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Sample records for emergency abdominal ultrasound

  1. Emergency ultrasound-based algorithms for diagnosing blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Dirk; Rademacher, Grit; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Güthoff, Claas; Mutze, Sven

    2015-09-14

    Ultrasonography (performed by means of a four-quadrant, focused assessment of sonography for trauma (FAST)) is regarded as a key instrument for the initial assessment of patients with suspected blunt abdominal and thoraco-abdominal trauma in the emergency department setting. FAST has a high specificity but low sensitivity in detecting and excluding visceral injuries. Proponents of FAST argue that ultrasound-based clinical pathways enhance the speed of primary trauma assessment, reduce the number of unnecessary multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) scans, and enable quicker triage to surgical and non-surgical care. Given the proven accuracy, increasing availability of, and indication for, MDCT among patients with blunt abdominal and multiple injuries, we aimed to compile the best available evidence of the use of FAST-based assessment compared with other primary trauma assessment protocols. To assess the effects of diagnostic algorithms using ultrasonography including in FAST examinations in the emergency department in relation to the early, late, and overall mortality of patients with suspected blunt abdominal trauma. The most recent search was run on 30th June 2015. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), ISI Web of Science (SCI-EXPANDED, SSCI, CPCI-S, and CPSI-SSH), clinical trials registers, and screened reference lists. Trial authors were contacted for further information and individual patient data. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Participants were patients with blunt torso, abdominal, or multiple trauma undergoing diagnostic investigations for abdominal organ injury. The intervention was diagnostic algorithms comprising emergency ultrasonography (US). The control was diagnostic algorithms without US examinations (for example, primary computed tomography (CT) or diagnostic peritoneal lavage (DPL)). Outcomes were mortality, use of CT or invasive procedures (DPL

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can also: ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ...

  4. Abdominal ultrasound referred by the Emergency department – Can sonographer findings help guide timely patient management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Michal; Bloesch, Justin; Lombardo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare sonographer findings with radiologists' reports regarding the level of agreement, ability to answer the clinical question, and the use of hedging (descriptive words that do not commit to a definitive diagnosis) in abdominal ultrasound cases referred by the Emergency department. Other criteria compared included caveats of image quality and requests for further investigations. Methods: Abdominal ultrasound examinations referred by the Emergency department at a large regional tertiary hospital were retrospectively reviewed and sonographer findings compared with radiologists' reports. A consultant Intensivist scored all examinations into one of four categories according to the level of diagnostic agreement between the sonographer and associated radiologists. The same rater also identified where hedging terminology was used, whether the clinical question posed was answered and when further requests for investigations (including imaging) were made. The proportion of scores between sonographers and radiologists for each outcome variable were analysed using Fisher Exact tests. Results: Eighty-six cases were identified for this study. Of those, 73 (84.9%) were in complete agreement. In 12 cases (14.0%) a minor discrepancy was reported and only one case (1.1%) was scored as moderately discrepant between sonographers findings and radiologists' reports. There were no significant differences in the use of hedging, ability to answer the clinical question, requests for further investigations or interpretation of image quality. Conclusion: Sonographer findings for cases of abdominal ultrasound referred by the Emergency department have a high level of agreement with radiologists' reports and could form the basis for acute patient care when radiologists' reports are unavailable

  5. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X- ... use high frequency sound waves to produce an image and do not expose the individual to radiation. ...

  6. Abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raissaki, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: There are numerous conditions that affect mainly or exclusively the pediatric population. These constitute true emergencies, related to patient's health. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of abdominal non-traumatic emergencies may result in rapid deterioration, peritonitis, sepsis, even death or in severe complications with subsequent morbidity. Abdominal emergencies in children mostly present with pain, tenderness, occasionally coupled by vomiting, fever, abdominal distension, and failure to pass meconium or stools. Diarrhea, blood per rectum, abnormal laboratory tests and lethargy may also be manifestations of acute abdominal conditions. Abdominal emergencies have a different aetiology, depending on age and whether the pain is acute or chronic. Symptoms have to be matched with age and gender. Newborns up to 1 months of age may have congenital diseases: atresia, low obstruction including Hirschsprung's disease, meconium ileus. Meconium plug is one of the commonest cause of low obstruction in newborns that may also develop necrotizing enterocolitis, incarcerated inguinal hernia and mid-gut volvulus. Past the immediate postnatal period, any duodenal obstruction should be considered midgut volvulus until proven otherwise and patients should undergo ultrasonography and/or properly performed upper GI contrast study that records the exact position of the deduno-jejunal junction. Infants 6 months-2 years carry the risk of intussusception, mid-gut volvulus, perforation, acute pyelonephritis. Preschool and school-aged children 2-12 years carry the risk of appendicitis, genito-urinary abnormalities including torsion, urachal abnormalities, haemolytic uremic syndrome and Henoch-Schonlein purpura. Children above 12 years suffer from the same conditions as in adults. Most conditions may affect any age despite age predilection. Abdominal solid organ ultrasonography (US) coupled with gastrointestinal ultrasonography is the principle imaging modality in radiosensitive

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to evaluate the: appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) ... uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. Except for traumatic injury, ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging produces pictures of the internal organs and blood vessels located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should we prepare for an ultrasound exam? What does the ultrasound equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine causes of ... are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses ... appendix stomach/ pylorus liver gallbladder spleen pancreas intestines kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  19. Ultrasonography in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risi, D.; Alessi, G.; Meli, C.; Marzano, M.; Fiori, E.; Caterino, S.

    1989-01-01

    From February 1986 to March 1988 113 abdominal US exams were performed in emergency situation to evaluate the accuracy of this methodology: 13 were blunt traumas, 18 post-operative complications. A real-time scanner with a linear probe of 5 MHz was employed. The results were confirmed by surgical and/or clinical and instrumental evaluation. In 81% of the examinations, ultrasonography allowed a diagnosis to be made. Gallbladder and biliary pathologies were the most common findings. The results (sensibility 96%, specificity 88%, accuracy 95%) confirm the affidability of ultrasonography in abdominal emergencies, as shown in literature

  20. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyou, J; Gaujoux, S; Marcellin, L; Leconte, M; Goffinet, F; Chapron, C; Dousset, B

    2015-12-01

    Abdominal emergencies during pregnancy (excluding obstetrical emergencies) occur in one out of 500-700 pregnancies and may involve gastrointestinal, gynecologic, urologic, vascular and traumatic etiologies; surgery is necessary in 0.2-2% of cases. Since these emergencies are relatively rare, patients should be referred to specialized centers where surgical, obstetrical and neonatal cares are available, particularly because surgical intervention increases the risk of premature labor. Clinical presentations may be atypical and misleading because of pregnancy-associated anatomical and physiologic alterations, which often result in diagnostic uncertainty and therapeutic delay with increased risks of maternal and infant morbidity. The most common abdominal emergencies are acute appendicitis (best treated by laparoscopic appendectomy), acute calculous cholecystitis (best treated by laparoscopic cholecystectomy from the first trimester through the early part of the third trimester) and intestinal obstruction (where medical treatment is the first-line approach, just as in the non-pregnant patient). Acute pancreatitis is rare, usually resulting from trans-ampullary passage of gallstones; it usually resolves with medical treatment but an elevated risk of recurrent episodes justifies laparoscopic cholecystectomy in the 2nd trimester and endoscopic sphincterotomy in the 3rd trimester. The aim of the present work is to review pregnancy-induced anatomical and physiological modifications, to describe the main abdominal emergencies during pregnancy, their specific features and their diagnostic and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Abdominal Aortic Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Christie; Swaminathan, Anand

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses abdominal aortic emergencies. There is a common thread of risk factors and causes of these diseases, including age, male gender, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and connective tissue disorders. The most common presenting symptom of these disorders is pain, usually in the chest, flank, abdomen, or back. Computed tomography scan is the gold standard for diagnosis of pathologic conditions of the aorta in the hemodynamically stable patient. Treatment consists of a combination of blood pressure and heart rate control and, in many cases, emergent surgical intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal ultrasound in AIDS patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escribano, J.; Gonzalez, J.; Alvarez, M.; Rivero, S.; Raya, J.L.; Ruza, M.

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the ultrasonography findings in abdomen in the AIDS patients in our hospital, as well as the indications for this exploration, assessing the role of abdominal ultrasound (AU). The ultrasonographic and clinical findings in 527 patients who underwent a total of 715 explorations between 1992 and 1996 were studied. Hepatomegaly and/or splenomegaly, usually homogeneous, were observed in nearly half of the studies (45%); one third of the patients with marked splenomegaly presented visceral leishmaniasis. Focal lesions in liver and/or spleen, corresponding to angiomas, abscesses, lymphomatous lesions and metastasis, were detected in 5.7% of the explorations. Thirty-five percent of the AU revealed the presence of lymphadenopathy; nodes measuring over 2.5 cm were usually related to potential treatable infection or neoplasm. Thickening of the gallbladder wall did not usually indicate the presence of acute cholecystitis unless Murphy''s sign was also detected. Bile duct dilation and wall thickening was related to opportunistic cholangitis, and the increase in the echogenicity of the renal parenchyma was linked to AIDS-related nephropathy. Despite the fact that many of findings with AU are nonspecific, we consider that this approach should be the principal diagnostic technique in AIDS patients with suspected abdominal pathology or fever of unknown origin. (Author) 43 refs,

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast enhanced ultrasound in patients with blunt abdominal trauma presenting to the emergency department: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Hong, Yucai; Liu, Ning; Chen, Yuhao

    2017-06-30

    We aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in evaluating blunt abdominal trauma for patients presenting to the emergency department. Electronic search of Scopus and Pubmed was performed from inception to September 2016. Human studies investigating the diagnostic accuracy of CEUS in identifying abdominal solid organ injuries were included. Risk of bias was assessed using the QUADAS tool. A total of 10 studies were included in the study and 9 of them were included for meta-analysis. The log(DOR) values ranged from 3.80 (95% CI: 2.81-4.79) to 8.52 (95% CI: 4.58-12.47) in component studies. The combined log(DOR) was 6.56 (95% CI: 5.66-7.45). The Cochran's Q was 11.265 (p = 0.793 with 16 degrees of freedom), and the Higgins' I 2 was 0%. The CEUS had a sensitivity of 0.981 (95% CI: 0.868-0.950) and a false positive rate of 0.018 (95% CI: 0.010-0.032) for identifying parenchymal injuries, with an AUC of 0.984. CEUS performed at emergency department had good diagnostic accuracy in identifying abdominal solid organ injuries. CEUS can be recommended in monitoring solid organ injuries, especially for patients managed with non-operative strategy.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound images can help ... tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. Doppler ultrasound ... joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... waves from passing into your body. The sonographer (ultrasound technologist) or radiologist then places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling the ... ultrasound images are reviewed. An ultrasound examination is usually ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic or scrotal pain in children. Preparation will depend on the type of examination. ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an apparent enlarged abdominal organ identify the location of abnormal fluid in the abdomen help determine ... places the transducer on the skin in various locations, sweeping over the area of interest or angling ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, abscesses or an ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for evaluating abdominal, pelvic ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... can be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect ... biopsies, in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... video display screen and a transducer that is used to do the scanning. The transducer is a ... the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... abdomen help determine causes of vomiting in young infants Because ultrasound provides real-time images, images that ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly valuable for ... is no radiation exposure to the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. top of page This page was reviewed on ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Preparation will depend on the type of examination. Ask your doctor if there are specific instructions ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... in a known abnormality can be monitored over time. Follow-up examinations are sometimes the best way ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do we get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Abdominal ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is ... with your doctor, the medical facility staff and/or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... an area of tenderness, your child may feel pressure or minor pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Once the imaging ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... young children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ... links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to relevant websites. RadiologyInfo.org , ACR ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  20. Contemporary imaging in abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivit, Carlos J.

    2008-01-01

    Imaging is often a fundamental part in the evaluation of an injured or ill child. A variety of imaging modalities (radiography, angiography/fluoroscopy, sonography, CT, magnetic resonance imaging and scintigraphy) are among the options. CT is worth focused attention because of its usefulness in a variety of emergency department settings, its increasing use, and its potential radiation risks. CT plays an important role in the evaluation of traumatic and nontraumatic abdominal emergencies in children. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to review current imaging approaches and controversies in the evaluation of common acute abdominal emergencies. Through discussion of various modalities, especially CT in evaluation of abdominal pain and trauma, the relative advantages and disadvantages including radiation risk will be reviewed. (orig.)

  1. Office-based ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blois, Beau

    2012-03-01

    To assess the efficacy of an office-based, family physician–administered ultrasound examination to screen for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). A prospective observational study. Consecutive patients were approached by nonphysician staff. Rural family physician offices in Grand Forks and Revelstoke, BC. The Canadian Society for Vascular Surgery screening recommendations for AAA were used to help select patients who were at risk of AAA. All men 65 years of age or older were included. Women 65 years of age or older were included if they were current smokers or had diabetes, hypertension, a history of coronary artery disease, or a family history of AAA. A focused “quick screen”, which measured the maximal diameter of the abdominal aorta using point-of-care ultrasound technology, was performed in the office by a resident physician trained in emergency ultrasonography. Each patient was then booked for a criterion standard scan (i.e., a conventional abdominal ultrasound scan performed by a technician and interpreted by a radiologist). The maximal abdominal aortic diameter measured by ultrasound in the office was compared with that measured by the criterion standard method. The time to screen each patient was recorded. Forty-five patients were included in data analysis; 62% of participants were men. The mean age was 73 years. The mean pairwise difference between the office-based ultrasound scan and the criterion standard scan was not statistically significant. The mean absolute difference between the 2 scans was 0.20 cm (95% CI 0.15 to 0.25 cm). Correlation between the scans was 0.81. The office-based ultrasound scan had both a sensitivity and a specificity of 100%. The mean time to screen each patient was 212 seconds (95% CI 194 to 230 seconds). Abdominal aortic aneurysm screening can be safely performed in the office by family physicians who are trained to use point-of- care ultrasound technology. The screening test can be completed within the time constraints of a

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs ... in children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency ...

  3. Basic ultrasound training assessment in the initial abdominal trauma screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUAN GERALDO OCAÑA OLIVEIRA

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to verify the efficiency and usefulness of basic ultrasound training in trauma (FAST - Focused Assessment with Sonography in Trauma for emergency physicians in the primary evaluation of abdominal trauma. Methods: a longitudinal and observational study was carried out from 2015 to 2017, with 11 emergency physicians from Hospital Universitário do Oeste do Paraná, submitted to ultrasound training in emergency and trauma (USET® - SBAIT. FAST results started to be collected two months after the course. These were compared with a composite score of complementary exams and surgical findings. Information was stored in a Microsoft Excel program database and submitted to statistical analysis. Results: FAST was performed in 120 patients. In the study, 38.4% of the assessed patients had a shock index ≥0.9. The composite score detected 40 patients with free peritoneal fluid, whereas FAST detected 27 cases. The method sensitivity was 67.5%, specificity was 98.7%, the positive predictive value was 96.4%, the negative predictive value was 85.39% and accuracy was 88%. All those with a positive FAST had a shock index ≥0.9. Fifteen patients with positive FAST and signs of instability were immediately submitted to surgery. Conclusions: the basic training of emergency physicians in FAST showed efficiency and usefulness in abdominal trauma assessment. Due to its low cost and easy implementation, this modality should be considered as a screening strategy for patients with abdominal trauma in health systems.

  4. Ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberger, Stephan; Rosso, Raffaele; Sarti, Manuela; Del Grande, Filippo; Canevascini, Reto; van den Berg, Jos C; Prouse, Giorgio; Giovannacci, Luca

    2017-03-21

    This pilot study aimed to assess the feasibility, acceptance and costs of an ultrasound scan screening programme for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) in the elderly male population resident in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. The target population were male patients aged 65-80 years who attended the outpatient clinics of the Lugano Regional Hospital in 2013. The patients showing interest were contacted by phone to verify their eligibility and fix the appointment for the ultrasound scan of the abdominal aorta. Patients with recent examinations suitable for AAA detection were excluded. Aneurysm was defined as an abdominal aorta with sagittal and/or axial diameter  30 mm. Patients' characteristics and study results were presented as descriptive statistics. The chi-squared test was used to compare categorical variables with p rate was 68.3%. A previously unknown AAA was diagnosed in 31 patients (4.2%, 95% confidence interval 2.8-5.9%). Age and area of residence had a statistically significant impact on patient's acceptance rate (p <0.05). The mean cost per screened patient was CHF 88. AAA screening of male patients aged 65-80 years is feasible with limited financial and organisational effort. Adherence might be improved by a larger community-based programme and involvement of general practitioners.

  5. The therapeutic impact of abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute abdominal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, S.; Halligan, S.; Goh, V.; Matravers, P.; Chambers, A.; Remedios, D.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The technical performance of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain has been thoroughly investigated but its therapeutic effects are less well understood. We aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of abdominal ultrasound for acute abdominal pain. Referring clinicians completed a pre-ultrasound questionnaire that detailed their leading diagnosis, confidence in this and intended management in 100 consecutive adult patients. Following ultrasound a second questionnaire was completed. This again detailed the leading diagnosis, confidence in this and their intended management. Clinicians quantified the management contribution of ultrasound both for the individual case in question and in their clinical experience generally. RESULTS: The leading diagnosis was either confirmed or rejected in 72 patients and a new diagnosis provided where no prior differential diagnosis existed in 10. Diagnostic confidence increased significantly following ultrasound (mean score 6·5 pre-ultrasound vs 7·6 post-ultrasound, P < 0·001). Intended management changed following ultrasound in 22 patients; 15 intended laparotomies were halted and a further seven patients underwent surgery where this was not originally intended. Ultrasound was rated either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful in 87% of patients, with 99% of clinicians finding it either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful generally. CONCLUSION: Abdominal ultrasound has considerable diagnostic and therapeutic effect in the setting of acute abdominal pain. Dhillon, S. et al. (2002)

  6. Ring down artefacts on abdominal sonography to predict pulmonary abnormalities in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C-L; Wang, H-P; Lien, W-C; Chen, C-C; Lai, T-I; Chen, W-J

    2005-10-01

    Ring down artefacts are sometimes found when emergency physicians perform abdominal ultrasound to differentiate between various abdominal problems. We describe a patient who presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and whose ultrasound examination showed ring down artefacts posterior to the right hemidiaphragm, which led to the eventual diagnosis of pneumonia. Ring down artefacts on ultrasound may be used to predict pulmonary abnormalities. Awareness of this sonographic finding may assist in accurate diagnosis and administration of appropriate treatment without delay.

  7. Trans-abdominal ultrasound evaluation of high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment of uterine leiomyoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Wei; Huang Jin; Wang Junhua; Wang Yuling

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of dynamic trans-abdominal ultrasound after high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment of uterine leiomyomas. Methods: The trans-abdominal ultrasound images of 63 patients before and after HIFU treatment of uterine leiomyomas were compared. Results: The volume and blood flow of leiomyomas were reduced after the HIFU treatment. Conclusion: Trans-abdominal ultrasound is a valuable method for evaluating the results of HIFU treatment of uterine leiomyomas. (authors)

  8. Developing an emergency ultrasound app

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Kim Thestrup; Subhi, Yousif; Aagaard, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Focused emergency ultrasound is rapidly evolving as a clinical skill for bedside examination by physicians at all levels of education. Ultrasound is highly operator-dependent and relevant training is essential to ensure appropriate use. When supplementing hands-on focused ultrasound courses, e-le...

  9. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaeté; Benedeti, Augusto César Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility.

  10. Reproducibility of abdominal fat assessment by ultrasound and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauad, Fernando Marum; Chagas-Neto, Francisco Abaete; Benedeti, Augusto Cesar Garcia Saab; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Carneiro, Antonio Adilton Oliveira; Muller, Enrico Mattana; Elias Junior, Jorge, E-mail: fernando@fatesa.edu.br [Faculdade de Tecnologia em Saude (FATESA), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Universidade de Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Departmento de Radiologia; Universidade de Sao Paulo (FMRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Departmento de Medicina Clinica; Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras; Hospital Mae de Deus, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Objective: To test the accuracy and reproducibility of ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) for the quantification of abdominal fat in correlation with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical assessments. Materials and Methods: Using ultrasound and CT, we determined the thickness of subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat in 101 subjects-of whom 39 (38.6%) were men and 62 (61.4%) were women-with a mean age of 66.3 years (60-80 years). The ultrasound data were correlated with the anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical parameters, as well as with the areas measured by abdominal CT. Results: Intra-abdominal thickness was the variable for which the correlation with the areas of abdominal fat was strongest (i.e., the correlation coefficient was highest). We also tested the reproducibility of ultrasound and CT for the assessment of abdominal fat and found that CT measurements of abdominal fat showed greater reproducibility, having higher intraobserver and interobserver reliability than had the ultrasound measurements. There was a significant correlation between ultrasound and CT, with a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Conclusion: In the assessment of abdominal fat, the intraobserver and interobserver reliability were greater for CT than for ultrasound, although both methods showed high accuracy and good reproducibility. (author)

  11. Ultrasound in the diagnosis of palpable abdominal masses in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annuar, Z; Sakijan, A S; Annuar, N; Kooi, G H

    1990-12-01

    Ultrasound examinations were done to evaluate clinically palpable abdominal masses in 125 children. The examinations were normal in 21 patients. In 15 patients, the clinically palpable masses were actually anterior abdominal wall abscesses or hematomas. Final diagnosis was available in 87 of 89 patients with intraabdominal masses detected on ultrasound. The majority (71%) were retroperitoneal masses where two-thirds were of renal origin. Ultrasound diagnosis was correct in 68 patients (78%). All cases of hydronephrosis were correctly diagnosed based on characteristic ultrasound appearances. Correct diagnoses of all cases of adrenal hematoma, psoas abscess, liver hematoma, liver abscess and one case of liver metastases were achieved with correlation of relevant clinical information.

