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Sample records for emergency department patient

  1. Use of Emergency Department by Elderly Patients

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    Orhan Akpinar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Using of EDs by the geriatric population is being increased in parallel to increase of our geriatric population. Objective of this study was to demonstrate what can be done for the EDs to be more effectively benefited by evaluating clinical and demographic data of the patients over 65 years old who presented to an emergency department. Material and Method: Recordings of the patients who presented to Isparta Public Hospital, ED in 2011 were retrospectively screened. All the data were evaluated through SPSS 17.0 software. Results: Of total 114,522 patients who presented to our ED during the study, 14,645 (12.7% were geriatrics. Mean age was found as 74,6 ± 6 years. The most common cause of presentation was found as cardiologic problems as 3,120 (21.3%, followed by respiratory system problems as 2,040 (13.9%, gastrointestinal problems as 1,875 (12.8%, neurological problems as 1,512 (10.3% and musculo-skeletal system problems as 1,230 (8.4% patients. While 71% of these patients were treated in basis of outpatients, 1,877 patients (12.8% were hospitalized and 9 patients were lost in the ED. Discussion: Some regional differences may be seen in the follow-up of geriatric patients. We recommend that, each hospital should arrange its ED services considering its patient profile.

  2. Infection Diseases in Geriatric Patients Who Admitted to Emergency Department

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    Orhan Akpinar

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In this study, it was aimed to investigate infectious disease frequency, most admission compliant, consultation type, the outpatient and hospitalization rates in geriatric patients who admitted to emergency department.Material and Method: Identification study was applied with computer based patient registration scan in 65 years or older patients who admitted to emergency department between 01.01.2011-31.12.2011. Results: Data of 115185 patients were evaluated for one year period. Geriatr...

  3. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

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    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  4. Emergency department patients' perception of nurse caring behaviors.

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    Huggins, K N; Gandy, W M; Kohut, C D

    1993-01-01

    To identify which behaviors performed by emergency department nurses were perceived by patients as important indicators of caring. Descriptive. Two private urban emergency departments. Ambulatory patients treated in the emergency department and interviewed by telephone within 30 days of discharge. The resulting sample consisted of a total of 288 interviews including 81 patients in the emergent group, 99 in the urgent group, and 108 in the nonurgent group. Of the 288 patients, 49% were male and 51% were female. Individual and composite measures of perceptions of nurse caring behaviors as measured with the Caring Behaviors Assessment, satisfaction with care, and patients' evaluation of their medical condition. Patients in all triage categories were found to assign the greatest importance to the technical nursing behaviors as indicators of nurse caring. Polychotomous logistic regression indicated that, although subscale differences occurred, they did not account for substantial differences among triage categories. Kruskall-Wallis one way ANOVA revealed no significant differences between triage levels and ratings of level of personal concern. Chi-square analysis indicated that patients in the emergent group identified fewer caring behaviors that the nurse must perform to demonstrate caring compared with patients in the nonurgent group. Patients experience nurse caring behavior most consistently from the technical aspects of nursing care.

  5. Family needs of critically ill patients in the emergency department.

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    Hsiao, Ping-Ru; Redley, Bernice; Hsiao, Ya-Chu; Lin, Chun-Chih; Han, Chin-Yen; Lin, Hung-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Family members' experience a range of physiological, psychological and emotional impacts when accompanying a critically ill relative in the emergency department. Family needs are influenced by their culture and the context of care, and accurate clinician understanding of these needs is essential for patient- and family-centered care delivery. The aim of this study was to describe the needs of Taiwanese family members accompanying critically ill patients in the emergency department while waiting for an inpatient bed and compare these to the perceptions of emergency nurses. A prospective cross-sectional survey was conducted in a large medical center in Taiwan. Data were collected from 150 family members and 150 emergency nurses who completed a Chinese version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory. Family members ranked needs related to 'communication with family members,' as most important, followed by 'family member participation in emergency department care', 'family member support' and 'organizational comfort'; rankings were similar to those of emergency nurses. Compared to nurses, family members reported higher scores for the importance of needs related to 'communication with family members' and 'family members' participation in emergency department care'. Family members place greater importance than emergency nurses on the need for effective communication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Models of emergency departments for reducing patient waiting times.

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    Marek Laskowski

    Full Text Available In this paper, we apply both agent-based models and queuing models to investigate patient access and patient flow through emergency departments. The objective of this work is to gain insights into the comparative contributions and limitations of these complementary techniques, in their ability to contribute empirical input into healthcare policy and practice guidelines. The models were developed independently, with a view to compare their suitability to emergency department simulation. The current models implement relatively simple general scenarios, and rely on a combination of simulated and real data to simulate patient flow in a single emergency department or in multiple interacting emergency departments. In addition, several concepts from telecommunications engineering are translated into this modeling context. The framework of multiple-priority queue systems and the genetic programming paradigm of evolutionary machine learning are applied as a means of forecasting patient wait times and as a means of evolving healthcare policy, respectively. The models' utility lies in their ability to provide qualitative insights into the relative sensitivities and impacts of model input parameters, to illuminate scenarios worthy of more complex investigation, and to iteratively validate the models as they continue to be refined and extended. The paper discusses future efforts to refine, extend, and validate the models with more data and real data relative to physical (spatial-topographical and social inputs (staffing, patient care models, etc.. Real data obtained through proximity location and tracking system technologies is one example discussed.

  7. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

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    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  8. Emergency department management of seizures in pediatric patients.

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    Santillanes, Genevieve; Luc, Quyen

    2015-03-01

    Seizures account for 1% of all emergency department visits for children, and the etiologies range from benign to life-threatening. The challenge for emergency clinicians is to diagnose and treat the life-threatening causes of seizures while avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure and painful procedures in patients who are unlikely to have an emergent pathology. When treating patients in status epilepticus, emergency clinicians are also faced with the challenge of choosing anticonvulsant medications that will be efficacious while minimizing harmful side effects. Unfortunately, evidence to guide the evaluation and management of children presenting with new and breakthrough seizures and status epilepticus is limited. This review summarizes available evidence and guidelines on the diagnostic evaluation of first-time, breakthrough, and simple and complex febrile seizures. Management of seizures in neonates and seizures due to toxic ingestions is also reviewed.

  9. Clustering Emergency Department patients - an assessment of group normality.

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    Schmidt, Thomas; Hallam, John; Lassen, Annmarie; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation into clustering of vital signs from Emergency Department patients with an intention of uncovering distinct thresholds for groups of patients. Emergency Department clinicians have to deal with an enormous spectrum of symptoms and diseases. The variety in patients is a cause for false alarms which greatly burden clinicians. Better targeted alarm thresholds may mitigate the risk of alarm fatigue. The study is based on vital signs from a prospective cohort study at a Danish Hospital coupled with health registry data, and utilizes k-means clustering and novel evaluation metrics for cluster assessment. All combinations of 5 key vital signs are clustered in a range from 2..20. We evaluate the clustering of respiration and arterial peripheral oxygen saturation for k=7. The study fails to identify distinct groups, but does uncover relevant traits and contribute with an evaluation strategy for further studies.

  10. Effect of emergency department information on patient satisfaction.

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    Krishel, S; Baraff, L J

    1993-03-01

    Patient satisfaction with emergency department care is enhanced by information distributed to patients on ED arrival. A convenience sample of 200 alert, English-speaking, adult ED patients. ED information was distributed on alternate days to all ED patients. The ED information described ED function and patient evaluation time. Patients not receiving ED information served as controls. A research assistant administered a satisfaction questionnaire to all patients immediately after discharge. Patients who received ED information rated their overall satisfaction higher than did the control group (P skill and competence (P = .0112), physician concern and caring (P = .0062), whether the patient would use the same ED again (P < .0001), appropriateness of ED time (P = .01), information received (P < .0001), ability of staff to decrease anxiety (P < .0001), physician's explanation of illness and treatment (P = .0366), and ease and convenience of care (P = .0014). ED information has a significant effect on patients' perceptions of the quality of care and overall satisfaction.

  11. Infection Diseases in Geriatric Patients Who Admitted to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Akpinar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, it was aimed to investigate infectious disease frequency, most admission compliant, consultation type, the outpatient and hospitalization rates in geriatric patients who admitted to emergency department.Material and Method: Identification study was applied with computer based patient registration scan in 65 years or older patients who admitted to emergency department between 01.01.2011-31.12.2011. Results: Data of 115185 patients were evaluated for one year period. Geriatric patients were consist with amount of 1467 (12.7% of total admission. Diagnosed patients number was 310 (21.2% in this age group according to the ICD -10 coding on infectious diseases. One hundred and sixty eight (5.4% of 310 patients were hospitalized. Eighty nine of these patients were hospitalized at infectious disease and clinical microbiology clinic, seventy nine patients were hospitalized at other clinics. Discussion: It is known that elders are at higher risk for infections and diseases are more common due to the cellular immune deficiency. Therefore, immediate treatment should be applied with rapid diagnose in elderly infections.

  12. Emergency department revisits for patients with kidney stones in California.

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    Scales, Charles D; Lin, Li; Saigal, Christopher S; Bennett, Carol J; Ponce, Ninez A; Mangione, Carol M; Litwin, Mark S

    2015-04-01

    Kidney stones affect nearly one in 11 persons in the United States, and among those experiencing symptoms, emergency care is common. In this population, little is known about the incidence of and factors associated with repeat emergency department (ED) visits. The objective was to identify associations between potentially mutable factors and the risk of an ED revisit for patients with kidney stones in a large, all-payer cohort. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients in California initially treated and released from EDs for kidney stones between February 2008 and November 2009. A multivariable regression model was created to identify associations between patient-level characteristics, area health care resources, processes of care, and the risk of repeat ED visits. The primary outcome was a second ED visit within 30 days of the initial discharge from emergent care. Among 128,564 patients discharged from emergent care, 13,684 (11%) had at least one additional emergent visit for treatment of their kidney stone. In these patients, nearly one in three required hospitalization or an urgent temporizing procedure at the second visit. On multivariable analysis, the risk of an ED revisit was associated with insurance status (e.g., Medicaid vs. private insurance; odds ratio [OR] = 1.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.43 to 1.61; p kidney stones. Access to urologic care and processes of care are associated with lower risk of repeat emergent encounters. Efforts are indicated to identify preventable causes of ED revisits for kidney stone patients and design interventions to reduce the risk of high-cost, high-acuity, repeat care. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  13. Bariatric surgery patients: reasons to visit emergency department after surgery.

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    Gonzalez-Sánchez, Juan A; Corujo-Vázquez, Omar; Sahai-Hernández, Mrisa

    2007-01-01

    Morbid obesity prevalence is reaching epidemic proportions in Western society. Long-term weight loss can be achieved by bariatric surgery. This surgery also has a positive impact in the reduction of obesity related co-morbid conditions. The purpose of this study is to determine the reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery. A retrospective chart review study was performed at the UPR Hospital in Carolina. Patients with the diagnosis of morbid obesity who had bariatric surgery were identified. Of the 283 patients who met the criteria, the following information was obtained: gender, age, height, weight, pre-operative BMI, obesity-related comorbid conditions, post operative length of stay (LOS), and reasons and length of stay of Emergency Department (ED) visits within a 3 month period after surgery. Statistical analysis was done with Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Program. The same profile of gender and BMI was obtained between the population that had the surgery and the sample that visited the ED, the group of patients between 20-29 years old was more likely to visit the ED. No correlation was found between a longer post operative length of stay and an increased probability of visiting the ED. Of the population, 5% had to visit ED within a three month period. The most common post operative complications were: Abdominal Pain (46.2%), Emesis (38.5%), and Dehydration (30.8%). Other less frequent complications were nausea, DVT, pneumonia, dizziness, gastritis, infected wound and upper GI bleeding. The most common reasons that bariatric surgery patients had to visit the emergency department within a three month period after surgery were: abdominal pain, emesis, dehydration and nausea. These complications could most likely be attributed to patient poor compliance with diet, resulting in the classical symptoms of the dumping syndrome which is common in patients that have undergone

  14. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

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    B. A. Nicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1% requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years, with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140 versus 340 min, CI (304–375; <0.001 when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198 compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue.

  15. Hypoglycemic treatment of diabetic patients in the Emergency Department

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    Carmen Caballero Requejo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To analyze if the hypoglycemic therapy prescribed in the Emergency Department adapts to the consensus recommendations available, as well as to assess its clinical impact. Methods: A descriptive observational study, which included patients awaiting hospital admission, who were in the Observation Ward of the Emergency Department and had been previously diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, and were receiving treatment with hypoglycemic drugs at home. The management of antidiabetic treatment and its clinical impact were assessed. Results: 78 patients were included. At admission to the Emergency Department, treatment was modified for 91% of patients, and omitted for 9%. The most prescribed treatment was sliding scale insulin (68%. The treatments prescribed coincided in a 16.7% with the recommendations by the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine. After intervention by the Pharmacist, the omission descended to 1.3%, and the adaptation to the recommendations increased to 20.5%. Comparing patients whose treatment coincided with the recommendations and those who did not, the clinical impact was respectively: mean glycemia at 24 hours: 138.3 } 49.5 mg/dL versus 182.7 } 97.1 mg/dL (p = 0.688; mean rescues with insulin lispro: } 1.6 versus 1.5 } 1.8 (p = 0.293; mean units of insulin lispro administered: 4.6 } 12.7 IU versus 6.6 } 11.3 IU (p = 0.155. Conclusions: We found antidiabetic prescriptions to have a low adaptation to consensus recommendations. These results are in line with other studies, showing an abuse of sliding scale regimen as single hypoglycemic treatment

  16. Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder in Emergency Departments

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    Untara Shaikh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Borderline personality disorder (BPD patients, when in crisis, are frequent visitors of emergency departments (EDs. When these patients exhibit symptoms such as aggressiveness, impulsivity, intense anxiety, severe depression, self-harm, and suicidal attempts or gestures, diagnosis, and treatment of the BPD becomes challenging for ED doctors. This review will, therefore, outline advice to physicians and health-care providers who face this challenging patient population in the EDs. Crisis intervention should be the first objective of clinicians when dealing with BPD in the emergency. For the patients with agitation, symptom-specific pharmacotherapy is usually recommended, while for non-agitated patients, short but intensive psychotherapy especially dialectical behavior therapy (DBT has a positive effect. Although various psychotherapies, either alone or integrated, are preferred modes of treatment for this group of patients, the effects of psychotherapies on BPD outcomes are small to medium. Proper risk management along with developing a positive attitude and empathy toward these patients will help them in normalizing in an emergency setting after which treatment course can be decided.

  17. Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder in Emergency Departments

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    Shaikh, Untara; Qamar, Iqra; Jafry, Farhana; Hassan, Mudasar; Shagufta, Shanila; Odhejo, Yassar Islamail; Ahmed, Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients, when in crisis, are frequent visitors of emergency departments (EDs). When these patients exhibit symptoms such as aggressiveness, impulsivity, intense anxiety, severe depression, self-harm, and suicidal attempts or gestures, diagnosis, and treatment of the BPD becomes challenging for ED doctors. This review will, therefore, outline advice to physicians and health-care providers who face this challenging patient population in the EDs. Crisis intervention should be the first objective of clinicians when dealing with BPD in the emergency. For the patients with agitation, symptom-specific pharmacotherapy is usually recommended, while for non-agitated patients, short but intensive psychotherapy especially dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) has a positive effect. Although various psychotherapies, either alone or integrated, are preferred modes of treatment for this group of patients, the effects of psychotherapies on BPD outcomes are small to medium. Proper risk management along with developing a positive attitude and empathy toward these patients will help them in normalizing in an emergency setting after which treatment course can be decided. PMID:28824467

  18. Adult patients in the pediatric emergency department: presentation and disposition.

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    Little, Wendalyn K; Hirsh, Daniel A

    2014-11-01

    Pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) are intended to care for acutely ill and injured children. Adult patients sometimes present to these facilities as well. Some of these are young adults still under the care of pediatric specialists, but older adults and those not under the care of specialists may seek care and may challenge pediatric care providers. Understanding the spectrum of adult illness encountered in the PED may help ensure optimum care for this patient population. This study aimed to describe the presentations of adult patients in 2 high-volume PEDs of a pediatric health care system. This is a retrospective review of electronic medical record to identify all visits for patients 21 years or older between 2008 and 2010. Patient demographics, reason for visit, diagnosis, and treatment details were identified. The combined PEDs recorded 417,799 total visits with 1097 patients 21 years or older; 188 of these were still followed by pediatric specialists. For the 907 remaining, the mean age was 36.5.years (range, 21-88 years); 73% were female. Fifty-one percent of the patients were triaged into the highest acuity levels. Fifty-seven percent of the patients were transferred to adult facilities for definitive care. There were no deaths among these patients at either PED, but 2 patients did require intubation and 1 received a period of chest compressions. Reason for presenting to the PED included on-site visitor (45%), mistakenly presented to children's hospital (34%), and hospital employee (21%). The most common presenting complaints were neurologic conditions, trauma/acute injuries, and chest pain. Adult patients in PEDs are rare but have relatively high acuity and often require transfer. Pediatric emergency department clinicians should have adequate, ongoing training to capably assess and stabilize adult patients across a spectrum of illness presentation.

  19. Patient Attitudes Regarding Consent for Emergency Department Computed Tomographies

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    Michael B. Weigner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Little is known about patient attitudes towards informed consent for computed tomography (CT in the emergency department (ED. We set out to determine ED patient attitudes about providing informed consent for CTs.Methods: In this cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey study, we evaluated a convenience sample of patients’ attitudes about providing informed consent for having a CT at 2 institutional sites. Historically, at our institutional network, patients received a CT at approximately 25% of their ED visits. The survey consisted of 17 “yes/no” or multiple-choice questions. The primary outcome question was “which type of informed consent do you feel is appropriate for a CT in the Emergency Department?”Results: We analyzed 300 survey responses, which represented a 90% return rate of surveys distributed. Seventy-seven percent thought they should give their consent prior to receiving a CT, and 95% were either comfortable or very comfortable with their physician making the decision regarding whether they needed a CT. Forty percent of the patients felt that a general consent was appropriate before receiving a CT in the ED, while 34% thought a verbal consent was appropriate and 15% percent thought a written consent was appropriate. Seventy-two percent of the ED patients didn’t expect to receive a CT during their ED visit and 30% of the ED patients had previously provided consent prior to receiving a CT. Conclusion: Most patients feel comfortable letting the doctor make the decision regarding the need for a CT. Most ED patients feel informed consent should occur before receiving a CT but only a minority feel the consent should be written and specific to the test. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(1:14–19.

  20. Emergency Department Length of Stay: Accuracy of Patient Estimates

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    Brendan T. Parker

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Managing a patient’s expectations in the emergency department (ED environment is challenging. Previous studies have identified several factors associated with ED patient satisfaction. Lengthy wait times have shown to be associated with dissatisfaction with ED care. Understanding that patients are inaccurate at their estimation of wait time, which could lead to lower satisfaction, provides administrators possible points of intervention to help improve accuracy of estimation and possibly satisfaction with the ED. This study was undertaken to examine the accuracy of patient estimates of time periods in an ED and identify factors associated with accuracy.Method: In this prospective convenience sample survey at UTMC ED, we collected data between March and July 2012. Outcome measures included duration of each phase of ED care and patient estimates of these time periods.Results: Among 309 participants, the majority underestimated the total length of stay (LOS in the ED (median difference -7 minutes (IQR -29-12. There was significant variability in ED LOS (median 155 minutes (IQR 75-240. No significant associations were identified between accuracy of time estimates and gender, age, race, or insurance status. Participants with longer ED LOS demonstrated lower patient satisfaction scores (p<0.001.Conclusion: Patients demonstrated inaccurate time estimates of ED treatment times, including total LOS. Patients with longer ED LOS had lower patient satisfaction scores. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:170-175.

  1. Emergency Department Observation Units and the Older Patient

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    Moseley, Mark G.; Hawley, Miles P.; Caterino, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis An increasing number of emergency departments (EDs) are providing extended care and monitoring of patients in ED observation units (EDOUs). EDOUs can be particularly useful for older adults both as an alternative to hospitalization in appropriately selected patients and as a means to risk-stratify older adults with unclear presentations. They can also provide a period of therapeutic intervention and reassessment for older patients in whom the appropriateness and safety of immediate outpatient care is unclear. They offer the opportunity for more comprehensive evaluation of many characteristics of particular importance to the care of older adults which cannot be accomplished during a short ED stay. The manuscript first discusses the general characteristics of EDOUs. Next, it reviews appropriate entry and exclusion criteria for older adults in EDOU including specific focus on several of the most common observation unit protocols, focusing on their relevance to older adults. Finally, it briefly discusses regulatory implications of observation status for patients with Medicare. PMID:23177601

  2. Early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at hospital emergency department

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2015-10-21

    Overcrowding is one of the most crucial issues confronting emergency departments (EDs) throughout the world. Efficient management of patient flows for ED services has become an urgent issue for most hospital administrations. Handling and detection of abnormal situations is a key challenge in EDs. Thus, the early detection of abnormal patient arrivals at EDs plays an important role from the point of view of improving management of the inspected EDs. It allows the EDs mangers to prepare for high levels of care activities, to optimize the internal resources and to predict enough hospitalization capacity in downstream care services. This study reports the development of statistical method for enhancing detection of abnormal daily patient arrivals at the ED, which able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations. The autoregressive moving average (ARMA)-based exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) anomaly detection scheme proposed was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France.

  3. Structured nursing intervention to geriatric patients discharged from Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie

    2010-01-01

    % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To investigate a structured nursing intervention’s impact on geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and their use of help from the community health centre. Method: We conducted a prospective descriptive study of selected...... the nurse made relevant referrals to geriatric outpatient clinic, community health centre, primary physician or arrangements with next-of-kin. Results: 150 geriatric patients participated, mean age 81.7 (70-99). At discharge they had in mean 2 (0-9) unresolved problems, after 1 month 0.8 (0-5), and after 6......Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80...

  4. Prescription History of Emergency Department Patients Prescribed Opioids

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    Jason A Hoppe

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To use Colorado’s prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP to describe the recent opioid prescription history of patients discharged from our emergency department (ED with a prescription for opioid pain medications.Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 300 adult ED patients who received an opioid prescription. We abstracted prescription histories for the six months prior to the ED visit from the PDMP, and abstracted clinical and demographic variables from the chart.Results: There were 5,379 ED visits during the study month, 3,732 of which were discharged. Providers wrote 1,165 prescriptions for opioid analgesics to 1,124/3,732 (30% of the patients. Median age was 36 years. Thirty-nine percent were male. Patients were 46% Caucasian, 26% African American, 22% Hispanic, 2% Asian and 4% other. These were similar to our overall ED population. There was substantial variability in the number of prescriptions, prescribers and total number of pills. A majority (205/296 of patients had zero or one prescription. The 90th percentile for number of prescriptions was seven, while the 10th percentile was zero. Patients in the highest decile tended to be older, with a higher proportion of Caucasians and females. Patients in the lowest decile resembled the general ED population. The most common diagnoses associated with opioid prescriptions were abdominal pain (11.5%, cold/flu symptoms (9.5%, back pain (5.4%, flank pain (5.0% and motor vehicle crash (4.7%.Conclusion: Substantial variability exists in the opioid prescription histories of ED patients, but a majority received zero or one prescription in the preceding six months. The top decile of patients averaged more than two prescriptions per month over the six months prior to ED visit, written by more than 6 different prescribers. There was a trend toward these patients being older, Caucasian and female. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:247–252.

  5. Emergency department patient characteristics: Potential impact on emergency medicine residency programs in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshove-Bolk, J.; Mencl, F.; Rijswijck, B.T. van; Weiss, I.M.; Simons, M.P.; Vugt, A.B. van

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We set out to study emergency department patient characteristics at a busy level-2 trauma center, to gain insight into the practise of emergency medicine, which is not yet recognized as a specialty in the Netherlands. METHODS: From May 27 to July 4 2001, the following data were recorded

  6. Altered Mental Status in Older Emergency Department Patients

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    Wilber, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Altered mental status is a common chief complaint among older emergency department (ED) patients. Acute changes in mental status are more concerning and are usually secondary to delirium, stupor, and coma. These forms of acute brain dysfunction are commonly precipitated by an underlying medical illness that can be potentially life-threatening and are associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes. Though stupor and coma are easily identifiable, the clinical presentation of delirium can be subtle and is often missed without actively screening for it. For patients with acute brain dysfunction, the ED evaluation should focus on searching for the underlying etiology. Infection is one of the most common precipitants of delirium, but multiple etiologies may exist concurrently. PMID:23177603

  7. Patients in prehospital transport to the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Camilla Louise Nørgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ambulance transfer is the first contact with the healthcare system for many patients in emergency conditions.We aimed to identify prognostic risk factors accessible in the prehospital phase that indicate an increased risk of 7-day mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We included patients...... aged 18 years or older, transferred by ambulance to the emergency department at Odense University Hospital, from 1 April 2012 to 30 September 2014. We carried out multivariate logistic regressions, adjusted for age and sex, to describe the relationship between vital sign values recorded.......0-5.6]. The risk of death increased with age. The odds ratios (ORs) were 2.0 (95% CI: 1.1-3.5) for ages 30-44 years and 7.3 (95% CI: 4.5-11) for ages 45-69 years compared with the 18-29-year-olds. All abnormal vital sign values were associated with increased 7-day mortality. Glasgow Coma Score of less than 14 had...

  8. Emergency Department Patient Burden from an Electronic Dance Music Festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Neeraj; Gimbar, Renee P; Walla, Lisa M; Thompson, Trevonne M

    2017-11-03

    Electronic dance music (EDM) festivals are increasingly common and psychoactive substance use is prevalent. Although prehospital care can obviate the transfer of many attendees to health care facilities (HCFs), little is known regarding the emergency department (ED) burden of patients presenting from EDM festivals. This study describes the patient volume, length of stay (LOS), and presenting complaints of patients from a 3-day EDM festival in close proximity to an area ED. Medical charts of patients presenting to one HCF from an EDM festival were reviewed for substances used, ED LOS, and sedative medications administered. Additionally, preparedness techniques are described. Over the 3-day festival, 28 patients presented to the ED (median age 21 years; range 18-29 years). Twenty-five had complaints related to substance use including ethanol (n = 18), "molly" or "ecstasy" (n = 13), and marijuana (n = 8). Three patients required intensive care or step-down unit admission for endotracheal intubation, rhabdomyolysis, and protracted altered mental status. The median LOS for discharged patients was 265 min (interquartile range 210-347 min). Eleven patients required the use of sedative medications, with cumulative doses of 42 mg of lorazepam and 350 mg of ketamine. All patients presented within the hours of 5:00 pm and 2:15 am. The majority of ED visits from an EDM festival were related to substance use. ED arrival times clustered during the evening and were associated with prolonged LOS. Few patients required hospital admission, but admitted patients required high levels of care. HCFs should use these data as a guide in planning for future events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Evaluation of patients with polytrauma treated in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwan, Krzysztof

    2009-10-01

    Polytrauma care is a very important diagnostic and therapeutic problem. The clinical profile of patients with multiorgan injuries admitted to the emergency department (ED) is different, similarly to severity of injuries. An evaluation of patients with polytrauma treated in ED and proposition of diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm in initial management in patients with multiply injuries. The analysis of medical data was performed in 72 polytraumized patients. Their age, sex, time of admission to ED, influence of alcohol and drugs, vital parameters, etiological factors, severity of injuries and the therapy after initial management in ED were studied. The majority of patients were admitted to ED in the morning. There were 25 females and 47 males. Their mean age was 41 years. Patients between 21-40 years of age represented half of all victims. There were 10 patients under influence of alcohol or drugs. Vital signs like Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and respiratory rate (RR) evaluated at the initial examination and counted as a values of Revised Trauma Score (RTS) in most cases were 7.841. The traffic accidents were the most frequent ethiologic factors. Head injuries, chest injuries and fractures were the most frequently. After initial treatment in ED, 22 patients were discharged home and 23 were hospitalized, because they had been needed surgical treatment, and 8 because of threat of life. 6 patients died in ED. Multiorgan injuries were diagnosed mainly in young men after traffic accidents in the morning. Head injuries, chest injuries and fractures were the most frequent. Author propose the diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for initial management in ED in patients with multiply injuries.

  10. Bullying and Suicide Risk Among Pediatric Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Horowitz, Lisa M; Bridge, Jeffrey A; Wharff, Elizabeth A; Pao, Maryland; Teach, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to describe the association between recent bullying victimization and risk of suicide among pediatric emergency department (ED) patients. Patients presenting to 1 of 3 different urban pediatric EDs with either medical/surgical or psychiatric chief complaints completed structured interviews as part of a study to develop a suicide risk screening instrument, the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions. Seventeen candidate items and the criterion reference Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire were administered to patients ages 10 to 21 years. Bullying victimization was assessed by a single candidate item ("In the past few weeks, have you been bullied or picked on so much that you felt like you couldn't stand it anymore?"). A total of 524 patients completed the interview (34.4% psychiatric chief complaints; 56.9% female; 50.4% white, non-Hispanic; mean [SD] age, 15.2 [2.6] years). Sixty patients (11.5%) reported recent bullying victimization, and of these, 33 (55.0%) screened positive for suicide risk on the Ask Suicide-Screening Questions or the previously validated Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire. After controlling for demographic and clinical variables, including a history of depression and drug use, the odds of screening positive for suicide risk were significantly greater in patients who reported recent bullying victimization (adjusted odds ratio, 3.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.66-6.11). After stratification by chief complaint, this association persisted for medical/surgical patients but not for psychiatric patients. Recent bullying victimization was associated with increased odds of screening positive for elevated suicide risk among pediatric ED patients presenting with medical/surgical complaints. Understanding this important correlate of suicide risk in pediatric ED patients may help inform ED-based suicide prevention interventions.

  11. [Impact of the elderly patient in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez Menéndez de la Granda, Manuel; Guzmán Gutiérrez, German; Fernández Fernández, María; Solano Jaurrieta, Juan José

    2017-09-07

    The aging of the population, chronic diseases, and non-urgent visits to the Emergency departments (ED) are considered the reasons for the increase of the demand of care. The aim of this study is to analyse the impact of the older population in the ED, when compared to a younger population. An observational, descriptive and retrospective study including an analysis of the 92,627 patients that attended the ED in Hospitals from Health Area IV belonging to the Principality of Asturias Health Services during 2009. The analysis included the number of visits, degree of urgency when arriving at the ED, length of stay (LOS), destination after ED assessment, demand of care per time of day, laboratory tests, and radiology, complaints, and social services consultation. A comparison was made between the data of patients over and below 70 years of age. At total of 28,965 (31.27%) patients were over 70 years of age, with a frequency rate in the ED of 52.29% (25.70% in those less than 70 years). Patients over 70 years had a higher priority attention through the Manchester triage scale, receiving more laboratory tests, with a higher LOS. They also had a higher probability of being seen by social services, of being admitted, and death. Older patients consult the ED with more justifiable reasons than the younger adult population. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Planning emergency patients: an attempt to change the nature of the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosmulder, Remco; Krabbendam, Koos; Luitse, Jan S. K.

    2006-01-01

    Throughout the day, arrivals of patients at the emergency department (ED) are unannounced, unpredictable and fully determined by chance. Healthcare professionals in the ED naturally react as quickly as possible when patients arrive. We wondered whether they could somehow act in advance. We

  13. How Accurately Can Emergency Department Providers Estimate Patient Satisfaction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalena M. Yarris

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient satisfaction is an important measure of emergency department (ED quality of care. Little is known about providers’ ability to estimate patient satisfaction. We aimed to measure providers’ ability to assess patient satisfaction and hypothesized that providers could accurately estimate overall patient satisfaction.Methods: We surveyed ED patients regarding satisfaction with their care. Treating providers completed analogous surveys, estimating patients’ responses. Sexual assault victims and non-English-speaking or severely ill patients were excluded. Satisfaction responses were categorized as ‘‘satisfied’’ or ‘‘not satisfied.’’ Patient satisfaction scores were considered the ‘‘gold standard,’’ and providers’ perceptions of the patient satisfaction were considered tests. Measures of diagnosticaccuracy, such as positive predictive value (PPV and sensitivity, were used to assess how accurately the provider could estimate his or her patient’s satisfaction.Results: Here, 242/457 eligible patients (53% completed the survey; 227 providers (94% completed a corresponding survey. Subject-reported overall satisfaction was 96.6%, compared with a provider estimated rate of 94.4%. The sensitivity and PPV of the provider’s estimate of the patient’s satisfaction were 95.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 91.4, 97.7 and 97.5 (95% CI 94.4, 99.2, respectively, for overall patient satisfaction. The PPV was similar for clarity of communication. The PPV was 78.9 for perceived length of ED stay (99% CI 70.8, 85.6 and 82.6 for quality of pain control (95% CI 68.6, 92.2. Accuracy of attending and resident estimates of patient satisfaction did not differ significantly. The agreement between patient-reported and provider-estimated patient satisfaction was not associated with age, gender, patient disposition, or ED divert status.Conclusion: Providers are able to assess overall patient satisfaction and clarity of

  14. Impact of an Expeditor on Emergency Department on Patient Throughput

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handel, Daniel A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our hypothesis was that an individual whose primary role was to assist with patient throughput would decrease emergency department (ED length of stay (LOS, elopements and ambulance diversion. The objective of this study was to measure how the use of an expeditor affected these throughput metrics.Methods: This pre- and post-intervention study analyzed ED patients > 21-years-old between June 2008 and June 2009, at a level one trauma center in an academic medical center with an annual ED census of 40,000 patients. We created the expeditor position as our study intervention in December 2008, by modifying the job responsibilities of an existing paramedic position. An expeditor was on duty from 1PM-1AM daily. The pre-intervention period was June to November 2008, and the post-intervention period was January to June 2009. We used multivariable to assess the impact of the expeditor on throughput metrics after adjusting for confounding variables.Results: We included a total of 13,680 visits in the analysis. There was a significant decrease in LOS after expeditor implementation by 0.4 hours, despite an increased average daily census (109 vs. 121, p<0.001. The expeditor had no impact on elopements. The probability that the ED experienced complete ambulance diversion during a 24-hour period decreased from 55.2% to 16.0% (OR:0.17, 95%CI:0.05-0.67.Conclusion: The use of an expeditor was associated with a decreased LOS and ambulance diversion. These findings suggest that EDs may be able to improve patient flow by using expeditors. This tool is under the control of the ED and does not require larger buy-in, resources, or overall hospital changes. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(2:198-203.

  15. Impact of the emergency department streaming decision on patients' outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S W; Horwood, C; Li, J Y; Hakendorf, P H; Teubner, D J O; Thompson, C H

    2015-12-01

    Streaming occurs in emergency department (ED) to reduce crowding, but misallocation of patients may impact patients' outcome. The study aims to determine the outcomes of patients misallocated by the ED process of streaming into likely admission or discharge. This is a retrospective cohort study, at an Australian, urban, tertiary referral hospital's ED between January 2010 and March 2012, using propensity score matching for comparison. Total and partitioned ED lengths of stay, inpatient length of stay, in-hospital mortality and 7- and 28-day unplanned readmission rate were compared between patients who were streamed to be admitted against those streamed to be discharged. Total ED length of stay did not differ significantly for admitted patients if allocated to the wrong stream (median 7.6 h, interquartile range 5.7-10.6, cf. 7.5 h, 5.3-11.2; P = 0.34). The median inpatient length of stay was shorter for those initially misallocated to the discharge stream (1.8 days, 1.1-3.0, cf. 2.4 days, 1.4-3.9; P stream stayed in the ED longer than those appropriately allocated (5.2 h, 3.7-7.3, cf. 4.6 h, 3.3-6.4; P streaming process. Patients' discharge from the ED was slower if they had been allocated to the admission stream. Streaming carries few risks for patients misallocated by such a process. © 2015 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  16. Triaging Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Karin; Seay, Meagan; Kim, Jeffrey; Ali, Ashhar; Bermel, Robert; Willis, Mary A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) present to the emergency department (ED) for various reasons. Although true relapse is rarely the underlying culprit, ED visits commonly result in new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurology admissions. We studied ED visits in patients with MS and evaluated decision making regarding diagnostic/therapeutic interventions and visit outcomes. We identified potential areas for improvement and used the data to propose a triaging algorithm for patients with MS in the ED. Methods: We reviewed the medical records from 176 ED visits for patients with MS in 2014. Results: Ninety-seven visits in 75 patients were MS related (66.6% female; mean ± SD age, 52.6 ± 13.8 years; mean ± SD disease duration, 18.5 ± 10.5 years). Thirty-three visits were for new neurologic symptoms (category 1), 29 for worsening preexisting symptoms (category 2), and 35 for MS-related complications (category 3). Eighty-nine visits (91.8%) resulted in hospital admission (42.7% to neurology). Only 39% of ordered MRIs showed radiographic activity. New relapses were determined in 27.8% of the visits and were more prevalent in category 1 compared with category 2 (P = .003); however, the two categories had similar rates of ordered MRIs and neurology admissions. Conclusions: New relapse is a rare cause of ED visits in MS. Unnecessary MRIs and neurology admissions can be avoided by developing a triaging system for patients with MS based on symptom stratification. PMID:29270086

  17. Repeat spine imaging in transferred emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Jesse E; Kadakia, Rishin J; Kay, Harrison F; Zhang, Chi E; Casimir, Geoffrey E; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-02-15

    Retrospective study. Assess frequency of repeat spine imaging in patients transferred with known spine injuries from outside hospital (OSH) to tertiary receiving institution (RI). Unnecessary repeat imaging after transfer has started to become a recognized problem with the obvious issues related to repeat imaging along with potential for iatrogenic injury with movement of patients with spine problems. Consecutive adult patients presenting to a single 1-level trauma center with spine injuries during a 51-month period were reviewed (n = 4500), resulting in 1427 patients transferred from OSH emergency department. All imaging and radiology reports from the OSH were reviewed, as well as studies performed at RI. A repeat was the same imaging modality used on the same spine region as OSH imaging. The overall rate of repeat spine imaging for both OSH imaging sent and not sent was 23%, and 6% if repeat spine imaging via traumagram (partial/full-body computed tomography [CT]) was excluded as a repeat. The overall rate of repeat CT was 29% (7% dedicated spine CT scans and 22% part of nondedicated spine CT scan).An observation of only those patients with OSH imaging that was sent and viewable revealed that 23% underwent repeat spine imaging with 23% undergoing repeat spine CT and 41% repeat magnetic resonance imaging.In those patients with sent and viewable OSH imaging, a lack of reconstructions prompted 14% of repeats, whereas inadequate visualization of injury site prompted 8%. In only 8% of the repeats did it change management or provide necessary surgical information. This study is the first to investigate the frequency of repeat spine imaging in transfers with known spine injuries and found a substantially high rate of repeat spine CT with minimal alteration in care. Potential solutions include only performing scans at the OSH necessary to establish a diagnosis requiring transfer and improving communication between OSH and RI physicians. 4.

  18. Triaging the emergency department, not the patient: United States emergency nurses' experience of the triage process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lisa A; Delao, Altair M; Perhats, Cydne; Moon, Michael D; Zavotsky, Kathleen Evanovich

    2017-07-24

    Triage, as it is understood in the context of the emergency department, is the first and perhaps the most formal stage of the initial patient encounter. Bottlenecks during intake and long waiting room times have been linked to higher rates of patients leaving without being seen. The solution in many emergency departments has been to collect less information at triage or use an "immediate bedding" or "pull until full" approach, in which patients are placed in treatment areas as they become available without previous screening. The purpose of this study was to explore emergency nurses' understanding of-and experience with-the triage process, and to identify facilitators and barriers to accurate acuity assignation. An exploratory qualitative study using focus-group interviews (N = 26). Five themes were identified: (1) "Sick or not sick," (2) "Competency/qualifications," (3) "Triaging the emergency department, not the patient," (4) "The unexpected," and (5) "Barriers and facilitators." Our participants described processes that were unit- and/or nurse-dependent and were manipulations of the triage system to "fix" problems in ED flow, rather than a standard application of a triage system. Our participants reported that, in practice, the use of triage scales to determine acuity and route patients to appropriate resources varies in accuracy and application among emergency nurses and in their respective emergency departments. Nurses in this sample reported a prevalence of "quick look" triage approaches that do not rely on physiologic data to make acuity decisions. Future research should focus on intervention and comparison studies examining the effect of staffing, nurse experience, hospital policies, and length of shift on the accuracy of triage decision making. Contribution to Emergency Nursing Practice. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Forecasting daily patient volumes in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Spencer S; Thomas, Alun; Evans, R Scott; Welch, Shari J; Haug, Peter J; Snow, Gregory L

    2008-02-01

    Shifts in the supply of and demand for emergency department (ED) resources make the efficient allocation of ED resources increasingly important. Forecasting is a vital activity that guides decision-making in many areas of economic, industrial, and scientific planning, but has gained little traction in the health care industry. There are few studies that explore the use of forecasting methods to predict patient volumes in the ED. The goals of this study are to explore and evaluate the use of several statistical forecasting methods to predict daily ED patient volumes at three diverse hospital EDs and to compare the accuracy of these methods to the accuracy of a previously proposed forecasting method. Daily patient arrivals at three hospital EDs were collected for the period January 1, 2005, through March 31, 2007. The authors evaluated the use of seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average, time series regression, exponential smoothing, and artificial neural network models to forecast daily patient volumes at each facility. Forecasts were made for horizons ranging from 1 to 30 days in advance. The forecast accuracy achieved by the various forecasting methods was compared to the forecast accuracy achieved when using a benchmark forecasting method already available in the emergency medicine literature. All time series methods considered in this analysis provided improved in-sample model goodness of fit. However, post-sample analysis revealed that time series regression models that augment linear regression models by accounting for serial autocorrelation offered only small improvements in terms of post-sample forecast accuracy, relative to multiple linear regression models, while seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average, exponential smoothing, and artificial neural network forecasting models did not provide consistently accurate forecasts of daily ED volumes. This study confirms the widely held belief that daily demand for ED services is characterized by

  20. Emergency team calls for critically ill non-trauma patients in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Marker; Do, Hien Quoc; Rasmussen, Søren W.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Handling critically ill patients is a complex task for Emergency Department (ED) personnel. Initial treatment is of major importance and requires adequately experienced ED doctors to initiate and decide for the right medical or surgical treatment. Our aim was, with regard to clinical...... presentation, management and mortality to describe adult non-trauma patients that upon ED arrival elicited emergency team calls. METHODS: An observational study of adult patients (≥ 18 years) admitted to a regional ED with conditions that elicited acute team activation and additional emergency team...... consultation calls for non-ED specialist physicians. Emergency team calls were two-tiered with 'orange' and 'red' calls. Additionally, intensive care unit (ICU) admission charts were reviewed to identify the total number of adult non-trauma and non-cardiac arrest patients admitted to the ICU from the ED during...

  1. Patient and provider attitudes to emergency department-based HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The national South African HIV Counselling and Testing (HCT) guidelines mandate that voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) should be offered in all healthcare facilities. Emergency departments (EDs) are at the forefront of many healthcare facilities, yet VCT is not routinely implemented in this setting.

  2. Patient-related violence against emergency department nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, Jacqueline; Hazelton, Michael; Sundin, Deborah; Kable, Ashley

    2010-06-01

    In a finding that reflects international experiences, nurses in Australia have been identified as the occupation at most risk of patient-related violence in the health-care sector. A search of the literature was undertaken to explore this concept, with a focus on the emergency department and triage nurses. Significant findings included the fact that nurses are subjected to verbal and physical abuse so frequently that, in many instances, it has become an accepted part of the job. This attitude, combined with the chronic under-reporting of violent incidents, perpetuates the normalization of violence, which then becomes embedded in the workplace culture and inhibits the development of preventative strategies and the provision of a safe working environment. Nurses are entitled to a safe workplace that is free from violence under both the occupational health and safety legislation and the zero-tolerance policies that have been adopted in many countries including Australia, the UK, Europe, and the USA. Therefore, policy-makers and administrators should recognize this issue as a priority for preventative action.

  3. How Can an Emergency Department Assist Patients and Caregivers at the End of Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Be Prepared Share this! Home » Be Prepared How Can An Emergency Department Assist Patients And Caregivers At ... your family. 5 ways that the Emergency Department can help 1. Assist in the recognition and understanding ...

  4. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments.

  5. How Much Time Do Unhospitalized Patients Applying for Emergency Services Stay in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansur Kürsad Erkuran

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The patients applying to a emergency service may stay longer than necessary for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment. This can be due to the inadequacy of the treatment performed in emergency department or to the absence of the required unit in the hospital. In this study, we analyzed the waiting period of the patients who have not been hospitalized. METHODS: The patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 have been studied regarding their application date, the season, and their waiting period in the emergency unit. The data have been analyzed using the statistics software Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, Inc., Chicago, IL, version 17.0 for Windows. The chi-square χ2 test has been used for the determination of the percentage distribution and significance and p<0,05 has been considered significant. RESULTS: 4215 patients applying to Bolu İzzet Baysal Public Hospital Emergency Unit between 24.11.2009 and 25.08.2011 and monitored without hospitalization have been studied. The patients mainly presented during spring (p<0.05. The application occurred more often between 20.00 PM – 23.59 PM (p<0.005. The mean duration of the accept-standby of the patients in emergency unit was 09±12 (minimum 0 minute, maximum 130 minutes. The patients waited 0,26 ±70 minutes in emergency unit examination (minimum 0 minute, maximum 1292 minutes. The total waiting time in emergency unit was 52 ±100 minutes (minimum 10, maximum 1435 minutes. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: In this study, we observed that the duration of the hospitalization in emergency unit is longer than the ideal duration.

  6. Screening of the frail patient in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Brabrand, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    and evaluated from the results of the included studies. Results: Four studies met the exact inclusion criteria. Four different frailty screening scales: Clinical Frailty Scale, Deficit Accumulation Index, Identification of Seniors At Risk and The Study of Osteoporotic Fracture frailty index used...... in the emergency department were described and compared. Predictive values for various outcomes are represented and discussed. Conclusions: The results suggest that frailty successfully predicts increased risk of hospitalization, nursing home admission, mortality and prolonged length of stay after an initial...... assessment should be identified as soon as possible, this systematic review only identified four cohort studies of frailty assessment in emergency departments.Although frailty screening appeared to predict the risk of mortality and of admission to hospital/nursing home, these four studies did not show...

  7. The accident and emergency department questionnaire: a measure for patients' experiences in the accident and emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Nanne; Sizmur, Steve; Graham, Chris; van Stel, Henk F

    2013-02-01

    The National Health Service National Patient Survey Programme systematically gathers patients' experiences about the care they have recently received. Prioritising quality improvement activities in the accident and emergency (A&E) department requires that survey outcomes are meaningful and reliable. We aimed to determine which method of obtaining summary scores for the A&E department questionnaire optimally combined good interpretability with robust psychometric characteristics. A&E department questionnaire data from 151 hospital trusts were analysed, covering 49 646 patients. Three methods of grouping and summarising items of the questionnaire were compared: principal components analysis (PCA); Department of Health dimensions; sections according to the patient's journey through the A&E department. The patient-level reliability of summary scores was determined by Cronbach's α coefficients (threshold: α>0.70), construct validity by Pearson's correlation coefficients, and the discriminative capacity by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and reliability of A&E-level mean scores. The PCA provided the best score reliability on six clear and interpretable composites: waiting time; doctors and nurses; your care and treatment; hygiene; information before discharge; overall. The discriminative power of the concepts was comparable for the three methods, with ICCs between 0.010 and 0.061. A&E sample sizes were adequate to obtain good to excellent reliability of A&E-level mean scores. The A&E department questionnaire is a valid and reliable questionnaire to assess patients' experiences with the A&E. The discriminative power of six summary scores offers a reliable comparison of healthcare performance between A&Es to increase patient centredness and quality of care.

  8. Hypoglycemia in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: When hypoglycemic patients present in the emergency department, physicians should pay attention to the presence of infection, malignancy, liver diseases (liver cirrhosis and biliary tract infection, and acute renal failure.

  9. Predictors of bacteremia in emergency department patients with suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Maureen; Klasco, Richard S; Joyce, Nina R; Donnino, Michael W; Wolfe, Richard E; Shapiro, Nathan I

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this study is to identify clinical variables associated with bacteremia. Such data could provide a rational basis for blood culture testing in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection. This is a secondary analysis of a prospective cohort of ED patients with suspected infection. Data collected included demographics, vital signs, medical history, suspected source of infection, laboratory and blood culture results and outcomes. Bacteremia was defined as a positive blood culture by Centers for Disease Control criteria. Clinical variables associated with bacteremia on univariate logistic regression were entered into a multivariable model. There were 5630 patients enrolled with an average age of 59.9 ± 19.9 years, and 54% were female. Blood cultures were obtained on 3310 (58.8%). There were 409 (12.4%) positive blood cultures, of which 68 (16.6%) were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 161 (39.4%) were Gram negatives. Ten covariates (respiratory failure, vasopressor use, neutrophilia, bandemia, thrombocytopenia, indwelling venous catheter, abnormal temperature, suspected line or urinary infection, or endocarditis) were associated with all-cause bacteremia in the final model (c-statistic area under the curve [AUC], 0.71). Additional factors associated with MRSA bacteremia included end-stage renal disease (odds ratio [OR], 3.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9-7.8) and diabetes (OR, 2.0; 95% CI, 1.1-3.6) (AUC, 0.73). Factors strongly associated with Gram-negative bacteremia included vasopressor use in the ED (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.6), bandemia (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 2.3-5.3), and suspected urinary infection (OR, 4.0; 95% CI, 2.8-5.8) (AUC, 0.75). This study identified several clinical factors associated with bacteremia as well as MRSA and Gram-negative subtypes, but the magnitude of their associations is limited. Combining these covariates into a multivariable model moderately increases their predictive value. Copyright

  10. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  11. Ethnic Disparities in Emergency Severity Index Scores among U.S. Veteran's Affairs Emergency Department Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M Vigil

    Full Text Available The goal of these analyses was to determine whether there were systematic differences in Emergency Severity Index (ESI scores, which are intended to determine priority of treatment and anticipate resource needs, across categories of race and ethnicity, after accounting for patient-presenting vital signs and examiner characteristics, and whether these differences varied among male and female Veterans Affairs (VA ED patients.We used a large national database of electronic medical records of ED patients from twenty-two U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs ED stations to determine whether ESI assignments differ systematically by race or ethnicity. Multi-level, random effects linear modeling was used to control for demographic characteristics and patient's vital signs (heart rate, respiratory rate, and pain level, as well as age, gender, and experience of triage nurses. The dataset included 129,991 VA patients presenting for emergency care between 2008 and 2012 (91% males; 61% non-Hispanic White, 28% Black, 7% Hispanic, 2% Asian, <1% American Indian/Alaska Native, 1% mixed ethnicity and 774 nurses for a total of 359,642 patient/examiner encounters. Approximately 13% of the variance in ESI scores was due to patient characteristics and 21% was due to the nurse characteristics. After controlling for characteristics of nurses and patients, Black patients were assigned less urgent ESI scores than White patients, and this effect was more prominent for Black males compared with Black females. A similar interaction was found for Hispanic males. It remains unclear how these results may generalize to EDs and patient populations outside of the U.S. VA Health Care system.The findings suggest the possibility that subgroups of VA patients receive different ESI ratings in triage, which may have cascading, downstream consequences for patient treatment quality, satisfaction with care, and trust in the health equity of emergency care.

  12. Undertriage in older emergency department patients--tilting against windmills?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian F Grossmann

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term effect of a teaching intervention designed to reduce undertriage rates in older ED patients. Further, to test the hypothesis that non-adherence to the Emergency Severity Index (ESI triage algorithm is associated with undertriage. Additionally, to detect patient related risk factors for undertriage.Pre-post-test design. The study sample consisted of all patients aged 65 years or older presenting to the ED of an urban tertiary and primary care center in the study periods. A teaching intervention designed to increase adherence to the triage algorithm. To assess, if the intervention resulted in an increase of factual knowledge, nurses took a test before and immediately after the teaching intervention. Undertriage rates were assessed one year after the intervention and compared to the pre-test period.In the pre-test group 519 patients were included, and 394 in the post-test-group. Factual knowledge among triage nurses was high already before the teaching intervention. Prevalence of undertriaged patients before (22.5% and one year after the intervention (24.2% was not significantly different (χ2 = 0.248, df = 1, p = 0.619. Sex, age, mode of arrival, and type of complaint were not identified as independent risk factors for undertriage. However, undertriage rates increased with advancing age. Adherence to the ESI algorithm is associated with correct triage decisions.Undertriage of older ED patients remained unchanged over time. Reasons for undertriage seem to be more complex than anticipated. Therefore, additional contributing factors should be addressed.

  13. Seasonal Variation in Emergency Department Visits Among Pediatric Headache Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakalnis, A; Heyer, G L

    2016-09-01

    To ascertain whether seasonal variation occurs in emergency department (ED) visits for headache among children and adolescents. A retrospective review was conducted using the electronic medical records of ED visits for headache at a tertiary children's hospital through calendar years 2010-2014. Using ICD-9 diagnostic codes for headache and migraine, the numbers of headache visits were determined and compared by season and during school months vs summer months. A total of 6572 headache visits occurred. Headache visits increased during the fall season (133 ± 27 visits per month) compared with other seasons (101 ± 19 visits per month), P ≤ .002, but did not differ when comparing school months (113 ± 25 visits per month) and summer months (100 ± 24 visits per month), P = .1. The corresponding increase in ED visits during the fall season coincides with the start of the school year. Academic stressors and the change in daily schedule may lead to more headaches and more ED headache visits among school-aged youth. © 2016 American Headache Society.

  14. Sentinel visits in emergency department patients with diabetes mellitus as a warning sign for hyperglycemic emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Justin W; Gushulak, Katherine M; Columbus, Melanie P; Hamelin, Alexandra L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2017-07-25

    Patients with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus may have a sentinel emergency department (ED) visit for a precipitating condition prior to presenting for a hyperglycemic emergency, such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS). This study's objective was to describe the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with a sentinel ED visit prior to their hyperglycemic emergency visit. This was a 1-year health records review of patients≥18 years old presenting to one of four tertiary care EDs with a discharge diagnosis of hyperglycemia, DKA, or HHS. Trained research personnel collected data on patient characteristics, management, disposition, and determined whether patients came to the ED within the 14 days prior to their hyperglycemia visit. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Of 833 visits for hyperglycemia, 142 (17.0%; 95% CI: 14.5% to 19.6%) had a sentinel ED presentation within the preceding 14 days. Mean (SD) age was 50.5 (19.0) years and 54.4% were male; 104 (73.2%) were discharged from this initial visit, and 98/104 (94.2%) were discharged either without their glucose checked or with an elevated blood glucose (>11.0 mmol/L). Of the sentinel visits, 93 (65.5%) were for hyperglycemia and 22 (15.5%) for infection. Upon returning to the ED, 61/142 (43.0%) were admitted for severe hyperglycemia, DKA, or HHS. In this unique ED-based study, diabetic patients with a sentinel ED visit often returned and required subsequent admission for hyperglycemia. Clinicians should be vigilant in checking blood glucose and provide clear discharge instructions for follow-up and glucose management to prevent further hyperglycemic emergencies from occurring.

  15. Recent Suicidal Ideation among Patients in an Inner City Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Barry, Kristen L.; Chermack, Steve T.; De Chavez, Peter; Blow, Frederic C.

    2009-01-01

    The rates and associated features of suicidal ideation among 5,641 patients seeking routine, nonsuicide related care in an inner-city emergency department were examined. Approximately 8% of patients seeking routine care in the emergency department reported some form of suicidal ideation within the past 2 weeks. Suicidal ideation was common in…

  16. Evaluation of patients' mask use after the implementation of cough etiquette in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longtin, Yves; Akakpo, Christophe; Rutschmann, Olivier T; Pittet, Didier; Sax, Hugo

    2009-09-01

    We developed a patient-based survey to evaluate the impact of a respiratory hygiene and cough etiquette implementation strategy on infection control practices in the emergency department. The frequency of self-reported mask use by coughing patients was low (27%) and often inconsistent. The frequency of use was highest among patients who presented with myalgia (odds ratio, 14.7; P = .02) and among patients who visited the emergency department during January (odds ratio, 4.1; P = .04).

  17. [Managing the discharge of diabetic patients from the emergency department: a consensus paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo Pinto, Rafael; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esther; González Pérez de Villar, Noemí; Artola-Menéndez, Sara; Girbés Borrás, Juan; Mata-Cases, Manel; Galindo Rubio, Mercedes; Puig Larrosa, Juan; Muñoz Albert, Ricardo; Díaz Pérez, José Ángel

    2017-10-01

    Eighty to 90% of patients attended in emergency departments are discharged to home. Emergency department physicians are therefore responsible for specifying how these patients are treated afterwards. An estimated 30% to 40% of emergency patients have diabetes mellitus that was often decompensated or poorly controlled prior to the emergency. It is therefore necessary to establish antidiabetic treatment protocols that contribute to adequate metabolic control for these patients in the interest of improving the short-term prognosis after discharge. The protocols should also maintain continuity of outpatient care from other specialists and contribute to improving the long-term prognosis. This consensus paper presents the consensus of experts from 3 medical associations whose members are directly involved with treating patients with diabetes. The aim of the paper is to facilitate the assessment of antidiabetic treatment when the patient is discharged from the emergency department and referred to outpatient care teams.

  18. Clinical features of emergency department patients with depression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinical features of poisoning patient with depression. 42. Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Jan-Feb ... existence of depression among the patients presented with a history of poisoning, the largest portion of the .... According to the research result that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, an antidepressant drug, may ...

  19. Oxygen therapy for sepsis patients in the emergency department : a little less?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolmeijer, Renate; ter Maaten, Jan C.; Zijlstra, Jan G.; Ligtenberg, Jack J. M.

    Liberal oxygen therapy has been a cornerstone in the treatment of critically ill patients. Recently, awareness of hyperoxia toxicity has emerged. We investigated the partial pressure of oxygen in arterial blood (PaO2) in sepsis patients admitted to the emergency department treated with a reduced

  20. Forensic patients in the emergency department: Who are they and how should we care for them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filmalter, Celia J; Heyns, T; Ferreira, R

    2017-10-16

    Patients who suffer violent, crime related injuries are likely to seek medical assistance in emergency departments. Forensic patients may not disclose the cause of their injuries leading to the impairment of evidence. We explored healthcare providers' perceptions of forensic patients and how they should be cared for. The perceptions of physicians and nurses regarding the profiles and care of forensic patients were explored in three urban emergency departments. The data were collected through a talking wall and analysed collaboratively, with the participants, using content analysis. Healthcare providers in emergency departments differentiated between living and deceased forensic patients. Healthcare providers identified living forensic patients as victims of sexual assault, assault, gunshots and stab wounds, and abused children. Deceased patients included patients that were dead on arrival or died in the emergency departments. Healthcare providers acknowledged that evidence should be collected, preserved and documented. Every trauma patient in the emergency department should be treated asa forensic patient until otherwise proven. If healthcare providers are unable to identify forensic patients and collect the evidence present, the patients' human right to justice will be violated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Emergency Department Real Time Location System Patient and Equipment Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    study of the application throughout the hospital in the inpatient and peri-operative setting. 15. SUBJECT TERMS nothing listed 16. SECURITY ...accomplishments/Reportable Outcomes Patient Tagging: Getting staff to embrace the change in their workflow and apply the RFID tag and band as well as getting...goes on if a patient passes the exit with a RFID tag still on. We have received the device however the vendor is researching how best to utilize the

  2. Can communication skills workshops for emergency department doctors improve patient satisfaction?

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, F. L.

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess whether the attending of the communication skills workshops by the emergency department doctors improves patient satisfaction and reduces the number of complaints on doctors' attitude.

  3. Best practices for improving flow and care of pediatric patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Isabel; Brown, Kathleen M; Fitzmaurice, Laura; Griffin, Elizabeth Stone; Snow, Sally K

    2015-01-01

    This report provides a summary of best practices for improving flow, reducing waiting times, and improving the quality of care of pediatric patients in the emergency department. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Preventing errors in patient management: the emergency department clinician and the toxicology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Michele Zell

    2009-02-01

    Poor communication between the clinical toxicologist and the toxicology laboratory can result in a variety of problems. Clinicians must familiarize themselves with the toxicology assays that are available in their hospital and how to interpret assay results. Toxicology tests ordered in the emergency department should provide useful information for patient management and disposition. Toxicology laboratory personnel should have a good working relationship with emergency department clinicians and clinical toxicologists to maximize the usefulness of the laboratory in patient management.

