuala Lumpur). We found substantial variation in 11 communities across the PAROS EMS systems. This study will provide the foundation for understanding subsequent studies arising from the PAROS effort.

  14. [Evaluation of hospitalizations in the gastroenterology service of Gabriel Toure Hospital, Mali].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diarra, M; Konate, A; Demble Doumbia, A; Kalle, A; Maiga, M Y

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to appreciate principal affections and mortality and in gastroenterology service of Gabriel Touré Hospital. It is about a survey longitudinal that has permit to analyze patients who have been care. During study, 766 patients were unregistered. Mean age of patient was 45.17 years and a sex ratio (M/F) = 1.10. The rate of reference was 13.85%. The morbidity was dominated by HIV infection (29.90%) followed by Hepato-cellular Carcinoma (7.83%) and cirrhosis (4.05%). Mortality (18.41%) was dominated by the VIH infection, HCC and Cirrhosis. The precocious recourse to cares, the improvement of work conditions, the sensitization, the infectious illness prevention is factors that will permit a reduction of morbidity and hospital mortality.

  15. Composition of emergency medical services teams and the problem of specialisation of emergency medical services physicians in the opinions of occupationally active paramedics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rębak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine includes prevention, prehospital care, specialised treatment, rehabilitation, and education. Aim of the research: The objective of the analysis was to determine the opinions of paramedics concerning the problem of the composition of emergency medical services (EMS teams and specialisation of EMS system physicians according to their education level and sense of coherence. Material and methods: The study was conducted among 336 occupationally active paramedics working in EMS teams delivering prehospital care in selected units in Poland. The study was conducted at Ambulance Stations and in Hospital Emergency Departments, which within their structure had an out-of-hospital EMS team. The study was conducted by the method of a diagnostic survey, and the research instrument was the Orientation to Life Questionnaire SOC-29 and a questionnaire designed by the author. Results: The respondents who had licentiate education relatively more frequently indicated paramedics with licentiate education level as persons most suitable to undertake medical actions (26.32% rather than physicians (21.05%. Paramedics with 2-year post-secondary school education relatively more often mentioned physicians (33.07% than those with licentiate education (17.32%. As many as 89.58% of the paramedics reported the need for a physician in the composition of the EMS team delivering prehospital care, while only 10.42% of them expressed an opinion that there should be teams composed of paramedics only. According to 30.65% of respondents, EMS team delivering prehospital care should include a physician with the specialty in emergency medicine, whereas 8.04% of respondents reported the need for a physician, irrespective of specialisation. However, 42.56% of the paramedics expressed an opinion that a physician is needed only in a specialist team with a specialisation in emergency medicine. The opinions of the paramedics concerning the need for a

  16. EMERGING ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITAL A THREAT TO PUBLIC HEALTH

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    Vichal Rastogi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antimicrobial resistance(AMR threatens the health of many throughout the world, since both old and new infectious diseases remain a formidable public health threat. When pathogenic microorganisms can multiply beyond some critical mass in the face of invading antimicrobials, treatment outcome is compromised. This phenomenon is referred as antimicrobial resistance (AMR. Objective: This retrospective study was conducted to assess the overall antimicrobial resistance in bacterial isolates from tertiary care hospitals as majority of patients here receive empirical antibiotics therapy. Method: This retrospective study was carried out in teaching hospital, Greater Noida to determine prevalence of multidrug resistance in patients in relation to empirical antibiotic therapy in hospital. Various samples (pus,urine,blood were collected for bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity. Results: Total 500 bacterial strains isolated from ICU, surgery, obstetrics & gynaecology and orthopaedics and their sensitivity pattern was compared in this study. The highest number of resistant bacterias were of pseudomonas sp. i.e. 21(33.87% followed by 16(25.80% of staphylococcus aureus, 12(19.35% of Escherichia coli, Klebseilla sp & Proteus vulgaris were 05(8.06% each & Citrobacter sp. 03(4.83%. Total 62(12.4% bacterial isolates were found to be resistant to multiple drugs. The 31 (50% of these resistant bacteria were prevalent in ICU, 12(19.35% in Surgery, 11(17.74% in Gynaecology, 08(12.90% in Orthopaedics.. All the bacterial strains were resistant to common antibiotics like Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline & Cotrimoxazole and some were even resistant to Imipenem. Conclusion: Therefore we have outlined the nature of the antimicrobial resistance problem as an important health issue for national and international community. It is advised to avoid use of empirical antibiotics therapy.