  12. [Basics of emergency ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellhaas, S; Breitkreutz, R

    2012-09-05

    Focused ultrasound is a key methodology of critical care medicine. By referencing few ultrasound differential diagnosis, it is possible to identifying in real-time the reason of the critical state of a patient. Therefore typical focused ultrasound protocols were developed. The well known Focused Assessment with Sonography for trauma (FAST) was incorporated into the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) for shock room. Focused echocardiographic evaluation in life support (FEEL) has been designed to be conformed with the universal Advanced Life Support (ALS) algorithm and to identify treatable conditions such as acute right ventricular pressure overload in pulmonary embolism, hypovolemia, or pericardial effusion/tamponade. Using lung ultrasound one can differentiate pulmonary edema, pleural effusion or pneumothorax.

  13. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnostic Accuracy of Secondary Ultrasound Exam in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajabzadeh Kanafi, Alireza; Giti, Masoumeh; Gharavi, Mohammad Hossein; Alizadeh, Ahmad; Pourghorban, Ramin; Shekarchi, Babak

    2014-01-01

    In stable patients with blunt abdominal trauma, accurate diagnosis of visceral injuries is crucial. To determine whether repeating ultrasound exam will increase the sensitivity of focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST) through revealing additional free intraperitoneal fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma. We performed a prospective observational study by performing primary and secondary ultrasound exams in blunt abdominal trauma patients. All ultrasound exams were performed by four radiology residents who had the experience of more than 400 FAST exams. Five routine intraperitoneal spaces as well as the interloop space were examined by ultrasound in order to find free fluid. All patients who expired or were transferred to the operating room before the second exam were excluded from the study. All positive ultrasound results were compared with intra-operative and computed tomography (CT) findings and/or the clinical status of the patients. Primary ultrasound was performed in 372 patients; 61 of them did not undergo secondary ultrasound exam; thus, were excluded from the study.Three hundred eleven patients underwent both primary and secondary ultrasound exams. One hundred and two of all patients were evaluated by contrast enhanced CT scan and 31 underwent laparotomy. The sensitivity of ultrasound exam in detecting intraperitoneal fluid significantly increased from 70.7% for the primary exam to 92.7% for the secondary exam. Examining the interloop space significantly improved the sensitivity of ultrasonography in both primary (from 36.6% to 70.7%) and secondary (from 65.9% to 92.7%) exams. Performing a secondary ultrasound exam in stable blunt abdominal trauma patients and adding interloop space scan to the routine FAST exam significantly increases the sensitivity of ultrasound in detecting intraperitoneal free fluid

  15. Chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speets, Anouk Mariëlle

    2006-01-01

    Chest radiography (CXR) and abdominal ultrasound (US) are two widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in Western societies. General practitioners (GPs) in The Netherlands annually request approximately 500,000 CXRs and 200,000 abdominal US, and therefore clearly place a burden on health care.

  16. Evaluating emergency ultrasound training in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Amit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : In countries with fully developed emergency medicine systems, emergency ultrasound (EUS plays an important role in the assessment and treatment of critically ill patients. Methods : The authors sought to introduce EUS to a group of doctors working in the emergency departments (EDs in India through an intensive 4-day adult and pediatric ultrasound course held at the Apex Trauma Center and EM division of the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. The workshop was evaluated with a survey questionnaire and a hands-on practical test. The questionnaire was designed to assess the current state of EUS in India′s EDs, and to identify potential barriers to the incorporation of EUS into current EM practice. The EUS course consisted of a general introductory didactic session followed by pediatric, abdominal and trauma, cardiothoracic, obstetrical and gynecologic, and vascular modules. Each module had a didactic session followed by hands-on applications with live models and/or simulators. A post-course survey questionnaire was given to the participants, and there was a practical test on the final day of the course. The ultrasound images taken by the participants were digitally recorded, and were subsequently graded for their accuracy by independent observers, residency, and/or fellowship trained in EUS. Results : There were a total of 42 participants who completed the workshop and took the practical examination; 32 participants filled in the course evaluation survey. Twenty-four (75% participants had no prior experience with EUS, 5 (16% had some experience, and 3 (9% had significant experience. During the practical examination, 38 of 42 participants (90% were able to identify Morison′s pouch on the focused abdominal sonography for trauma (FAST examination, and 32 (76% were able to obtain a parasternal long axis cardiac view and identify the left ventricle. The inferior vena cava was identified as it crosses the diaphragm into

  17. Role of abdominal ultrasound imaging in evaluation of children with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To evaluate the sonographic abdominal findings in children with suspected upper gastrointestinal disease, establish indications for sonography and describe the gastrointestinal disease patterns that can be evaluated by ultrasound. Design: Descriptive prospective study. Setting: Kenyatta National Hospital and ...

  18. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice ar...

  19. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Lorentzen, T.; Appelbaum, L.

    2016-01-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presen...

  20. Ultrasound surface probe as a screening method for evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasr-Esfahani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blunt abdominal trauma is one of the causes of mortality in emergency department. Free fluid in the abdomen due to intra-abdominal blunt trauma can be determined by the surface probe of ultrasound. Since the importance of this free fluid in hemodynamic stable patients with blunt trauma is associated with the unknown outcome for surgeons, this study was performed to evaluate the role of ultrasound surface probe as a screening method in evaluating the patients with blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods: A descriptive-analytical study was done on 45 patients with blunt abdominal trauma and hemodynamic stability. The patients were evaluated twice during the three-hours, including repeated ultrasound surface probe and clinical examinations. Computerized tomography was also performed. The patients were divided based on the amount of the free fluid in the abdomen during the evaluations into two groups: Fixed or increased, and decreased free fluid. The results of the different evaluated methods were compared using the sensitivity and specificity. Results: From 17 patients with CT abnormalities, free fluid increased in 14 patients (82.4%. Free fluid was decreased in three patients who were discharged well from the surgery service without any complication. Surface probe in prognosis detection had a sensitivity of 82.4% and specificity of 92.9%. The percentage of false positive and negative ultrasound compared with CT scan was 7.1% and 17.6%. Also, positive and negative predictive value of the ultrasound with surface probe was 87.5% and 89.7% respectively. Conclusion: The use of the ultrasound with surface probe in the diagnosis of free fluid in blunt abdominal trauma in hemodynamic stable patients can be considered as a useful screening method.

  1. Renal Angiomyolipoma Presenting as Acute Abdominal Emergency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 47-year-old woman presented as an acute abdominal emergency with rapid progression to shock following spontaneous rupture of a left renal angiomyolipoma. The diagnosis was missed clinically and on computerized tomographic scan. At different stages of management based on her pattern of symptoms, signs and ...

  2. Eyeball test using abdominal ultrasound unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Chun Kyu; Lee, Yong Woo; Cheung, Hwan

    1984-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a wide diagnostic use for its desirable quality that it causes no radiation hazard to the patient and allows to test him without causing pains, while affording much valued diagnostic information. Since Mundt reported in 1955 that Ultrasonography can be used for testing the eyeball, it has widely been used for clinical purpose, but in Korea many difficulties are being exist in the sonographic evaluation of the eyeball due to storage of the exclusive Ultrasound units for eyeball diagnosis. This treatise describes eyeball test methods along with clinical instances observed by a compound scanner for abdomen scan mounted with an eyeball transducer of a frequency as high as 5 to 7.5MHz and using water bag

  3. Experience with Emergency Ultrasound Training by Canadian Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Starting in 2008, emergency ultrasound (EUS was introduced as a core competency to the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (Royal College emergency medicine (EM training standards. The Royal College accredits postgraduate EM specialty training in Canada through 5-year residency programs. The objective of this study is to describe both the current experience with and the perceptions of EUS by Canadian Royal College EM senior residents. Methods: This was a web-based survey conducted from January to March 2011 of all 39 Canadian Royal College postgraduate fifth-year (PGY-5 EM residents. Main outcome measures were characteristics of EUS training and perceptions of EUS. Results: Survey response rate was 95% (37/39. EUS was part of the formal residency curriculum for 86% of respondents (32/37. Residents most commonly received training in focused assessment with sonography for trauma, intrauterine pregnancy, abdominal aortic aneurysm, cardiac, and procedural guidance. Although the most commonly provided instructional material (86% [32/37] was an ultrasound course, 73% (27/37 of residents used educational resources outside of residency training to supplement their ultrasound knowledge. Most residents (95% [35/37] made clinical decisions and patient dispositions based on their EUS interpretation without a consultative study by radiology. Residents had very favorable perceptions and opinions of EUS. Conclusion: EUS training in Royal College EM programs was prevalent and perceived favorably by residents, but there was heterogeneity in resident training and practice of EUS. This suggests variability in both the level and quality of EUS training in Canadian Royal College EM residency programs.

  4. Diagnostic ultrasound use in physiotherapy, emergency medicine, and anaesthesiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKiernan, Sharmaine [School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callagham, NSW 2308 (Australia)], E-mail: sharmaine.mckiernan@newcastle.edu.au; Chiarelli, Pauline; Warren-Forward, Helen [School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callagham, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2010-05-15

    Background: Diagnostic ultrasound is traditionally and extensively used within the radiology department. However in recent years its use has expanded outside this traditional area into health professions such as physiotherapy, emergency medicine and anaesthesiology. Purpose: The radiology community needs to be aware of the expansion of use of diagnostic ultrasound. This article starts this exploration in the health professions mentioned, however it is acknowledged that diagnostic ultrasound use goes beyond what is covered in this article. As diagnostic ultrasound is a user dependant modality and the outcome of an examination is largely influenced by the skill and experience of the operator, the radiology community should take a guiding role in its use, training and protocol development for health professionals. Method: This article explores the literature on the use of diagnostic ultrasound within physiotherapy, emergency medicine and anaesthesiology. Literature was searched for on the databases Medline, Cinahl and Embase. Results: Diagnostic ultrasound is being used in health professions such as physiotherapy, where it is being used to provide biofeedback to patients on contraction of abdominal and pelvic floor muscles; emergency medicine, for the investigation of free fluid within the abdomen of a trauma patient and anaesthesiology, for the placement of catheters and nerve blocks. Conclusion: As members of the radiology community are considered experts in the field, they need to take the lead to guide and mentor the other health professionals who are now using the modality. To be able to achieve this they must have an understanding of what these professions are using the modality for.

  5. Diagnostic ultrasound use in physiotherapy, emergency medicine, and anaesthesiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKiernan, Sharmaine; Chiarelli, Pauline; Warren-Forward, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diagnostic ultrasound is traditionally and extensively used within the radiology department. However in recent years its use has expanded outside this traditional area into health professions such as physiotherapy, emergency medicine and anaesthesiology. Purpose: The radiology community needs to be aware of the expansion of use of diagnostic ultrasound. This article starts this exploration in the health professions mentioned, however it is acknowledged that diagnostic ultrasound use goes beyond what is covered in this article. As diagnostic ultrasound is a user dependant modality and the outcome of an examination is largely influenced by the skill and experience of the operator, the radiology community should take a guiding role in its use, training and protocol development for health professionals. Method: This article explores the literature on the use of diagnostic ultrasound within physiotherapy, emergency medicine and anaesthesiology. Literature was searched for on the databases Medline, Cinahl and Embase. Results: Diagnostic ultrasound is being used in health professions such as physiotherapy, where it is being used to provide biofeedback to patients on contraction of abdominal and pelvic floor muscles; emergency medicine, for the investigation of free fluid within the abdomen of a trauma patient and anaesthesiology, for the placement of catheters and nerve blocks. Conclusion: As members of the radiology community are considered experts in the field, they need to take the lead to guide and mentor the other health professionals who are now using the modality. To be able to achieve this they must have an understanding of what these professions are using the modality for.

  6. Emergency point-of-care ultrasound applications

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pneumothoraces led to the development of the extended FAST (EFAST) and can be used in abdominal (blunt) and chest (blunt and penetrating) trauma. The operator obtains six views to systematically evaluate the unstable trauma patient (Fig. 1). Ultrasound uses no contrast media and is rapid, repeatable, portable, non-.

  7. Simulation-Based Abdominal Ultrasound Training – A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mia L.; Ewertsen, Caroline; Konge, Lars

    2016-01-01

    of Science, and the Cochrane Library was searched. Articles were divided into three categories based on study design (randomized controlled trials, before-and-after studies and descriptive studies) and assessed for level of evidence using the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine (OCEBM) system......PURPOSE: The aim is to provide a complete overview of the different simulation-based training options for abdominal ultrasound and to explore the evidence of their effect. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA guidelines and Medline, Embase, Web...

  8. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marincek, B. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, 8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  9. Nontraumatic abdominal emergencies: acute abdominal pain: diagnostic strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincek, B.

    2002-01-01

    Common causes of acute abdominal pain include appendicitis, cholecystitis, bowel obstruction, urinary colic, perforated peptic ulcer, pancreatitis, diverticulitis, and nonspecific, nonsurgical abdominal pain. The topographic classification of acute abdominal pain (pain in one of the four abdominal quadrants, diffuse abdominal pain, flank or epigastric pain) facilitates the choice of the imaging technique. The initial radiological evaluation often consists of plain abdominal radiography, despite significant diagnostic limitations. The traditional indications for plain films - bowel obstruction, pneumoperitoneum, and the search of ureteral calculi - are questioned by helical computed tomography (CT). Although ultrasonography (US) is in many centers the modality of choice for imaging the gallbladder and the pelvis in children and women of reproductive age, CT is considered to be one of the most valued tools for triaging patients with acute abdominal pain. CT is particularly beneficial in patients with marked obesity, unclear US findings, bowel obstruction, and multiple lesions. The introduction of multidetector row CT (MDCT) has further enhanced the utility of CT in imaging patients with acute abdominal pain. (orig.)

  10. Emergency Department Ultrasound Is not a Sensitive Detector of Solid Organ Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendall, John L

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the sensitivity and specificity of emergency department (ED ultrasound for the detection of solid organ injury following blunt abdominal trauma.Methods: A prospective cohort study performed in the ED of an urban Level I trauma center on patients who sustained blunt abdominal trauma. Following initial standard trauma evaluation, patients underwent a secondary ultrasound examination performed specifically to identify injury to the liver or spleen, followed by computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen. Ultrasound examinations were performed by emergency medicine residents or attending physicians experienced in the use of ultrasound for detecting hemoperitoneum. Ultrasonographers prospectively determined the presence or absence of liver or spleen injury. CT findings were used as the criterion standard to evaluate the ultrasound results.Results: From July 1998 through June 1999, 152 patients underwent secondary ultrasound examination and CT. Of the 152 patients, nine (6% had liver injuries and 10 (7% had spleen injuries. Ultrasound correctly detected only one of the liver injuries for a sensitivity of 11% (95% CI: 0%-48% and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 94%-100%. Ultrasound correctly detected eight spleen injuries for a sensitivity of 80% (95% CI: 44%-98% and a specificity of 99% (95% CI: 95%-100%.Conclusion: Emergency ultrasound is not sensitive or specific for detecting liver or spleen injuries following blunt abdominal trauma.[WestJEM. 2009;10:1-5.

  11. Bacteriological aspects implicated in abdominal surgical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israil, A M; Delcaru, C; Palade, R S; Chifiriuc, C; Iordache, C; Vasile, D; Grigoriu, M; Voiculescu, D

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to establish the microbial etiology of abdominal surgical emergencies as well as the relationship between the bacterial etiology and the virulence factors produced by the respective isolated strains. 110 bacterial strains were isolated from 100 randomized clinical cases, operated during 2009-2010 in the First Surgical Clinic of the University Hospital of Bucharest. The clinical cases (sex ratio 52 M/48F aged between 22-85 years old) were classified into three risk groups, as related to their severity. The isolated strains were characterized by cultural, microscopic and biochemical methods. After identification, the bacterial strains were investigated for their virulence potential (adherence to abiotic surface and production of soluble virulence factors). The specimens were collected from different clinical pathologies: diffuse acute peritonitis, biliary duct infections, severe acute pancreatitis followed by septic processes etc. The 110 bacterial (72 aerobic and 38 anaerobic) strains were isolated only in 70 out of 100 cases. Out of these 70 cases, in 45 already submitted to pre-operatory empiric broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, there were isolated 74 strains, whereas in 25 cases without any treatment, there were isolated 36 strains. The etiology was either mono-specific or multi-specific (aerobic-anaerobic associations, especially in old persons). Out of the 30 negative culture cases, 16 were already submitted to pre-operatory parenteral empiric antibiotic therapy at the moment of specimen collection. The aerobic etiology was dominated by Enterobacteriaceae. The most frequent anaerobic species belonged to Clostridium, Peptococcus and Bacteroides genera. It is to be mentioned that the isolation of Bifidobacterium and Veillonella spp. in 11 (10%) severe cases of the studied abdominal surgical emergencies is pleading for the fact that in certain conditions, bacteria belonging usually to commensal gut flora can turn to pathogenic

  12. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Hereditary Angioedema Diagnosed by Ultrasound in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Riguzzi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdominal angioedema is a less recognized type of angioedema, which can occur in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE. The clinical signs may range from subtle, diffuse abdominal pain and nausea, to overt peritonitis. We describe two cases of abdominal angioedema in patients with known HAE that were diagnosed in the emergency department by point-of-care (POC ultrasound. In each case, the patient presented with isolated abdominal complaints and no signs of oropharyngeal edema. Findings on POC ultrasound included intraperitoneal free fluid and bowel wall edema. Both patients recovered uneventfully after receiving treatment. Because it can be performed rapidly, requires no ionizing radiation,and can rule out alternative diagnoses, POC ultrasound holds promise as a valuable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with HAE. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  13. Wavelet compression algorithm applied to abdominal ultrasound images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Cheng-Hsun; Pan, Su-Feng; LU, Chin-Yuan; Lee, Ming-Che

    2006-01-01

    We sought to investigate acceptable compression ratios of lossy wavelet compression on 640 x 480 x 8 abdominal ultrasound (US) images. We acquired 100 abdominal US images with normal and abnormal findings from the view station of a 932-bed teaching hospital. The US images were then compressed at quality factors (QFs) of 3, 10, 30, and 50 followed outcomes of a pilot study. This was equal to the average compression ratios of 4.3:1, 8.5:1, 20:1 and 36.6:1, respectively. Four objective measurements were carried out to examine and compare the image degradation between original and compressed images. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was also introduced for subjective assessment. Five experienced and qualified radiologists as reviewers blinded to corresponding pathological findings, analysed paired 400 randomly ordered images with two 17-inch thin film transistor/liquid crystal display (TFT/LCD) monitors. At ROC analysis, the average area under curve (Az) for US abdominal image was 0.874 at the ratio of 36.6:1. The compressed image size was only 2.7% for US original at this ratio. The objective parameters showed the higher the mean squared error (MSE) or root mean squared error (RMSE) values, the poorer the image quality. The higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) values indicated better image quality. The average RMSE, PSNR at 36.6:1 for US were 4.84 ± 0.14, 35.45 dB, respectively. This finding suggests that, on the basis of the patient sample, wavelet compression of abdominal US to a ratio of 36.6:1 did not adversely affect diagnostic performance or evaluation error for radiologists' interpretation so as to risk affecting diagnosis

  14. US Emergency Department Trends in Imaging for Pediatric Nontraumatic Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Lauren M; Goyal, Monika K; Badolato, Gia M; Chamberlain, James M; Cohen, Joanna S

    2017-10-01

    To describe national emergency department (ED) trends in computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound imaging for the evaluation of pediatric nontraumatic abdominal pain from 2007 through 2014. We used data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to measure trends in CT and ultrasound use among children with nontraumatic abdominal pain. We performed multivariable logistic regression to measure the strength of the association of ED type (pediatric versus general ED) with CT and ultrasound use adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of an estimated 21.1 million ED visits for nontraumatic abdominal pain, 14.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.2%-16.0%) had CT imaging only, 10.9% (95% CI, 9.7%-12.1%) had ultrasound imaging only, and 1.9% (95% CI, 1.4%-2.4%) received both CT and ultrasound. The overall use of CT and ultrasound did not significantly change over the study period ( P trend .63 and .90, respectively). CT use was lower among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 0.34; 95% CI, 0.17-0.69). Conversely, ultrasound use was higher among children treated in pediatric EDs compared with general EDs (adjusted odds ratio 2.14; 95% CI, 1.29-3.55). CT imaging for pediatric patients with nontraumatic abdominal pain has plateaued since 2007 after the steady increase seen in the preceding 9 years. Among this population, an increased likelihood of CT imaging was demonstrated in general EDs compared with pediatric EDs, in which there was a higher likelihood of ultrasound imaging. Dissemination of pediatric-focused radiology protocols to general EDs may help optimize radiation exposure in children. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Gastrointestinal manifestations of hereditary angioedema diagnosed by ultrasound in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riguzzi, Christine; Losonczy, Lia; Teismann, Nathan; Herring, Andrew A; Nagdev, Arun

    2014-11-01

    Abdominal angioedema is a less recognized type of angioedema, which can occur in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE). The clinical signs may range from subtle, diffuse abdominal pain and nausea, to overt peritonitis. We describe two cases of abdominal angioedema in patients with known HAE that were diagnosed in the emergency department by point-of-care (POC) ultrasound. In each case, the patient presented with isolated abdominal complaints and no signs of oropharyngeal edema. Findings on POC ultrasound included intraperitoneal free fluid and bowel wall edema. Both patients recovered uneventfully after receiving treatment. Because it can be performed rapidly, requires no ionizing radiation, and can rule out alternative diagnoses, POC ultrasound holds promise as a valuable tool in the evaluation and management of patients with HAE.