  5. Quality management for trauma patients in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubbert, P.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    The quality of care for trauma patients seems to have dramatically improved in the last decades. Both political and medical changes have influenced these changes. In the Netherlands the organization of a trauma system started in the eighties of last century with the foundation of the Dutch Trauma

  6. Evaluation of emergency department nursing services and patient satisfaction of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollaoğlu, Mukadder; Çelik, Pelin

    2016-10-01

    To identify nursing services and assess patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department. Emergency nursing care is a significant determinant of patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction is often regarded as a reliable indicator of the quality of services provided in the emergency department. This is a descriptive study. Eighty-four patients who presented to the university emergency department were included in the study. The study data were collected by the Patient Information Form and the Satisfaction Level Form. Emergency nursing services, including history taking, assessing vital signs, preparing the patient for an emergency intervention, oxygen therapy, drug delivery and blood-serum infusion were shown to be more commonly provided compared with other services such as counselling the patients and the relatives about their care or delivering educational and psychosocial services. However, 78·6% of the patients were satisfied with their nursing services. The highest satisfaction rates were observed in the following sub-dimensions of the Satisfaction Level Form: availability of the nurse (82·1%), behaviour of the nurse towards the patient (78·6%) and the frequency of nursing rounds (77·4%). The most common practices performed by nurses in the emergency department were physical nursing services. Patient satisfaction was mostly associated with the availability of nurses when they were needed. Our results suggest that in addition to the physical care, patients should also receive education and psychosocial care in the emergency department. We believe that this study will contribute to the awareness and understanding of principles and concepts of emergency nursing, extend the limits of nursing knowledge and abilities, and improve and maintain the quality of clinical nursing education and practice to train specialist nurses with high levels of understanding in ethical, intellectual, administrative, investigative and professional issues.

  7. Emergency Department Management of Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Colin; Lippert, Freddy

    1999-01-01

    Initial assessment and management of severely injured patients may occur in a specialized area of an emergency department or in a specialized area of a trauma center. The time from injury until definitive management is of essence for survival of life-threatening trauma. The initial care delivered...... injured patients after these patients reach a hospital emergency department or a trauma center....

  8. Patient handover in the emergency department: 'How' is as important as 'what'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Santel; van Eeden, Ilze; Heyns, Tanya

    2017-10-16

    We explored the existing patient handover practices between emergency care practitioners and healthcare professionals in the emergency department. In the emergency department, patient handover between emergency care practitioner's and healthcare professionals is a complex process involving multiple functions, such as the transfer of information, responsibility and accountability from one person to another. We used a qualitative study design. Emergency care practitioners and healthcare professionals were identified using purposive and convenience sampling data. Data were collected through unstructured participant observation. We conducted 20 observation sessions, varying between 15 and 20min. The data were analysed using a creative hermeneutic approach. The 'how' or manner of patient handover observed between emergency care practitioners and health professionals was perceived as important. A diagnosis of disrespectful behaviour was made which could negatively influence patient handover and ultimately patient outcome. Disrespectful behaviour stemmed from the two signs that supported the diagnosis: task-orientated behaviour and the use of indigenous language. Involving the emergency care practitioners and healthcare professionals in observing and analysing the existing patient handover practices in the ED raised their awareness of the current workplace culture. Transforming behaviour from disrespectful to respectful should include greeting one another, listening attentively to the patient handover and include emergency care practitioners, patients and their significant other in the handover process that should be conducted in a commonly understood language. Emergency care practitioners and healthcare professionals should recognise that during patient handover 'how' is as important as 'what'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara H

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Murat Akinci,1 Necmettin Tufekci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Melih Azap21Department of Emergency Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Konya Numune Hospital, Konya, TurkeyPurpose: Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma.Materials and methods: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital.Results: Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%, traffic accident in 79 patients (14%, high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%, and other causes in 41 patients (7%. The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66% were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5% who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury.Conclusion: Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged $65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly.Keywords: fall, femur, fracture, injury

  10. Physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety risks in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källberg, Ann-Sofie; Ehrenberg, Anna; Florin, Jan; Östergren, Jan; Göransson, Katarina E

    2017-07-01

    The emergency department has been described as a high-risk area for errors. It is also known that working conditions such as a high workload and shortage off staff in the healthcare field are common factors that negatively affect patient safety. A limited amount of research has been conducted with regard to patient safety in Swedish emergency departments. Additionally, there is a lack of knowledge about clinicians' perceptions of patient safety risks. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe emergency department clinicians' experiences with regard to patient safety risks. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 physicians and 10 registered nurses from two emergency departments. Interviews were analysed by inductive content analysis. The experiences reflect the complexities involved in the daily operation of a professional practice, and the perception of risks due to a high workload, lack of control, communication and organizational failures. The results reflect a complex system in which high workload was perceived as a risk for patient safety and that, in a combination with other risks, was thought to further jeopardize patient safety. Emergency department staff should be involved in the development of patient safety procedures in order to increase knowledge regarding risk factors as well as identify strategies which can facilitate the maintenance of patient safety during periods in which the workload is high. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Screening for Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Emergency Department Medical Patients: Instrument and Results from the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Michael H.; Abar, Beau W.; McCormick, Mark; Barnes, Donna H.; Haukoos, Jason; Garmel, Gus M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2013-01-01

    Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 15 calls for organizations "to identify patients at risk for suicide." Overt suicidal behavior accounts for 0.6% of emergency department (ED) visits, but incidental suicidal ideation is found in 3%-11.6%. This is the first multicenter study of suicide screening in EDs. Of 2,243 patients in…

  12. Identifying Patients at Risk of Deterioration in the Joint Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Wiil, Uffe Kock

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Danish hospitals have merged their emergency facilities into Joint Emergency Departments. This poses new collaborative challenges across traditionally separated specialized departments, which now have to collaborate in a shared environment. Despite established protocols and patient...... at the case through the lenses of common information spaces. In particular, we apply Bossen’s seven-parameter framework to discover new dimensions of how Emergency Departments and individual clinicians identify and respond to unforeseen events, and how they handle the associated cognitive challenges. We...

  13. Do patients understand their physician's level of training? a survey of emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Sally A; Hemphill, Robin R; Prough, Emily E; Perlowski, Alice A

    2004-02-01

    To assess patients' understanding of levels of training and responsibilities for residents, medical students, and attendings in the emergency department as well as their degree of comfort in being cared for by a physician-in-training. In 1999, a questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 430 adult patients and family members in a university emergency department. The questionnaire asked for demographic information and contained 17 questions addressing the different levels of medical training and seven opinion-based questions on patients' willingness to have physicians-in-training care for them. Respondents answered 65% of the knowledge-based questions about physicians' training correctly. Only 43% understood that residents are always supervised when caring for patients, and 30% thought attendings required supervision by a resident. Respondents with education greater than a high school diploma answered more questions correctly (71% versus 59%; p training, but only 58% reported actually knowing the level of training. Only 62% felt comfortable knowing that their physician might be a supervised physician-in-training. In addition, despite the fact that this survey took place at a teaching hospital, 22% of respondents prefer not to be treated in a teaching hospital. Patients and their families do not fully understand the roles and responsibilities of the physicians-in-training that may be caring for them despite feeling it is important to know their physicians' level of training.

  14. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs.......The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  15. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    OpenAIRE

    Alley W; Mahler SA

    2015-01-01

    William Alley, Simon A Mahler Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. ...

  16. Lost in translation? How patients perceive the extended scope of physiotherapy in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaf, Sophie; Sheppard, Lorraine A

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the perceptions of emergency department physiotherapy practice by emergency patients in metropolitan and regional Australia with a view to probing how consumers interpret the place of physiotherapy in such an acute, non-traditional setting. A qualitative investigation using a descriptive open-ended questionnaire technique was administered to emergency patients in order to thematically analyse their perceptions of emergency physiotherapy practice. Case 1 was a metropolitan emergency department in Melbourne, Australia. Case 2 was a regional emergency department in North Queensland, Australia. A purposeful, convenience sample of 80 emergency department patients (n=40, Case 1; n=40, Case 2) responded to the open-ended questionnaire. Data were thematically analysed using NVivo software and manual analysis, facilitating constant case comparison, and were reflected upon continually within an interpretivist framework. Participants at both emergency departments had a general, but limited, awareness of the role of physiotherapy. Among multiple themes identified were six key domains which participants could recognise as being both the role of general physiotherapy and also relevant to the emergency setting. These were sports injury management, musculoskeletal care, rehabilitation and mobility, pain management, respiratory care and management of elderly patients. Discussions also involved those areas that were specific to general physiotherapy practice or emergency department care but which did not overlap. Participants in this study demonstrated a general, but limited, awareness of the scope of physiotherapy practice. There was strong identification of musculoskeletal-based interventions, with less familiarity with the potential role of physiotherapy in cardiorespiratory and rehabilitative management. Further research is needed on consumer awareness of the broader, less traditional roles of physiotherapy to increase acceptance and familiarity of its extended

  17. Access to paediatric emergency departments in Italy: a comparison between immigrant and Italian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pietro Pasquale

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The aim of the study was to investigate whether access to paediatric emergency departments differed between foreign and Italian patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study between January-December 2007 to analyse attendance's characteristics in the paediatric emergency departments of ten Italian public hospitals. The study population included each foreign patient and the following Italian patient admitted to the same emergency department. All causes of admission of these subjects were evaluated, together with the child's age, gender, country of birth, parents' nationality, time of admission, severity code and discharge-related circumstances. Results We enrolled 4874 patients, 2437 foreign (M:F = 1409:1028 and 2437 Italian ones (M:F = 1368:1069. Most of foreign and Italian patients' admissions were sorted as green (72.5% and 87.8%, respectively or white codes (25.2% and 9.8%, respectively. The most frequent causes for attendance concerned respiratory tract diseases, followed by gastroenteric ones and injuries in both groups. Conclusion In our survey immigrants didn't access to emergency departments more than Italian children. Both of them referred to emergency departments mainly for semi-urgent or non-urgent problems. Foreign and Italian patients suffered from the same pathologies. Infectious diseases traditionally thought to be a potential problem in immigrant populations actually seem to be quite infrequent.

  18. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergency department for patients admitted with respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    help improve the diagnostic accuracy, the proportion of patients receiving appropriate treatment, and possibly the patient outcome. This article gives a practical guide and an overview of some of the current concepts of using focused cardiac US in patients admitted with respiratory symptoms.......In patients admitted with respiratory failure, a large proportion is diagnosed incorrectly in the emergency department and an even larger proportion seems to receive inappropriate treatment. Inappropriate initial treatment of these patients in the emergency department is associated with increased...... triage, patients with cardiac arrest, patients with undifferentiated shock, patients with cardiopulmonary instability, patients with respiratory symptoms, trauma patients with suspected cardiac injuries, and assessment of the fluid status before fluid loading. When using focused cardiac ultrasound (US...

  19. Complaints from emergency department patients largely result from treatment and communication problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David McD; Wolfe, Rory; Cameron, Peter A

    2002-03-01

    Emergency department patient complaints are often justified and may lead to apology, remedial action or compensation. The aim of the present study was to analyse emergency department patient complaints in order to identify procedures or practices that require change and to make recommendations for intervention strategies aimed at decreasing complaint rates. We undertook a retrospective analysis of patient complaints from 36 Victorian emergency departments during a 61 month period. Data were obtained from the Health Complaint Information Program (Health Services Commissioner). In all, 2,419 emergency department patients complained about a total of 3,418 separate issues (15.4% of all issues from all hospital departments). Of these, 1,157 complaints (47.80%) were received by telephone and 829 (34.3%) were received by letter; 1,526 (63.1 %) complaints were made by a person other than the patient. Highest complaint rates were received from patients who were female, born in non-English-speaking countries and very young or very old. One thousand one hundred and forty-one issues (33.4%) related to patient treatment, including inadequate treatment (329 issues) and inadequate diagnosis (249 issues); 1079 (31.6%) issues related to communication, including poor staff attitude, discourtesy and rudeness (444 issues); 407 (11.9%) issues related to delay in treatment. Overall, 2516 issues (73.6%) were resolved satisfactorily, usually by explanation or apology. Only 59 issues (1.7%) resulted in a procedure or policy change. Remedial action was taken in 109 issues (3.2%) and compensation was paid to eight patients. Communication remains a significant factor in emergency department patient dissatisfaction. While patient complaints have resulted in major changes to policy and procedure, research and intervention strategies into communication problems are indicated. In the short term, focused staff training is recommended.

  20. Emergency department and inpatient health care utilization among patients who require interpreter services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Jacobson, Debra J; Ebbert, Jon O; Takahashi, Paul Y; Fan, Chun; Wieland, Mark L

    2015-05-29

    Limited English proficiency is associated with health disparities and suboptimal health outcomes. Although Limited English proficiency is a barrier to effective health care, its association with inpatient health care utilization is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the association between patients with limited English proficiency, and emergency department visits and hospital admissions. We compared emergency department visits and hospitalizations in 2012 between patients requiring interpreter services and age-matched English-proficient patients (who did not require interpreters), in a retrospective cohort study of adult patients actively empanelled to a large primary health care network in a medium-sized United States city (n = 3,784). Patients who required interpreter services had significantly more Emergency Department visits (841 vs 620; P ≤ .001) and hospitalizations (408 vs 343; P ≤ .001) than patients who did not require interpreter services. On regression analysis the risk of a first Emergency Department visit was 60% higher for patients requiring interpreter services than those who did not (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-1.9; P interpreter services had higher rates of inpatient health care utilization compared with patients who did not require an interpreter. Further research is required to understand factors associated with this utilization and to develop sociolinguistically tailored interventions to facilitate appropriate health care provision for this population.

  1. A prospective validation of the HEART score for chest pain patients at the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backus, B. E.; Six, A. J.; Kelder, J. C.; Bosschaert, M. A. R.; Mast, E. G.; Mosterd, A.; Veldkamp, R. F.; Wardeh, A. J.; Tio, R.; Braam, R.; Monnink, S. H. J.; van Tooren, R.; Mast, T. P.; van den Akker, F.; Cramer, M. J. M.; Poldervaart, J. M.; Hoes, A. W.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The focus of the diagnostic process in chest pain patients at the emergency department is to identify both low and high risk patients for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The HEART score was designed to facilitate this process. This study is a prospective validation of the HEART score.

  2. What Drives Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction? An Empirical Test using Structural Equation Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Patient satisfaction determinants in emergency departments (EDs) have for decades been heavily investigated. Despite great focus, a lack of consensus about which parameters are deemed most important remains. This study proposes an integrated framework for ED patient satisfaction, testing four key...

  3. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; van Dyck, C.; Twisk, J.; de Bruijne, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. Design: Cross-sectional survey

  4. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey

  5. Reliability of Best Possible Medication Histories Completed by Non-admitted Patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Nicole; Manuel, Leslie; Brennan, Haley; Musgrave, Erin; Wanbon, Richard; Stoica, George

    2017-01-01

    Accreditation standards have outlined the need for staff in emergency departments to initiate the medication reconciliation process for patients who are at risk of adverse drug events. The authors hypothesized that a guided form could be used by non-admitted patients in the emergency department to assist with completion of a best possible medication history (BPMH). To determine the percentage of patients in the non-acute care area of the emergency department who could complete a guided BPMH form with no clinically significant discrepancies (defined as no major discrepancies and no more than 1 moderate discrepancy). This prospective exploratory study was conducted over 4 weeks in February and March 2016. Data were collected using the self-administered BPMH form, patient interviews, and a data collection form. After completion of the guided BPMH form, patients were randomly selected for interview by a pharmacy team member to ensure their self-completed BPMH forms were complete and accurate. Eligible patients were those with non-acute needs who had undergone triage to the waiting room. Patients who were already admitted and those with immediate triage to the acute care or trauma area of the emergency department were excluded. Of the 160 patients who were interviewed, 146 (91.3%) completed the form with no more than 1 moderate discrepancy (but some number of minor discrepancies). There were no discrepancies in 31 (19.4%) of the BPMH forms, and 101 (63.1%) of the forms had only minor discrepancies. Most of the patients interviewed by the pharmacy team were able to complete the BPMH form with no clinically significant discrepancies. The self-administered BPMH form would be a useful tool to initiate medication reconciliation in the emergency department for this patient population, but used on its own, it would not be a reliable source of BPMH information, given the relatively low number of patients who completed the form with no discrepancies.

  6. Emergency teams in Danish emergency departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafrenz, Thomas; Lindberg, Søren Østergaard; La Cour, Jeppe Lerche

    2012-01-01

    The use of designated emergency teams for cardiac arrest and trauma patients is widely implemented. However, the use of designated teams in Danish emergency departments (EDs) has not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the use and staffing of emergency teams in Danish EDs....

  7. Causes of the emergency department visits in cancer patients: postchemotherapy toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Buendía-Bravo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to assess the causes of the Emergency Department visits in cancer patients treated with antineoplastics. The secondary objective is to analyse the use of growth stimulating factors in febrile neutropenia. Methods: a retrospective observational study was conducted during six months of 2012. The adult patients diagnosed with solid tumour that visited the Emergency Department and whose physician was an oncologist, were included. Results: a total of 83 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The causes of visits were: 63% due to the tumour, 31% due to the chemotherapy toxicity and 6% due to other causes. In patients with chemotherapy toxicity, 65% had fever or infection, 50% pain and 42% febrile neutropenia. The treatment and prophylaxis with filgrastim followed the recommendations. Conclusions: in cancer patients, most of emergencies are due to the tumour. The management of the pain, the fever and the neutropenia is important

  8. Swedish emergency department triage and interventions for improved patient flows: a national update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhnia, Nasim; Göransson, Katarina E

    2011-12-08

    In Scandinavia, emergency department triage and patient flow processes, are under development. In Sweden, the triage development has resulted in two new triage scales, the Adaptive Process Triage and the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System. Both these scales have logistic components, aiming to improve patient flows. The aim of this study was to report the development and current status of emergency department triage and patient flow processes in Sweden. In 2009 and 2010 the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment sent out a questionnaire to the ED managers in all (74) Swedish hospital emergency departments. The questionnaire comprised questions about triage and interventions to improve patient flows. Nearly all (97%) EDs in Sweden employed a triage scale in 2010, which was an increase from 2009 (73%). Further, the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System was the triage scale most commonly implemented across the country. The implementation of flow-related interventions was not as common, but more than half (59%) of the EDs have implemented or plan to implement nurse requested X-ray. There has been an increase in the use of triage scales in Swedish EDs during the last few years, with acceleration for the past two years. Most EDs have come to use the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System, which also indicates regional co-operation. The implementation of different interventions for improved patient flows in EDs most likely is explained by the problem of crowding. Generally, more studies are needed to investigate the economical aspects of these interventions.

  9. Emergency department seizure epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Jennifer L; Goldstein, Joshua N; Pallin, Daniel J

    2011-02-01

    Although only 3% of people in the United States are diagnosed with epilepsy, 11% will have at least one seizure during their lifetime. Seizures account for about 1% of all emergency department (ED) visits, and about 2% of visits to children's hospital EDs. Seizure accounts for about 3% of prehospital transports. In adult ED patients, common causes of seizure are alcoholism, stroke, tumor, trauma, and central nervous system infection. In children, febrile seizures are most common. In infants younger than 6 months, hyponatremia and infection are important considerations. Epilepsy is an uncommon cause of seizures in the ED, accounting for a minority of seizure-related visits. Of ED patients with seizure, about 7% have status epilepticus, which has an age-dependent mortality averaging 22%. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rated practice skills when caring for older patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Helen; Bennett, Paul N; Ockerby, Cherene; Hutchinson, Alison M; Considine, Julie

    2017-11-01

    Older adults are high users of emergency department services and their care requirements can present challenges for emergency nurses. Although clinical outcomes for older patients improve when they are cared for by nurses with specialist training, emergency nurses' knowledge and self-assessment of care for older patients is poorly understood. To assess emergency nurses' knowledge and self-rating of practice when caring for older patients. A cross-sectional self-report survey of emergency nurses (n=101) in Melbourne, Australia. Mean scores were 12.7 (SD 2.66) for the 25-item knowledge of older persons questionnaire, and 9.04 (SD 1.80) for the 15-item gerontic health related questions. Scores were unaffected by years of experience as a registered nurse or emergency nurse. More than 80% of nurses rated themselves as 'very good' or 'good' in assessing pain (94.9%), identifying delirium (87.8%), and identifying dementia (82.8%). Areas with a 'poor' ratings were identifying depression (46.5%), assessing polypharmacy (46.5%) and assessing nutrition (37.8%). There was variation in knowledge and self-rating of practice related to care of older patients. The relationship between knowledge and self-ratings of practice in relation to actual emergency nursing care of older people and patient outcomes warrants further exploration. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Ketamine as a first-line treatment for severely agitated emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Jeff; Tran, Alexander; Bengiamin, Rimon; Hendey, Gregory W; Armenian, Patil

    2017-07-01

    Emergency physicians often need to control agitated patients who present a danger to themselves and hospital personnel. Commonly used medications have limitations. Our primary objective was to compare the time to a defined reduction in agitation scores for ketamine versus benzodiazepines and haloperidol, alone or in combination. Our secondary objectives were to compare rates of medication redosing, vital sign changes, and adverse events in the different treatment groups. We conducted a single-center, prospective, observational study examining agitation levels in acutely agitated emergency department patients between the ages of 18 and 65 who required sedation medication for acute agitation. Providers measured agitation levels on a previously validated 6-point sedation scale at 0-, 5-, 10-, and 15-min after receiving sedation. We also assessed the incidence of adverse events, repeat or rescue medication dosing, and changes in vital signs. 106 patients were enrolled and 98 met eligibility criteria. There was no significant difference between groups in initial agitation scores. Based on agitation scores, more patients in the ketamine group were no longer agitated than the other medication groups at 5-, 10-, and 15-min after receiving medication. Patients receiving ketamine had similar rates of redosing, changes in vital signs, and adverse events to the other groups. In highly agitated and violent emergency department patients, significantly fewer patients receiving ketamine as a first line sedating agent were agitated at 5-, 10-, and 15-min. Ketamine appears to be faster at controlling agitation than standard emergency department medications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Profile and results of frail patient assessed by advanced practice nursing in an Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Casals, Montserrat; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Puigoriol-Juvanteny, Emma; Nubó-Puntí, Núria; Chabrera-Sanz, Carolina; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2017-06-02

    To describe the profile of patients evaluated by Nurse Care Management in an Emergency Department and identify the type of alternative healthcare resource assigned and report the results of clinical practice. Prospective follow-up, on admission to the Emergency Department in an acute hospital and on discharge from the alternative healthcare resource, of patients assessed by Nurse Care Management, from July to December 2015. The patient characteristics, social environment and results of clinical practice were studied. 190 patients were included of whom 13 were readmitted (6.8%). 122 (59.8%) cases from the Emergency Department were referred to to intermediate care facilities, 71 (34.8%) cases for domiciliary care, 10 (4.9%) cases were referred to an acute care hospital and 1 (0.5%) died. Patients referred to intermediate care were more complex, presented geriatric syndromes as their reason for admission and diagnosed with dementia, while those referred to home care presented more respiratory and cardiovascular illnesses (p <0.05). The mean Barthel Index and polypharmacy before emergency admission were higher than at the time of discharge from the alternative healthcare resource (p <0.05). Patients presenting with advanced age, complexity, comorbidity, are referred to intermediate care facilities or domiciliary care, they are admitted to acute care hospitasl and are readmitted less than other patients. After being discharged from the alternative resource, they lose functional capacity and present less polypharmacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlates of women's cancer screening and contraceptive knowledge among female emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bock Beth C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of knowledge regarding preventive health services for women might impede campaigns to expand these services in the emergency department setting. For 18–55-year-old English-speaking women visiting an urban emergency department, we aimed to: (1 Ascertain their knowledge regarding the applicability, purpose, and recommended intervals of three women's cancer screening and three contraceptive methods; and (2 Determine if patient age, race/ethnicity, medical insurance status, and current or recent usage of these methods are associated with greater or lesser knowledge about them. Methods Emergency department-based survey on recent or current usage and knowledge about Pap smears, breast self-examinations, mammograms, condoms, birth control, and emergency contraception. Analyses included calculation of summary statistics and creation of multivariable logistic regression models. Results Of 1,100 patients eligible for the study, 69.9% agreed to participate. Most of the participants were Conclusion Although these female ED patients demonstrated strong knowledge on some women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods, there were several areas of knowledge deficit. Women without private medical insurance and those who have not used a particular cancer screening or contraceptive method demonstrated less knowledge. Reduced knowledge about women's cancer screening and contraceptive methods should be considered during clinical encounters and when instituting or evaluating emergency department-based initiatives that assess the need for these methods.

  14. Forecasting hourly patient visits in the emergency department to counteract crowding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Background: Emergency department (ED) crowding is a frequent problem that causes prolonged waiting and increased risk of adverse events. While the number of daily and monthly patient arrivals can be forecasted with good accuracy, ED clinicians need hourly forecasts in their ongoing scheduling...

  15. [Prognostic factors of early 30-day mortality in elderly patients admitted to an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Erazo, Alexander; Cardona Arango, Doris

    The main aim of this study was to identify the variables related to early mortality in the elderly at the time of admission to the emergency department. Using probability sampling, the study included patients 60 years old or older of both genders who were admitted for observation to the emergency department of the University Hospital of Nariño, ¿Colombia? in 2015. Using a questionnaire designed for this study, some multidimensional features that affect the health of the elderly were collected (demographic, clinical, psychological, functional, and social variables). The patients were then followed-up for 30 days in order to determine the mortality rate during this time. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions and survival analysis were performed. Data were collected from 246 patients, with a mean age of 75.27 years and the majority female. The 30-day mortality rate was 15%. The variables most associated with death were: being female, temperature problems, initial diagnosis of neoplasia, and unable to walk independently in the emergency department. It is possible to determine the multidimensional factors present in the older patient admitted to an emergency department that could affect their 30-day mortality prognosis. and which should be intervened. Copyright © 2017 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Can Triage Nurses Accurately Predict Patient Dispositions in the Emergency Department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Danette; Abbott, Lincoln; Zhou, Qiuping; Staff, Ilene

    2016-11-01

    Contemporary emergency departments experience crowded conditions with poor patient outcomes. If triage nurses could accurately predict admission, one theoretical intervention to reduce crowding is to place patients in the admission cue on arrival to the emergency department. The purpose of this study was to determine if triage nurses could accurately predict patient dispositions. This prospective study was conducted in a tertiary academic hospital's emergency department using a data collection tool embedded in the ED electronic information system. Study variables included the predicted and actual disposition, as well as level of care, gender, age, and Emergency Severity Index level. Data were collected for 28 consecutive days from September 17 through October 9, 2013. Sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of prediction, as well as the associations between patient characteristics and nurse prediction, were calculated. A total of 5,135 cases were included in the analysis. The triage nurses predicted admissions with a sensitivity of 71.5% and discharges with a specificity of 88.0%. Accuracy was significantly higher for younger patients and for patients at very low or very high severity levels. Although the ability to predict admissions at triage by nurses was not adequate to support a change in the bed procurement process, a specificity of 88.0% could have implications for rapid ED discharges or other low-acuity processes designed within the emergency department. Further studies in additional settings and on alternative interventions are needed. Copyright © 2016 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Implementation of a clinical pathway for emergency department out-patient management of deep vein thrombosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kidney, R

    2010-09-01

    There is good evidence demonstrating that outpatient management of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is feasible and safe. However, few emergency departments in Ireland have implemented care pathways for outpatient management of DVT. The aim of this study was to examine the safety and efficacy of implementing an Emergency Department (ED)- care pathway for outpatient management of patients with DVT. A retrospective observational study of this care pathway introduced at our institution was performed. The primary outcome measure was the number of hospital admissions avoided by using the care pathway. Two hundred and eighty-four patients presenting to the ED with suspected lower limb DVT, were managed using the care pathway over a 6 month period. Forty-nine patients (17%) had a DVT diagnosed. Thirty-nine patients (81%) were suitable for outpatient DVT management. Ten patients (19%) were admitted to hospital. At 3 months there were no reported cases of the following complications: missed DVT, pulmonary embolism or death.

  18. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking LR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available LR Stoneking,1 AL Waterbrook,1 J Garst Orozco,2 D Johnston,1 A Bellafiore,1 C Davies,3 T Nuño,1 J Fatás-Cabeza,4 O Beita,5 V Ng,1 KH Grall,6 W Adamas-Rappaport7 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Sinai Health System, Chicago, IL, 3Department of Emergency Medicine, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, 4Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 5Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 6Department of Emergency Medicine, Regions Hospital, St Paul, MN, 7Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: After emergency department (ED discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit.Objectives: To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency.Methods: Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC and South Campus (SC. SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient’s native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions.Results: Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study

  19. Elderly patients' experiences of care received in the emergency department: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoon, Lim Siew; Mackey, Sandra; Hong-Gu, He

    2012-01-01

    Elderly patients admitted into the emergency department present with high levels of illness acuity and severity, accompanied by multiple and complex medical and psychosocial issues, creating challenges for health care professionals to provide appropriate care. To determine the best available evidence on elderly patients' experiences of care received in the emergency department. The review considered studies that included male and female patients of all ethnic groups who were 65 years old and above, and admitted to the emergency department with urgent and non-urgent health-related issues. Both quantitative and qualitative studies were included. The phenomena of interest were the experiences of elderly patients in the emergency department. A three-step search strategy was utilised in this review. The following databases were searched for articles published in English before year 2010: CINAHL, Medline, Scopus, PsycINFO, Mednar and Cochrane library. Each paper was assessed independently by two reviewers for methodological quality prior to inclusion in the review using standardised critical appraisal checklists from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data were extracted using standardised data extraction tools from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (MAStARI) for descriptive/case series, and Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (QARI) for interpretive and critical research. The findings from the quantitative study were presented in a narrative summary. The findings from the qualitative papers were pooled using JBI-QARI, involving the aggregation of findings to generate a set of statements that represent that aggregation. A total of five papers were included in this review. The quantitative evidence demonstrated elderly patients' satisfaction level with care received in the emergency department was related to the length of waiting time and the information and pain management received. Two syntheses were generated

  20. Painful Discrimination in the Emergency Department: Risk Factors for Underassessment of Patients' Pain by Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierik, Jorien G J; IJzerman, Maarten J; Gaakeer, Menno I; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam M R; Doggen, Carine J M

    2017-05-01

    Unrelieved acute musculoskeletal pain continues to be a reality of major clinical importance, despite advancements in pain management. Accurate pain assessment by nurses is crucial for effective pain management. Yet inaccurate pain assessment is a consistent finding worldwide in various clinical settings, including the emergency department. In this study, pain assessments between nurses and patients with acute musculoskeletal pain after extremity injury will be compared to assess discrepancies. A second aim is to identify patients at high risk for underassessment by emergency nurses. The prospective PROTACT study included 539 adult patients who were admitted to the emergency department with musculoskeletal pain. Data on pain assessment and characteristics of patients including demographics, pain, and injury, psychosocial, and clinical factors were collected using questionnaires and hospital registry. Nurses significantly underestimated patients' pain with a mean difference of 2.4 and a 95% confidence interval of 2.2-2.6 on an 11-points numerical rating scale. Agreement between nurses' documented and patients' self-reported pain was only 27%, and 63% of the pain was underassessed. Pain was particularly underassessed in women, in persons with a lower educational level, in patients who used prehospital analgesics, in smokers, in patients with injury to the lower extremities, in anxious patients, and in patients with a lower urgency level. Underassessment of pain by emergency nurses is still a major problem and might result in undertreatment of pain if the emergency nurses rely on their assessment to provide further pain treatment. Strategies that focus on awareness among nurses of which patients are at high risk of underassessment of pain are needed. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Patient Factors Associated With the Decision to Transfer Adult Patients From a Pediatric Emergency Department For Definitive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblith, Aaron E; Foster, Ashley A; Cho, Christine S; Wang, Ralph C; Jaffe, David M

    2017-11-14

    Adults presenting to pediatric emergency departments are transferred to general emergency departments in proportions between 20% and 60%. How illness severity is related to the decision to transfer is poorly understood. We compared the proportion of adults with emergent and nonemergent conditions with respect to their final disposition. We also determined characteristics associated with transfer. We conducted a retrospective review of the electronic medical record and identified all patients 25 years and older presenting to a large urban freestanding pediatric emergency department from 2008 to 2013. We collected demographic and clinical information and used a preexisting algorithm to classify visits as emergent or nonemergent. We created a multivariate logistical regression model to determine independent variables associated with transfer. Among 246,694 encounters, 1182 (0.5%) patients were older than 25 years. We excluded 402 (34%) because they were not categorized. Of the 780 categorized, 32% had an emergent and 68% had a nonemergent condition. Only 22% were transferred. Compared with nonurgent patients, the proportion transferred was twice as high for emergent patients (36% vs 15%), but even for emergent patients, most (63%) were retained for definitive care and/or disposition. Emergent diagnosis, age 45 to 64 years, and higher triage acuity were independently associated with the decision to transfer. Regardless of illness severity, a minority of adult patients were transferred away for definitive care. Factors independently associated with transfer were emergent condition, higher triage acuity, and older age.

  2. The perception of the patient safety climate by professionals of the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello, Mayara Carvalho Godinho; Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Guerreiro, Juliana Magalhães; Motta, Ana Paula Gobbo; Atila, Elizabeth; Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael Escobar

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the patient safety climate from the perspective of healthcare professionals working in the emergency department of a hospital in Brazil. Emergency departments are complex and dynamic environments. They are prone to adverse events that compromise the quality of care provided and reveal the importance of patient safety culture and climate. This was a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) - Short Form 2006 was used for data collection, validated and adapted into Portuguese. The study sample consisted of 125 participants. Most of the participants were female (57.6%) and had worked in emergency department for more than 10years (56.8%). Sixty-two participants (49.6%) were nursing professionals. The participants demonstrated satisfaction with their jobs and dissatisfaction with the actions of management with regard to safety issues. Participants' perceptions about the patient safety climate were found to be negative. Knowledge of professionals' perceptions of patient safety climate in the context of emergency care helps with assessments of the safety culture, contributes to improvement of health care, reduces adverse events, and can focus efforts to improve the quality of care provided to patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Neglected, lonely and sick - the social breakdown : A special patient group in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräff, I; Dolscheid-Pommerich, R C; Ghamari, S; Baehner, T; Goost, H

    2017-06-06

    The emergency department (ED) is increasingly becoming the primary care unit of patients who are no longer able to meet the necessary minimum requirements for a healthy life. In the emergency medical care of these patients, fixation errors and stereotyped thinking can distract from serious illnesses, which can be tended by emergency medicine. This group of patients, with their multifactorial problems, represents a special challenge for the staff of the ED. The aim of this study is to improve the quality of the care for a special patient group. A monocentric retrospective observation study was conducted at the University Hospital Bonn (UKB). On the basis of case studies, the emergency medical care of this special patient group was examined in the ED. Over the period of 7 years (2009 to 2016), 17 patients in a state of total neglect could be examined. The endpoints identified, during the emergency care, are the therapy of life-threatening diseases, laboratory pathologies, introduction of infectious protective measures, initiation of diagnostic measures, measures to be initiated within different departments (operating room, intensive care unit) and outcome. Patients in a state of total neglect require interdisciplinary primary care at a hospital with extended care structures. The apparent primary impression of these patients must not lead to a fixation error. Due to the often not obtainable history of the patient's and the complex appearance of these patients, the evaluation should be carried out according to a defined algorithm in the emergency room.

  4. Fire Department Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  5. Clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with valvular heart disease admitted to the emergency department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Ricardo Casalino Sanches de [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Katz, Marcelo [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tarasoutchi, Flávio [Instituto do Coração, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the clinical and epidemiological profile of patients with valvular heart disease who arrived decompensated at the emergency department of a university hospital in Brazil. A descriptive analysis of clinical and echocardiographic data of 174 patients with severe valvular disease, who were clinically decompensated and went to the emergency department of a tertiary cardiology hospital, in the State of São Paulo, in 2009. The mean age of participants was 56±17 years and 54% were female. The main cause of valve disease was rheumatic in 60%, followed by 15% of degenerative aortic disease and mitral valve prolapse in 13%. Mitral regurgitation (27.5%) was the most common isolated valve disease, followed by aortic stenosis (23%), aortic regurgitation (13%) and mitral stenosis (11%). In echocardiographic data, the mean left atrial diameter was 48±12mm, 38±12mm for the left ventricular systolic diameter, and 54±12mm for the diastolic diameter; the mean ejection fraction was 56±13%, and the mean pulmonary artery pressure was 53±16mmHg. Approximately half of patients (44%) presented atrial fibrillation, and over one third of them (37%) had already undergone another cardiac surgery. Despite increased comorbidities and age-dependent risk factors commonly described in patients with valvular heart disease, the clinical profile of patients arriving at the emergency department represented a cohort of rheumatic patients in more advanced stages of disease. These patients require priority care in high complexity specialized hospitals.

  6. Neurocysticercosis in Radiographically Imaged Seizure Patients in U.S. Emergency Departments1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talan, David A.; Moran, Gregory J.; Mower, William; Newdow, Michael; Tsang, Victor C.W.; Pinner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis appears to be on the rise in the United States, based on immigration patterns and published cases series, including reports of domestic acquisition. We used a collaborative network of U.S. emergency departments to characterize the epidemiology of neurocysticercosis in seizure patients. Data were collected prospectively at 11 university-affiliated, geographically diverse, urban U.S. emergency departments from July 1996 to September 1998. Patients with a seizure who underwent neuroimaging were included. Of the 1,801 patients enrolled in the study, 38 (2.1%) had seizures attributable to neurocysticercosis. The disease was detected in 9 of the 11 sites and was associated with Hispanic ethnicity, immigrant status, and exposure to areas where neurocysticercosis is endemic. This disease appears to be widely distributed and highly prevalent in certain populations (e.g., Hispanic patients) and areas (e.g., Southwest). PMID:12023918

  7. Emergency department patient liaison volunteers: a cost containment and visitor satisfaction strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, S

    1995-02-01

    We have saved a minimum of $17,064 in personnel salaries of a patient representative (based on minimum wage and no paid benefits) during the past year. Although our liaison program was initially started as a cost-saving measure, the benefits of the program cannot be measured in monetary terms. Although this venture was our first attempt with a program of this nature, and we are still developing the program, we believe the development of the ED liaison volunteer program has been a major accomplishment for the emergency department and has also increased community support. Many of the liaisons were totally unaware of the activities in an emergency department. They now have a greater appreciation for the process of emergency care, and can relate that understanding to patients and families.

  8. Therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markun, Stefan; Holzer, Barbara M; Rodak, Roksana; Kaplan, Vladimir; Wagner, Claudia C; Battegay, Edouard; Zimmerli, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Patients with multimorbidity are an increasing concern in healthcare. Clinical practice guidelines, however, do not take into account potential therapeutic conflicts caused by co-occurring medical conditions. This makes therapeutic decisions complex, especially in emergency situations. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity. We reviewed electronic records of all patients ≥18 years with two or more concurrent active medical conditions, admitted from the emergency department to the hospital ward of the University Hospital Zurich in January 2009. We cross-tabulated all active diagnoses with treatments recommended by guidelines for each diagnosis. Then, we identified potential therapeutic conflicts and classified them as either major or minor conflicts according to their clinical significance. 166 emergency inpatients with multimorbidity were included. The mean number of active diagnoses per patient was 6.6 (SD±3.4). We identified a total of 239 therapeutic conflicts in 49% of the of the study population. In 29% of the study population major therapeutic conflicts, in 41% of the patients minor therapeutic conflicts occurred. Therapeutic conflicts are common among multimorbid patients, with one out of two experiencing minor, and one out of three experiencing major therapeutic conflicts. Clinical practice guidelines need to address frequent therapeutic conflicts in patients with co-morbid medical conditions.

  9. Therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Markun

    Full Text Available Patients with multimorbidity are an increasing concern in healthcare. Clinical practice guidelines, however, do not take into account potential therapeutic conflicts caused by co-occurring medical conditions. This makes therapeutic decisions complex, especially in emergency situations.The aim of this study was to identify and quantify therapeutic conflicts in emergency department patients with multimorbidity.We reviewed electronic records of all patients ≥18 years with two or more concurrent active medical conditions, admitted from the emergency department to the hospital ward of the University Hospital Zurich in January 2009. We cross-tabulated all active diagnoses with treatments recommended by guidelines for each diagnosis. Then, we identified potential therapeutic conflicts and classified them as either major or minor conflicts according to their clinical significance.166 emergency inpatients with multimorbidity were included. The mean number of active diagnoses per patient was 6.6 (SD±3.4. We identified a total of 239 therapeutic conflicts in 49% of the of the study population. In 29% of the study population major therapeutic conflicts, in 41% of the patients minor therapeutic conflicts occurred.Therapeutic conflicts are common among multimorbid patients, with one out of two experiencing minor, and one out of three experiencing major therapeutic conflicts. Clinical practice guidelines need to address frequent therapeutic conflicts in patients with co-morbid medical conditions.

  10. Management of critically ill patients receiving noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise RoseLawrence S Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation frequently present to emergency departments, and may remain for prolonged periods due to constrained critical care services. Emergency clinicians often do not receive the same education on management of mechanical ventilation or have similar exposure to these patients as do their critical care colleagues. The aim of this review was to synthesize the evidence on management of patients requiring noninvasive and invasive ventilation in the emergency department including indications, clinical applications, monitoring priorities, and potential complications. Noninvasive ventilation is recommended for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Less evidence supports its use in asthma and other causes of acute respiratory failure. Use of noninvasive ventilation in the prehospital setting is relatively new, and some evidence suggests benefit. Monitoring priorities for noninvasive ventilation include response to treatment, respiratory and hemodynamic stability, noninvasive ventilation tolerance, detection of noninvasive ventilation failure, and identification of air leaks around the interface. Application of injurious ventilation increases patient morbidity and mortality. Lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volumes based on determination of predicted body weight and control of plateau pressure has been shown to reduce mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, and some evidence exists to suggest this strategy should be used in patients without lung injury. Monitoring of the invasively ventilated patient should focus on assessing response to mechanical ventilation and other interventions, and avoiding complications, such as ventilator-associated pneumonia. Several key aspects of management of noninvasive

  11. The Microcirculation is Preserved in Emergency Department Low‐acuity Sepsis Patients Without Hypotension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Simon; Filbin, Michael; Hou, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Microcirculatory dysfunction plays an important role in sepsis pathophysiology. Previous studies using sidestream dark-field (SDF) imaging have demonstrated microcirculatory flow abnormalities in patients with septic shock; however, the microcirculation is relatively unstudied in lower......, conducted in three urban, tertiary care emergency departments (EDs) in the United States. Sepsis was defined as suspected infection plus two or more systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria; those with hypotension were excluded. Noninfected controls were ED patients without infection...

  12. MODELING CHRONIC DISEASE PATIENT FLOWS DIVERTED FROM EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS TO PATIENT-CENTERED MEDICAL HOMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rafael; Behr, Joshua; Kumar, Sameer; Britton, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Disease is defined as a long lasting health condition, which can develop and/or worsen over an extended time, but which can also be controlled. The monetary and budgetary toll due to its persistent nature has become unsustainable and requires pressing actions to limit their incidence and burden. This paper demonstrates the utility of the System Dynamics approach to simulate the behavior of key factors involved in the implementation of chronic disease management. We model the patient flow diversion from emergency departments (ED) to patient-centered medical homes (PCMH), with emphasis on the visit rates, as well as the effect of insurance coverage, in an effort to assure continuity of quality care for Asthma patients at lower costs. The model is used as an evaluative method to identify conditions of a maintained health status through adequate policy planning, in terms of resources and capacity. This approach gives decision makers the ability to track the level of implementation of the intervention and generate knowledge about dynamics between population demands and the intervention effectiveness. The functionality of the model is demonstrated through the consideration of hypothetical scenarios executed using sensitivity analysis. PMID:26770663

  13. Transgender and Gender-Nonconforming Patients in the Emergency Department: What Physicians Know, Think, and Do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm-Straker, Makini; Willging, Cathleen; Daul, Adrian D; McNamara, Shannon; Sante, S Cham; Shattuck, Daniel G; Crandall, Cameron S

    2017-11-03

    We explore self-reported knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of emergency physicians in regard to the care of transgender and gender-nonconforming patients to identify opportunities to improve care of this population. From July to August 2016, we electronically surveyed the American College of Emergency Physicians' Emergency Medicine Practice-Based Research Network of 654 active emergency physician participants. We performed frequency tabulations to analyze the closed-ended response items. Of the 399 respondents (61% response rate), 88.0% reported caring for transgender and gender-nonconforming patients in the emergency department (ED), although 82.5% had no formal training about this population. The majority of physicians (86.0%) were comfortable asking about personal pronouns. Only 26.1% of respondents knew the most common gender-affirming surgery for female-to-male patients; 9.8% knew the most common nonhormone gender-affirming medication that male-to-female patients use. Almost no respondents (nonconforming patients. Although transgender and gender-nonconforming people represent a minority of ED patients nationwide, the majority of respondents reported personally providing care to members of this population. Most respondents lacked basic clinical knowledge about transgender and gender-nonconforming care. Copyright © 2017 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Medical short stay unit for geriatric patients in the emergency department: clinical and healthcare benefits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Teresa; Hornillos, Mercedes; Rodríguez, Miriam; Martínez, Javier; Madrigal, María; Mauleón, Coro; Alvarez, Bárbara

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of comprehensive geriatric assessment and management of high-risk elders in a medical short stay unit located in the emergency department of a general hospital. We performed a descriptive, prospective study of patients admitted to the medical short stay unit for geriatric patients of the emergency department in 2006. A total of 749 patients were evaluated, with a mean (standard deviation) stay in the unit of 37 (16) h. The mean age was 86 (7) years; 57% were women, and 50% had moderate-severe physical impairment and dementia. Thirty-five percent lived in a nursing home. The most frequent reason for admission was exacerbation of chronic cardiopulmonary disease. Multiple geriatric syndromes were identified. The most frequent were immobility, pressure sores and behavioral disorders related to dementia. Seventy percent of the patients were discharged to home after being stabilized and were followed-up by the geriatric clinic and day hospital (39%), the home care medical team (11%), or the nursing home or primary care physician (20%). During the month after discharge, 17% were readmitted and 7.7% died, especially patients with more advanced age or functional impairment. After the unit was opened, admissions to the acute geriatric unit fell by 18.2%. Medical short stay units for geriatric patients in emergency departments may be useful for geriatric assessment and treatment of exacerbations of chronic diseases. These units can help to reduce the number of admissions and optimize the care provided in other ambulatory and domiciliary geriatric settings.

  15. A pilot study to evaluate learning style–tailored information prescriptions for hypertensive emergency department patients*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuse, Nunzia B; Storrow, Alan B

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study explored whether learning style–tailored education materials, “information prescriptions,” are effective in increasing hypertension knowledge in emergency room patients. Methods: In a randomized trial, hypertensive emergency medicine patients received either standard care discharge instructions or discharge instructions in combination with an information prescription individualized to each patient's learning-style preference. Two weeks post-visit, the study team assessed changes in hypertension knowledge via a survey. Results: No significant difference was observed for changes in quiz scores on the hypertension knowledge assessment, though patients receiving the tailored information prescriptions reported higher levels of satisfaction with intervention materials. Conclusion: The study demonstrated the workflow feasibility of implementing a learning-style approach to patient education in the emergency department setting. Further research is needed to develop more robust measures of high blood pressure knowledge among the emergency department patient population. This work will contribute to establishing a framework for developing customized information prescriptions that can be broadly adapted for use in varied settings and with varied health care conditions. PMID:22022222

  16. A pilot study to evaluate learning style-tailored information prescriptions for hypertensive emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonce, Taneya Y; Giuse, Nunzia B; Storrow, Alan B

    2011-10-01

    This pilot study explored whether learning style-tailored education materials, "information prescriptions," are effective in increasing hypertension knowledge in emergency room patients. In a randomized trial, hypertensive emergency medicine patients received either standard care discharge instructions or discharge instructions in combination with an information prescription individualized to each patient's learning-style preference. Two weeks post-visit, the study team assessed changes in hypertension knowledge via a survey. No significant difference was observed for changes in quiz scores on the hypertension knowledge assessment, though patients receiving the tailored information prescriptions reported higher levels of satisfaction with intervention materials. The study demonstrated the workflow feasibility of implementing a learning-style approach to patient education in the emergency department setting. Further research is needed to develop more robust measures of high blood pressure knowledge among the emergency department patient population. This work will contribute to establishing a framework for developing customized information prescriptions that can be broadly adapted for use in varied settings and with varied health care conditions.

  17. Patients' views of teamwork in the emergency department offer insights about team performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Beverly W; McCarthy, Danielle M; Nannicelli, Anna P; Seivert, Nicholas P; Vozenilek, John A

    2016-06-01

    Research into efforts to engage patients in the assessment of health-care teams is limited. To explore, through qualitative methods, patient awareness of teamwork-related behaviours observed during an emergency department (ED) visit. Researchers used semi-structured question guides for audio-recorded interviews and analysed their verbatim transcripts. Researchers conducted individual phone interviews with 6 teamwork subject matter experts (SMEs) and held 5 face-to-face group interviews with patients and caregivers (n = 25) about 2 weeks after discharge from the emergency department (ED). SMEs suggested that a range of factors influence patient perspectives of teams. Many patients perceived the health-care team within the context of their expectations of an ED visit and their treatment plan. Four themes emerged: (i) patient-centred views highlight gaps in coordination and communication; (ii) team processes do concern patients; (iii) patients are critical observers of ways that team members present their team roles; (iv) patients' observations of team members relate to patients' views of team effectiveness. Analysis also indicated that patients viewed health-care team members' interactions with each other as proxy for how team members actually felt about patients. Results from both sets of interviews (SME and patient) indicated that patient observations of teamwork could add to assessment of team processes/frameworks. Patients' understanding about teamwork organization seemed helpful and witnessed interteam communication appeared to influence patient confidence in the team. Patients perspectives are an important part of assessment in health care and suggest potential areas for improvement through team training. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Patient satisfaction with nursing care in an urban and suburban emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Greg; Causey, Sherry; Dienemann, Jacqueline; Guiton, Paula; Coleman, Frankie Sue; Nussbaum, Marcy

    2013-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important outcome measurement in the emergency department (ED). When unavoidable, the negative effect of patient wait time may be lessened by communicating expected wait time, affective support, health information, decisional control, and competent providers. This controlled quasi-experimental design used a convenience sample. The patient questionnaire included demographics, expected and perceived wait time, receiving of comfort items, information and engaging activities and their perceived helpfulness for coping with waiting, and the Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale measure of patient satisfaction with nursing. Systematic offering of comfort items, clinical information, and engaging activities were statistically analyzed for impact on perceived wait times, helpfulness in waiting, and satisfaction with nursing care. Interventions were supported by the data as helpful for coping with waiting and were significantly related to nursing care satisfaction. Interventions were less helpful for suburban patients who were also less satisfied. Nurses can influence patient satisfaction in the ED through communication and caring behaviors.

  19. Analysis of Patient Visits and Collections After Opening a Satellite Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Katherine M; Caperell, Kerry; Cross, Keith; Duncan, Scott; Foster, Ben; Liu, Gil; Pritchard, Hank; Southard, Gary; Shinabery, Ben; Sutton, Brad; Kim, In K

    2017-02-04

    Satellite pediatric emergency departments (PEDs) have emerged as a strategy to increase patient capacity. We sought to determine the impact on patient visits, physician fee collections, and value of emergency department (ED) time at the primary PED after opening a nearby satellite PED. We also illustrate the spatial distribution of patient demographics and overlapping catchment areas for the primary and satellite PEDs using geographical information system. A structured, financial retrospective review was conducted. Aggregate patient demographic data and billing data were collected regarding physician fee charges, collections, and patient visits for both PEDs. All ED visits from January 2009 to December 2013 were analyzed. Geographical information system mapping using ArcGIS mapped ED patient visits. Patient visits at the primary PED were 53,050 in 2009 before the satellite PED opened. The primary PED visits increased after opening the satellite PED to 55,932 in 2013. The satellite PED visits increased to 21,590 in 2013. Collections per visit at the primary PED decreased from $105.13 per visit in 2011 to $86.91 per visit in 2013. Total collections at the satellite PED decreased per visit from $155.41 per visit in 2011 to $128.53 per visit in 2013. After opening a nearby satellite PED, patient visits at the primary PED did not substantially decrease, suggesting that there was a previously unrecognized demand for PED services. The collections per ED visit were greater at the satellite ED, likely due to a higher collection rate.

  20. Type and Context of Alcohol-Related Injury among Patients Presenting to Emergency Departments in a Caribbean Country

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandra D Reid; Jannel Gentius

    2017-01-01

    .... Data on drinking patterns, injury type, drinking context prior to injury, and demographics were collected from patients presenting with injuries to the Emergency Departments (ED) of four hospitals...

  1. Success of applying early goal-directed therapy for septic shock patients in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worapratya P

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Panita Worapratya,1 Apisit Wanjaroenchaisuk,2 Jutharat Joraluck,3 Prasit Wuthisuthimethawee1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Songklanagarind Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, 2Emergency Department, Samitivej Thonburi Hospital, Bangkok, 3Emergency Department, Hatyai Hospital, Hatyai, Songkhla, Thailand Background: Since early goal-directed therapy (EGDT became standard care in severe sepsis and septic shock patients in intensive care units many years ago, we suppose that the survival rate of severe sepsis and septic shock patients improves if the resuscitative procedure is quickly implemented and is initiated in the emergency room. Objective: We aimed at recording emergency department time to improve our patient care system as well as determine the rate at which EGDT goals can be achieved. The second analysis is to find out how much we can improve the survival rate. Methods: This was a prospective observational study in an emergency room setting at a tertiary care facility where EGDT was applied for resuscitation of severe sepsis and septic shock patients. The data recorded were the initial vital signs, APACHE II (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score, SAP II (Simplified Acute Physiology II score, SOFA (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score, time at which EGDT goals were achieved (central venous oxygen saturation [Scvo2] >70%, initial and final diagnosis, and outcome of treatment. The t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare between the achieved goal and nonachieved goal groups. Results: There were 63 cases of severe sepsis in the study period. Only 55 patients submitted a signed consent form and had central line insertion. Twenty-eight (50.9% cases were male. Thirty-nine (70.9% patients achieved the goal, and the mean SAP II score was 8. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups (P-value =0.097. Thirty of the 39 patients (70.9% survived in

  2. Lactate level, aetiology and mortality of adult patients in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mathilde; Brandt, Vibeke Schnack; Holler, Jon Gitz

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased lactate is associated with high mortality among patients with suspected infection or trauma in the emergency department (ED), but the association with patients with other aetiologies is less well described. The aim of this study was to describe the relation between lactate......, aetiology and 7-day mortality in adult ED patients. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of all adult patients who had a lactate measured within 4 h after arrival to the ED at Odense University Hospital between June 2012 and May 2013. The categorisation of suspected aetiology was based on discharge...

  3. Effects of immigration enforcement legislation on Hispanic pediatric patient visits to the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniflah, Jacob D; Little, Wendalyn K; Simon, Harold K; Sturm, Jesse

    2013-12-01

    To compare the visits by Hispanic patients to the pediatric emergency department (PED) before and after passage of Georgia House Bill 87 (HB87). This bill grants local law enforcement the authority to enforce immigration laws. A retrospective chart review of all Hispanic patients who presented to the PED in a 4-month period after implementation of HB87 in 2011 was conducted and compared with the same period in 2009 and 2010. Data compared included patient acuity score, disposition, payer status, and demographics. Fewer Hispanic patients presented to the ED after passage of the bill (18.3% vs 17.1%, P immigration legislation.

  4. Impacts of social networking sites on patient care in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Anne; Pourmand, Ali; Shokoohi, Hamid; Shesser, Robert; Sanchez, Jesus; Joyce, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The use of Facebook is ubiquitous among both patients and physicians. Often Facebook intrudes into medical practice, thereby highlighting its potential to be either a positive or negative factor in a patient's medical care. Despite being a "hot topic" in the medical literature, very few real world examples exist of physicians actually using information obtained from Facebook to reach a diagnosis or otherwise affect patient care. We present a case involving a 13-year-old girl who posted photographs and captions on Facebook demonstrating suicidal ideation. The patient's parents were alerted to the girl's statements in her Facebook profile and brought her to the emergency department. The girl's statements and photographs, as reported by her parents, were used by an emergency physician to make a diagnosis of suicidal risk and to disposition of the patient to an inpatient psychiatric ward. We discuss the potential diagnostic utility of information posted on Facebook and briefly discuss the ethical questions surrounding this situation.

  5. Assessment of prehospital medical care for the patients transported to emergency department by ambulance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehnaz Akın Paker

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In our study we aimed to investigate the quality and quantity of medical management inside ambulances for 14 and over 14 years old patients transported to a level three emergency department (ED. Material and methods: Our study was conducted prospectively at a level three ED. 14 and over 14 years old patients who were transported to the ED by ambulance were included in the study consecutively. “Lack of vital rate” was described as missing of one or more of five vital rates during ambulance transportation. Both of two attending emergency physicians evaluated the medical procedures and management of patients at the ambulance simultaneously and this was recorded on the study forms. Results: Four hundred and fifty six patients were included in the study. Missing vital signs were identified for 90.1% (n = 322 of the patients that were transported by physicians and 92.4% (n = 73 of the patients that were transported by paramedics. For five patients with cardiac arrest two (33.3% had cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR, one (20% was intubated, one (20% received adrenaline. Out of 120 patients, needed spinal immobilization, 69 (57.5% had spinal board. Cervical collar usage was 65.1% (n = 69 We have revealed that 316 (69.3% patients did not receive at least one of the necessary medical intervention or treatment. Conclusion: During ambulance transportation, life-saving procedures like cardiopulmonary resuscitation, vital sign measurement, crucial treatment administration, endotracheal intubation, defibrillation, fracture immobilization were not performed adequately. Increasing the training on the deficient interventions and performing administrative inspections may improve quality of patient care. Keywords: Emergency department, Ambulance, Prehospital emergency care

  6. A systematic review of patient tracking systems for use in the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Ian; Doan, Quynh; Hung, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    Patient safety is of great importance in the pediatric emergency department (PED). The combination of acutely and critically ill patients and high patient volumes creates a need for systems to support physicians in making accurate and timely diagnoses. Electronic patient tracking systems can potentially improve PED safety by reducing overcrowding and enhancing security. To enhance our understanding of current electronic tracking technologies, how they are implemented in a clinical setting, and resulting effect on patient care outcomes including patient safety. Nine databases were searched. Two independent reviewers identified articles that contained reference to patient tracking technologies in pediatrics or emergency medicine. Quantitative studies were assessed independently for methodological strength by two reviewers using an external assessment tool. Of 2292 initial articles, 22 were deemed relevant. Seventeen were qualitative, and the remaining five quantitative articles were assessed as being methodologically weak. Existing patient tracking systems in the ED included: infant monitoring/abduction prevention; barcode identification; radiofrequency identification (RFID)- or infrared (IR)-based patient tracking. Twenty articles supported the use of tracking technology to enhance patient safety or improve efficiency. One article failed to support the use of IR patient sensors due to study design flaws. Support exists for the use of barcode-, IR-, and RFID-based patient tracking systems to improve ED patient safety and efficiency. A lack of methodologically strong studies indicates a need for further evidence-based support for the implementation of patient tracking technology in a clinical or research setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A survey of patients with bed bugs in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheele, Johnathan M; Gaines, Stephanie; Maurer, Nicholas; Coppolino, Katirina; Li, Jennifer S; Pound, Amy; Luk, Jeffrey H; Mandac, Ed

    2017-05-01

    Bed bugs are one of the most important human ectoparasites in the United States, and a growing problem in the emergency department. We evaluated 40 emergency department (ED) patients found with a bed bug. The data show that ED patients with bed bugs are statistically more likely to be male, older, more likely to be admitted to the hospital, have higher triage emergency severity index (ESI) scores, and arrive by ambulance than the general ED patient population (pbed bugs were found 108min after a patient arrived to the ED, after 35% of subjects had already received a blood draw, and after 23% had already received a radiology study; putting other ED patients and staff at risk for acquiring the infestation. We found that 13% and 18% of subjects had wheezing and a papular rash, respectively on physical exam. Of those patients found with a bed bug in the ED, 42% reported having bed bugs at home and 21% reporting having a possible home infestation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. General characteristics of patients with electrolyte imbalance admitted to emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Balcı, Arif Kadri; Koksal, Ozlem; Kose, Ataman; Armagan, Erol; Ozdemir, Fatma; Inal, Taylan; Oner, Nuran

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fluid and electrolyte balance is a key concept to understand for maintaining homeostasis, and for a successful treatment of many metabolic disorders. There are various regulating mechanisms for the equilibrium of electrolytes in organisms. Disorders of these mechanisms result in electrolyte imbalances that may be life-threatening clinical conditions. In this study we defined the electrolyte imbalance characteristics of patients admitted to our emergency department. METHODS: This s...