  17. Sustained health-economic effects after reorganisation of a Swiss hospital emergency centre: a cost comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Klaus; Hess, Sascha; Chmiel, Corinne; Bögli, Karin; Sidler, Patrick; Senn, Oliver; Rosemann, Thomas; Brügger, Urs

    2014-10-01

    Emergency departments (EDs) are increasingly overcrowded by walk-in patients. However, little is known about health-economic consequences resulting from long waiting times and inefficient use of specialised resources. We have evaluated a quality improvement project of a Swiss urban hospital: In 2009, a triage system and a hospital-associated primary care unit with General Practitioners (H-GP-unit) were implemented beside the conventional hospital ED. This resulted in improved medical service provision with reduced process times and more efficient diagnostic testing. We now report on health-economic effects. From the hospital perspective, we performed a cost comparison study analysing treatment costs in the old emergency model (ED, only) versus treatment costs in the new emergency model (triage plus ED plus H-GP-unit) from 2007 to 2011. Hospital cost accounting data were applied. All consecutive outpatient emergency contacts were included for 1 month in each follow-up year. The annual number of outpatient emergency contacts increased from n=10 440 (2007; baseline) to n=16 326 (2011; after intervention), reflecting a general trend. In 2007, mean treatment costs per outpatient were €358 (95% CI 342 to 375). Until 2011, costs increased in the ED (€423 (396 to 454)), but considerably decreased in the H-GP-unit (€235 (221 to 250)). Compared with 2007, the annual local budget spent for treatment of 16 326 patients in 2011 showed cost reductions of €417 600 (27 200 to 493 600) after adjustment for increasing patient numbers. From the health-economic point of view, our new service model shows 'dominance' over the old model: While quality of service provision improved (reduced waiting times; more efficient resource use in the H-GP-unit), treatment costs sustainably decreased against the secular trend of increase. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Eight months of emergency services by ambulance (with doctor on board) of the Emergency Department of Prato, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olia, P M; Mollica, T V; Querci, A

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyse the types of calls attended by the authors in their ambulance, assigned to one sector of the urban area of Prato. We analysed 1060 consecutive calls carried out by our ambulance; 33 calls (3.1%), cancelled for various reasons, were excluded from statistical analysis. The calls regarded 1027 patients, 549 (53.5%) males and 478 (46.5%) females. 46% of calls concerned non trauma cases, 17% trauma cases and 7.2% transfers between hospitals. Calls in the non trauma group were for dyspnea (16.7%), unconsciousness (16.6%), chest pain (11.8%), cerebrovascular pathology (7.7%), mental disorders (7.1%), abdominal pain (5.1%), use of psychotropic substances (4%) and convulsions (3.2%). Support to patients with terminal cancer accounted for 2.3% of cases, metabolic disorders 2.2%, hypertensive events 2.1%, tachycardia 1.9%, vertigo 1.9%, allergies 1%, obstetric pathology 0.5% and cardiorespiratory resuscitation 2,2%. Thirteen point seven percent were miscellaneous, including poisonings, migraines, haemorrhages and flu syndromes. Trauma cases included road accidents (62.6%), falls (27%), aggression (6.9%), work-related accidents (3.5%). The percentage of trauma cases (17%) was similar to that reported for a Swedish urban area (20%). Cases of cardiorespiratory resuscitation were 1.65% of our calls, compared to 1.73% and 1.8% reported in Northeastern Germany and Taiwan. Although prehospital emergency medical services are organised differently in different countries, our data suggest that emergency medical services in our area have a percentage distribution of case types similar to services in other countries.

  19. Absenteeism and its implications for nursing care in emergency services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ione Carvalho Pinto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of absenteeism among nursing teams and its determinants in healthcare emergency services. A cross-sectional study was carried out by means of secondary data from records of a coordination of human resources. Occurrences with 208 nursing professionals were identified. Univariate analysis was carried out with frequency calculation of the variables age, gender, professional category, workplace, and days and reasons for absenteeism. Fisher’s exact test was applied, fixing the error type I in 5%. The mean age of the participants was 47.2 years, with a prevalence of the female gender (79.8%. A total of 5,778 occurrences of absenteeism were found (mean of 28 per professional, and illness was the main determinant for absenteeism (2,671 occurrences; 46.2%. There was a prevalence of short-term absenteeism (3,020 occurrences; 52.3%. The findings observed in emergency services were similar, with a potential impact on planning, workforce, and quality of care.