  16. Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central Nigerian centre. ... The causes of PSAEs vary worldwide, and the management is challenging, often with unimaginably poor outcome if not carefully handled. The aim of this ... Keywords: abdominal emergencies, acute abdomen, children, morbidity, mortality ...

  17. Value of ultrasound in the evaluation of blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayanthi, Shri Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Trauma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in an age group including from teenagers to young adults, in a male dominant proportion, resulting in great economic and social impact. Within the complex of trauma, blunt abdominal trauma (BAT) is frequent event and presents difficulty in the evaluation and management since the clinical examination shows low sensitivity and specificity. The detection of hemo peritoneum is one of the methods of evaluation of possible indirect intra-abdominal injuries, initially using direct diagnostic abdominal paracentesis and posteriorly the diagnostic peritoneal lavage, that despite the effectiveness, have drawbacks such as invasiveness and the inability of hemo peritoneum quantification and the lesion staging, resulting in non-therapeutic laparotomies. Imaging methods provide useful information in the investigation of abdominal injuries, such as conventional and contrast radiology, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT), which is the best effective method, but has its own drawbacks, such as cost, accessibility, use of ionizing radiation and contrast media and the displacement of the patient to the machine. US presents itself as an alternative in the initial evaluation of these patients as noninvasive method, with lack of harmfulness, low cost, fast answer and portability. Nevertheless, this method also has its limitations, as in cases of abdominal injuries without free fluid. This study was conducted in order to establish the performance of the US in this setting, allowing to rationalise the use of CT. For this purpose we studied 163 patients treated in the ER of HC/FMUSP, with the completion of consecutive US and CT. The population fits the usual profile of trauma victims, with 83% male, 56% in the age group between 20 and 39 years and in 73% of cases victims of traffic accidents. They were brought to the service in an average time of 51 minutes, mainly stable and with satisfactory level of consciousness. US took on

  18. Comparative study between ultrasound guided TAP block and paravertebral block in upper abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya M Elsayed Goda

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that ultrasound guided transverses abdominis plane block and thoracic paravertebral block were safe and effective anesthetic technique for upper abdominal surgery with longer and potent postoperative analgesia in thoracic paravertebral block than transverses abdominis block.

  19. Reproducibility of ECG-gated Ultrasound Diameter Assessment of Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, K; Eldrup, N; Meyer, C

    2013-01-01

    No standardised ultrasound procedure to obtain reliable growth estimates for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is currently available. We investigated the feasibility and reproducibility of a novel approach controlling for a combination of vessel wall delineation and cardiac cycle variation....

  20. Echogenic rim of hepatic hemangioma on abdominal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Chul Joong; Cheong, In Joo; Kim, Baek Hyun; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Cheol Min; Chung, Kyu Byung

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the association between the size of the hepatic hemangioma and the shape and thickness of the echogenic rim of hepatic hemangioma on abdominal ultrasound. We examined 47 cases (M:F=24:23, mean age 47.1) of hepatic hemangiomas with echogenic rim on abdominal ultrasound during the past 2 years. Radiologic findings were retrospectively reviewed in terms of completeness and thickness of echogenic rim. If echogenic rim showed even thickness, it was measured. But if not, the maximum and minimum thickness of the rim was measured. The association between the size of hemangioma and the completeness and thickness of the echogenic rim were analyzed statistically. Of the 47 cases, complete echogenic rim and incomplete echogenic rim were obtained in 29 (62%) and 18 (38%) cases, respectively. Twenty-two cases of hemangioma were less than 2 cm in diameter, and their distribution according to echogenic rim were as follows: complete echogenic rim (17/20, 91% mean thickness 2.2 cm) and uneven thickness with complete echogenic rim (3/20, 15%, range:2.0-6.1 mm). Twenty-five hemangiomas were larger than 2 cm in diameter and their distribution according to echogenic rim were as follows: complete echogenic rim (n=9, 34%), incomplete echogenic rim (n=16, 64%0,even thickness with complete echogenic rim (3/9, 33%, mean thickness 2.2 mm) and uneven thickness with complete echogenic rim (6/9,67%, range: 2.0-7.6 mm). In statistical analysis, hemangiomas more than 2 cm in diameter were more likely to have incomplete echogenic rim (p<0.05) than those of less than 2 cm; hemangiomas more than with more than 2 cm in diameter and complete echogenic rim showed uneven thickness of echogenic rim (p<0.05), more often than those of less than 2 cm diameter. Hemangiomas with more than 2 cm in diameter showed more frequent incomplete echogenic rim than those of less than 2 cm in diameter, which had more frequent complete echogenic rim. Hemangiomas with complete echogenic rim and even rim

  1. Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using 3D ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, A. M.; Nguyen, V.L.; Speelman, L.; Schurink, G.W.H.; van de Vosse, F.N.; Lopata, R.G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Wall stress analysis is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging, however, 3D ultrasound (US) has not been

  2. The value of plain abdominal radiographs in management of abdominal emergencies in Luth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashindoitiang, J A; Atoyebi, A O; Arogundade, R A

    2008-01-01

    The plain abdominal x-ray is still the first imaging modality in diagnosis of acute abdomen. The aim of this study was to find the value of plain abdominal x-ray in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos university teaching hospital. The accurate diagnosis of the cause of acute abdominal pain is one of the most challenging undertakings in emergency medicine. This is due to overlapping of clinical presentation and non-specific findings of physical and even laboratory data of the multifarious causes. Plain abdominal radiography is one investigation that can be obtained readily and within a short period of time to help the physician arrive at a correct diagnosis The relevance of plain abdominal radiography was therefore evaluated in the management of abdominal emergencies seen in Lagos over a 12 month period (April 2002 to March 2003). A prospective study of 100 consecutively presenting patients with acute abdominal conditions treated by the general surgical unit of Lagos University Teaching Hospital was undertaken. All patients had supine and erect abdominal x-ray before any therapeutic intervention was undertaken. The diagnostic features of the plain films were compared with final diagnosis to determine the usefulness of the plain x-ray There were 54 males and 46 females (M:F 1.2:1). Twenty-four percent of the patients had intestinal obstruction, 20% perforated typhoid enteritis; gunshot injuries and generalized peritonitis each occurred in 13%, blunt abdominal trauma in 12%, while 8% and 10% had acute appendicitis and perforated peptic ulcer disease respectively. Of 100 patients studied, 54% had plain abdominal radiographs that showed positive diagnostic features. Plain abdominal radiograph showed high sensitivity in patients with intestinal obstruction 100% and perforated peptic ulcer 90% but was less sensitive in patients with perforated typhoid, acute appendicitis, and blunt abdominal trauma and generalized peritonitis. In conclusion, this study

  3. Three-dimensional Ultrasound in the Management of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lowe, C B; Ghulam, Q; Bredahl, K

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound is an evolving modality that may have numerous applications in the management of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Many vascular specialists will not be familiar with the different ways in which 3D vascular ultrasound data can be acquired nor how potential applications...

  4. The range of abdominal surgical emergencies in children older than ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... survey of all children older than 1 year undergoing an emergency abdominal surgery was carried out. ..... that affect the small bowel leading to perforations are ..... Source of Support: Nil, Con.ict of Interest: None declared.

  5. Outcome of Emergency Abdominal Surgery at Kigali University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is little information regarding the clinical spectrum of disease in these patients ... was a case series study of 229 patients who underwent emergency abdominal ... The most common operative findings were peritonitis (41.5%), intestinal ...

  6. Plain abdominal radiographs in acute medical emergencies: an abused investigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyler, S; Williamson, V; King, D

    2002-02-01

    Plain abdominal radiographs are commonly requested for acute medical emergencies on patients with non-specific abdominal symptoms and signs. In this study 131 plain abdominal radiographs performed on the day of admission were prospectively analysed. In only 16 cases (12%) the reasons for requests conformed to the recommended guidelines by the Royal College of Radiologists. The reason for the request was stated in the case notes in only three cases. In 62 cases (47%), there was no comment made on the film by the requesting clinician. There was a discrepancy in the interpretation of the radiograph between the clinician and the radiologist in 31 cases (24%). The clinical management was influenced by plain abdominal radiographs in only nine cases (7%). The majority of plain abdominal radiographs requested on acute medical emergencies is inappropriate. There is a need to ensure guidelines are followed to prevent unnecessary exposure of patients to radiation as well as preventing expenditure on irrelevant investigations.

  7. Strain measurement of abdominal aortic aneurysm with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, P; Shelke, A; Nwe, T H; Mularczyk, M; Nelson, K; Schmandra, T; Knez, P; Schmitz-Rixen, T

    2013-04-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm rupture is caused by mechanical vascular tissue failure. Although mechanical properties within the aneurysm vary, currently available ultrasound methods assess only one cross-sectional segment of the aorta. This study aims to establish real-time 3-dimensional (3D) speckle tracking ultrasound to explore local displacement and strain parameters of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm. Validation was performed on a silicone aneurysm model, perfused in a pulsatile artificial circulatory system. Wall motion of the silicone model was measured simultaneously with a commercial real-time 3D speckle tracking ultrasound system and either with laser-scan micrometry or with video photogrammetry. After validation, 3D ultrasound data were collected from abdominal aortic aneurysms of five patients and displacement and strain parameters were analysed. Displacement parameters measured in vitro by 3D ultrasound and laser scan micrometer or video analysis were significantly correlated at pulse pressures between 40 and 80 mmHg. Strong local differences in displacement and strain were identified within the aortic aneurysms of patients. Local wall strain of the whole abdominal aortic aneurysm can be analysed in vivo with real-time 3D ultrasound speckle tracking imaging, offering the prospect of individual non-invasive rupture risk analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms. Copyright © 2013 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency of Chest Radiography and Abdominal Ultrasound in The Netherlands: 1999-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speets, Anouk M.; Kalmijn, Sandra; Hoes, Arno W.; Graaf, Yolanda der; Smeets, Hugo M.; Mali, Willem P. Th. M.

    2005-01-01

    Chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound are two widely used diagnostic imaging techniques in Western societies. However, little is known about the frequency of these examinations and its determinants. The aim of this descriptive study was to provide detailed information on the number of chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound examinations by age, gender, referring physician and ethnicity. We used data of approximately 3,000,000 sick fund insured persons of the Health Insurance Company Agis in The Netherlands from 1999 to 2003. We calculated annual numbers and corresponding 95% confidence intervals for different age, gender and ethnicity categories. The mean age of the population was 38±22 years and 46% were male. Chest radiographs were ordered in 130 per 1000 persons per year and abdominal ultrasound examinations in 39 per 1000 persons per year; these frequencies did not change noticeable over the five-year period. Chest radiography was performed more often in males (156 vs. 109 per 1,000 persons/year in females; p<0.05) and abdominal ultrasound more often in females (43 vs. 34 per 1000 persons/year in males; p<0.05). Frequencies were highest in persons aged 70-79 years. Compared to medical specialists, general practitioners more frequently referred younger patients and females, especially for abdominal ultrasound. Up to the age of 60 years the frequencies of both chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound were higher in Turks and Moroccans compared to other persons. In conclusion, this study showed marked differences in the frequencies of chest radiography and abdominal ultrasound according to age, gender and ethnicity in The Netherlands

  9. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Wang Wei; Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  10. Ultrasound-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment for abdominal wall endometriosis: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yang [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Wei, E-mail: wangyang301301@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wang Longxia; Wang Junyan; Tang Jie [Department of Ultrasound, Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the safety and therapeutic efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation for the treatment of abdominal wall endometriosis (AWE). Materials and methods: Twenty-one consecutive patients with AWE were treated as outpatients by US-guided HIFU ablation under conscious sedation. The median size of the AWE was 2.4 cm (range 1.0-5.3 cm). An acoustic power of 200-420 W was used, intermittent HIFU exposure of 1 s was applied. Treatment was considered complete when the entire nodule and its nearby 1 cm margin become hyperechoic on US. Pain relief after HIFU ablation was observed and the treated nodule received serial US examinations during follow-up. Results: All AWE was successfully ablated after one session of HIFU ablation, the ablation time lasted for 5-48 min (median 13 min), no major complications occurred. The cyclic pain disappeared in all patients during a mean follow-up of 18.7 months (range 3-31 months). The treated nodules gradually shank over time, 16 nodules became unnoticeable on US during follow-up. Conclusion: US-guided HIFU ablation appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of AWE.

  11. Abdominal Ultrasound in asymptomatic adult patients of the executive medical check-up, at the FSFB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintero Corredor, Ana Maria; Solano Flores, Gloria Stella; Restrepo Uribe, Santiago; Triana Rodriguez, Gustavo

    1998-01-01

    There is no specific agreement in the literature about the benefit of the use of abdominal ultrasound in the study asymptomatic adult patients. Based on the abdominal ultrasounds done to patient of the executive medical check-up program at the Foundation Santafe de Bogota (FSFB), we carried out a study to determine the prevalence of diseases detected by the abdominal ultrasound, the possibility that these modified the course of the disease and the cost-benefit relationship of the ultrasound in asymptomatic patients. We carried out a descriptive study with a series of cases, 500 medical charts of the executive medical check-up program at the FSFB. Were reviewed, 489 (97.8%) of these patient underwent abdominal ultrasound. the sample was distributed in 390 (78%) men and 110 (22%) women, the average age was 43.4 years. we found 216 (44.2%) patients with abnormal findings and an overall 315 positive findings. the main findings detected in ultrasound were not significant from the clinical point of view. the most common finding was liver fatty infiltration 138 (43.8%), which had statistically significant relationship with the abnormal serum of total cholesterol, high density cholesterol and triglycerides

  12. Paediatric Abdominal Surgical Emergencies in a General Surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... organized for general surgeons undertaking paediatric surgical emergencies. More paediatric surgeons should be trained and more paediatric surgical units should established in the country. Key Words: Paediatric Abdominal Surgical Emergencies; Paediatric Surgeons, General Surgeons. Journal of College of Medicine ...

  13. Emergency abdominal surgery in Zaria, Nigeria | Ahmed | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The causes of abdominal surgical emergencies in a particular setting may change because of alterations in demographic, socio-economic or geographical factors. We present the pattern, management and outcome of such emergencies in Zaria, Northern Nigeria. Methods. This is a retrospective review of ...

  14. WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Sartelli (Massimo); F. Coccolini (Federico); G.H. van Ramshorst (Gabrielle); G. Campanelli (Giampiero); V. Mandala; L. Ansaloni (Luca); E.E. Moore (Ernest); A. Peitzman (Andrew); G.C. Velmahos (George ); F.A. Moore (Fredrick); A. Leppaniemi (Ari); C.C. Burlew (Clay); W.L. Biffl (Walter); K. Koike (Kaoru); Y. Kluger (Yoram); G.P. Fraga (Gustavo); C.A. Ordonez (Carlos); S. Di Saverio (Salomone); F. Agresta; B. Sakakushev (Boris); I. Gerych (Igor); I. Wani (Imtiaz); M.D. Kelly (Michael ); C.A. Gomes (Carlos); M.P. Faro Jr (Mario); K. Taviloglu (Korhan); Z. Demetrashvili (Zaza); J.G. Lee (Jeong ); N. Vettoretto (Nereo); G. Guercioni (Gianluca); C. Tranà (Cristian); Y. Cui (Yijun); K.Y.Y. Kok (Kenneth); W.M. Ghnnam (Wagih); A.E.S. Abbas (Ashraf El-Sayed); N. Sato (Norio); S. Marwah (Sanjay); M. Rangarajan (Muthukumaran); O. Ben-Ishay (Offir); A.R.K. Adesunkanmi (Abdul Rashid); H.A. Segovia Lohse (Helmut); J. Kenig (Jakub); V. Mandalà (Vincenzo); A. Patrizi (Andrea); R. Scibé (Rodolfo); F. Catena (Fausto)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEmergency repair of complicated abdominal hernias is associated with poor prognosis and a high rate of post-operative complications. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013, during the 2nd Congress of the World Society of

  15. Abdominal ultrasound-scanning versus non-contrast computed tomography as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liisberg, Mads; Diederichsen, Axel C.; Lindholt, Jes S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Validating non-contrast-enhanced computed tomography (nCT) compared to ultrasound sonography (US) as screening method for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) screening. Methods: Consecutively attending men (n = 566) from the pilot study of the randomized Danish CardioVascular Screening......CT seems superior to US concerning sensitivity, and is able to detect aneurysmal lesions not detectable with US. Finally, the prevalence of AAA in Denmark seems to remain relatively high, in this small pilot study group....

  16. The cardiac cycle is a major contributor to variability in size measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysms by ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøndal, Nikolaj Fibiger; Bramsen, Morten; Thomsen, Marie Dahl

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters.......The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact of the cardiac cycle on ultrasound measurements of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) diameters....

  17. Emergency thoracic ultrasound and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Interrigi MC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Concetta Interrigi,1 Francesca M Trovato,2,3 Daniela Catalano,3,4 Guglielmo M Trovato3,5 1Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Cannizzaro, Catania, 2Accident and Emergency Department, Ospedale Civile, Ragusa, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, 4Postgraduate School of Clinical Ultrasound, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, University of Catania, 5Postgraduate School of e-Learning and ICT in Health Sciences, The School of Medicine, University of Catania, Catania, Italy Purpose: Thoracic ultrasound (TUS has been proposed as an easy-option replacement for chest X-ray (CXR in emergency diagnosis of pneumonia, pleural effusion, and pneumothorax. We investigated CXR unforeseen diagnosis, subsequently investigated by TUS, considering its usefulness in clinical risk assessment and management and also assessing the sustainability of telementoring. Patients and methods: This observational report includes a period of 6 months with proactive concurrent adjunctive TUS diagnosis telementoring, which was done using freely available smartphone applications for transfer of images and movies. Results: Three hundred and seventy emergency TUS scans (excluding trauma patients were performed and telementored. In 310 cases, no significant chest pathology was detected either by CXR, TUS, or the subsequent work-up; in 24 patients, there was full concordance between TUS and CXR (ten isolated pleural effusion; eleven pleural effusion with lung consolidations; and three lung consolidation without pleural effusion; in ten patients with lung consolidations, abnormalities identified by CXR were not detected by TUS. In 26 patients, only TUS diagnosis criteria of disease were present: in 19 patients, CXR was not diagnostic, ie, substantially negative, but TUS detected these conditions correctly, and these were later confirmed by computed

  18. Emergency abdominal surgery in Zaria, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    high rate of emergency operations could be due to the large number of trauma ... of sanitation, which may trigger lymphoid tissue reaction in the appendix wall and .... future surgical training and help surgeons who practise in our setting to ...

  19. Lessons from emergency laparotomy for abdominal tuberculosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Committee and the Biomedical Research Ethics Committee of the. University of ... A prospective audit of all patients with abdominal TB undergoing emergency laparotomy was conducted. .... support or proceed to a laparotomy with its attendant risks. ... surgical management of intestinal tuberculosis at tertiary care hospital.

  20. Emergency medicine physicians performed ultrasound for pediatric intussusceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jung Chang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Intussusception is the common acute abdomen in children with difficult clinical diagnosis. The routine ultrasound has recently been proposed as the initial diagnostic modality with high accuracy, but is not available for 24 h by gastroenterologists. We aimed to evaluate the validation of bedside ultrasound for intussusceptions performed by pediatric emergency physicians with ultrasound training during the night or holiday. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted in children with suspected intussusceptions when routine ultrasounds by gastroenterologists were not available over the period from July 2004 to July 2008. Patients were divided into two groups: those diagnosed by emergency physicians with ultrasound training and without training. The clinical characteristics and course for all patients were reviewed and compared for seeking the difference. Results: A total of 186 children were included. One hundred and thirteen (61% children were diagnosed by pediatric emergency physician with ultrasound training. The clinical symptoms were not statistically different between the two groups. The diagnostic sensitivity of the ultrasound training group was significantly higher (90% vs. 79%, p = 0.034. Children of the training group also had significantly shorter hospital stay duration at emergency departments before reduction (2.41 ± 2.01 vs. 4.58 ± 4.80 h, p = 0.002. Conclusion: Bedside ultrasound performed by pediatric emergency physicians with ultrasound training is a sensitive test for detecting intussusceptions. Knowledge and use of bedside ultrasound can aid the emergency physician in the diagnosis of pediatric intussusceptions with less delay in treatment.

  1. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-01-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries. (orig.)

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm in a premature neonate with disseminated candidiasis: Ultrasound and angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoss, A.E.; Ponhold, W.; Pollak, A.; Schlemmer, M.; Weninger, M.