  9. Assessment of the Acute Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department: Legal Cases and Caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    in his wife’s behavior as she became more lethargic and depressed . He presented to Greenville Memorial Hospital’s emergency department (ED) on a Friday...do this, Dr. Crumpler negligently failed to prescribe appropriate antipsychotic medication.3 In the above case the EP correctly diagnosed a...patient one must always consider medication- related medical issues (neuroleptic malignant syndrome, serotonin syndrome, anticholinergic Good et al

  10. Analysis of Emergency Department Nurse Attitudes Toward Caring for Ethnically Diverse Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-31

    assessments of both the patient and the nurse (Charonko, 1992). Transcultural Nursing Madeleine Leininger (1991), in an effort to improve health care to...other health care services (1991) . Leininger describes transcultural nursing as a blend of nursing and anthropology which attempts to help nurses...Emergency Department (ED) is no exception, and often the ED nurse is the first health care contact for minorities and new immigrants (ENA, 1995

  11. Injuries Associated with Hoverboard Use: A Case Series of Emergency Department Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Weingart, Gregory S.; Glueckert, Lindsey; Cachaper, Girlyn A.; Zimbro, Kathie S.; Maduro, Ralitsa S.; Counselman, Francis

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Since hoverboards became available in 2015, 2.5 million have been sold in theUS. An increasing number of injuries related to their use have been reported, with limited data onassociated injury patterns. We describe a case series of emergency department (ED) visits forhoverboard-related injuries. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review on patients presenting to 10 EDs insoutheastern Virginia from December 24, 2015, through June 30, 2016. We used a free-textsea...

  12. Chest Pain Units: A Modern Way of Managing Patients with Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Bassan Roberto

    2002-01-01

    It is estimated that 5 to 8 million individuals with chest pain or other symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia are seen each year in emergency departments (ED) in the United States 1,2, which corresponds to 5 to 10% of all visits 3,4. Most of these patients are hospitalized for evaluation of possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This generates an estimated cost of 3 - 6 thousand dollars per patient 5,6. From this evaluation process, about 1.2 million patients receive the diagnosis of a...

  13. Caring for Patients or Organs: New Therapies Raise New Dilemmas in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Arjun; Parker, Lisa S; DeVita, Michael A

    2017-05-01

    Two potentially lifesaving protocols, emergency preservation and resuscitation (EPR) and uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death (uDCDD), currently implemented in some U.S. emergency departments (EDs), have similar eligibility criteria and initial technical procedures, but critically different goals. Both follow unsuccessful cardiopulmonary resuscitation and induce hypothermia to "buy time": one in trauma patients suffering cardiac arrest, to enable surgical repair, and the other in patients who unexpectedly die in the ED, to enable organ donation. This article argues that to fulfill patient-focused fiduciary obligations and maintain community trust, institutions implementing both protocols should adopt and publicize policies to guide ED physicians to utilize either protocol for particular patients, in order to address the appearance of conflict of interest arising from the protocols' similarities. It concludes by analyzing ethical implications of incentives that may influence institutions to develop the expertise required for uDCDD but not EPR.

  14. Factors associated with mortality in patients presenting to the emergency department with severe hypernatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Ihsan; Özkayar, Nihal; Toprak, Güvenç; Yılmaz, Nisbet; Dede, Fatih

    2016-04-01

    Hypernatremia is a common electrolyte disorder associated with prolonged hospitalization and death. Severe hypernatremia is defined as a serum sodium (Na(+)) concentration >160 mmol/L. To the best of our knowledge, there is little information on patients with severe hypernatremia, Na(+) >160 mmol/L. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine the frequency, demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions and treatment strategies in patients presenting to the emergency department with severe hypernatremia, and also to evaluate the effects of these factors on mortality. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients presenting to the emergency department between January 2011 and June 2014. Patients with Na(+) >160 mmol/L were screened retrospectively via the hospital electronic information management system and patient medical record files. During the 3.5 years of screening, 256 patients (0.04 %) with Na(+) >160 mmol/L presented to the emergency department. The mean age of the patients included in the study was 74.4 ± 15.2 years, mean Na(+) level was 168.7 ± 7.4 mmol/L and, mean mortality was 49.5 % during the hospitalization. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that low systolic blood pressure, low pH, Na(+) >166 mmol/L, increased plasma osmolarity, mean sodium reduction rate ≤-0.134 mmol/L/h, dehydration, and, pneumonia to be independently associated with mortality. This study describes the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with Na(+) >160 mmol/L in a large population along with comorbid conditions, incidence, treatment strategies and, its association with mortality.

  15. Evolution of the clinical profile of patients with acute heart failure treated in Spanish emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoda, R; Miró, Ò; Martín-Sánchez, F J; Jacob, J; Herrero, P; Gil, V; Garrido, J M; Pérez-Durá, M J; Fuentes, M; Llorens, P

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the changes in epidemiology, outpatient and emergency department clinical care, and outcomes of patients treated for acute heart failure (AHF) in Spanish hospital emergency departments (HEDs) between 2007 and 2014. A multicentre cohort study was conducted that consecutively included patients with AHF diagnosed in 9HEDs during 4 periods (2007, 2009, 2011 and 2014). The study analysed the changes observed in 20 variables corresponding to baseline data, outpatient care and emergency care data and outcome data. A total of 4,845 patients were included. There were significant changes in 13 variables: there was an increase in patients older than 80years (2007/2014: 45.9%/55.4%; P<.001) and a decrease in severe functional dependence (28.2%/19.7%; P<.001). In terms of long-term outpatient care, there was an increased use of beta-blockers (44.6%/57.8%; P=.002) and aldosterone antagonists (26.6%/37.7%; P<.05) among patients with reduced ejection fraction and an increase use of echocardiography (42.8%/56.2%; P=.001). The use of digoxin decreased (25.4%/16.9%; P=.005). In terms of emergency care, there was an increase in requests for troponins (54.6%/61.9%; P<.001), natriuretic peptides (7.8%/48.5%; P<.001) and the use of noninvasive ventilation (3.2%/6.9%; P=.004). Requests for endovenous perfusion drugs decreased (diuretics: 21.3%/10.4%; P<.001; nitrates: 21.3%/17.5%; P=.001; vasopressors: 4.2%/1.5%; P<.001). Finally, discharges directly from the emergency department without hospitalization increased (20.0%/25.9%; P<.001), and emergency department readmissions at 30days decreased (27.3%/17.6%; P=.007). Hospital mortality and mortality at 30days did not change. Changes in outcomes were detected during a 7-year period in patients with AHF treated in HEDs, with care that was more in line with the clinical guidelines. There are, however, areas for improvement. There was a noteworthy increase in outpatient follow-up without hospitalisation and a reduction in HED

  16. Impact on Quality of Life in Dermatology Patients Attending an Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegre-Sánchez, A; de Perosanz-Lobo, D; Pascual-Sánchez, A; Pindado-Ortega, C; Fonda-Pascual, P; Moreno-Arrones, Ó M; Jaén-Olasolo, P

    2017-12-01

    Dermatological complaints have been estimated to represent up to 5-10% of all the visits to emergency departments. The main objective of our study was to determine how affected is the Health related Quality of Life (HRQL) in a series of patients attending an emergency department due to skin symptoms. A prospective study during one month (July 2016) was conducted in a hospital with full-time on-call dermatologists. The Short-Form SF-12v2 Health Survey and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were offered to all the patients over 18 years old attending the emergency department with cutaneous complaints. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics were also collected. In total 108 patients completed the study. Mean age found was 45.1±16.1 years. Mean DLQI score found was 10.56±6.12. Fifty-three patients (49%) had a score of 11 or higher in the DLQI questionnaire. Most affected subscales were "Symptoms and Feelings" in DLQI scale and "Overall Health" and "Vitality" for the SF-12. A very significant difference (p<0.0001) was found between women's (12.4±5.7) and men's (7.5±5.6) DLQI mean score (mean difference of 4.9; 95% confidence interval of the difference: 2.7-7.1). Patients visiting emergency units with cutaneous complaints seem to feel a moderate-large impact on their quality of life which is mainly related to the symptoms and feelings that they are experiencing. This impact is significantly higher among women. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Decreasing non-value-added nursing time transporting stable patients from the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selph, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    In the emergency department (ED), one non-value-added task is transporting stable patients to telemetry units. This process improvement intervention introduces a decision tree to determine which patients are stable enough to be safely transported nonmonitored, thus more efficiently using valuable nursing time. A decision tree was utilized to determine which patients would be transported nonmonitored. A data collection instrument was completed at the time of each nonmonitored transport of a patient, and data were collected over a 4-month period. A total of 280 patients met the criteria to be transported nonmonitored from the ED to the inpatient unit during the data collection period, saving an average of 20.7 hr per month. With appropriate use of the decision tree, clinical staff successfully determined the need for monitored transport of patients admitted to non-intensive care unit telemetry units from the ED. There were no adverse patient events.

  18. [Troponin I values during rhabdomyolysis in elderly patients admitted to the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallon, Alain; Marjollet, Olivier; Berger, Christophe; Pouzet, Valérie; Chamson, Annette; Robert, Floriane; Guyomarch, Stéphane; Gonthier, Régis; Page, Yves; Bertrand, Jean-Claude

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the utility of determining serum cardiac troponin I (TcI) levels in the elderly. During the nine-month study period, all patients older than 70 years admitted to the emergency department presenting rhabdomyolysis (defined by creatine kinase>500 IU/L) were included in this prospective descriptive study, except for those with acute coronary syndrome or pulmonary embolism. Patients were classified into two groups according to their serum TcI level:>0.15 or0.15 ng/mL group and 37 in the other group. Clinical and laboratory indicators were similar in the two groups. In contrast, significantly more patients in the TcI>0.15 ng/mL group had been treated with a curative dose of heparin (14 versus 2, p=0.01). This difference between the two groups was noted in both the emergency department and other hospital units. Serum TcI levels were not correlated with creatine kinase levels. Concordance between emergency department diagnosis and discharge diagnosis was 95%. No patient was discharged with a diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome; one patient, with a serum TcI levelcases (6% in the TcI>0. 15 ng/mL group versus 8% in the other group). Mortality at six months was higher among patients with an elevated serum TcI level, but the difference was not significant (23% versus 8%, p=0.07). This study indicated a trend toward higher mortality among patients with elevated serum TcI levels, although the factors underlying these increased concentrations remain unclear.

  19. Emergency department thoracotomy for the critically injured patient: Objectives, indications, and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Ernest E

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the past three decades there has been a significant clinical shift in the performance of emergency department thoracotomy (EDT, from a nearly obligatory procedure before declaring any trauma patient to select patients undergoing EDT. The value of EDT in resuscitation of the patient in profound shock but not yet dead is unquestionable. Its indiscriminate use, however, renders it a low-yield and high-cost procedure. Overall analysis of the available literature indicates that the success of EDT approximates 35% in the patient arriving in shock with a penetrating cardiac wound, and 15% for all penetrating wounds. Conversely, patient outcome is relatively poor when EDT is done for blunt trauma; 2% survival in patients in shock and less than 1% survival with no vital signs. Patients undergoing CPR upon arrival to the emergency department should be stratified based upon injury and transport time to determine the utility of EDT. The optimal application of EDT requires a thorough understanding of its physiologic objectives, technical maneuvers, and the cardiovascular and metabolic consequences.

  20. Packaging Patients and Handing Them Over: Communication Context and Persuasion in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugus, Peter; McCarthy, Sally; Holdgate, Anna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Schoenmakers, Anne; Wagner, Cordula

    2017-02-01

    Communication is commonly understood by health professional researchers to consist of relatively isolated exchanges of information. The social and organizational context is given limited credit. This article examines the significance of the environmental complexity of the emergency department (ED) in influencing communication strategies and makes the case for adopting a richer understanding of organizational communication. This study draws on approximately 12 months (1,600 hours) of ethnographic observations, yielding approximately 4,500 interactions across 260 clinicians and staff in the EDs of 2 metropolitan public teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. The study identifies 5 communication competencies of increasing complexity that emergency clinicians need to accomplish. Furthermore, it identifies several factors-hierarchy, formally imposed organizational boundaries and roles, power, and education-that contribute to the collective function of ensuring smooth patient transfer through and out of the ED. These factors are expressed by and shape external communication with clinicians from other hospital departments. This study shows that handoff of patients from the ED to other hospital departments is a complex communication process that involves more than a series of "checklistable" information exchanges. Clinicians must learn to use both negotiation and persuasion to achieve objectives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hospitalisation in an emergency department short-stay unit compared to an internal medicine department is associated with fewer complications in older patients - an observational study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, Camilla; Mollerup, Talie Khadem; Kromberg, Laurits Schou

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Older patients are at particular risk of experiencing adverse events during hospitalisation. OBJECTIVE: To compare the frequencies and types of adverse events during hospitalisation in older persons acutely admitted to either an Emergency Department Short-stay Unit (SSU) or an Interna......, unplanned readmission, and nosocomial infection. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse events of hospitalisation were significantly less common in older patients acutely admitted to an Emergency Department Short-stay Unit as compared to admission to an Internal Medicine Department....

  2. Panic Disorder in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department With Chest Pain: Prevalence and Presenting Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Jaimi H; Hawkins, Tracey; Parsonage, William; Cullen, Louise

    2017-12-01

    Patients with panic disorder experience symptoms such as palpitations, chest pain, dizziness, and breathlessness. Consequently, they may attend the Emergency Department (ED) to be assessed for possible emergency medical conditions. Recognition of panic disorder within the ED is low. We sought to establish the prevalence of panic disorder in patients presenting for ED investigation of potential acute coronary syndrome. We also sought to characterise the cohort of patients with panic disorder in terms of presenting symptoms, risk factors, medical history and major adverse cardiac events (MACE). This was an observational study of 338 adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department of a tertiary hospital in Australia. Research nurses collected clinical data using a customised case report form. The outcome was panic disorder, assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The average age of participants was 50.2 years and 37.9% were female. Thirty-day MACE occurred in 7.7% of the cohort. The clinical diagnosis of panic disorder was made in 5.6% (95% CI: 3.4-8.6%) of patients. Compared to patients without panic disorder, patients with panic disorder were slightly more likely to report that their pain felt heavy (48.9% and 73.7% respectively, p=0.04). All other reported symptoms were similar in the two groups. The prevalence of panic disorder was low in patients presenting to an Australian ED with chest pain. Clinical signs or symptoms that are routinely collected as part of the chest pain workup cannot be used to distinguish patients with and without panic disorder. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). All rights reserved.

  3. A brief assessment of capacity to consent instrument in acutely intoxicated emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Marc L; Klein, Lauren R; Miner, James R; Cole, Jon B; Nystrom, Paul C; Holm, Kayla M; Biros, Michelle H

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine to what extent acute alcohol intoxication effects capacity to assent, consent, or refuse research participation. This was a prospective, observation study performed at our inner city, county hospital with >100,000 annual emergency department visits. Non-pregnant, English speaking patients older than 18 with evidence of acute alcohol intoxication were considered eligible. After medical screening, a trained research associate presented the study version of the University of California, San Diego Brief Assessment of Capacity to Consent (UBACC) tool. The primary outcome was the number of patients able to correctly respond to all 10 questions. Of 642 screened patients, 415 patients were enrolled and completed the tool. The mean alcohol concentration was 227mg/dL (range 25-500mg/dL). Sixteen patients (3.9%) answered all 10 questions correctly; by definition of the UBACC, these patients were deemed to possess capacity to consent. Mean alcohol concentrations in the capacity group were lower than in those lacking capacity; 182mg/dL (SD 6.7) versus 229mg/dL, (SD 7.9). Of the 287 patients who were interviewed upon sobriety at discharge, 182 patients (63.4%) did not recall completing the questionnaire. While intoxicated emergency department patients are able to complete the questionnaire, the majority do not possess capacity to provide informed consent to research. A minority of participants remember involvement once they have achieved sobriety, exception from informed consent protocols are needed to perform emergency research in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute management and outcomes of patients with diabetes mellitus presenting to Canadian emergency departments with hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Brian H; Singh, Mira; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Leiter, Lawrence A; Hramiak, Irene; Edmonds, Marcia L; Lang, Eddy; Sivilotti, Marco; Scheuermeyer, Frank; Worster, Andrew; Riley, Jennifer; Afilalo, Marc; Stiell, Ian; Yale, Jean-Francois; Woo, Vincent C; Campbell, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    This retrospective chart audit examined the demographics, investigations, management and outcomes of adult patients with diabetes mellitus presenting to Canadian emergency departments (EDs). All sites conducted a search of their electronic medical records using International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes to identify ED visits for hypoglycemia between 2008 and 2010. Patient characteristics, demographics, ED management, ED resources and outcome are reported. A total of 1039 patients over the age of 17 years were included in the study; 347 (33.4%) were classified as type 1 diabetes and 692 (66.6%) were classified as type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes patients were significantly older (73 vs. 49 years; pdiabetes required admission (30.3 vs. 8.8%). Discharge instructions were documented in only 55.5% of patients, and referral to diabetes services occurred in fewer than 20% of cases. Considerable variation existed in the management of hypoglycemia across EDs. Patients with diabetes presenting to an ED with hypoglycemia consume considerable healthcare resources, and practice variation exists. Emergency departments should develop protocols for the management of hypoglycemia, with attention to discharge planning to reduce recurrence. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Retrospective evaluation of patients with elevated digoxin levels at an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulsum Limon

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We investigated the demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings, treatment strategies and clinical outcomes of patients presenting at emergency department (ED with digoxin levels at or above 1.2 ng/ml. Materials and methods: The demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with serum digoxin levels at or above 1.2 ng/ml admitted to an ED between January 2010 and July 2011 were investigated in this cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients with ECG and clinical findings consistent with digoxin toxicity and no additional explanation of their symptoms were evaluated for digoxin toxicity. Results: In this study 137 patients were included, and 68.6% of patients were women with mean age 76.1 ± 12.2. There was no significant difference between gender and digoxin intoxication. The mean age of intoxicated group was significantly higher than the non-intoxicated group (P = 0.03. The most common comorbidities were congestive heart failure (n = 91 and atrial fibrillation (n = 74. The most common symptoms were nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. The levels of hospitalization and mortality in this group were significantly higher. Conclusion: Digoxin intoxication must be suspected in patients present in the ED, particularly those with complaints that include nausea and vomiting, as well as new ECG changes; serum digoxin levels must be determined. Keywords: Digoxin, Digoxin level, Intoxication, Emergency department

  6. Analysis of Patients Presenting to a Pediatric Emergency Department with Acute Limping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiha Şahin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limping is a common presenting complaint to a pediatric emergency department among children. The differential diagnosis of acute limp includes transient synovitis, trauma, infections, neoplasia, and congenital neuromuscular and developmental disorders. We aimed to evaluate patients presenting with acute limp to our pediatric emergency department and to analyze the clinical characteristics of the disease. In addition, we aimed to investigate the value of several laboratory parameters in early identification of septic and aseptic conditions. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed children under 18 years of age who were admitted to our emergency department with acute limping in a two-year period. Patients with any chronic diseases, any history of trauma, coagulopathy (as documented by blood clotting tests and any history of intramuscular injections within the previous week were excluded. The patients’ complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP levels, plain pelvic radiographs and ultrasonography reports were evaluated. The patients were classified as septic or aseptic according to their white blood cells (WBC, CRP and ESR values. Totally 120 patients were included in the study. The upper limit for WBC, ESR and CRP was accepted as 9000 cells/mm3, 20 mm/h and 0.8 mg/dL, respectively. Results: Of the total of 86 patients in the aseptic group, 81 had normal WBC, ESR and CRP levels and were diagnosed with transient synovitis, 2 female patients received the diagnosis of slipped upper femoral epiphysis, and 3 patients were diagnosed with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease during clinical follow-up. The remaining 34 patients with high ESR, WBC and CRP levels were included in the septic group in whom the following diagnoses were established during the follow-up: septic arthritis (n=12, Familial Mediterranean Fever (n=4, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (n=4, Guillain-Barré syndrome (n=3, osteomyelitis (n=3, acute

  7. Analysis of patients presenting to the emergency department with carbon monoxide intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selim Yurtseven

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Carbon monoxide is a potentially fatal form of poisoning. The exact incidence is unclear, due to cases being undiagnosed or reported as fewer than the real number. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is of proven efficacy in the treatment of CO intoxication.The purpose of this study was to describe the general characteristics of carbon monoxide (CO intoxications presenting to the emergency department and to investigate troponin I values and the effectiveness of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT in these patients. Material and methods: Patients presenting to the emergency department with CO intoxication over one year and patients with such intoxications receiving HBOT were examined retrospectively. Results: One hundred seventy-one patients were included; 140 (81.9% were poisoned by stoves, 18 (10.5% by hot water boilers and 10 in (5.8% by fires. COHb levels were normal in 49 of the 163 patients whose values were investigated, and were elevated in 114 patients. Mean COHb value was 16.6. Troponin I values were investigated in 112 patients. These were normal in 86 patients and elevated in 26. Mean troponin I value was 0.38 ng/ml. One hundred twenty-three of the 171 patients in the study were discharged in a healthy condition after receiving normobaric oxygen therapy, while 48 patients received HBOT. Forty-two (87.5% of the patients receiving HBOT were discharged in a healthy condition while sequelae persisted in five (10.4%. One patient died after 15 session of HBOT. Conclusion: Although elevated carboxyhemoglobin confirms diagnosis of CO intoxication, normal levels do not exclude it. Troponin I levels may rise in CO intoxication. No significant relation was observed between carboxyhemoglobin and receipt of HBOT. A significant correlation was seen, however, between troponin I levels and receipt of HBOT. Keywords: Carbon monoxide intoxication, Hyperbaric oxygen, Troponin I, Echocardiography

  8. Ethnic Disparities in Emergency Severity Index Scores among U.S. Veteran's Affairs Emergency Department Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vigil, Jacob M; Alcock, Joe; Coulombe, Patrick; McPherson, Laurie; Parshall, Mark; Murata, Allison; Brislen, Heather

    2015-01-01

    ... characteristics, and whether these differences varied among male and female Veterans Affairs (VA) ED patients. We used a large national database of electronic medical records of ED patients from twenty-two...

  9. Simulation modelling of a patient surge in an emergency department under disaster conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Gul

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of emergency departments (EDs in handling patient surges during disaster times using the available resources is very important. Many EDs require additional resources to overcome the bottlenecks in emergency systems. The assumption is that EDs consider the option of temporary staff dispatching, among other options, in order to respond to an increased demand or even the hiring temporarily non-hospital medical staff. Discrete event simulation (DES, a well-known simulation method and based on the idea of process modeling, is used for establishing ED operations and management related models. In this study, a DES model is developed to investigate and analyze an ED under normal conditions and an ED in a disaster scenario which takes into consideration an increased influx of disaster victims-patients. This will allow early preparedness of emergency departments in terms of physical and human resources. The studied ED is located in an earthquake zone in Istanbul. The report on Istanbul’s disaster preparedness presented by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA and Istanbul Metropolitan Municipality (IMM, asserts that the district where the ED is located is estimated to have the highest injury rate. Based on real case study information, the study aims to suggest a model on pre-planning of ED resources for disasters. The results indicate that in times of a possible disaster, when the percentage of red patient arrivals exceeds 20% of total patient arrivals, the number of red area nurses and the available space for red area patients will be insufficient for the department to operate effectively. A methodological improvement presented a different distribution function that was tested for service time of the treatment areas. The conclusion is that the Weibull distribution function used in service process of injection room fits the model better than the Gamma distribution function.

  10. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alley W

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available William Alley, Simon A Mahler Department of Emergency Medicine, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA Abstract: Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT; Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT; North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR; and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. Keywords: chest pain, decision aid, risk score, acute coronary syndrome

  11. The HEART Pathway randomized trial: identifying emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Simon A; Riley, Robert F; Hiestand, Brian C; Russell, Gregory B; Hoekstra, James W; Lefebvre, Cedric W; Nicks, Bret A; Cline, David M; Askew, Kim L; Elliott, Stephanie B; Herrington, David M; Burke, Gregory L; Miller, Chadwick D

    2015-03-01

    The HEART Pathway is a decision aid designed to identify emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge. No randomized trials have compared the HEART Pathway with usual care. Adult emergency department patients with symptoms related to acute coronary syndrome without ST-elevation on ECG (n=282) were randomized to the HEART Pathway or usual care. In the HEART Pathway arm, emergency department providers used the HEART score, a validated decision aid, and troponin measures at 0 and 3 hours to identify patients for early discharge. Usual care was based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. The primary outcome, objective cardiac testing (stress testing or angiography), and secondary outcomes, index length of stay, early discharge, and major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization), were assessed at 30 days by phone interview and record review. Participants had a mean age of 53 years, 16% had previous myocardial infarction, and 6% (95% confidence interval, 3.6%-9.5%) had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days of randomization. Compared with usual care, use of the HEART Pathway decreased objective cardiac testing at 30 days by 12.1% (68.8% versus 56.7%; P=0.048) and length of stay by 12 hours (9.9 versus 21.9 hours; P=0.013) and increased early discharges by 21.3% (39.7% versus 18.4%; P<0.001). No patients identified for early discharge had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days. The HEART Pathway reduces objective cardiac testing during 30 days, shortens length of stay, and increases early discharges. These important efficiency gains occurred without any patients identified for early discharge suffering MACE at 30 days. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT01665521. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Characteristics of patients and families who make early return visits to the pediatric emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logue EP

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Erin Patricia Logue,1 Samina Ali,2,3 Judith Spiers,4 Amanda S Newton,2,3 Janice A Lander4 1 Alberta Health Services, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, 3Women and Children’s Health Research Institute, 4Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to identify reasons why parents make early return visits, within 72 hours of discharge from a tertiary care pediatric emergency department (PED. A secondary objective was to investigate associated demographic and diagnostic variables. Methods: A survey was conducted with a convenience sample of parents of children returning to the PED within 72 hours of discharge. A chart review was also completed for consented survey participants. Recruitment occurred from September 2005 to August 2006 at the Stollery Children's Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Results: A total of 264 parents were approached to participate. Overall, 231 surveys were returned and 212 (92% charts were reviewed. The overall rate of early return during the study period was 5.4%. More than half of parents stated that they returned because their child's condition worsened and many parents (66.7% reported feeling stressed. Patients were typically under 6 years of age (67.4%, and most frequently diagnosed with infectious diseases (38.0%. Patients triaged with the Canadian Emergency Department Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS as CTAS 2 (emergent for initial visits were more likely to be admitted on return, regardless of age (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Variables associated with early returns included young age, diagnosis, triage acuity, and parental stress. Future variable definition should include a deeper exploration of modifiable factors such as parental stress and patient education. These next steps may help direct interventions and resources to address needs in this group and possibly pre-empt the need to return

  13. Inter-facility transfer of pediatric burn patients from U.S. Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A; Shi, Junxin; Groner, Jonathan I; Thakkar, Rajan K; Fabia, Renata; Besner, Gail E; Xiang, Huiyun; Wheeler, Krista K

    2016-11-01

    To describe the epidemiology of pediatric burn patients seen in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) and to determine factors associated with inter-facility transfer. We analyzed data from the 2012 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. Current American Burn Association (ABA) Guidelines were used to identify children burn centers. Burn patient admission volume was used as a proxy for burn expertise. Logistic models were fitted to examine the odds of transfer from low volume hospitals. In 2012, there were an estimated 126,742 (95% CI: 116,104-137,380) pediatric burn ED visits in the U.S. Of the 69,003 (54.4%) meeting referral criteria, 83.2% were in low volume hospitals. Only 8.2% of patients meeting criteria were transferred from low volume hospitals. Of the 52,604 (95% CI: 48,433-56,775) not transferred, 98.3% were treated and released and 1.7% were admitted without transfer; 54.7% of burns involved hands. Over 90% of pediatric burn ED patients meet ABA burn referral criteria but are not transferred from low volume hospitals. Perhaps a portion of the 92% of patients currently receiving definitive care in low volume hospitals are under-referred and would have improved clinical outcomes if transferred at the time of presentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Inter-Facility Transfer of Pediatric Burn Patients from U.S. Emergency Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sarah A.; Shi, Junxin; Groner, Jonathan I.; Thakkar, Rajan K.; Fabia, Renata; Besner, Gail E.; Xiang, Huiyun; Wheeler, Krista K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To describe the epidemiology of pediatric burn patients seen in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) and to determine factors associated with inter-facility transfer. Methods We analyzed data from the 2012 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. Current American Burn Association (ABA) Guidelines were used to identify children burn centers. Burn patient admission volume was used as a proxy for burn expertise. Logistic models were fitted to examine the odds of transfer from low volume hospitals. Results In 2012, there were an estimated 126,742 (95% CI: 116,104–137,380) pediatric burn ED visits in the U.S. Of the 69,003 (54.4%) meeting referral criteria, 83.2% were in low volume hospitals. Only 8.2% of patients meeting criteria were transferred from low volume hospitals. Of the 52,604 (95% CI: 48,433 – 56,775) not transferred, 98.3% were treated and released and 1.7% were admitted without transfer; 54.7% of burns involved hands. Conclusions Over 90% of pediatric burn ED patients meet ABA burn referral criteria but are not transferred from low volume hospitals. Perhaps a portion of the 92% of patients currently receiving definitive care in low volume hospitals are under-referred and would have improved clinical outcomes if transferred at the time of presentation. PMID:27554628

  15. Motivation of trauma patients to stop smoking after admission to the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss-Gerlach, E; Franck, M; Neuner, B

    2008-01-01

    was to prospectively compare the performance of each questionnaire at identifying patients who will successfully quit smoking within one year of Emergency Department (ED) discharge. Out of 1292 injured ED patients nearly half (n = 599, 46.4%) were identified as current smokers. Both questionnaires were given to all...... patients as ready to quit (A = 13% vs. 22.2%). At 12 month follow-up, 55 patients (17.9%) had stopped smoking. The HSH was more successful to predict quitters. Multivariate logistic regression with respect to smoking cessation resulted in significant impact of HSH (p = 0.024).......Every smoker should be offered smoking cessation treatment when they present for clinical care. The Readiness to Change-Smokers (RTC-S) questionnaire and the Heidelberg Smoking History (HSH) are brief questionnaires that divide patients into three stages. The purpose of this study...

  16. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Departments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To investigate a structured nursing intervention’s impact on geriatric patients’ unresolved problems and their use of help from the community health centre. Method: We conducted a prospective descriptive study of selected......Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80...... geriatric patients with nursing intervention at discharge and 1 and 6 months follow-up. Included were geriatric patients 70+ years discharged to their home October 2006-June 2008. Intervention: After detecting the geriatric patients planned to be discharged, the geriatric nurse in the ED did a brief...

  17. Seasonal variations of schizophrenic patients in emergency departments in Sofia, Bulgaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornitsa Spasova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to reveal the seasonal distribution of emergency department visits of schizophrenic patients in Sofia, Bulgaria. Methods: We collected daily data for visits of patients with schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders in the emergency center of the regional dispenser for mental disorders in the city of Sofia for the period 1998-2003. The total number of emergency visits was 5723 (mean daily visits: 5.04±2.4. T-test was used to compare the monthly and seasonal distribution of visits. Results: The season with the highest levels of emergency visits was summer, and the lowest levels were observed in winter (P<0.0001. Spring and autumn had intermediate values close to the mean value, and significantly differentiated from winter values. The month with the highest admission rates was September, followed by May and the three summer’s months. The lowest levels were observed in December, October and January, with statistically significant differences observed between the values of all the three months. Differences between July values compared with December and October values were significant, but not with January values. Conclusion: The study showed significant seasonal and monthly differences in emergency schizophrenics’ visits. The data confirm the outcome of similar studies conducted in countries with temperate climate in the Northern Hemisphere. These results could prove useful for psychiatrists, public health specialists, and governmental authorities dealing with team planning and prevention programs in the field of psychiatry.

  18. Initiating palliative care consults for advanced dementia patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kei; Wu, Mark; Medairos, Robert; Grudzen, Corita R; Balsells, Herberth; Marcus, David; Whitson, Micah; Ahmad, Danish; Duprey, Kael; Mancherje, Noel; Bloch, Helen; Jaffrey, Fatima; Liberman, Tara

    2014-03-01

    Patients with dementia, an underrecognized terminal illness, frequently visit the emergency department (ED). These patients may benefit from ED-initiated palliative care (PC) consultation. The study's objective was to track the rate of ED-initiated PC consultation for patients with advanced dementia (AD) after an educational intervention, and to categorize decision making for physicians who chose not to initiate consultation. As part of a quality improvement project at a suburban, tertiary care, university-affiliated medical center, emergency physicians (EPs) were taught to identify AD patients and initiate PC consultation. A convenience sample of patients over age 70 was screened for AD by research staff from July 1, 2012 to August 1, 2012 using the Functional Assessment Staging (FAST) criteria. A questionnaire was then administered to patients' physicians to inquire about barriers to initiating consultation. Questionnaires and medical records of those who met AD criteria were reviewed to examine patient characteristics, disposition information, and consultation initiation barriers. Patients (N=548) over 70 who visited the ED were approached and 304 completed the screening. Fifty-one of the 304 met criteria for AD. Their average age was 86; 33% were male. Eighteen of the 51 (35%) patients received a PC consultation sometime during their ED or hospital stay. Four of the 18 (22%) consultations were ED initiated. In 23 of 51 (45%) unique cases, physicians responded to the questionnaire. The majority felt that a PC consult was not appropriate for patients based on their knowledge, attitudes, or beliefs. Preexisting physician attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs prevent emergency physicians from addressing PC needs for AD patients.

  19. General characteristics of patients with electrolyte imbalance admitted to emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcı, Arif Kadri; Koksal, Ozlem; Kose, Ataman; Armagan, Erol; Ozdemir, Fatma; Inal, Taylan; Oner, Nuran

    2013-01-01

    Fluid and electrolyte balance is a key concept to understand for maintaining homeostasis, and for a successful treatment of many metabolic disorders. There are various regulating mechanisms for the equilibrium of electrolytes in organisms. Disorders of these mechanisms result in electrolyte imbalances that may be life-threatening clinical conditions. In this study we defined the electrolyte imbalance characteristics of patients admitted to our emergency department. This study was conducted in the Emergency Department (ED) of Uludag University Faculty of Medicine, and included 996 patients over 18 years of age. All patients had electrolyte imbalance, with various etiologies other than traumatic origin. Demographic and clinical parameters were collected after obtaining informed consent from the patients. The ethical committee of the university approved this study. The mean age of the patients was 59.28±16.79, and 55% of the patients were male. The common symptoms of the patients were dyspnea (14.7%), fever (13.7%), and systemic deterioration (11.9%); but the most and least frequent electrolyte imbalances were hyponatremia and hypermagnesemia, respectively. Most frequent findings in physical examination were confusion (14%), edema (10%) and rales (9%); and most frequent pathological findings in ECG were tachycardia in 24%, and atrial fibrillation in 7% of the patients. Most frequent comorbidity was malignancy (39%). Most frequent diagnoses in the patients were sepsis (11%), pneumonia (9%), and acute renal failure (7%). Electrolyte imbalances are of particular importance in the treatment of ED patients. Therefore, ED physicians must be acknowledged of their fluid-electrolyte balance dynamics and general characteristics.

  20. Patient satisfaction, stress and burnout in nursing personnel in emergency departments: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos-Risquez, M Isabel; García-Izquierdo, Mariano

    2016-07-01

    of the burnout dimensions, namely emotional exhaustion and cynicism. The length of stay of the patients in the emergency department was negatively related to the frequency of nurses experiencing perceived stress as well as the burnout dimension of cynicism. No significant association was observed between experiences of stress and burnout dimensions by nursing professionals and the satisfaction with care received reported by their patients. These findings could be explained by the professional and organizational characteristics of the unit. Finally, the limitations and implications of the study are discussed, as well as future research questions related to research of the associations between occupational stress, burnout and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  2. A Semantic-Based Model for Triage Patients in Emergency Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Guilherme; da Costa, Cristiano A; Righi, Rodrigo R

    2017-04-01

    Triage is a process performed in an emergency department that aims to sort patients according to their need for care. When performed speedily and correctly, this process can potentially increase the chances of survival for a patient with serious complications. This study aims to develop a computer model, called UbiTriagem, which supports the process of triage using the concepts of web semantics and ubiquitous computing focused on healthcare. For evaluating the proposal, we performed an analysis of scenario-driven triage based on previously determined ratings. In addition, we conducted a usability evaluation in emergency department with the developed prototype with two user groups: nurses and patients. The main scientific contribution is the automatic triage assessment based on the gathering of patient data on mobile devices, performed automatically through the use of a reasoning technique in an ontology. The results for all evaluations were very positive. The automatic triage assessment has been assertive in 93.3% of the cases and, after adjustments in the model, in 100% of the cases. Regarding user satisfaction, we obtained rates of 98.7% and 96% when considering perception of utility and ease of use, respectively.

  3. Evaluation of pregnant patients admitted to the emergency department with suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz Zengin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pregnancy period, the incidence of suicide attempt is lower compared to other life-periods. However, according to the recent studies, suicide attempts may lead life-threatening consequences in high-risk pregnant women. The aim of this study is to compare pregnant patients admitted to the emergency department for suicide attempt in terms of their sociodemographic and clinical properties and suicide attempt methods. Methods: In this study, 56 patients admitted to the emergency department of university for suicide attempt between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014, were included and they were classified according to suicide attempt methods into 2 groups as violent ones. Group 1 included violent methods as hanging, jumping, shooting and Group 2 included non-violent method as drugs. The study was a retrospective cross-sectional study. The sociodemographic, psychiatric and clinical properties of the patients were identified by patient registry system and patient files, and inter-group differences were compared. Results: In this study, 15 (26.7% patients in the violent suicide attempt group, and 41 (73.3% patients in the non-violent suicide attempt group, totally 56 patients were included. In the non-violent suicide attempt group, cigarette smoking, suicide attempt due to boredom, and live birth was significantly higher as compared to violent group; hospitalization period and fetal death was lower (p=0.04; p=0.006; p=0.004; p=0.004, respectively. Conclusion: Most of our pregnant suicide attempt patients are in the non-violent group, however, violent suicide attempt increased hospitalization period and fetal mortality significantly. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (2: 115-120

  4. Emergency department patients who stay more than 6 hours contribute to crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Philip L; Nathanson, Brian H; Li, Haiping; Smithline, Howard A; Blank, Fidela S J; Santoro, John P; Maynard, Ann M; Provost, Deborah A; Henneman, Elizabeth A

    2010-07-01

    Admitted and discharged patients with prolonged emergency department (ED) stays may contribute to crowding by utilizing beds and staff time that would otherwise be used for new patients. To describe patients who stay > 6 h in the ED and determine their association with measures of crowding. This was a retrospective, observational study carried out over 1 year at a single, urban, academic ED. Of the 96,562 patients seen, 16,017 (17%) stayed > 6 h (51% admitted). When there was at least one patient staying > 6 h, 60% of the time there was at least one additional patient in the waiting room who could not be placed in an ED bed because none was open. The walk-out rate was 0.34 patients/hour when there were no patients staying in the ED > 6 h, vs. 0.77 patients/hour walking out when there were patients staying > 6 h in the ED (p 6 h, a trend was noted between increasing numbers of patients staying in the ED > 6 h and the percentage of time the ED was on ambulance diversion (p = 0.011). In our ED, having both admitted and discharged patients staying > 6 h is associated with crowding. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Are patients admitted to emergency departments with regular supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) treated appropriately?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Vinit; Corden, Benjamin; Abdul-Mukith, Kibria; Harris, Tim; Schilling, Richard John

    2013-04-01

    Regular supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is frequently encountered in clinical practice. Guidelines are available from the National Service Framework (NSF) for the treatment of patients attending emergency departments (ED) with SVT. These recommend a thyroid-function test (TFT) and arrhythmia electrocardiography (ECG), and referral to a heart-rhythm specialist on discharge. Hospital admission is rarely required. In our multicentre study, we examined the implementation of these guidelines among patients attending the ED with SVT. Only 34% of patients had specialist referrals, with an average wait of 50.3 days (the majority of delays resulted from referral requests from general practitioners). A history of previous SVT, the mode of tachycardia termination, patient age and/or comorbidities were similar for the 27 (23.5%) patients who were admitted overnight. Of these, 15 (13%) of the total 115 patients who attended ED with regular SVT were referred for Holter monitoring despite having ECGs demonstrating arrhythmia. Low referral rates, unnecessary investigations and admissions indicate a need for improvement for better patient care and to minimise healthcare costs. We have formulated a standard operating procedure, which will be available via the College of Emergency Medicine website.

  6. Nursing Assessment and Intervention to Geriatric Patients Discharged From Emergency Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosted, Elizabeth Emilie; Poulsen, Ingrid; Hendriksen, Carsten

    Background: Geriatric patients recently discharged from hospital are at risk of unplanned readmissions and admission to nursing home. When discharged directly from Emergency Department (ED) the risk increases, as time pressure often requires focus on the presenting problem, although 80...... % of geriatric patients have complex and often unresolved caring needs. Objective: To examine the effect of a two-stage nursing assessment and intervention to address the patients uncompensated problems given just after discharge from ED and one and six months after. Method: We conducted a prospective......, randomized, controlled trial with follow-up at one and six months. Included were patients >70 at increased risk of readmission and functional decline (had an ISAR 1 score of 2-6 points) and discharged home in the period 16th of February 2009 to 31st of January 2011, N=271. Intervention: A nurse did a brief...

  7. Role of Quantitative Wall Motion Analysis in Patients with Acute Chest Pain at Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Na, Sang-Hoon; Park, Jin-Sik

    2017-03-01

    Evaluation of acute chest pain in emergency department (ED), using limited resource and time, is still very difficult despite recent development of many diagnostic tools. In this study, we tried to determine the applicability of new semi-automated cardiac function analysis tool, velocity vector imaging (VVI), in the evaluation of the patients with acute chest pain in ED. We prospectively enrolled 48 patients, who visited ED with acute chest pain, and store images to analyze VVI from July 2005 to July 2007. In 677 of 768 segments (88%), the analysis by VVI was feasible among 48 patients. Peak systolic radial velocity (Vpeak) and strain significantly decreased according to visual regional wall motion abnormality (Vpeak, 3.50 ± 1.34 cm/s for normal vs. 3.46 ± 1.52 cm/s for hypokinesia, 2.51 ± 1.26 for akinesia, p patient with acute chest pain at ED.

  8. Prognosis and risk factors for deterioration in patients admitted to a medical emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Brabrand, Mikkel; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients that initially appear stable on arrival to the hospital often have less intensive monitoring of their vital signs, possibly leading to excess mortality. The aim was to describe risk factors for deterioration in vital signs and the related prognosis among patients with normal...... vital signs at arrival to a medical emergency department (MED). DESIGN AND SETTING: Single-centre, retrospective cohort study of all patients admitted to the MED from September 2010-August 2011. SUBJECTS: Patients were included when their vital signs (systolic blood pressure, pulse rate, respiratory...... presentation, 1440/4292 (33.6%) had all normal vital signs and were included in study, 44.0% were male, median age 64 years (5th/95th percentile: 21-90 years) and 446/1440 (31.0%) deteriorated within 24 hours. Independent risk factors for deterioration included age 65-84 years odds ratio (OR): 1.79 (95...

  9. Impact of Post-Intubation Interventions on Mortality in Patients Boarding in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency physicians frequently perform endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. The impact of instituting early post-intubation interventions on patients boarding in the emergency department (ED is not well studied. We sought to determine the impact of postintubation interventions (arterial blood gas sampling, obtaining a chest x-ray (CXR, gastric decompression, early sedation, appropriate initial tidal volume, and quantitative capnography on outcomes of mortality, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP, ventilator days, and intensive care unit (ICU length-of-stay (LOS. Methods: This was an observational, retrospective study of patients intubated in the ED at a large tertiary-care teaching hospital and included patients in the ED for greater than two hours postintubation. We excluded them if they had incomplete data, were designated “do not resuscitate,” were managed primarily by the trauma team, or had surgery within six hours after intubation. Results: Of 169 patients meeting criteria, 15 died and 10 developed VAP. The mortality odds ratio (OR in patients receiving CXR was 0.10 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.98, and 0.11 (95% CI 0.03 to 0.46 in patients receiving early sedation. The mortality OR for patients with 3 or fewer interventions was 4.25 (95% CI 1.15 to 15.75 when compared to patients with 5 or more interventions. There was no significant relationship between VAP rate, ventilator days, or ICU LOS and any of the intervention groups. Conclusion: The performance of a CXR and early sedation as well as performing five or more vs. three or fewer post-intubation interventions in boarding adult ED patients was associated with decreased mortality. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:708-711

  10. [Prescription errors in patients admitted to an internal medicine department from the emergency room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Paúls, L; González Alvarez, I; Requena Caturla, T; Fernández Capitán, M C

    2006-01-01

    To identify and quantify emergency room prescription errors upon patient admission in an internal medicine unit, assess their severity and causes, and evaluate their potential clinical impact. Discrepancies found between emergency room and internal medicine unit prescriptions were analyzed by 4th-year resident pharmacists. Prescription errors were collected and classified according to their severity and potential morbidity, and a medical analysis of service value was performed according to Overhage's method. Furthermore, pharmacist actions regarding therapeutic regimen optimization are described. Of 177 patients, 50 had prescription errors, for a total of 141 errors. Seven percent of prescriptions had an error. Mean errors per patient amounted to 0.8 (SD 1.51). Most commonly involved medications included anti-asthmatic and anti-infectious agents, and fluid therapy agents. On severity assessment 12.8% were considered severe, and 57.4% were considered significant. The main cause was omission of a needed therapy. Potential pharmacotherapeutic morbidity is related to adverse effects and cardiovascular disease. Medical assessment considered 12% very significant, and 52% significant. Pharmacist actions were directed towards effectiveness improvement in 57% of cases, and safety in 43.2% of cases. Emergency departments, as main entry points for patient admission to hospital, should be considered a priority in prescription quality improvement programs.

  11. How much risk are emergency department patients willing to accept to avoid diagnostic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Padalecki

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There is a paucity of research evaluating the risk tolerance of Emergency Department (ED patients. We hypothesized that a significant percentage of ED patients surveyed would be comfortable with ≥5% risk of adverse outcome if they avoided testing in several hypothetical scenarios. Materials and methods: This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of stable inner-city ED patients. Patients completed a written survey and were asked four closed-answer questions regarding risk tolerance/willingness to refuse a test/procedure, including the following scenarios: #1: LP following CT head; #2 overnight serial troponins for rule out myocardial infarction; #3 CT for possible appendicitis, #4 parent deciding whether child should undergo head CT for low risk head injury. Risk preferences were stratified to ≥5% (high and <5% (low. Multivariate logistic regressions performed for each scenario to control for confounding factors. Results: There were 217 patients in the study group; mean age 42 ± 15 years, 48% female, 66% Hispanic, 87% income < $40,000 income group. A substantial percentage of patients rated high risk tolerance for each scenario, including 31% for #1 (avoid LP, 25% for #2 (avoid cardiac rule-out admission, 27% for #3 (avoid CT for appendicitis, and 19% for #4 (avoid head CT for child. Discussion: For 3 of 4 scenarios, 25% or more of our patients would accept a high risk tolerance of adverse outcome to avoid further testing. Conclusion: Our findings contribute further evidence to the growing body of literature supporting patient interest in shared decision making in the ED. Keywords: Risk tolerance, Emergency department, Shared decision making

  12. Patients' knowledge about paracetamol (acetaminophen): a study in a French hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjemai, Y; Mbida, P; Potinet-Pagliaroli, V; Géffard, F; Leboucher, G; Brazier, J-L; Allenet, B; Charpiat, B

    2013-07-01

    Paracetamol is the most widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug. In France, little is known concerning patients' knowledge and beliefs about paracetamol. To determine how much outpatients attending an emergency department know about paracetamol. A semi-structured questionnaire was applied to patients consulting for non-severe medical or traumatic conditions. Thirty-three (45%) of 73 participating patients knew that paracetamol was the active ingredient of the medication they used to reduce pain and/or fever. Three patients thought 2g was the maximum recommended single dose; 25% thought that a delay between two doses ≤ 3 hours was recommended and 15% thought the maximum daily dose was > 4 g. While 8% cited liver toxicity as a side effect, 38% did not believe an excessive dose could be fatal. Two patients correctly answered all questions and five gave no correct answer. Outpatients attending an emergency department (ED) have poor knowledge about paracetamol. This situation is disturbing and our results may serve as an eye opener to healthcare professionals. They emphasize the need for research programs with the following objectives: a) to determine the actual content of the message delivered by healthcare professionals; b) to study conditions under which this message is issued; c) to analyze how patients understand key messages and what their behavioral response is. In ED patients, the level of knowledge about paracetamol is insufficient to ensure its safe use in ambulatory care. Further studies are needed to determine the causes and to permit better patient education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Consensus statement on advancing research in emergency department operations and its impact on patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Ward, Michael J; Chang, Anna Marie; Pines, Jesse M; Jouriles, Nick; Yealy, Donald M

    2015-06-01

    The consensus conference on "Advancing Research in Emergency Department (ED) Operations and Its Impact on Patient Care," hosted by The ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), convened to craft a framework for future investigations in this important but understudied area. The EDOSG is a research consortium dedicated to promoting evidence-based clinical practice in emergency medicine. The consensus process format was a modified version of the NIH Model for Consensus Conference Development. Recommendations provide an action plan for how to improve ED operations study design, create a facilitating research environment, identify data measures of value for process and outcomes research, and disseminate new knowledge in this area. Specifically, we call for eight key initiatives: 1) the development of universal measures for ED patient care processes; 2) attention to patient outcomes, in addition to process efficiency and best practice compliance; 3) the promotion of multisite clinical operations studies to create more generalizable knowledge; 4) encouraging the use of mixed methods to understand the social community and human behavior factors that influence ED operations; 5) the creation of robust ED operations research registries to drive stronger evidence-based research; 6) prioritizing key clinical questions with the input of patients, clinicians, medical leadership, emergency medicine organizations, payers, and other government stakeholders; 7) more consistently defining the functional components of the ED care system, including observation units, fast tracks, waiting rooms, laboratories, and radiology subunits; and 8) maximizing multidisciplinary knowledge dissemination via emergency medicine, public health, general medicine, operations research, and nontraditional publications. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  14. Emergency Department Patient Perspectives on the Risk of Addiction to Prescription Opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrardy, Michael; Lank, Patrick; Cameron, Kenzie A; McConnell, Ryan; Chevrier, Alison; Sears, Jill; Ahlstrom, Eric; Wolf, Michael S; Courtney, D Mark; McCarthy, Danielle M

    2016-01-01

    To characterize emergency department (ED) patients' knowledge and beliefs about the addictive potential of opioids. Mixed methods analysis of data from a randomized controlled trial. Urban academic ED (>88,000 visits). One hundred and seventy four discharged ED patients prescribed hydrocodone-acetaminophen for acute pain. The study analyzed data collected from a randomized controlled trial investigating patients' knowledge of opioids. ED patients discharged with hydrocodone-acetaminophen completed an audio-recorded phone interview 4–7 days later. This analysis focuses on responses about addiction. Responses were categorized using content analysis; thematic analysis identified broad themes common across different categories. Participants' mean age was 45.5 years (SD, 14.8), 58.6% female, 50.6% white, and the majority had an orthopedic diagnosis (24.1% back pain, 52.3% other injuries). Responses were categorized first based on whether the patient believed that opioids could be addictive (categorized as: yes, 58.7%; no, 19.5%; depends, 17.2%; or do not know, 4.6%), and second based on whether or not the patient discussed his/her own experience with the medication (categorized as: personalized, 35.6%; or not personalized, 64.4%). Cohen's Kappa was 0.84 for all categories. Three themes emerged in the thematic analysis: theme 1) patients expect to “feel” addicted if they are addicted, theme 2) patients fear addiction, and theme 3) side effects affected patient views of addiction. In this sample, patients had misconceptions about opioid addiction. Some patients did not know opioids could be addictive, others underestimated their personal risk of addiction, and others overtly feared addiction and, therefore, risked inadequate pain management. Despite limited data, we recommend providers discuss opioid addiction with their patients. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. 2016. This work is written by US Government

  15. Does Spanish instruction for emergency medicine resident physicians improve patient satisfaction in the emergency department and adherence to medical recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, L R; Waterbrook, A L; Garst Orozco, J; Johnston, D; Bellafiore, A; Davies, C; Nuño, T; Fatás-Cabeza, J; Beita, O; Ng, V; Grall, K H; Adamas-Rappaport, W

    2016-01-01

    After emergency department (ED) discharge, Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency are less likely than English-proficient patients to be adherent to medical recommendations and are more likely to be dissatisfied with their visit. To determine if integrating a longitudinal medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into emergency medicine residency didactics improves patient satisfaction and adherence to medical recommendations in Spanish-speaking patients with limited English proficiency. Our ED has two Emergency Medicine Residency Programs, University Campus (UC) and South Campus (SC). SC program incorporates a medical Spanish and cultural competency curriculum into their didactics. Real-time Spanish surveys were collected at SC ED on patients who self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking during registration and who were treated by resident physicians from both residency programs. Surveys assessed whether the treating resident physician communicated in the patient's native Spanish language. Follow-up phone calls assessed patient satisfaction and adherence to discharge instructions. Sixty-three patients self-identified as primarily Spanish-speaking from August 2014 to July 2015 and were initially included in this pilot study. Complete outcome data were available for 55 patients. Overall, resident physicians spoke Spanish 58% of the time. SC resident physicians spoke Spanish with 66% of the patients versus 45% for UC resident physicians. Patients rated resident physician Spanish ability as very good in 13% of encounters - 17% for SC versus 5% for UC. Patient satisfaction with their ED visit was rated as very good in 35% of encounters - 40% for SC resident physicians versus 25% for UC resident physicians. Of the 13 patients for whom Spanish was the language used during the medical encounter who followed medical recommendations, ten (77%) of these encounters were with SC resident physicians and three (23%) encounters were with UC

  16. Survey of Patient Knowledge and Expectations about a Free-Standing Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bucciarelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. A free-standing emergency department (FSED is defined as a facility that is structurally separate and distinct from a hospital and provides emergency care. Nationally, the number of FSEDs continues to grow, but the general public may have limited knowledge about the costs and services associated with FSEDs. The purpose of this paper is to survey patient knowledge and expectations about FSEDs. Methods. A convenience sample of patients presenting to a FSED was given a 19-item survey to complete. Results. 187 surveys were collected; 126 were included for analysis. 40% of respondents thought they could be seen by a specialist at the FSED, and 55% of patients did not know they had to be transferred for hospitalization if required. Most patients did not know that the cost of services at the FSED would be the same as that at the traditional ED. Convenience and perceived shorter wait times were the primary reasons patients selected the FSED for care. Conclusion. In general, patients do not have adequate knowledge about the costs and services associated with FSEDs. Education through marketing and advertising may be helpful in creating more public awareness about FSEDs.

  17. Management and educational status of adult anaphylaxis patients at emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Park, Chan Sun; Jeong, Jae-Won

    2017-12-28

    We evaluated the management and educational status of adult anaphylaxis patients at emergency departments (EDs). Anaphylaxis patients who visited ED from 2011 to 2013 were enrolled from three hospitals. We analyzed clinical features, prior history of anaphylaxis, management and provided education for etiology and/or prevention. For analyzing associated factors with epinephrine injection, Pearson chi-square test was used by SPSS version 21 (IBM Co.). A total of 194 anaphylaxis patients were enrolled. Ninety-nine patients (51%) visited ED by themselves. Time interval from symptom onset to ED visit was 62 ± 70.5 minutes. Drug (56.2%) was the most frequent cause of anaphylaxis. Forty-seven patients (24.2%) had prior history of anaphylaxis and 33 patients had same suspicious cause with current anaphylaxis. Cutaneous (88.7%) and respiratory (72.7%) symptoms were frequent. Hypotension was presented in 114 patients (58.8%). Mean observation time in ED was 12 ± 25.7 hours and epinephrine was injected in 114 patients (62%). In 68 patients, epinephrine was injected intramuscularly with mean dose of 0.3 ± 0.10 mg. Associated factor with epinephrine injection was hypotension (p = 0.000). Twenty-three patients (13%) were educated about avoidance of suspicious agent. Epinephrine auto-injectors were prescribed only in five patients. Only 34 (19%) and 72 (40%) patients were consulted to allergist at ED and outpatient allergy department respectively. We suggested that management and education of anaphylaxis were not fully carried out in ED. An education and promotion program on anaphylaxis is needed for medical staff.

  18. Impact on patient outcome of emergency department length of stay prior to ICU admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gigorro, R; de la Cruz Vigo, F; Andrés-Esteban, E M; Chacón-Alves, S; Morales Varas, G; Sánchez-Izquierdo, J A; Montejo González, J C

    2017-05-01

    The favorable evolution of critically ill patients is often dependent on time-sensitive care intervention. The timing of transfer to the intensive care unit (ICU) therefore may be an important determinant of outcomes in critically ill patients. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact upon patient outcome of the length of stay in the Emergency Care Department. A single-center ambispective cohort study was carried out. A general ICU and Emergency Care Department (ED) of a single University Hospital. We included 269 patients consecutively transferred to the ICU from the ED over an 18-month period. Patients were first grouped into different cohorts based on ED length of stay (LOS), and were then divided into two groups: (a) ED LOS ≤5h and (b) ED LOS >5h. Demographic, diagnostic, length of stay and mortality data were compared among the groups. Median ED LOS was 277min (IQR 129-622). Patients who developed ICU complications had a longer ED LOS compared to those who did not (349min vs. 209min, p5h. The odds ratio of dying for patients with ED LOS >5h was 2.5 (95% CI 1.3-4.7). Age and sepsis diagnosis were the risk factors associated to prolongation of ED length of stay. A prolonged ED stay prior to ICU admission is related to the development of time-dependent complications and increased mortality. These findings suggest possible benefit from earlier ICU transfer and the prompt initiation of organ support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  19. Errors in fracture diagnoses in the emergency department--characteristics of patients and diurnal variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallas, Peter; Ellingsen, Trond

    2006-01-01

    Evaluation of the circumstances related to errors in diagnosis of fractures at an Emergency Department may suggest ways to reduce the incidence of such errors.......Evaluation of the circumstances related to errors in diagnosis of fractures at an Emergency Department may suggest ways to reduce the incidence of such errors....

  20. Mortality and prognostic factors of patients who have blood cultures performed in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prier Lindvig, Katrine; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Henriksen, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    .6 (95% CI 3.6-6.0)], at least two organ failure [HR 3.6 (2.9-4.5)], bacteraemia [HR 1.4 (1.1-1.8)], Charlson Comorbidity Index of at least 2 h [HR 1.7 (1.3-2.0)], SIRS [HR 1.5 (1.2-1.7)], a history of alcohol dependency [HR 1.7 (1.3-2.3)] and late drawing of blood cultures 24-48 h after arrival [HR 1......, bacteraemia, Charlson Comorbidity Index of at least 2, SIRS, a history of alcohol dependency and late drawing of blood cultures.......BACKGROUND: Early identification and treatment of patients with severe infection improve their prognosis. The aims of this study were to describe the 30-day mortality and to identify prognostic factors among blood-cultured patients in a medical emergency department (MED). PATIENTS AND METHODS...

  1. Complaints and Diagnoses of Emergency Department Patients in the Netherlands: A Comparative Study of Integrated Primary and Emergency Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A M H Thijssen

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands, an increasing number of emergency departments (EDs and general practitioner cooperatives collaborate by creating one Emergency-Care-Access-Point (ECAP. This has resulted in fewer patients at ECAP EDs. The objective of this study was to explore differences in patient characteristics, presented complaints and ED discharge diagnoses between EDs with an ECAP and EDs without an ECAP.A retrospective observational study was performed with 1800 consecutive patient records sampled from six EDs spread over the Netherlands in 2013. We extracted data on time and date of presentation, sex, age, presenting complaint, discharge diagnosis, origin and follow up.At ECAP EDs, the mean age was 47.8 years (95%CI 46.1-49.4 compared to 41.3 (95%CI 39.7-42.9. Compared to non-ECAP EDs, more patients were referred by medical professionals (74.7% versus 46.8%, more patients received hospital admission (45.2% versus 29.0% and fewer patients received GP follow-up (4.1% versus 16.9%. There was no significant difference in presenting complaints between ECAP and non-ECAP EDs. Most prevalent complaints were trauma (25.7% versus 29.7%, abdominal pain (12.1% versus 10.9% and general symptoms (7.8% versus 4.8%. The most prevalent ED diagnoses significantly differed with fractures and dislocations (10.8%, sprains and strains (10.4% and respiratory infections (6.8% at ECAP EDs versus fractures and dislocations (10.7%, wounds (9.3% and sprains and strains (8.9% at non-ECAP EDs.Compared to non-ECAP EDs, patients at ECAP EDs were older, medical professionals referred more patients and more patients received a hospital admission. We found some small differences in discharge diagnoses between ECAP EDs compared to non-ECAP EDs, but no difference in presented complaints.