  20. Training Librarians for 21st Century Repository Services: Emerging Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Emasealu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviewed the emerging roles of the 21st century librarians, charged with the responsibility to manage repository services across libraries in present-day information technology environment. Librarians need to be trained and empowered with requisite skills and knowledge needed for successful management of the ICT driven repository initiatives that the 21st century demands. Literature was reviewed on the roles and responsibilities of librarians, training needs and opportunities, career path and recruitment of librarians, and community support necessary for effective and efficient implementation and management of repository initiatives. This entails the ability to comprehend trends and change patterns which are essential for providing research focused and user-friendly models in open repository services that are based on thorough analytical understanding of the challenges of emerging trends. To achieve this requires the training and retraining of librarians to reposition them as information specialists in their career path. The role of the library as an integral part of its social environment is to educate the community about the existence of an open repository by building partnership with community-oriented research centres through seminars, workshops, symposium, training, and awareness programmes. The study recommends that librarians should strategize and collaborate with researchers to make open repository an essential research tool.

  1. Rehospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits after Hospital Discharge in Patients Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Ziv; Wald, Ron; McArthur, Eric; Chertow, Glenn M; Harel, Shai; Gruneir, Andrea; Fischer, Hadas D; Garg, Amit X; Perl, Jeffrey; Nash, Danielle M; Silver, Samuel; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical outcomes after a hospital discharge are poorly defined for patients receiving maintenance in-center (outpatient) hemodialysis. To describe the proportion and characteristics of these patients who are rehospitalized, visit an emergency department, or die within 30 days after discharge from an acute hospitalization, we conducted a population-based study of all adult patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis who were discharged between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2011, from 157 acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. For patients with more than one hospitalization, we randomly selected a single hospitalization as the index hospitalization. Of the 11,177 patients included in the final cohort, 1926 (17%) were rehospitalized, 2971 (27%) were treated in the emergency department, and 840 (7.5%) died within 30 days of discharge. Complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus were the most common reason for rehospitalization, whereas heart failure was the most common reason for an emergency department visit. In multivariable analysis using a cause-specific Cox proportional hazards model, the following characteristics were associated with 30-day rehospitalization: older age, the number of hospital admissions in the preceding 6 months, the number of emergency department visits in the preceding 6 months, higher Charlson comorbidity index score, and the receipt of mechanical ventilation during the index hospitalization. Thus, a large proportion of patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis will be readmitted or visit an emergency room within 30 days of an acute hospitalization. A focus on improving care transitions from the inpatient setting to the outpatient dialysis unit may improve outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. Patient satisfaction with a hospital-based neuropsychology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foran, Amie; Millar, Elisa; Dorstyn, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop and pilot a measure of patient satisfaction that encompasses themes, activities, settings and interactions specific to the neuropsychological assessment process. Methods A focus group of out-patients (n=15) was surveyed to identify the factors commonly associated with a satisfactory neuropsychological experience. Responses informed a purposely designed 14-item patient satisfaction scale (α=0.88) that was completed by 66 hospital out-patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Results Satisfaction with the neuropsychological assessment process was generally reported, with the testing phase (85%) rated significantly more favourably than the pre-assessment (79%) and feedback (70%) phases. Commentaries provided by 32 respondents identified interpersonal facilitators to a satisfactory neuropsychological assessment experience, but also dissatisfaction with physical aspects of the testing environment in addition to service availability. Conclusions The patient satisfaction scale can be used as a quality assurance tool to evaluate neuropsychological service delivery. Large-scale research is needed to confirm the scale's psychometric properties. Further research may also include a broader perspective on the consumers' experience of neuropsychological services.

  3. Evidence of an emerging digital divide among hospitals that care for the poor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashish K; DesRoches, Catherine M; Shields, Alexandra E; Miralles, Paola D; Zheng, Jie; Rosenbaum, Sara; Campbell, Eric G

    2009-01-01

    Some hospitals that disproportionately care for poor patients are falling behind in adopting electronic health records (EHRs). Data from a national survey indicate early evidence of an emerging digital divide: U.S. hospitals that provide care to large numbers of poor patients also had minimal use of EHRs. These same hospitals lagged others in quality performance as well, but those with EHR systems seemed to have eliminated the quality gap. These findings suggest that adopting EHRs should be a major policy goal of health reform measures targeting hospitals that serve large populations of poor patients.