    1985-09-01

    When using ultrasound for detection of kidney enlargement, we found an acute abdominal aortic aneurysm secondary to aortitis arising from umbilical artery catheterisation in a premature neonate with systemic candidiasis. Aortography was performed to provide vascular details such as involvement of celiac, renal, iliac and femoral arteries.

  3. [Abdominal ultrasound abnormalities incidentally discovered in patients with asymptomatic HIV in Lome (Togo)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonhaye, L; Tchaou, M; Amadou, A; Gbande, P; Assih, K; Djibril, M; Adjenou, K; Redah, D; N'Dakéna, K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined ultrasound imaging of abdominal manifestations of HIV-AIDS, although these rank second only to its pleuropulmonary manifestations. Thus, this study sought to determine the features of abdominal ultrasound in HIV infection. This prospective, descriptive and analytical study took place in the radiology department of the University Hospital Campus Lomé and covered the three-year period of 2009-2011. It included all patients older than 15 years with positive HIV serology. During the study period, 566 patients met the inclusion criteria. Ultrasound examination showed the liver appeared normal in 153 patients (27.0%), but homogeneously hyperechoic and thus suggestive of hepatic steatosis in 107 (18.9%). The bile duct was dilatated in 12 patients or 2.1%. An anomaly in the corticomedullary differentiation in normal-sized kidneys was noted in 28.1% (159 patients). Diffuse homogeneous hypertrophy of the pancreas was found in 3 patients (0.53%). Splenomegaly was noted in 387 patients (68.4%); the echopattern of the spleen was diffusely micronodular in 6 patients (1.1%). Deep adenopathies were found in 29 patients (5.1%) and ascites in 46 patients (8.1%). Abdominal ultrasound is a medical imaging technique available in developing countries, less expensive than others, which can be considered an alternative to computed tomography (CT) in the countries of sub-Saharan Africa for the exploration of the abdominal manifestations of HIV.

  4. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Cross-sectional imaging, in particular CT, has become the main method of detecting abdominal collections. Indium-labelled white-cell scintigraphy and gallium scintigraphy are reserved for patients in whom there is a high clinical suspicion of abdominal sepsis but CT has not revealed a source of sepsis. Scintigraphy is also used in patients with suspected vascular graft infections or suspected infected hip prostheses. Percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD) has revolutionised the treatment of abdominal abscesses over the past 20 years, with repeat laparotomy for postoperative abscesses becoming a rare event. Ultrasound or CT can be used to guide PAD. Choosing an access route that does not cross intervening organs is of crucial importance to the safe performance of PAD. The Trocar or Seldinger techniques can be used with equal success. The cavity should be aspirated until dry and irrigated with saline. Repeat imaging after drainage is helpful to detect any undrained locules. PAD endpoints include patient defervescence, reduction in white blood cell count and catheter drainage of less than 10 ml per day. Details regarding PAD in specific abdominal regions are discussed. Success rates for PAD are high (close to 90%) in most abdominal organs. Slightly lower success rates are seen with PAD of pancreatic abscesses and abscesses associated with fistulas (60-85% success rates). Complication rates lie between 0% and 10%. Complications can be minimised by ensuring that the patient has broad spectrum antibiotic coverage before drainage, by carefully planning the access route and by ensuring diligent post-procedure care by radiology staff. (orig.)

  5. The comparative study of CT guided and ultrasound guided percutaneous ethanol injection in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Heping; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Zhuang Wenquan; Huang Yulian; Chen Jianye

    2005-01-01

    Objective: An comparative study of the interventional approach of CT guided and ultiasound guided percutaneous ethanol injection(PEI) in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst. Methods: CT guided PEI was performed in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst in 38 patients while ultrasound guided PEI was performed in 45 cases. Results: The puncture procedure of CT guided PEI was totally performed 83 times in treating 56 intra-abdominal cysts in 38 patients and CT guided PEI was unsuccessful in 6 patients. The puncture procedure of ultrasound guided PEI were performed 87 times in treating 71 intra-abdominal cysts in 55 patients and ultrasound guided PEI only failed only in 1 patient. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided PEI is superior to CT guided PEI in the treatment of intra-abdominal cyst. (authors)

  6. The role of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of typhoid fever: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Saeed Nadhim

    2014-01-01

    To study the usefulness of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of typhoid fever and to determine the common ultrasound findings early in the course of the disease. Abdominal ultrasound examination was performed within the first week of initiation of symptoms in 350 cases with clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever. Subsequent ultrasound follow-up examination was done 15 days later (beginning of the third week). All the patients proved to have positive Widal test and Sallmonella culture. The study was performed in Erbil-Iraq from the period January 1993 to October 2010. The following ultrasound findings were reported: hepatomegaly (31.4%), prominent intrahepatic bile ducts (64.85%), splenomegaly (100%), mesenteric lymphadenopathy (42.85%), bowel wall thickening (35.71%), acalculous cholecystitis (16.28%), perforations (1.14%), and ascites in (3.4%). The current study showed that the findings are typical enough to justify initiation of treatment for typhoid fever when serology is equivocal and culture is negative, and is fairly safe to say that normal ultrasound examination early in the course of febrile illness rules out typhoid fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency CT in blunt abdominal trauma of multiple injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinnunen, J.; Kivioja, A.; Poussa, K.; Laasonen, E.M.

    1994-01-01

    Multiple injury patients with blunt abdominal trauma (n = 110) were examined by abdominal CT. An i.v., but not peroral, contrast medium was used, thereby eliminating the delay caused by administering peroral contrast medium and any subsequent delay in making the diagnoses and beginning operative treatment. Eighteen patients underwent emergency laparotomy after the initial CT examination. The preoperative CT findings were compared to the laparotomy findings. CT revealed all but one of the severe parenchymal organ lesions requiring surgery. The one liver laceration that went undetected had caused hemoperitoneum, which was diagnosed by CT. The bowel and mesenteric lesions presented as intra-abdominal blood, and the hemoperitoneum was discovered in every patient with these lesions. Fourteen patients also initially had positive abdominal CT findings; 10 of them underwent an additional abdominal CT within 3 days, but the repeat studies did not reveal any lesions in need of surgery. Omission of the oral contrast medium did not jeopardize making the essential diagnoses, but it did save time. (orig.)

  8. Prospective study of emergency presentation of abdominal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh R. Mishra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing countries like India, where poverty, malnutrition and overcrowding prevail, tuberculosis continues to be one of the important causes of morbidity, mortality and loss of working man hours. Abdominal tuberculosis (TB can affect the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, lymph nodes of the small bowel mesentery or the solid viscera (e.g. liver, spleen, pancreas etc Patient of abdominal Koch’s can present as those with a chronic undulating course and those with an acute or subacute abdominal catastrophe. In emergency the patient may present with various presentations like stricture causing obstruction or with perforation and require a different management from those routine such cases Aim and Objective: To study the varied presentation of patients with Abdominal Tuberculosis as acute surgical abdomen presenting in emergency setting to those with a subacute course. To evaluate the line of management whether operative or conservative, the operative details, post operative course and the final outcome of the disease. To study the incidence of HIV positivity in patients with abdominal tuberculosis. Methods and material: The study was designed as a prospective observational study conducted during a study period between June 2006 and June 2008 in a tertiary care centre in Mumbai. All patients with a clinical suspicion of abdominal tuberculosis were included in the study with confirmation on histopathological examination. Patient’s written informed valid consent was taken after explaining the nature of study. Result and Conclusion: Age group commonly affected was between 21-30 years with male predominance. Amongst the various complications of abdominal tuberculosis intestinal obstruction was the most common mainly due to stricture and less commonly due to hyperplastic ileocaecal mass. Next common complication observed was free perforation of the intestine which occurs at a site proximal to a tight stricture. All patients were

  9. Race and acute abdominal pain in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperell, Kerry; Pitetti, Raymond; Cross, Keith P

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the demographic and clinical factors of children who present to the pediatric emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain and their outcomes. A review of the electronic medical record of patients 1 to 18 years old, who presented to the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh ED with a complaint of abdominal pain over the course of 2 years, was conducted. Demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as visit outcomes, were reviewed. Subjects were grouped by age, race, and gender. Results of evaluation, treatment, and clinical outcomes were compared between groups by using multivariate analysis and recursive partitioning. There were 9424 patient visits during the study period that met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Female gender comprised 61% of African American children compared with 52% of white children. Insurance was characterized as private for 75% of white and 37% of African American children. A diagnosis of appendicitis was present in 1.9% of African American children and 5.1% of white children. Older children were more likely to be admitted and have an operation associated with their ED visit. Appendicitis was uncommon in younger children. Constipation was commonly diagnosed. Multivariate analysis by diagnosis as well as recursive partitioning analysis did not reflect any racial differences in evaluation, treatment, or outcome. Constipation is the most common diagnosis in children presenting with abdominal pain. Our data demonstrate that no racial differences exist in the evaluation, treatment, and disposition of children with abdominal pain.

  10. Value of abdominal CT in the emergency department for patients with abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, Max P.; Siewert, Bettina; Bromberg, Rebecca; Raptopoulos, Vassilios; Sands, Daniel Z.; Edlow, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our study is to demonstrate the value of CT in the emergency department (ED) for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. Between August 1998 and April 1999, 536 consecutive patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain were entered into our study. Using a computer order entry system, physicians were asked to identify: (a) their most likely diagnosis; (b) their level of certainty in their diagnosis; (c) if they thought CT would be normal or abnormal; (d) their treatment plan (prior to knowledge of the CT results); and (e) their role in deciding to order CT. This information was correlated with each patient's post-CT diagnosis and subsequent management. Pre- and post-CT diagnoses were concordant in 200 of 536 (37%) patients. The physicians' certainty in the accuracy of their pre-CT diagnosis was less than high in 88% of patients. Prior to CT, the management plan included hospital admission for 402 patients. Following CT, only 312 patients were actually admitted; thus, the net impact of performing CT was to obviate the need for hospital admission in 90 of 536 (17%) of patients with abdominal pain. Prior to CT, 67 of 536 (13%) of all patients would have undergone immediate surgery; however, following CT only 25 (5%) actually required immediate surgery. Among patients with the four most common pre-CT diagnoses (appendicitis, abscess, diverticulitis, and urinary tract stones) CT had the greatest impact on hospital admission and surgical management for patients with suspected appendicitis. For patients with suspected appendicitis, CT reduced the hospital admission rate in 28% (26 of 91) of patients and changed the surgical management in 40% (39 of 91) of patients. Our study demonstrates the advantage of performing abdominal CT in the ED for patients with non-traumatic abdominal pain. (orig.)

  11. Comparative study between ultrasound guided tap block and paravertebral block in upper abdominal surgeries. Randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaya M. Elsayed

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We concluded that ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane block and thoracic paravertebral block were safe and effective anesthetic technique for upper abdominal surgery with longer and potent postoperative analgesia in thoracic paravertebral block than transversus abdominis block.

  12. Transfer Learning with Convolutional Neural Networks for Classification of Abdominal Ultrasound Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Phillip M; Malhi, Harshawn S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate transfer learning with deep convolutional neural networks for the classification of abdominal ultrasound images. Grayscale images from 185 consecutive clinical abdominal ultrasound studies were categorized into 11 categories based on the text annotation specified by the technologist for the image. Cropped images were rescaled to 256 × 256 resolution and randomized, with 4094 images from 136 studies constituting the training set, and 1423 images from 49 studies constituting the test set. The fully connected layers of two convolutional neural networks based on CaffeNet and VGGNet, previously trained on the 2012 Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge data set, were retrained on the training set. Weights in the convolutional layers of each network were frozen to serve as fixed feature extractors. Accuracy on the test set was evaluated for each network. A radiologist experienced in abdominal ultrasound also independently classified the images in the test set into the same 11 categories. The CaffeNet network classified 77.3% of the test set images accurately (1100/1423 images), with a top-2 accuracy of 90.4% (1287/1423 images). The larger VGGNet network classified 77.9% of the test set accurately (1109/1423 images), with a top-2 accuracy of VGGNet was 89.7% (1276/1423 images). The radiologist classified 71.7% of the test set images correctly (1020/1423 images). The differences in classification accuracies between both neural networks and the radiologist were statistically significant (p convolutional neural networks may be used to construct effective classifiers for abdominal ultrasound images.

  13. Can sonographers offer an accurate upper abdominal ultrasound service in a district general hospital?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dongola, N.A.; Guy, R.L.; Giles, J.A.; Ward, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of upper abdominal ultrasound (US) scanning performed by sonographers in a district general hospital, to identify potential areas of weakness and to make recommendations to improve the service. Materials and methods: Upper abdominal US examinations performed and reported by sonographers over a 4-week period were retrospectively reviewed. The accuracy of the imaging findings and reports were assessed against other imaging, surgical, histological or laboratory findings and against clinical outcome. Results: A heterogenous group of 104 patients were included in the study, 62 of whom had an US abnormality. Errors of scanning or interpretation were identified in 10 patients (9.6%) of whom five (4.8%) were felt to be potentially significant. Conclusions: The sonographers' accuracy in reporting upper abdominal US scans was 90%. However, on the basis of this study we have implemented specific recommendations to improve the quality of the service

  14. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  15. Abdominal emergencies after liver transplantation: Presentation and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaretti, Manuela; Dioguardi Burgio, Marco; Zarzavadjian Le Bian, Alban

    2017-11-01

    With an increasing number of liver transplantation (LT) and an enhanced overall survival, LT recipients are more likely to be admitted in emergency departments of general hospitals. Yet, in LT recipients, common but also benign symptoms may reveal a LT-related (or not) severe condition. To improve management of LT recipients by emergency physicians and general surgeons and potentially improve long-term outcomes, a clinical review was performed. Overall, CT scan and blood tests should be systematically performed. Immunosuppressive side effects should be excluded using blood tests. LT-related complications are more likely to occur during the first three months after LT, including mainly bile leak, arterial aneurysm, and pseudoaneurysm. Patients should be referred in emergency to tertiary centers. Non-LT-related complications and common abdominal conditions may also be diagnosed in LT recipients. Except in case of diffuse peritonitis or in hemodynamically unstable patients when surgical procedure should be performed, most conditions should be reassessed regarding the immunosuppressive treatment and the adhesive abdominal cavity. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Hemorrhagic episodes in hemophiliacs stimulating abdominal surgical emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabie, Mohammad E.; Al-Tayeb, Abdul-Rehman E.; Zafer, Mubarak H.; Seikha, Anwar A.

    2004-01-01

    Hemophiliacs are subjected to develop episodes of spontaneous bleeding at different sites of the body, primarily the knees. On occasions such episodes affect the abdomen. The picture engendered in such cases may mimic that of an abdominal emergency requiring surgical intervention.Such ill advised and unwarranted intervention may end with the patient's death.With the proper emloyment of radiology, the correct diagonosis may be reached and consequently, conservative treatment, in which factor VIII plays the major role, instituted. Here we describe the clinical course of two patients with hemophilia A who suffered bleeding in the abdomen and were treated conservatively with a successfull outcome. (author)

  17. A comparison of the accuracy of ultrasound and computed tomography in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randen, Adrienne van; Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (suite G1-227), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lameris, Wytze; Boermeester, Marja A. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Es, H.W. van; Heesewijk, Hans P.M. van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ramshorst, Bert van [St Antonius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Hove, Wim ten [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Bouma, Willem H. [Gelre Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Apeldoorn (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Maarten S. van [University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Keulen, Esteban M. van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Radiology, Hilversum (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Bioinformatics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-07-15

    Head-to-head comparison of ultrasound and CT accuracy in common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Consecutive patients with abdominal pain for >2 h and <5 days referred for imaging underwent both US and CT by different radiologists/radiological residents. An expert panel assigned a final diagnosis. Ultrasound and CT sensitivity and predictive values were calculated for frequent final diagnoses. Effect of patient characteristics and observer experience on ultrasound sensitivity was studied. Frequent final diagnoses in the 1,021 patients (mean age 47; 55% female) were appendicitis (284; 28%), diverticulitis (118; 12%) and cholecystitis (52; 5%). The sensitivity of CT in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was significantly higher than that of ultrasound: 94% versus 76% (p < 0.01) and 81% versus 61% (p = 0.048), respectively. For cholecystitis, the sensitivity of both was 73% (p = 1.00). Positive predictive values did not differ significantly between ultrasound and CT for these conditions. Ultrasound sensitivity in detecting appendicitis and diverticulitis was not significantly negatively affected by patient characteristics or reader experience. CT misses fewer cases than ultrasound, but both ultrasound and CT can reliably detect common diagnoses causing acute abdominal pain. Ultrasound sensitivity was largely not influenced by patient characteristics and reader experience. (orig.)

  18. Acute abdominal emergencies: What radiologist have to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text: Acute abdominal pathology is an important cause of emergency admissions, generally putting pressure to obtain a quick and correct diagnosis. This may lead to the simultaneous use of concurrent imaging techniques, where the diagnostic accuracy may be operator dependent. It is important to the radiologist to understand how, when and why medical imaging should be used for each clinical context under appreciation. Imaging protocols should be optimally set in order not to miss the most important, bur subtle diagnostic signs. Radiologist should be conversant in all aspects of this emergency situation including the ability to provide minimally invasive treatment option, such as access drainage or vascular embolization. Although multidetector computed tomography is considered the workhorse in the diagnostic management, imaging alternatives must be kept in mind, especially tailored to the available equipment and the experience of the investigator team. Learning objectives: to describe the advantages and shortcomings of the different imaging techniques; to understand the value of the diagnostic information and the way this can change patient management; to describe and propose an effective diagnostic imaging strategy for the assessment of acute abdominal pain

  19. Value of Abdominal Radiography, Colonic Transit Time, and Rectal Ultrasound Scanning in the Diagnosis of Idiopathic Constipation in Children : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, Marjolein Y.; Tabbers, Merit M.; Kurver, Miranda J.; Boluyt, Nicole; Benninga, Marc A.

    Objective To perform a systematic review evaluating the value of abdominal radiography, colonic transit time (CTT), and rectal ultrasound scanning in the diagnosis of idiopathic constipation in children. Study design Eligible studies were those assessing diagnostic accuracy of abdominal radiography,

  20. Is It Worthwhile to Fully Evaluate the Stomach in Every Ultrasound Examination of the Abdominal Cavity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goudarzi, M.; Navabi, J.; Salimi, Gh.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of abdominal sonography in the fasting state with no hypotonic agents in the detection and exclusion of gastric lesions. One-hundred patients with normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 94 patients with a major gastric abnormality (including 59 intraluminal tumors, three submucosal masses, 29 ulcers, two polyps and one hypertrophied gastric mucosa) and 75 patients with minor gastric abnormalities (mainly gastritis) were enrolled into the study. Of the 100 normal patients, ultrasound showed four false positive results with 96% specificity of the examination. Within the major gastric lesion group, ultrasound was true positive in 55 of 59 tumors, 15 of 29 ulcers, three of three submucosal masses and the case of giant gastric mucosa. It was negative in the detection of gastric polyps. It could detect only 8% of minor gastric abnormalities. Abdominal sonography in the fasting state, if carefully performed, is sufficiently accurate in detection and exclusion of major gastric lesions. Therefore, although it cannot replace endoscopic and barium studies of the stomach, careful evaluation of the stomach is recommended in every sonographic evaluation of the abdominal cavity

  1. Interhospital transfer delays emergency abdominal surgery and prolongs stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Alexandra M; Edye, Michael B

    2017-11-01

    Interhospital transfer of patients requiring emergency surgery is common practice. It has the potential to delay surgical intervention, increase rate of complications and thus length of hospital stay. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of adult patients who underwent emergency surgery for abdominal pain at a large metropolitan hospital in New South Wales (Hospital A) in 2013. The impact of interhospital transfer on time to surgical intervention, post-operative length of stay and overall length of stay was assessed. Of the 910 adult patients who underwent emergency surgery for abdominal pain at Hospital A in 2013, 31.9% (n = 290) were transferred by road ambulance from a local district hospital (Hospital B). The leading surgical procedures performed were appendicectomy (n = 299, 32.9%), cholecystectomy (n = 174, 19.1%), gastrointestinal endoscopy (n = 95, 10.4%), cystoscopy (n = 86, 9.5%), hernia repair (n = 45, 4.9%), salpingectomy (n = 19, 2.1%) and oversewing of perforated peptic ulcer (n = 13, 1.4%). Overall, interhospital transfer (n = 290, 31.9%) was associated with increases in mean time to surgical intervention (14.2 h, P < 0.001), post-operative length of stay (1.1 days, P = 0.001) and overall length of stay (1.6 days, P < 0.001). Delayed surgical intervention was observed across all procedure types except surgery for perforated peptic ulcer, where transferred patients underwent surgery within a comparable timeframe to direct admissions. Interhospital transfer delays surgical intervention and increases length of hospital stay. This mandates attention due to the implications for patient outcomes and added burden to the healthcare system. The system did, however, show capability to appropriately expedite surgery for acutely life-threatening cases. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  2. Financial impact of emergency department ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soremekun, Olanrewaju A; Noble, Vicki E; Liteplo, Andrew S; Brown, David F M; Zane, Richard D

    2009-07-01

    There is limited information on the financial implications of an emergency department ultrasound (ED US) program. The authors sought to perform a fiscal analysis of an integrated ED US program. A retrospective review of billing data was performed for fiscal year (FY) 2007 for an urban academic ED with an ED US program. The ED had an annual census of 80,000 visits and 1,101 ED trauma activations. The ED is a core teaching site for a 4-year emergency medicine (EM) residency, has 35 faculty members, and has 24-hour availability of all radiology services including formal US. ED US is utilized as part of evaluation of all trauma activations and for ED procedures. As actual billing charges and reimbursement rates are institution-specific and proprietary information, relative value units (RVUs) and reimbursement based on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) 2007 fee schedule (adjusted for fixed diagnosis-related group [DRG] payments and bad debt) was used to determine revenue generated from ED US. To estimate potential volume, assumptions were made on improvement in documentation rate for diagnostic scans (current documentation rates based on billed volume versus diagnostic studies in diagnostic image database), with no improvements assumed for procedural ED US. Expenses consist of three components-capital costs, training costs, and ongoing operational costs-and were determined by institutional experience. Training costs were considered sunken expenses by this institution and were thus not included in the original return on investment (ROI) calculation, although for this article a second ROI calculation was done with training cost estimates included. For the purposes of analysis, certain key assumptions were made. We utilized a collection rate of 45% and hospitalization rates (used to adjust for fixed DRG payments) of 33% for all diagnostic scans, 100% for vascular access, and 10% for needle placement. An optimal documentation rate of 95% was used to

  3. Correlation between Abdominal Fat Amount and Fatty Liver, using Liver to Kidney Echo Ratio on Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yanhg Shin; Lee, Chang Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Lee, Jong Mee; Choi, Jae Woong; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min [Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    It has been generally recognized that fatty liver can often be seen in the obese population. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the association between fatty liver and abdominal fat volume. A total of 105 patients who visited our obesity clinic in the recent three years underwent fat CT scans and abdominal US. Attenuation difference between liver and spleen on CT was considered as a reference standard for the diagnosis of fatty liver. On US, the echogenicity of the liver parenchyma was measured in three different regions of interest (ROI) close to the adjacent right kidney in the same slice, avoiding vessels, bile duct, and calcification. Similar measurements were performed in the right renal cortex. The mean values were calculated automatically on the histogram of the ROI using the PACS program. The hepatorenal echogenicity ratio (HER; mean hepatic echogenicity/ mean renal echogenicity) was then calculated. Abdominal fat volume was measured using a 3 mm slice CT scan at the L4/5 level and was calculated automatically using a workstation. Abdominal fat was classified according to total fat (TF), visceral fat (VF), and subcutaneous fat (SF). We used Pearson's bivariate correlation method for assessment of the correlation between HER and TF, VF, and SF, respectively. Significant correlation was observed between HER and abdominal fat (TF, VF, and SF). HER showed significant correlation with VF and TF (r = 0.491 and 0.402, respectively; p = 0.000). The correlation between HER and SF (r = 0.255, p = 0.009) was less significant than for VF or TF. Fat measurement (HER) by hepatic ultrasound correlated well with the amount of abdominal fat. In particular, the VF was found to show a stronger association with fatty liver than SF.