  2. Shock in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon Gitz; Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The knowledge of the frequency and associated mortality of shock in the emergency department (ED) is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, all-cause mortality and factors associated with death among patients suffering shock in the ED. METHODS: Population...

  3. Understanding Emergency Department 72-Hour Revisits Among Medicaid Patients Using Electronic Healthcare Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James; Hendler, James; Bennett, Kristin P

    2015-12-01

    Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) have the potential to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs by providing quality metrics, discovering actionable insights, and supporting decision-making to improve future outcomes. Within the United States Medicaid Program, rates of recidivism among emergency department (ED) patients serve as metrics of hospital performance that help ensure efficient and effective treatment within the ED. We analyze ED Medicaid patient data from 1,149,738 EHRs provided by a hospital over a 2-year period to understand the characteristics of the ED return visits within a 72-hour time frame. Frequent flyer patients with multiple revisits account for 47% of Medicaid patient revisits over this period. ED encounters by frequent flyer patients with prior 72-hour revisits in the last 6 months are thrice more likely to result in a readmit than those of infrequent patients. Statistical L1-logistic regression and random forest analyses reveal distinct patterns of ED usage and patient diagnoses between frequent and infrequent patient encounters, suggesting distinct opportunities for interventions to improve efficacy of care and streamline ED workflow. This work forms a foundation for future development of predictive models, which could flag patients at high risk of revisiting.

  4. Characteristics and resource utilization of patients presenting to the emergency department from mass gathering events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, Joshua M; Hebert, Charles L; Novak, Matthew; Mahmood, Sajid; Peksa, Gary D

    2017-11-06

    At many mass gathering events (MGEs), emergency medical services decrease the number of patient transfers to the hospital; however, little information is known regarding the characteristics of attendees presenting to or requiring transfer to the emergency department (ED). The purpose of this study is to describe the characteristics of patients presenting from MGEs to the ED. A secondary aim of this study is to describe ED resources utilized by these patients. This was a single-center, retrospective review evaluating patients attending MGEs who presented to the ED. Electronic medical records of patients seen in the ED of a tertiary academic medical center between October 13, 2013 and December 31, 2015 were reviewed and a descriptive analysis performed. We reviewed and included 209 patients. The majority of patients presenting to the ED were from large outdoor concerts (n=186, 89%), young (median age 20years), single (n=156, 87%) and had no past medical history (n=114, 63%). Alcohol use was reported in a majority (n=140, 78%) and polysubstance use in over a quarter of patients (n=55, 31%). The most frequently administered medications were intravenous fluids (n=94, 52%) and antiemetics (n=59, 33%). The majority of patients (n=161, 89%) were discharged directly from the ED, and median length of stay in the ED was 3.3h [IQR 2.3 to 5.3]. Patients presenting to the ED from MGEs generally required minimal medical care beyond supportive management with low rates of hospital admission. Further controlled studies are needed to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lactate Clearance Predicts Survival Among Patients in the Emergency Department with Severe Sepsis

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    Sundeep R. Bhat

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lactate clearance has been implicated as a predictor of mortality among emergency department (ED patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. We aimed to validate prior studies showing that lactate clearance during the ED stay is associated with decreased mortality. Methods: Retrospective dual-centered cross-sectional study using patients identified in the YaleNew Haven Hospital Emergency Medicine sepsis registry with severe sepsis or septic shock who had initial lactate levels measured in the ED and upon arrival (<24 hours to the hospital floor. Lactate clearance was calculated as percent of serum lactate change from ED to floor measurement. We compared mortality and hospital interventions between patients who cleared lactate and those who did not. Results: 207 patients (110 male; 63.17±17.9 years were included. Two reviewers extracted data with 95% agreement. One hundred thirty-six patients (65.7% had severe sepsis and 71 patients (34.3% had septic shock. There were 171 patients in the clearance group and 36 patients in the non-clearance group. The 28-day mortality rates were 15.2% in the lactate clearance group and 36.1% in the non-clearance group (p<0.01. Vasopressor support was initiated more often in the nonclearance group (61.1% than in the clearance group (36.8%, p<0.01 and mechanical ventilation was used in 66.7% of the non-clearance group and 36.3% of the clearance group (p=0.001. Conclusion: Patients who do not clear their lactate in the ED have significantly higher mortality than those with decreasing lactate levels. Our results are confirmatory of other literature supporting that lactate clearance may be used to stratify mortality-risk among patients with severe sepsis or septic shock.

  6. How Long Are Patients Willing to Wait in the Emergency Department Before Leaving Without Being Seen?

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    Michael N Brodeur

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our goal was to evaluate patients’ threshold for waiting in an emergency department(ED waiting room before leaving without being seen (LWBS. We analyzed whether willingness to wait was influenced by perceived illness severity, age, race, triage acuity level, or insurance status.Methods: We conducted this survey-based study from March to July 2010 at an urban academic medical center. After triage, patients were given a multiple-choice questionnaire, designed to as certain how long they would wait for medical care. We collected data including age, gender, race,insurance status, and triage acuity level. We looked at the association between willingness to wait and these variables, using stratified analysis and logistic regression.Results: Of the 375 patients who were approached, 340 (91% participated. One hundred seventy one(51% were willing to wait up to 2 hours before leaving, 58 (17% would wait 2 to 8 hours, and110 (32% would wait indefinitely. No association was found between willingness to wait and race,gender, insurance status, or perceived symptom severity. Patients willing to wait >2 hours tended to be older than 25, have higher acuity, and prefer the study site ED.Conclusion: Many patients have a defined, limited period that they are willing to wait for emergency care. In our study, 50% of patients were willing to wait up to 2 hours before leaving the ED without being seen. This result suggests that efforts to reduce the percentage of patients who LWBS must factor in time limits.

  7. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

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    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Sands, Daniel Z. [Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Edlow, Jonathan [Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  8. Emergency department septic shock patient mortality with refractory hypotension vs hyperlactatemia: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    April, Michael D; Donaldson, Chase; Tannenbaum, Lloyd I; Moore, Tyler; Aguirre, Jose; Pingree, Alexander; Lantry, James H

    2017-10-01

    Our objective was to compare in-hospital mortality among emergency department (ED) patients meeting trial-based criteria for septic shock based upon whether presenting with refractory hypotension (systolic blood pressurerefractory hypotension or hyperlactatemia. Trained chart abstractors blinded to the study hypothesis double entered data from each patient's record including demographics, clinical data, treatments, and in-hospital mortality. We compared in-hospital mortality among patients with isolated refractory hypotension, isolated hyperlactatemia, or both. We also calculated odds ratios (ORs) via logistic regression for in-hospital mortality based on presence of refractory hypotension or hyperlactatemia. Of 202 patients included in the analysis, 38 (18.8%) died during hospitalization. Mortality was 10.9% among 101 patients with isolated refractory hypotension, 24.4% among 41 patients with isolated hyperlactatemia, and 28.3% among 60 patients with both (p=0.01). Logistic regression analyses yielded in-hospital mortality OR for refractory hypotension of 1.3 (95% CI 0.5-3.8) versus OR for hyperlactatemia of 2.9 (95% CI 1.2-7.4). Hyperlactatemia appears associated with higher in-hospital mortality compared to refractory hypotension among ED patients with septic shock. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Emergency department care of seizure patients: demographic trends in southern Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Ellen; Chong, Jenny; Drake, Kendra; Labiner, David M

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of epilepsy and characteristics of patients with seizures who presented at the Yuma Regional Medical Center Emergency Department (YRMC ED) from 2005 to 2008. A seizure diagnosis was present in 2.7% of the patients, and accounted for 1.7% of all ED visits. Visits by patients identified as having epilepsy accounted for 0.3% of all ED visits. Patients with seizures were 2.8 times more likely to have used the ED for 2 or more years of the study period compared with control patients. Patients with at least one ED visit because of seizures were more likely to have multiyear visits, 43.6% visiting the ED within 2 or more years. Patients with epilepsy and seizures were significantly younger than the no-seizure control group. Patients who had ever been admitted to the ED for seizures or epilepsy had higher ED utilization even if the subsequent admissions were not seizure related. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The use of a new automatic device for patients' assessment at Triage in Emergency Department

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    Salvatore Di Somma

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess time saving in an Emergency Department arising out of the introduction of automatic devices (Carescape™ V100 to measure vital signs compared to the manual devices. Methods: We performed a prospective, observational study of eligible patients referring to Sant’Andrea Hospital Emergency Department during the entire month of October 2009, randomly assigned into two groups. In the first group of 476 patients vital signs measurements were detected with manual devices, while in the second group of 477 patients with automatic device Carescape™ V100. Results: Data indicated that the comparison of the total time between the two groups gave a significant difference (1993 vs 1518 min, p < 0.001. No differences were found with respect to age, sex and priority codes. Significant differences were also found when comparing the subgroups of the same acuity categories: white codes 4.33 vs 2.27 (min, p < 0.05; green codes 4.28 vs 3.37 (min, p < 0.001; yellow codes 3.92 vs 2.72 (min, p < 0.001. Conclusions: Our data demonstrated a statistical significance between the two groups with a difference of 475 minutes spent in Triage procedures including vital signs measurements. In conclusion time saved by vital signs automatic device could allow ED physicians to make a qualified approach with an earlier diagnosis and a more rapid and effective therapy, possibly improving patients’ outcomes. ABSTRACT of data concerning vital signs quality assessment, because we did not compare the two methods in the same patient and we did not correlate Triage priority evaluation with patients’ outcomes. In the future further studies should be specifically aimed to address this issue. In conclusion time saved by vital signs automatic device could allow ED physicians to make a qualified approach to patient with an earlier diagnosis and a more rapid and effective therapy, possibly improving patients’ outcomes.

  11. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  12. Demographic Analysis of Emergency Department Patients at the Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai

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    Wim Lammers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine is an upcoming discipline that is still under development in many countries. Therefore, it is important to gain insight into the organization and patients presenting to the Emergency Department (ED. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to provide an epidemiological description of complaints and referrals of the patients visiting the ED of the Ruijin Hospital in Shanghai, China. A questionnaire was developed and completed for a convenience sample of all patients presenting to the Triage Desk of the ED. The study was performed in June 2008. A total of 2183 questionnaires were completed. The most common complaints were fever (15%, stomach/abdominal pain (15%, vertigo/dizziness (11%, and cough (10%. Following triage, patients were predominantly referred to an internist (41%, neurologist (14%, pulmonologist (11%, or general surgeon (9%. This study provides a better understanding of the reason for the ED visit and the triage system at the ED of the Ruijin Hospital. The results can be used in order to improve facilities appropriate for the specific population in the ED.

  13. Barriers and enablers to emergency department nurses' management of patients' pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretorius, Annatjie; Searle, Judy; Marshall, Bob

    2015-06-01

    Pain is the most common reason for presentation to the emergency department (ED). On presentation patients expect rapid pain relief, yet this is often not met. Despite extensive improvements in analgesia medication there are still barriers to nurses' assessment, management, documentation, and reassessment of pain. The aim of this study is to identify barriers, enablers, and current nursing knowledge regarding pain management. Using an anonymous quantitative web-based survey, members of the College of Emergency Nurses New Zealand were invited to complete a questionnaire on pain assessment and management. The questionnaires were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Enablers to ED nurses' improved management of pain were the provision of nurse-initiated analgesic protocols and pain management champions. Common barriers perceived by the respondents were the responsibility of caring for acutely ill patients as well as a patient with pain. Similar barriers to previous research were identified and included lack of time, workload, reluctance of clinicians to prescribe analgesia, and the lack of nursing knowledge regarding opioid administration. Raising awareness that oligoanalgesia exists in the ED is essential. This research suggested that nurses would benefit from ongoing education on the usage of opioids. Nurses' attitude regarding patients' right to expect total pain relief as a consequence of treatment was also an issue. ED nurses, by virtue of their role, are in a unique position to be leaders in pain assessment and pain management. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Chest Pain Units: A Modern Way of Managing Patients with Chest Pain in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Bassan

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that 5 to 8 million individuals with chest pain or other symptoms suggestive of myocardial ischemia are seen each year in emergency departments (ED in the United States 1,2, which corresponds to 5 to 10% of all visits 3,4. Most of these patients are hospitalized for evaluation of possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS. This generates an estimated cost of 3 - 6 thousand dollars per patient 5,6. From this evaluation process, about 1.2 million patients receive the diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI, and just about the same number have unstable angina. Therefore, about one half to two thirds of these patients with chest pain do not have a cardiac cause for their symptoms 2,3. Thus, the emergency physician is faced with the difficult challenge of identifying those with ACS - a life-threatening disease - to treat them properly, and to discharge the others to suitable outpatient investigation and management.

  15. Emergency Department Crowding and Loss of Medical Licensure: A New Risk of Patient Care in Hallways

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    Robert W. Derlet

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 32-year-old male recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes treated at an urban university emergency department (ED crowded to 250% over capacity. His initial symptoms of shortness of breath and feeling ill for several days were evaluated with chest radiograph, electrocardiogram (EKG, and laboratory studies, which suggested mild diabetic ketoacidosis. His medical care in the ED was conducted in a crowded hallway. After correction of his metabolic abnormalities he felt improved and was discharged with arrangements made for outpatient follow-up. Two days later he returned in cardiac arrest, and resuscitation efforts failed. The autopsy was significant for multiple acute and chronic pulmonary emboli but no coronary artery disease. The hospital settled the case for $1 million and allocated major responsibility to the treating emergency physician (EP. As a result the state medical board named the EP in a disciplinary action, claiming negligence because the EKG had not been personally interpreted by that physician. A formal hearing was conducted with the EP’s medical license placed in jeopardy. This case illustrates the risk to EPs who treat patients in crowded hallways, where it is difficult to provide the highest level of care. This case also demonstrates the failure of hospital administration to accept responsibility and provide resources to the ED to ensure patient safety. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:137–141.

  16. Consensus-based Recommendations for Research Priorities Related to Interventions to Safeguard Patient Safety in the Crowded Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Fee, Christopher; Hall, Kendall; Morrison, J. Bradley; Stephens, Robert; Cosby, Karen; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Youngberg, Barbara; Lenehan, Gail; Abualenain, Jameel; O’Connor, Kevin; Wears, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the results of the Interventions to Safeguard Safety breakout session of the 2011 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference entitled “Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department.” Using a multistep nominal group technique, experts in emergency department (ED) crowding, patient safety, and systems engineering defined knowledge gaps and priority research questions related to the maintenance of safety in the crowded ED. Consensus was re...

  17. Can Patient Variables Measured on Arrival to the Emergency Department Predict Disposition in Medium-acuity Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, John P; Dell, Wayne L; Patrie, James T

    2017-05-01

    Emergency department crowding has led to innovative "front end" care models to safely and efficiently care for medium and lower acuity patients. In the United States, most treatment algorithms rely on the emergency severity index (ESI) triage tool to sort patients. However, there are no objective criteria used to differentiate ESI 3 patients. We seek to derive and validate a model capable of predicting patient discharge disposition (DD) using variables present on arrival to the emergency department for ESI 3 patients. Our retrospective cohort study included adult patients with an ESI triage designation 3 treated in an academic emergency department over the course of 2 successive years (2013-2015). The main outcome was DD. Two datasets were used in the modeling process. One dataset, the derivation dataset (n = 25,119), was used to develop the statistical model, while the second dataset, the validation dataset (n = 24,639), was used to evaluate the statistical model's prediction performance. All variables included in the derivation model were uniquely associated with DD status (p saturation (1.06 [95% CI 1.01-1.10]), temperature (1.10 [95% CI 1.06-1.15]), systolic blood pressure (1.18 [95% CI 1.12-1.25]), diastolic blood pressure (1.16 [95% CI 1.09-1.22]), respiratory rate (1.05 [95% CI 1.01-1.10]), and pain score (1.13 [95% CI 1.06-1.21]). The validation C-statistic was 0.73. We derived and validated a model and created a nomogram with acceptable discrimination of ESI 3 patients on arrival for purposes of predicting DD. Incorporating these variables into the care of these patients could improve patient flow by identifying patients who are likely to be discharged. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential complications of combining intramuscular olanzapine with benzodiazepines in emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; MacDonald, Kai; Vilke, Gary M; Feifel, David

    2012-11-01

    Olanzapine (Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN) is starting to be used with more frequency in emergency departments (EDs) for agitated patients. The potential complications of the use of olanzapine in combination with a benzodiazepine have not been well characterized in ED patients with undifferentiated agitation. The measurement of vital signs, repeat medication dosage, and ethanol levels in patients who received parenteral (intramuscular [IM]) olanzapine either alone or concurrently with benzodiazepines. This is a structured retrospective chart review of all patients who met the criteria of having received IM olanzapine for agitation and having vital signs documented both before medication administration and within 4 h afterwards. Twenty-five patients were identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Ten patients received olanzapine and benzodiazepine, and 15 patients received olanzapine alone. Regardless of whether or not they received benzodiazepines, patients who had ingested significant amounts of alcohol before arrival in the ED had decreased oxygen saturations after olanzapine administration. Oxygen saturations decreased more in patients who had ingested alcohol and then received olanzapine + benzodiazepines. Two patients (20%) who received olanzapine + benzodiazepines and who had ingested significant amounts of alcohol exhibited hypoxia, defined as lowest O(2) saturation ≤ 92%. In this relatively small sample, olanzapine plus benzodiazepines seems to be safe in patients who have not ingested alcohol, but may produce potentially significant oxygen desaturations in patients who have. Future, prospective studies should explore the benefits vs. potential risks of adding a benzodiazepine to olanzapine for agitated patients in the ED. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic Pain Patients' Impressions of an Emergency Department Opioid Prescribing Guideline Poster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Scott G; Yannopoulos, Paul F; Lu, Chao

    2015-09-01

    To determine if an opioid prescribing guideline poster, meant to be posted in an emergency department (ED) triage area, would deter patients with chronic pain from seeking care. We prospectively enrolled patients presenting to a chronic craniofacial pain clinic affiliated with an urban academic Level I trauma center. Patients were surveyed with a close-ended, structured questionnaire. Included patients were aged 18 and older with pain lasting 12 weeks or longer. Patients were shown a sample pain poster. The primary outcome was determination if such a poster would prevent the patient from staying to receive care in the ED. One hundred patients were surveyed. Most patients (77%) reported having been a patient in the ED in the past, and of these, 23% reported visiting the ED for worsening of chronic pain. After being shown the poster, 97% believed the recommendations in the poster were reasonable and 97% thought that the poster should be displayed in the ED. Seven patients (7%) reported that seeing the poster in the ED waiting room or triage area would intimidate them, and two patients within this group (2% of total sample) reported that it would prevent them from staying to get care. The vast majority of patients with chronic pain in this cohort believes that a pain guideline poster is reasonable and should be posted in the ED. However, a small percentage of patients reported that they would feel intimidated by such a poster and that it would prevent them from staying to get care, a result meant to inform hospitals and policy-makers deciding if such posters should be displayed. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Effect of music on pain, anxiety, and patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlar Kilic, Serap; Karadag, Gulendam; Oyucu, Serpil; Kale, Ozlem; Zengin, Suat; Ozdemir, Emine; Korhan, Esra Akin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of music therapy on pain, anxiety, and patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department in Turkey. This controlled and experimental study was conducted in the emergency department of a hospital in Turkey between July and October 2012. The study sample consisted of 200 patients in total, 100 forming the intervention group and 100 being the control group, who fell under color code green in the triage system and came with complaints of pain due to nausea/vomiting and diarrhea, abdominal pain, headaches, and joint pain. A questionnaire, the State Anxiety Scale, and the Visual Analog Scale to measure the patients' level of pain were used in the study. The questionnaires of the intervention group were administered after playing the music. When the intervention and control groups were compared, it was observed that there was a significant decrease in the VASP and STAI-S scores in favor of the intervention group. It was observed that 21.0% of the patients in the intervention group were very pleased to hear music in the emergency department, 58% of them were moderately or at least a little pleased, and 21.0% were not pleased at all. The results showed that music therapy had a positive effect in terms of reducing the severity of pain and the level of anxiety in patients, that only a very small portion of the patients were not pleased to listen to music in the emergency department. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  1. Patient Satisfaction Perceived in the Emergency Department: A Quantitative Study in a State Hospital in Romania

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    Mirela Catalina Türkes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the level of satisfaction of the students as patients, who called for urgent medical services during the month of April 2017, aged between 18-30 years. Quantitative marketing analysis was used in the study. Data and information provided by respondents were processed on the basis of a questionnaire comprised of 10 questions. The study shows that 35.3% of the respondents rated the level of cleanliness unsatisfactory and 35.9% of the patients said that the kindness and availability of the medical staff of the emergency department were unsatisfactory. However, 34.4% of the visitors said they would return to the same state hospital if needed, while 51.5% said they did not know if they would go to the same state hospital.

  2. Congenital Heart Disease In Pediatric Patients: Recognizing The Undiagnosed And Managing Complications In The Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Pavan; Meckler Mshs, Garth

    2016-05-01

    Congenital heart disease is the most common form of all congenital malformations and, despite advances in prenatal and newborn screening, it may present undiagnosed to the emergency department. Signs and symptoms of congenital heart disease are variable and often nonspecific, making recognition and treatment challenging. Patient presentations can range from life-threatening shock or cyanosis in a neonate to respiratory distress or failure to thrive in infants. Advances in surgical techniques have improved short- and long-term survival of infants and children with congenital heart disease, but these children are at risk for a variety of complications related to the underlying or surgical anatomy and physiology. This review focuses on the recognition and initial management of patients with undiagnosed congenital heart disease presenting to the ED and touches on considerations for postoperative infants and children with complex congenital heart disease.

  3. Pain management in the emergency department and its relationship to patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, La Vonne A; Zun, Leslie S

    2010-10-01

    Pain is the most common reason due to which patients come to the emergency department (ED). The purpose of this study was to measure the correlation, if any, between pain reduction and the level of satisfaction in patients who presented to the ED with pain as their chief complaint. This study used a randomly selected group of patients who presented to the ED with pain of 4 or more on the Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS) as their chief complaint to a level one adult and pediatric trauma center. Instruments that were used in this study were the VAS, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS). They were administered to patients by research fellows in the treatment rooms. Statistical analysis included frequencies, descriptive, and linear regression. This study was approved by the Internal Review Board. A total of 159 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients were given some type of treatment for their pain upon arrival to the ED. A logistic regression showed a significant relationship to reduction in pain by 40% or more and customer service questions. A reduction in perceived pain levels does directly relate to several indicators of customer service. Patients who experienced pain relief during their stay in the ED had significant increases in distress relief, rapport with their doctor, and intent to comply with given instructions.

  4. Following the patient journey: Older persons' experiences of emergency departments and discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Sandra; Casey, Michelle; Hider, Phil

    2007-07-01

    There has been little research to date which focuses on patients' experience of emergency department (ED) care, and transfer to in-patient treatment. This is an essential perspective to identify as it has the potential to impact on future planning and service development. This study was designed to examine the experience of the older patient (aged 80 years or over) admitted to an in-patient bed via the ED of a major tertiary level teaching hospital. Patients who were admitted to a medical ward over a four month period were followed by means of an internal audit process, and a sample of patients were asked to consent to an in-hospital face to face interview and a telephone interview following discharge. Findings suggest that patients in this age group were reluctant to criticise any of the hospital processes and in general expressed satisfaction with their time spent in-hospital. Descriptive statistics around admission timing and procedures were obtained, together with work load and acuity indicators. Potential barriers to seamless care were identified.

  5. Where health and welfare meet: social deprivation among patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J A; Chudnofsky, C R; Hayward, R A

    2001-03-01

    As a safety net provider for many disadvantaged Americans, the emergency department (ED) may be an efficient site not only for providing acute medical care, but also for addressing serious social needs. To characterize the social needs of ED patients, and to evaluate whether the most disadvantaged patients have connections with the health and welfare system outside the ED. Cross-sectional survey conducted over 24 hours in the fall of 1997. Three EDs: an urban public teaching hospital, a suburban university hospital, and a semirural community hospital. Consecutive patients presenting for care, including those transported by ambulance. The survey response rate was 91% (N = 300; urban = 115, suburban = 102, rural = 83). Index of socioeconomic deprivation described by the US Census Bureau (based on food, housing, and utilities). Of all ED patients, 31% reported one or more serious social deprivations. For example, 13% of urban patients reported not having enough food to eat, and 9% of rural patients reported disconnection of their gas or electricity (US population averages both less than 3%). While 40% of all patients had no consistent health care outside the ED (networks. Community efforts to address serious social deprivation should include partnerships with the local ED.

  6. Clinical predictors for Legionella in patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia to the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Reno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella species cause severe forms of pneumonia with high mortality and complication rates. Accurate clinical predictors to assess the likelihood of Legionella community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in patients presenting to the emergency department are lacking. Methods We retrospectively compared clinical and laboratory data of 82 consecutive patients with Legionella CAP with 368 consecutive patients with non-Legionella CAP included in two studies at the same institution. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis we identified six parameters, namely high body temperature (OR 1.67, p Legionella CAP. Using optimal cut off values of these six parameters, we calculated a diagnostic score for Legionella CAP. The median score was significantly higher in Legionella CAP as compared to patients without Legionella (4 (IQR 3–4 vs 2 (IQR 1–2, p Legionella pneumonia. Conversely, of the 73 patients (16% with ≥4 points, 66% of patients had Legionella CAP. Conclusion Six clinical and laboratory parameters embedded in a simple diagnostic score accurately identified patients with Legionella CAP. If validated in future studies, this score might aid in the management of suspected Legionella CAP.

  7. Pain management in the emergency department and its relationship to patient satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downey La Vonne

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Pain is the most common reason due to which patients come to the emergency department (ED. Aim : The purpose of this study was to measure the correlation, if any, between pain reduction and the level of satisfaction in patients who presented to the ED with pain as their chief complaint. Materials and Methods : This study used a randomly selected group of patients who presented to the ED with pain of 4 or more on the Visual Analogue Pain Scale (VAS as their chief complaint to a level one adult and pediatric trauma center. Instruments that were used in this study were the VAS, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI, and the Medical Interview Satisfaction Scale (MISS. They were administered to patients by research fellows in the treatment rooms. Statistical analysis included frequencies, descriptive, and linear regression. This study was approved by the Internal Review Board. Results : A total of 159 patients were enrolled in the study. All patients were given some type of treatment for their pain upon arrival to the ED. A logistic regression showed a significant relationship to reduction in pain by 40% or more and customer service questions. Conclusions : A reduction in perceived pain levels does directly relate to several indicators of customer service. Patients who experienced pain relief during their stay in the ED had significant increases in distress relief, rapport with their doctor, and intent to comply with given instructions.

  8. [On hospital emergency department crowding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudela, Pere; Mòdol, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a range of measures deployed to curb crowding in hospital emergency departments, but as episodes of overcrowding continue to occur the discussion of causes and possible solutions remains open. The problem is universal, and efforts to revamp health care systems as a result of current socioeconomic circumstances have put emergency services in the spotlight. Consensus was recently achieved on criteria that define emergency department overcrowding. The causes are diverse and include both external factors and internal ones, in the form of attributes specific to a department. The factors that have the most impact, however, involve hospital organization, mainly the availability of beds and the difficulty of assigning them to emergency patients requiring admission. Crowding is associated with decreases in most health care quality indicators, as departments see increases in the number of patients waiting, the time until initial processing, and the time until a physician or nurse intervenes. Crowding is also associated with risk for more unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. This situation leads to dissatisfaction all around-of patients, families, and staff-as aspects such as dignity, comfort, and privacy deteriorate. Proposals to remedy the problem include assuring that the staff and structural resources of a facility meet minimum standards and are all working properly, facilitating access to complementary tests, and providing observation areas and short-stay units. The response of hospitals to the situation in emergency departments should include alternatives to conventional admission, through means for rapid diagnosis, day hospitals, and home hospitalization as well as by offering a clear response in cases where admission is needed, granting easier access to beds that are in fact available. For its part, the health system overall, should improve the care of patients with chronic diseases, so that fewer admissions are required. It is also essential to

  9. Diagnostic performance of CT angiography in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Hang; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Yoon Jin; Park, Ji Hoon [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of computed tomography angiography (CTA) in identifying the cause of bleeding and to determine the clinical features associated with a positive test result of CTA in patients visiting emergency department with overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. We included 111 consecutive patients (61 men and 50 women; mean age: 63.4 years; range: 28-89 years) who visited emergency department with overt GI bleeding. They underwent CTA as a first-line diagnostic modality from July through December 2010. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed the CTA images and determined the presence of any definite or potential bleeding focus by consensus. An independent assessor determined the cause of bleeding based on other diagnostic studies and/or clinical follow-up. The diagnostic performance of CTA and clinical characteristics associated with positive CTA results were analyzed. To identify a definite or potential bleeding focus, the diagnostic yield of CTA was 61.3% (68 of 111). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value were 84.8% (67 of 79), 96.9% (31 of 32), 98.5% (67 of 68), and 72.1% (31 of 43), respectively. Positive CTA results were associated with the presence of massive bleeding (p = 0.001, odds ratio: 11.506). Computed tomography angiography as a first-line diagnostic modality in patients presenting with overt GI bleeding showed a fairly high accuracy. It could identify definite or potential bleeding focus with a moderate diagnostic yield and a high PPV. CTA is particularly useful in patients with massive bleeding.

  10. The effect of establishing a new, reorganized emergency department on quality of clinical healthcare and patient satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Maria Søe

    2015-01-01

    as increased competences of doctors and nurses, adds efficiency and safety to each patients need for acute care. The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate the quality of healthcare and patient-perceived quality before and after the reorganization of an ED into a new emergency department with observation...... based on data from the National Indicators Project. The study showed an overall improvement of 48% (15/31) in the indicators. The greatest improvement was seen in stroke patients, which had been a special focus in the emergency department investigated. In Study II patient satisfaction in the emergency...

  11. Quantitative sensory testing measures individual pain responses in emergency department patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duffy KJ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Kevin J Duffy, Katharyn L Flickinger, Jeffrey T Kristan, Melissa J Repine, Alexandro Gianforcaro, Rebecca B Hasley, Saad Feroz, Jessica M Rupp, Jumana Al-Baghli, Maria L Pacella, Brian P Suffoletto, Clifton W Callaway Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Background: Refining and individualizing treatment of acute pain in the emergency department (ED is a high priority, given that painful complaints are the most common reasons for ED visits. Few tools exist to objectively measure pain perception in the ED setting. We speculated that variation in perception of fixed painful stimuli would explain individual variation in reported pain and response to treatment among ED patients. Materials and methods: In three studies, we 1 describe performance characteristics of brief quantitative sensory testing (QST in 50 healthy volunteers, 2 test effects of 10 mg oxycodone versus placebo on QST measures in 18 healthy volunteers, and 3 measure interindividual differences in nociception and treatment responses in 198 ED patients with a painful complaint during ED treatment. QST measures adapted for use in the ED included pressure sensation threshold, pressure pain threshold (PPT, pressure pain response (PPR, and cold pain tolerance (CPT tests. Results: First, all QST measures had high inter-rater reliability and test–retest reproducibility. Second, 10 mg oxycodone reduced PPR, increased PPT, and prolonged CPT. Third, baseline PPT and PPR revealed hyperalgesia in 31 (16% ED subjects relative to healthy volunteers. In 173 (88% ED subjects who completed repeat testing 30 minutes after pain treatment, PPT increased and PPR decreased (Cohen’s dz 0.10–0.19. Verbal pain scores (0–10 for the ED complaint decreased by 2.2 (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.9, 2.6 (Cohen’s dz 0.97 but did not covary with the changes in PPT and PPR (r=0.05–0.13. Treatment effects were greatest in ED subjects

  12. Feasibility of a computer-assisted alcohol SBIRT program in an urban emergency department: patient and research staff perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Murphy, Mary K; Bijur, Polly E; Rosenbloom, David; Bernstein, Steven L; Gallagher, E John

    2013-01-01

    ...) program to identify at-risk alcohol users among adult emergency department (ED) patients. The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of implementing a computerized screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment...

  13. Ambulatory Cardiac Monitoring for Discharged Emergency Department Patients with Possible Cardiac Arrhythmias

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    Donald Scheiber

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Many emergency department (ED patients have symptoms that may be attributed to arrhythmias, necessitating outpatient ambulatory cardiac monitoring. Consensus is lacking on the optimal duration of monitoring. We describe the use of a novel device applied at ED discharge that provides continuous prolonged cardiac monitoring. Methods: We enrolled discharged adult ED patients with symptoms of possible cardiac arrhythmia. A novel, single use continuous recording patch (Zio®Patch was applied at ED discharge. Patients wore the device for up to 14 days or until they had symptoms to trigger an event. They then returned the device by mail for interpretation. Significant arrhythmias are defined as: ventricular tachycardia (VT ≥4 beats, supraventricular tachycardia (SVT ≥4 beats, atrial fibrillation, ≥3 second pause, 2nd degree Mobitz II, 3rd degree AV Block, or symptomatic bradycardia. Results: There were 174 patients were enrolled and all mailed back their devices. The average age was 52.2 (± 21.0 years, and 55% were female. The most common indications for device placement were palpitations 44.8%, syncope 24.1% and dizziness 6.3%. Eighty-three patients (47.7% had ≥1 arrhythmias and 17 (9.8% were symptomatic at the time of their arrhythmia. Median time to first arrhythmia was 1.0 days (IQR 0.2-2.8 and median time to first symptomatic arrhythmia was 1.5 days (IQR 0.4-6.7. 93 (53.4% of symptomatic patients did not have any arrhythmia during their triggered events. The overall diagnostic yield was 63.2% Conclusion: The Zio®Patch cardiac monitoring device can efficiently characterize symptomatic patients without significant arrhythmia and has a higher diagnostic yield for arrhythmias than traditional 24-48 hour Holter monitoring. It allows for longer term monitoring up to 14 days. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(2:194–198.

  14. The Effect of Intravenous Ketamine in Suicidal Ideation of Emergency Department Patients

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    Parvin Kashani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Suicidal ideation is an emergent problem in the Emergency Department (ED that often complicates patient disposition and discharge. It has been shown that ketamine possesses fast acting antidepressant and anti-suicidal effects. This study was conducted to examine the effects of a single intravenous bolus of ketamine on patients with suicidal ideations in ED. Methods: Forty-nine subjects with suicidal ideations with or without an unsuccessful suicide attempt, received 0.2 mg/kg of ketamine. Scale for suicidal ideation (SSI and Montgomery-Abserg depression rating scale (MADRS were evaluated before and 40, 80 and 120 minutes after drug intervention. The results were compared using the paired t-test and patients were followed up 10 days after ED admission for remnant suicide ideation. Results: SSI (df: 3, 46; F=80.7; p<0.001 and MADRS (df: 3, 46; F=87.2; p<0.001 scores significantly dropped after ketamine injection; the SSI score before and after 20, 40, and 80 minutes of ketamine injection were 23.0±6.7, 16.2±5.2, 14.3±4.3, and 13.6±4.0 respectively. The MADRS scores were 38.2±9.3, 25.6±7.1, 22.7±6.3, and 22.1±5.95 at the same time intervals. 25.5% of patients were hospitalized, 63.3% received medications and 12.2% discharged. 6.2% of patients had suicidal ideations ten days after ED disposition.  Conclusion: It seems that Ketamine couldn't be a good choice for fast reduction of suicidal ideations in ED patients. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal dose of ketamine for different patients.

  15. [Clinical profile and 90-day mortality in centenarian patients attended in emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Fernández-Alonso, Cesáreo; Hormigo, Ana Isabel; Jiménez-Díaz, Gregorio; Roiz, Honan; Bermejo-Boixareu, Cristina; Rodríguez-Salazar, Jaime; Fernández Pérez, Cristina; Gil-Gregorio, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    To determine the clinical profile and to develop a model to predict 90-day mortality in centenarian patients attended in emergency departments (ED). This was an observational, retrospective, multicentre cohort study including patients >99years attended in 5 ED in the Community of Madrid from January to December 2012. Demographic variables were recorded, as well as, comorbidities, cognitive, functional, social basal status, geriatric syndromes, acute episode, and hospital and social resources use, and 90-day mortality. The study included 209patients aged 101years (SD 1.7) of whom 161 (77.0%) were female. Sixty four (32.5%) had severe comorbidity (Charlson index≥3), 101 (49.8%) on multiple medication, 100 (52.6%) had cognitive impairment, 82 (42.3%) had severe functional dependence, 85 (40.7%) were institutionalised, and 190 (94.5%) had a geriatric syndrome. Dyspnoea (26.8%), followed by falls (12.4%) were the most common causes of attendance. One hundred and eighteen (56.5%) were admitted, and 58 out of 174 (33.3%) died in the first 90days. The model to predict 90-day overall mortality included male sex (OR 2.42 95% CI=0.97-6.04; P=.059), emergency care in the previous 3months (OR 4.08 95% CI=1.26-13.16; P=.019) and the hospitalization by index event (OR 8.63 95% CI=3.25-22.9; P<.001) and this model had an area under ROC curve of 0.776 (95% CI=0.70-0.85; P<.001). Centenarian patients attended in ED had a significant frailty and one in three cases died in the first 90days after being attended, and this was associated with male sex, emergency care in the previous 3months, and hospitalisation. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploring patterns of health service use in older emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, S Nicole; Horney, Carolyn; Landerman, Lawrence R; Sanders, Linda L; Hocker, Michael B; Schmader, Kenneth E

    2010-10-01

    Study objectives were to identify groups of older patients with similar patterns of health care use in the 12 months preceding an index outpatient emergency department (ED) visit and to identify patient-level predictors of group membership.   Subjects were adults ≥ 65 years of age treated and released from an academic medical center ED. Latent cluster analysis (LCA) models were estimated to identify groups with similar numbers of primary care (PC), specialist, and outpatient ED visits and hospital days within 12 months preceding the index ED visit.   In this sample (n = 308), five groups with distinct patterns of health service use emerged. Low Users (35%) had fewer visits of all types and fewer hospital days compared to sample means. Low Users were more likely to be female and had fewer chronic health conditions relative to the overall sample (p < 0.05). The ED to Supplement Primary Care Provider (PCP) (23%) group had more PCP visits, but also significantly more ED visits. Specialist Heavy (22%) group members had twice as many specialist visits, but no difference in PCP visits. Members of this class were more likely to be white and male (p < 0.05). High Users (15%) received more care in all categories and had more chronic baseline health conditions (p < 0.05) but no differences in demographic characteristics relative to the whole sample. The ED and Hospital as Substitution Care (6%) group had fewer PC and specialist visits, but more ED visits and hospital days.   In this sample of older ED patients, five groups with distinct patterns of health service use were identified. Further study is needed to determine whether identification of these patient groups can add important information to existing risk-assessment methods. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  17. Follow Up for Emergency Department Patients After Intravenous Contrast and Risk of Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getaw Worku Hassen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, defined as an increase in serum creatinine (SCr greater than 25% or ≥0.5 mg/dL within 3 days of intravenous (IV contrast administration in the absence of an alternative cause, is the third most common cause of new acute renal failure in hospitalized patients. It is known to increase in-hospital mortality up to 27%. The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate of outpatient follow up and the occurrence of CIN in patients who presented to the emergency department (ED and were discharged home after computed tomography (CT of the abdomen and pelvis (AP with IV contrast. Methods: We conducted a single center retrospective review of charts for patients who required CT of AP with IV contrast and who were discharged home. Patients’ clinical data included the presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease (CKD and congestive heart failure (CHF. Results: Five hundred and thirty six patients underwent CT of AP with IV contrast in 2011 and were discharged home. Diabetes mellitus was documented in 96 patients (18%. Hypertension was present in 141 patients (26.3%, and 82 patients (15.3% were on angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEI. Five patients (0.9% had documented CHF and all of them were taking furosemide. Seventy patients (13% had a baseline SCr >1.2 mg/dL. One hundred fifty patients (28% followed up in one of the clinics or the ED within one week after discharge, but only 40 patients (7.5% had laboratory workup. Out of 40 patients who followed up within 1 week after discharge, 9 patients (22.5% developed CIN. One hundred ninety patients (35.4% followed up in one of the clinics or the ED after 7 days and within 1 month after discharge, but only 71 patients (13.2% had laboratory workup completed. Out of 71 patients who followed up within 1 month, 11 patients (15% developed CIN. The overall incidence of CIN was 15.3% (17 out of 111 patients. Conclusion: There was a

  18. Minor head injury in anticoagulated patients: a 6-year retrospective analysis in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Riccardi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate management of minor head injury (MHI in patients receiving oral anticoagulant (OAC is unclear. In this retrospective study, we focused on elderly patients (>65 years treated with OAC, presented to our emergency department with MHI between 2004 and 2010. Three hundred and six patients with MHI were taking OAC: we documented 7.19% hemorrhages at the first computed tomography (C; 18.19% deaths; 50.1% spontaneous reabsorptions; 22.73% deteriorations of intracranial bleeding without surgical intervention (for clinical comorbidity, and 4.55% neurosurgical interventions. We documented a second positive CT scan in 2 patients (1.51% who had no symptoms and remained asymptomatic during observation. In both cases, intracranial bleeding resolved spontaneously. The mean international normalized ratio (INR value was 2.26, higher in the group of patients with bleeding (2.74 than in the group without bleeding (2.19. We found a significant increased risk in patients with posttraumatic loss of consciousness [odds ratio (OR 28.3], diffuse headache (OR 14.79, vomiting (OR 14.2 and neurological signs (OR 5.27. We did not reach significance in patients with post-traumatic amnesia. Our data confirm the need for a CT scan of any patients on OAC with MHI. None of our patients developed any symptoms or signs during observation, and only 2 patients developed an intracranial hemorrhage in the second CT scan with a favorable evolution. Our data need to be confirmed with an observational study, but we suggest that the second CT could be reserved for patients developing symptoms and signs during observation. We also underline the role of the INR in the stratification of risk.

  19. Adjusting patients streaming initiated by a wait time threshold in emergency department for minimizing opportunity cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byungjoon B J; Delbridge, Theodore R; Kendrick, Dawn B

    2017-07-10

    Purpose Two different systems for streaming patients were considered to improve efficiency measures such as waiting times (WTs) and length of stay (LOS) for a current emergency department (ED). A typical fast track area (FTA) and a fast track with a wait time threshold (FTW) were designed and compared effectiveness measures from the perspective of total opportunity cost of all patients' WTs in the ED. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This retrospective case study used computerized ED patient arrival to discharge time logs (between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2010) to build computer simulation models for the FTA and fast track with wait time threshold systems. Various wait time thresholds were applied to stream different acuity-level patients. National average wait time for each acuity level was considered as a threshold to stream patients. Findings The fast track with a wait time threshold (FTW) showed a statistically significant shorter total wait time than the current system or a typical FTA system. The patient streaming management would improve the service quality of the ED as well as patients' opportunity costs by reducing the total LOS in the ED. Research limitations/implications The results of this study were based on computer simulation models with some assumptions such as no transfer times between processes, an arrival distribution of patients, and no deviation of flow pattern. Practical implications When the streaming of patient flow can be managed based on the wait time before being seen by a physician, it is possible for patients to see a physician within a tolerable wait time, which would result in less crowded in the ED. Originality/value A new streaming scheme of patients' flow may improve the performance of fast track system.

  20. Triaging Patients with Multiple Sclerosis in the Emergency Department: Room for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Hesham; Mente, Karin; Seay, Meagan; Kim, Jeffrey; Ali, Ashhar; Bermel, Robert; Willis, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) present to the emergency department (ED) for various reasons. Although true relapse is rarely the underlying culprit, ED visits commonly result in new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurology admissions. We studied ED visits in patients with MS and evaluated decision making regarding diagnostic/therapeutic interventions and visit outcomes. We identified potential areas for improvement and used the data to propose a triaging algorithm for patients with MS in the ED. We reviewed the medical records from 176 ED visits for patients with MS in 2014. Ninety-seven visits in 75 patients were MS related (66.6% female; mean ± SD age, 52.6 ± 13.8 years; mean ± SD disease duration, 18.5 ± 10.5 years). Thirty-three visits were for new neurologic symptoms (category 1), 29 for worsening preexisting symptoms (category 2), and 35 for MS-related complications (category 3). Eighty-nine visits (91.8%) resulted in hospital admission (42.7% to neurology). Only 39% of ordered MRIs showed radiographic activity. New relapses were determined in 27.8% of the visits and were more prevalent in category 1 compared with category 2 (P = .003); however, the two categories had similar rates of ordered MRIs and neurology admissions. New relapse is a rare cause of ED visits in MS. Unnecessary MRIs and neurology admissions can be avoided by developing a triaging system for patients with MS based on symptom stratification.

  1. Mapping patient path in the Pediatric Emergency Department: A workflow model driven approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmi, Ines; Zgaya, Hayfa; Gammoudi, Lotfi; Hammadi, Slim; Martinot, Alain; Beuscart, Régis; Renard, Jean-Marie

    2015-04-01

    The workflow models of the patient journey in a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) seems to be an effective approach to develop an accurate and complete representation of the PED processes. This model can drive the collection of comprehensive quantitative and qualitative service delivery and patient treatment data as an evidence base for the PED service planning. Our objective in this study is to identify crowded situation indicators and bottlenecks that contribute to over-crowding. The greatest source of delay in patient flow is the waiting time from the health care request, and especially the bed request to exit from the PED for hospital admission. It represented 70% of the time that these patients occupied in the PED waiting rooms. The use of real data to construct the workflow model of the patient path is effective in identifying sources of delay in patient flow, and aspects of the PED activity that could be improved. The development of this model was based on accurate visits made in the PED of the Regional University Hospital Center (CHRU) of Lille (France). This modeling, which has to represent most faithfully possible the reality of the PED of CHRU of Lille, is necessary. It must be detailed enough to produce an analysis allowing to identify the dysfunctions of the PED and also to propose and to estimate prevention indicators of crowded situations. Our survey is integrated into the French National Research Agency (ANR) project, titled: "Hospital: Optimization, Simulation and avoidance of strain" (HOST). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Emergency Department Length of Stay for Maori and European Patients in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Prisk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department length of stay (ED LOS is currently used in Australasia as a quality measure. In our ED, Maori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, have a shorter ED LOS than European patients. This is despite Maori having poorer health outcomes overall. This study sought to determine drivers of LOS in our provincial New Zealand ED, particularly looking at ethnicity as a determining factor. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study that reviewed 80,714 electronic medical records of ED patients from December 1, 2012, to December 1, 2014. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out on raw data, and we used a complex regression analysis to develop a predictive model of ED LOS. Potential covariates were patient factors, temporal factors, clinical factors, and workload variables (volume and acuity of patients three hours prior to and two hours after presentation by a baseline patient. The analysis was performed using R studio 0.99.467. Results: Ethnicity dropped out in the stepwise regression procedure; after adjusting for other factors, a specific ethnicity effect was not informative. Maori were, on average, younger, less likely to receive bloodwork and radiographs, less likely to go to our observation area, less likely to have a general practitioner, and more likely to be discharged and to self-discharge; all of these factors decreased their length of stay. Conclusion: Length of stay in our ED does not seem to be related to ethnicity alone. Patient factors had only a small impact on ED LOS, while clinical factors, temporal factors, and workload variables had much greater influence. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;17(4438-448.

  3. Teaching the Emergency Department Patient Experience: Needs Assessment from the CORDEM Task Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London, Kory S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the creation of HCAHPS Patient Satisfaction (PS scores, Patient Experience (PE has become a metric that can profoundly affect the fiscal balance of hospital systems, reputation of entire departments and welfare of individual physicians. While government and hospital mandates demonstrate the prominence of PE as a quality measure, no such mandate exists for its education. The objective of this study was to determine the education and evaluation landscape for PE in categorical Emergency Medicine (EM residencies.This was a prospective survey analysis of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD membership. Program directors (PDs, assistant PDs and core faculty who are part of the CORD listserv were sent an email link to a brief, anonymous electronic survey. Respondents were asked their position in the residency, the name of their department, and questions regarding the presence and types of PS evaluative data and PE education they provide.146 responses were obtained from 139 individual residencies, representing 72% of all categorical EM residencies. This survey found that only 27% of responding residencies provide PS data to their residents. Of those programs, 61% offer simulation scores, 39% provide third party attending data on cases with resident participation, 37% provide third party acquired data specifically about residents and 37% provide internally acquired quantitative data. Only 35% of residencies reported having any organized PE curricula. Of the programs that provide an organized PE curriculum, most offer multiple modalities. 96% provide didactic lectures, 49% small group sessions, 47% simulation sessions and 27% specifically use standardized patient encounters in their simulation sessions. The majority of categorical EM residencies do not provide either PS data or any organized PE curriculum. Those that do utilize a heterogeneous set of data collection modalities and educational techniques. AOA and ACGME

  4. Estimating the Cost of Care for Emergency Department Syncope Patients: Comparison of Three Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Probst

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to compare three hospital cost-estimation models for patients undergoing evaluation for unexplained syncope using hospital cost data. Developing such a model would allow researchers to assess the value of novel clinical algorithms for syncope management. Methods: We collected complete health services data, including disposition, testing, and length of stay (LOS, on 67 adult patients (age 60 years and older who presented to the emergency department (ED with syncope at a single hospital. Patients were excluded if a serious medical condition was identified. We created three hospital cost-estimation models to estimate facility costs: V1, unadjusted Medicare payments for observation and/or hospital admission; V2: modified Medicare payment, prorated by LOS in calendar days; and V3: modified Medicare payment, prorated by LOS in hours. Total hospital costs included unadjusted Medicare payments for diagnostic testing and estimated facility costs. We plotted these estimates against actual cost data from the hospital finance department, and performed correlation and regression analyses. Results: Of the three models, V3 consistently outperformed the others with regard to correlation and goodness of fit. The Pearson correlation coefficient for V3 was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81, 0.92 with an R-square value of 0.77 and a linear regression coefficient of 0.87 (95% CI 0.76, 0.99. Conclusion: Using basic health services data, it is possible to accurately estimate hospital costs for older adults undergoing a hospital-based evaluation for unexplained syncope. This methodology could help assess the potential economic impact of implementing novel clinical algorithms for ED syncope. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(2253-257.

  5. Factors associated with triage assignment of emergency department patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kimberley; Greenslade, Jaimi; Dalton, Emily; Chu, Kevin; Brown, Anthony F T; Cullen, Louise

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to explore factors associated with the triage category assigned by the triage nurse for patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. This was a retrospective analysis of 12 months of data, on adult emergency department patients ultimately diagnosed with acute myocardial infarction. Data were obtained from hospital databases and included patient demographics, patient clinical characteristics and nurses' experience. Of the 153 patients, 20% (95% CI: 14-27%) were given a lower urgency triage category than recommended by international guidelines. Compared to patients who were triaged Australasian Triage Category 1 or 2, patients with an Australasian Triage Category 3-5 were older (mean age 76 versus 68 years), more likely to be female (63% versus 32%), more likely to present without chest pain (93% versus 35%) and less likely to have a cardiac history (3.3% versus 17.9%). A slightly higher proportion of patients Australasian Triage Category 3-5 were triaged by an experienced nurse (50%) compared to patients categorised Australasian Triage Category 1-2 (35.2%) but this finding did not reach statistical significance. One in five presentations was given a lower urgency triage category than recommended by international guidelines, potentially leading to delays in medical treatment. The absence of chest pain was the defining characteristic in this group of patients, along with other factors identified by previous research such as being of female sex and elderly. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Critical Care Nurses Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emergency department tobacco cessation program: staff participation and intervention success among patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marna Rayl; Weinstock, Michael; Fenimore, Deborah Gaston; Sierzega, Gina M

    2008-08-01

    The emergency department (ED) is often the primary source of healthcare for uninsured and underinsured patients. To evaluate ED staff attitudes toward and participation in referring patients to a tobacco cessation program, and to assess the program's effectiveness. A nonvalidated survey on smoking cessation and preventative services for ED patients was mailed to ED staff at a suburban hospital. After survey completion, ED staff was encouraged to refer smokers with diagnoses substantially worsened by tobacco use to a brief intervention delivered in the ED. An incentive was provided to staff beginning in the second month of the 3-month period. Referred patients were briefly counseled by a hospital social worker or an ED physician or nurse. Follow-up telephone interviews with patients occurred 1 to 3 months postintervention. Of the 70 ED staff contacted, 63 (90%) responded to the survey. Most staff members (81%) agreed that they should facilitate clinical prevention. Fewer staff (60%) were comfortable advising patients to quit tobacco use (Pstaff should assist patients in tobacco cessation (PStaff referrals increased with program incentives (P=.008), with a total of 150 interventions occurring in the 3-month span. Of the 36 patients (24%) reached for follow-up, 13 (36%) attempted to quit and 6 (17%) succeeded. Overall, 45% of the patients reached for follow-up either cut down or quit tobacco use. Staff members' attitudes toward tobacco cessation are not a firm barrier to the successful implementation of an ED tobacco cessation program. In addition, the ED provides an important opportunity to encourage patients to quit or cut down tobacco use.

  7. Increased 30-Day Emergency Department Revisits Among Homeless Patients with Mental Health Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Nok Lam

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with mental health conditions frequently use emergency medical services. Many suffer from substance use and homelessness. If they use the emergency department (ED as their primary source of care, potentially preventable frequent ED revisits and hospital readmissions can worsen an already crowded healthcare system. However, the magnitude to which homelessness affects health service utilization among patients with mental health conditions remains unclear in the medical community. This study assessed the impact of homelessness on 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions among patients presenting with mental health conditions in an urban, safety-net hospital. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of administrative data on all adult ED visits in 2012 in an urban safety-net hospital. Patient demographics, mental health status, homelessness, insurance coverage, level of acuity, and ED disposition per ED visit were analyzed using multilevel modeling to control for multiple visits nested within patients. We performed multivariate logistic regressions to evaluate if homelessness moderated the likelihood of mental health patients’ 30-day ED revisits and hospital readmissions. Results: Study included 139,414 adult ED visits from 92,307 unique patients (43.5±15.1 years, 51.3% male, 68.2% Hispanic/Latino. Nearly 8% of patients presented with mental health conditions, while 4.6% were homeless at any time during the study period. Among patients with mental health conditions, being homeless contributed to an additional 28.0% increase in likelihood (4.28 to 5.48 odds of 30-day ED revisits and 38.2% increase in likelihood (2.04 to 2.82 odds of hospital readmission, compared to non-homeless, non-mental health (NHNM patients as the base category. Adjusted predicted probabilities showed that homeless patients presenting with mental health conditions have a 31.1% chance of returning to the ED within 30-day post discharge and a 3

  8. An emergency department patient flow model based on queueing theory principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Bolandifar, Ehsan; Griffey, Richard T; Poirier, Robert F; Olsen, Tava

    2013-09-01

    The objective was to derive and validate a novel queuing theory-based model that predicts the effect of various patient crowding scenarios on patient left without being seen (LWBS) rates. Retrospective data were collected from all patient presentations to triage at an urban, academic, adult-only emergency department (ED) with 87,705 visits in calendar year 2008. Data from specific time windows during the day were divided into derivation and validation sets based on odd or even days. Patient records with incomplete time data were excluded. With an established call center queueing model, input variables were modified to adapt this model to the ED setting, while satisfying the underlying assumptions of queueing theory. The primary aim was the derivation and validation of an ED flow model. Chi-square and Student's t-tests were used for model derivation and validation. The secondary aim was estimating the effect of varying ED patient arrival and boarding scenarios on LWBS rates using this model. The assumption of stationarity of the model was validated for three time periods (peak arrival rate = 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.; a moderate arrival rate = 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.; and lowest arrival rate = 4:00 a.m. to 6:00 a.m.) and for different days of the week and month. Between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m., defined as the primary study period representing peak arrivals, 3.9% (n = 4,038) of patients LWBS. Using the derived model, the predicted LWBS rate was 4%. LWBS rates increased as the rate of ED patient arrivals, treatment times, and ED boarding times increased. A 10% increase in hourly ED patient arrivals from the observed average arrival rate increased the predicted LWBS rate to 10.8%; a 10% decrease in hourly ED patient arrivals from the observed average arrival rate predicted a 1.6% LWBS rate. A 30-minute decrease in treatment time from the observed average treatment time predicted a 1.4% LWBS. A 1% increase in patient arrivals has the same effect on LWBS rates as a 1

  9. A questionnaire to document self-medication history in adult patients visiting emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulet, Lucien; Asseray, Nathalie; Foucher, Nadine; Potel, Gilles; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Ballereau, Françoise

    2013-02-01

    To develop the first questionnaire to obtain a complete medication history by documenting self-medication history in adult patients admitted to a medical emergency department (ED). A Questionnaire to document Self-Medicating Behaviours (QSMB) was developed between January and September 2008 (reference period), tested and refined between October and December 2008, and used routinely between January and December 2009 (routine period) in a tertiary care medical ED. The rate of SMBs measured with QSMB during the routine period was compared to the SMB rate measured with a spontaneous reporting method during the reference period. As survey teams changed every trimester, we also analysed the evolution of SMB rate over time. QSMB is divided into two parts. The first part consists of 20 closed-ended questions exploring all indications and dimensions of self-medication. The second part assesses the characteristics of each medication mentioned by the patient in the first 20 questions. The patients interviewed during reference and routine periods did not significantly differ. The routine period patients reported a third more SMBs (89.8% vs 57.6%, respectively; p self-medication drugs than the reference period patients. SMB rate was significantly different between the survey teams during the reference period (p self-medication, and provide support to public health efforts and research programs on self-medication. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The importance of nurse caring behaviors as perceived by patients receiving care at an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldursdottir, Gyda; Jonsdottir, Helga

    2002-01-01

    Increased workload at the emergency department (ED) and the shortage of nurses may leave some patients without proper care. The importance of patients' perceptions of caring is vital when organizing nursing practice under such circumstances. The purpose of the study was to identify which nurse caring behaviors are perceived by patients in an ED as important indicators of caring. The nurse caring behaviors were categorized in terms of relative importance with respect to demographic variables and perceived illness. Watson's theory of caring was used as a theoretic framework for this quantitative and descriptive study. A 61-item questionnaire designed on the basis of Cronin and Harrison's Caring Behaviors Assessment tool, which reflected the 10 carative factors of Watson's theory, was mailed to 300 ED patients. The response rate was 60.7%. Results showed that subjects scored the items "Know what they are doing", "Know when it is necessary to call the doctor", "Know how to give shots, IVs, etc.", and "Know how to handle equipment" as the most important nurse caring behaviors. The subscale "human needs assistance" was ranked highest. In line with several previous studies, subjects considered clinical competence to be the most important nurse caring behavior, which further emphasizes the notion of caring as a moral stance integral to all interactions with patients.

  11. Missed diagnoses among elderly patients discharged from an accident and emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S A; Miskelly, F G; Platt, J S; Bhattachryya, B K

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how often elderly patients are discharged from an accident and emergency (A&E) department with unrecognized but remediable problems. METHODS: Over a period of six months, 174 elderly patients fulfilling inclusion criteria for the study were discharged from A&E, and of these 97 (56%) agreed to be reviewed in the day hospital. They were assessed by a doctor, nurse, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, speech therapist, and social worker. A full blood count, urea and electrolytes, liver and thyroid function tests, a chest radiograph, and an electrocardiogram were performed. A Barthel activity of daily living index was performed on the first visit and before discharge. RESULTS: 28% had missed diagnoses which benefited from day hospital attendance and a further 13 patients had been admitted before they could attend day hospital. Those patients presenting with falls and living alone constituted a high risk group. CONCLUSIONS: Elderly patients attending A&E merit special consideration to detect underlying medical or social problems. PMID:8832343

  12. A pilot cross-sectional study of patients presenting with cellulitis to emergency departments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quirke, M

    2014-11-01

    To characterise the Emergency Department (ED) prevalence of cellulitis, factors predicting oral antibiotic therapy and the utility of the Clinical Resource Efficiency Support Team (CREST) guideline in predicting patient management in the ED setting, a prospective, cross-sectional study of consecutive adult patients presenting to 3 Irish EDs was performed. The overall prevalence of cellulitis was 12 per 1,000 ED visits. Of 59 patients enrolled, 45.8% were discharged. Predictors of treatment with oral antibiotics were: CREST, Class 1 allocation (odds ratio (OR) 6.81, 95% Cl =1.5-30.1, p=0.012), patient self-referral (OR= 6.2, 95% Cl 1.9- 20.0, p=0.03) and symptom duration longer than 48 hours (OR 1.2, 95% Cl = 1.0-1.5,p=0.049). In conflict with guideline recommendation, 43% of patients in CREST Class 1 received IV therapy. Treatment with oral antibiotics was predicted by CREST Class 1 allocation, self-referral, symptom duration of more than 48 hours and absence of pre-EO antibiotic therapy.