  4. Are hospitals ready to response to disasters? Challenges, opportunities and strategies of Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Yarmohammadian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Applying an effective management system in emergency incidents provides maximum efficiency with using minimum facilities and human resources. Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS is one of the most reliable emergency incident command systems to make hospitals more efficient and to increase patient safety. This research was to study requirements, barriers, and strategies of HEICS in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS. Methods: This was a qualitative research carried out in Isfahan Province, Iran during 2008-09. The study population included senior hospital managers of IUMS and key informants in emergency incident management across Isfahan Province. Sampling method was in non-random purposeful form and snowball technique was used. The research in-strument for data collection was semi-structured interview; collected data was analyzed by Colaizzi Technique. Results: Findings of study were categorized into three general categories including requirements (organizational and sub-organizational, barriers (internal and external of HEICS establishment, and providing short, mid and long term strategies. These categories are explained in details in the main text. Conclusions: Regarding the existing barriers in establishment of HEICS, it is recommended that responsible authori-ties in different levels of health care system prepare necessary conditions for implementing such system as soon as possible via encouraging and supporting systems. This paper may help health policy makers to get reasonable frame-work and have comprehensive view for establishing HEICS in hospitals. It is necessary to consider requirements and viewpoints of stakeholders before any health policy making or planning.

  5. Rural hospital ownership: medical service provision, market mix, and spillover effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2011-10-01

    To test whether nonprofit, for-profit, or government hospital ownership affects medical service provision in rural hospital markets, either directly or through the spillover effects of ownership mix. Data are from the American Hospital Association, U.S. Census, CMS Healthcare Cost Report Information System and Prospective Payment System Minimum Data File, and primary data collection for geographic coordinates. The sample includes all nonfederal, general medical, and surgical hospitals located outside of metropolitan statistical areas and within the continental United States from 1988 to 2005. We estimate multivariate regression models to examine the effects of (1) hospital ownership and (2) hospital ownership mix within rural hospital markets on profitable versus unprofitable medical service offerings. Rural nonprofit hospitals are more likely than for-profit hospitals to offer unprofitable services, many of which are underprovided services. Nonprofits respond less than for-profits to changes in service profitability. Nonprofits with more for-profit competitors offer more profitable services and fewer unprofitable services than those with fewer for-profit competitors. Rural hospital ownership affects medical service provision at the hospital and market levels. Nonprofit hospital regulation should reflect both the direct and spillover effects of ownership. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  6. Satisfaction of health professionals after implementation of a primary care hospital emergency centre in Switzerland: A prospective before-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Sascha; Sidler, Patrick; Chmiel, Corinne; Bögli, Karin; Senn, Oliver; Eichler, Klaus

    2015-10-01

    The increasing number of patients requiring emergency care is a challenge and leads to decreased satisfaction of health professionals at emergency departments (EDs). Thus, a Swiss hospital implemented a hospital-associated primary care centre at the ED. The study aim was to investigate changes in job satisfaction of ED staff before and after the implementation of this new service model and to measure hospital GPs' (HGPs) satisfaction at the hospital-associated primary care centre. This study was embedded in a large prospective before-after study over two years. We examined changes in job satisfaction with a questionnaire followed by selected interviews approaching all of the involved 25 ED staff members and 38 HGPs. The new emergency care model increased job satisfaction of ED staff and HGPs in all measured dimensions. The overall job satisfaction of ED employees improved from 76.5 to 83.9 points (visual analogue scale 0-100; difference 7.4 points [95% CI: 1.3 to 13.5, p = 0.02]). 86% of 29 HGPs preferred to provide their out-of-hours service at the new hospital-associated primary care centre. The hospital-associated primary care centre is a promising option to improve job satisfaction of different health professionals in emergency care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors associated with emergency services use in Taiwanese advanced cancer patients receiving palliative home care services during out-of-hours periods: a retrospective medical record study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Yee-Hsin; Liu, Yao-Ting; Koo, Malcolm; Chiang, Jui-Kun