  4. Correlation between Abdominal Fat Amount and Fatty Liver, using Liver to Kidney Echo Ratio on Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yanhg Shin; Lee, Chang Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Lee, Jong Mee; Choi, Jae Woong; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min

    2012-01-01

    It has been generally recognized that fatty liver can often be seen in the obese population. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the association between fatty liver and abdominal fat volume. A total of 105 patients who visited our obesity clinic in the recent three years underwent fat CT scans and abdominal US. Attenuation difference between liver and spleen on CT was considered as a reference standard for the diagnosis of fatty liver. On US, the echogenicity of the liver parenchyma was measured in three different regions of interest (ROI) close to the adjacent right kidney in the same slice, avoiding vessels, bile duct, and calcification. Similar measurements were performed in the right renal cortex. The mean values were calculated automatically on the histogram of the ROI using the PACS program. The hepatorenal echogenicity ratio (HER; mean hepatic echogenicity/ mean renal echogenicity) was then calculated. Abdominal fat volume was measured using a 3 mm slice CT scan at the L4/5 level and was calculated automatically using a workstation. Abdominal fat was classified according to total fat (TF), visceral fat (VF), and subcutaneous fat (SF). We used Pearson's bivariate correlation method for assessment of the correlation between HER and TF, VF, and SF, respectively. Significant correlation was observed between HER and abdominal fat (TF, VF, and SF). HER showed significant correlation with VF and TF (r = 0.491 and 0.402, respectively; p = 0.000). The correlation between HER and SF (r = 0.255, p = 0.009) was less significant than for VF or TF. Fat measurement (HER) by hepatic ultrasound correlated well with the amount of abdominal fat. In particular, the VF was found to show a stronger association with fatty liver than SF.

  5. Investigation of childhood blunt abdominal trauma: A practical approach using ultrasound as the initial diagnostic modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filiatrault, D.; Longpre, D.; Patriquin, H.; Perreault, G.; Grignon, A.; Pronovost, J.; Boisvert, J.

    1987-01-01

    During a 5.5-year retrospective study (1979-84) 170 children with blunt abdominal trauma were investigated with intravenous urography (IVU), ultrasound (US) and scintigraphy. For the investigation of the last 71 children (after 1982) a 4th generation CT scanner was available in the same department. The results of radiologic investigations were compared with clinical outcome in 157 and results at laparotomy in 13 children. During the study period, real time US became the first line screening tool, and was combined with IVU in suspected renal trauma. In spite of permanent accessibility of CT since November 1982, the latter was used only in complex diagnostic problems or in children with multiple injuries (8% of the series). There were no deaths resulting from abdominal trauma. During the study, the incidence of splenectomy and exploratory laparotomy decreased, and no diagnostic peritoneal lavage was performed after 1980. (orig.)

  6. Reliability of ultrasound thickness measurement of the abdominal muscles during clinical isometric endurance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ShahAli, Shabnam; Arab, Amir Massoud; Talebian, Saeed; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil; Bahmani, Andia; Karimi, Noureddin; Nabavi, Hoda

    2015-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the intra-examiner reliability of ultrasound (US) thickness measurement of abdominal muscles activity when supine lying and during two isometric endurance tests in subjects with and without Low back pain (LBP). A total of 19 women (9 with LBP, 10 without LBP) participated in the study. Within-day reliability of the US thickness measurements at supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests were assessed in all subjects. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess the relative reliability of thickness measurement. The standard error of measurement (SEM), minimal detectable change (MDC) and the coefficient of variation (CV) were used to evaluate the absolute reliability. Results indicated high ICC scores (0.73-0.99) and also small SEM and MDC scores for within-day reliability assessment. The Bland-Altman plots of agreement in US measurement of the abdominal muscles during the two isometric endurance tests demonstrated that 95% of the observations fall between the limits of agreement for test and retest measurements. Together the results indicate high intra-tester reliability for the US measurement of the thickness of abdominal muscles in all the positions tested. According to the study's findings, US imaging can be used as a reliable method for assessment of abdominal muscles activity in supine lying and the two isometric endurance tests employed, in participants with and without LBP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Follow-up on Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Three Dimensional Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghulam, Q. M.; Bredahl, K. K.; Lönn, L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Rupture risk in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) is assessed using AAA diameter; yet 10% of ruptures occur in a small aneurysm. This underlines the inadequacy of diameter as a standalone parameter. In this prospective follow-up study, ultrasound determined aneurysm diameter was compared...... with aneurysm volume determined by three dimensional ultrasound (3D-US) in a group of 179 AAAs. Design This was a prospective cohort study with repeated diameter and volume measurements by 3D-US. Material and methods In total, 179 patients with small infrarenal AAAs (diameter 30–55 mm) were enrolled......L) were recorded. In post-hoc analysis, it was found that more AAAs with a stable diameter and a growing volume than AAAs with a stable diameter and volume were undergoing aortic repair during follow-up, based on the maximum diameter. Conclusion In this cohort of small AAAs, 40% of patients with a stable...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  9. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6 who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US guidance group (n=75. All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3% and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7% and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7% major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%. The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%. Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Feng; Dong, Yi; Ji, Zhengbiao; Cao, Jiaying; Wang, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6) who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US) guidance group ( n = 75). All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3%) and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm) nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7%) and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7%) major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%). The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%). Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management.

  11. Emergency Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms: Feasibility and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagana, Domenico; Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Mangini, Monica; Fontana, Federico; Caronno, Roberto; Castelli, Patrizio; Cuffari, Salvatore; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of emergency endovascular treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs). Methods. During 36 months we treated, on an emergency basis, 30 AAAs with endovascular exclusion. In 21 hemodynamically stable patients preoperative CT angiography (CTA) was performed to confirm the diagnosis and to plan the treatment; 9 patients with hemorrhagic shock were evaluated with angiography performed in the operating room. Twenty-two Excluder (Gore) and 8 Zenith (Cook) stent-grafts (25 bifurcated and 5 aorto-uni-iliac) were used. The follow-up was performed by CTA at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Technical success was achieved in 100% of cases with a 10% mortality rate. The total complication rate was 23% (5 increases in serum creatinine level and 2 wound infections). During the follow-up, performed in 27 patients (1-36 months, mean 15.2 months), 4 secondary endoleaks (15%) (3 type II, 2 spontaneously thrombosed and 1 under observation, and 1 type III treated by iliac extender insertion) and 1 iliac leg occlusion (treated with femoro-femoral bypass) occurred. We observed a shrinkage of the aneurysmal sac in 8 of 27 cases and stability in 19 of 27 cases; we did not observe any endotension. Conclusions. Endovascular repair is a good option for emergency treatment of AAAs. The team's experience allows correct planning of the procedure in emergency situations also, with technical results comparable with elective repair. In our experience the bifurcated stent-graft is the device of choice in patients with suitable anatomy because the procedure is less time-consuming than aorto-uni-iliac stent-grafting with surgical crossover, allowing faster aneurysm exclusion. However, further studies are required to demonstrate the long-term efficacy of endovascular repair compared with surgical treatment

  12. Who should be performing routine abdominal ultrasound? A prospective double-blind study comparing the accuracy of radiologist and radiographer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, A.; Lockyer, H.; Virjee, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To compare the accuracy of radiographers and radiologists in routine abdominal ultrasound. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred consecutive patients attending for routine abdominal ultrasound were included. Each patient was examined by both a radiographer and radiologist. Both operators noted their findings and wrote a concluding report without conferring. Reports were compared. Where there was disagreement the patient was either re-examined by another radiologist or had further investigation. RESULTS: Of 100 patients, 52 were men and 48 were women. The age range was 19-88 years (median 52 years). Thirty-seven patients had renal tract ultrasound, one had an aortic ultrasound and 62 had general upper abdominal ultrasound. In 44 cases both operators reported the examination as normal. In 49 cases both operators reported the examinations as abnormal and there was complete agreement between the operators. In seven cases there was not complete agreement between operators. Three of these disagreements were considered minor and four major. In three of the seven cases the radiographer was correct, and in four the radiologist was correct. CONCLUSION: Experienced radiographers and radiologists are highly accurate in performing and interpreting routine abdominal sonography. Both operators missed a small minority of abnormalities. There was no statistically significant difference in the accuracy of radiographers and radiologist. Leslie, A. (2000)

  13. 12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Yahya; Tezel, Onur; Salman, Necati; Cevik, Erdem; Algaba-Montes, Margarita; Oviedo-García, Alberto; Patricio-Bordomás, Mayra; Mahmoud, Mustafa Z; Sulieman, Abdelmoneim; Ali, Abbas; Mustafa, Alrayah; Abdelrahman, Ihab; Bahar, Mustafa; Ali, Osama; Lester Kirchner, H; Prosen, Gregor; Anzic, Ajda; Leeson, Paul; Bahreini, Maryam; Rasooli, Fatemeh; Hosseinnejad, Houman; Blecher, Gabriel; Meek, Robert; Egerton-Warburton, Diana; Ćuti, Edina Ćatić; Belina, Stanko; Vančina, Tihomir; Kovačević, Idriz; Rustemović, Nadan; Chang, Ikwan; Lee, Jin Hee; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Cheng, Chi-Yung; Pan, Hsiu-Yung; Kung, Chia-Te; Ćurčić, Ela; Pritišanac, Ena; Planinc, Ivo; Medić, Marijana Grgić; Radonić, Radovan; Fasina, Abiola; Dean, Anthony J; Panebianco, Nova L; Henwood, Patricia S; Fochi, Oliviero; Favarato, Moreno; Bonanomi, Ezio; Tomić, Ivan; Ha, Youngrock; Toh, Hongchuen; Harmon, Elizabeth; Chan, Wilma; Baston, Cameron; Morrison, Gail; Shofer, Frances; Hua, Angela; Kim, Sharon; Tsung, James; Gunaydin, Isa; Kekec, Zeynep; Ay, Mehmet Oguzhan; Kim, Jinjoo; Kim, Jinhyun; Choi, Gyoosung; Shim, Dowon; Lee, Ji-Han; Ambrozic, Jana; Prokselj, Katja; Lucovnik, Miha; Simenc, Gabrijela Brzan; Mačiulienė, Asta; Maleckas, Almantas; Kriščiukaitis, Algimantas; Mačiulis, Vytautas; Macas, Andrius; Mohite, Sharad; Narancsik, Zoltan; Možina, Hugon; Nikolić, Sara; Hansel, Jan; Petrovčič, Rok; Mršić, Una; Orlob, Simon; Lerchbaumer, Markus; Schönegger, Niklas; Kaufmann, Reinhard; Pan, Chun-I; Wu, Chien-Hung; Pasquale, Sarah; Doniger, Stephanie J; Yellin, Sharon; Chiricolo, Gerardo; Potisek, Maja; Drnovšek, Borut; Leskovar, Boštjan; Robinson, Kristine; Kraft, Clara; Moser, Benjamin; Davis, Stephen; Layman, Shelley; Sayeed, Yusef; Minardi, Joseph; Pasic, Irmina Sefic; Dzananovic, Amra; Pasic, Anes; Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Hauptman, Ana Godan; Brajkovic, Ana Vujaklija; Babel, Jaksa; Peklic, Marina; Radonic, Vedran; Bielen, Luka; Ming, Peh Wee; Yezid, Nur Hafiza; Mohammed, Fatahul Laham; Huda, Zainal Abidin; Ismail, Wan Nasarudin Wan; Isa, W Yus Haniff W; Fauzi, Hashairi; Seeva, Praveena; Mazlan, Mohd Zulfakar

    2016-09-01

    A1 Point-of-care ultrasound examination of cervical spine in emergency departmentYahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati SalmanA2 A new technique in verifying the placement of a nasogastric tube: obtaining the longitudinal view of nasogastric tube in addition to transverse view with ultrasoundYahya Acar, Necati Salman, Onur Tezel, Erdem CevikA3 Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cannulation of a central venous line. Should we always use ultrasound in these procedures?Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA4 Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization. A novel approach in emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA5 Clinical ultrasound in a septic and jaundice patient in the emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA6 Characterization of the eyes in preoperative cataract Saudi patients by using medical diagnostic ultrasoundMustafa Z. Mahmoud, Abdelmoneim SuliemanA7 High-frequency ultrasound in determining the causes of acute shoulder joint painMustafa Z. MahmoudA8 Teaching WINFOCUS Ultrasound Life Support Basic Level 1 for Providers in resource-limited countriesAbbas Ali, Alrayah Mustafa, Ihab Abdelrahman, Mustafa Bahar, Osama Ali, H. Lester Kirchner, Gregor ProsenA9 Changes of arterial stiffness and endothelial function during uncomplicated pregnancyAjda Anzic, Paul LeesonA10 Cardiovascular haemodynamic properties before, during and after pregnancyAjda Anzic, Paul LeesonA11 An old man with generalized weaknessMaryam Bahreini, Fatemeh RasooliA12 Ultrasonography for non-specific presentations of abdominal painMaryam Bahreini, Houman HosseinnejadA13 Introduction of a new imaging guideline for suspected renal colic in the emergency department: effect on CT Urogram utilisationGabriel Blecher, Robert Meek, Diana Egerton-WarburtonA14 Transabdominal ultrasound screening for pancreatic cancer in Croatian military

  14. Usefulness of emergency ultrasound in nontraumatic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpicelli, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Treatment of nontraumatic cardiac arrest in the hospital setting depends on the recognition of heart rhythm and differential diagnosis of the underlying condition while maintaining a constant oxygenated blood flow by ventilation and chest compression. Diagnostic process relies only on patient's history, physical findings, and active electrocardiography. Ultrasound is not currently scheduled in the resuscitation guidelines. Nevertheless, the use of real-time ultrasonography during resuscitation has the potential to improve diagnostic accuracy and allows the physician a greater confidence in deciding aggressive life-saving therapeutic procedures. This article reviews the current opinions and literature about the use of emergency ultrasound during resuscitation of nontraumatic cardiac arrest. Cardiac and lung ultrasound have a great potential in identifying the reversible mechanical causes of pulseless electrical activity or asystole. Brief examination of the heart can even detect a real cardiac standstill regardless of electrical activity displayed on the monitor, which is a crucial prognostic indicator. Moreover, ultrasound can be useful to verify and monitor the tracheal tube placement. Limitation to the use of ultrasound is the need to minimize the no-flow intervals during mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation. However, real-time ultrasound can be successfully applied during brief pausing of chest compression and first pulse-check. Finally, lung sonographic examination targeted to the detection of signs of pulmonary congestion has the potential to allow hemodynamic noninvasive monitoring before and after mechanical cardiopulmonary maneuvers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Malformations detected by abdominal ultrasound in children with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rosana Cardoso Manique; Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Flores, José Antônio Monteiro; Golendziner, Eliete; Oliveira, Ceres Andréia Vieira de; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola

    2012-12-01

    Extracardiac malformations may be present in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), bringing greater risk of comorbidity and mortality. Verify frequency and types of abdominal abnormalities detected in children with and without CHD through abdominal ultrasound (AUS), compare the patients in relation to their dysmorphic/cytogenetic findings and perform an estimative of the cost-effectiveness of the screening through AUS. We conducted a cross-sectional study with a control cohort. The cases consisted of patients with CHD admitted for the first time in a pediatric intensive care unit; the controls consisted of children without CHD who underwent AUS at the hospital shortly thereafter a case. All patients with CHD underwent AUS, high-resolution karyotype and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for microdeletion 22q11.2. AUS identified clinically significant abnormalities in 12.2% of the cases and 5.2% of controls (p= 0.009), with a power of significance of 76.6%. Most malformations with clinical significance were renal anomalies (10.4% in cases and 4.9% in controls; p= 0.034). In Brazil, the cost of an AUS examination for the Unified Health System is US$ 21. Since clinically significant abnormalities were observed in one in every 8.2 CHD patients, the cost to identify an affected child was calculated as approximately US$ 176. Patients with CHD present a significant frequency of abdominal abnormalities detected by AUS, an inexpensive and noninvasive diagnostic method with good sensitivity. The cost of screening for these defects is considerably lower than the cost to treat the complications of late diagnoses of abdominal malformations such as renal disease.

  16. [When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Saussure, Wassila Oulhaci; Andereggen, Elisabeth; Sarasin, François

    2010-08-25

    When should a patient with abdominal pain be referred to the emergency ward? The following goals must be achieved upon managing patients with acute abdominal pain: 1) identify vital emergency situations; 2) detect surgical conditions that require emergency referral without further diagnostic procedures; 3) in "non surgical acute abdomen patients" perform appropriate diagnostic procedures, or in selected cases delay tests and reevaluate the patient after an observation period, after which a referral decision is made. Clues from the history and physical examination are critical to perform this evaluation. A good knowledge of the most frequent acute abdominal conditions, and identifying potential severity criteria allow an appropriate management and decision about emergency referral.

  17. Association of splenic and renal infarctions in acute abdominal emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania E-mail: stefromano@libero.it; Scaglione, Mariano; Gatta, Gianluca; Lombardo, Patrizia; Stavolo, Ciro; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2004-04-01

    Introduction: Splenic and renal infarctions are usually related to vascular disease or haematologic abnormalities. Their association is infrequent and rarely observed in trauma. In this study, we analyze our data to look at the occurrence of renal and splenic infarctions based on CT findings in a period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of 84 patients admitted to our Department of Diagnostic Imaging from June 1998 to December 2002, who underwent emergency abdominal spiral CT examination and in whom there was evidence of splenic and/or renal infarction. Results: We found 40 cases of splenic infarction and 54 cases of renal infarction, associated in 10 patients. In 26 patients, there was also evidence of intestinal infarction. A traumatic origin was found in 19 cases; non-traumatic causes were found in 65 patients. Association between renal and splenic infarction in the same patient was related to trauma in two cases. Conclusions: Although renal and splenic infarctions are a common manifestation of cardiac thromboembolism, other systemic pathologies, infections or trauma may lead to this occurrence. Renal infarction may be clinically and/or surgically managed with success in most cases. There are potential complications in splenic infarction, such as development of pseudocysts, abscesses, hemorrhage, subcapsular haematoma or splenic rupture; splenectomy in these cases may be necessary. Some patients with splenic and/or renal infarction may be clinically asymptomatic. The high accuracy of CT examination is needed to allow a correct evaluation of infarcted organs.