  13. Forecasting Daily Volume and Acuity of Patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Rafael; Fogliatto, Flavio S; Lucini, Filipe R; Neyeloff, Jeruza; Kuchenbecker, Ricardo S; Schaan, Beatriz D

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing the performance of four forecasting models in predicting the demand for medical care in terms of daily visits in an emergency department (ED) that handles high complexity cases, testing the influence of climatic and calendrical factors on demand behavior. We tested different mathematical models to forecast ED daily visits at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), which is a tertiary care teaching hospital located in Southern Brazil. Model accuracy was evaluated using mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), considering forecasting horizons of 1, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days. The demand time series was stratified according to patient classification using the Manchester Triage System's (MTS) criteria. Models tested were the simple seasonal exponential smoothing (SS), seasonal multiplicative Holt-Winters (SMHW), seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA), and multivariate autoregressive integrated moving average (MSARIMA). Performance of models varied according to patient classification, such that SS was the best choice when all types of patients were jointly considered, and SARIMA was the most accurate for modeling demands of very urgent (VU) and urgent (U) patients. The MSARIMA models taking into account climatic factors did not improve the performance of the SARIMA models, independent of patient classification.

  14. Forecasting Daily Volume and Acuity of Patients in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Calegari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at analyzing the performance of four forecasting models in predicting the demand for medical care in terms of daily visits in an emergency department (ED that handles high complexity cases, testing the influence of climatic and calendrical factors on demand behavior. We tested different mathematical models to forecast ED daily visits at Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA, which is a tertiary care teaching hospital located in Southern Brazil. Model accuracy was evaluated using mean absolute percentage error (MAPE, considering forecasting horizons of 1, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days. The demand time series was stratified according to patient classification using the Manchester Triage System’s (MTS criteria. Models tested were the simple seasonal exponential smoothing (SS, seasonal multiplicative Holt-Winters (SMHW, seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA, and multivariate autoregressive integrated moving average (MSARIMA. Performance of models varied according to patient classification, such that SS was the best choice when all types of patients were jointly considered, and SARIMA was the most accurate for modeling demands of very urgent (VU and urgent (U patients. The MSARIMA models taking into account climatic factors did not improve the performance of the SARIMA models, independent of patient classification.

  15. Predictors of early seizure recurrence in patients admitted for seizures in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Christophe; Depret-Vassal, Jaqueline; Doumenc, Benoit; Sarnel, Sophie; Casalino, Enrique

    2008-10-01

    To determine the frequency of early seizure recurrence (ESR) and to evaluate predictors of ESR among patients attending the Emergency Department (ED) for seizure. Prospective observational 12-month study in two Paris metropolitan area EDs including all consecutive adult patients presenting after one or more convulsive seizure episodes. Patients were classified into four groups: alcoholism (A), nonalcoholism (nA), new-onset seizure (NO), and past history of seizures (PS). ESR was defined as a seizure recurrence during the first 24 h after admission. A total of 1025 patients were enrolled. The groups were as follows: A-NO 176 patients (17.2%); A-PS 263 patients (25.6%); nA-NO 170 patients (16.6%); and nA-PS 416 patients (40.6%). Alcohol-related episodes involved 439 patients (42.8) with 346 NO seizures (33.7%). ESR rates were 16.3 and 18.6% at 6 and 24 h. Alcoholism, diagnostic group, age >or=40 years, glucose >or=5 and >or=8.5 mmol/l, and Glasgow Coma Scale 5 mmol/l, OR: 1.68 (95% CI: 1.37-2.1), >or=8.5 mmol/l, 2.83 (95% CI: 2.3-3.47), P=0.000001], and Glasgow Coma Scale [<15 OR: 1.9 (95% CI: 1.29-2.78); P=0.001] remained significantly associated on multivariate analysis. We constructed a predictive model from these data. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 89.1, 27.4, 60.4, and 91.7%, respectively. ESR is common in the ED setting. Alcohol consumption, capillary glucose, and abnormal neurological examination on arrival at the ED are associated with increased risk of ESR.

  16. Injuries Associated with Hoverboard Use: A Case Series of Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Gregory S; Glueckert, Lindsey; Cachaper, Girlyn A; Zimbro, Kathie S; Maduro, Ralitsa S; Counselman, Francis

    2017-10-01

    Since hoverboards became available in 2015, 2.5 million have been sold in the US. An increasing number of injuries related to their use have been reported, with limited data on associated injury patterns. We describe a case series of emergency department (ED) visits for hoverboard-related injuries. We performed a retrospective chart review on patients presenting to 10 EDs in southeastern Virginia from December 24, 2015, through June 30, 2016. We used a free-text search feature of the electronic medical record to identify patients documented to have the word "hoverboard" in the record. We reported descriptive statistics for patient demographics, types of injuries, body injury location, documented helmet use, injury severity score (ISS), length of stay in the ED, and ED charges. We identified 83 patients in our study. The average age was 26 years old (18 months to 78 years). Of these patients, 53% were adults; the majority were female (61.4%) and African American (56.6%). The primary cause of injury was falls (91%), with an average ISS of 5.4 (0-10). The majority of injuries were contusions (37.3%) and fractures (36.1%). Pediatric patients tended to have more fractures than adults (46.2% vs 27.3%). Though 20% of patients had head injuries, only one patient reported using a helmet. The mean and median ED charges were $2,292.00 (SD $1,363.64) and $1,808.00, respectively. Head injuries resulted in a significantly higher cost when compared to other injuries; median cost was $2,846.00. While the overall ISS was low, more pediatric patients suffered fractures compared to adults. Documented helmet use was low, yet 20% of our population had head injuries. Further investigation into proper protective gear and training is warranted.

  17. A descriptive analysis of patients with an emergency department diagnosis of acute pericarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Andrew J; Celenza, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    To describe clinical characteristics, assessment and treatment of patients diagnosed in an emergency department (ED) with acute pericarditis. A medical record review of patients with an ED diagnosis of pericarditis conducted in an adult tertiary hospital over a 5-year period. Variables collected included pain characteristics, associated symptoms, physical examination findings, investigation results, ED treatment and disposition. 179 presentations were included, with 73.9% men and a mean age of 38.8 years. The majority of patients described pleuritic chest pain worse with inspiration with half characterising the pain as sharp or stabbing, with others describing tightness, dullness or cramping. Radiation to the left shoulder occurred in 2.8% and change of pain with posture occurred in 46.4%. A pericardial rub was documented in 19 presentations. All patients had an ECG recorded with ST segment elevation present in 69.3% and PR segment depression in 49.2%. Nearly 90% of patients had troponin testing but only 6.4% of these were positive. Only 8.1% of cases were treated with colchicine. No patients required pericardiocentesis. Patients with high-risk factors were more likely to have previous pericarditis, dyspnoea, nausea, abnormal investigation results, treatment with colchicine and admission to hospital. However, 16.9% of patients without risk factors were admitted, and 46.9% of patients with at least one risk factor were discharged. Pericarditis may not follow the classical clinical description. Admission and discharge decisions appear to relate to individual clinical characteristics rather than known risk factors. Use of colchicine for treatment in ED is infrequent.

  18. How do emergency department patients store and dispose of opioids after discharge? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Paula; Paice, Judith A; Stancati, Jennifer; Fleming, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Opioid abuse and overdose have increased drastically in recent years. Diversion of opioids used to treat pain, either through theft or sharing, is increasing and may contribute to this misuse. Based on these trends, we designed a study to investigate opioid storage and disposal practices of patients who were prescribed these agents in the emergency department. A prospective cohort pilot study was conducted. All adults (aged ≥18 years) with a chief complaint of either minor musculoskeletal trauma, renal colic, or acute back pain who were discharged home with an opioid prescription were eligible for inclusion; persons with chronic pain were excluded. Patients were asked to participate in two home interviews in which the research assistant viewed the storage location of the opioid prescription. Safe storage was defined as being stored in a locked container or cabinet. Safe disposal was defined as returning the drugs to a designated location or mixing unused pills with an undesirable substance, placing in a sealable container, and then in the trash. Patients self-reported disposal methods. Feasibility of study methods evaluated the ability to conduct home interviews after the ED visit. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Twenty-five subjects consented to participate; 20 patients completed both home interviews. None of the medications were safely stored. Only 1 patient disposed of the medication, yet did so improperly. This pilot study revealed widespread improper storage and disposal of opioids. The study has major implications for education for ED physicians, nurses, and residents. Copyright © 2012 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Does determining serum alcohol concentrations in emergency department patients influence physicians' civil suit liability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simel, D L; Feussner, J R

    1989-05-01

    Emergency physicians may incur liability when impaired patients who have been treated and released are subsequently involved in traffic crashes. We surveyed attorneys to assess their perception of how serum alcohol determinations might influence their liability in civil suits. Overall, 63.9% of the attorneys surveyed would advise patients that they received potentially negligent care if they were impaired following treatment in the emergency department and were involved in a traffic crashes. Perceived liability was altered by physician behavior as follows: 43.1% of attorneys would advise clients that they received potentially negligent care when impairment was documented by a test for serum alcohol concentration and no advice was given regarding drunk driving, and 17.3% of attorneys would give similar advice when impairment was not documented by a test for serum alcohol concentration and no advice was given regarding drunk driving. In contrast, only 3.5% of attorneys would suggest possible negligence when impairment was documented by a test for serum alcohol concentration and with advice subsequently given not to drive. The coupling of diagnosing impairment by the serum alcohol concentration and driving advice is medically sensible and might result in minimal civil liability.

  20. Association between Intimate Partner Violence and Health Behaviors of Female Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Elizabeth Mathew

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We assessed the correlation between intimate partner violence (IPV and health behaviors, including seat belt use, smoke alarm in home, handgun access, body mass index, diet, and exercise. We hypothesized that IPV victims would be less likely to have healthy behaviors as compared to women with similar demographics.Methods: All adult female patients who presented to 3 Atlanta-area emergency department waiting rooms on weekdays from 11AM to 7PM were asked to participate in a computer-based survey by trained research assistants. The Universal Violence Prevention Screen was used for IPV identification. The survey also assessed seatbelt use, smoke alarm presence, handgun access, height, weight, exercise, and diet. We used chi-square tests of association, odds ratios, and independent t-tests tomeasure associations between variables.Results: Participants ranged from 18 to 68 years, with a mean of 38 years. Out of 1,452 respondents, 155 patients self-identified as white (10.7%, and 1,218 as black (83.9%; 153 out of 832 women who were in a relationship in the prior year (18.4% screened positive for IPV. We found significant relationships between IPV and not wearing a seatbelt (p,0.01, handgun access (p,0.01, and eating unhealthy foods (p,0.01.Conclusion: Women experiencing IPV are more likely to exhibit risky health behaviors than women who are not IPV victims. [West J Emerg Med. 2012;13(3:278–282.

  1. Discharge from an emergency department observation unit and a surgical assessment unit: experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Helen; Qvist, Niels; Mogensen, Christian B; Pedersen, Birthe D

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the experiences of patients with acute abdominal pain at discharge from an emergency department observation unit compared with discharge from a surgical assessment unit. The increase in emergency department observation units has increased short-term admissions and changed the patient journey from admission and discharge from specialised wards staffed by specialist nurses to admission and discharge from units staffed by emergency nurses. A comparative qualitative interview study. The study included 20 patients: 10 from an emergency department observation unit and 10 from a surgical assessment unit, and took a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Patients were interviewed at discharge and three months later. More patients from the emergency department observation unit experienced readiness for discharge and had plans for follow-up, compared with patients from the surgical assessment unit. In the surgical assessment unit, more patients were readmitted, had unanswered questions after three months and experienced a follow-up visit at the general practitioner as insufficient. More patients from the surgical assessment unit reported receiving useful self-care advice, compared with those from the emergency department observation unit. The experience of emergency department observation unit patients on discharge and follow-up was that the health professionals were more supportive, compared with surgical assessment unit patients, who felt discharge occurred too early, but with more preparation for independent home self-care. These results are an important factor in the patient experience of discharge from hospital and may reflect differences in specialisation of the nurses. Units discharging patients with acute abdominal pain could be inspired by scheduled fast-track surgery programmes with structured information about admission, treatment and follow-up and easy access to relevant health professionals after discharge. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Perception of the Risks of Ebola, Enterovirus-E68 and Influenza Among Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren K. Whiteside

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emerging infectious diseases often create concern and fear among the public. Ebola virus disease (EVD and enterovirus (EV-68 are uncommon viral illnesses compared to influenza. The objective of this study was to determine risk for these viral diseases and then determine how public perception of influenza severity and risk of infection relate to more publicized but less common emerging infectious diseases such as EVD and EV-68 among a sample of adults seeking care at an emergency department (ED in the United States. Methods: We included consenting adults who sought care in two different urban EDs in Seattle, WA in November 2014. Excluded were those who were not fluent in English, in police custody, had decreased level of consciousness, a psychiatric emergency, or required active resuscitation. Patients were approached to participate in an anonymous survey performed on a tablet computer. Information sought included demographics, medical comorbidities, risk factors for EVD and EV-68, and perceptions of disease likelihood, severity and worry for developing EVD, EV-68 or influenza along with subjective estimates of the number of people who have died of each virus over the year in the United States. Results: A total of 262 (88.5% participation rate patients participated in the survey. Overall, participants identified that they were more likely to get influenza compared to EVD (p<0.001 or EV-68 (p<0.001, but endorsed worry and concern about getting both EVD and EV-68 despite having little or no risk for these viral diseases. Nearly two-thirds (64% of participants had at-least one risk factor for an influenza-related complication. Most participants (64% believed they could get influenza in the next 12 months. Only 52% had received a seasonal influenza vaccine. Conclusion: Perception of risk for EVD, EV-68 and influenza is discordant with actual risk as well as self-reported use of preventive care. Influenza is a serious public health

  3. Management of Discharged Emergency Department Patients with a Primary Diagnosis of Hypertension: A Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Dennis D; Austin, Peter C; Atzema, Clare L

    2015-09-01

    Introduction Many patients are seen in the emergency department (ED) for hypertension, and the numbers will likely increase in the future. Given limited evidence to guide the management of such patients, the practice of one's peers provides a de facto standard. A survey was distributed to emergency physicians during academic rounds at three community and four tertiary EDs. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of participants who had a blood pressure (BP) threshold at which they would offer a new antihypertensive prescription to patients they were sending home from the ED. Secondary outcomes included patient- and provider-level factors associated with initiating an antihypertensive based on clinical vignettes of a 69-year-old man with two levels of hypertension (160/100 vs 200/110 mm Hg), as well as the recommended number of days after which to follow up with a primary care provider following ED discharge. All 81 surveys were completed (100%). Half (51.9%; 95% CI 40.5-63.1) of participants indicated that they had a systolic BP threshold for initiating an antihypertensive, and 55.6% (95% CI 44.1-66.6) had a diastolic threshold: mean systolic threshold was 199 mm Hg (SD 19) while diastolic was 111 mm Hg (SD 8). A higher BP (OR 12.9; 95% CI 7.5-22.2) and more patient comorbidities (OR 3.0; 95% CI 2.1-4.3) were associated with offering an antihypertensive prescription, while physician years of practice, certification type, and hospital type were not. Participants recommended follow-up care within a median 7.0 and 3.0 days for the patient with lower and higher BP levels, respectively. Half of surveyed emergency physicians report having a BP threshold to start an antihypertensive; BP levels and number of patient comorbidities were associated with a modification of the decision, while physician characteristics were not. Most physicians recommended follow-up care within seven days of ED discharge.

  4. Outcome of Patients Underwent Emergency Department Thoracotomy and Its Predictive Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Paydar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department thoracotomy (EDT may serve as the last survival chance for patients who arrive at hospital in extremis. It is considered as an effective tool for improvement of traumatic patients’ outcome. The present study was done with the goal of assessing the outcome of patients who underwent EDT and its predictive factors. Methods: In the present study, medical charts of 50 retrospective and 8 prospective cases underwent emergency department thoracotomy (EDT were reviewed during November 2011 to June 2013. Comparisons between survived and died patients were performed by Mann-Whitney U test and the predictive factors of EDT outcome were measured using multivariate logistic regression analysis. P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty eight cases of EDT were enrolled (86.2% male. The mean age of patients was 43.27±19.85 years with the range of 18-85. The mean time duration of CPR was recorded as 37.12±12.49 minutes. Eleven cases (19% were alive to be transported to OR (defined as ED survived. The mean time of survival in ED survived patients was 223.5±450.8 hours. More than 24 hours survival rate (late survived was 6.9% (4 cases. Only one case (1.7% survived to discharge from hospital (mortality rate=98.3%. There were only a significant relation between ED survival and SBP, GCS, CPR duration, and chest trauma (p=0.04. The results demonstrated that initial SBP lower than 80 mmHg (OR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.001-1.05, p=0.04 and presence of chest trauma (OR=2.6, 95% CI: 1.75-3.16, p=0.02 were independent predictive factors of EDT mortality. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that the survival rate of trauma patients underwent EDT was 1.7%. In addition, it was defined that falling systolic blood pressure below 80 mmHg and blunt trauma of chest are independent factors that along with poor outcome.

  5. Viral meningitis: which patients can be discharged from the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Michael M; Wilde, James A

    2012-12-01

    Even in an era when cases of viral meningitis outnumber bacterial meningitis by at least 25:1, most patients with clinical meningitis are hospitalized. We describe the clinical characteristics of an unusual outbreak of viral meningitis that featured markedly elevated cerebrospinal fluid white blood cell counts (CSF WBC). A validated prediction model for viral meningitis was applied to determine which hospital admissions could have been avoided. Data were collected retrospectively from patients presenting to our tertiary care center. Charts were reviewed in patients with CSF pleocytosis (CSF WBC > 7 cells/mm(3)) and a clinical diagnosis of meningitis between March 1, 2003 and July 1, 2003. Cases were identified through hospital infection control and by surveying all CSF specimens submitted to the microbiology laboratory during the outbreak. There were 78 cases of viral meningitis and 1 case of bacterial meningitis identified. Fifty-eight percent of the viral meningitis cases were confirmed by culture or polymerase chain reaction to be due to Enterovirus. Mean CSF WBC count was 571 cells/mm(3), including 20 patients with a CSF WBC count > 750 cells/mm(3) (25%) and 11 patients with values > 1000 cells/mm(3) (14%). Sixty-four of 78 patients (82%) were hospitalized. Rates of headache, photophobia, nuchal rigidity, vomiting, and administration of intravenous fluids in the Emergency Department were no different between admitted and discharged patients. Only 26/78 (33%) patients with viral meningitis would have been admitted if the prediction model had been used. Although not all cases of viral meningitis are necessarily suitable for outpatient management, use of a prediction model for viral meningitis may have helped decrease hospitalization by nearly 60%, even though this outbreak was characterized by unusually high levels of CSF pleocytosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An observation tool for studying patient-oriented workflow in hospital emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaynak, M; Brennan, P

    2013-01-01

    Studying workflow is a critical step in designing, implementing and evaluating informatics interventions in complex sociotechnical settings, such as hospital emergency departments (EDs). Known approaches to studying workflow in clinical settings attend to the activities of individual clinicians, thus being inadequate to characterize patient care as a cooperative work. The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we introduce a novel, theory-driven patient-oriented workflow methodology, which better addresses the complex, multiple-provider nature of patient care. Second, we report the development of an observational tool and protocol for use in studies of this type, and the results of an evaluation study. We created a tablet computer implementation of an instrument to efficiently capture patient-oriented workflow, and evaluated it through a field study in three EDs. We focused on activities occurring over time during a single patient care episode as well as the roles of the ED staff members who conducted the activities. The evidence generated supports the validity, viability, and reliability of the tool. The coverage of the tool in terms of activities and roles was satisfactory. The tool was able to capture the sequence of activity-role pairs for 108 patient care episodes. The inter-rater reliability assessment yielded a high kappa value (0.79). The patient-oriented workflow methodology has the potential to facilitate modeling patient care in EDs by characterizing both roles and activities in sequence. The methodology also provides researchers and practitioners a more realistic and comprehensive workflow perspective that can inform the design, implementation and evaluation of health information technology interventions.

  7. Profiling acute presenting symptoms of geriatric patients attending an urban hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Chik Loon; Chan, Kim Chai; Goh, Hsin Kai; Seow, Eillyne

    2009-06-01

    To study the profile of geriatric patients warded to the emergency department (ED) of an Asian acute care general hospital and determine if they are 'more ill', more likely to have atypical presentations and have a higher utilisation of healthcare resources when compared to a younger group of patients. This is a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients aged 45 years and above presenting to the study ED over a period of 4 weeks from 4 June 2006 to 1 July 2006. The following data were obtained: (i) demographics, (ii) mode of arrival and triage acuity, (iii) presence of co-morbidities, (iv) investigations ordered in the ED, (v) clinical symptoms and diagnoses, (vi) disposition, (vii) length of hospital stay, (viii) injuries and outcomes of elderly fallers. The study population was divided into 2 groups--a study group with patients aged 65 years and above, and a control group with patients aged 45 to 64. There were 2847 patients in the study group and these were compared against 2875 in the control group. Those 65 years and above had greater representation in the ED population compared to the general population. In the study group, the proportion of females, the number arriving by ambulance and the likelihood of having a higher triage acuity increased with age. The elderly had higher rates of co-morbidities. They also had a higher resource utilisation rate. Falls was their commonest presenting complaint. It is crucial that EDs recognise the special needs of elderly patients due to the growing ageing population. Healthcare policy makers when allocating resources should take into account the profile of elderly patients presenting to an ED and their resource utilisation.

  8. Treatment of self-referred patients with abdominal complaints by emergency physicians. A prospective observational study in an emergency department in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geloven, A. A.; de Vries, G. M.; van der Eerden, M. M.; Luitse, J. S.; Hoitsma, H. F.; Obertop, H.

    1999-01-01

    The quality of the treatment by emergency physicians of patients with abdominal complaints, who visited the emergency department (ED) of a city hospital (OLVG), Amsterdam, The Netherlands, was evaluated in a prospective observational study. During 6 months 1853 patients with abdominal complaints

  9. The Clinical Epidemiology and 30-Day Outcomes of Emergency Department Patients With Acute Kidney Injury

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    Frank Xavier Scheuermeyer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI is associated with increased mortality and dialysis in hospitalized patients but has been little explored in the emergency department (ED setting. Objective: The objective of this study was to describe the risk factors, prevalence, management, and outcomes in the ED population, and to identify the proportion of AKI patients who were discharged home with no renal-specific follow-up. Design: This is a retrospective cohort study using administrative and laboratory databases. Setting: Two urban EDs in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Patients: We included all unique ED patients over a 1-week period. Methods: All patients had their described demographics, comorbidities, medications, laboratory values, and ED treatments collected. AKI was defined pragmatically, based upon accepted guidelines. The cohort was then probabilistically linked to the provincial renal database to ascertain renal replacement (transplant or dialysis and the provincial vital statistics database to obtain mortality. The primary outcome was the prevalence of AKI; secondary outcomes included (1 the proportion of AKI patients who were discharged home with no renal-specific follow-up and (2 the combined 30-day rate of death or renal replacement among AKI patients. Results: There were 1651 ED unique patients, and 840 had at least one serum creatinine (SCr obtained. Overall, 90 patients had AKI (10.7% of ED patients with at least one SCr, 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.7%-13.1%; 5.5% of all ED patients, 95% CI, 4.4%-6.7% with a median age of 74 and 70% male. Of the 31 (34.4% AKI patients discharged home, 4 (12.9% had renal-specific follow-up arranged in the ED. Among the 90 AKI patients, 11 died and none required renal replacement at 30 days, for a combined outcome of 12.2% (95% CI, 6.5%-21.2%. Limitations: Sample sizes may be small. Nearly half of ED patients did not obtain an SCr. Many patients did not have sequential SCr testing, and a

  10. Association of education with occurrence of delirium in patients from an emergency department

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    Simone Sieben da Mota

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Delirium is a neuropsychiatric syndrome with multiple etiological factors. Evaluation of delirium in different settings, especially the Emergency Department (ED pertaining to different regions of the world with patients from different cultural and educational backgrounds is needed. Objective: To determine the prevalence of delirium and its association with education in an ED in Brazil during a 6-month period. Methods: Patients aged >18 years were randomly selected from ED admissions. The instruments Confusion Assessment Method (CAM scale, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Wechsler Logical Memory (WLM and Charlson comorbidity score were applied to evaluate delirium, cognitive status, and comorbidities. Results: The prevalence of delirium was10.7%. Delirium patients had significantly lower education, MMSE and WLM (immediate and delayed scores, with 97.4% presenting episodic memory impairment. Patients with delirium had more history of neurological disorders. Three logistic regression models evaluating the association of variables with delirium were developed. Age and MMSE were retained in the first model, WLM scores in the second, and education in the third. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study estimating the prevalence of delirium in a Brazilian ED. Lower education was associated with the occurrence of delirium.

  11. Demographic disparities in numeracy among emergency department patients: evidence from two multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginde, Adit A; Clark, Sunday; Goldstein, Joshua N; Camargo, Carlos A

    2008-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence and demographic disparities in limited numeracy among emergency department (ED) patients. We performed two cross-sectional studies of ED patients with sub-critical illness in 2000-2001 and 2006. We enrolled 959 adult patients from 28 EDs in 17 US states and measured numeracy based on four validated questions. Rates of correct responses for individual numeracy questions ranged from 15% to 68%; only 11% of participants answered all questions correctly. Several demographic characteristics were independently associated with frequency of correct answers, including age (OR 0.92 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.87-0.97] per (upward arrow) 5 years), race/ethnicity (compared to whites: OR 0.35 for blacks [95%CI, 0.20-0.63]; and OR 0.36 for Hispanics [95%CI, 0.19-0.69]), education (OR 4.74 [95%CI, 2.01-11.14] for high school graduates vs. not), health insurance (OR 1.70 [95%CI, 1.06-2.71] for those with private insurance vs. not), and income (OR 1.13 [95%CI, 1.05-1.22] per (upward arrow) $10,000). We found a higher prevalence of limited numeracy among ED patients compared to the general population. Significant demographic disparities are consistent with previous observations for general health literacy. Greater understanding of the high prevalence of limited numeracy may guide healthcare providers to simplify messages and communicate health information more effectively.

  12. Absolute Lymphocyte Count as a Predictor of Mortality in Emergency Department Patients with Paraquat Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changwoo; Kim, Seong Chun; Lee, Soo Hoon; Jeong, Jin Hee; Kim, Dong Seob; Kim, Dong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ) is a potent, highly toxic and widely used herbicide. The major medical problems associated with PQ are accidental or suicidal ingestion. There are several prognostic markers of PQ poisoning, with the serum PQ concentration considered to be the best indicator of outcome. However, the measurement of such markers is limited in many hospitals. Objective The present study was conducted to investigate the association of absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) and the 30-day mortality rate in patients with PQ poisoning. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to the emergency department after paraquat poisoning between January 2010 and April 2013. Independent risk factors including ALC for 30-day mortality were determined. The ALC was categorized in quartiles as ≤1700, 1700 to 3200, 3200 to 5000, and >5000. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis were performed to determine the independent risk factors for mortality. Results A total of 136 patients were included in the study, and the 30-day mortality was 73.5%. ALC was significantly higher in nonsurvivors than in survivors. The highest ALC quartile (ALC>5000; hazard ratio, 2.58; 95% CI, 1.08–6.21) was associated with increased mortality in multivariate analysis. In addition, old age, lower arterial PaCO2, increased peripheral neutrophil count, and high serum levels of creatinine were associated with mortality. Conclusion The absolute lymphocyte count is associated with the 30-day mortality rate in patients with paraquat poisoning. PMID:24205140

  13. Short-term prognostic factors in the elderly patients seen in emergency departments due to infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; González-Del-Castillo, Juan; Martínez-Ortiz-de-Zárate, Mikel; Arranz-Nieto, María Jesús; González-Martínez, Félix; Piñera-Salmerón, Pascual; Navarro-Bustos, Carmen; Henríquez-Camacho, César; García-Lamberechts, Eric Jorge

    2017-04-01

    To analyse factors associated with short-term mortality in elderly patients seen in emergency departments (ED) for an episode of infectious disease. A prospective, observational, multicentre, analytical study was carried out on patients aged 75years and older who were treated in the ED of one of the eight participating hospitals. An assessment was made of 26 independent variables that could influence mortality at 30days. They covered epidemiological, comorbidity, functional, clinical and analytical factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. The study included 488 consecutive patients, 92 (18.9%) of whom died within 30days of visiting the ED. Three variables were significantly associated with higher mortality: severe functional dependence, with Barthel index ≤60 [odds ratio (OR) 8,92; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.98-15.98, P=.003], systolic blood pressure 4mmol/l [OR 21.14; 95%CI: 8.94-49.97, P=.001]. The area under the curve for the model was 0.971 (95%CI: 0.951-0.991; P<.001). Several factors evaluated in an initial assessment in the ED, including the level of functional dependence, systolic blood pressure and, especially, serum lactate, were found to determine a poor short-term prognosis in the elderly patients who presented with an episode of an infectious disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. Emergency Department Utilization Report to Decrease Visits by Pediatric Gastroenterology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jarone; Greenspan, Peter T; Israel, Esther; Katz, Aubrey; Fasano, Alessio; Kaafarani, Haytham M A; Linov, Pamela L; Raja, Ali S; Rao, Sandhya K

    2016-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) utilization is a major driver of health care costs. Specialist physicians have an important role in addressing ED utilization, especially at highly specialized, academic medical centers. We sought to investigate whether reporting of ED utilization to specialist physicians can decrease ED visits. This study analyzed an intervention to reduce ED utilization among ED patients who were followed by pediatric gastroenterologists. In May 2013, each pediatric gastroenterologist began receiving reports with rates of ED use by their patients. The reports generated discussion that resulted in a cultural and process change in which patients with urgent gastrointestinal (GI)-related complaints were preferentially seen in the office. Using control charts, we examined GI-related and all-diagnoses ED use over a 2-year period. The rate of GI-related ED visits decreased by 60% after the intervention, from 4.89 to 1.95 per 1000 office visits (P pediatric gastroenterologists was associated with physician engagement and a cultural and process change to preferentially treat patients with urgent issues in the office. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Psychological comorbidities predicting prescription opioid abuse among patients in chronic pain presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, Barth L; Fishman, Scott M; Tsodikov, Alexander; Ogden, Christine; Symreng, Ingela; Ernst, Amy

    2008-11-01

    We attempted to identify psychological comorbidities that are associated with the propensity for prescription opioid abuse. Patients presenting to an emergency department seeking opioid refills for chronic pain were evaluated with five validated self-report instruments and structured clinical interviews. The potential for prescription opioid abuse was modeled with multiple regression analysis using depression, anxiety disorders, personality disorder, and addiction as independent variables. Of the 113 patients studied, 91 (81%) showed a propensity for prescription opioid abuse as determined by scores on the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain instrument. Depression, anxiety, and a history of substance were common and panic attacks, posttraumatic stress disorder, and personality disorders were also found, albeit less frequently. Panic attacks, trait anxiety, and the presence of a personality disorder accounted for 38% of the variance in the potential for prescription opioid abuse. Patients in chronic pain should be assessed for psychological and addiction disorders because they are at increased risk for abusing opioids. They should also be referred for psychosocial treatment as part of their care, where appropriate.

  16. Clinical policy: critical issues in the evaluation and management of adult patients presenting to the emergency department with seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, J Stephen; Melnick, Edward R; Tomaszewski, Christian A; Thiessen, Molly E W; Jagoda, Andy S; Fesmire, Francis M

    2014-04-01

    This clinical policy from the American College of Emergency Physicians is the revision of a 2004 policy on critical issues in the evaluation and management of adult patients with seizures in the emergency department. A writing subcommittee reviewed the literature to derive evidence-based recommendations to help clinicians answer the following critical questions: (1) In patients with a first generalized convulsive seizure who have returned to their baseline clinical status, should antiepileptic therapy be initiated in the emergency department to prevent additional seizures? (2) In patients with a first unprovoked seizure who have returned to their baseline clinical status in the emergency department, should the patient be admitted to the hospital to prevent adverse events? (3) In patients with a known seizure disorder in which resuming their antiepileptic medication in the emergency department is deemed appropriate, does the route of administration impact recurrence of seizures? (4) In emergency department patients with generalized convulsive status epilepticus who continue to have seizures despite receiving optimal dosing of a benzodiazepine, which agent or agents should be administered next to terminate seizures? A literature search was performed, the evidence was graded, and recommendations were given based on the strength of the available data in the medical literature.

  17. Teaching the Emergency Department Patient Experience: Needs Assessment from the CORD-EM Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Kory S; Druck, Jeffrey; Silver, Matthew; Finefrock, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Since the creation of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) patient satisfaction (PS) scores, patient experience (PE) has become a metric that can profoundly affect the fiscal balance of hospital systems, reputation of entire departments and welfare of individual physicians. While government and hospital mandates demonstrate the prominence of PE as a quality measure, no such mandate exists for its education. The objective of this study was to determine the education and evaluation landscape for PE in categorical emergency medicine (EM) residencies. This was a prospective survey analysis of the Council of Emergency Medicine Residency Directors (CORD) membership. Program directors (PDs), assistant PDs and core faculty who are part of the CORD listserv were sent an email link to a brief, anonymous electronic survey. Respondents were asked their position in the residency, the name of their department, and questions regarding the presence and types of PS evaluative data and PE education they provide. We obtained 168 responses from 139 individual residencies, representing 72% of all categorical EM residencies. This survey found that only 27% of responding residencies provide PS data to their residents. Of those programs, 61% offer simulation scores, 39% provide third-party attending data on cases with resident participation, 37% provide third-party acquired data specifically about residents and 37% provide internally acquired quantitative data. Only 35% of residencies reported having any organized PE curricula. Of the programs that provide an organized PE curriculum, most offer multiple modalities; 96% provide didactic lectures, 49% small group sessions, 47% simulation sessions and 27% specifically use standardized patient encounters in their simulation sessions. The majority of categorical EM residencies do not provide either PS data or any organized PE curriculum. Those that do use a heterogeneous set of data collection modalities

  18. Patient experience in the emergency department: inconsistencies in the ethic and duty of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Cheryle; Nelson, Katherine; Connor, Margaret; Wensley, Cynthia; McKinlay, Eileen; Boulton, Amohia

    2015-01-01

    To understand how people who present on multiple occasions to the emergency department experience their health professionals' moral comportment (ethic of care and duty of care); and to understand the consequences of this for 'people who present on multiple occasions' ongoing choices in care. People (n = 34) with chronic illness who had multiple presentations were interviewed about the role that emergency departments played within their lives and health-illness journey. Unprompted, all participants shared views about the appropriateness or inappropriateness of the care they received from the health professionals in the emergency departments they had attended. These responses raised the imperative for specific analysis of the data regarding the need for and experience of an ethic of care. Qualitative description of interview data (stage 3 of a multimethod study). The methods included further analysis of existing interviews, exploration of relevant literature, use of Tronto's ethic of care as a theoretical framework for analysis, thematic analysis of people who present on multiple occasions' texts and explication of health professionals' moral positions in relation to present on multiple occasions' experiences. Four moral comportment positions attributed by the people who present on multiple occasions to the health professionals in emergency department were identified: 'sustained and enmeshed ethic and duty of care', 'consistent duty of care', 'interrupted or mixed duty and ethic of care', and 'care in breach of both the ethic and duty of care'. People who present on multiple occasions are an important group of consumers who attend the emergency department. Tronto's phases/moral elements in an ethic of care are useful as a framework for coding qualitative texts. Investigation into the bases, outcomes and contextual circumstances that stimulate the different modes of moral comportment is needed. Findings carry implications for emergency department care of people who

  19. Primary care patients in the emergency department: who are they? A review of the definition of the 'primary care patient' in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzina, Andrew J; Smith, Peter B; Cromwell, David; Eagar, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    To review the definition of 'primary care' and 'inappropriate' patients in ED and develop a generally acceptable working definition of a 'primary care' presentation in ED. A Medline review of articles on primary care in ED and the definitions used. A total of 34 reviewed papers contained a proposed definition or comment on the definition for potential 'primary care', 'general practice', or 'inappropriate' patients in ED. A representative definition was developed premised on the common factors in these papers: low urgency/acuity--triage categories four or five in the Australasian Triage Scale, self-referred--by definition, patients referred by general practitioner/community primary medical services are not primary care cases because a primary care service has referred them on, presenting for a new episode of care (i.e. not a planned return because planned returns are not self-referred), unlikely to be admitted (in the opinion of Emergency Nurse interviewers) or ultimately not admitted. This definition can be applied either prospectively or retrospectively, depending on the purpose. Appropriateness must be considered in light of a legitimate role for ED in primary care and the balance of resources between primary care and emergency medicine in local settings.

  20. Pharmacist elicited medication histories in the Emergency Department: Identifying patient groups at risk of medication misadventure

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    Ajdukovic M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Australian Pharmaceutical Advisory Committee guidelines call for a detailed medication history to be taken at the first point of admission to an Emergency Department (ED. The elderly, in particular those residing in Residential Aged Care Facilities and those with a non-English speaking background, have been identified as patient groups vulnerable to medication misadventure. Objective: to analyse the incidence of discrepancies in medication histories in these demographic groups when pharmacist elicited medication histories were compared with those taken by ED physicians. It also aimed to investigate the incidence of medication related ED presentations. Methods: The study was conducted over a six week period and included 100 patients over the age of 70, who take five or more regular medications, have three or more clinical co-morbidities and/or have been discharged from hospital in three months prior to the study. Results: Twenty four participants were classified as ‘language barrier’; 12 participants were from residential aged care facilities, and 64 participants were classified as ‘general’. The number of correctly recorded medications was lowest in the ‘language barrier’ group (13.8% compared with 18% and 19.6% of medications for ‘general’ patients and patients from residential aged care facilities respectively. Seven of the patients (29.2% with ‘language barrier’; 1 from a residential aged care facility (8.3% and 13 of the (20.3% patients from the ‘general’ category were suspected as having a medication related ED presentation. Conclusion: This study further highlights the positive contribution an ED pharmacist can make to enhancing medication management along the continuum of care. This study also confirms the vulnerability of patients with language barrier to medication misadventure and their need for interpreter services at all stages of their hospitalisation, in particular at the point of ED presentation.

  1. Alternate Access to Care: A Cross Sectional Survey of Low Acuity Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Jacqueline; Atkinson, Paul; Palmer, Erin; Fraser, Jacqueline; Vaillancourt, Elise; Howlett, Michael; Stoica, George; Powell, Maria

    2017-06-23

    Introduction Patients with low-acuity (Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale level IV and V) complaints use the emergency department (ED) to access care. This has often been attributed to lack of a primary care provider. However, simply being registered with a primary care provider may not prevent low acuity ED presentation. There is some evidence that a lack of timely access to primary care may contribute to low acuity ED presentations. The Wait Time Alliance, a group of Canadian physicians and their respective professional associations, has recently set a benchmark of same day access to family doctors. It is unclear if this benchmark has been achieved in all jurisdictions.  Methods We performed linked cross sectional surveys to quantify the number of people presenting to the ED for nonurgent problems who felt unable to access primary care. Primary care practices were also surveyed to assess access using the metric of time to third next available appointment.  Results In the patient survey, 381 of 580 patients consented to participate. Of the 89 patients who met eligibility criteria, 100% completed the survey. 32 (35.9%) reported that the wait to see their primary care provider was "too long". 45 (50.5%) patients did not contact their primary care provider's office prior to ED presentation. 45 of 72 physician surveys were returned; a response rate of 62.5%. Most (77%) physicians estimated their wait time for a standard appointment to be greater than 48 hours. The mean calculated time to third next available appointment in the region was 6.6 (95% CI 4.6-8.7) days. Conclusions Approximately half of low acuity patients do not attempt to access their primary care provider prior to ED presentation. The benchmark of same day access to primary care has not been achieved in many practices in our region. Further education regarding primary care access would likely be beneficial to both patients and providers.

  2. Health care utilization among adenosine-sensitive supraventricular tachycardia patients presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewland, Thomas A; Oesterle, Adam; Stein, John; Marcus, Gregory M

    2017-08-01

    Although adenosine-sensitive supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is generally curable, it remains an important cause of healthcare utilization. We sought to determine predictors of health care utilization among SVT patients presenting to the emergency department (ED). We studied consecutive patients evaluated in an urban, academic ED for adenosine-sensitive SVT. The primary study outcomes were (1) ambulance transportation to the index ED visit, (2) hospital admission from the index ED encounter, and (3) recurrent SVT-associated ED encounters. Among 100 patients with adenosine-sensitive SVT, 35 were transported to the ED by ambulance. Prior electrophysiologist evaluation was associated with a significant 87% reduced odds of ambulance utilization (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.03-0.67, p = 0.015). A total of 62 patients were subsequently admitted to the hospital. All patients with coronary artery disease, diabetes, syncope, and wide complex SVT were admitted. Similarly, individuals with an elevated troponin had a significantly greater odds of hospital admission (OR 16.8, 95% CI 1.9-148.4, p = 0.011). After the index ED visit, 60 patients were seen by an electrophysiologist, and 47 underwent catheter ablation. Individuals treated with catheter ablation had a significant 75% reduction in the risk of a recurrent ED visit for SVT (HR 0.25, 95% CI 0.10-0.62, p = 0.003). Readily modifiable clinical factors, including a previous visit to an electrophysiologist and treatment with catheter ablation, are associated with reduced health care utilization among patients presenting to the ED with SVT.

  3. Identification of inappropriate medication use in elderly patients with frequent emergency department visits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeffrey; Marr, Patricia; Kwan, Debbie; Meiyappan, Soumia; Adcock, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the demographic and health care characteristics of elderly family health team patients who are frequent emergency department (ED) users, focusing on potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and access to primary care services. Design: Cross-sectional retrospective chart review. Setting: Academic family medicine clinic in Toronto, Ontario. Participants: A total of 46 elderly patients (age >65 years) with 4 or more visits to a University Health Network–affiliated ED between April 1, 2010, and March 31, 2011. Main outcome measures: Using the validated STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria, PIMs were identified. The primary objective was to determine whether PIMs were associated with more frequent ED use. The secondary objective was to determine whether patients who had previously undergone a clinic pharmacist-led medication review had fewer PIMs. We also determined the health characteristics of these patients at the time of their last ED visit of the study period. Utilization of primary care resources, both prior to and after ED visits, was determined. Results: Sixty-five percent of patients were taking at least 1 PIM. The total number of PIMs in the study population was 71. Having more PIMs was significantly correlated with a higher number of ED visits (r = 0.32, p < 0.05). Patients with a previous medication review had a similar number of PIMs compared with those without a review. The mean number of concurrent medications was 12.1 and the mean Charlson Comorbidity Index score was 3.7. Significant delay between hospital discharge and primary care follow-up (median 13 days) was observed. Conclusion: Elderly patients who are more frequent ED users have a greater number of PIMs. Primary care resources appear to be underused in this population. PMID:25360151

  4. Unrecognized Hypoxia and Respiratory Depression in Emergency Department Patients Sedated For Psychomotor Agitation: Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Deitch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of respiratory depression in patients who are chemically sedated in the emergency department (ED is not well understood. As the drugs used for chemical restraint are respiratory depressants, improving respiratory monitoring practice in the ED may be warranted. The objective of this study is to describe the incidence of respiratory depression in patients chemically sedated for violent behavior and psychomotor agitation in the ED. Methods: Adult patients who met eligibility criteria with psychomotor agitation and violent behavior who were chemically sedated were eligible. SpO2 and ETCO2 (end-tidal CO2 was recorded and saved every 5 seconds. Demographic data, history of drug or alcohol abuse, medical and psychiatric history, HR and BP every 5 minutes, any physician intervention for hypoxia or respiratory depression, or adverse events were also recorded. We defined respiratory depression as an ETCO2 of >50 mmHg, a change of 10% above or below baseline, or a loss of waveform for >15 seconds. Hypoxia was defined as a SpO2 of 15 seconds. Results: We enrolled 59 patients, and excluded 9 because of >35% data loss. Twenty-eight (28/50 patients developed respiratory depression at least once during their chemical restraint (56%, 95% CI 42-69%; the median number of events was 2 (range 1-6. Twenty-one (21/50 patients had at least one hypoxic event during their chemical restraint (42%, 95% CI 29-55%; the median number of events was 2 (range 1-5. Nineteen (19/21 (90%, 95% CI 71-97% of the patients that developed hypoxia had a corresponding ETCO2 change. Fifteen (15/19 (79%, 95% CI 56-91% patients who became hypoxic met criteria for respiratory depression before the onset of hypoxia. The sensitivity of ETCO2 to predict the onset of a hypoxic event was 90.48% (95% CI: 68-98% and specificity 69% (95% CI: 49-84%. Five patients received respiratory interventions from the healthcare team to improve respiration [Airway repositioning: (2

  5. Emergency Department Management of Sepsis Patients: A Randomized, Goal-Oriented, Noninvasive Sepsis Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Win Sen; Ibrahim, Irwani; Leong, Benjamin S H; Jain, Swati; Lu, Qingshu; Cheung, Yin Bun; Mahadevan, Malcolm

    2016-03-01

    The noninvasive cardiac output monitor and passive leg-raising maneuver has been shown to be reasonably accurate in predicting fluid responsiveness in critically ill patients. We examine whether using a noninvasive protocol would result in more rapid lactate clearance after 3 hours in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department. In this open-label randomized controlled trial, 122 adult patients with sepsis and serum lactate concentration of greater than or equal to 3.0 mmol/L were randomized to receive usual care or intravenous fluid bolus administration guided by measurements of change of stroke volume index, using the noninvasive cardiac output monitor after passive leg-raising maneuver. The primary outcome was lactate clearance of more than 20% at 3 hours. Secondary outcomes included mortality, length of hospital and ICU stay, and total hospital cost. Analysis was intention to treat. Similar proportions of patients in the randomized intervention group (70.5%; N=61) versus control group (73.8%; N=61) achieved the primary outcome, with a relative risk of 0.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.77 to 1.19). Secondary outcomes were similar in both groups (P>.05 for all comparisons). Hospital mortality occurred in 6 patients (9.8%) each in the intervention and control groups on or before 28 days (relative risk=1.00; 95% CI 0.34 to 2.93). Among a subgroup of patients with underlying fluid overload states, those in the intervention group tended to receive clinically significantly more intravenous fluids at 3 hours (difference=975 mL; 95% CI -450 to 1,725 mL) and attained better lactate clearance (difference=19.7%; 95% CI -34.6% to 60.2%) compared with the control group, with shorter hospital lengths of stay (difference=-4.5 days; 95% CI -9.5 to 2.5 days). Protocol-based fluid resuscitation of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock with the noninvasive cardiac output monitor and passive leg-raising maneuver did not result in better

  6. The effects of publishing emergency department wait time on patient utilization patterns in a community with two emergency department sites: a retrospective, quasi-experiment design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bin; Youash, Sabrina

    2011-06-14

    Providing emergency department (ED) wait time information to the public has been suggested as a mechanism to reduce lengthy ED wait times (by enabling patients to select the ED site with shorter wait time), but the effects of such a program have not been evaluated. We evaluated the effects of such a program in a community with two ED sites. Descriptive statistics for wait times of the two sites before and after the publication of wait time information were used to evaluate the effects of the publication of wait time information on wait times. Multivariate logistical regression was used to test whether or not individual patients used published wait time to decide which site to visit. We found that the rates of wait times exceeding 4 h, and the 95th percentile of wait times in the two sites decreased after the publication of wait time information, even though the average wait times experienced a slight increase. We also found that after controlling for other factors, the site with shorter wait time had a higher likelihood of being selected after the publication of wait time information, but there was no such relationship before the publication. These findings were consistent with the hypothesis that the publication of wait time information leads to patients selecting the site with shorter wait time. While publishing ED wait time information did not improve average wait time, it reduced the rates of lengthy wait times.

  7. Sex differences in clinical presentation, management and outcome in emergency department patients with chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Erik P; Perry, Jeffery J; Calder, Lisa A; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh; Roger, Veronique L; Wells, George A; Stiell, Ian G

    2010-09-01

    We sought to assess sex differences in clinical presentation, management and outcome in emergency department (ED) patients with chest pain, and to measure the association between female sex and coronary angiography within 30 days. We conducted a prospective cohort study in an urban academic ED between Jul. 1, 2007, and Apr. 1, 2008. We enrolled patients over 24 years of age with chest pain and possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Among the 970 included patients, 386 (39.8%) were female. Compared with men, women had a lower prevalence of known coronary artery disease (21.0% v. 34.2%, p women as having a low (stress testing between sexes, there was a lower rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (4.7% v. 8.4%, p = 0.03) and positive stress test results (4.4% v. 7.9%, p = 0.03) in women. Women were less frequently referred for coronary angiography (9.3% v. 18.9%, p Women had a lower rate of AMI and a lower rate of positive stress test results despite similar rates of testing between sexes. Although women were less frequently referred for coronary angiography, these data suggest that sex differences in management were likely appropriate for the probability of disease.

  8. Patients With Ice Hockey Injuries Presenting to US Emergency Departments, 1990–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deits, Jeff; Yard, Ellen E.; Collins, Christy L.; Fields, Sarah K.; Comstock, R. Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Although the number of US ice hockey participants doubled from 1990 to 2006, no nationally representative studies have examined US ice hockey injuries among participants of all ages during this period. Objective: To describe patients with ice hockey injuries presenting to a representative sample of US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 through 2006. Design: Prospective injury surveillance study. Setting: The US Consumer Product Safety Commission collects data from 100 nationally representative EDs via the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Patients or Other Participants: Individuals injured while playing ice hockey and presenting to a NEISS-affiliated ED from 1990 through 2006. Main Outcome Measure(s): Incidence and patterns of ice hockey–related injuries. Results: From 1990 through 2006, 8228 patients with ice hockey–related injuries presented to NEISS-affiliated EDs, representing an estimated 302 368 ice hockey–related injuries sustained nationally during this time. Injuries occurred predominantly among males (93.5%). More than half of the injured were aged 9 to 14 years (28.9%) or 15 to 18 years (30.1%), and injury incidence in these age groups increased over the study period (P  =  .009 and P Ice hockey injury patterns vary by age and sex. Our findings indicate that many trips to the ED might be prevented by using protective equipment appropriately. PMID:20831391

  9. Validation study of a transcutaneous carbon dioxide monitor in patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicar, J; Eager, R

    2009-05-01

    Transcutaneous carbon dioxide tension (TcPco(2)) monitors offer a non-invasive method of continuously measuring arterial carbon dioxide tensions. The concordance between the TcPco(2) measurement and the value obtained from arterial blood gas sampling (Paco(2)) was measured in patients attending the emergency department. A prospective observational cohort study was performed in 49 adult patients who were undergoing arterial blood gas sampling as part of their assessment. Blood gas sampling and recording of the TcPco(2) level from the monitor was done simultaneously. Concordance between the two values (Paco(2) and TcPco(2)) was demonstrated using the method described by Bland and Altman. The mean difference was 0.02 kPa (95% CI -0.11 to 0.15). The Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.94 (parterial blood sampling is good. Using the transcutaneous method, patients may be monitored non-invasively which may reduce the need for repeated blood gas sampling.

  10. A Retrospective Analysis of the Burn Injury Patients Records in the Emergency Department, an Epidemiologic Study

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    Nilgün Aksoy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burns can be very destructive, and severely endanger the health and lives of humans. It maybe cause disability and even psychological trauma in individuals. . Such an event can also lead to economic burden on victim’s families and society. The aim of our study is to evaluate epidemiology and outcome of burn patients referring to emergency department. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study was conducted by evaluation of patients’ files and forensic reports of burned patients’ referred to the emergency department (ED of Akdeniz hospital, Turkey, 2008. Demographic data, the season, place, reason, anatomical sites, total body surface area, degrees, proceeding treatment, and admission time were recorded. Multinomial logistic regression was used to compare frequencies’ differences among single categorized variables. Stepwise logistic regression was applied to develop a predictive model for hospitalization. P<0.05 was defined as a significant level. Results: Two hundred thirty patients were enrolled (53.9% female. The mean of patients' ages was 25.3 ± 22.3 years. The most prevalence of burn were in the 0-6 age group and most of which was hot liquid scalding (71.3%. The most affected parts of the body were the left and right upper extremities. With increasing the severity of triage level (OR=2.2; 95% CI: 1.02-4.66; p=0.046, intentional burn (OR=4.7; 95% CI: 1.03-21.8; p=0.047, referring from other hospitals or clinics (OR=3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.6; p=0.001, and percentage of burn (OR=18.1; 95% CI: 5.42-62.6; p<0.001 were independent predictive factor for hospitalization. In addition, odds of hospitalization was lower in patients older than 15 years (OR=0.7; 95% CI: 0.5-0.91; p=0.035. Conclusion: This study revealed the most frequent burns are encountered in the age group of 0-6 years, percentage of <10%, second degree, upper extremities, indoor, and scalding from hot liquids. Increasing ESI severity, intentional burn, referring from

  11. Prevalence of alcohol and other substances of abuse among injured patients in a Norwegian emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogstrand, Stig Tore; Normann, Per Trygve; Rossow, Ingeborg; Larsen, Margrete; Mørland, Jørg; Ekeberg, Øivind

    2011-09-01

    Studies have found a high prevalence of both alcohol and other impairing psychoactive drugs in injured patient populations. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of potentially impairing psychoactive substances in all patients admitted to a hospital emergency department with injuries from accidents, assault or deliberate self harm. A total of 1272 patients over 18 years of age, admitted to the hospital within 12h of injury, were included. Presence of alcohol was determined by an enzymatic method and other drugs by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), both highly specific analytical methods for determining recent intake. There were 510 (40%) women in the sample. Of the patients, 38% of the women and 48% of the men had a positive blood sample for psychoactive substances on admission. The most prevalent psychoactive substance was alcohol (27%) with an average concentration of 1.5 g/kg. A further 21% of patients tested showed use of medicinal drugs, and 9% showed use of illicit substances. Cannabis was the most prevalent illicit drug (6.2%). Diazepam (7.4%) and zopiclone (5.3%) were the most prevalent medicinal drugs. In road traffic accidents, 25% of the car drivers had positive findings, about half of them for alcohol. Psychoactive substances were found in nearly half the patients admitted with injuries. The most common substance was alcohol. Alcohol was particularly related to violence, whereas medicinal drugs were most prevalent in accidents at home. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of inappropriate medication use in elderly patients with frequent emergency department visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jeffrey; Marr, Patricia; Kwan, Debbie; Meiyappan, Soumia; Adcock, Lesley

    2014-07-01

    To determine the demographic and health care characteristics of elderly family health team patients who are frequent emergency department (ED) users, focusing on potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and access to primary care services. Cross-sectional retrospective chart review. Academic family medicine clinic in Toronto, Ontario. A total of 46 elderly patients (age >65 years) with 4 or more visits to a University Health Network-affiliated ED between April 1, 2010, and March 31, 2011. Using the validated STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons' potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria, PIMs were identified. The primary objective was to determine whether PIMs were associated with more frequent ED use. The secondary objective was to determine whether patients who had previously undergone a clinic pharmacist-led medication review had fewer PIMs. We also determined the health characteristics of these patients at the time of their last ED visit of the study period. Utilization of primary care resources, both prior to and after ED visits, was determined. Sixty-five percent of patients were taking at least 1 PIM. The total number of PIMs in the study population was 71. Having more PIMs was significantly correlated with a higher number of ED visits (r = 0.32, p PIMs compared with those without a review. The mean number of concurrent medications was 12.1 and the mean Charlson Comorbidity Index score was 3.7. Significant delay between hospital discharge and primary care follow-up (median 13 days) was observed. Elderly patients who are more frequent ED users have a greater number of PIMs. Primary care resources appear to be underused in this population.

  13. Systolic blood pressure at Emergency Department presentation and 1-year mortality in acute chest pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Affan; Haaf, Philip; Meissner, Julia; Twerenbold, Raphael; Reiter, Miriam; Reichlin, Tobias; Schaub, Nora; Zbinden, Anina; Heinisch, Corinna; Drexler, Beatrice; Winkler, Katrin; Mueller, Christian

    2011-10-01

    High blood pressure at rest has been an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However the relationship between Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP) and 1-year-mortality among acute chest pain patients presenting to Emergency Department (ED); and effects of preexisting renal insufficiency, hemodynamic stress - as quantified by Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) and chest pain duration, on this relationship is unknown. Data was used from APACE (Advantageous Predictors of Acute Coronary Syndrome Evaluation), a prospective observational multicenter study of 1240 ED chest pain patients. SBP at presentation was categorized into quartiles: Q1≤127mmHg; Q2 128-142mmHg; Q3 143-160mmHg; Q4≥161mmHg. 60 deaths occurred during 1-year. One-year-mortality-rate showed lower Hazard Ratios for Q2, Q3 and Q4 vs Q1 (HR [95% CI]; 0.39 (0.19-0.78), 0.34 (0.17-0.70), 0.35 (0.17-0.72); pPatients showed progressively better prognosis from Q2 through Q4 vs Q1 only in patients who presented to ED with for more than 12h of chest pain duration. Patients with renal insufficiency had lower SBP at presentation than others (p=0.001). There was no association between the outcome and interaction variable of SBP quartiles and BNP (p=0.27). Acute chest pain patients presenting to ED exhibit an inverse association between SBP at presentation and 1-year-mortality; a relationship which appears stronger in those who present with chest pain of greater than 12h duration. Copyright © 2011 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Consultation Phone Service for Patients With Total Joint Arthroplasty May Reduce Unnecessary Emergency Department Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hällfors, Eerik; Saku, Sami A; Mäkinen, Tatu J; Madanat, Rami

    2017-10-31

    Different measures for reducing costs after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) have gained attention lately. At our institution, a free-of-charge consultation phone service was initiated that targeted patients with TJA. This service aimed at reducing unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and, thus, potentially improving the cost-effectiveness of TJAs. To our knowledge, a similar consultation service had not been described previously. We aimed at examining the rates and reasons for early postdischarge phone calls and evaluating the efficacy of this consultation service. During a 2-month period, we gathered information on every call received by the consultation phone service from patients with TJAs within 90 days of the index TJA procedure. Patients were followed for 2 weeks after making a call to detect major complications and self-initiated ED visits. Data were collected from electronic medical charts regarding age, gender, type of surgery, date of discharge, and length of hospital stay. We analyzed 288 phone calls. Calls were mostly related to medication (41%), wound complications (17%), and mobilization issues (15%). Most calls were resolved in the phone consultation. Few patients (13%) required further evaluation in the ED. The consultation service failed to detect the need for an ED visit in 2 cases (0.7%) that required further care. The consultation phone service clearly benefitted patients with TJAs. The service reduced the number of unnecessary ED visits and functioned well in detecting patients who required further care. Most postoperative concerns were related to prescribed medications, wound complications, and mobilization issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Understanding Why Patients Return to the Emergency Department after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury within 72 Hours

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    Ganti, Latha

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although there are approximately 1.1 million case presentations of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI in the emergency department (ED each year, little data is available to clinicians to identify patients who are at risk for poor outcomes, including 72-hour ED return after discharge. An understanding of patients at risk for ED return visits during the hyperacute phase following head injury would allow ED providers to develop clinical interventions that reduce its occurrence and improve outcomes. Methods: This institutional review board-approved consecutive cohort study collected injury and outcome variables on adults with the purpose of identifying positive predictors for 72-hour ED return visits in mTBI patients. Results: Of 2,787 mTBI patients, 145 (5% returned unexpectedly to the ED within 72 hours of hospital discharge. Positive predictors for ED return visits included being male (p=0.0298, being black (p=0.0456, having a lower prehospital Glasgow Coma Score (p=0.0335, suffering the injury due to a motor vehicle collision (p=0.0065, or having a bleed on head computed tomography (CT (p=0.0334. ED return visits were not significantly associated with age, fracture on head CT, or symptomology following head trauma. Patients with return visits most commonly reported post-concussion syndrome (43.1%, pain (18.7%, and recall for further clinical evaluation (14.6% as the reason for return. Of the 124 patients who returned to the ED within 72 hours, one out of five were admitted to the hospital for further care, with five requiring intensive care unit stays and four undergoing neurosurgery. Conclusion: Approximately 5% of adult patients who present to the ED for mTBI will return within 72 hours of discharge for further care. Clinicians should identify at-risk individuals during their initial visits and attempt to provide anticipatory guidance when possible. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:481–485.