    2018-03-12

    For patients receiving palliative home care, the need to visit the emergency department is considered to be an indicator of poor quality care. The situation can be particularly distressing when it occurs outside of normal hours of palliative home care service. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors for emergency department use during out-of-hours periods of palliative home care service among advanced cancer patients in Taiwan. This case-control study was based on a retrospective medical chart review (January 2010 to December 2012) of advanced cancer patients who were receiving palliative home care in a community hospital in south Taiwan. The use of emergency medical services by these patients was dichotomized into either normal hours (8 a.m. to midnight, Monday to Friday, excluding public holidays) of palliative home care or outside normal hours. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate factors associated with emergency services use during out-of-hours period of palliative home care. Of the 94 patients receiving palliative home care, 65 had used emergency services at least once during the 3-year study period. Of these 65 patients, 40% used emergency services during out-of-hours of palliative home care. Patients with distressing conditions (defined as the occurrence of any two conditions of dyspnea, change of consciousness, or gastrointestinal bleeding) were significantly more likely to use emergency services during out-of-hours of palliative home care. Patients at risk of developing dyspnea, change of consciousness, or gastrointestinal bleeding should be provided with relevant information regarding these symptoms and signs.

  8. A Model Curriculum for an Emergency Medical Services (EMS Rotation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Mancera

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This EMS curriculum is designed for Emergency Medicine residents at all levels of training. Introduction: Emergency Medicine (EM physicians have routine interaction with Emergency Medical Services (EMS in their clinical practice. Additionally, the American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandates that all Emergency Medicine resident physicians receive specific training in the area of EMS.1 Historically, EMS training for EM residents has been conducted in the absence of a standardized didactic curriculum. Despite advancements in the area of prehospital training, there remains wide inconsistency in EMS training experiences among EM residency training programs.2 To our knowledge a standardized and reproducible EMS curriculum for EM residents does not exist. Objectives: The aim of this curriculum is to provide a robust learning experience for EM residents around prehospital care and EMS that fulfills the ACGME requirements and which can be easily replicated and implemented in a variety of EM residency training programs. Method: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include didactics, asynchronous learning through online modules and a focused reading list, experiential learning through ride-alongs, structured small group discussion, supervised medical command shifts, and mentored practice in organizing and delivering didactics to EMS providers.

  9. Electronic health record adoption in US hospitals: the emergence of a digital "advanced use" divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; Holmgren, A Jay; Kralovec, Peter; Worzala, Chantal; Searcy, Talisha; Patel, Vaishali

    2017-11-01

    While most hospitals have adopted electronic health records (EHRs), we know little about whether hospitals use EHRs in advanced ways that are critical to improving outcomes, and whether hospitals with fewer resources - small, rural, safety-net - are keeping up. Using 2008-2015 American Hospital Association Information Technology Supplement survey data, we measured "basic" and "comprehensive" EHR adoption among hospitals to provide the latest national numbers. We then used new supplement questions to assess advanced use of EHRs and EHR data for performance measurement and patient engagement functions. To assess a digital "advanced use" divide, we ran logistic regression models to identify hospital characteristics associated with high adoption in each advanced use domain. We found that 80.5% of hospitals adopted at least a basic EHR system, a 5.3 percentage point increase from 2014. Only 37.5% of hospitals adopted at least 8 (of 10) EHR data for performance measurement functions, and 41.7% of hospitals adopted at least 8 (of 10) patient engagement functions. Critical access hospitals were less likely to have adopted at least 8 performance measurement functions (odds ratio [OR] = 0.58; P functions (OR = 0.68; P = 0.02). While the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act resulted in widespread hospital EHR adoption, use of advanced EHR functions lags and a digital divide appears to be emerging, with critical-access hospitals in particular lagging behind. This is concerning, because EHR-enabled performance measurement and patient engagement are key contributors to improving hospital performance. Hospital EHR adoption is widespread and many hospitals are using EHRs to support performance measurement and patient engagement. However, this is not happening across all hospitals. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  10. Clinical characteristics of dental emergencies and prevalence of dental trauma at a university hospital emergency center in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Young-Kyun; Choi, Yong-Hoon

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the clinical characteristics of dental emergency patients who visited a university hospital emergency center and to evaluate the incidence of dental trauma. A retrospective chart review of patients with dental complaints and who visited the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) emergency center in Gyeonggi-do, Korea, from January 2009 to December 2009 was conducted. Information regarding age, gender, the time, day, and month of presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and follow up was collected and analyzed. One thousand four hundred twenty-five patients with dental problems visited the SNUBH emergency center. Dental patients accounted for 1.47% of the total 96,708 patients at the emergency center. The male-to-female ratio was 1.68:1, with a considerably larger number of male patients (62.7%). The age distribution peak was at 0-9 years (27.5%), followed by patients in their forties (14.1%). The number of patients visiting the dental emergency center peaked in May (14.2%), on Sundays (22.4%), and between 2100 and 2400 h (20.8%). The patients' chief complaints were as follows: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). The prevalence of dental trauma was 66%. The reasons for dental emergency visits included the following: dental trauma, dental infection, oral bleeding, and TMD, with 66% of the patients requiring management of dental trauma. It is important that dentists make a prompt, accurate diagnosis and initiate effective treatment in case of dental emergencies, especially dental trauma. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Emergency medical services key performance measurement in Asian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nik Hisamuddin; Tanaka, Hideharu; Shin, Sang Do; Ng, Yih Yng; Piyasuwankul, Thammapad; Lin, Chih-Hao; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2015-01-01