  18. Association of splenic and renal infarctions in acute abdominal emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano, Stefania; Scaglione, Mariano; Gatta, Gianluca; Lombardo, Patrizia; Stavolo, Ciro; Romano, Luigia; Grassi, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Splenic and renal infarctions are usually related to vascular disease or haematologic abnormalities. Their association is infrequent and rarely observed in trauma. In this study, we analyze our data to look at the occurrence of renal and splenic infarctions based on CT findings in a period of 4 years. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging findings of 84 patients admitted to our Department of Diagnostic Imaging from June 1998 to December 2002, who underwent emergency abdominal spiral CT examination and in whom there was evidence of splenic and/or renal infarction. Results: We found 40 cases of splenic infarction and 54 cases of renal infarction, associated in 10 patients. In 26 patients, there was also evidence of intestinal infarction. A traumatic origin was found in 19 cases; non-traumatic causes were found in 65 patients. Association between renal and splenic infarction in the same patient was related to trauma in two cases. Conclusions: Although renal and splenic infarctions are a common manifestation of cardiac thromboembolism, other systemic pathologies, infections or trauma may lead to this occurrence. Renal infarction may be clinically and/or surgically managed with success in most cases. There are potential complications in splenic infarction, such as development of pseudocysts, abscesses, hemorrhage, subcapsular haematoma or splenic rupture; splenectomy in these cases may be necessary. Some patients with splenic and/or renal infarction may be clinically asymptomatic. The high accuracy of CT examination is needed to allow a correct evaluation of infarcted organs

  19. Standardized cine-loop documentation in abdominal ultrasound facilitates offline image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormagen, Johann Baptist; Gaarder, Mario; Drolsum, Anders

    2015-01-01

    One of the main disadvantages of conventional ultrasound is its operator dependency, which might impede the reproducibility of the sonographic findings. A new approach with cine-loops and standardized scan protocols can overcome this drawback. To compare abdominal ultrasound findings of immediate bedside reading by performing radiologist with offline reading by a non-performing radiologist, using standardized cine-loop sequences. Over a 6-month period, three radiologists performed 140 dynamic ultrasound organ-based examinations in 43 consecutive outpatients. Examination protocols were standardized and included predefined probe position and sequences of short cine-loops of the liver, gallbladder, pancreas, kidneys, and urine bladder, covering the organs completely in two planes. After bedside examinations, the studies were reviewed and read out immediately by the performing radiologist. Image quality was registered from 1 (no diagnostic value) to 5 (excellent cine-loop quality). Offline reading was performed blinded by a radiologist who had not performed the examination. Bedside and offline reading were compared with each other and with consensus results. In 140 examinations, consensus reading revealed 21 cases with renal disorders, 17 cases with liver and bile pathology, and four cases with bladder pathology. Overall inter-observer agreement was 0.73 (95% CI 0.61-0.91), with lowest agreement for findings of the urine bladder (0.36) and highest agreement in liver examinations (0.90). Disagreements between the two readings were seen in nine kidneys, three bladder examinations, one pancreas and bile system examinations each, and in one liver, giving a total number of mismatches of 11%. Nearly all cases of mismatch were of minor clinical significance. The median image quality was 3 (range, 2-5) with most examinations deemed a quality of 3. Compared to consensus reading, overall accuracy was 96% for bedside reading and 94% for offline reading. Standardized cine

  20. Ultrasound assisted evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colony, M Deborah; Edwards, Frank; Kellogg, Dylan

    2018-04-01

    Chest pain is a commonly encountered emergency department complaint, with a broad differential including several life-threatening possible conditions. Ultrasound-assisted evaluation can potentially be used to rapidly and accurately arrive at the correct diagnosis. We propose an organized, ultrasound assisted evaluation of the patient with chest pain using a combination of ultrasound, echocardiography and clinical parameters. Basic echo techniques which can be mastered by residents in a short time are used plus standardized clinical questions and examination. Information is kept on a checklist. We hypothesize that this will result in a quicker, more accurate evaluation of chest pain in the ED leading to timely treatment and disposition of the patient, less provider anxiety, a reduction in the number of diagnostic errors, and the removal of false assumptions from the diagnostic process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Pseudoaneurysm: Is It a Real Emergency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massara, Mafalda; Prunella, Roberto; Gerardi, Pasquale; Lillo, Antonio; De Caridi, Giovanni; Serra, Raffaele; Notarstefano, Stefano; Impedovo, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm is a rare but life-threatening condition that occurs due to penetrating or blunt trauma. Clinical manifestations are variable, and the time interval from the initial trauma to diagnosis is variable. A prompt diagnosis and an aggressive management approach are required to avoid catastrophic complications. Possible treatment options are open surgical repair, endovascular repair, pseudoanerysmal sac thrombosis induction through direct thrombin injection, and coil embolization. Here, we present the case of a 75-year-old man affected by an infrarenal abdominal aortic pseudoaneurysm presenting with abdominal and lumbar pain for 3 days, who was successfully treated with an endograft. PMID:29515707

  2. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound study of the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana D. Guimarães

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the ultrasound characterization of the abdominal and pelvic regions of five maned wolves kept in captivity at the Triage Center of Wild Animals of the Federal University of Viçosa (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres, Universidade Federal de Viçosa. This characterization included descriptions of ultrasonographic aspects and measurements of various structures using B-mode ultrasound. Biometric data were collected to assess the existence of significant linear correlations between these measurements and the measurements obtained by ultrasound. Additionally, hematological and serum biochemistry evaluations of the animals were performed. The ultrasound findings were similar to those available in the literature on domestic dogs, which were used for comparison as a result of the lack of published data regarding maned wolves. The latter species showed characteristics closely resembling those of the former, differing in the spleen and left renal cortex echogenicities, in the appearance of the prostatic and testicular regions and in the hepatic portal vein morphology. In the current study, the biometric values were similar to those previously published; however, no data regarding thoracic perimeter, modified crown-rump length or thoracic depth were found in the literature for this Canidae species. Statistical analysis showed the existence of a strong negative correlation between the modified crown-rump length and left renal length, between the modified crown-rump length and the right renal volume, between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the cranial pole of the left adrenal gland and between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the caudal pole of the left adrenal gland. Laboratory findings, including segmented neutrophil, eosinophil, monocyte and lymphocyte counts and the serum levels of glucose, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, urea, total protein, globulin, creatine phosphokinase, triglyceride, sodium

  3. The feasibility of trans-abdominal biopsy by ultrasound guiding during uterine artery embolization for benign diseases of uterus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Wenbo; Yang Jianyong; Chen Wei; Zhuang Wenquan; Li Heping; Yao Shuzhong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of trans-abdominal biopsy by ultrasound guiding during uterine artery embolization (UAE) for uterine fibroids and adenomyosis. Methods: Trans-abdominal biopsies by ultrasound guiding were performed in 62 cases of uterine fibroids or adenomyosis diagnosed pre-UAE. Multi-points in focus were punctured in single lesion and multi-points in every focus of multiple lesions were punctured. The diagnosis before UAE was made according to clinical symptoms, pelvic ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The pathological diagnosis by biopsy was comparative to its clinical diagnosis before biopsy. The complications were also observed. Results: Biopsies were performed successfully in 60 cases with pathological examination, including 52 uterine fibroids and 8 adenomyosis cases. The clinical diagnosis of uterine fibroids or adenomyosis was coincident with the pathology except 2 cases of fibroids diagnosed before biopsy were failed to puncture. Conclusion: Trans-abdominal biopsy by ultrasound guiding in uterine artery embolization for benign diseases of uterus is safe and feasible. (authors)

  4. Effect of abdominal resistance exercise on abdominal subcutaneous fat of obese women: a randomized controlled trial using ultrasound imaging assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Ramin; Dehghani, Saeed; Noormohammadpour, Pardis; Rostami, Mohsen; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of diet and an abdominal resistance training program to diet alone on abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness and waist circumference of overweight and obese women. This randomized clinical trial included 40 overweight and obese women randomly divided into 2 groups: diet only and diet combined with 12 weeks of abdominal resistance training. Waist and hip circumferences and abdominal skin folds of the subjects were measured at the beginning and 12 weeks after the interventions. In addition, abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness of the subjects was measured using ultrasonography. Percentage body fat and lean body mass of all the subjects were also measured using a bioelectric impedance device. After 12 weeks of intervention, the weight of participants in both groups decreased; but the difference between the 2 groups was not significant (P = .45). Similarly, other variables including abdominal subcutaneous fat, waist circumference, hip circumference, body mass index, body fat percentage, and skin fold thickness were reduced in both groups; but there were no significant differences between the groups. This study found that abdominal resistance training besides diet did not reduce abdominal subcutaneous fat thickness compared to diet alone in overweight or obese women. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients' experiences of postoperative intermediate care and standard surgical ward care after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thordis; Vester-Andersen, Morten; Nielsen, Martin Vedel

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how patie......, intermediate care patients felt hindered in doing so by continuous monitoring of vital signs. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Intermediate care may increase patient perceptions of quality and safety of care.......AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To elicit knowledge of patient experiences of postoperative intermediate care in an intensive care unit and standard postoperative care in a surgical ward after emergency abdominal surgery. BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery is common, but little is known about how...... patients experience postoperative care. The patient population is generally older with multiple comorbidities, and the short-term postoperative mortality rate is 15-20%. Thus, vigilant surgeon and nursing attention is essential. The present study is a qualitative sub-study of a randomised trial evaluating...

  6. Achados ultra-sonográficos abdominais em pacientes com dengue Abdominal ultrasound findings in patients with dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Amaral do Vabo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar os achados ultra-sonográficos abdominais em pacientes com dengue e compará-los aos descritos na literatura. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Foram realizados exames ultra-sonográficos abdominais de 38 pacientes, 25 do sexo feminino e 13 do sexo masculino, com idade média de 35 anos, com diagnóstico de dengue sorologicamente confirmado. Os achados foram comparados com os descritos na literatura. RESULTADOS: Os achados ultra-sonográficos mais relevantes foram espessamento difuso da parede da vesícula biliar em 18 casos (47,4%, líquido livre na cavidade abdominal e/ou pélvica em 12 (31,6%, esplenomegalia em 11 (28,9%, hepatomegalia em 10 (26,3% e líquido pericolecístico em 10 (26,3%. Vinte e seis por cento dos pacientes apresentaram exames ultra-sonográficos normais. CONCLUSÃO: Os achados ultra-sonográficos abdominais são uma ferramenta adicional útil na confirmação de casos suspeitos de dengue hemorrágica e na detecção precoce da gravidade e da progressão da doença, sendo de extrema importância para o radiologista o conhecimento destes possíveis achados.OBJECTIVE: To review the abdominal ultrasound findings in patients with serologically proven dengue fever and to compare the results with data from the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients with serologically proven dengue fever, 25 female and 13 male, mean age of 35 years, were submitted to abdominal ultrasound. The ultrasound findings were compared with data from the literature. RESULTS: The most relevant ultrasound findings were diffuse gallbladder wall thickening in 18 cases (47.4%, abdominal and/or pelvic free fluid in 12 (31.6%, splenomegaly in 11 (28.9%, hepatomegaly in 10 (26.3% and perivesicular fluid in 10 (26.3%. Twenty-six percent of the patients had normal abdominal ultrasound. CONCLUSION: Abdominal sonography is a useful additional diagnostic tool for the confirmation of suspected cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and for the

  7. Superior Reproducibility of the Leading to Leading Edge and Inner to Inner Edge Methods in the Ultrasound Assessment of Maximum Abdominal Aortic Diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Bøgsted, Martin; Lindholt, Jes S

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Controversy exists regarding optimal caliper placement in ultrasound assessment of maximum abdominal aortic diameter. This study aimed primarily to determine reproducibility of caliper placement in relation to the aortic wall with the three principal methods: leading to leading edge...

  8. Paediatric surgical abdominal emergencies in a north central ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5 days of onset of symptoms with abdominal pain/distension and/or vomiting as chief complaint. Fourteen (63.7%) of .... one was a duodenal perforation (in addition to rib and femoral fracture), one was an ileal perforation and one was a right ...

  9. Ultrasound measurements of visceral and subcutaneous abdominal thickness to predict abdominal adiposity among older men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolfe, Ema De Lucia; Sleigh, Alison; Finucane, Francis M.; Brage, Soren; Stolk, Ronald P.; Cooper, Cyrus; Sharp, Stephen J.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ong, Ken K.

    Accurate measures of visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat are essential for investigating the pathophysiology of obesity. Classical anthropometric measures such as waist and hip circumference cannot distinguish between these two fat depots. Direct imaging methods such as computed tomography and

  10. Ultrasound measurements of isceral and subcutaneous abdominal thickness to predict abdominal adiposity among older men and women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Lucia, Rolfe E.; Sleigh, A.; Finucane, F.M.; Brage, S.; Stolk, R.P.; Cooper, C.; Sharp, S.J.; Wareham, N.J.; Ong, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate measures of visceral and abdominal subcutaneous fat are essential for investigating the pathophysiology of obesity. Classical anthropometric measures such as waist and hip circumference cannot distinguish between these two fat depots. Direct imaging methods such as computed tomography and

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams ... are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men ...

  12. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging of acute intestinal obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taourel, P.; Kessler, N.; Lesnik, A.; Blayac, P.M.; Morcos, L. [Departement d' Imagerie Medicale, Hopital Lapeyronie, 371, avenue du Doyen Gaston Giraud, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Bruel, J.M. [Departement d' Imagerie Medicale, Hopital Saint-Eloi, 80 rue Augustin Fliche, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France)

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the main clinical questions in bowel obstruction, to discuss the value of various imaging modalities, including conventional radiography, ultrasound, and CT, to underline the impact of imaging in the management of patients with suspect bowel obstruction, and then to suggest a diagnostic triage in such patients. (orig.)

  13. Abdominal aortic aneurysm development in men following a "normal" aortic ultrasound scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, H; Druce, P S; Ashton, H A

    2008-11-01

    To determine predictors related to abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development following a "normal" aortic ultrasound scan. Over a 23-year period, 22 961 men participated in an AAA screening programme. Maximum aortic diameter of less than 30 mm was deemed "normal". 4308 of these "normal" individuals were later re-scanned at intervals for research purposes. AAA prevalence was 4.4% at initial scanning. In those with a normal scan, 46 patients subsequently presented with AAAs incidentally detected and 120 (2.8%) had AAAs identified as part of the ongoing surveillance. The median initial aortic size of these 166 men was 25 mm (range 15-29 mm). Over the follow-up period, there have been 24 (14%) AAA-related deaths, 24 patients underwent successful AAA surgery and 36 died of unrelated causes. In those with an initial aortic diameter of <25 mm who later developed an AAA, the odds ratio for AAA-related mortality was 2 (95% CI 1-4.1, p=0.03, x(2)). AAAs can develop following an initial "normal" scan and men with an aortic diameters of 25-29 mm appear to be at greater risk. Surveillance for this sub-group may further reduce the incidence of undiagnosed AAA and AAA-related mortality.

  14. Comparison of Colour Duplex Ultrasound with Computed Tomography to Measure the Maximum Abdominal Aortic Aneurysmal Diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Maximum diameter of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is the main indication for surgery. This study compared colour duplex ultrasound (CDU and computed tomography (CT in assessing AAA diameter. Patients and Methods. Patients were included if they had both scans performed within 90 days. Pearson’s correlation coefficient, paired t-test, and limits of agreement (LOA were calculated for the whole group. Subgroup analysis of small (6.5 cm aneurysms was performed. A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results. 389 patients were included, giving 130 pairs of tests for comparison. Excellent correlation was in the whole group (r = 0.95 and in the subgroups (r = 0.94; 0.69; 0.96, resp.. Small LOA between the two imaging modalities was found in all subgroups. Conclusion. Small aneurysms can be accurately measured using CDU. CDU is preferable for small AAAs, but cannot supplant CT for planning aortic intervention.

  15. Is Abdominal Fetal Electrocardiography an Alternative to Doppler Ultrasound for FHR Variability Evaluation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Jezewski

    2017-05-01

    depend on the acquisition method. The obtained results prove that the abdominal FECG, considered as an alternative to the ultrasound approach, does not change the interpretation of the FHR signal, which was confirmed during both visual assessment and automated analysis.

  16. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  17. Duplex ultrasound and computed tomography angiography in the follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantador, Alex Aparecido; Siqueira, Daniel Emilio Dalledone; Jacobsen, Octavio Barcellos; Baracat, Jamal; Pereira, Ines Minniti Rodrigues; Menezes, Fabio Hüsemann; Guillaumon, Ana Terezinha, E-mail: alex_cantador@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FCM/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas

    2016-07-15

    Objective: To compare duplex ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) angiography in terms of their performance in detecting endoleaks, as well as in determining the diameter of the aneurysm sac, in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective study involving 30 patients who had undergone endovascular repair of infrarenal aortoiliac aneurysms. Duplex ultrasound and CT angiography were performed simultaneously by independent radiologists. Measurements of the aneurysm sac diameter were assessed, and the presence or absence of endoleaks was determined. Results: The average diameter of the aneurysm sac, as determined by duplex ultrasound and CT angiography was 6.09 ± 1.95 and 6.27 ± 2.16 cm, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficient showing a statistically significant correlation (R = 0.88; p < 0.01). Comparing the duplex ultrasound and CT angiography results regarding the detection of endoleaks, we found that the former had a negative predictive value of 92.59% and a specificity of 96.15%. Conclusion: Our results show that there is little variation between the two methods evaluated, and that the choice between the two would have no significant effect on clinical management. Duplex ultrasound could replace CT angiography in the postoperative follow-up of endovascular aneurysm repair of the infrarenal aorta, because it is a low-cost procedure without the potential clinical complications related to the use of iodinated contrast and exposure to radiation. (author)

  18. Evaluation and management of acute abdominal pain in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macaluso CR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Christopher R Macaluso, Robert M McNamaraDepartment of Emergency Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Evaluation of the emergency department patient with acute abdominal pain is sometimes difficult. Various factors can obscure the presentation, delaying or preventing the correct diagnosis, with subsequent adverse patient outcomes. Clinicians must consider multiple diagnoses, especially those life-threatening conditions that require timely intervention to limit morbidity and mortality. This article will review general information on abdominal pain and discuss the clinical approach by review of the history and the physical examination. Additionally, this article will discuss the approach to unstable patients with abdominal pain.Keywords: acute abdomen, emergency medicine, peritonitis

  19. 2017 update of the WSES guidelines for emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Birindelli, Arianna

    2017-01-01

    Emergency repair of complicated abdominal wall hernias may be associated with worsen outcome and a significant rate of postoperative complications. There is no consensus on management of complicated abdominal hernias. The main matter of debate is about the use of mesh in case of intestinal resection and the type of mesh to be used. Wound infection is the most common complication encountered and represents an immense burden especially in the presence of a mesh. The recurrence rate is an important topic that influences the final outcome. A World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) Consensus Conference was held in Bergamo in July 2013 with the aim to define recommendations for emergency repair of abdominal wall hernias in adults. This document represents the executive summary of the consensus conference approved by a WSES expert panel. In 2016, the guidelines have been revised and updated according to the most recent available literature.

  20. Computed tomography use among children presenting to emergency departments with abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahimi, Jahan; Herring, Andrew; Harries, Aaron; Gonzales, Ralph; Alter, Harrison

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate trends in and factors associated with computed tomography (CT) use among children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with abdominal pain. This study was a cross-sectional, secondary analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 1998 to 2008. We identified ED patients aged abdominal pain and collected patient demographic and hospital characteristics, and outcomes related to imaging, hospital admission, and diagnosis of appendicitis. Trend analysis was performed over the study period for the outcomes of interest, and a multivariate regression model was used to identify factors associated with CT use. Of all pediatric ED visits, 6.0% were for abdominal pain. We noted a rise in the proportion of these patients with CT use, from 0.9% in 1998 to 15.4% in 2008 (P pediatric patients with abdominal pain. Some groups of children may have a differential likelihood of receiving CT scans.

  1. Ultrasound guided TAP block versus ultrasound guided caudal block for pain relief in children undergoing lower abdominal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa Mohamed Alsadek

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: TAP block and caudal block under ultrasound guidance proved to be safe with no recorded complications either intra or postoperatively. Patient and parent satisfaction was markedly observed in case of TAP block.