  16. Effect of an Emergency Department Fast Track on Press-Ganey Patient Satisfaction Scores

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    Hwang, Calvin E.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mandated patient surveys have become an integral part of Medicare remuneration, putting hundreds of millions of dollars in funding at risk. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS recently announced a patient experience survey for the emergency department (ED. Development of an ED Fast Track, where lower acuity patients are rapidly seen, has been shown to improve many of the metrics that CMS examines. This is the first study examining if ED Fast Track implementation affects Press-Ganey scores of patient satisfaction. Methods: We analyzed returned Press-Ganey questionnaires from all ESI 4 and 5 patients seen 11AM - 11PM, August-December 2011 (pre-fast track, and during the identical hours of fast track, August-December 2012. Raw ordinal scores were converted to continuous scores for paired student t-test analysis. We calculated an odds ratio with 100% satisfaction considered a positive response. Results: An academic ED with 52,000 annual visits had 140 pre-fast track and 85 fast track respondents. Implementation of a fast track significantly increased patient satisfaction with the following: wait times (68% satisfaction to 88%, OR 4.13, 95% CI [2.32-7.33], doctor courtesy (90% to 95%, OR 1.97, 95% CI [1.04-3.73], nurse courtesy (87% to 95%, OR 2.75, 95% CI [1.46-5.15], pain control (79% to 87%, OR 2.13, 95% CI [1.16-3.92], likelihood to recommend (81% to 90%, OR 2.62, 95% CI [1.42-4.83], staff caring (82% to 91%, OR 2.82, 95% CI [1.54-5.19], and staying informed about delays (66% to 83%, OR 3.00, 95% CI [1.65-5.44]. Conclusion: Implementation of an ED Fast Track more than doubled the odds of significant improvements in Press-Ganey patient satisfaction metrics and may play an important role in improving ED performance on CMS benchmarks. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(1:34–38.

  17. Development of a Sexual Health Screening Tool for Adolescent Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Monika K; Shea, Judy A; Hayes, Katie L; Badolato, Gia; Chamberlain, James M; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Fein, Joel

    2016-07-01

    The objective was to develop a content-valid audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) sexual health survey (SHS) that is understandable and acceptable to adolescents and can be feasibly implemented in a pediatric emergency department (ED) for sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk assessment. Multistep iterative qualitative study utilizing a Delphi panel of key informants for survey development and content validity, cognitive interviews with end-users to evaluate understanding, and pilot testing with end-users to evaluate acceptability and feasibility. We developed a 20-item questionnaire through an iterative modified Delphi process with experts in adolescent and pediatric emergency medicine. All items were assessed as understandable by >90% of adolescents during the cognitive interviews. All respondents found the SHS easy to use. A total of 76.5% preferred answering questions related to sexual health through the SHS compared to face-to-face interviews. Mean (±SD) length of survey completion was 17.5 (±6.7) minutes and 88.6% of participants found survey length to be "just right." With respect to feasibility testing, there was no statistically significant difference in median ED LOS between those who piloted the SHS and those who did not (230.0 minutes vs. 219.0 minutes; p = 0.7). We developed a content-valid ACASI for the identification of adolescents at risk for STIs that was understandable, acceptable, and easy to use by adolescent patients and feasible for implementation in the pediatric ED. Future planned steps include the evaluation of the SHS in providing clinical decision support for targeted STI screening in the ED. © 2016 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  18. Male Patient Visits to the Emergency Department Decline During the Play of Major Sporting Events

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    Jerrard, David A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study whether emergency department (ED visits by male patients wane simultaneously with the play of scheduled professional and college sports events.METHODS: Retrospective cohort analysis looked at ED male patient registration rates during a time block lasting from two hours before, during, and two hours after the play of professional football games (Monday night, Sundays, post-season play, major league baseball, and a Division I college football and basketball team, respectively. These registration rates were compared to rates at similar times on similar days of the week during the year devoid of a major sporting contest. Games were assumed to have a play time of three hours. Data was collected from April 2000 through March 2003 at an urban academic ED seeing 33,000 male patients above the age of 18 years annually.RESULTS: A total of 782 games were identified and used for purposes of the study. Professional football game dates had a mean of 17.9 males (95% confidence interval [CI] 17.4-18.4 registering vs. 26.8 males (95% CI 25.9-27.6 on non-game days. A registration rate for major league baseball was 18.4 patients (95% CI 17.6-18.4. The mean for registration on comparable non-game days was 23.9 patients (95% CI 22.8-24.3. For the regional Division I college football team, the mean number of patients registering on game days and non-game days was 21.7 (95% CI 20.9-22.4 and 23.4 (95% CI 22.9-23.7, respectively. Division I college basketball play for game and non-game days had mean rates of registration of 14.5 (95% CI 13.9-15.1 and 15.5 (95% CI 15.1-15.9 patients, respectively. For all sports dates collectively, a comparison of two means yielded a mean of 18.2 patients (95% CI 17.4-18.8 registering during the study hours on game days vs. 23.3 patients (95% CI 22.0-23.7 on non-game days. The mean difference was 5.1 patients (95% CI 3.7 to 7.0 with p < .000074.CONCLUSION: Male patient visits to the ED decline during major sporting

  19. Male patient visits to the emergency department decline during the play of major sporting events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrard, David A

    2009-05-01

    To study whether emergency department (ED) visits by male patients wane simultaneously with the play of scheduled professional and college sports events. Retrospective cohort analysis looked at ED male patient registration rates during a time block lasting from two hours before, during, and two hours after the play of professional football games (Monday night, Sundays, post-season play), major league baseball, and a Division I college football and basketball team, respectively. These registration rates were compared to rates at similar times on similar days of the week during the year devoid of a major sporting contest. Games were assumed to have a play time of three hours. Data was collected from April 2000 through March 2003 at an urban academic ED seeing 33,000 male patients above the age of 18 years annually. A total of 782 games were identified and used for purposes of the study. Professional football game dates had a mean of 17.9 males (95% confidence interval [CI] 17.4-18.4) registering vs. 26.8 males (95% CI 25.9-27.6) on non-game days. A registration rate for major league baseball was 18.4 patients (95% CI 17.6-18.4). The mean for registration on comparable non-game days was 23.9 patients (95% CI 22.8-24.3). For the regional Division I college football team, the mean number of patients registering on game days and non-game days was 21.7 (95% CI 20.9-22.4) and 23.4 (95% CI 22.9-23.7), respectively. Division I college basketball play for game and non-game days had mean rates of registration of 14.5 (95% CI 13.9-15.1) and 15.5 (95% CI 15.1-15.9) patients, respectively. For all sports dates collectively, a comparison of two means yielded a mean of 18.2 patients (95% CI 17.4-18.8) registering during the study hours on game days vs. 23.3 patients (95% CI 22.0-23.7) on non-game days. The mean difference was 5.1 patients (95% CI 3.7 to 7.0) with p < .000074. Male patient visits to the ED decline during major sporting events.

  20. Patient-Reported Pain Outcomes for Children Attending an Emergency Department With Limb Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Adrianna D M; Thull-Freedman, Jennifer; Mitra, Tatum; Lethebe, Brendan Cord; Williamson, Tyler; Stang, Antonia Schirmer

    2017-10-27

    The aim of this study was to describe patient-reported pain outcomes at various stages of an emergency department (ED) visit for pediatric limb injury. This prospective cohort consisted of 905 patients aged 4 to 17 years with acute limb injury and a minimum initial pain score of 4/10. Patients reported pain scores and treatments offered and received at each stage of their ED visit. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify predictors for severe pain on initial assessment and moderate or severe pain at ED discharge. The initial median pain score was 6/10 (interquartile range, 4-6) and decreased at discharge to 4/10 (interquartile range, 2-6). Stages of the ED visit where the highest proportion of patients reported severe pain (score, ≥8 of 10) were fracture reduction (26.0% [19/73]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 17.1%-37.5%), intravenous insertion (24.4% [11/45]; 95% CI, 13.8%-39.6%), and x-ray (23.7% [158/668]; 95% CI, 20.6%-27.0%). Predictors of severe pain at initial assessment included younger age (odds ratio [OR], 0.92; 95% CI, 0.87-0.97), female sex (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.40-0.84), and presence of fracture (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.07-2.33) whereas, at discharge, older age (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23) predicted moderate/severe pain (score, ≥4 of 10). These results on the location and predictors of severe pain during an ED visit for limb injury can be used to target interventions to improve pain management and patient outcomes.

  1. A cross-sectional study of the self-report of stress among emergency department patients

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    Nirenberg Ted

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a lack of information about the prevalence of stress and types of stressors experienced by Emergency Department (ED patients. Objective: The present aim is to study the prevalence of stress, types of stressful situations and the relationship with other health issues within the ED population. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study performed in an ED at a level-1 urban trauma center for four months. An anonymous survey was offered to adult non critically ill patients who were admitted in the ED. They were divided on the basis of gender, age and level of stress and were asked about their demographics, reasons for their ED visit and health issues including stress, tobacco, alcohol and marijuana use, weight concern and health. Chi-square for the categorical variables and unpaired t-tests for continuous variables were conducted. Results: We interviewed 1797 patients, over 66% reported that they felt stressed on at least a weekly basis, and over 45% indicated that they felt stressed more than twice per week. While both young and old were equally stressed, females reported significantly more stress. Family, finances and work are the most frequently cited stressors. Different age groups reported different types of stressors. Overall, those patients reporting being stressed more frequently reported more high risk behaviors including cigarette and marijuana use and health problems including being overweight, being depressed, and having sleeping problems and chronic fatigue. Conclusions: Considering the high frequency of ED patients that report frequent stress and high risk behaviors, their ED visit may be an excellent opportunity to provide a referral or an intervention for stress reduction.

  2. A series of patients in the emergency department diagnosed with copper poisoning: recognition equals treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Nurullah; Yildirim, Cuma; Karcioglu, Ozgur; Gunay, Nahide Ekici; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Usalan, Celalettin; Kose, Ataman; Togun, Ismail

    2006-07-01

    Only scarce data are available on chronic copper poisoning in general toxicology literature. This paper reports four patients with chronic copper poisoning and one patient with acute poisoning. The cases with chronic poisoning in our study consisted of four members of a farmer family presenting to the emergency department (ED) with malaise, weakness, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness, tightness in the chest, leg and back pain, accompanied by significant anemia (hemoglobin [Hb]: 8.7 - 9.5 g/dl). They were hospitalized and investigated thoroughly, although there were no other findings or clues enlightening the etiology of anemia. The anemia was attributed to chronic copper exposure acquired from vegetables containing copper. The diagnosis was established by ruling out other possible etiologies and history coupled with laboratory findings. The patients were discharged with the recommendation on diet to avoid consumption of pesticide-treated vegetables. Their Hb values were between 10 and 11.4 g/dl on the 15th day, and between 12 and 14 g/dl after two months. Their symptoms had also resolved completely in two months. The patient with acute intoxication (5th case) had ingested copper oxychloride with suicidal intent. He was admitted with anuria and hemolytic anemia. After being hospitalized for fifteen days, he was diagnosed with chronic renal failure and was scheduled for a dialysis program. Acute poisoning is more deliberate, while chronic exposure may result in atypical findings. In conclusion, physicians working in primary care and EDs should consider copper poisoning in patients presenting with anemia, abdominal pain, headache, tightness in the chest, and leg and back pain.

  3. Predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Lobato-Casado, Paula; Cámara-Marín, Belén; Pérez-Matos, Julio Alberto; Martínez-Maroto, Tamara

    2017-04-01

    To analyse and compare predictive factors of bacterial meningitis in the patients seen in the Emergency Departments (ED) due to an episode of acute meningitis (AM). A prospective, observational study was carried out in patients aged 15 years and older seen in ED due to AM between August 2009 and November 2015. Thirty-two variables for predicting bacterial meningitis were assessed. They covered epidemiological, comorbidity, clinical and analytical factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. The study included 154 patients. The diagnosis was bacterial meningitis in 53 (34.4%) patients. Four variables were significantly associated with bacterial aetiology: cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate concentration ≥33mg/dl (odds ratio [OR] 50.84; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.63-119.47, P<.001), serum procalcitonin (PCT) ≥0.8ng/ml (OR 46.34; 95%CI: 19.71-108.89; P<.001), CSF glucose <60% of blood value (OR 20.82; 95%CI: 8.86-48.96; P=.001), CSF polymorphonuclears greater than 50% (OR 20.19; 95%CI: 8.31-49.09; P=.002]. The area under the curve for the model serum PCT≥0.8ng/ml plus CSF lactate ≥33mg/dl was 0.992 (95%CI: 0.979-1; P<.001), and achieved 99% sensitivity and 98% specificity for predicting bacterial meningitis. Serum PCT with CSF lactate, CSF glucose and CSF polymorphonuclears evaluated in an initial assessment in the ED for patients with AM, achieved an excellent diagnostic usefulness for predicting bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Predictive score for mortality in patients with COPD exacerbations attending hospital emergency departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about predictors of short-term outcomes in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (eCOPD) attending an emergency department (ED). Such information could help stratify these patients and guide medical decision-making. The aim of this study was to develop a clinical prediction rule for short-term mortality during hospital admission or within a week after the index ED visit. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of patients with eCOPD attending the EDs of 16 participating hospitals. Recruitment started in June 2008 and ended in September 2010. Information on possible predictor variables was recorded during the time the patient was evaluated in the ED, at the time a decision was made to admit the patient to the hospital or discharge home, and during follow-up. Main short-term outcomes were death during hospital admission or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED, as well as at death within 1 month of the index ED visit. Multivariate logistic regression models were developed in a derivation sample and validated in a validation sample. The score was compared with other published prediction rules for patients with stable COPD. Results In total, 2,487 patients were included in the study. Predictors of death during hospital admission, or within 1 week of discharge to home from the ED were patient age, baseline dyspnea, previous need for long-term home oxygen therapy or non-invasive mechanical ventilation, altered mental status, and use of inspiratory accessory muscles or paradoxical breathing upon ED arrival (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.85). Addition of arterial blood gas parameters (oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures (PO2 and PCO2)) and pH) did not improve the model. The same variables were predictors of death at 1 month (AUC = 0.85). Compared with other commonly used tools for predicting the severity of COPD in stable patients, our rule was significantly better

  5. A Patient-Centered Emergency Department Management Strategy for Sickle-Cell Disease Super-Utilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grant G; Hahn, Hallie R; Powel, Alex A; Leverence, Robert R; Morris, Linda A; Thompson, Lara G; Zumberg, Marc S; Borde, Deepa J; Tyndall, Joseph A; Shuster, Jonathan J; Yealy, Donald M; Allen, Brandon R

    2017-04-01

    A subpopulation of sickle-cell disease patients, termed super-utilizers, presents frequently to emergency departments (EDs) for vaso-occlusive events and may consume disproportionate resources without broader health benefit. To address the healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population, we piloted a multidisciplinary intervention seeking to create and use individualized patient care plans that alter utilization through coordinated care. Our goals were to assess feasibility primarily, and to assess resource use secondarily. We evaluated the effects of a single-site interventional study targeted at a population of adult sickle-cell disease super-utilizers using a pre- and post-implementation design. The pre-intervention period was 06/01/13 to 12/31/13 (seven months) and the post-intervention period was 01/01/14 to 02/28/15 (14 months). Our approach included patient-specific best practice advisories (BPA); an ED management protocol; and formation of a "medical home" for these patients. For 10 subjects targeted initially we developed and implemented coordinated care plans; after deployment, we observed a tendency toward reduction in ED and inpatient utilization across all measured indices. Between the annualized pre- and post-implementation periods we found the following: ED visits decreased by 16.5 visits/pt-yr (95% confidence interval [CI] [-1.32-34.2]); ED length of state (LOS) decreased by 115.3 hours/pt-yr (95% CI [-82.9-313.5]); in-patient admissions decreased by 4.20 admissions/pt-yr (95% CI [-1.73-10.1]); in-patient LOS decreased by 35.8 hours/pt-yr (95% CI [-74.9-146.7]); and visits where the patient left before treatment were reduced by an annualized total of 13.7 visits. We observed no patient mortality in our 10 subjects, and no patient required admission to the intensive care unit 72 hours following discharge. This effort suggests that a targeted approach is both feasible and potentially effective, laying a foundation for broader study.

  6. Impact of visual art on patient behavior in the emergency department waiting room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Upali; Chanaud, Cheryl; Nelson, Michael; Zhu, Xi; Bajema, Robyn; Jansen, Ben H

    2012-07-01

    Wait times have been reported to be one of the most important concerns for people visiting emergency departments (EDs). Affective states significantly impact perception of wait time. There is substantial evidence that art depicting nature reduces stress levels and anxiety, thus potentially impacting the waiting experience. To analyze the effect of visual art depicting nature (still and video) on patients' and visitors' behavior in the ED. A pre-post research design was implemented using systematic behavioral observation of patients and visitors in the ED waiting rooms of two hospitals over a period of 4 months. Thirty hours of data were collected before and after new still and video art was installed at each site. Significant reduction in restlessness, noise level, and people staring at other people in the room was found at both sites. A significant decrease in the number of queries made at the front desk and a significant increase in social interaction were found at one of the sites. Visual art has positive effects on the ED waiting experience. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Patients with ice hockey injuries presenting to US emergency departments, 1990-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deits, Jeff; Yard, Ellen E; Collins, Christy L; Fields, Sarah K; Comstock, R Dawn

    2010-01-01

    Although the number of US ice hockey participants doubled from 1990 to 2006, no nationally representative studies have examined US ice hockey injuries among participants of all ages during this period. To describe patients with ice hockey injuries presenting to a representative sample of US emergency departments (EDs) from 1990 through 2006. Prospective injury surveillance study. The US Consumer Product Safety Commission collects data from 100 nationally representative EDs via the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Individuals injured while playing ice hockey and presenting to a NEISS-affiliated ED from 1990 through 2006. Incidence and patterns of ice hockey-related injuries. From 1990 through 2006, 8228 patients with ice hockey-related injuries presented to NEISS-affiliated EDs, representing an estimated 302 368 ice hockey-related injuries sustained nationally during this time. Injuries occurred predominantly among males (93.5%). More than half of the injured were aged 9 to 14 years (28.9%) or 15 to 18 years (30.1%), and injury incidence in these age groups increased over the study period (P  =  .009 and P Ice hockey injury patterns vary by age and sex. Our findings indicate that many trips to the ED might be prevented by using protective equipment appropriately.

  8. Early predictors of narcotics-dependent patients in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Che Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not unusual that narcotics-dependent patients fulfill their medical requirements in the emergency department (ED. The behavior of these patients varies, and their manifestations and predictors are still not fully studied. We performed this retrospective study by prospectively collecting data on patients with suspected drug dependence who were undiagnosed at first and then treated for some kind of reported pain at the ED. Patients who were confirmed to have narcotics dependence were compared with control patients in a ratio of 1:3 matching for age, gender, disease, and clinical diagnoses. From January 2006 to October 2009, 26 of 223 patients treated for pain were found to be drug dependent (12 males and 14 females. The average dose of narcotics used was higher than the control group [3.23 ± 1.14 vs. 1.12 ± 0.36, p < 0.001, confidence interval (CI: 1.648–2.583]. Numbers of patients making unscheduled returns to the ED within 24 hours were significant [24/26 vs. 8/78, p ≤ 0.001, odds ratio (OR 105.00, 95% CI 20.834–529.175]. In addition, patients showing aggressive attitudes were significant (17/26 vs. 2/78, p < 0.001, OR 71.78, 95% CI 14.206–362.663. In the case group, six of them told the physician that they were allergic to medicines other than the particular one they wanted, and three of the six presented injuries that were reported to be in the same (or repeated place for unscheduled returns, which were not found in the control group. In this study, some behaviors were commonly observed in the at-risk group. These patients were prone to manifest some types of symptoms and behaviors, such as uncontrolled pain with three doses of analgesics, aggressive attitude, returning to the ED within 24 hours with the complaint of the same severe pain, repeating the same injury, claiming allergy to other analgesics, and asking for certain analgesics. All these behaviors should alert the physician to suspect a drug-seeking problem.

  9. Characteristics of patients presenting to the vascular emergency department of a tertiary care hospital: a 2-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotsikoris Ioannis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of health care in Greece is receiving increased attention to improve its cost-effectiveness. We sought to examine the epidemiological characteristics of patients presenting to the vascular emergency department of a Greek tertiary care hospital during a 2-year period. We studied all patients presenting to the emergency department of vascular surgery at Red Cross Hospital, Athens, Greece between 1st January 2009 and 31st December 2010. Results Overall, 2452 (49.4% out of 4961 patients suffered from pathologies that should have been treated in primary health care. Only 2509 (50.6% needed vascular surgical intervention. Conclusions The emergency department of vascular surgery in a Greek tertiary care hospital has to treat a remarkably high percentage of patients suitable for the primary health care level. These results suggest that an improvement in the structure of health care is needed in Greece.

  10. 23 Patient and staff perspectives on the reasons for increasing emergency department attendances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablard, Suzanne; Rimmer, Melanie; O'Keeffe, Colin; Mason, Suzanne

    2017-12-01

    An NHS England review recognised that demand for Urgent and Emergency Care is unsustainable. Health practitioners and policy makers are interested in understanding the reasons why patients with low acuity problems attend the Emergency Department (ED). This should, in turn, assist the development of interventions to reduce demand.We aimed to gain an understanding about the reasons for rising ED demand and to identify possible solutions. A self-report patient survey was administered to non-ambulance patients at 9 EDs across Yorkshire and Humber (Y and H) asking participants: reasons for attending the ED; awareness of alternative services; and perceptions of the suitability of other services to manage their health problem. Survey data was analysed descriptively and compared with two similar studies conducted in 1997 and 2006.Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ED and Urgent Care staff (Consultants, Doctors, Nurses, Managers, General Practitioner) working in 9 EDs across Y and H. The interview topic guide was structured around: description of patients attending EDs and impact on demand; and current/future initiatives to deal with rising demand. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically using Framework Analysis. 481 surveys were completed. Increasing numbers of patients reported that a health professional advised them to attend the ED (31% in 1997 vs 50% in 2016). Awareness of alternative urgent care services had increased since 2006 but the perceived appropriateness of these services had decreased or stayed the same.Interviews were carried out with 25 ED and urgent care staff. Reasons for attendance at the ED were divided into patient-level reasons (e.g., people are more demanding of the healthcare system; poor health literacy) and structural-level reasons (e.g., difficulties accessing primary care; alternative healthcare services directing patients to the ED inappropriately). Our participants described a wide range of interventions

  11. Reducing Unnecessary Imaging for Patients With Constipation in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Catherine Craun; Gray, Matthew P; Diaz, Melissa; Boyd, Kevin P

    2017-07-01

    Constipation is a common diagnosis in the pediatric emergency department (ED). Children diagnosed with constipation may undergo an abdominal radiograph (AXR) as part of their diagnostic workup despite studies that suggest that an AXR in a patient suspected of being constipated is unnecessary and potentially misleading. We aimed to decrease the percentage of low-acuity patients aged between 6 months and 18 years diagnosed with constipation who undergo an AXR in our pediatric ED from 60% to 20% over 12 months. We conducted an interventional improvement project at a large, urban pediatric ED by using the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Model for Improvement. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients ultimately diagnosed with constipation who had an AXR during their ED visit. Analysis was performed by using rational subgrouping and stratification on statistical process control (SPC) charts. Process analysis was performed by using a cause-and-effect diagram. Four plan-do-study-act cycles were completed over 9 months. Interventions included holding Grand Rounds on constipation, sharing best practices, metrics reporting, and academic detailing. Rational subgrouping and stratification on SPC charts were used to target the interventions to different ED provider groups. Over 12 months, we observed a significant and sustained decrease from a mean rate of 62% to a mean rate of 24% in the utilization of AXRs in the ED for patients with constipation. The use of rational subgrouping and stratification on SPC charts to study different ED provider groups resulted in a substantial and sustained reduction in the rate of AXRs for constipation. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Self-reported safety belt use among emergency department patients in Boston, Massachusetts

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    Mitchell Patricia

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safety belt use is 80% nationally, yet only 63% in Massachusetts. Safety belt use among potentially at-risk groups in Boston is unknown. We sought to assess the prevalence and correlates of belt non-use among emergency department (ED patients in Boston. Methods A cross-sectional survey with systematic sampling was conducted on non-urgent ED patients age ≥18. A closed-ended survey was administered by interview. Safety belt use was defined via two methods: a single-item and a multiple-item measure of safety belt use. Each was scored using a 5-point frequency scale. Responses were used to categorize safety belt use as 'always' or less than 'always'. Outcome for multivariate logistic regression analysis was safety belt use less than 'always'. Results Of 478 patients approached, 381 (80% participated. Participants were 48% female, 48% African-American, 40% White, median age 39. Among participants, 250 (66% had been in a car crash; 234 (61% had a valid driver's license, and 42 (11% had been ticketed for belt non-use. Using two different survey measures, a single-item and a multiple-item measure, safety belt use 'always' was 51% and 36% respectively. According to separate regression models, factors associated with belt non-use included male gender, alcohol consumption >5 drinks in one episode, riding with others that drink and drive, ever receiving a citation for belt non-use, believing that safety belt use is 'uncomfortable', and that 'I just forget', while 'It's my usual habit' was protective. Conclusion ED patients at an urban hospital in Boston have considerably lower self-reported safety belt use than state or national estimates. An ED-based intervention to increase safety belt use among this hard-to-reach population warrants consideration.

  13. DRINKING PATTERNS AND DSM-IV ALCOHOL USE DISORDERS’ CRITERIA IN ARGENTINEAN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonte, Mariana; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.; Borges, Guilherme; Peltzer, Raquel I.; Santángelo, Pablo R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown cultural variations in normative drinking and furthermore, in the quantity and frequency of drinking related to alcohol use disorders. Aim The main goal of this study is to characterize alcohol drinking patterns in Argentinean Emergency Department patients, and secondly, to explore the association between those drinking patterns and DSM-IV alcohol use disorders. Method Data were collected from a probability sample of patients admitted to the Emergency Department of a large public hospital in Mar del Plata, Argentina. Data analyzed here pertain to those who reported consuming at least one drink during the last twelve months (n=529). A factor analysis of multiple correspondences and a hierarchic classification were performed. For the factor analysis, usual quantity and frequency of drinking (for the last 12 months) were considered active variables; number of DSM-IV dependence criteria met, positive or negative diagnostic status for abuse, positive or negative diagnostic status for dependence (both for the last 12 months), and socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender and economic level) were considered illustrative variables. Results The first five factorial axes were retained, accounting for 88% of the total variance. Hierarchic classification resulted in six distinctive classes of drinking patterns. Two patterns were associated with a positive diagnosis of abuse and dependence, respectively. One, drinking between 4 and 6 drinks per occasion mostly on a weekly basis, was associated with a diagnosis of abuse; this pattern was also associated with meeting one or two dependence criteria (dependence orphans). The other, drinking 7 or more drinks per occasion, was associated with a diagnosis of dependence, and also with a diagnostic orphan condition. This class, composed primarily of males, was not characterized by any particular frequency of drinking. The other four drinking patterns were not associated with a positive

  14. Evaluation of California's Alcohol and Drug Screening and Brief Intervention Project for Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan I Woodruff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Visits to settings such as emergency departments (EDs may present a “teachable moment” in that a patient may be more open to feedback and suggestions regarding their risky alcohol and illicit drug-use behaviors. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT is an ’opportunistic’ public health approach that targets low-risk users, in addition to those already dependent on alcohol and/or drugs. SBIRT programs provide patients with comprehensive screening and assessments, and deliver interventions of appropriate intensity to reduce risks related to alcohol and drug use. Methods: This study used a single group pre-post test design to assess the effect of the California SBIRT service program (i.e., CASBIRT on 6 substance-use outcomes (past-month prevalence and number of days of binge drinking, illegal drug use, and marijuana use. Trained bilingual/bicultural Health Educators attempted to screen all adult patients in 12 EDs/trauma centers (regardless of the reason for the patient’s visit using a short instrument, and then delivered a brief motivational intervention matched to the patient’s risk level. A total of 2,436 randomly selected patients who screened positive for alcohol and/or drug use consented to be in a 6-month telephone follow-up interview. Because of the high loss to follow-up rate, we used an intention-to-treat approach for the data analysis. Results: Results of generalized linear mixed models showed modest reductions in all 6 drug- and alcohol-use outcomes. Men (versus women, those at relatively higher risk status (versus lower risk, and those with only one substance of misuse (versus both alcohol and illicit drug misuse tended to show more positive change. Conclusion: These results suggest that SBIRT services provided in acute care settings are associated with modest changes in self-reported recent alcohol and illicit drug use. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(3:263–270.

  15. Pharmacist advice is accepted more for medical than for surgical patients in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer Mogensen, Christian; Olsen, Inger; Thisted, Anette Rehn

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacists' advice may reduce medication errors in the emergency department (ED). However, pharmacists' recommendations are of little value if not acknowledged by physicians. The aim of the present study was to analyze how often and which categories of pharmacist recommendations were taken...

  16. The value of the clinical impression in recognizing and treating sepsis patients in the emergency department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Anna Elizabeth; Holman, Mirjam; ter Maaten, Jan Cornelis

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Immediate bedside recognition of sepsis in the emergency department (ED) enables early treatment. This study aims to investigate whether the clinical impression score of different health care providers (a) is a good predictor of the severity of sepsis, (b) is mutually agreed, and (c)

  17. Autism in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen-Silver, Justine Heather; Muskat, Barbara; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2014-10-01

    This is a retrospective chart review of autistic patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) in a tertiary care pediatric center during the year 2011. There were 160 ED visits by 130 patients, 25% of visits were repeated, and 20% were admitted to the hospital. There were 126 (79%) male and 34 (21%) female patients mean age of 12 years, 79% had comorbid health conditions. Forty percent were CTAS 2 (Canadian Triage Acuity Score) acuity, 42% of visits were CTAS 3 acuity, and 7% rated their pain as "severe." Visits were for behavior (10%), neurological concern (13%), 3% dental related, and the remainder were for gastrointestinal infections and other complaints. Average length of stay was 6 hours 21 minutes, with 2-hour wait to start assessment with physician. Autism is a prevalent diagnosis and patients with autism are accessing the ED. We hope to use these demographic findings to better serve these patients and their families. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Impact of Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders on Emergency Department Visit Outcomes for HIV Patients

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    Brian Y. Choi, MD, MPH

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A disproportionate number of individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV have mental health and substance-use disorders (MHSUDs, and MHSUDs are significantly associated with their emergency department (ED visits. With an increasing share of older adults among HIV patients, this study investigated the associations of MHSUDs with ED outcomes of HIV patients in four age groups: 21-34, 35-49, 50-64, and 65+ years. Methods: We used the 2012 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS dataset (unweighted n=23,244,819 ED events by patients aged 21+, including 115,656 visits by patients with HIV. Multinomial and binary logistic regression analyses, with “treat-and-release” as the base outcome, were used to examine associations between ED outcomes and MHSUDs among visits that included a HIV diagnosis in each age group. Results: Mood and “other” mental disorders had small effects on ED-to-hospital admissions, as opposed to treat-and-release, in age groups younger than 65+ years, while suicide attempts had medium effects (RRR=3.56, CI [2.69-4.70]; RRR=4.44, CI [3.72-5.30]; and RRR=5.64, CI [4.38- 7.26] in the 21-34, 35-49, and 50-64 age groups, respectively. Cognitive disorders had mediumto-large effects on hospital admissions in all age groups and large effects on death in the 35-49 (RRR=7.29, CI [3.90-13.62] and 50-64 (RRR=5.38, CI [3.39-8.55] age groups. Alcohol use disorders (AUDs had small effects on hospital admission in all age groups (RRR=2.35, 95% CI [1.92-2.87]; RRR=2.15, 95% CI [1.95-2.37]; RRR=1.92, 95% CI [1.73-2.12]; and OR=1.93, 95% CI [1.20-3.10] in the 21-34, 35-49, 50-64, and 65+ age groups, respectively. Drug use disorders (DUDs had small-to-medium effects on hospital admission (RRR=4.40, 95% CI [3.87-5.0]; RRR=4.07, 95% CI [3.77-4.40]; RRR=4.17, 95% CI [3.83-4.55]; and OR=2.53, 95% CI [2.70- 3.78] in the 21-34, 35-49, 50-64, and 65+ age groups, respectively. AUDs and DUDs were also significantly related to

  19. Medical consumption compared for TIMI and HEART score in chest pain patients at the emergency department : A retrospective cost analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwets, A.; Poldervaart, J. M.; Reitsma, J. B.; Buitendijk, S.; Six, A. J.; Backus, B. E.; Hoes, A. W.; Doevendans, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate which risk score (TIMI score or HEART score) identifies the largest population of low-risk patients at the emergency department (ED). Furthermore, we retrospectively calculated the corresponding expected decrease in medical consumption if these patients would have been

  20. Be careful with triage in emergency departments: interobserver agreement on 1,578 patients in France

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    Olivier Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For several decades, emergency departments (EDs utilization has increased, inducing ED overcrowding in many countries. This phenomenon is related partly to an excessive number of nonurgent patients. To resolve ED overcrowding and to decrease nonurgent visits, the most common solution has been to triage the ED patients to identify potentially nonurgent patients, i.e. which could have been dealt with by general practitioner. The objective of this study was to measure agreement among ED health professionals on the urgency of an ED visit, and to determine if the level of agreement is consistent among different sub-groups based on following explicit criteria: age, medical status, type of referral to the ED, investigations performed in the ED, and the discharge from the ED. Methods We conducted a multicentric cross-sectional study to compare agreement between nurses and physicians on categorization of ED visits into urgent or nonurgent. Subgroups stratified by criteria characterizing the ED visit were analyzed in relation to the outcome of the visit. Results Of 1,928 ED patients, 350 were excluded because data were lacking. The overall nurse-physician agreement on categorization was moderate (kappa = 0.43. The levels of agreement within all subgroups were variable and low. The highest agreement concerned three subgroups of complaints: cranial injury (kappa = 0.61, gynaecological (kappa = 0.66 and toxicology complaints (kappa = 1.00. The lowest agreement concerned two subgroups: urinary-nephrology (kappa = 0.09 and hospitalization (kappa = 0.20. When categorization of ED visits into urgent or nonurgent cases was compared to hospitalization, ED physicians had higher sensitivity and specificity than nurses (respectively 94.9% versus 89.5%, and 43.1% versus 30.9%. Conclusions The lack of physician-nurse agreement and the inability to predict hospitalization have important implications for patient safety. When urgency screening is used

  1. Original sound compositions reduce anxiety in emergency department patients: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Tracey J; Jelinek, George A; Macarow, Keely E; Samartzis, Philip; Brown, David M; Grierson, Elizabeth M; Winter, Craig

    2011-12-19

    To determine whether emergency department (ED) patients' self-rated levels of anxiety are affected by exposure to purpose-designed music or sound compositions with and without the audio frequencies of embedded binaural beat. Randomised controlled trial in an ED between 1 February 2010 and 14 April 2010 among a convenience sample of adult patients who were rated as category 3 on the Australasian Triage Scale. All interventions involved listening to soundtracks of 20 minutes' duration that were purpose-designed by composers and sound-recording artists. Participants were allocated at random to one of five groups: headphones and iPod only, no soundtrack (control group); reconstructed ambient noise simulating an ED but free of clear verbalisations; electroacoustic musical composition; composed non-musical soundtracks derived from audio field recordings obtained from natural and constructed settings; sound composition of audio field recordings with embedded binaural beat. All soundtracks were presented on an iPod through headphones. Patients and researchers were blinded to allocation until interventions were administered. State-trait anxiety was self-assessed before the intervention and state anxiety was self-assessed again 20 minutes after the provision of the soundtrack. Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Of 291 patients assessed for eligibility, 170 patients completed the pre-intervention anxiety self-assessment and 169 completed the post-intervention assessment. Significant decreases (all P anxiety level were observed among patients exposed to the electroacoustic musical composition (pre-intervention mean, 39; post-intervention mean, 34), audio field recordings (42; 35) or audio field recordings with embedded bianaural beats (43; 37) when compared with those allocated to receive simulated ED ambient noise (40; 41) or headphones only (44; 44). In moderately anxious ED patients, state anxiety was reduced by 10%-15% following exposure to purpose

  2. Patient- and Community-Level Sociodemographic Characteristics Associated with Emergency Department Visits for Childhood Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Michelle L; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Cook, Lawrence J; Funai, Tomohiko; Goldstick, Jason; Stanley, Rachel M; Chamberlain, James M; Cunningham, Rebecca M; Lipton, Robert; Alpern, Elizabeth R

    2015-09-01

    To examine pediatric emergency department (ED) visits over 5 years, trends in injury severity, and associations between injury-related ED visit outcome and patient and community-level sociodemographic characteristics. Retrospective analysis of administrative data provided to the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Core Data Project, 2004-2008. Home addresses were geocoded to determine census block group and associated sociodemographic characteristics. Maximum Abbreviated Injury Scale severity and Severity Classification System scores were calculated. Generalized estimating equations were used to test for associations between sociodemographic characteristics and admission or transfer among injury-related ED visits. Overall ED visits and injury-related visits increased from 2004 to 2008 at study sites. Of 2,833676 successfully geocoded visits, 700,821 (24.7%) were injury-related. The proportion of higher severity injury-related visits remained consistent. Nearly 10% of injury-related visits resulted in admission or transfer each year. After adjusting for age, sex, payer, and injury severity, odds of admission or transfer were lower among minority children and children from areas with moderate and high prevalence of poverty. Pediatric injury-related ED visits to included sites increased over the study period while injury severity, anticipated resource utilization, and visit outcomes remained stable, with low rates of admission or transfer. Sociodemographic differences in injury-related visits and ED disposition were apparent. ED-based injury surveillance is essential to understand disparities, inform targets for prevention programs, and reduce the overall burden of childhood injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transgender and Gender Nonconforming in Emergency Departments: A Qualitative Report of Patient Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm-Straker, Makini; Jardine, Logan; Bennouna, Cyril; Morency-Brassard, Nina; Coy, Lauren; Egemba, Maria Olivia; Shearer, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Background: Individuals who have a transgender or gender nonconforming (TGGNC) experience belong to a marginalized segment of the U.S. population, and healthcare can be difficult for them to navigate. Although emergency departments (EDs) traditionally serve as healthcare "safety nets" for vulnerable populations, quantitative studies outside the United States have found that TGGNC-experienced persons tend to avoid EDs and/or have negative experiences. This qualitative study primarily describes the ED experiences of people with a TGGNC history; furthermore, the study explores reasons why this population avoids U.S. EDs and their recommendations for improvements to ED care. Methods: This qualitative study used data about TGGNC-historied persons' experiences in U.S. EDs from retrospective, anonymous, written surveys (paper or web based). National data collection took place from June 2012 through December 2014. Participant responses (n=240) were examined using thematic analysis. Results: Using a framework that recognized positive and negative responses, the themes of Self-Efficacy and Power Inequity surfaced. These themes exposed the tension between patients with TGGNC experiences and clinicians who were perceived to lack training in this area, resulting in negative patient experiences. When practitioners had specific training about this population, participants reported positive care experiences. Conclusions: This study indicates that many TGGNC-historied persons who use U.S. EDs have negative experiences, largely due to lack of provider sensitivity toward and training about this patient population. Data from this investigation suggest that training of U.S. ED providers and institutional support would help improve care for this marginalized group.

  4. Information Technology Improves Emergency Department Patient Discharge Instructions Completeness and Performance on a National Quality Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, E.J.; Takhar, S.S.; Beloff, J.R.; Schuur, J.D.; Landman, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective To compare the completeness of Emergency Department (ED) discharge instructions before and after introduction of an electronic discharge instructions module by scoring compliance with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Outpatient Measure 19 (OP-19). Methods We performed a quasi-experimental study examining the impact of an electronic discharge instructions module in an academic ED. Three hundred patients discharged home from the ED were randomly selected from two time intervals: 150 patients three months before and 150 patients three to five months after implementation of the new electronic module. The discharge instructions for each patient were reviewed, and compliance for each individual OP-19 element as well as overall OP-19 compliance was scored per CMS specifications. Compliance rates as well as risk ratios (RR) and risk differences (RD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing the overall OP-19 scores and individual OP-19 element scores of the electronic and paper-based discharge instructions were calculated. Results The electronic discharge instructions had 97.3% (146/150) overall OP-19 compliance, while the paper-based discharge instructions had overall compliance of 46.7% (70/150). Electronic discharge instructions were twice as likely to achieve overall OP-19 compliance compared to the paper-based format (RR: 2.09, 95% CI: 1.75 – 2.48). The largest improvement was in documentation of major procedures and tests performed: only 60% of the paper-based discharge instructions satisfied this criterion, compared to 100% of the electronic discharge instructions (RD: 40.0%, 95% CI: 32.2% – 47.8%). There was a modest difference in medication documentation with 92.7% for paper-based and 100% for electronic formats (RD: 7.3%, 95% CI: 3.2% – 11.5%). There were no statistically significant differences in documentation of patient care instructions and diagnosis between paper-based and electronic formats. Conclusion With

  5. Pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury; the influence of risk factors present in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, H W Wietske; Schoonhoven, L Lisette; Schuurmans, M Marieke J; Leenen, L Luke P H

    2017-01-01

    To explore the influence of risk factors present at Emergency Department admission on pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury, admitted to the hospital for evaluation and treatment of acute traumatic injuries. Prospective cohort study setting level one trauma center in the Netherlands participants adult trauma patients transported to the Emergency Department on a backboard, with extrication collar and headblocks and admitted to the hospital for treatment or evaluation of their injuries. Between January and December 2013, 254 trauma patients were included. The following dependent variables were collected: Age, Skin color and Body Mass Index, and Time in Emergency Department, Injury Severity Score, Mean Arterial Pressure, hemoglobin level, Glasgow Coma Score, and admission ward after Emergency Department. Pressure ulcer development during admission was associated with a higher age (p 0.00, OR 1.05) and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p 0.00, OR 1.21) and higher Injury Severity Scores (p 0.03, OR 1.05). Extra nutrition decreases the probability of PU development during admission (p 0.04, OR 0.20). Pressure ulcer development within the first 48h of admission was positively associated with a higher age (p 0.01, OR 1.03) and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (p 0.01, OR 1.16). The proportion of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit and Medium Care Unit was higher in patients with pressure ulcers. The pressure ulcer risk during admission is high in patients with an increased age, lower Glasgow Coma Scale and higher Injury Severity Score in the Emergency Department. Pressure ulcer risk should be assessed in the Emergency Department to apply preventive interventions in time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High-sensitivity troponin assays in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Michael; Bertsch, Thomas; Popp, Steffen; Bahrmann, Philipp; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Müller, Christian

    2011-09-06

    Evaluating patients with acute chest pain presenting to the emergency department remains an ongoing challenge. The spectrum of etiologies in acute chest pain ranges from minor disease entities to life-threatening diseases, such as pulmonary embolism, acute aortic dissection or acute myocardial infarction (MI). The diagnosis of acute MI is usually made integrating the triad of patient history and clinical presentation, readings of 12-lead ECG and measurement of cardiac troponins (cTn). Introduction of high-sensitivity cTn assays substantially increases sensitivity to identify patients with acute MI even at the time of presentation to the emergency department at the cost of specificity. However, the proportion of patients presenting with cTn positive, non-vascular cardiac chest pain triples with the implementation of new sensitive cTn assays increasing the difficulty for the emergency physician to identify those patients who are at need for invasive diagnostics. The main objectives of this mini-review are 1) to discuss elements of disposition decision made by the emergency physician for the evaluation of chest pain patients, 2) to summarize recent advances in assay technology and relate these findings into the clinical context, and 3) to discuss possible consequences for the clinical work and suggest an algorithm for the clinical evaluation of chest pain patients in the emergency department.

  7. Characterizing emergency departments to improve understanding of emergency care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steptoe, Anne P; Corel, Blanka; Sullivan, Ashley F; Camargo, Carlos A

    2011-07-14

    International emergency medicine aims to understand different systems of emergency care across the globe. To date, however, international emergency medicine lacks common descriptors that can encompass the wide variety of emergency care systems in different countries. The frequent use of general, system-wide indicators (e.g. the status of emergency medicine as a medical specialty or the presence of emergency medicine training programs) does not account for the diverse methods that contribute to the delivery of emergency care both within and between countries. Such indicators suggest that a uniform approach to the development and structure of emergency care is both feasible and desirable. One solution to this complex problem is to shift the focus of international studies away from system-wide characteristics of emergency care. We propose such an alternative methodology, in which studies would examine emergency department-specific characteristics to inventory the various methods by which emergency care is delivered. Such characteristics include: emergency department location, layout, time period open to patients, and patient type served. There are many more ways to describe emergency departments, but these characteristics are particularly suited to describe with common terms a wide range of sites. When combined, these four characteristics give a concise but detailed picture of how emergency care is delivered at a specific emergency department. This approach embraces the diversity of emergency care as well as the variety of individual emergency departments that deliver it, while still allowing for the aggregation of broad similarities that might help characterize a system of emergency care.

  8. Clinical Overview and Emergency-Department Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    In Denmark emergency departments are newly established and still in a process of devising their procedures and technology support. Electronic whiteboards are a means of supporting clinicians in creating and maintaining the overview necessary to provide quality treatment of patients. The concrete ...... differences between the emergency-department respondents and the pediatric respondents call for caution in transferring electronic whiteboards designed for emergency departments to other departments.......In Denmark emergency departments are newly established and still in a process of devising their procedures and technology support. Electronic whiteboards are a means of supporting clinicians in creating and maintaining the overview necessary to provide quality treatment of patients. The concrete...... meaning of the notion of overview is, however, fussy. To explore the notion of overview and how it might be affected by whiteboards, we conducted a survey at two emergency departments and, for reasons of comparison, a pediatric department. Our results indicate that respondents consider the information...

  9. Emergency department physicians spend only 25% of their working time on direct patient care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füchtbauer, Laila Maria; Nørgaard, Birgitte; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2013-01-01

    In modern hospital medicine, there is a growing awareness of the need for efficient and secure -patient care. Authorities seek to improve this by adding requirements for documentation, administrative tasks and standardized patient programmes. However, it is rarely investigated how much time...... for physicians working in the emergency room (ER) and the admission area of our ED....

  10. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  11. [Effectiveness of a home hospitalization program for patients with urinary tract infection after discharge from an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soledad Gallardo, María; Antón, Ane; Pulido Herrero, Esther; Itziar Larruscain, Miren; Guinea Suárez, Rocío; García Gutiérrez, Susana; Sandoval Negral, Julio César

    2017-10-01

    To compare outcomes of urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients referred to a home hospitalization program or admitted to a conventional ward after initial management in the emergency department. Prospective, quasi-experimental study of patients with UTIs attended in 3 hospital emergency departments in the public health system of the Basque Country, Spain, between January 2012 and June 2013. Patients were assigned to 2 groups according to site of treatment (home or hospital ward) after discharge from the emergency department. We collected sociodemographic data, history of kidney or urologic symptoms, concomitant diseases, risk for complicated UTI, presentation on admission to the emergency department, diagnostic findings, and prescribed treatments. The main outcome was poor clinical course (local complications during hospital or home care, recurrence, or readmission related to UTI. Multivariate logistic modeling was used to analyze factors related to poor clinical course. Home hospitalization was the main independent variable of interest. Patients referred to home hospitalization were more often women (70.6% vs 57.1% men, P=.04). Fewer cases of prior admission were recorded in the group treated at home (2.4% vs 9.5% of hospitalized patients, P=.03). Likewise, fewer home-hospitalization patients had risk factors for complicated UTI (58.7% vs 83.3% in the hospitalized group, Phome hospitalization (0.8% vs 8.3% in hospitalized patients, P=.007). The frequency of poor clinical course was similar in home-hospitalized and ward-admitted patients. The clinical course of UTI is similar whether patients are hospitalized after emergency department management or discharged to a home hospitalization program.

  12. Outpatient Management of Emergency Department Patients With Acute Pulmonary Embolism: Variation, Patient Characteristics, and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, David R; Ballard, Dustin W; Huang, Jie; Reed, Mary E; Lin, James S; Kene, Mamata V; Sax, Dana R; Rauchwerger, Adina S; Wang, David H; McLachlan, D Ian; Pleshakov, Tamara S; Silver, Matthew A; Clague, Victoria A; Klonecke, Andrew S; Mark, Dustin G

    2017-12-13

    Outpatient management of emergency department (ED) patients with acute pulmonary embolism is uncommon. We seek to evaluate the facility-level variation of outpatient pulmonary embolism management and to describe patient characteristics and outcomes associated with home discharge. The Management of Acute Pulmonary Embolism (MAPLE) study is a retrospective cohort study of patients with acute pulmonary embolism undertaken in 21 community EDs from January 2013 to April 2015. We gathered demographic and clinical variables from comprehensive electronic health records and structured manual chart review. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess the association between patient characteristics and home discharge. We report ED length of stay, consultations, 5-day pulmonary embolism-related return visits and 30-day major hemorrhage, recurrent venous thromboembolism, and all-cause mortality. Of 2,387 patients, 179 were discharged home (7.5%). Home discharge varied significantly between EDs, from 0% to 14.3% (median 7.0%; interquartile range 4.2% to 10.9%). Median length of stay for home discharge patients (excluding those who arrived with a new pulmonary embolism diagnosis) was 6.0 hours (interquartile range 4.6 to 7.2 hours) and 81% received consultations. On adjusted analysis, ambulance arrival, abnormal vital signs, syncope or presyncope, deep venous thrombosis, elevated cardiac biomarker levels, and more proximal emboli were inversely associated with home discharge. Thirteen patients (7.2%) who were discharged home had a 5-day pulmonary embolism-related return visit. Thirty-day major hemorrhage and recurrent venous thromboembolism were uncommon and similar between patients hospitalized and those discharged home. All-cause 30-day mortality was lower in the home discharge group (1.1% versus 4.4%). Home discharge of ED patients with acute pulmonary embolism was uncommon and varied significantly between facilities. Patients selected for outpatient management had a

  13. Organisational Factors Induce Prolonged Emergency Department Length of Stay in Elderly Patients--A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffie H A Brouns

    Full Text Available To assess the association of patient and organisational factors with emergency department length of stay (ED-LOS in elderly ED patients (226565 years old and in younger patients (1 consultation during the emergency department visit (odds ratio (OR 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI 2.3-4.3, a higher number of diagnostic tests (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.16-1.33 and evaluation by a medical student or non-trainee resident compared with a medical specialist (OR 4.2, 95% CI 2.0-8.8 and OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.9. In younger patients, prolonged ED-LOS was associated with >1 consultation (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.4-4.6. Factors associated with shorter ED-LOS were arrival during nights or weekends as well as a high urgency level in elderly patients and self-referral in younger patients.Organisational factors, such as a higher number of consultations and tests in the emergency department and a lower seniority of the physician, were the main aspects associated with prolonged ED-LOS in elderly patients. Optimisation of the organisation and coordination of emergency care is important to accommodate the needs of the continuously growing number of elderly patients in a better way.

  14. Procedural pain and anxiety in paediatric patients in a Mexican emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Mario I; López-Zarco, Mayeli; Arreola-Bautista, Edna J

    2012-12-01

    This article is a report of a study carried out to investigate the procedures that are likely to induce pain and anxiety in children in a Mexican emergency department. In emergency rooms, children often experience unpredictable diagnostic and therapeutic procedural-related pain that can be associated with considerable anxiety. A prospective, descriptive and cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of procedures or situations that probably induced anxiety and/or pain in children in an emergency room. Procedural pain and anxiety were evaluated in children and adolescents (8-16 years) who were admitted to the emergency department of a paediatric hospital between February-September 2010. Children rated their pain and anxiety using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. A total of 252 children with a mean age of 10·1 years were evaluated. Four-hundred fifty-nine procedures were completed, with an average of 1·82 events/child. Of these procedures, 369 (80·4%) were rated painful and 357 (77·8%) were rated stressful. The most frequently reported procedural pain or stressful episodes were peripheral catheterization, clinical examination and vascular puncture. Overall, 32·5% of the painful events were rated severe, 32·0% were rated moderate and 35·5% were rated slight. However, 30% of the stressful events were rated severe, 38·9% were rated moderate and 31·1% were rated slight. Peripheral catheterization was rated severe in 58 children (33·9%), moderate in 55 children (32·2%) and slight in 58 (33·9%) children. This study provides data on common emergency department procedures that cause pain and anxiety in children and young adolescents. Healthcare providers must consider the best psychological and pharmacological interventions to reduce procedural anxiety and pain. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. The needs of families accompanying injured patients into the emergency department in a tertiary hospital in Gauteng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botes, Meghan L; Langley, Gayle

    2016-06-24

    Families are not prepared for traumatic injuries of loved ones. Emergency nurses have the important role of caring for patients and families in this time of crisis. Family needs in the critical care setting have been explored using the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI), however little is known about family needs in the emergency department. This study sought to determine the needs of family members accompanying injured patients into the emergency department, and if these needs were met. A quantitative, descriptive, study was conducted in a level 1 trauma facility in Johannesburg, South Africa. The population included families of patients admitted to the emergency department, sampling 100 participants. The instrument, based on the CCFNI, was validated in a pilot study in Melbourne, Australia and re-evaluated using the Cronbach Alpha validity test to ensure internal consistency.Five themes were explored: 'meaning', 'proximity', 'communication', 'comfort' and 'support' and data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were analysed using content analysis. Permission from the Human Research Ethics Committee was granted and participants were ensured confidentiality and the option for counselling if required. Themes ranked highly important were 'meaning' and 'communication'. Satisfaction was highest for 'meaning'. Low satisfaction levels for 'communication' were found. Issues regarding prolonged time spent in the emergency department and discrimination were raised. These findings have a negative impact on the family's satisfaction with care and it is recommended that the nurse's role in family care be further explored and emphasised.

  16. Intranasal Oxytocin to Prevent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial in Emergency Department Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zuiden, Mirjam; Frijling, Jessie L; Nawijn, Laura; Koch, Saskia B J; Goslings, J Carel; Luitse, Jan S; Biesheuvel, Tessa H; Honig, Adriaan; Veltman, Dick J; Olff, Miranda

    2017-06-15

    There are currently few preventive interventions available for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Intranasal oxytocin administration early after trauma may prevent PTSD, because oxytocin administration was previously found to beneficially impact PTSD vulnerability factors, including neural fear responsiveness, peripheral stress reactivity, and socioemotional functioning. Therefore, we investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration early after trauma on subsequent clinician-rated PTSD symptoms. We then assessed whether baseline characteristics moderated the intervention's effects. We performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Adult emergency department patients with moderate to severe acute distress (n = 120; 85% accident victims) were randomized to intranasal oxytocin (8 days/40 IU twice daily) or placebo (8 days/10 puffs twice daily), initiated within 12 days posttrauma. The Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) was administered at baseline (within 10 days posttrauma) and at 1.5, 3, and 6 months posttrauma. The intention-to-treat sample included 107 participants (oxytocin: n = 53; placebo: n = 54). We did not observe a significant group difference in CAPS total score at 1.5 months posttrauma (primary outcome) or across follow-up (secondary outcome). Secondary analyses showed that participants with high baseline CAPS scores receiving oxytocin had significantly lower CAPS scores across follow-up than participants with high baseline CAPS scores receiving placebo. Oxytocin administration early after trauma did not attenuate clinician-rated PTSD symptoms in all trauma-exposed participants with acute distress. However, participants with high acute clinician-rated PTSD symptom severity did show beneficial effects of oxytocin. Although replication is warranted, these findings suggest that oxytocin administration is a promising preventive intervention for PTSD for individuals with high acute PTSD symptoms

  17. Knowledge and Attitude Regarding Organ Donation among Relatives of Patients Referred to the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouraghaei, Mahboob; Tagizadieh, Mohammad; Tagizadieh, Ali; Moharamzadeh, Payman; Esfahanian, Samaneh; Shahsavari Nia, Kavous

    2015-01-01

    Organ donation is one of the surviving procedures, which can increase the life expectancy of end-stage patients. Inappropriate beliefs and attitude of individuals to organ donation, their poor knowledge, and the socio-economic level are one of the most important barriers for organ donation. Therefore, here knowledge and attitude levels among relatives of trauma patients regarding organ donation were evaluated. This cross-sectional study was done on relatives of trauma patients referred to the emergency department of Sina Hospital, Tabriz, Iran, through 2013 to 2014. The questionnaire included parts of demographic data and socio-economic situations as well as status of knowledge and attitude regarding organ donation. A score between 0-7 was belonged to each person based on his/her level of knowledge. Attitude level had a score between 0-12. Chi- square, Fisher, and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to assess the relation between demographic variables and the level of knowledge and attitude. Porgan transplant. The main causes of disagreement among relatives regarding organ donation were dissatisfaction of the donor's relatives (25%) and religious issues (15%). 49 (62.02%) studied people had inappropriate attitude and 27 (34.2%) ones had good knowledge. male gender (OR=5.87; 95%CI: 3.32-8.42; p=0.001) and self-employed job (OR=7.78; 95%CI: 4.64-10.92; p=0.001) are independent factors associated with poor knowledge about organ donation. Self-employed job (OR=3.86; 95%CI: 1.41-6.11; p=0.009) and poor knowledge (OR=15.3; 95%CI: 9.03-21.57; porgan donation. The present study showed that 73.1% of participants agreed with organ donation. The major causes of disagreements were dissatisfaction of other relatives and religious beliefs. 62.0% of the studied people had positive view regarding organ donation and 34.2% of them well informed about. The most important causative factors for poor knowledge in this context were male gender and self-employed occupation. In addition

  18. Lung cancer detected in patients presenting to the Emergency Department studies for suspected pulmonary embolism on computed tomography pulmonary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kino, Aya [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)]. E-mail: akino@bidmc.harvard.edu; Boiselle, Phillip M. [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Raptopoulos, Vassilios [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Purpose: To study the frequency and demographics of lung cancer on CT pulmonary angiography in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism referred from the Emergency Department. Materials and methods: Retrospective review of the medical records and radiology reports, clinical and imaging follow-up studies and pathological reports revealed 1106 CT pulmonary angiography studies referred from our Emergency Department during the 15-month period between March 2003 and June 2004. Results: Five incidental lung cancer cases were found in 1106 studies from 1081 patients (0.47%). Pulmonary embolism was found in 95 patients (8.5%). Among the five incidental cases three patients were female and two were male (62-81 years old; mean 73 years, 17-130 packs year; mean 51 packs year). Tumor size ranged from 1.8 to 4.5 cm (mean 3.3 cm). The stagings of the lung cancers were IIIB in one patient and IV in four patients. Conclusion: Previously undiagnosed lung cancer was detected in 0.45% of patients among 1081 patients referred from Emergency Department, one of whom had coexistent pulmonary embolism. All five patients presented at advanced lung cancer stages of IIIB and IV.