    One of the key principles in the recommended standards is that emergency medical service (EMS) providers should continuously monitor the quality and safety of their services. This requires service providers to implement performance monitoring using appropriate and relevant measures including key performance indicators. In Asia, EMS systems are at different developmental phases and maturity. This will create difficultly in benchmarking or assessing the quality of EMS performance across the region. An attempt was made to compare the EMS performance index based on the structure, process, and outcome analysis. The data was collected from the Pan-Asian Resuscitation Outcome Study (PAROS) data among few Asian cities, namely, Tokyo, Osaka, Singapore, Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Taipei, and Seoul. The parameters of inclusions were broadly divided into structure, process, and outcome measurements. The data was collected by the site investigators from each city and keyed into the electronic web-based data form which is secured strictly by username and passwords. Generally, there seems to be a more uniformity for EMS performance parameters among the more developed EMS systems. The major problem with the EMS agencies in the cities of developing countries like Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur is inadequate or unavailable data pertaining to EMS performance. There is non-uniformity in the EMS performance measurement across the Asian cities. This creates difficulty for EMS performance index comparison and benchmarking. Hopefully, in the future, collaborative efforts such as the PAROS networking group will further enhance the standardization in EMS performance reporting across the region.

  12. Emergency patients receiving anaesthesiologist-based pre-hospital treatment and subsequently released at the scene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, S G; Sørensen, L P; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Mobile Emergency Care Unit in Odense, Denmark consists of a rapid response car, manned with an anaesthesiologist and an emergency medical technician. Eleven per cent of the patients are released at the scene following treatment. The aim of the study was to investigate which...... investigated. In each patient, diagnosis as well as any renewed contact with the Mobile Emergency Care Unit or the hospital within 24 h was registered. RESULTS: ONE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED NINE: patients were released at the scene. Diagnoses within the category 'examination and investigation' [International...... with the Mobile Emergency Care Unit within 24 h. Of the 143 victims of traffic accidents, 19 (13%) required renewed contact with the emergency department and one required admission to hospital (0.7%). Of all 1609 patients, four died within 24 h of contact (0.2%). CONCLUSION: Patients treated and released...

  13. Hospital-Level Factors Associated with Pediatric Emergency Department Return Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittsenbarger, Zachary; Thurm, Cary; Neuman, Mark; Spencer, Sandra; Simon, Harold; Gosdin, Craig; Shah, Samir; McClead, Richard; Stack, Anne; Alpern, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Return visits (RVs) and RVs with admission (RVAs) are commonly used emergency department quality measures. Visit- and patient-level factors, including several social determinants of health, have been associated with RV rates, but hospital-specific factors have not been studied. To identify what hospital-level factors correspond with high RV and RVA rates. Multicenter mixed-methods study of hospital characteristics associated with RV and RVA rates. Pediatric Health Information System with survey of emergency department directors. Adjusted return rates were calculated with generalized linear mixed-effects models. Hospitals were categorized by adjusted RV and RVA rates for analysis. Twenty-four hospitals accounted for 1,456,377 patient visits with an overall adjusted RV rate of 3.7% and RVA rate of 0.7%. Hospitals with the highest RV rates served populations that were more likely to have government insurance and lower median household incomes and less likely to carry commercial insurance. Hospitals in the highest RV rate outlier group had lower pediatric emergency medicine specialist staffing, calculated as full-time equivalents per 10,000 patient visits: median (interquartile range) of 1.9 (1.5-2.1) versus 2.9 (2.2-3.6). There were no differences in hospital population characteristics or staffing by RVA groups. RV rates were associated with population social determinants of health and inversely related to staffing. Hospital-level variation may indicate population-level economic factors outside the control of the hospital and unrelated to quality of care. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  14. Therapeutic hypothermia following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; does it start in the emergency department?