  2. A Formalized Three-Year Emergency Medicine Residency Ultrasound Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew King

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience and type of curriculum: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Residency Program Ultrasound Education Curriculum is a three-year curriculum for PGY-1 to PGY-3 learners. Introduction/Background: Each year of the three-year The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center Emergency Medicine Ultrasound Curriculum focuses on different aspects of emergency ultrasonography, thereby promoting progressive understanding and utilization of point-of-care ultrasound in medical decision-making during residency training. Ultrasound is an invaluable bedside tool for emergency physicians; this skill must be mastered by resident learners during residency training, and ultrasound competency is a required ACGME milestone.1 The American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP currently recommends that 11 applications of emergency ultrasound be part of the core skills of an emergency physician.2 This curriculum acknowledges the standards developed by ACEP and the ACGME. Objectives: Learners will 1 know the indications for each the 11 ACEP point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS applications; 2 perform each of the 11 ACEP POCUS applications; 3 integrate POCUS into medical decision-making. Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum include: independent, self-directed learning (textbook and literature reading, brief didactic sessions describing indications and technique for each examination, hands-on ultrasound scanning under the direct supervision of ultrasound faculty with real-time feedback, and quality assurance review of ultrasound images. Residents are expected to perform a minimum of 150 ultrasound examinations with associated quality assurance during the course of their residency training. The time requirements, reading material, and ultrasound techniques taught vary depending on the year of training. Length of curriculum: The entirety of the curriculum is three years; however, each year of residency training has

  3. The role of routine post-natal abdominal ultrasound for newborns in a resource-poor setting: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omokhodion Samuel I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Neonatal abdominal ultrasound is usually performed in Nigeria to investigate neonatal symptoms rather than as a follow up to evaluate fetal abnormalities which were detected on prenatal ultrasound. The role of routine obstetric ultrasonography in the monitoring of pregnancy and identification of fetal malformations has partly contributed to lowering of fetal mortality rates. In Nigeria which has a high maternal and fetal mortality rate, many pregnant women do not have ante-natal care and not infrequently, women also deliver their babies at home and only bring the newborns to the clinics for immunization. Even when performed, most routine obstetric scans are not targeted towards the detection of fetal abnormalities. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the benefit of routinely performing abdominal scans on newborns with a view to detecting possible abnormalities which may have been missed ante-natally. Methods- This was a longitudinal study of 202 consecutive, apparently normal newborns. Routine clinical examination and abdominal ultrasound scans were performed on the babies by their mother's bedside, before discharge. Neonates with abnormal initial scans had follow-up scans. Results- There were 108 males and 94 females. There were 12 (5.9% abnormal scans seen in five male and seven female neonates. Eleven of the twelve abnormalities were in the kidneys, six on the left and five on the right. Three of the four major renal anomalies- absent kidney, ectopic/pelvic kidney and two cases of severe hydronephrosis were however on the left side. There was one suprarenal abnormality on the right suspected to be a possible infected adrenal haemorrage. Nine of the abnormal cases reported for follow- up and of these, two cases had persistent severe abnormalities. Conclusions- This study demonstrated a 5.9% incidence of genito urinary anomalies on routine neonatal abdominal ultrasound in this small population. Routine obstetric USS

  4. Laparoscopy in major abdominal emergency surgery seems to be a safe procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Tengberg, Line Toft; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Laparoscopy is well established in the majority of elective procedures in abdominal surgery. In contrast, it is primarily used in minor surgery such as appendectomy or cholecystectomy in the emergent setting. This study aimed to analyze the safety and effectiveness of a laparoscopic...

  5. Emergency abdominal aortic aneurysm repair with a preferential endovascular strategy : Mortality and cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapma, Marten R.; Groen, Henk; Oranen, Bjorn I.; van der Hilst, Christian S.; Tielliu, Ignace F.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Prins, Ted R.; van den Dungen, Jan J.; Verhoeven, Eric L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess mortality and treatment costs of a new management protocol with preferential use of emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (eEVAR) for acute abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Methods: From September 2003 until February 2005, 49 consecutive patients (45 men; mean age 71 years) with

  6. Suspected leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm: use of sonography in the emergency room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, W P; Hastrup, W; Kohler, T R; Nyberg, D A; Wang, K Y; Vincent, L M; Mack, L A

    1988-07-01

    To determine the value of sonography in the emergent evaluation of suspected leaking abdominal aortic aneurysms, the authors examined 60 patients in the emergency department using sonography and a protocol involving advance radio notification from the ambulance; arrival of sonographic personnel and equipment in the triage room before patient arrival; and, during other triage activities, rapid sonographic evaluation of the aorta for aneurysm and of the paraaortic region for extraluminal blood. Sonographic findings were correlated with surgical results and clinical outcome. When performed under these circumstances, sonography was accurate in demonstrating presence or absence of aneurysm (98%), but its sensitivity for extraluminal blood was poor (4%). A combination of sonographic confirmation of aneurysm, abdominal pain, and unstable hemodynamic condition resulted in the correct decision to perform emergent surgery in 21 of 22 patients (95%). An abbreviated sonographic examination done in the emergency room can provide accurate, useful information about the presence of aneurysm; this procedure does not significantly delay triage of these patients.

  7. Longitudinal trends in the treatment of abdominal pain in an academic emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Orhan; Jay, Loni; Fosnocht, David; Carey, Jessica; Rogers, LeGrand; Carey, Adrienne; Horne, Benjamin; Madsen, Troy

    2013-09-01

    Abdominal pain is a top chief complaint of patients presenting to Emergency Departments (ED). Historically, uncertainty surrounded correct management. Evidence has shown adequate analgesia does not obscure the diagnosis, making it the standard of care. We sought to evaluate trends in treatment of abdominal pain in an academic ED during a 10-year period. We prospectively evaluated a convenience sample of patients in an urban academic tertiary care hospital ED from September 2000 through April 2010. Adult patients presenting with a chief complaint of abdominal pain were included in this study. Analgesic administration rates and times, pain scores, and patient satisfaction at discharge were analyzed to evaluate trends by year. There were 2,646 patients presenting with abdominal pain who were enrolled during the study period. Rates of analgesic administration generally increased each year from 39.9% in 2000 to 65.5% in 2010 (p value for trend trend of increase in analgesic administration. In patients presenting to the ED with abdominal pain, analgesia administration increased and time to medication decreased during the 10-year period. Despite overall improvements in satisfaction, significant numbers of patients presenting with abdominal pain still reported moderate to severe pain at discharge. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Feasibility of wall stress analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms using three-dimensional ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Annette M; Nguyen, V Lai; Speelman, Lambert; Brands, Peter J; Schurink, Geert-Willem H; van de Vosse, Frans N; Lopata, Richard G P

    2015-05-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are local dilations that can lead to a fatal hemorrhage when ruptured. Wall stress analysis of AAAs is a novel tool that has proven high potential to improve risk stratification. Currently, wall stress analysis of AAAs is based on computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging; however, three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound (US) has great advantages over CT and magnetic resonance imaging in terms of costs, speed, and lack of radiation. In this study, the feasibility of 3D US as input for wall stress analysis is investigated. Second, 3D US-based wall stress analysis was compared with CT-based results. The 3D US and CT data were acquired in 12 patients (diameter, 35-90 mm). US data were segmented manually and compared with automatically acquired CT geometries by calculating the similarity index and Hausdorff distance. Wall stresses were simulated at P = 140 mm Hg and compared between both modalities. The similarity index of US vs CT was 0.75 to 0.91 (n = 12), with a median Hausdorff distance ranging from 4.8 to 13.9 mm, with the higher values found at the proximal and distal sides of the AAA. Wall stresses were in accordance with literature, and a good agreement was found between US- and CT-based median stresses and interquartile stresses, which was confirmed by Bland-Altman and regression analysis (n = 8). Wall stresses based on US were typically higher (+23%), caused by geometric irregularities due to the registration of several 3D volumes and manual segmentation. In future work, an automated US registration and segmentation approach is the essential point of improvement before pursuing large-scale patient studies. This study is a first step toward US-based wall stress analysis, which would be the modality of choice to monitor wall stress development over time because no ionizing radiation and contrast material are involved. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Bedside Ultrasound in the Emergency Department to Detect Hydronephrosis for the Evaluation of Suspected Ureteric Colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Shakya, R M; Khan A, A

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal colic is a common emergency department presentation. Hydronephrosis is indirect sign of urinary obstruction which may be due to obstructing ureteric calculus and can be detected easily by bedside ultrasound with minimal training. Objective To compare the accuracy of detection of hydronephrosis performed by the emergency physician with that of radiologist's in suspected renal colic cases. Method This was a prospective observational study performed over a period of 6 months. Patients >8 years with provisional diagnosis of renal colic with both the bedside ultrasound and the formal ultrasound performed were included. Presence of hydronephrosis in both ultrasounds and size and location of ureteric stone if present in formal ultrasound was recorded. The accuracy of the emergency physician detection of hydronephrosis was determined using the scan reported by the radiologists as the "gold standard" as computed tomography was unavailable. Statistical analysis was executed using SPSS 17.0. Result Among the 111 included patients, 56.7% had ureteric stone detected in formal ultrasound. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of bedside ultrasound performed by emergency physician for detection of hydronephrosis with that of formal ultrasound performed by radiologist was 90.8%., 78.3%, 85.5% and 85.7% respectively. Bedside ultrasound and formal ultrasound both detected hydronephrosis more often in patients with larger stones and the difference was statistically significant (p=.000). Conclusion Bedside ultrasound can be potentially used as an important tool in detecting clinically significant hydronephrosis in emergency to evaluate suspected ureteric colic. Focused training in ultrasound could greatly improve the emergency management of these patients.

  10. X-ray radiography of abdominal emergencies in clinical diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bencur, J.M.; Svoboda, M.

    1987-01-01

    The book explains in detail the procedure in X-ray examination and how to get the maximum of diagnostic information out of it. Part one is devoted to the organization, technology and methodology of X-ray examinations, the equipment of X-ray units and to radiation protection. Part two presents the anatomy of the abdomen and of the thorax, and the pathological manifestations of emergencies in the X-ray picture. Part three presents an analysis of the individual types of diseases and injuries illustrated with many pictures. (M.D.). 96 figs., 7 tabs., 400 refs

  11. Increased mortality in the elderly after emergency abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Peter; Manoharan, Thukirtha; Foss, Nicolai B

    2014-01-01

    was a retrospective analysis of patient charts and perioperative documentation in an unselected consecutive cohort of 131 patients. Covariates for survival outcomes were evaluated in a multivariate analysis. No external funding and no competing interests were declared. The study was approved by The Danish Data...... within 30 days post-operatively. CONCLUSION: Acute admission and emergency laparotomy is associated with a very high mortality, especially in elderly patients. However, delay in the surgical treatment exceeding six hours is not associated with a higher mortality. There may be a considerable potential...

  12. Does the use of bedside pelvic ultrasound decrease length of stay in the emergency department?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamburaj, Ravi; Sivitz, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasounds by emergency medicine (EM) and pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians have increased because of ultrasonography training during residency and fellowship. The availability of ultrasound in radiology departments is limited or difficult to obtain especially during nighttime hours. Studies have shown that EM physicians can accurately perform goal-directed ultrasound after appropriate training. The goal of this study was to compare the length of stay for patients receiving an ultrasound to confirm intrauterine pregnancies. The hypothesis of this study is that a bedside ultrasound by a trained EM/PEM physician can reduce length of stay in the emergency department (ED) by 1 hour. This was a case cohort retrospective review for patients aged 13 to 21 years who received pelvic ultrasounds in the ED during 2007. Each patient was placed into 1 of 2 groups. Group 1 received bedside ultrasounds done by institutionally credentialed EM/PEM attending physicians. Group 2 received radiology department ultrasound only. Each group had subanalysis done including chief complaint, time of presentation, time to completion of ultrasound, length of stay, diagnosis, and disposition. Daytime was defined as presentation between 7 AM and 9 PM when radiology ultrasound technologists were routinely available. We studied 330 patients, with 244 patients (74%) in the bedside ultrasound group. The demographics of both groups showed no difference in age, presenting complaints, discharge diagnoses, and ultimate disposition. Group 1 had a significant reduction (P ultrasound compared with group 2 (mean, 82 minutes [range, 1-901 minutes] vs 149 minutes [range, 7-506 minutes]) and length of stay (142 [16-2268] vs. 230 [16-844]). Of those presenting during the day (66%), group 1 showed a significant reduction in length of stay (P ultrasound by trained EM/PEM physicians produced a significant reduction in length of stay in the ED, regardless of radiology ultrasound technologist

  13. Emergency ultrasound usage among recent emergency medicine residency graduates of a convenience sample of 14 residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Anthony J; Breyer, Michael J; Ku, Bon S; Mills, Angela M; Pines, Jesse M

    2010-02-01

    Emergency Medicine (EM) residency graduates are trained to perform Emergency Medicine bedside ultrasound (EMBU). However, the degree to which they use this skill in their practice after graduation is unknown. We sought to test the amount and type of usage of EMBU among recent residency graduates, and how usage and barriers vary among various types of EM practice settings. Graduates from 14 EM residency programs in 2003-2005 were surveyed on their current practice setting and use of EMBU. There were 252 (73%) graduates who completed the survey. Of the 73% of respondents reporting access to EMBU, 98% had used it within the past 3 months. Access to EMBU was higher in academic (97%) vs. community teaching (79%) vs. community non-teaching settings (62%) (p < 0.001), and in Emergency Departments (EDs) where yearly census exceeded 60,000 visits (87% vs. 65%, p < 0.001). Physicians in academic settings reported "high use" of EMBU more frequently than those in community settings for most modalities. FAST (focused assessment by sonography in trauma) was the most common high-use application and the most useful in practice. The greatest impediment to EMBU use was "not enough time" (61%). Ultrasound usage among recent EM residency graduates is significantly higher in teaching than in community settings and in high-volume EDs. Its use is more widespread than in previous reports in all types of practice. There is a wide range of utilization of ultrasound in the various applications in emergency practice, with the evaluation of trauma being the most common. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, Morten; Waldau, Tina; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality....... The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients.Methods and design: The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency...... laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure...

  15. Lead toxicity as an etiology for abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarity, Risa S; Harris, James T; Cox, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Abdominal pain is an uncommon presentation of lead toxicity in the emergency department (ED). However, making the diagnosis is important in avoiding unnecessary testing and the long-term sequelae of lead toxicity. To illustrate possible presentations of abdominal pain secondary to lead toxicity and highlight the importance of taking a thorough patient history. We report 2 patients who presented to the ED with abdominal pain and underwent extensive evaluations that did not reveal an etiology. At follow-up visits, their occupational histories revealed possible lead exposures from working for a bullet-recycling company. Tests revealed that each patient had extremely high lead levels and they were both treated for lead toxicity. Their abdominal pain resolved as their lead levels decreased. These cases demonstrate a rare but significant cause of abdominal pain in the ED. Although history-taking in the ED is necessarily brief, these cases underscore the importance of obtaining an occupational history. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of abdominal viscera: Tips to ensure safe and effective biopsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo [Chonnam National University Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju(Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications.

  17. Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Methods Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21 mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n = 31, 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL saline in Group B (n = 31, and 20 mL 0.5% bupivacaine + 1 mL dexmedetomidine (100 µg in Group BD (n = 31. Results Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (p 0.05. Conclusions The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement.

  18. [Efficiency of bupivacaine and association with dexmedetomidine in transversus abdominis plane block ultrasound guided in postoperative pain of abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Patmano, Gülçin; Biçer, Cihangir; Emek, Ertan; Çoruh, Aliye Esmaoğlu

    We aimed to evaluate the effect of bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine used in tranversus abdominis plane (TAP) block on postoperative pain and patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients submitted to lower abdominal surgery were enrolled in the study. After anesthesia induction, ultrasound guided TAP block was performed. TAP block was obtained with 21mL 0.9% saline in Group C (n=31), 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL saline in Group B (n=31), and 20mL 0.5% bupivacaine+1mL dexmedetomidine (100μg) in Group BD (n=31). Visual analog scale scores were lower in Group BD compared to Group C, at all time points (pconsumption was lower in Group BD compared to other groups and lower in group B than in the controls (p0.05). The addition of dexmedetomidine to bupivacaine on TAP block decreased postoperative pain scores and morphine consumption; it also increased patient satisfaction in patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Dexmedetomidine did not have any effect on nausea and vomiting score and antiemetic requirement. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy of abdominal viscera: Tips to ensure safe and effective biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy (USPCB) is used extensively in daily clinical practice for the pathologic confirmation of both focal and diffuse diseases of the abdominal viscera. As a guidance tool, US has a number of clear advantages over computerized tomography or magnetic resonance imaging: fewer false-negative biopsies, lack of ionizing radiation, portability, relatively short procedure time, real-time intra-procedural visualization of the biopsy needle, ability to guide the procedure in almost any anatomic plane, and relatively lower cost. Notably, USPCB is widely used to retrieve tissue specimens in cases of hepatic lesions. However, general radiologists, particularly beginners, find USPCB difficult to perform in abdominal organs other than the liver; indeed, a full understanding of the entire USPCB process and specific considerations for specific abdominal organs is necessary to safely obtain adequate specimens. In this review, we discuss some points and techniques that need to be borne in mind to increase the chances of successful USPCB. We believe that the tips and considerations presented in this review will help radiologists perform USPCB to successfully retrieve target tissue from different organs with minimal complications

  20. Prediction of Outcome After Emergency High-Risk Intra-abdominal Surgery Using the Surgical Apgar Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cihoric, Mirjana; Toft Tengberg, Line; Bay-Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: With current literature quoting mortality rates up to 45%, emergency high-risk abdominal surgery has, compared with elective surgery, a significantly greater risk of death and major complications. The Surgical Apgar Score (SAS) is predictive of outcome in elective surgery, but has nev...... emergency high-risk abdominal surgery. Despite its predictive value, the SAS cannot in its current version be recommended as a standalone prognostic tool in an emergency setting....

  1. A Review of Lawsuits Related to Point-of-Care Emergency Ultrasound Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolz, Lori

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: New medical technology brings the potential of lawsuits related to the usage of that new technology. In recent years the use of point-of-care (POC ultrasound has increased rapidly in the emergency department (ED. POC ultrasound creates potential legal risk to an emergency physician (EP either using or not using this tool. The aim of this study was to quantify and characterize reported decisions in lawsuits related to EPs performing POC ultrasound. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of all United States reported state and federal cases in the Westlaw database. We assessed the full text of reported cases between January 2008 and December 2012. EPs with emergency ultrasound fellowship training reviewed the full text of each case. Cases were included if an EP was named, the patient encounter was in the emergency department, the interpretation or failure to perform an ultrasound was a central issue and the application was within the American College of Emergency Physician (ACEP ultrasound core applications. In order to assess deferred risk, cases that involved ultrasound examinations that could have been performed by an EP but were deferred to radiology were included. Results: We identified five cases. All reported decisions alleged a failure to perform an ultrasound study or a failure to perform it in a timely manner. All studies were within the scope of emergency medicine and were ACEP emergency ultrasound core applications. A majority of cases (n=4 resulted in a patient death. There were no reported cases of failure to interpret or misdiagnoses. Conclusion: In a five-year period from January 2008 through December 2012, five malpractice cases involving EPs and ultrasound examinations that are ACEP core emergency ultrasound applications were documented in the Westlaw database. All cases were related to failure to perform an ultrasound study or failure to perform a study in a timely manner and none involved failure to

  2. Type of incision does not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim; Oma, Erling; Harling, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    for anastomotic leakage were included with a median follow-up of 5.4 years. Incisional hernia occurred in 41 of 227 (15.3%) patients undergoing midline incision compared with 14 of 81 (14.7%) following transverse incision, P = 1.00. After adjusting for confounders, there was no association between the type...... not predict abdominal wall outcome after emergency surgery for colonic anastomotic leakage....

  3. Abdominal Adiposity Distribution Quantified by Ultrasound Imaging and Incident Hypertension in a General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seven, Ekim; Thuesen, Betina H; Linneberg, Allan

    2016-01-01

    -up examination and among them 203 had developed hypertension. In models including both VAT and SAT, the Framingham Hypertension Risk Score variables (age, sex, smoking status, family history of hypertension, and baseline blood pressure) and glycated hemoglobin, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for incident......Abdominal obesity is a major risk factor for hypertension. However, different distributions of abdominal adipose tissue may affect hypertension risk differently. The main purpose of this study was to explore the association of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue......)). We constructed multiple logistic regression models to compute standardized odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals per SD increase in SAT and VAT. Of the 2119 normotensive participants at baseline, 1432, with mean SAT of 2.8 cm and mean VAT of 5.7 cm, returned 5 years later for a follow...

  4. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying; Herman, Joseph; Wong, John; Ding, Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ji, Tianlong [Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning (China); Iordachita, Iulian [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Tutkun Sen, H.; Kazanzides, Peter; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A. [Department of Computer Science, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion. The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer ABC

  5. MO-FG-CAMPUS-JeP3-04: Feasibility Study of Real-Time Ultrasound Monitoring for Abdominal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Lin; Kien Ng, Sook; Zhang, Ying; Herman, Joseph; Wong, John; Ding, Kai; Ji, Tianlong; Iordachita, Iulian; Tutkun Sen, H.; Kazanzides, Peter; Lediju Bell, Muyinatu A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ultrasound is ideal for real-time monitoring in radiotherapy with high soft tissue contrast, non-ionization, portability, and cost effectiveness. Few studies investigated clinical application of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time monitoring of 3D target motion using 4D ultrasound. Methods: An ultrasound probe holding system was designed to allow clinician to freely move and lock ultrasound probe. For phantom study, an abdominal ultrasound phantom was secured on a 2D programmable respiratory motion stage. One side of the stage was elevated than another side to generate 3D motion. The motion stage made periodic breath-hold movement. Phantom movement tracked by infrared camera was considered as ground truth. For volunteer study three healthy subjects underwent the same setup for abdominal SBRT with active breath control (ABC). 4D ultrasound B-mode images were acquired for both phantom and volunteers for real-time monitoring. 10 breath-hold cycles were monitored for each experiment. For phantom, the target motion tracked by ultrasound was compared with motion tracked by infrared camera. For healthy volunteers, the reproducibility of ABC breath-hold was evaluated. Results: Volunteer study showed the ultrasound system fitted well to the clinical SBRT setup. The reproducibility for 10 breath-holds is less than 2 mm in three directions for all three volunteers. For phantom study the motion between inspiration and expiration captured by camera (ground truth) is 2.35±0.02 mm, 1.28±0.04 mm, 8.85±0.03 mm in LR, AP, SI directly, respectively. The motion monitored by ultrasound is 2.21±0.07 mm, 1.32±0.12mm, 9.10±0.08mm, respectively. The motion monitoring error in any direction is less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: The volunteer study proved the clinical feasibility of real-time ultrasound monitoring for abdominal SBRT. The phantom and volunteer ABC

  6. Acute Testicular Ischemia following Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair Identified in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Finnerty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR is perhaps the most widely utilized surgical procedure for patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms. This procedure is minimally invasive and reduces inpatient hospitalization requirements. The case involves a 72-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with right testicular ischemia two days following EVAR. Given the minimal inpatient hospitalization associated with this procedure, emergency physicians are likely to encounter associated complications. Ischemic and thromboembolic events following EVAR are extremely rare but require prompt vascular surgery intervention to minimize morbidity and mortality.