  19. Patient and institutional characteristics associated with initial computerized tomography in children presenting to the emergency department with kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Justin B; Canning, Douglas A; Lavelle, Jane; Kalmus, Angela; Tasian, Gregory E

    2015-05-01

    Professional associations recommend ultrasound as the initial imaging study in children with suspected nephrolithiasis but computerized tomography remains frequently used. We identified patient and institutional characteristics associated with computerized tomography as the first imaging study in children with nephrolithiasis diagnosed in the emergency department. We performed a cross-sectional study of children 2 to 18 years old with nephrolithiasis who were referred to a freestanding pediatric hospital from 2003 to 2012. We identified the imaging modality first used to evaluate the child. Medical directors at the emergency department where children were first evaluated were sent a questionnaire to ascertain emergency department characteristics. Multivariate hierarchical logistic regression models were used to determine patient and institutional characteristics associated with initial computerized tomography. Of 536 eligible children 323 (60.2%) were evaluated at emergency departments from which surveys were returned. Of the 323 children 238 (71%) underwent computerized tomography as initial imaging. Ultrasound was available at all emergency departments. Older patient age was associated with higher initial computerized tomography use (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.04-1.16). A more recent year of diagnosis (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.72-0.88) and a clinical care pathway that used ultrasound as initial imaging (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.01-0.38) were associated with lower initial computerized tomography use. A clinical care pathway in the emergency department was the only institutional characteristic associated with lower computerized tomography use. Future studies are needed to determine whether care pathways using ultrasound for initial imaging in children with suspected nephrolithiasis would decrease inappropriate computerized tomography and improve adherence to national guidelines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. The needs of families accompanying injured patients into the emergency department in a tertiary hospital in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan L. Botes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Families are not prepared for traumatic injuries of loved ones. Emergency nurses have the important role of caring for patients and families in this time of crisis. Family needs in the critical care setting have been explored using the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI, however little is known about family needs in the emergency department.Objectives: This study sought to determine the needs of family members accompanying injured patients into the emergency department, and if these needs were met.Methods: A quantitative, descriptive, study was conducted in a level 1 trauma facility in Johannesburg, South Africa. The population included families of patients admitted to the emergency department, sampling 100 participants. The instrument, based on the CCFNI, was validated in a pilot study in Melbourne, Australia and re-evaluated using the Cronbach Alpha validity test to ensure internal consistency.Five themes were explored: ‘meaning’, ‘proximity’, ‘communication’, ‘comfort’ and ‘support’ and data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were analysed using content analysis. Permission from the Human Research Ethics Committee was granted and participants were ensured confidentiality and the option for counselling if required.Results: Themes ranked highly important were ‘meaning’ and ‘communication’. Satisfaction was highest for ‘meaning’. Low satisfaction levels for ‘communication’ were found. Issues regarding prolonged time spent in the emergency department and discrimination were raised.Conclusion: These findings have a negative impact on the family’s satisfaction with care and it is recommended that the nurse’s role in family care be further explored and emphasised.Keywords: Family needs, emergency department, emergency nurses

  1. Pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury; the influence of risk factors present in the Emergency Department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, H. W (Wietske); Schoonhoven, Lisette; Schuurmans, M. (Marieke) J; Leenen, L. (Luke) P H

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To explore the influence of risk factors present at Emergency Department admission on pressure ulcer development in trauma patients with suspected spinal injury, admitted to the hospital for evaluation and treatment of acute traumatic injuries. Design Prospective cohort study setting

  2. Effectiveness of mechanical chest compression for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in an emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Kuo Lin

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: No difference was found in early survival between standard CPR performed with MeCC and that performed with MaCC. However, the use of the MeCC device appears to promote staff availability without waiving patient care in the human power-demanding emergency departments of Taiwan hospitals.

  3. Pediatric Patients Discharged from the Emergency Department with Abnormal Vital Signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Josephine; Waxman, Michael J; Waterman, George; Ata, Ashar; Frisch, Adam; Collins, Kevin P; King, Christopher

    2017-08-01

    Children often present to the emergency department (ED) with minor conditions such as fever and have persistently abnormal vital signs. We hypothesized that a significant portion of children discharged from the ED would have abnormal vital signs and that those discharged with abnormal vital signs would experience very few adverse events. We performed a retrospective chart review encompassing a 44-month period of all pediatric patients (aged two months to 17 years) who were discharged from the ED with an abnormal pulse rate, respiratory rate, temperature, or oxygen saturation. We used a local quality assurance database to identify pre-defined adverse events after discharge in this population. Our primary aim was to determine the proportion of children discharged with abnormal vital signs and the frequency and nature of adverse events. Additionally, we performed a sub-analysis comparing the rate of adverse events in children discharged with normal vs. abnormal vital signs, as well as a standardized review of the nature of each adverse event. Of 33,185 children discharged during the study period, 5,540 (17%) of these patients had at least one abnormal vital sign. There were 24/5,540 (0.43%) adverse events in the children with at least one abnormal vital sign vs. 47/27,645 (0.17%) adverse events in the children with normal vital signs [relative risk = 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 2.4)].However, upon review of each adverse event we found only one case that was related to the index visit, was potentially preventable by a 23-hour hospital observation, and caused permanent disability. In our study population, 17% of the children were discharged with at least one abnormal vital sign, and there were very few adverse (0.43%) events associated with this practice. Heart rate was the most common abnormal vital sign leading to an adverse event. Severe adverse events that were potentially related to the abnormal vital sign(s) were exceedingly rare. Additional research is

  4. Acceptability of a computerized alcohol screening and advice routine in an emergency department setting--a patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Anna; Bendtsen, Preben

    2005-05-01

    Disseminating screening and brief alcohol intervention in routine emergency department (ED) care seems to be a demanding challenge due to the complexity of the emergency setting. Further empirical realistic intervention models need to be developed that are appropriate for staff and patients before such models are tested in large scale controlled trials. This study explores patients' acceptance of a computerized opportunistic alcohol screening, followed by a personalized printout as feedback, at an emergency department performed by ordinary emergency department staff. In all, 44 patients were interviewed after performing the computerized screening test. The majority of patients were positive about answering the questions about alcohol habits, and 95% found it easy to use the touch screen and understand the instructions, even those with little computer experience. Regarding the personalized printout of advice, 76% were positive to this kind of feedback and 93% said they would read the printout. Most patients, 74%, preferred the computerized printout instead of a more personalized feedback from staff members. Whether the computerized advice is sufficient for a change in alcohol habits among excessive drinkers is still to be shown in controlled trials, but the concept could be one means of making preventive measures more feasible in a real-world ED setting. This might provide a basis for dissemination and integration of more extensive interventions in the long term.

  5. Effective Management of Pain and Anxiety for the Pediatric Patient in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Virginia B

    2017-06-01

    Inadequate treatment of pain for children in the emergency department is a persistent problem. Health care professionals are bound by ethical principles to provide adequate pain management; in children, this may be challenging owing to cognitive and developmental differences, lack of knowledge regarding best practices, and other barriers. Studies have concluded that immediate assessment, treatment, and reassessment of pain after an intervention are essential. Self-report and behavioral scales are available. Appropriate management includes pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions. Specific diagnoses (eg, abdominal pain or traumatic injuries) have been well-studied and guidance is available to maximize efforts in managing the associated pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost analysis of emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonesi, P; Di Bella, E; Montefiori, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper is intended to examine both clinical and economic data concerning the activity of an emergency department of an Italian primary Hospital. Real data referring to arrivals, waiting times, service times, severity (according to triage classification) of patients' condition collected along the whole 2009 are matched up with the relevant accounting and economic information concerning the costs faced. A new methodological approach is implemented in order to identify a "standard production cost" and its variability. We believe that this kind of analysis well fits the federalizing process that Italy is experiencing. In fact the federal reform is driving our Country toward a decentralized provision and funding of local public services. The health care services are "fundamental" under the provisions of the law that in turn implies that a standard cost has to be defined for its funding. The standard cost (as it is defined by the law) relies on the concepts of appropriateness and efficiency in the production of the health care service, assuming a standard quality level as target. The identification and measurement of health care costs is therefore a crucial task propaedeutic to health services economic evaluation. Various guidelines with different amount of details have been set up for costing methods which, however, are defined in simplified frameworks and using fictious data. This study is a first attempt to proceed in the direction of a precise definition of the costs inherent to the emergency department activity.

  7. Physician e-mail and telephone contact after emergency department visit improves patient satisfaction: a crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pankaj B; Vinson, David R

    2013-06-01

    Enhancing emergency department (ED) patient satisfaction has wide-ranging benefits. We seek to determine how postvisit patient-physician contact by e-mail or telephone affects patients' satisfaction with their emergency physician. We undertook this crossover study from May 1, 2010, to June 30, 2010, at 2 community EDs. Forty-two physicians either e-mailed or telephoned their patients within 72 hours of the ED visit for 1 month; in the alternate month, they provided no contact, serving as their own controls. Patients received satisfaction surveys after their ED visit. Patient satisfaction is reported as a percentage of those responding very good or excellent on a 5-point Likert scale for 3 questions about their emergency physician's skills, care, and communication. We calculated differences between patient groups (noncontact versus contact) using an intention-to-treat analysis. The mean patient satisfaction score was 79.4% for the 1,002 patients in the noncontact group and 87.7% for the 348 patients in the contact group (difference 8.3%; 95% confidence interval 4.0% to 12.6%). Patient satisfaction scores were similar for e-mail and telephone contact: 89.3% for the e-mail group and 85.2% for the telephone group (difference 4.1%; 95% confidence interval -2.3% to 10.5%). Patient satisfaction was higher when emergency physicians contacted patients briefly after their visit, either by e-mail or by telephone. Higher patient satisfaction was observed equally among patients contacted by e-mail and those contacted by telephone. Postvisit patient-physician contact could be a valuable practice to improve ED patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of TIMI and Gensini score in patients admitted to the emergency department with chest pain, who underwent coronary angiography

    OpenAIRE

    İşcanlı, Murat Doğan; Aksu, Nalan Metin; Evranos, Banu; Aytemir, Kudret; Özmen, Mehmet Mahir

    2014-01-01

    Background In patients admitted to the emergency department with complaints of chest pain and unstable angina pectoris, ST-elevation MI scoring is done according to risk factors used to calculate risks of urgent revascularization, MI, and death within 14 days. For this calculation, the most widely used scoring system is TIMI risk score. Materila/Methods In this prospective, cross-sectional descriptive study, we evaluated and compared the effectiveness of TIMI and Gensini scores of patients wi...

  9. High-sensitivity troponin assays in the evaluation of patients with acute chest pain in the emergency department

    OpenAIRE

    Christ, Michael; Bertsch, Thomas; Popp, Steffen; Bahrmann, Philipp; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Müller, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Evaluating patients with acute chest pain presenting to the emergency department remains an ongoing challenge. The spectrum of etiologies in acute chest pain ranges from minor disease entities to life-threatening diseases, such as pulmonary embolism, acute aortic dissection or acute myocardial infarction (MI). The diagnosis of acute MI is usually made integrating the triad of patient history and clinical presentation, readings of 12-lead ECG and measurement of cardiac troponins (cTn). Introdu...

  10. Evaluation of emergency department performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter; Forberg, Jakob Lundager

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluation of emergency department (ED) performance remains a difficult task due to the lack of consensus on performance measures that reflects high quality, efficiency, and sustainability. Aim To describe, map, and critically evaluate which performance measures that the published...

  11. [Prevalence and severity of hypertensive emergencies and outbreaks in the hospital emergency department of CHU Timone at Marseille: Follow-up in three months of hospitalized patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiga, H; Sarlon-Bartoli, G; Silhol, F; Radix, W; Michelet, P; Vaïsse, B

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the prevalence and severity of hypertensive emergencies and crisis in an Emergency Service of Timone hospital in Marseille and follow-up of 3 months of hospitalized emergencies. This study was conducted in the Emergency Department between April 1 and June 30, 2015. All patients with BP>180 and/or 110mmHg was recorded and classified in true emergencies (presence of visceral pain) and hypertensive isolated crisis. A phone follow-up patients was organized. During this period, 170 patients were identified: 95 (56%) hypertensive crisis and 75 (44%) hypertensive emergencies: 25 OAP (33%), 18 ischemic stroke (24%), 15 hemorrhagic stroke (20%), 9 angina (12%) and 8 different. The clinical characteristics of hypertensive emergencies are preferentially dyspnea (27%) motor deficit (36%), and chest pain (16%). The BP of hypertensive emergencies at their admission (3 measurements, oscillometric automatic device) is close to the hypertensive crisis (198.17±19.3 to 96.4±21.2mmHg versus 191±31.6 to 96.12±21). The BP controlled after 15minutes of rest is lower for crisis compared to real emergencies (152±47 to 79±28 vs. 174±31 to 86±26). Age emergency is larger (77±14 vs. 67±17), the number of slightly larger drug (1.79 versus 1.67±1±1). Telephone follow-up was performed after an average period of three months. Ninety-nine patients were contacted by telephone: 46 patients who were admitted for hypertensive emergency patients and 53 for a push. Eighteen deaths have been recorded, including 15 among hypertensive emergencies (9 in hemorrhagic stroke, 5 for ischemic stroke, and 1 for OAP) with 5-hospital deaths within 48hours after admission and 10 within 3 months in patients hospitalized with hypertensive emergency or 33%. Seventy-seven patients out of 99 had been reviewed by their attending physicians. A questionnaire was sent by mail to patients who have not answered the phone contacts, and responses are pending. Hypertensive emergencies hospitalized in

  12. Initial Emergency Department Diagnosis and Management of Adult Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perman Sarah M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe sepsis is a medical emergency affecting up to 18 million individuals world wide, with an annual incidence of 750,000 in North America alone. Mortality ranges between 28-50% of those individuals stricken by severe sepsis. Sepsis is a time critical illness, requiring early identification and prompt intervention in order to improve outcomes. This observation has led to increased awareness and education in the field of Emergency Medicine; it has also led to the implementation of critical interventions early in the course of patient management, specifically Early-Goal Directed Therapy, and rapid administration of appropriate antimicrobials. This review begins with a brief summary of the pathophysiology of sepsis, and then addresses the fundamental clinical aspects of ED identification and resuscitation of the septic patient.

  13. The impact of a pre-hospital medical response unit on patient care and emergency department attendances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deasy, C

    2012-02-03

    A rapid response team was instigated in Cork to improve prehospital care and reduce unnecessary Emergency Department (ED) visits. This consisted of a Specialist Registrar (SpR) in Emergency Medicine and a Paramedic who attended all "999" calls in a designated rapid response vehicle on the allotted study days. Two hundred and sixty-three patients were seen on designated days between Jan 2004 and March 2006. Presentations seen included; road traffic accident (23%) collapse (12%), fall (10%) and seizure (8%). The majority of calls were to houses (36%). The most common medical intervention was intravenous cannulation (25%). Intravenous medications were administered in 21% of these patients--morphine sulphate was the most common drug given. It was possible to safely discharge 31% of patients on scene. In our experience skilled Emergency Medicine doctors attending at scene could provide advanced care and reduce ambulance transportation and patient attendance.

  14. Last call: ethanol metabolism and the implications for emergency department clinicians managing patients with extreme ethanol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy M

    2009-01-01

    The legal consumption of alcohol at a drinking age of 21 years and the accepting, ubiquitous nature of our society has caused alcohol consumption to become highly prevalent in our society. To this avail, emergency departments will continue to see a greater number of intoxicated patients, and it is imperative that clinicians remain up to date about treatment strategies and general management of the acutely intoxicated individual. This article expounds on many of the subtle presentations that may be featured by the intoxicated patient and discusses the current treatment modalities and pitfalls utilized by today's emergency clinician.

  15. Decreased levels of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein are related to the mortality of septic patients in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romualdo Barroso-Sousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein as a novel biomarker for mortality in patients with severe sepsis. METHODS: We prospectively included patients with severe sepsis or septic shock at the emergency department at a single tertiary referral teaching hospital. All of the patients were enrolled within the first 24 hours of emergency department admission, and clinical data and blood samples were obtained. As the primary outcome, we investigated the association of serum levels of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein and 96-hour mortality with logistic regression analysis and generalized estimating equations adjusted for age, sex, shock status and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score. RESULTS: Patients with septic shock had lower alpha-1-acid glycoprotein levels at the time of emergency department admission compared to patients without shock (respectively, 149.1 ±42.7 vs. 189.8 ±68.6; p = 0.005. Similarly, non-survivors in the first 96 hours were also characterized by lower levels of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein at the time of emergency department admission compared to survivors (respectively, 132.18 ±50.2 vs. 179.8 ±61.4; p = 0.01. In an adjusted analysis, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein levels ≤120 mg/dL were significantly associated with 96-hour mortality (odds ratio = 14.37; 95% confidence interval = 1.58 to 130.21. CONCLUSION: Septic shock patients exhibited lower circulating alpha-1-acid glycoprotein levels than patients without shock. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein levels were independently associated with 96-hour mortality in individuals with severe sepsis.

  16. Emergency department physician telemedical triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, Stephen J; Butler, Rebecca; Chang, Yu-Hui; Lipinski, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    Telemedical physician triage (TPT) is a potential application of telemedicine in the emergency department (ED). We report the technical success, patient satisfaction, and effect on ED throughput metrics (length of stay [LOS] and time to physician evaluation [TPE]) of TPT performed on a mobile platform. Patients underwent standard nursing triage with or without TPT. Technical success is reported as raw data. Patient satisfaction is reported as raw data±standard deviation on a 5-point (low-to-high) scale. LOS and TPE are reported as mean±SD [95% CI] values. Statistical analyses of LOS and TPE are via two-sample t test. One hundred six patients were registered during intervention periods, and TPT was completed in 36 (34%). One hundred ninety-six patients were registered during control periods. The technical success rate was 95%. Average patient satisfaction was 4.7 on a 5-point scale. The primary analysis (106 patients) showed no change in LOS (266±101 [244-288] min versus 258±172 [234-282] min) but a trend toward improved TPE with TPT (35±28 [29-41] min versus 42±31 [38-46] min) (p=0.052). A secondary analysis (36 patients) showed no change in LOS (273±125 [231-316] min versus 258±172 [234-282] min) but improved TPE with TPT (16±15 [11-21] min versus 42±31 [38-46] min) (p<0.0001). TPT in the ED on a mobile platform was technically successful, well accepted by patients, and associated with a decrease in TPE but not LOS.

  17. Antecedents and precipitants of patient-related violence in the emergency department: Results from the Australian VENT Study (Violence in Emergency Nursing and Triage).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pich, Jacqueline V; Kable, Ashley; Hazelton, Mike

    2017-08-01

    Workplace violence is one of the most significant and hazardous issues faced by nurses globally. It is a potentially life-threatening and life-affecting workplace hazard often downplayed as just "part of the job" for nurses. A cross-sectional design was used and data were collected using a purpose developed survey tool. Surveys were distributed to all members of the College of Emergency Nurses' Australasia (CENA) in 2010 and 537 eligible responses were received (RR=51%). Patient-related violence was reported by 87% of nurses in the last six months. Precipitants and antecedents for episodes of violence were reported in three categories: nurse-related; patient-related and emergency-department specific factors. Triaging was identified as the highest risk nursing activity, and the triage area identified as the highest risk location in the department. Patients who presented with alcohol intoxication, substance misuse or mental health issues were identified as the groups at greatest risk for potential violence. Patient-related violence was reported by the majority of emergency nurses surveyed. A number of precipitants and antecedents perceived to be risk factors by participants were found to be significant and are unavoidable in the working lives of emergency department nurses. Copyright © 2017 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electronic Emergency-Department Whiteboards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Many emergency departments (EDs) are in a process of transitioning from dry-erase to electronic whiteboards. This study investigates differences in ED clinicians’ perception and assessment of their electronic whiteboards across departments and staff groups and at two points in time. Method...

  19. [Emergency department training on the appropriate prescription of anticoagulants in atrial fibrillation and on patient follow-up after discharge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Alonso, Joaquín; Pedraza, Jorge; García Pérez, Elisa; Muñoz, María Del Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Urbano, María Del Mar

    2015-01-01

    The main objective was to evaluate the effect of an emergency department training intervention on the use of a protocol for prescribing anticoagulant therapy in atrial fibrillation and on following patients after discharge. Quasi-experimental pre-post study of a training intervention; the control patients were not matched but were selected consecutively before and after the intervention. All patients were over the age of 18 years, had atrial fibrillation identified by electrocardiogram, and indications for anticoagulant therapy, specifically a score of 2 or more on the CHADS2-DS2-VASc scale (cardiac failure, hypertension, age >75 years, diabetes, stroke [doubled], vascular disease, age 65-74 years, sex). The primary outcome was percentage of patients on anticoagulant therapy on discharge from the department. The secondary outcome was the percentage of patients on therapy 1 month after discharge. A total of 184 patients (86 before the intervention and 98 afterwards) were included. Training significantly increased the prescription of anticoagulants in the department (before the intervention, 32 patients [37%] vs 95 [97%] afterwards; P<.001). In the preintervention period, 26 patients (30% were on anticoagulants 1 month later; in the postintervention period, 26 (30%) were still on therapy (P<.001). This study shows that emergency staff training is effective for implementing protocols based on anticoagulant therapy guidelines.

  20. US emergency nurses' perceptions of challenges and facilitators in the management of behavioural health patients in the emergency department: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Lisa A; Perhats, Cydne; Delao, Altair M

    2015-08-01

    Behavioural health patients often have longer lengths of stay in the emergency department compared with general medical patients, and their modalities of care are not well documented. This study's purpose is to describe US emergency nurses' estimates of lengths of stay for behavioural health patients, explore factors affecting length of stay, and assess nurses' perceptions of their skills, beliefs/attitudes, and confidence in caring for this population. Using a mixed-methods design with demographically-diverse samples of emergency nurses, survey data (N=1229) were analysed using descriptive statistics, correlation coefficients, and linear regression. Focus group participant data (N=20) were analysed for themes using constant comparison. Findings suggest that shorter lengths of stay are associated with higher levels of perceived nursing confidence/preparation to care for this population, along with the availability of appropriate resources and protocols/standards of care (p=0.01). Longer lengths of stay are associated with an absence of dedicated inpatient space for managing the care of these patients. Participants note a lack of education, resources, and treatment options tailored to the delivery of safe, effective care for behavioural health patients. The use of trained specialists and additional guidelines/protocols may help move patients through the emergency department faster and with greater surety. Copyright © 2015 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Doctor's perception of doctor-patient relationships in emergency departments: What roles do gender and ethnicity play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitsch, Birgit; Braun, Tanja; Borde, Theda; David, Matthias

    2008-04-11

    Emergency departments continuously provide medical treatment on a walk-in basis. Several studies investigated the patient's perception of the doctor-patient relationship, but few have asked doctors about their views. Furthermore, the influence of the patient's ethnicity and gender on the doctor's perception remains largely unanswered. Based on data collated in three gynaecology (GYN)/internal medicine (INT) emergency departments in Berlin, Germany, we evaluated the impact of the patient's gender and ethnicity on the doctors' satisfaction with the course of the treatment they provided. Information was gathered from 2.429 short questionnaires completed by doctors and the medical records of the corresponding patients. The patient's ethnicity had a significant impact on the doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR) for physician satisfaction was significantly lower for patients of Turkish origin (OR = 2.6 INT and 5.5 GYN) than for those of German origin. The main reasons stated were problems with communication and a perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment. The odds ratios for dissatisfaction due to a lack of language skills were 4.48 (INT) and 6.22 (GYN), and those due to perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment were 0.75 (INT) and 0.63 (GYN). Sex differences caused minor variation. The results show that good communication despite language barriers is crucial in providing medical care that is satisfactory to both patient and doctors, especially in emergency situations. Therefore the use of professional interpreters for improved communication and the training of medical staff for improved intercultural competence are essential for the provision of adequate health care in a multicultural setting.

  2. Doctor's perception of doctor-patient relationships in emergency departments: What roles do gender and ethnicity play?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borde Theda

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments continuously provide medical treatment on a walk-in basis. Several studies investigated the patient's perception of the doctor-patient relationship, but few have asked doctors about their views. Furthermore, the influence of the patient's ethnicity and gender on the doctor's perception remains largely unanswered. Methods Based on data collated in three gynaecology (GYN/internal medicine (INT emergency departments in Berlin, Germany, we evaluated the impact of the patient's gender and ethnicity on the doctors' satisfaction with the course of the treatment they provided. Information was gathered from 2.429 short questionnaires completed by doctors and the medical records of the corresponding patients. Results The patient's ethnicity had a significant impact on the doctors' satisfaction with the doctor-patient relationship. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds ratio (OR for physician satisfaction was significantly lower for patients of Turkish origin (OR = 2.6 INT and 5.5 GYN than for those of German origin. The main reasons stated were problems with communication and a perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment. The odds ratios for dissatisfaction due to a lack of language skills were 4.48 (INT and 6.22 (GYN, and those due to perceived lack of urgency for emergency treatment were 0.75 (INT and 0.63 (GYN. Sex differences caused minor variation. Conclusion The results show that good communication despite language barriers is crucial in providing medical care that is satisfactory to both patient and doctors, especially in emergency situations. Therefore the use of professional interpreters for improved communication and the training of medical staff for improved intercultural competence are essential for the provision of adequate health care in a multicultural setting.

  3. Consensus-based recommendations for research priorities related to interventions to safeguard patient safety in the crowded emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fee, Christopher; Hall, Kendall; Morrison, J Bradley; Stephens, Robert; Cosby, Karen; Fairbanks, Rollin Terry J; Youngberg, Barbara; Lenehan, Gail; Abualenain, Jameel; O'Connor, Kevin; Wears, Robert

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the results of the Interventions to Safeguard Safety breakout session of the 2011 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference entitled "Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department." Using a multistep nominal group technique, experts in emergency department (ED) crowding, patient safety, and systems engineering defined knowledge gaps and priority research questions related to the maintenance of safety in the crowded ED. Consensus was reached for seven research priorities related to interventions to maintain safety in the setting of a crowded ED. Included among these are: 1) How do routine corrective processes and compensating mechanism change during crowding? 2) What metrics should be used to determine ED safety? 3) How can checklists ensure safer care and what factors contribute to their success or failure? 4) What constitutes safe staffing levels/ratios? 5) How can we align emergency medicine (EM)-specific patient safety issues with national patient safety issues? 6) How can we develop metrics and skills to recognize when an ED is getting close to catastrophic overload conditions? and 7) What can EM learn from experts and modeling from fields outside of medicine to develop innovative solutions? These priorities have the potential to inform future clinical and human factors research and extramural funding decisions related to this important topic. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Management of the patient with sepsis in emergency department: a new alternative protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Monti

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a clinical syndrome induced from the host response to an infection. Severe sepsis is the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. The introduction of the early goaldirected therapy (EGDT has been able to reduce mortality in patients with severe sepsis/ septic shock. However, sepsis mortality rates remain high compared to other critical illnesses. Many studies have pointed out that the use of arterial line placement and the execution of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation measurements are the most difficult EGDT elements to carry out in community hospitals. For these reasons, the present independent review examines recent pathogenic, diagnostic, and therapeutic development in sepsis with particular relevance to the emergency practice, following the latest guidelines published in February 2013 and several recent studies. We propose a non-invasive alternative protocol which can replace the standard treatment with non-substantial changes in the patient outcome though overcoming the obstacles of a invasive method.

  5. Diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus: evidence-based management of pediatric patients in the emergency department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibners, Lara

    2017-02-01

    Diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus are potentially deadly bacterial infections that are largely preventable through vaccination, though they remain in the population. This issue reviews the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and current recommended emergency management of these conditions. Disease-specific medications, as well as treatment of the secondary complications, are examined in light of the best current evidence. Resources include obtaining diphtheria antitoxin from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and best-practice recommendations with regard to testing, involvement of government health agencies, isolation of the patient, and identification and treatment of close contacts. Most importantly, issues regarding vaccination and prevention are highlighted.

  6. Patient choice of provider type in the emergency department: perceptions and factors relating to accommodation of requests for care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padela, Aasim I; Schneider, Sandra M; He, Hua; Ali, Zarina; Richardson, Thomas M

    2010-06-01

    Patient satisfaction is related to the perception of care. Some patients prefer, and are more satisfied with, providers of the same gender, race or religious faith. This study examined emergency medical provider attitudes towards, as well as patient and provider characteristics that are associated with, accommodating such requests. A survey administered to a convenience sample of participants at the 2007 American College of Emergency Physicians Scientific Assembly. The nine-question survey ascertained Likert-type responses to the likelihood of accommodating patient requests for specific provider types. Statistical analyses used Wilcoxon rank-sum, Wilcoxon signed-rank and Cochran's Q tests. The 176 respondents were predominantly white (83%) and male (74%), with a mean age of 42 y. Nearly a third of providers felt that patients perceive better care from providers of shared demographics with racial matching perceived as more important than gender or religion (p=0.02). Female providers supported patient requests for same gender providers more so than males (prequesting like providers, female patients had higher accommodation scores than male patients (prequests for providers of specific demographics within the emergency department may be related to provider characteristics. When patients ask for same gender providers, female providers are more likely to accommodate such a request than male providers. Female, non-white and Muslim patients may be more likely to have their requests honoured for matched providers.

  7. Key Players in Key Roles: The Baystate Patient Progress Initiative to Improve Emergency Department Efficiency and Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathlev, Niels K; Anderson, Jacqualyn; Schmidt, Joseph; Hettler, Joeli; Garreffi, Lynn; Gray, Molly; Neal, Douglas; Visintainer, Paul

    2017-12-06

    The percentage of patients who leave the emergency department without being seen by a provider is a measure of efficiency and presents risk-management concerns. The number of patients actually "seen" by a provider is a measure of productivity. The opening of our new emergency department in December 2012, resulted in increases in both demand and the percentage of patients who left without being seen. Operational nursing leadership managed ED patient flow, but the structure was loosely organized on an ad hoc basis. Operational nursing leadership roles were re-assigned to personnel with management aptitude and interest. The charge nurse coordinated care throughout all sections (pods) of the department while the pod lead nurse coordinated care in each pod. The flow coordinator nurse accepted transfers and emergency medical services arrivals. Nursing and physician staffing remained unchanged, and measures were calculated over a 3-year period (December 3, 2012, to December 2, 2015). The number of patients seen per day was analyzed using simple linear regression. The percentage of patients who left without being seen was analyzed using fractional logistic regression; P< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The weekly mean number of patients seen per day rose 13% from 265 to 299 patients. The weekly mean percentage of patients who left without being seen declined 45% from 8.2% to 4.5%. The regression lines for both measures were significant at P < 0.001. Measures of efficiency and productivity can be improved significantly with a dedicated operational nursing leadership structure without adding nursing or physician staffing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparison of Pulmonary Embolism and Subsequent Cardiovascular Events Between Elderly and Young Patients in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Yi Feng

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: Diagnosis intervals in the elderly were widely variable. Rapid and precise diagnosis of PE in the emergency department remains a challenge. Clinical presentations gave less useful information to make a correct diagnosis of PE, especially in the elderly. There are more new episodes of ischemic heart disease in the elderly followed by PE, but no significant difference in the overall SCVE between the two groups. The relationship between SCVE and age in patients with PE may need further evaluation.

  9. Availability of mobile phones for discharge follow-up of pediatric Emergency Department patients in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlene R. House

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Mobile phones have been successfully used for Emergency Department (ED patient follow-up in developed countries. Mobile phones are widely available in developing countries and may offer a similar potential for follow-up and continued care of ED patients in low and middle-income countries. The goal of this study was to determine the percentage of families with mobile phones presenting to a pediatric ED in western Kenya and rate of response to a follow-up phone call after discharge.Methods. A prospective, cross-sectional observational study of children presenting to the emergency department of a government referral hospital in Eldoret, Kenya was performed. Documentation of mobile phone access, including phone number, was recorded. If families had access, consent was obtained and families were contacted 7 days after discharge for follow-up.Results. Of 788 families, 704 (89.3% had mobile phone access. Of those families discharged from the ED, successful follow-up was made in 83.6% of cases.Conclusions. Mobile phones are an available technology for follow-up of patients discharged from a pediatric emergency department in resource-limited western Kenya.

  10. Availability of mobile phones for discharge follow-up of pediatric Emergency Department patients in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Darlene R; Cheptinga, Philip; Rusyniak, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Mobile phones have been successfully used for Emergency Department (ED) patient follow-up in developed countries. Mobile phones are widely available in developing countries and may offer a similar potential for follow-up and continued care of ED patients in low and middle-income countries. The goal of this study was to determine the percentage of families with mobile phones presenting to a pediatric ED in western Kenya and rate of response to a follow-up phone call after discharge. Methods. A prospective, cross-sectional observational study of children presenting to the emergency department of a government referral hospital in Eldoret, Kenya was performed. Documentation of mobile phone access, including phone number, was recorded. If families had access, consent was obtained and families were contacted 7 days after discharge for follow-up. Results. Of 788 families, 704 (89.3%) had mobile phone access. Of those families discharged from the ED, successful follow-up was made in 83.6% of cases. Conclusions. Mobile phones are an available technology for follow-up of patients discharged from a pediatric emergency department in resource-limited western Kenya.

  11. Prediction of bacteremia in the emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marie Kristine Jessen; Mackenhauer, Julie; Hvass, Anne Mette Sondrup Wulff

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate a previously published clinical decision rule for predicting a positive blood culture in emergency department (ED) patients with suspected infection on the basis of major and minor criteria and a total score (Shapiro et al., J Emerg Med, 2008...

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of the TIMI risk score in patients with chest pain in the emergency department: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Erik P; Agarwal, Dipti; Chandra, Subhash; Murad, Mohammed H; Erwin, Patricia J; Hollander, Judd E; Montori, Victor M; Stiell, Ian G

    2010-07-13

    The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk score uses clinical data to predict the short-term risk of acute myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization or death from any cause. It was originally developed for use in patients with unstable angina or non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction. We sought to expand the clinical application of the TIMI risk score by assessing its prognostic accuracy in patients in the emergency department with potential acute coronary syndromes. We searched five electronic databases, hand-searched reference lists of included studies and contacted content experts to identify articles for review. We included prospective cohort studies that validated the TIMI risk score in emergency department patients. We performed a meta-regression to determine whether a linear relation exists between TIMI risk score and the cumulative incidence of cardiac events. We included 10 prospective cohort studies (with a total of 17 265 patients) in our systematic review. Data were available for meta-analysis in 8 of the 10 studies. Of patients with a score of zero, 1.8% had a cardiac event within 30 days (sensitivity 97.2%, 95% CI 96.4-97.8; specificity 25.0%, 95% CI 24.3-25.7; positive likelihood ratio 1.30, 95% CI 1.28-1.31; negative likelihood ratio 0.11, 95% CI 0.09-0.15). Meta-regression analysis revealed a strong linear relation between TIMI risk score (p TIMI risk score is an effective risk stratification tool for patients in the emergency department with potential acute coronary syndromes, it should not be used as the sole means of determining patient disposition.

  13. PTSD, cyberbullying and peer violence: prevalence and correlates among adolescent emergency department patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Patena, John V; Nugent, Nicole; Spirito, Anthony; Boyer, Edward; Zatzick, Douglas; Cunningham, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is often underdiagnosed and undertreated among adolescents. The objective of this analysis was to describe the prevalence and correlates of symptoms consistent with PTSD among adolescents presenting to an urban emergency department (ED). A cross-sectional survey of adolescents aged 13-17 years presenting to the ED for any reason was conducted between August 2013 and March 2014. Validated self-report measures were used to measure mental health symptoms, violence exposure and risky behaviors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine adjusted differences in associations between symptoms consistent with PTSD and predicted correlates. Of 353 adolescents, 23.2% reported current symptoms consistent with PTSD, 13.9% had moderate or higher depressive symptoms and 11.3% reported past-year suicidal ideation. Adolescents commonly reported physical peer violence (46.5%), cyberbullying (46.7%) and exposure to community violence (58.9%). On multivariate logistic regression, physical peer violence, cyberbullying victimization, exposure to community violence, female gender and alcohol or other drug use positively correlated with symptoms consistent with PTSD. Among adolescents presenting to the ED for any reason, symptoms consistent with PTSD, depressive symptoms, physical peer violence, cyberbullying and community violence exposure are common and interrelated. Greater attention to PTSD, both disorder and symptom levels, and its cooccurring risk factors is needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. PTSD, Cyberbullying, and Peer Violence: Prevalence and Correlates among Adolescent Emergency Department Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L.; Patena, John V; Nugent, Nicole; Spirito, Anthony; Boyer, Edward; Zatzick, Douglas; Cunningham, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Objective Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is often underdiagnosed and undertreated among adolescents. The objective of this analysis was to describe the prevalence and correlates of symptoms consistent with PTSD among adolescents presenting to an urban emergency department (ED). Method A cross-sectional survey of adolescents aged 13–17 presenting to the ED for any reason was conducted between August 2013 and March 2014. Validated self-report measures were used to measure mental health symptoms, violence exposure, and risky behaviors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine adjusted differences in associations between symptoms consistent with PTSD, and predicted correlates. Results Of 353 adolescents, 23.2% reported current symptoms consistent with PTSD, 13.9% had moderate or higher depressive symptoms, and 11.3% reported past-year suicidal ideation. Adolescents commonly reported physical peer violence (46.5%), cyberbullying (46.7%), and exposure to community violence (58.9%). On multivariate logistic regression, physical peer violence, cyberbullying victimization, exposure to community violence, female gender, and alcohol or other drug use positively correlated with symptoms consistent with PTSD. Conclusions Among adolescents presenting to the ED for any reason, symptoms consistent with PTSD PTSD, depressive symptoms, physical peer violence, cyberbullying, and community violence exposure are common and inter-related. Greater attention to PTSD, both the disorder and symptom level, and its co-occurring risk factors is needed. PMID:26786845

  15. Vulnerability of Older Adults in Disasters: Emergency Department Utilization by Geriatric Patients After Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sidrah; Lee, David C; Doran, Kelly M; Grudzen, Corita R; Worthing, Justin; Portelli, Ian; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Smith, Silas W

    2017-08-02

    Older adults are a potentially medically vulnerable population with increased mortality rates during and after disasters. To evaluate the impact of a natural disaster on this population, we performed a temporal and geospatial analysis of emergency department (ED) use by adults aged 65 years and older in New York City (NYC) following Hurricane Sandy's landfall. We used an all-payer claims database to analyze demographics, insurance status, geographic distribution, and health conditions for post-disaster ED visits among older adults. We compared ED patterns of use in the weeks before and after Hurricane Sandy throughout NYC and the most afflicted evacuation zones. We found significant increases in ED utilization by older adults (and disproportionately higher in those aged ≥85 years) in the 3 weeks after Hurricane Sandy, especially in NYC evacuation zone one. Primary diagnoses with notable increases included dialysis, electrolyte disorders, and prescription refills. Secondary diagnoses highlighted homelessness and care access issues. Older adults display heightened risk for worse health outcomes with increased ED visits after a disaster. Our findings suggest the need for dedicated resources and planning for older adults following a natural disaster by ensuring access to medical facilities, prescriptions, dialysis, and safe housing and by optimizing health care delivery needs to reduce the burden of chronic disease. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;page 1 of 10).

  16. Improving Pain Relief in Elder Patients (I-PREP): An Emergency Department Education and Quality Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Teresita M; Howell, Michael D; Cursio, John F; Wong, Alexandra; Dale, William

    2016-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a novel combined education and quality improvement (QI) program for management of pain in older adults in the emergency department (ED). Controlled pre/postintervention examination. An academic urban ED seeing 60,000 adult visits annually. Individuals aged 65 and older experiencing moderate to severe pain. Linked standardized education and continuous QI for multidisciplinary staff in an urban, academic ED from January 2012 to January 2014. Pain intensity, percentage receiving and time to pain assessment and reassessment, percentage receiving and time to delivery of analgesic. The percentage of participants with final pain score of 4 or less (out of 10) increased 47.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) = 41.8-53.2%). Median decrease in pain intensity improved significantly, from 0.0 to 5.0 points (P improvement increased 43.7% (95% CI = 37.1-50.3%, P improved pain management in older adults in the ED with moderate to severe musculoskeletal or abdominal pain. Significant reductions in pain intensity were achieved, the timing of pain assessments and reassessments was improved, and analgesics were delivered faster. Tightly linking education to targeted QI improved pain management of older adults in the ED. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. The diagnostic significance of NT-proBNP and troponin I in emergency department patients presenting with palpitations

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    Tarık Ocak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This prospective study investigated the diagnostic significance of the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic (NT-proBNP and troponin I peptides in emergency department patients presenting with palpitations. METHODS: Two groups of patients with palpitations but without documented supraventricular tachycardia were compared: a group with supraventricular tachycardia (n = 49 and a control group (n = 47. Both groups were diagnosed using electrophysiological studies during the study period. Blood samples were obtained from all of the patients to determine the NT-proBNP and troponin I levels within the first hour following arrival in the emergency department. RESULT: The mean NT-proBNP levels were 207.74±197.11 in supraventricular tachyarrhythmia group and 39.99±32.83 pg/mL in control group (p0.001. The mean troponin I levels were 0.17±0.56 and 0.01±0.06 pg/mL for the patients with and without supraventricular tachycardia, respectively (p<0.05. Of the 96 patients, 21 (21.87% had troponin I levels ≥0.01: 2 (4.25% in the control group and 19 (38.77% in the supraventricular tachycardia group (p<0.001. CONCLUSION: Troponin I and, in particular, NT-proBNP peptide were helpful for differentiating supraventricular tachycardia from non- supraventricular tachycardia palpitations. Further randomized, large, multicenter trials are needed to define the benefit and diagnostic role of NT-proBNP and troponin I in the management algorithm of patients presenting with palpitations in emergency departments.

  18. Effects of mandatory screening labs in directing the disposition of the apparently healthy psychiatric patient in the emergency department.

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    Kagel, Karyn E; Smith, Meghan; Latyshenko, Ilya V; Mitchell, Christopher; Kagel, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether mandatory psychiatric admission laboratory tests yield results that change the disposition of a patient with primary psychiatric complaint from admission to a psychiatric service to admission to a medical service. This was a single center retrospective cohort chart review study approved by the facility Institutional Review Board in which we used a records database maintained by the emergency department's social workers to access the records of every patient that presented to our emergency department with a psychiatric chief complaint between the dates of December 1, 2011, and December 1, 2013. We focused on those that were admitted to either a psychiatric service or a medical service after a thorough evaluation by the department of social work and an emergency provider. We applied our inclusion and exclusion criteria and reviewed the results of the mandatory psychiatric laboratory tests (complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, thyroid stimulating hormone, acetaminophen, aspirin, blood alcohol level, urinalysis, urine pregnancy test, urine drug screen) required for admission. Our independent variables were the compulsory psychiatric admission laboratory tests and our dependent variable was the admission to a medical service. Of 5,606 laboratory tests that were ordered and produced results for the 682 patients enrolled in our study, 51 results were considered clinically significant abnormal results, or results requiring treatment prior to psychiatric service admission, by the 2 reviewing emergency physicians. Only one of 682 psychiatric patients received a final disposition to a medical service based upon abnormal laboratory studies. That patient presented without any medical complaints but a chief complaint of "suicidal ideation," and was found to have diabetic ketoacidosis. Based on our data, the probability that an abnormal laboratory test will result in a change in disposition is 1/682=0.1% (95% CI: 0.0% to 0.9%). Patients

  19. Can surgical need in patients with Naja atra (Taiwan or Chinese cobra) envenomation be predicted in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H Y; Wang, M J; Li, Y H; Tang, C N; Tsai, M J

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the clinical predictors and the aetiologies for surgery in patients with Naja atra (Taiwan or Chinese cobra) envenomation. This case series was conducted in the only tertiary care centre in eastern Taiwan. Patients who presented to the emergency department with Naja atra bite between January 2008 and September 2014 were included. Clinical information was collected and compared between surgical and non-surgical patients. A total of 28 patients with Naja atra envenomation presented to the emergency department during the study period. Of these, 60.7% (n=17) required surgery. Necrotising fasciitis (76.5%) was the main finding in surgery. Comparisons between surgical and non-surgical patients showed skin ecchymosis (odds ratio=34.36; 95% confidence interval, 2.20-536.08; P=0.012) and a high total dose of antivenin (≥6 vials; odds ratio=14.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-192.72; P=0.042) to be the most significant predictors of surgery. The rate of bacterial isolation from the surgical wound was 88.2%. Morganella morganii (76.5%), Enterococcus faecalis (58.8%), and Bacteroides fragilis (29.4%) were the most common pathogens involved. Bacterial susceptibility testing indicated that combined broad-spectrum antibiotics were needed to cover mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacterial infection. Patients with Naja atra envenomation who present with skin ecchymosis or the need for a high dose of antivenin may require early surgical assessment. Combined broad-spectrum antibiotics are mandatory.

  20. The effect of supportive emergency department nursing care on pain reduction of patients with Red Sea marine wildlife injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviv, Osnat; Delbar, Vered; Arad, Jacob; Grinstein-Cohen, Orli

    2015-10-01

    The emergency department at Yoseftal hospital in Eilat is on the shore of the Red Sea, and it is visited by patients with marine wildlife injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of supportive nursing care on the pain level of patients with Red Sea marine wildlife injuries. A prospective quantitative study including 102 patients admitted to the emergency department. The study included a study group (N = 50) and a control group (N = 52). Both groups rated their pain level on the VAS before and after receiving treatment. The control group received the usual treatment, and the study group received the usual nursing treatment along with structured patient guidance and support. There was a significant difference in the level of pain after the intervention between the control and the study group. In the study group, the level of pain was significantly reduced compared with the control group (p Nursing training and patient guidance contributed to increasing cooperation with patients and pain reduction. Therefore, training interventions should be structured and assimilated as an integral part of nursing practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach. PMID:21982119

  2. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastmans Chris

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach.

  3. Managed care and the pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, D

    1999-12-01

    The growth of managed care has provided health benefits to millions of children while attempting to control the increase in health care costs. In adhering to these goals, MCOs are often at odds with emergency departments, and the emergency department physicians providing emergency care. The appropriateness or inappropriateness of emergency department visits can be disputed, but no criteria have been established. Even the definition of emergency is debated, although many states are adopting a prudent layperson standard. Emergency medicine physicians, primary care providers, and MCOs must cooperate to fully educate parents about the appropriate use of pediatric emergency services. Patients and MCOs should use facilities that can deliver pediatric emergency and critical care or provide appropriate transport systems to facilities that can. COBRA and EMTALA set the legal requirements to which emergency departments must comply when patients present for care. The basic caveats under COBRA require a medical screening examination for every patient and the stabilization of all patients with emergency medical conditions before inquiring about insurance or patients' ability to pay. A part of gatekeeping, MCOs often require authorization for treatment. MCOs authorize payment only. Evaluation and emergency treatment should not be withheld pending authorization. After the medical screening examination, recommended treatment should be in patients' best interests. All patients with potentially life-threatening conditions should be stabilized before transport, and all transfers must comply with the EMTALA. The transfer of unstable patients purely for economic reasons is a violation of the EMTALA. When stable, patients may be transferred to other facilities, but patients requiring specialty care should be taken to facilities best able to provide that care. Financial considerations should be superseded by medical necessity. Finally, improvements can be made in the way emergency

  4. [Medication-related negative outcomes in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation attended in a hospital emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Degayón, Virginia; Montero-Pérez, Francisco Javier; Torres-Murillo, José Manuel; Faus-Dáder, María José; Baena-Parejo, María Isabel; Calleja-Hernández, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    To detect the frequency of negative outcomes associated with medication in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) who are attended in a hospital emergency department, and to assess type and severity of such outcomes related to AF medications as well as the rate of preventable negative outcomes. Descriptive, observational cross-sectional study in patients with permanent AF who were attended in the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital during a 3-month period. A pharmacist interviewed the patients to record demographic characteristics, health problems, degree of functional impairment, and current drug treatments. An emergency physician and a pharmacist reviewed the patients' questionnaires and medical histories and evaluated them using the Dader method of pharmacotherapeutic follow-up. Of the 210 patients assessed, 198 entered the final analysis. They had a mean (SD) age of 80.5 (7.3) years, and 114 (57.5%) were women. One handred and thirty-four (67.7%) patients had medication-related negative outcomes; 61 (45.5%) of the outcomes were related to treatment for permanent AF. Twenty-four of these 61 patients (39.3%) had problems affecting safety; 36 (59%) of the problems were caused by drugs to control heart rate. Of the 73 patients with negative outcomes unrelated to AF medication, 34 (46.6%) were related to necessary medications and 38 (52.1%) were taking antibiotics. The frequencies of avoidable negative outcomes were significantly different between the group of patients with problems related to drug therapy for AF (where 55.7% were due to medications considered unnecessary) and those with problems unrelated to AF medications (where 78.1% were from avoidable medications) (P=.010). However, the level of seriousness was similar. Nearly two-thirds of patients with permanent AF who come to the emergency department have a medication- related negative outcome that may or may not be related to AF treatment. Problems from drugs taken for reasons other

  5. [Prevalence of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus infection in an emergency department and the characteristics of newly diagnosed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro Portillo, Alberto; Del Arco Galán, Carmen; de Los Santos Gil, Ignacio; Rodríguez Salvanés, Francisco; Negro Rua, Mónica; Del Rey Ubago, Ana

    2016-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection detected by routine testing of patients seeking care in an emergency department and to describe the characteristics associated with new HIV-infection diagnosis. Walk-in patients between the ages of 15 and 75 years who required a blood test were included. Routine fourth-generation enzyme-linked immunoassays were performed to detect HIV infection in all samples extracted. Patients with positive results were referred to the infectious diseases department for monitoring and treatment. Blood samples for 1722 patients were analyzed. Twenty-one patients (1.2%) refused to allow their samples to be tested; 19 more samples (1.1%) could not be tested. The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection among the remaining 1682 remaining patients was 0.6% (95% CI, 0.23%-0.96%). The prevalence tended to be nonsignificantly higher among patients born outside Spain (0.97% [95% CI, 0.3%-2.20%]) and in 36-50-year-olds (1.46% [95% CI, 0.4%-2.5%]). Characteristics associated with undiagnosed HIV infection were male sex (odds ratio [OR], 5.78 [95% CI, 1.0-31.4]), presenting with a chief complaint that suggested infection (OR, 8.14 [95% CI, 1.6-41.4]), and a history of hepatitis (OR, 5.53 [95% CI, 1.1-27.7]). The prevalence of undiagnosed HIV infection in our emergency department was high at 0.6%. The rate of patient acceptance of routine HIV testing was high. Strategies that target improving the detection of undiagnosed HIV infection are advisable.

  6. Investigating the effect of clinical governess approach on patients' length of stay in emergency department: an action research study.

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    Tahmine Salehi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, clinical governance approach with aims to improve the quality of health services has been proposed in Iran. Considering the obvious problems especially patients' length of stay (LOS in the emergency departments (EDs; the present study has been carried out with the purpose of Investigating the effect of clinical governess approach on patients' LOS in the one of the largest medical centers in the country. After the problem was specified by the 17 interviews with employees and managers of the ED; the emergency clinical governance committee was formed by two academic researchers and seven ED staff (key participants that had the most involvement with the subject of study. The activities of the committee, including planning, acting, observing and reflecting, was organized by using participatory action research approach and action research cycle (Kemmis 1995. During this time, three formal meetings with key participants were held in 6-month intervals. Monthly records of patients' average LOS and interview with ED staff were used to analyze the findings. The research was completed with two cycles in one year. Committee members took the following actions. As a result, the patients' LOS reduced from 2.68 days to 1.73 days. Make regular patients visits by medical groups especially orthopedists and neurologists; Decision making about patients situation by emergency physicians and transferring patients to the relevant units by bed managers; Refusing to admit elective patients during overcrowding times; to regulate the list of patients requiring ICU by anesthesiologists. Prolonged LOS can be due to various causes and a team approach, which is one of the requirements of clinical governance approach, is needed to manage it. The results showed that the multidisciplinary team could make positive changes and reduce LOS in emergency setting.

  7. Detection of the awareness rate of abuse in pediatric patients admitted to emergency medicine department with injury

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    Selen Acehan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It was aimed to investigate whether neglected and abused pediatric patients are properly recognized and reported by emergency physicians in the emergency department (ED. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on patients between 0 and 6 years of age presenting with trauma to ED. Patients were examined again by an emergency medicine specialist independent from the physician who did the first intervention during clinical follow-up phase after notification of patients presenting with trauma to emergency physician. Asked radiological examinations and clinical follow-up were performed. The suspected abuse evaluation form, consisting 12 items, which was formed by considering the forms used in previous studies was used to examine the awareness of physicians in cases of abuse suspicion. Results: A total of 126 patients were included in our study. 54% of cases (n = 68 were male and mean age was determined to be 31.3 ± 18.9 months. It was found that no judicial records were written to 35.7% (n = 45 of our patients and that 11.1% (n = 5 of these patients were hospitalized. In 51.1% (n = 23 of patients without judicial records, multiple suspected abuse findings were identified. According to evaluation of first physician, it was found that 75.9% (n = 41 of discharged patients had no judicial records and was not considered as neglect and abuse. Conclusion: We conclude that detection rates of abuse can be increased by developing child abuse screening forms and ensuring the continuity of the necessary training programs. Keywords: Neglect, Abuse, Pediatric

  8. Cardiac Troponin Is a Predictor of Septic Shock Mortality in Cancer Patients in an Emergency Department: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

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    Zhi Yang

    Full Text Available Septic shock may be associated with myocardial damage; however, the prognostic value of cardiac enzymes in cancer patients with septic shock is unknown. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic significance of cardiac enzymes in combination with established prognostic factors in predicting the 7-day mortality rate of patients with septic shock, and we constructed a new scoring system, Septic Oncologic Patients in Emergency Department (SOPED, which includes cardiac enzymes, to predict 7-day mortality rates.We performed a retrospective cohort study of 375 adult cancer patients with septic shock who visited the emergency department of a comprehensive cancer center between 01/01/2004 and 12/31/2013. The 7-day and 28-day mortality rates were 19.7% and 37.6%, respectively. The creatine kinase myocardial band fraction and troponin-I were significantly higher in patients who died in ≤7 days and ≤28 days than in those who did not. In Cox regression models, troponin-I >0.05 ng/mL plus Predisposition, Infection, Response, and Organ Failure (PIRO2011 or Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS score was a significant predictor of survival for ≤7 days. With our new SOPED scoring system, the receiver operating characteristic area under the curve was 0.836, higher than those for PIRO2011 and MEDS.Troponin-I >0.05 ng/mL was an important predictor of short-term mortality (≤7 days. The SOPED scoring system, which incorporated troponin-I, was more prognostically accurate than were other scores for 7-day mortality. Large multicenter studies are needed to verify our results and prospectively validate the prognostic performance of the SOPED score.

  9. Evaluation of Performance Indexes of Emergency Department

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    Alireza Baratloo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of evaluating performance indicators in the emergency department, as one of the most important departments of hospital, is obvious to everyone. Therefore, in this study we aimed to appraise the five performance indicators, approved by the ministry of health, in Shohadaye Tajrish hospital, Tehran, Iran. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study based on the profiles of all the patients admitted to the emergency department, performance indicators in the emergency department were evaluated. The study was divided into 2 parts about the establishment of emergency medicine system and training the medical staff: the first 6 months of 1392 and the second. Then these 2 periods were compared using Mann-Whitney U test while P< 0.05 was considered as the level of significance. Results: Of the studied indicators, mean triage time was 6.04 minutes in the first 6 months which was reduced to 1.5 minutes in the second 6 months (p=0.016. In addition, the percentage of patients who moved out of the department in 12 hours was lowered from 97.3% in the first period to 90.4% in the second (p=0.004. While, the percentage of patients who were decided upon in 6 hours (p=0.2, unsuccessful CPR percentage (p=0.34 and patients discharged against medical advice (p=0.42 showed no significant difference. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the establishment of the emergency medicine system in the emergency department could lead to more efficient triage. Due to the differences made after their establishment including: different pattern of the patients admitted, increased stay of the patients in the department due to their need for prolonged intensive care, a raise in patient referral to the hospital by pre-hospital services and a higher percentage of occupied hospital beds, other indicators have not shown a significant improvement.

  10. [Peripheral venous catheter use in the emergency department: reducing adverse events in patients and biosafety problems for staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás Vecina, Santiago; Mozota Duarte, Julián; Ortega Marcos, Miguel; Gracia Ruiz Navarro, María; Borillo, Vicente; San Juan Gago, Leticia; Roqueta Egea, Fermin; Chanovas Borrás, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    To test a strategy to reduce the rate of adverse events in patients and safety problems for emergency department staff who insert peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). The strategy consisted of training, implementing a protocol, and introducing safety-engineered PVCs. Prospective, multicenter, observational, preauthorization study in patients requiring PVC placement in an emergency department. The study had 2 phases. The first consisted of training, implementing a protocol for using conventional PVCs, and monitoring practice. The second phase introduced safety-engineered PVC sets. The number of adverse events in patients and threats to safety for staff were compared between the 2 phases. A total of 520 patients were included, 180 in the first phase and 340 in the second. We detected breaches in aseptic technique, failure to maintain a sterile field, and improper management of safety equipment and devices. Some practices improved significantly during the second phase. Eighty-six adverse events occurred in the first phase and 52 (15.4%) in the second; the between-phase difference was not statistically significant. The incidence of postinfusion phlebitis was 50% lower in the second phase. Seven splash injuries and 1 accidental puncture occurred with conventional PVCs in the first phase; 2 splash injuries occurred with the safety-engineered PVCs in the second phase (36% decrease, P = .04). Differences were particularly noticeable for short-term PVC placements (P = .02). Combining training, a protocol, and the use of safety-engineered PVC sets offers an effective strategy for improving patient and staff safety.

  11. Triage vital signs predict in-hospital mortality among emergency department patients with acute poisoning: a case control study

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    Yu Jiun-Hao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To document the relationship between triage vital signs and in-hospital mortality among emergency department (ED patients with acute poisoning. Methods Poisoning patients who admitted to our emergency department during the study period were enrolled. Patient’s demographic data were collected and odds ratios (OR of triage vital signs to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the proper cut-off value of vital signs that predict in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the association of in-hospital mortality and vital signs after adjusting for different variables. Results 997 acute poisoning patients were enrolled, with 70 fatal cases (6.7%. A J-shaped relationship was found between triage vital signs and in-hospital mortality. ED triage vital signs exceed cut-off values independently predict in-hospital mortality after adjusting for variables were as follow: body temperature 37°C, p 150 mmHg, p 120 bpm, p 20 per minute, p = 0.38, OR: 1.4. Conclusions Triage vital signs could predict in-hospital mortality among ED patients with acute poisoning. A J-curve relationship was found between triage vital signs and in-hospital mortality. ED physicians should take note of the extreme initial vital signs in these patients.

  12. Language barriers among patients in Boston emergency departments: use of medical interpreters after passage of interpreter legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginde, Adit A; Clark, Sunday; Camargo, Carlos A

    2009-12-01

    Since 2001, Massachusetts state law dictates that emergency department (ED) patients with limited English proficiency have the right to a professional interpreter. One year later, for two 24-h periods, we interviewed adult patients presenting to four Boston EDs. We assessed language barriers and compared this need with the observed use and type of interpreter during the ED visit. We interviewed 530 patients (70% of eligible) and estimated that an interpreter was needed for 60 (11%; 95% confidence interval, 7-12%) patients. The primary interpreter for these clinical encounters was a physician (30%), friend or family member age >or=18 years (22%), hospital interpreter services (15%), younger family member (11%), or other hospital staff (17%). We found that 11% of ED patients had significant language barriers, but use of professional medical interpreters remained low. One year after passage of legislation mandating access, use of professional medical interpreters remained inadequate.

  13. Racial Disparity in Duration of Patient Visits to the Emergency Department: Teaching Versus Non-teaching Hospitals

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    Zynal Karaca

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The sources of racial disparity in duration of patients’ visits to emergency departments (EDs have not been documented well enough for policymakers to distinguish patient-related factors from hospital- or area-related factors. This study explores the racial disparity in duration of routine visits to EDs at teaching and non-teaching hospitals.Methods: We performed retrospective data analyses and multivariate regression analyses to investigate the racial disparity in duration of routine ED visits at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD were used in the analyses. The data include 4.3 million routine ED visits encountered in Arizona, Massachusetts, and Utah during 2008. We computed duration for each visit by taking the difference between admission and discharge times.Results: The mean duration for a routine ED visit was 238 minutes at teaching hospitals and 175 minutes at non-teaching hospitals. There were significant variations in duration of routine ED visits across race groups at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. The risk-adjusted results show that the mean duration of routine ED visits for Black/African American and Asian patients when compared to visits for white patients was shorter by 10.0 and 3.4%, respectively, at teaching hospitals; and longer by 3.6 and 13.8%, respectively, at non-teaching hospitals. Hispanic patients, on average, experienced 8.7% longer ED stays when compared to white patients at non-teaching hospitals.Conclusion: There is significant racial disparity in the duration of routine ED visits, especially in non-teaching hospitals where non-White patients experience longer ED stays compared to white patients. The variation in duration of routine ED visits at teaching hospitals when compared to non-teaching hospitals was smaller across race groups. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(5:529–541.

  14. Can the ABCD Score be dichotomised to identify high-risk patients with transient ischaemic attack in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Janet E; Coughlan, Kelly; Bladin, Christopher

    2007-02-01

    Recent evidence shows a substantial short-term risk of ischaemic stroke after transient ischaemic attack (TIA). Identification of patients with TIA with a high short-term risk of stroke is now possible through the use of the "ABCD Score", which considers age, blood pressure, clinical features and duration of symptoms predictive of stroke. To evaluate the ability of dichotomising the ABCD Score to predict stroke at 7 and 90 days in a population with TIA presenting to an emergency department. A retrospective audit was conducted on all probable or definite TIAs presenting to the emergency department of a metropolitan hospital from July to December 2004. The ABCD Score was applied to 98 consecutive patients with TIA who were reviewed for subsequent strokes within 90 days. Patients obtaining an ABCD Score > or = 5 were considered to be at high risk for stroke. Dichotomising the ABCD Score categorised 48 (49%) patients with TIA at high risk for stroke (ABCD Score > or = 5). This high-risk group contained all four strokes that occurred within 7 days (sensitivity 100% (95% confidence interval (CI) 40% to 100%), specificity 53% (95% CI 43% to 63%), positive predictive value 8% (95% CI 3% to 21%) and negative predictive value 100% (95% CI 91% to 100%)), and six of seven occurring within 90 days (sensitivity 86% (95% CI 42% to 99%), specificity 54% (95% CI 43% to 64%), positive predictive value 12.5% (95% CI 5% to 26%) and negative predictive value 98% (95% CI 88% to 100%)). Removal of the "age" item from the ABCD Score halved the number of false-positive cases without changing its predictive value for stroke. In this retrospective analysis, dichotomising the ABCD Score was overinclusive but highly predictive in identifying patients with TIA at a high short-term risk of stroke. Use of the ABCD Score in the emergency care of patients with TIA is simple, efficient and provides a unique opportunity to prevent stroke in this population of patients.

  15. Impact of a logistics management program on admitted patient boarders within an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy-Rodriguez, Mary Anne; Freer, Chris; Pontiggia, Laura; Wilson, Rula; Metraux, Steve; Lord, Lyndsey

    2014-03-01

    ED crowding is a public health issue, and hospitals across the country must pursue aggressive strategies to improve patient flow to help solve this growing problem. The logistics management program (LMP) is an expansion of the bed management process to include a systematic approach to patient flow management throughout the facility and a clinical liaison or field agent to drive throughput at all points of care. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of an LMP on ED length of stay (ED evaluation times and ED placement times), as well as inpatient length of stay (IPLOS). This is a quasi-experimental study of 28,684 ED admissions in a suburban, tertiary medical center before and after implementing an LMP (2008 vs 2009). The median ED evaluation time was 219 minutes (interquartile range [IQR], 178 minutes) in 2008 versus 207 minutes (IQR, 171 minutes) in 2009 (P < .001). The median ED placement time was 219 minutes (IQR, 259 minutes) in 2008 versus 193 minutes (IQR, 158 minutes) in 2009 (P < .001). The median IPLOS was 3.93 days (IQR, 4.9 days) in 2008 versus 3.83 days (IQR, 4.7 days) in 2009 (P < .001), which represents a reduction of 1,483 inpatient days in 2009. The results provide strong evidence to support the impact of an LMP on decreasing ED evaluation times, ED placement times, and IPLOS. Further exploration is needed to examine the program as a best practice, as well as its applicability for other facilities. Copyright © 2014 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Considerations for early acute myocardial infarction rule-out for emergency department chest pain patients: the case of copeptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Plebani, Mario; Di Somma, Salvatore; Monzani, Valter; Tubaro, Marco; Volpe, Massimo; Moscatelli, Paolo; Vernocchi, Arialdo; Cavazza, Mario; Galvani, Marcello; Cappelletti, Piero; Marenzi, Giancarlo; Ferraro, Simona; Lombardi, Alberto; Peracino, Andrea

    2012-01-06

    The evaluation of patients admitted at the emergency department (ED) for chest pain is challenging and involves many different clinical specialists including emergency physicians, laboratory professionals and cardiologists. The preferable approach to deal with this issue is to develop joint protocols that will assist the clinical decision-making to quickly and accurately rule-out patients with non life-threatening conditions that can be considered for early and safe discharge or further outpatient follow-up, rule-in patients with acute coronary syndrome and raise the degree of alert of the emergency physicians on non-cardiac life-threatening emergencies. The introduction of novel biomarkers alongside the well-established troponins might support this process and also provide prognostic information about acute short-term or chronic long-term risk and severity. Among the various biomarkers, copeptin measurement holds appealing perspectives. The utility of combining troponin with copeptin might be cost-effective due to the high negative predictive value of the latter biomarker in the rule-out of an acute coronary syndrome. Moreover, in the presence of a remarkably increased concentration (e.g., more than 10 times the upper limit of the reference range), to reveal the presence of acute life-threatening conditions that may not necessarily be identified with the use of troponin alone. The aim of this article is to review current evidence about the clinical significance of copeptin testing in the ED as well as its appropriate placing within diagnostic protocols.

  17. A renal colic fast track pathway to improve waiting times and outcomes for patients presenting to the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Kadhi O

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Omar Al Kadhi,1 Kate Manley,1 Madhavi Natarajan,1 Valmiki Lutchmedial,2 Abbi Forsyth,2 Kate Tabrett,2 Jonathan Betteridge,2 William Finch,3 Heinrich Hollis4 1Department of Urology, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, 2Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of East Anglia, 3Department of Urology, 4Department of Emergency Medicine, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Norwich, UK Introduction: Renal colic is commonly encountered in the emergency department (ED. We validated a fast track renal colic (FTRC initiative to decrease patient waiting times and streamline patient flow.Method: The FTRC pathway was devised according to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical summary criteria for the management of patients with suspected renal colic. ED triage nurses use the pathway to identify patients with likely renal colic suitable for fast track to analgesia, investigation and management. Investigations, diagnosis and patient demographics were recorded for 1157 consecutive patients coded as renal colic at a single-center ED over 12 months.Results: Three hundred and two patients were suitable for the FTRC pathway (26.1%, while 855 were seen by the ED clinicians prior to onward referral. Also, 83.9% of patients underwent computed tomography scan. In the FTRC group, 57.3% of patients had radiologically confirmed calculi versus 53.8% in the non-FTRC group (p=0.31. Alternative diagnoses among FTRC patients (2.6% included ovarian pathology (n=1, diverticulitis (n=2 and incidental renal cell carcinoma (n=2, while 26.1% had no identifiable pathology. No immediately life-threatening diagnoses were identified on imaging. Computed tomography scans performed in the non-FTRC group identified two ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms and alternative diagnoses (2.57% including ovarian pathology (n=7, cholecystitis (n=2, incidental renal cell carcinoma (n=3 and inflammatory bowel

  18. Don't Label Me: A Qualitative Study of Patients' Perceptions and Experiences of Sedation During Behavioral Emergencies in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Celene Y L; Knott, Jonathan C; Kong, David C M; Gerdtz, Marie; Stewart, Kay; Taylor, David M

    2017-08-01

    Behavioral emergencies are commonly seen in emergency departments (EDs). Acutely agitated patients can be difficult to manage and sedation may be required to decrease dangerous behavior and to ensure the safety of both the patient and the staff. While the experience of staff caring for this population has been reported, patients' experiences with their overall management remains unknown. We aimed to describe the perceptions and experiences of patients regarding the use of sedation during acute behavioral emergencies. Face-to-face semistructured interviews were conducted with adults aged 18 years or older, who had received parenteral sedative medication for the management of a behavioral emergency and were deemed capable to participate. The participants were asked about their experiences of receiving care in the ED during the episode and their perceptions of sedation. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed thematically. Data saturation was reached after 13 interviews. Two broad themes emerged: trusting relationships and needs or wants following sedation. A trusting relationship is built through 1) confidence in care, 2) sedation as an appropriate treatment, 3) insight into own behavior, and 4) humane treatment. Four subthemes of needs or wants were identified: 1) empathy, 2) debrief, 3) addressing concerns, and 4) follow-up. A trusting relationship was identified as crucial to minimize the negative impact of coercive measures used to manage behavioral emergencies. Participants expressed similar needs to patients presenting with medical problems. This study illustrates their needs for compassionate communication, adequate information about the treatment provided, and follow-up care. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  19. Infection Prevention in the Emergency Department

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Stephen Y; Theodoro, Daniel L.; Jeremiah D. Schuur; Marschall, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Infection prevention remains a major challenge in emergency care. Acutely ill and injured patients seeking evaluation and treatment in the emergency department (ED) not only have the potential to spread communicable infectious diseases to healthcare personnel and other patients, but are vulnerable to acquiring new infections associated with the care they receive. This article will evaluate these risks and review the existing literature for infection prevention practices in the ED, ranging fro...

  20. Acute cocaine-related health problems in patients presenting to an urban emergency department in Switzerland: a case series

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bodmer, Michael; Enzler, Florian; Liakoni, Evangelia; Bruggisser, Marcel; Liechti, Matthias E

    2014-01-01

    .... We therefore conducted a retrospective analysis of 165 acute, laboratory-confirmed cocaine intoxications admitted to an urban emergency department in Switzerland between January 2007 and March 2011...

  1. Patient Safety and Satisfaction Drivers in Emergency Departments Re-visited - An Empirical Analysis using Structural Equation Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørup, Christian Michel; Jacobsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    How can emergency department (ED) decision makers contribute to increase patient satisfaction rates? This question has been thoroughly investigated in many hospital departments but not so much in the ED, which has led to a number of untested hypotheses. Maximising value-added activities seen from...... a patient’s perspective has become an essential outcome in health care, meaning that the untested hypotheses are in need of quantitative testing. This study proposes an integrated framework in which four latent constructs reflecting principal aspects of patient care are tested. The four constructs...... are entitled safety and satisfaction, waiting time, information delivery, and infrastructure accordingly. As an empirical foundation, a recently published comprehensive survey in 11 Danish EDs is analysed in depth using structural equation modeling (SEM). Consulting the proposed framework, ED decision makers...

  2. A qualitative assessment of emergency department patients' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and acceptance toward revised HIV testing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Ethan; Leider, Jason; Velastegui, Lorena; Wexler, Juliana; Velloza, Jennifer; Calderon, Yvette

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore emergency department (EDs) patients' knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and acceptability toward revised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing recommendations. Participants were recruited in proportion to the racial, sex, and ethnic makeup of the study ED. Interviewers presented participants with a stimulus followed by questions about opt-out consent, elimination of separate written consent, and curtailed counseling. Three investigators coded all transcripts using an iterative coding strategy until thematic saturation was achieved. Thirty-four semistructured, in-depth, individual interviews were conducted, including five with patients ages 13 to 17 years and five with Spanish-speaking patients. Nineteen (56%) participants were women. The mean (± SD) age was 31 (± 12) years. Most were Hispanic (38%) or African American/black (44%). Only one (2.9%) participant knew about the revised testing recommendations. Participants believed that opt-out consent would result in increased testing, but this was confounded by misunderstanding of the consent process: "so the opt-out is, you basically don't have a choice." Participants thought eliminating separate written consent was a positive change but that it could result in people being tested without their knowledge. Attitudes diverged over curtailed counseling, but participants felt patients "should have options" for counseling because "everybody isn't the same." Emergency department patients were unaware of revised HIV testing recommendations. Most felt that opt-out consent and elimination of separate written consent were positive changes but could result in a patient being tested without his or her knowledge. The response to curtailed counseling was polarized but participants agreed on the need to accommodate personal preferences. This information may be useful when designing ED-based HIV testing programs. © 2013 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  3. Emergency department crowding and the performance of damage control resuscitation in major trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dingqian; Zhou, Xiaoxia; Ye, Ligang; Gan, Jianxin; Zhang, Mao

    2015-08-01

    Uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock is the leading cause of potentially preventable death in major trauma patients. Damage control resuscitation (DCR), a strategy combining the techniques of permissive hypotension, hemostatic resuscitation, and damage control surgery, has been highly recommended for trauma patients. This study investigated whether emergency department (ED) crowding was associated with poor performance of the DCR strategies in treating hemorrhagic shock trauma patients. This was a retrospective cohort study in an urban tertiary hospital conducted from January 2010 to December 2013. Major trauma patients who presented to the ED with hemorrhagic shock were included. ED crowding, measured by ED occupancy rate, was categorized into three groups (low, medium, and high). The performance of DCR and inpatient outcomes were analyzed using multivariate logistic analysis. Of the 3,037 major trauma patients assessed, 852 met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. Patients in the high-crowding group had delayed initiation of transfusion (high vs. medium and low, 2.5 hours vs. 2.1 hours and 1.0 hours, respectively, p = 0.01), received less blood products in the ED (both comparisons p 0.05). ED crowding was associated with poor performance of DCR for major trauma patients in the ED. New strategies should be implemented to ameliorate crowded conditions and potential adverse outcomes. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  4. Emergency Department Query for Patient-Centered Approaches to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity : The EQUALITY Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Adil H; Schneider, Eric B; Kodadek, Lisa M; Adler, Rachel R; Ranjit, Anju; Torain, Maya; Shields, Ryan Y; Snyder, Claire; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Vail, Laura; German, Danielle; Peterson, Susan; Lau, Brandyn D

    2017-06-01

    The Institute of Medicine and The Joint Commission recommend routine documentation of patients' sexual orientation in health care settings. Currently, very few health care systems collect these data since patient preferences and health care professionals' support regarding collection of data about patient sexual orientation are unknown. To identify the optimal patient-centered approach to collect sexual orientation data in the emergency department (ED) in the Emergency Department Query for Patient-Centered Approaches to Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity study. An exploratory, sequential, mixed-methods design was used first to evaluate qualitative interviews conducted in the Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, DC, areas. Fifty-three patients and 26 health care professionals participated in the qualitative interviews. Interviews were followed by a national online survey, in which 1516 (potential) patients (244 lesbian, 289 gay, 179 bisexual, and 804 straight) and 429 ED health care professionals (209 physicians and 220 nurses) participated. Survey participants were recruited using random digit dialing and address-based sampling techniques. Qualitative interviews were used to obtain the perspectives of patients and health care professionals on sexual orientation data collection, and a quantitative survey was used to gauge patients' and health care professionals' willingness to provide or obtain sexual orientation information. Mean (SD) age of patient and clinician participants was 49 (16.4) and 51 (9.4) years, respectively. Qualitative interviews suggested that patients were less likely to refuse to provide sexual orientation than providers expected. Nationally, 154 patients (10.3%) reported that they would refuse to provide sexual orientation; however, 333 (77.8%) of all clinicians thought patients would refuse to provide sexual orientation. After adjustment for demographic characteristics, only bisexual patients had increased odds of refusing to provide sexual

  5. Factors contributing to emergency department care within 30 days of hospital discharge and potential ways to prevent it: differences in perspectives of patients, caregivers, and emergency physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffoletto, Brian; Hu, Jennifer; Guyette, Maria; Callaway, Clifton

    2014-05-01

    Identifying needs in patients who utilize the emergency department (ED) soon after being discharged from inpatient care is essential for planning appropriate care-transition interventions. To examine differences in stakeholder perspectives on reasons for ED care soon after hospital discharge and interventions that could be useful to prevent these ED visits. A convenience sample of 135 patients who presented to an urban teaching hospital ED hospital discharge, their caregivers (when present), and emergency physicians were administered identical structured surveys. Concordance and agreement rates between patient-physician and patient-caregiver dyads were calculated. Concordances between stakeholders were poor, with weighted kappas ranging from 0.02 to 0.34 for patient-physician dyads and 0.03 to 0.68 for patient-caregiver dyads. Emergency physicians and caregivers identified factors between 1% and 42% of the time the patients did not. Less than half of any stakeholder could identify an intervention to potentially prevent the ED visit. Our findings suggest the difficulty in forming unified definitions for root cause of ED visits soon after hospital discharge and support the use of multiple stakeholders in identifying appropriate targets for care-transition interventions. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  6. Differences between orthopaedic evaluation and radiological reports of conventional radiographs in patients with minor trauma admitted to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catapano, Michele; Albano, Domenico; Pozzi, Grazia; Accetta, Riccardo; Memoria, Sergio; Pregliasco, Fabrizio; Messina, Carmelo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2017-11-01

    During night and on weekends, in our emergency department there is no radiologist on duty or on call: thus, X-ray examinations (XR) are evaluated by the orthopaedic surgeon on duty and reported the following morning/monday by radiologists. The aim of our study was to examine the discrepancy rate between orthopaedists and radiologists in the interpretation of imaging examinations performed on patients in our tertiary level orthopaedic institution and the consequences of delayed diagnosis in terms of patient management and therapeutic strategy. We retrospectively reviewed all cases of discrepancy between orthopaedists and radiologists, which were categorized according to anatomical location of injury, initial diagnosis and treatment, change in diagnosis and treatment. We used the Chi square test to compare the frequencies of discrepancies between patients ≤14 and >14years of age. From January to December 2016, 19,512 patients admitted to our emergency department performed at least an imaging examination; among these patients, 13,561 underwent XR in absence of an attending radiologist. A discrepant diagnosis was found in 337/13,561 (2.5%; 184 males; mean age: 36.7±23.7, range 2-95); 151/337 (45%) discrepancies were encountered in the lower limbs, with ankle being the most common site of misdiagnosis (64/151), and 103/337 (30%) in the upper limbs, with the elbow being the most frequent site in this district (35/103). We found 293/337 false negatives (87%) and 44/337 false positives (13%), with 134 and 13 patients needing treatment change, respectively. We found 85/337 discrepancies (25%) in patients ≤14 years of age, and 252/337 (75%) in those >14years. The distribution of discrepancies per anatomic district was significantly different (P<0.001) in these two groups of patients. A low rate of discrepancy between orthopaedists and radiologists in evaluating images of patients admitted to our emergency department was found, although treatment change occurred in about

  7. Evaluation of the Medical Care of Patients with Hypertension in an Emergency Department and in Ambulatory Hypertension Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Nobre

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the characteristics of the patients receiving medical care in the Ambulatory of Hypertension of the Emergency Department, Division of Cardiology, and in the Emergency Unit of the Clinical Hospital of the Ribeirão Preto Medical School. METHODS: Using a protocol, we compared the care of the same hypertensive patients in on different occasions in the 2 different places. The characteristics of 62 patients, 29 men with a mean age of 57 years, were analyzed between January 1996 and December 1997. RESULTS: The care of these patients resulted in different medical treatment regardless of their clinical features and blood pressure levels. Thus, in the Emergency Unit, 97% presented with symptoms, and 64.5% received medication to rapidly reduce blood pressure. In 50% of the cases, nifedipine SL was the elected medication. Patients who applied to the Ambulatory of Hypertension presenting with similar features, or, in some cases, presenting with similar clinically higher levels of blood pressure, were not prescribed medication for a rapid reduction of blood pressure at any of the appointments. CONCLUSION: The therapeutic approach to patients with high blood pressure levels, symptomatic or asymptomatic, was dependent on the place of treatment. In the Emergency Unit, the conduct was, in the majority of cases, to decrease blood pressure immediately, whereas in the Ambulatory of Hypertension, the same levels of blood pressure, in the same individuals, resulted in therapeutic adjustment with nonpharmacological management. These results show the need to reconsider the concept of hypertensive crises and their therapeutical implications.

  8. Behavioral and physiologic adverse effects in adolescent and young adult emergency department patients reporting use of energy drinks and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Deidrya A E; Cotter, Bradford V; Merchant, Roland C; Babu, Kavita M; Baird, Janette R; Nirenberg, Ted; Linakis, James G

    2013-08-01

    This pilot study assessed the prevalence of physiologic and behavioral adverse effects among adolescent (13-17 years) and adult (18-25 years) emergency department patients who reported energy drink and/or caffeinated-only beverage use within the 30 days prior to emergency department presentation. It was hypothesized that energy drink users would report more adverse effects than those who used only traditional caffeinated beverages such as coffee, tea, or soft drinks. This cross-sectional pilot study was conducted in two urban emergency departments, one adult and one pediatric. Eligible patients were enrolled during a 6-week period between June and August 2010. Participants completed a tablet computer-based, self-administered, anonymous questionnaire about their past 30-day energy drink and/or caffeinated-only beverage use, substance use, and experience of 10 physiologic and 10 behavioral symptoms. Multivariable logistic regression and negative binomial regression models, adjusted for age, gender, and substance use, were created to compare the occurrence of each adverse effect between energy drink and caffeinated-only beverage users. Odds ratios (ORs) and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated. Of those enrolled, 53.3% reported consuming energy drinks, 39.1% caffeinated-only beverages, and 7.6% no energy drinks or caffeinated-only beverages within the past 30 days. In multivariable logistic regression models, energy drink users were more likely than caffeinated-only beverage users to report having "gotten into trouble at home, school, or work" in the past 30 days (OR: 3.12 [1.24-7.88]). In the negative binomial regression multivariable models, more behavioral effects were reported among drug users (IRR: 1.50 [1.18-1.93]), and more physiologic effects were reported among tobacco users (IRR: 1.42 [1.13-1.80]) and females (IRR: 1.48 [1.21-1.80]), but not among energy drink users. Energy drink users and substance users are more likely to report specific physiologic

  9. Computed tomography abnormalities and epidemiology of adult patients presenting with first seizure to the emergency department in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathan, Sameer A; Abosalah, Salem; Nadeem, Sana; Ali, Amjad; Hameed, Asma A; Marathe, Mandar; Cameron, Peter A

    2014-11-01

    There is little information available from the Middle Eastern region on adult patients presenting with first seizure. The objectives of this study were to describe epidemiological characteristics of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) in Doha, Qatar, with first seizure and to determine the incidence of computed tomographic (CT) scan abnormalities. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on all adult patients with first seizure presenting to Hamad General Hospital ED over a 1-year period (June 2012 through May 2013). Electronic patient records were reviewed for demographics, neuroimaging, electroencephalography, laboratory test results, and medications administered. There were 439 patients who satisfied inclusion criteria. Patients were aged a mean of 35.3 years (95% confidence interval [CI] = 33.92 to 36.69 years) with a male-to-female ratio of five to one. CT abnormalities were detected in 154 patients (35.3%; 95% CI = 30.81% to 39.82%). Out of reported abnormal scans, 14.7% patients had significant abnormalities such as neurocysticercosis (9.2%); brain metastasis and neoplasm (3.4%); and subarachnoid and subdural hemorrhage, cavernous sinus thrombosis, acute stroke, and brain edema (2.0%). None of the patients had any electrolyte abnormalities, and three patients had hypoglycemia. Patients with initial abnormal CT brain results were more likely to have recurrent seizures (OR = 1.65; 95% CI = 1.11 to 2.45) within 6 months. Adults who presented with first seizure to the ED in Qatar had a young male predominance, and a high proportion of brain CT scans were reported as abnormal. It is recommended that all such patients in this population should undergo prompt CT scanning in the ED, but the utility of routine electrolyte tests requires further investigation. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  10. [Nurse-led educational intervention in patients with atrial fibrillation discharged from the emergency department reduces complications and shortterm admissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida Inostroza, Carolina Isabel; Ferró Ricart, Inés; Siches Cuadra, Carme; Ambrós Ribó, Àngels; Sánchez, Miquel; Cabrera, Javier; Coll-Vinent, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether a nurse-led patient educational intervention for patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) discharged from the emergency department (ED) can improve the patients' understanding of arrhythmia and its treatment and reduce the number of complications and arrhythmia-related admissions. Prospective study of an intervention. Patients diagnosed with AF discharged from the ED were studied in 2 groups. Intervention-group patients received instruction about AF, its treatment, precautions to take, warning signs, and pulse-taking. They also received an information leaflet. The control group patients were discharged without specific instruction. At 30 and 90 days, the patients' records were reviewed and follow-up telephone interviews were undertaken in order to assess their understanding of arrhythmia, the presence of complications, and whether they had returned for emergency care or had been hospitalized. We enrolled 240 patients (116 in the intervention group and 124 in the control group); the mean (SD) age was 76 (11) years and 138 (58%) were women. The intervention group patients remembered more warning signs of AF than did patients in the control group (P=.012) and they also understood their treatment better (P=.004). Fewer important arrhythmia-related complications were experienced in the intervention group (13.8%) than in the control group (24.2%) (P=.040). Fewer intervention patients had been admitted with heart failure at 30 days (0.8% vs 6.4% in the control group; P=.023); there were also fewer all-cause admissions at 90 days (11.2% vs 20.9%; P=.041). A nurse-led educational intervention on discharge from the ED improved patients' understanding of AF and decreased the number of complications, short-term admissions for heart failure, and mid-term all-cause admissions.

  11. Comparison of TIMI and Gensini score in patients admitted to the emergency department with chest pain, who underwent coronary angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İşcanlı, Murat Doğan; Metin Aksu, Nalan; Evranos, Banu; Aytemir, Kudret; Özmen, Mehmet Mahir

    2014-03-01

    In patients admitted to the emergency department with complaints of chest pain and unstable angina pectoris, ST-elevation MI scoring is done according to risk factors used to calculate risks of urgent revascularization, MI, and death within 14 days. For this calculation, the most widely used scoring system is TIMI risk score. In this prospective, cross-sectional descriptive study, we evaluated and compared the effectiveness of TIMI and Gensini scores of patients with chest pain who were admitted to Hacettepe University Hospitals Emergency Department between March 2011 and September 2011 and who underwent coronary angiography. The mean (range) age of 165 patients was 62 (31-88) years. Moderate correlation between TIMI and Gensini scores was detected (mean values of Gensini score for TIMI 1 is 53.50, for TIMI 2 it is 52.09, for TIMI 3 it is 102.77, for TIMI 4 it is 113.70, and for TIMI 5 it is 115.43). There was also a positive correlation between TIMI score and the results. TIMI risk stratification score is safe and easy to use for rapid assessment of mortality and MI risk, despite its low possibility of predicting the outcome.

  12. Platelet function testing to predict hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel in patients with chest pain seen in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma RK

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rakesh K Sharma,1 Stephen W Erickson,1 Rohit Sharma,2 Donald J Voelker,1 Hanumanth K Reddy,1 Harvinder Dod,2 James D Marsh1 1Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, 2Medical Center of South Arkansas, El Dorado, AR, USA Background: A dual antiplatelet regimen has been shown to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, there is little information available on inhibition of platelet aggregation in patients with a prior coronary stent presenting with chest pain. This study evaluated the prevalence of hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel and factors associated with this in patients presenting to our emergency department with chest pain who had previously undergone coronary stent placement and were prescribed dual antiplatelet therapy. Methods: Responsiveness to clopidogrel was evaluated in a cohort of 533 consecutive stented patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain. P2Y12 reaction units (PRU and percent P2Y12 inhibition with clopidogrel were measured in all patients. Of 533 patients, 221 (41.6% had PRU ≥ 230. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to determine the relationship between hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel (defined as PRU ≥ 230 and several potential risk factors, ie, gender, age, race, type 1 or type 2 diabetes, hypertension, smoking, chronic renal failure, and obesity. Results: There was a greater risk of hyporesponsiveness in African Americans than in non-African American patients (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.165, in patients with type 2 diabetes than in those without (adjusted OR = 2.109, and in women than in men (adjusted OR = 1.813, as well as a greater risk of hyporesponsiveness with increasing age (adjusted OR = 1.167 per decade. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of hyporesponsiveness to clopidogrel in patients presenting with chest pain and a prior coronary stent. Non

  13. The Impact of an Emergency Department Front-End Redesign on Patient-Reported Satisfaction Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repplinger, Michael D; Ravi, Shashank; Lee, Andrew W; Svenson, James E; Sharp, Brian; Bauer, Matt; Hamedani, Azita G

    2017-10-01

    For emergency department (ED) patients, delays in care are associated with decreased satisfaction. Our department focused on implementing a front-end vertical patient flow model aimed to decrease delays in care, especially care initiation. The physical space for this new model was termed the Flexible Care Area (FCA). The purpose of this study was to quantify the impact of this intervention on patient satisfaction. We conducted a retrospective study of patients discharged from our academic ED over a one-year period (7/1/2013-6/30/2014). Of the 34,083 patients discharged during that period, 14,075 were sent a Press-Ganey survey and 2,358 (16.8%) returned the survey. We subsequently compared these survey responses with clinical information available through our electronic health record (EHR). Responses from the Press-Ganey surveys were dichotomized as being "Very Good" (VG, the highest rating) or "Other" (for all other ratings). Data abstracted from the EHR included demographic information (age, gender) and operational information (e.g. - emergency severity index, length of stay, whether care was delivered entirely in the FCA, utilization of labs or radiology testing, or administration of opioid pain medications). We used Fisher's exact test to calculate statistical differences in proportions, while the Mantel-Haenszel method was used to report odds ratios. Of the returned surveys, 62% rated overall care for the visit as VG. However, fewer patients reported their care as VG if they were seen in FCA (53.4% versus 63.2%, p=0.027). Patients seen in FCA were less likely to have advanced imaging performed (12% versus 23.8%, p=0.001) or labs drawn (24.8% vs. 59.1%, p=0.001). Length of stay (FCA mean 159 ±103.5 minutes versus non-FCA 223 ±117 minutes) and acuity were lower for FCA patients than non-FCA patients (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between patient-reported ratings of physicians or nurses when comparing patients seen in FCA vs. those

  14. A Sample of Crisis Management in the Emergency Department and Evaluation of Patients; Reyhanli-Hatay-Turkey Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karakus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Natural disasters, terrorist bombings, transportation and industrial accidents can lead to many deaths and injuries. The number of deaths and injuries in these situations are closely related to cooperation among police, fire fighters, ambulances and hospital staff. Practice and organized positioning can improve such cooperation and experiences. In this study, we aimed to investigate the medical situation of the patients admitted to our hospital emergency service after the terrorist bombing attack occurred on Saturday May 11th, 2013 at about 14:00 pm in the Reyhanli province and to evaluate our hospital applications. Material and Method: Data including gender, age, Glascow Coma Scale score, Injury Severity Score-ISS , K-Revise Trauma Score(RTS, type of transportation and injury, duration of treatment and prognosis of the patients injured after the explosion were collected retrospectively from the hospital records. Results: The terrorist bombing attack was the bloodiest event in the history of the Republic of Turkey. After the explosion, 51 people died. 27 of the 146 injured patients were admitted to our hospital. 20 of them were male and 7 were female. The mean age of the patients was 31,85 (1-63. Glascow Coma Scale scores were 3-8 for 3 patients, 9-13 for 6 patients and 14-15 for 18 patients. The most frequent injuries were observed in the extremities and soft tissues. 15 patients were discharged after their treatment and 9 patients were hospitalized by different services related to their medical conditions. Three patients died in the emergency department. The size of the event and the number of injured patients were evaluated by the doctors in charge in emergency service and the 112 paramedics. Then, other relevant doctors, administrative officers and health care staffs were instructed and called to the hospital. Appropriately triaged, monitored and treated patients were resulted after evaluating their conditions. Discussion: The soft

  15. Do we need new personalized emergency telehealth solutions? A survey of 100 emergency department patients and a first report of the swiss limmex emergency wristwatch: an original study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Malek; Hodel, Thomas; Müller, Urs; Briner, Gabi; Zimmermann, Heinz; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K

    2012-01-01

    Development of new personal mobile and wireless devices for healthcare has become essential due to our aging population characterized by constant rise in chronic diseases that consequently require a complex treatment and close monitoring. Personal telehealth devices allow patients to adequately receive their appropriate treatment, followup with their doctors, and report any emergency without the need of the presence of any caregivers with them thus increasing their quality of life in a cost-effective fashion. This paper includes a brief overview of personal telehealth systems, a survey of 100 consecutive ED patients aged >65 years, and introduces "Limmex" a new GSM based technology packaged in a wristwatch. Limmex can by a push of a button initiate multiple emergency call and establish mobile communication between the patient and a preselected person, institution, or a search and rescue service. To the best of our knowledge, Limmex is the first of its kind worldwide.

  16. Do We Need New Personalized Emergency Telehealth Solutions? A Survey of 100 Emergency Department Patients and a First Report of the Swiss Limmex Emergency Wristwatch: An Original Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malek Tabbara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of new personal mobile and wireless devices for healthcare has become essential due to our aging population characterized by constant rise in chronic diseases that consequently require a complex treatment and close monitoring. Personal telehealth devices allow patients to adequately receive their appropriate treatment, followup with their doctors, and report any emergency without the need of the presence of any caregivers with them thus increasing their quality of life in a cost-effective fashion. This paper includes a brief overview of personal telehealth systems, a survey of 100 consecutive ED patients aged >65 years, and introduces “Limmex” a new GSM based technology packaged in a wristwatch. Limmex can by a push of a button initiate multiple emergency call and establish mobile communication between the patient and a preselected person, institution, or a search and rescue service. To the best of our knowledge, Limmex is the first of its kind worldwide.

  17. Comparison of self-reported and performance-based measures of functional ability in elderly patients in an emergency department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Louise M.; Kirkegaard, Hans; Østergaard, Lisa Gregersen

    2016-01-01

    Background Assessment of functional ability in elderly patients is often based on self-reported rather than performance-based measures. This study aims to compare self-reported and performance-based measures of functional ability in a population of elderly patients at an emergency department (ED......). Methods Participants were 61 patients aged 65 years and above admitted to an ED. The self-reported measure used was the Barthel-20; the performance-based measures were Timed Up and Go (TUG); 30s-Chair Stand Test (30s-CST) and Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) with the two scales; motor...... and process. Correlation analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between the self-reported and performance-based measures of functional ability. Results The correlation between the Barthel-20 and the TUG was moderate (r = −0.64). The correlation between the Barthel-20 and the AMPS motor was also...

  18. Comparison of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system and artificial neutral networks model to categorize patients in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, Dhifaf; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd; Gan, Kok Beng; Saiboon, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Unexpected disease outbreaks and disasters are becoming primary issues facing our world. The first points of contact either at the disaster scenes or emergency department exposed the frontline workers and medical physicians to the risk of infections. Therefore, there is a persuasive demand for the integration and exploitation of heterogeneous biomedical information to improve clinical practice, medical research and point of care. In this paper, a primary triage model was designed using two different methods: an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and artificial neural network (ANN).When the patient is presented at the triage counter, the system will capture their vital signs and chief complains beside physiology stat and general appearance of the patient. This data will be managed and analyzed in the data server and the patient's emergency status will be reported immediately. The proposed method will help to reduce the queue time at the triage counter and the emergency physician's burden especially duringdisease outbreak and serious disaster. The models have been built with 2223 data set extracted from the Emergency Department of the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre to predict the primary triage category. Multilayer feed forward with one hidden layer having 12 neurons has been used for the ANN architecture. Fuzzy subtractive clustering has been used to find the fuzzy rules for the ANFIS model. The results showed that the RMSE, %RME and the accuracy which evaluated by measuring specificity and sensitivity for binary classificationof the training data were 0.14, 5.7 and 99 respectively for the ANN model and 0.85, 32.00 and 96.00 respectively for the ANFIS model. As for unseen data the root mean square error, percentage the root mean square error and the accuracy for ANN is 0.18, 7.16 and 96.7 respectively, 1.30, 49.84 and 94 respectively for ANFIS model. The ANN model was performed better for both training and unseen data than ANFIS model in

  19. Patients Who Leave Naval Medical Center Portsmouth’s Emergency Medicine Department Without Being Seen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    patients LWBS. Sainsbury (1990) considers patients who LWBS to be a subset of the group of patients who leave “Against Medical Advice” (AMA). In contrast to...problems (McNamara, 1995). In a study conducted at a military treatment facility, Sainsbury (1990) found 44% of the patients who left without being seen...got tired of waiting, followed by the patient felt too sick to wait any longer, felt better, had work commitments, and family logistics . In a

  20. Compliance with stress testing in patients discharged from the emergency department following a diagnosis of low-risk chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Kent; Prabhala, Shreyas

    2014-01-01

    To determine rates of compliance with outpatient stress testing in patients with a diagnosis of low-risk chest pain, reasons for non-compliance and incidence of adverse cardiac events (ACE). This was a prospective study of 79 patients who were discharged from the emergency department with low-risk chest pain. Patients were followed-up by phone interview. 36.7% of patients completed EST within 30 days, 2.5% of patients completed their EST within the recommended 72 h. A lack of time was the most common reason for non-compliance and was seen in 32.0% of patients. 20% of ESTs were cancelled by the primary care physician (PCP). 12% of patients were non-compliant, as they believed the pain to be non-cardiac. There were no documented ACEs in the study. Compliance with EST is poor in patients with low-risk chest pain. Non-compliance is related to a number of factors including work commitments, cancellation of studies by the PCP and patients beliefs about the nature of their chest pain.

  1. Suboptimal anti-epilepsy drug use is common among indigenous patients with seizures presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ian B; Hawkins, Simon; Green, Stella; Archer, John S

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to explore the causes of higher than expected rates of Indigenous emergency department (ED) seizure presentations. A questionnaire was administered to adult patients presenting with seizure to an ED in Far North Queensland. Over 15 months, among 260 presentations with seizure (22% Indigenous), 50% non-Indigenous patients, and 45% Indigenous patients completed the questionnaire. Risk factors for alcohol misuse were common in both groups (50% Indigenous, 43% non-Indigenous; p = 0.50), as were rates of reported head injury (50% Indigenous, 44% non-Indigenous; p = 0.50). However, 47% Indigenous patients, compared to 19% non-Indigenous patients (p seizure presentation for 12% Indigenous patients and 26% non-Indigenous patients. We conclude that among ED seizure presentations, alcohol excess and prior head injury are commonly observed, in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous patients. However, Indigenous patients have higher rates of anti-convulsant non-adherence, likely contributing to ED presentations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bedside Teaching on Time to Disposition Improves Length of Stay for Critically-ill Emergency Departments Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Pourmand, MD

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We tested the effect of a brief disposition process intervention on residents’ time todisposition and emergency department (ED length of stay (LOS in high acuity ED patients.Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study design in a single teaching hospital where ED residentsare responsible for administrative bed requests for patients. Enrollment was performed for interventionand control groups on an even-odd day schedule. Inclusion criteria were ED patients triaged asEmergency Severity Index (ESI 1 and 2. In the intervention group, the attending physician prompted theresident to make the disposition immediately after the evaluation of resuscitation patients. In the controlgroup, the attending physicians did not intervene in the disposition process unless more than 2 hourspassed without a disposition. Main outcomes were time to disposition and total ED LOS.Results: A total of 104 patients were enrolled; 53 (51% in the intervention group and 51 (49% inthe control group. After controlling for ESI and resident training year, mean disposition time wassignificantly shorter in the intervention group by 41.4 minutes (95% CI: 32.6-50.1. LOS was alsoshorter in the intervention group by 93.3 minutes (95% CI: 41.9-144.6.Conclusion: Prompting residents to enter administrative disposition orders in high acuity patientsis associated with significant reduction in both time to disposition and ED LOS.

  3. Clinical implementation of an emergency department coronary computed tomographic angiography protocol for triage of patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshhajra, Brian B.; Staziaki, Pedro V.; Vadvala, Harshna; Kim, Phillip; Meyersohn, Nandini M.; Janjua, Sumbal A.; Hoffmann, Udo [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Takx, Richard A.P. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Neilan, Tomas G.; Francis, Sanjeev [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Bittner, Daniel [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuernberg (FAU), Department of Medicine 2 - Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany); Mayrhofer, Thomas [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Stralsund University of Applied Sciences, School of Business Studies, Stralsund (Germany); Greenwald, Jeffrey L. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Truong, Quyhn A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Weill Cornell College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Abbara, Suhny [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Department of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging) and Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department Cardiothoracic Imaging, Dallas, TX (United States); Brown, David F.M.; Nagurney, John T. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Januzzi, James L. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Division of Cardiology, Boston, MA (United States); Collaboration: MGH Emergency Cardiac CTA Program Contributors

    2017-07-15

    To evaluate the efficiency and safety of emergency department (ED) coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) during a 3-year clinical experience. Single-center registry of coronary CTA in consecutive ED patients with suspicion of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The primary outcome was efficiency of coronary CTA defined as the length of hospitalization. Secondary endpoints of safety were defined as the rate of downstream testing, normalcy rates of invasive coronary angiography (ICA), absence of missed ACS, and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during follow-up, and index radiation exposure. One thousand twenty two consecutive patients were referred for clinical coronary CTA with suspicion of ACS. Overall, median time to discharge home was 10.5 (5.7-24.1) hours. Patient disposition was 42.7 % direct discharge from the ED, 43.2 % discharge from emergency unit, and 14.1 % hospital admission. ACS rate during index hospitalization was 9.1 %. One hundred ninety two patients underwent additional diagnostic imaging and 77 underwent ICA. The positive predictive value of CTA compared to ICA was 78.9 % (95 %-CI 68.1-87.5 %). Median CT radiation exposure was 4.0 (2.5-5.8) mSv. No ACS was missed; MACE at follow-up after negative CTA was 0.2 %. Coronary CTA in an experienced tertiary care setting allows for efficient and safe management of patients with suspicion for ACS. (orig.)

  4. The risk stratification and prognostic evaluation of soluble programmed death-1 on patients with sepsis in emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongzhen; Jia, Yumei; Li, Chunsheng; Fang, Yingying; Shao, Rui

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of soluble programmed death-1 (sPD-1) for risk stratification and prediction of 28-day mortality in patients with sepsis, we compared serum sPD-1 with procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and the Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis (MEDS) score. A total of 60 healthy volunteers and 595 emergency department (ED) patients were recruited for this prospective cohort study. According to the severity of their condition on ED arrival, the patients were allocated to the systemic inflammatory response syndrome group (130 cases), sepsis group (276 cases), severe sepsis group (121 cases), and septic shock group (68 cases). In addition, all patients with sepsis were also divided into the survivor group (349 cases) and nonsurvivor group (116 cases) according to the 28-day outcomes. When the severity of sepsis increased, the levels of sPD-1 gradually increased. The levels of sPD-1, PCT, CRP and the MEDS score were also higher in the nonsurvivor group compared to the survivor group. Logistic regression suggested that sPD-1, PCT, and the MEDS score were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality of patients with sepsis. Area under the curve (AUC) of sPD-1, PCT and the MEDS score for 28-day mortality was 0.725, 0.693, and 0.767, respectively, and the AUC was improved when all 3 factors were combined (0.843). Serum sPD-1 is positively correlated with the severity of sepsis, and it is valuable for risk stratification of patients and prediction of 28-day mortality. Combining sPD-1 with PCT and the MEDS score improves the prognostic evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Timing of antibiotic administration and lactate measurement in septic shock patients: a comparison between hospital wards and the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vattanavanit V

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Veerapong Vattanavanit,1 Theerapat Buppodom,2 Bodin Khwannimit1 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Critical Care Medicine, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla, Thailand Background: The timing of intravenous antibiotic administration and lactate measurement is associated with survival of septic shock patients. Septic shock patients were admitted to the medical intensive care unit (MICU from 2 major sources: hospital ward and emergency department (ED. This study aimed to compare the timing of antibiotic administration and lactate measurement between hospital wards and the ED.Patients and methods: Medical data were collected from adult patients admitted to the MICU with septic shock from January 2015 to December 2016. “Time Zero” was defined as the time of diagnosis of sepsis. The associations between the times and risk-adjusted 28-day mortality were assessed. Results: In total, 150 septic shock patients were admitted to the MICU. The median time interval (hour [h] interquartile range [IQR] from time zero to antibiotic administration was higher in patients from the hospital wards compared to those from the ED (4.84 [3.5–8.11] vs 2.04 [1.37–3.54], P<0.01, but the lactate level measurement time interval (h [IQR] from time zero was not different between the hospital wards and the ED (1.6 [0.2–2.7] vs 1.6 [0.9–3.0], P=0.85. In multivariate analysis, higher risk-adjusted 28-day mortality was associated with antibiotic monotherapy (odds ratio [OR]: 19.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.4–153.1, P<0.01 and admission during the weekends (OR: 24.4, 95% CI: 2.9–199.8, P<0.01.Conclusion: Antibiotic administration in septic shock patients from the hospital wards took longer, and there was also less appropriate antibiotic prescriptions seen in this group compared with those admitted from the ED. However, neither the timing of antibiotic administration nor lactate

  6. Clinical Factors and Outcomes in Patients with Acute Mesenteric Ischemia in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Hao Huang

    2005-07-01

    Conclusion: A high index of suspicion and aggressive diagnostic imaging can facilitate early diagnosis and improve outcomes for patients with acute mesenteric ischemia. Risk stratification showed that elderly patients with metabolic acidosis, bandemia, or elevated AST and BUN had a poor prognosis. Greater therapeutic intervention is advocated to reduce mortality in high-risk patients with acute mesenteric ischemia.

  7. Elder neglect assessment in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, T; Paveza, G; Abraham, I; Fairchild, S

    2000-10-01

    Emergency departments are often the first point of contact for elder neglect victims. The purpose of this article is to describe a pilot study pertaining to the screening of patients and detection of elder neglect conducted in a large metropolitan medical center emergency department. The research question to be answered was, "Is it feasible for ED nurses to conduct accurate screening protocols for elder neglect in the context of their busy practice?" During a 3-week period, 180 patients older than age 70 years (90% of all possible elderly patients during the screening hours) were screened to determine if they met the study criteria and could be enrolled into the protocol. Thirty-six patients met the eligibility criteria to enroll in the study, and 7 patients screened positive for neglect by a home caregiver. The nurses were able to screen and detect elder neglect with more than 70% accuracy, confirming the research question. The true-positive rate was 71%, and the false-positive rate was 7%. Elder neglect protocols are feasible in busy emergency departments, and neglect can be accurately detected in the emergency department when screening procedures are in place.

  8. Alcohol use and adherence to prescribed therapy among under-served Latino and African-American patients using emergency department services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargan-Hejazi, Shahrzad; Bazargan, Mohsen; Hardin, Eugene; Bing, Eric G

    2005-01-01

    Non-adherence to prescribed therapy is a factor that results in many patients attending emergency departments. However, increasingly, we recognize that patients who seek health care from inner-city emergency departments are among those experiencing health disparities. For these marginalized patients, emergency departments can play an important role in complementing the process of individualized care to achieve successful health outcomes. Research that examines socio-psychological characteristics and correlates of healthcare utilization of emergency department service users among under-served minority patients is needed for redirecting appropriate care among this segment of our population. This study examines the prevalence and correlates of adherence to prescribed therapy among patients presenting to an inner-city emergency department for a medical emergency or trauma injury. Specific attention is paid to the role of alcohol. A cross-sectional face-to-face survey was conducted among a consecutive sample of 412 Hispanic and African Americans aged 18 years and older who sought care at an inner-city emergency department facility. Among patients who use medication (N=145), 32% reported low adherence. More than 24% scored positive for alcohol problems based on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Results of multivariate regression analysis showed that those emergency department patients who: 1) identified themselves as Hispanic, 2) reported excessive use of alcohol, 3) reported a higher number of depressive symptoms, and 4) reported a higher number of alcohol related consequences were less likely to adhere to prescribed therapy. Future investigation regarding factors related to adherence to prescribed medication among emergency department patients should take into consideration the role of alcohol and depression in this process. Further research is also needed to factor in patient's ethnicity in the context of treatment adherence.

  9. Why do patients seek primary medical care in emergency departments? An ethnographic exploration of access to general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKichan, Fiona; Brangan, Emer; Wye, Lesley; Checkland, Kath; Lasserson, Daniel; Huntley, Alyson; Morris, Richard; Tammes, Peter; Salisbury, Chris; Purdy, Sarah

    2017-05-04

    To describe how processes of primary care access influence decisions to seek help at the emergency department (ED). Ethnographic case study combining non-participant observation, informal and formal interviewing. Six general practitioner (GP) practices located in three commissioning organisations in England. Reception areas at each practice were observed over the course of a working week (73 hours in total). Practice documents were collected and clinical and non-clinical staff were interviewed (n=19). Patients with recent ED use, or a carer if aged 16 and under, were interviewed (n=29). Past experience of accessing GP care recursively informed patient decisions about where to seek urgent care, and difficulties with access were implicit in patient accounts of ED use. GP practices had complicated, changeable systems for appointments. This made navigating appointment booking difficult for patients and reception staff, and engendered a mistrust of the system. Increasingly, the telephone was the instrument of demand management, but there were unintended consequences for access. Some patient groups, such as those with English as an additional language, were particularly disadvantaged, and the varying patient and staff semantic of words like 'urgent' and 'emergency' was exacerbated during telephone interactions. Poor integration between in-hours and out-of-hours care and patient perceptions of the quality of care accessible at their GP practice also informed ED use. This study provides important insight into the implicit role of primary care access on the use of ED. Discourses around 'inappropriate' patient demand neglect to recognise that decisions about where to seek urgent care are based on experiential knowledge. Simply speeding up access to primary care or increasing its volume is unlikely to alleviate rising ED use. Systems for accessing care need to be transparent, perceptibly fair and appropriate to the needs of diverse patient groups. © Article author(s) (or

  10. Emergency Department Cardiopulmonary Evaluation of Low-Risk Chest Pain Patients with Self-Reported Stress and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musey, Paul I; Kline, Jeffrey A

    2017-03-01

    Chest pain is a high-risk emergency department (ED) chief complaint; the majority of clinical resources are directed toward detecting and treating cardiopulmonary emergencies. However, at follow-up, 80%-95% of these patients have only a symptom-based diagnosis; a large number have undiagnosed anxiety disorders. Our aim was to measure the frequency of self-identified stress or anxiety among chest pain patients, and compare their pretest probabilities, care processes, and outcomes. Patients were divided into two groups: explicitly self-reported anxiety and stress or not at 90-day follow-up, then compared on several variables: ultralow (acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and pulmonary embolism (PE), radiation exposure, total costs at 30 days, and 90-day recidivism. Eight hundred and forty-five patients were studied. Sixty-seven (8%) explicitly attributed their chest pain to "stress" or "anxiety"; their mean ACS pretest probability was 4% (95% confidence interval 2.9%-5.7%) and 49% (33/67) had ultralow pretest probability (0/33 with ACS or PE). None (0/67) were diagnosed with anxiety. Seven hundred and seventy-eight did not report stress or anxiety and, of these, 52% (403/778) had ultralow ACS pretest probability. Only one patient (0.2%; 1/403) was diagnosed with ACS and one patient (0.4%; 1/268) was diagnosed with PE. Patients with self-reported anxiety had similar radiation exposure, associated costs, and nearly identical (25.4% vs. 25.7%) ED recidivism to patients without reported anxiety. Without prompting, 8% of patients self-identified "stress" or "anxiety" as the etiology for their chest pain. Most had low pretest probability, were over-investigated for ACS and PE, and not investigated for anxiety syndromes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of establishing a new, reorganized emergency department on quality of clinical healthcare and patient satisfaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Maria Søe

    2015-01-01

    department was assessed by a questionnaire before and after the establishment of the new emergency department. In particular, there was a positive difference in the perceived waiting time and degree of staff collaboration in the new department. The shorter waiting on arrival was, however, matched by what...

  12. A comparison of the safety of olanzapine and haloperidol in combination with benzodiazepines in emergency department patients with acute agitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael P; MacDonald, Kai; Vilke, Gary M; Feifel, David

    2012-11-01

    Pharmacologic management of the agitated emergency department patient is controversial. The combination of olanzapine + benzodiazepines is not recommended by the manufacturer, but a recent report suggested harm only if the patient was intoxicated. Whether this is also true for haloperidol + benzodiazepines is not known. The measurement of vital signs and ethanol levels in patients who received haloperidol with or without benzodiazepines was compared to a previous analysis of patients who received olanzapine with or without benzodiazepines. This is a structured retrospective chart review of patients who received parenteral haloperidol or parental olanzapine either with or without benzodiazepines. There were 96 patients (71 haloperidol, 25 olanzapine) who met inclusion criteria. No patient in the olanzapine + benzodiazepine group had hypotension, although one patient in the olanzapine-only group did (6.7%); 2 patients in the haloperidol + benzodiazepines group (5.1%) and 2 patients in the haloperidol-only group (6.3%) had hypotension. In alcohol-negative (ETOH-) patients, neither olanzapine alone nor olanzapine + benzodiazepines was associated with decreased oxygen saturations. In ETOH+ patients, olanzapine alone was not associated with decreased oxygen saturations, but olanzapine + benzodiazepines were associated with lower oxygen saturations than haloperidol + benzodiazepines. In this sample, olanzapine alone or with a benzodiazepine was not associated with more hypotension than haloperidol. However, olanzapine + benzodiazepines were associated with lower oxygen saturations than haloperidol + benzodiazepines in ETOH+ but not ETOH- patients. In patients with known alcohol ingestion, haloperidol, haloperidol + benzodiazepines, or olanzapine alone may be better choices for treatment of agitation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Outcomes of patients with blunt chest trauma encountered at emergency department and possible risk factors affecting mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Ming Tsai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt chest trauma is associated with a high risk of mortality. Respiratory complications may necessitate prolonged ventilation and result in death. The present study aimed to investigate possible signs of trauma and the prognosis of trauma patients with thoracic injuries and identify risk factors for mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective study was performed to investigate the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of trauma patients with blunt chest injuries who underwent thoracic computed tomography on arrival in the emergency department (January 2010–December 2013. Patients with brain injuries were excluded from the study. The prognostic values of age, sex, trauma type, injury severity score, revised trauma score (RTS, ventilator requirement, days in Intensive Care Unit (ICU, associated thoracic injury, and laboratory examinations (including arterial blood gas [ABG] were evaluated. Results: Fifteen of 30 analyzed patients died during their ICU stays; accordingly, we classified patients as survivors and nonsurvivors. These groups differed significantly regarding the RTS (P = 0.002, mechanical ventilation requirement (P = 0.007, total stay length (P = 0.009, and the presence of hemothorax (P = 0.030. However, no significant differences in the pneumothorax, rib fractures, and blood tests (including ABG analysis were observed between the groups. Conclusion: Among hospitalized trauma patients with blunt thoracic injuries, RTS, mechanical ventilation requirement, and hemothorax were identified as risk factors for mortality. Patients with hemothorax should receive multidisciplinary care and be monitored closely to improve survival.

  14. Management of the anticoagulated trauma patient in the emergency department: a survey of current practice in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri E; Lecky, Fiona E; Stacey, Tom; Edwards, Antoinette; Evans, Phillip A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate current management of the anticoagulated trauma patient in the emergency departments (EDs) in England and Wales. A survey exploring management strategies for anticoagulated trauma patients presenting to the ED was developed with two patient scenarios concerning assessment of coagulation status, reversal of international normalised ratio (INR), management of hypotension and management strategies for each patient. Numerical data are presented as percentages of total respondents to that particular question. 106 respondents from 166 hospitals replied to the survey, with 24% of respondents working in a major trauma unit with a specialist neurosurgical unit. Variation was reported in the assessment and management strategies of the elderly anticoagulated poly-trauma patient described in scenario one. Variation was also evident in the responses between the neurosurgical and non-neurosurgical units for the head-injured, anticoagulated trauma patient in scenario two. The results of this study highlight the similarities and variation in the management strategies used in the EDs in England and Wales for the elderly, anticoagulated trauma patient. The variations in practice reported may be due to the differences evident in the available guidelines for these patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Economic Impact of a New Rapid PCR Assay for Detecting Influenza Virus in an Emergency Department and Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Marcelo; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Vilella, Anna; Pantoja, Efraín; Asenjo, María; Arjona, Ruth; Hurtado, Juan Carlos; Trilla, Antoni; Alvarez-Martínez, Míriam José; Mira, Aurea; Vila, Jordi; Marcos, María Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality and has a substantial economic impact on the healthcare system. The main objective of this study was to compare the cost per patient for a rapid commercial PCR assay (Xpert® Flu) with an in-house real-time PCR test for detecting influenza virus. Community patients with influenza like-illness attending the Emergency Department (ED) as well as hospitalized patients in the Hospital Clínic of Barcelona were included. Costs were evaluated from the perspective of the hospital considering the use of resources directly related to influenza testing and treatment. For the purpose of this study, 366 and 691 patients were tested in 2013 and 2014, respectively. The Xpert® Flu test reduced the mean waiting time for patients in the ED by 9.1 hours and decreased the mean isolation time of hospitalized patients by 23.7 hours. This was associated with a 103€ (or about $113) reduction in the cost per patient tested in the ED and 64€ ($70) per hospitalized patient. Sensitivity analyses showed that Xpert® Flu is likely to be cost-saving in hospitals with different contexts and prices.

  16. Mind the (knowledge) gap: the effect of a communication instrument on emergency department patients' comprehension of and satisfaction with care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Stefanie; Sharp, Brian; Fowler, Jennifer; Fowkes, Hope; Paz-Arabo, Patricia; Dilt-Skaggs, Mary Kate; Singal, Bonita; Carter, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    We developed a communication instrument to be used in the Emergency Department (ED) and hypothesized that use of this guide would increase patient comprehension of and satisfaction with care. This multi-site trial enrolled 643 patients in treatment and control groups. Comprehension of care was assessed by chart review and satisfaction measured via validated survey. Use of the instrument was not associated with improvements in patient knowledge about their care, with a mean of 4.6 (95% CI: 4.8-5.8) comprehension defects in the control group and 4.4 (95% CI: 3.9-4.9) in the treatment group. There was no significant effect on patient satisfaction 76.4% versus 76.9%, p=0.34. Elderly patients in both groups were found to have 1.1 (ppatients. Patients frequently misunderstand medical care in the ED. Comprehension decreases with increasing age. An isolated communication instrument does not improve satisfaction with or understanding of the care received. Providing a structured place for providers and patients to record details of care does not seem to improve satisfaction with or comprehension of care. Interventions that focus on communication skills and face time with patients may prove more effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of the Content of EMS Handoff of Critically Ill and Injured Patients to the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Scott A; Porat, Avital; Strother, Christopher G; Lim, Nadine Q; Wijeratne, H R Sagara; Sanchez, Greisy; Munjal, Kevin G

    2017-01-01

    Patient handoff occurs when responsibility for patient diagnosis, treatment, or ongoing care is transferred from one healthcare professional to another. Patient handoff is an integral component of quality patient care and is increasingly identified as a potential source of medical error. However, evaluation of handoff from field providers to ED personnel is limited. We here present a quantitative analysis of the information transferred from EMS providers to ED physicians during handoff of critically ill and injured patients. This study was conducted at an urban academic medical center with an emergency department census of greater than 100,000 visits annually. All patients arriving to our institution by EMS and meeting predefined triage criteria are brought immediately to the ED resuscitation area upon EMS arrival. Handoff from EMS to ED providers occurring in the resuscitation area was observed and audio recorded by trained research assistants and subsequently coded for content. The emergency department team as well as EMS were blinded to study design. Ninety patient handoffs were evaluated. In 78% (95%CI = 70.0-86.7) of all handoffs, EMS provided a chief concern. In 58% (95%CI = 47.7-67.7) of handoffs EMS provided a description of the scene and in 57% (95%CI = 46.7-66.7) they provided a complete set of vital signs. In 47% (95%CI = 31.3-57.5) of handoffs pertinent physical exam findings were described. The EMS provider gave an overall assessment of the patient's clinical status in 31% (95%CI = 21.6-40.3) of cases. Significantly more paramedic handoffs included vital signs (70% vs. 37%, χ2 = 9.69, p = 0.002) and physical exam findings (63% vs. 23%, χ2 = 14.11, p Paramedics were more likely to provide an overall assessment (39% vs. 17%, χ2 = 4.71, p < 0.05). While patient handoff is a critical component of safe and effective patient care, our study confirms previous literature demonstrating poor quality handoff from EMS to ED providers in critically ill and

  18. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Ingrid; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Riou, Bruno; Taourel, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1x10(-6)) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6x10(-6)) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. • Systematic unenhanced CT improves significantly diagnosis accuracy compared to current practice. • Systematic unenhanced CT optimizes appropriate hospitalization by increasing the number of discharged patients. • Systematic unenhanced CT allows detection of about one-third of acute unsuspected abdominal conditions. • It should allow boosting emergency department management decision-making confidence in old patients.

  19. Effect of a Physician Assistant as Triage Liaison Provider on Patient Throughput in an Academic Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, David M.; Fratzke, Alesia R.; Church, Christopher J.; Scanlan-Hanson, Lori; Sadosty, Annie T.; Halasy, Michael P.; Finley, Janet L.; Boggust, Andy; Hess, Erik P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Overcapacity issues plague emergency departments (EDs). Studies suggest triage liaison providers (TLPs) may shorten patient length of stay (LOS) and reduce the proportion of patients who leave without being seen (LWBS), but these results are not universal. Previous studies used physicians as TLPs. We evaluated whether a physician assistant (PA), acting as a TLP, would shorten LOS and decrease LWBS rates. Methods The authors used an observational cohort controlled before-and-after study design with predefined outcome measures, comparing eight pilot days to eight control days. The TLP evaluated all Emergency Se