  7. Development of a fetal weight chart using serial trans-abdominal ultrasound in an East African population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Christentze; Scheike, Thomas; Oesterholt, Mayke

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To produce a fetal weight chart representative of a Tanzanian population, and compare it to weight charts from Sub-Saharan Africa and the developed world. METHODS: A longitudinal observational study in Northeastern Tanzania. Pregnant women were followed throughout pregnancy with serial...... trans-abdominal ultrasound. All pregnancies with pathology were excluded and a chart representing the optimal growth potential was developed using fetal weights and birth weights. The weight chart was compared to a chart from Congo, a chart representing a white population, and a chart representing...... a white population but adapted to the study population. The prevalence of SGA was assessed using all four charts. RESULTS: A total of 2193 weight measurements from 583 fetuses/newborns were included in the fetal weight chart. Our chart had lower percentiles than all the other charts. Most importantly...

  8. Reported provision of analgesia to patients with acute abdominal pain in Canadian paediatric emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Cowie, Allyson; Davidson, Chloe; Benidir, Andréanne; Thompson, Graham C; Boisclair, Philippe; Harman, Stuart; Miller, Michael; Butter, Andreana; Lim, Rod; Ali, Samina

    2016-09-01

    Evidence exists that analgesics are underutilized, delayed, and insufficiently dosed for emergency department (ED) patients with acute abdominal pain. For physicians practicing in a Canadian paediatric ED setting, we (1) explored theoretical practice variation in the provision of analgesia to children with acute abdominal pain; (2) identified reasons for withholding analgesia; and (3) evaluated the relationship between providing analgesia and surgical consultation. Physician members of Paediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC) were prospectively surveyed and presented with three scenarios of undifferentiated acute abdominal pain to assess management. A modified Dillman's Tailored Design method was used to distribute the survey from June to July 2014. Overall response rate was 74.5% (149/200); 51.7% of respondents were female and mean age was 44 (SD 8.4) years. The reported rates of providing analgesia for case scenarios representative of renal colic, appendicitis, and intussusception, were 100%, 92.1%, and 83.4%, respectively, while rates of providing intravenous opioids were 85.2%, 58.6%, and 12.4%, respectively. In all 60 responses where the respondent indicated they would obtain a surgical consultation, analgesia would be provided. In the 35 responses where analgesia would be withheld, 21 (60%) believed pain was not severe enough, while 5 (14.3%) indicated it would obscure a surgical condition. Pediatric emergency physicians self-reported rates of providing analgesia for acute abdominal pain scenarios were higher than previously reported, and appeared unrelated to request for surgical consultation. However, an unwillingness to provide opioid analgesia, belief that analgesia can obscure a surgical condition, and failure to take self-reported pain at face value remain, suggesting that the need exists for further knowledge translation efforts.

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  11. Percutaneous drainage of abdominal fluid collections that require laparotomy or relaparotomy with ultrasound guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miletic, D.; Topljak-Polic, D.; Uravic, M.; Fuckar, Z.; Glavas, R.

    2001-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to determine efficacy and reliability of percutaneous abdominal drainage in surgical patients and to evaluate intercostal approach to drain subphrenic collections. Material and methods. Eighty-seven patients aged from 29 to 84 years (mean, 55.5 years) were percutaneously drained under the sonographic guidance due to the postoperative or nonoperated abdominal collection that would otherwise require laparotomy. Intercostal, subcostal, lateral and anterior approach with eight to 14 French catheters were used to evacuate abdominal collection. Results. The intercostal approach was used to drain 31 (60.8%) of 51 subphrenic collections. The mean duration of drainage was independent of the intercostal or subcostal drainage route, but was significantly prolonged (p<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test) for purulent collections (median, 18 days; range 7-73 days) in comparison to hematomas, bilomas and other nonpurulent collections (median, 11 and 6 days, respectively). Sonographically guided percutaneous drainage was a definitive method in 92% patients, with 9.2% minor complications. Successful rate for subphrenic collections was even greater (96%). Conclusions. Sonographically guided percutaneous drainage is the method of choice in the treatment of abdominal collections that require laparotomy. If the puncture site is at least two intercostal spaces lower than the dome of diaphragm and catheter is not introduced through the pleural effusion, intercostal drainage is equally efficient and not less secure than subcostal approach. (author)

  12. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. SETTING: Hvidovre Univers...

  13. The Sound Games: Introducing Gamification into Stanford's Orientation on Emergency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Viveta; Stromberg, Andrew Q; Rosston, Peter

    2017-09-18

    Point-of-care ultrasound is a critical component of graduate medical training in emergency medicine. Innovation in ultrasound teaching methods is greatly needed to keep up with a changing medical landscape. A field-wide trend promoting simulation and technology-enhanced learning is underway in an effort to improve patient care, as well as patient safety. In an effort to both motivate students and increase their skill retention, training methods are shifting towards a friendly competition model and are gaining popularity nationwide. In line with this emerging trend, Stanford incorporated the Sound Games - an educational ultrasound event with a distinctly competitive thread - within its existing two-day point-of-care ultrasound orientation course for emergency medicine interns. In this study, we demonstrate successful implementation of the orientation program, significant learning gains in participants, and overall student satisfaction with the course.

  14. Proposed protocol for realization of abdominal CT in patients admitted to the emergency room for trauma in HSJD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Cascante, Lizbeth

    2013-01-01

    A protocol is established for computed tomography in trauma patients treated in emergency of Hospital San Juan de Dios. A literature review is conducted on abdominal CT protocols in specialized databases. The criteria, scanning, parameters and delay time are established for realization of abdominal CT in patients with traumatic emergencies in HSJD. Taking the thickness of the sections, the thickness of the sections in reconstruction, the quantities of contrast and the speed of injection in patients, have been standardized for the realization of abdominal CT in HSJD. Computed tomography should be preferably performed of routine in portal phase and the late from 5 minutes in patients with abdominal trauma, contributing in this phase as much information regarding the extent of abdominal injury [es

  15. Focused Ultrasound Lipolysis in the Treatment of Abdominal Cellulite: An Open-Label Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravvej, Hamideh; Akbari, Zahra; Mohammadian, Shahrzad; Razzaghi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Despite a growing popularity of noninvasive ultrasonic lipolysis procedure, there is a lack of evidence about the efficacy of this method. This study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of focused ultrasonic lipolysis on abdominal cellulite treatment. Methods: Twenty-eight consecutive subjects (age: 37.8 ± 8 years) underwent weekly transdermal focused ultrasonic lipolysis (Med Contour, General Project Ltd., Florence, Italy) and vacuum drainage for a maximum of eight sessions. Largest abdominal girth and 2 lines at 4 cm to 7 cm distance above and under it were located as fixed points of measurements. The mean value of the three fixed lines was considered as the abdominal circumference. Subjects were evaluated using measurements of circumference, immediately after and 3 weeks after the final treatment and compared using paired t test. Results: One hundred ninety-four ultrasonic lipolysis procedures were performed on 28 subjects. A statistically significant (P cellulite, although some amount of circumference reduction reversal may be observed in long term follow-up visit. PMID:26464776

  16. Sarcopenia increases risk of long-term mortality in elderly patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Erika L; Rios-Diaz, Arturo J; Uyeda, Jennifer W; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Cooper, Zara; Olufajo, Olubode A; Salim, Ali; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2017-12-01

    Frailty is associated with poor surgical outcomes in elderly patients but is difficult to measure in the emergency setting. Sarcopenia, or the loss of lean muscle mass, is a surrogate for frailty and can be measured using cross-sectional imaging. We sought to determine the impact of sarcopenia on 1-year mortality after emergency abdominal surgery in elderly patients. Sarcopenia was assessed in patients 70 years or older who underwent emergency abdominal surgery at a single hospital from 2006 to 2011. Average bilateral psoas muscle cross-sectional area at L3, normalized for height (Total Psoas Index [TPI]), was calculated using computed tomography. Sarcopenia was defined as TPI in the lowest sex-specific quartile. Primary outcome was mortality at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and mortality at 30, 90, and 180 days. The association of sarcopenia with mortality was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression and model performance judged using Harrell's C-statistic. Two hundred ninety-seven of 390 emergency abdominal surgery patients had preoperative imaging and height. The median age was 79 years, and 1-year mortality was 32%. Sarcopenic and nonsarcopenic patients were comparable in age, sex, race, comorbidities, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification, procedure urgency and type, operative severity, and need for discharge to a nursing facility. Sarcopenic patients had lower body mass index, greater need for intensive care, and longer hospital length of stay (p Sarcopenia was independently associated with increased in-hospital mortality (risk ratio, 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-3.7) and mortality at 30 days (hazard ratio [HR], 3.7; 95% CI, 1.9-7.4), 90 days (HR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8-6.0), 180 days (HR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4-4.4), and 1 year (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.4-3.9). Sarcopenia is associated with increased risk of mortality over 1 year in elderly patients undergoing emergency abdominal surgery. Sarcopenia defined by TPI is

  17. Value of liver elastography and abdominal ultrasound for detection of complications of allogeneic hemopoietic SCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlas, T; Weber, J; Nehring, C; Kronenberger, R; Tenckhoff, H; Mössner, J; Niederwieser, D; Tröltzsch, M; Lange, T; Keim, V

    2014-06-01

    Hepatic complications contribute to morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hemopoietic SCT. Liver Doppler ultrasound and elastography represent promising methods for pretransplant risk assessment and early detection of complications. Ultrasound (liver and spleen size, liver perfusion) and elastography (transient elastography (TE); right liver lobe acoustic radiation force impulse imaging (r-ARFI); left liver lobe ARFI (l-ARFI)) were prospectively evaluated in patients with indications for allo-SCT. Measurements were performed before and repeatedly after SCT. Results were compared with the incidence of life-threatening complications and death during the first 150 days after SCT. Of 59 included patients, 16 suffered from major complications and 9 of them died within the follow-up period. At baseline, liver and spleen size, liver perfusion, TE and r-ARFI did not differ significantly between patients with and without severe complications. In contrast, l-ARFI was significantly elevated in patients who later developed severe complications (1.58±0.30 m/s vs 1.37±0.27 m/s, P=0.030). After SCT, l-ARFI values remained elevated and TE showed increasing liver stiffness in patients with complications. The value of conventional liver ultrasound for prediction of severe SCT complications is limited. Increased values for TE and l-ARFI are associated with severe SCT complications and demand further evaluation.

  18. Development and Implementation of an Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Program for Emergency Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Courtney; Jones, Jodi

    2018-01-01

    Emergency medical care often necessitates placement of peripheral intravenous (PIV) catheters. When traditional methods for obtaining PIV access are not successful, ultrasound guidance is a rescue technique for peripheral vascular placement that improves the quality of patient care. The aim of this training program was to develop a process where emergency nurses would be competent to perform ultrasound guided PIV to improve the quality of patient care delivered while reducing throughput time. Administrative program development required creating a nursing practice statement, procedure guideline, operational plan, and competency validation. A training program comprising both didactic and hands-on training was developed and provided by emergency medicine physicians with formal ultrasound fellowship training. In determining whether the training program was adequate in preparing the student to place an ultrasound-guided PIV, 92.9% of students "agreed" or "strongly agreed." In having confidence in their ability to obtain an ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 35.7% of respondents "agreed" and 64.3% "strongly agreed." In finding it difficult to be successful in achieving ultrasound guided PIV catheter placement, 71.4% of students "strongly disagreed" and 14.3% "disagreed." All students (100%) felt it was a feasible task to train nurses to successfully place ultrasound-guided PIV catheters and 71.4% of students strongly support continuing to provide this training program and competency validation. Establishment of an effective didactic and hands-on training program resulted in emergency department nurses becoming competent in placement of ultrasound guided PIV catheters to provide optimal patient care. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergency department assessment of abdominal pain: clinical indicator tests for detecting peritonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Scott; Watt, Martin

    2005-12-01

    Peritonism is a finding that leads to a more cautious approach in the emergency department management of abdominal pain. This study examined whether peritonism assessment using inspiration, expiration and cough tests was associated with the patient's clinical management. This prospective observational study evaluated consecutive patients presenting directly to the emergency department for 3 months from June 2000 with abdominal pain. Triage initial observations of blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation and temperature were recorded. The examining emergency physician recorded each patient's response and pain score to the individual peritonism tests and scored it as positive if there was an indication of it being a painful manoeuvre. The results were blinded from the receiving specialty if subsequent referral was required. Sixty-seven patients had peritonism tests performed. No individual test was more painful than the others with similar values in pain scores. In all, 70% (7/10) were admitted when all three tests were positive, compared with 21% (12/57) when two or less of the tests scored positive (P=0.004, Fisher's exact test). Admission was not associated with any individual test or combination of tests, or any other variable. The peritonism tests were not associated with any other physiological observation or measurement. These peritonism tests represent a simple investigation, and are significantly associated with admission when all three tests are positive. They seem to be a clinical predictor of cases in which continuing assessment was required, and may be useful as a departmental 'safety net' in the management of abdominal pain.

  20. Physicians using ultrasound in Danish emergency departments are mostly summoned specialists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Klaus; Lauridsen, Johnny Rene Meilstrup; Laursen, Christian Borbjerg

    2015-01-01

    ultrasound and 304 were non-users (54 %, 95 % CI: 50-58). The largest group with 146 respondents (25 %, 95 % CI: 21-29) were anaesthetists with merely consult duty in the ED. When looking exclusively on physicians with on-call duty in the ED, thus excluding anaesthetists, only 146 (35 %, 95 % CI: 30-40) were...... young physicians with on call duty in the ED. CONCLUSIONS: We have found that although almost all Danish EDs have ultrasound equipment available, few physicians working in the ED seem to have adopted the tool. Emergency Ultrasound is mainly performed by specialists who are summoned to the ED in case...

  1. Ultrasound imaging in children with acute abdominal pain - can it help to decrease the rate of negative appendectomies?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, J.; Miodek, M.; Kucharski, P.; Sokal, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of high-resolution ultrasound (US) with graded compression in the diagnosis of pediatric appendicitis.Material/Methods: The medical records of 664 consecutive children with acute abdominal pain treated between 2007 and 2009 were reviewed retrospectively and analyzed; 408 children (61.4 %) underwent appendectomy and 256 patients were treated conservatively (38.6 %). High-resolution US was performed in 570 out of 664 patients (85.8 %). The US data were verified by intraoperative findings or by clinical follow-up. Results: Out of 664 children, 408 underwent appendectomy and 256 were treated conservatively. US was performed in 570 out of 664 children (85.8 %); in 327/408 children (80.1 %) with AA and in 243/256 children (94.9 %) with negative diagnosis. The sensitivity and specificity for US was 66.6% and 77.4%, respectively. If histopathological diagnosis of catarrhal appendicitis was considered a negative (unnecessary) appendectomy, the sensitivity was 68.6 % (p=0.87), and specificity was 67 % (p=0.29). Positive and negative predictive values of US were 79.9 % and 63.1 %, respectively. After recalculating results, positive predictive value decreased to 59.8% (p=0.036) and negative predictive value increased to 74.8 % (p=0.2). The rate of false negative results was 13.1 % (75/572) and the rate of false positives was 19.2 % (110/572). The negative appendectomy rate was 27.4 % (112/408). Conclusions: High-resolution ultrasonography provides an accurate and specific test for acute appendicitis and is recommended by the authors as an examination of choice in children with acute abdominal pain. (authors)

  2. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  3. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Mandai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient’s condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in the intra-abdominal fluid collection resulting from the perforation. We performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided abscess drainage. The patient improved and was discharged in satisfactory condition. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided drainage is a treatment option for patients with intra-abdominal abscess following gastric perforation due to ramucirumab.

  4. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound determination of microvascular blood volume in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue in man. Evidence for adipose tissue capillary recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobin, L; Simonsen, L; Bülow, J

    2010-01-01

    The adipose tissue metabolism is dependent on its blood perfusion. During lipid mobilization e.g. during exercise and during lipid deposition e.g. postprandial, adipose tissue blood flow is increased. This increase in blood flow may involve capillary recruitment in the tissue. We investigated...... of ultrasound contrast agent to establish the reproducibility of the technique. In nine subjects, the effect of an oral glucose load on blood flow and microvascular volume was measured in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and forearm skeletal muscle. ¹³³Xe washout and venous occlusion strain......-gauge plethysmography was used to measure the adipose tissue and forearm blood flow, respectively. Ultrasound signal intensity of the first plateau phases was 27 ± dB in the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and 18 ± 2 dB (P

  5. Ultrasound detection of abdominal lymph nodes in chronic liver diseases. A retrospective analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soresi, M.; Bonfissuto, G.; Magliarisi, C.; Riili, A.; Terranova, A.; Di Giovanni, G.; Bascone, F.; Carroccio, A.; Tripi, S.; Montalto, G. E-mail: gmontal@unipa.it

    2003-05-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of lymph nodes of the hepato-duodenal ligament in a group of patients with chronic liver disease of various aetiologies and to investigate what clinical, aetiological and laboratory data may lead to their appearance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One thousand and three patients (554 men, 449 women) were studied, including 557 with chronic hepatitis and 446 with liver cirrhosis. The presence of lymph nodes near the trunk of the portal vein, hepatic artery, celiac axis, superior mesenteric vein and pancreas head was investigated using ultrasound. RESULTS: Lymph nodes were detected in 394 out of the 1003 study patients (39.3%); their number ranged from one to four, with a diameter ranging between 0.8 and 4 cm. The highest prevalence was in the subgroup of patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (87.5%), followed by patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV; 42%), patients with HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV; 41.3%), autoimmune hepatitis (40%), and HBV alone (21.2%). In the alcoholic and idiopathic subgroups prevalence was 9.5%, while in the non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and haemochromatosis subgroups it was 0%. HCV RNA was present in 97 out of 103 lymph node-positive patients and in 141 out of 168 lymph node-negative HCV-negative patients (p<0.003). Lymphadenopathy frequency increased as the liver disease worsened ({chi}{sup 2} MH=74.3; p<0.0001). CONCLUSION: Despite the limitations of a retrospective study, our data indicate a high prevalence of lymphadenopathy in liver disease patients; ultrasound evidence of lymph nodes of the hepato-duodenal ligament in a given liver disease may most likely suggest a HCV or an autoimmune aetiology and a more severe histological picture.

  6. Patients Presenting to the Emergency Unit with Gynaecological Lower Abdominal Pain, with and without Pathological Clinical Findings - Service Utilisation, Pain History, Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedentopf, F; Wowro, E; Möckel, M; Kentenich, H; David, M

    2016-09-01

    Introduction: Few studies have evaluated the utilisation of emergency gynaecological services, although lower abdominal pain (LAP) is one of the most common symptoms prompting emergency presentation. Although such pain may be caused by potentially life-threatening gynaecological diseases, very often no clinical cause is found. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of emergency presentations in order to enable quicker identification of real emergencies in routine clinical practice. Materials and Methods: Standardised, so-called first aid cards of 1066 consecutive patients with LAP presenting acutely to one emergency unit were analysed in this retrospective, cross-sectional study. Results: Over one third of cases did not constitute actual medical emergencies on objective criteria, with investigations yielding "no pathological findings". Parameters were identified that more often lead to hospital admission, e.g. palpation of a mass/resistance or at least one pathological ultrasound finding. In addition, it was found that symptoms of longer duration (average 8 days), and not only acute LAP, were also often experienced by patients as emergencies. Conclusion: A diagnosis of "no pathological findings", which was common in our study, suggests a subjective experience of an emergency from the patient's point of view, although the possibility of unrecognised pathology has to be borne in mind. Apart from functional disorders, the origins of symptoms may include psychosomatic causes and psychosocial problems, which cannot be further defined in the emergency care setting. Also, the phenomenon of increased utilisation of emergency services parallel to the assumed opening hours of routine outpatient care facilities must be seen in a critical light.

  7. The effect of morphine added to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block for postoperative analgesia following lower abdominal cancer surgery, a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sherif, Fatma Adel; Mohamed, Sahar Abdel-Baky; Kamal, Shereen Mamdouh

    2017-06-01

    Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block used for management of surgical abdominal pain by injecting local anesthetics into the plane between the internal oblique and transversus abdominis muscles. We aimed to explore the effect of adding morphine to bupivacaine in ultrasound guided TAP-block in patients undergoing lower abdominal cancer surgery. Randomized, double-blind, prospective study. Clinical trial identifier: NCT02566096. Academic medical center. Sixty patients were enrolled in this study after ethical committee approval. Patients divided into 2 groups (30 each): Bupivacaine group (GB): given ultrasound guided TAP-block 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine diluted in 20ml saline; Morphine group (GM): given ultrasound guided TAP-block with 20ml 0.5% bupivacaine+10mg morphine sulphate diluted in 20ml saline. Patients were observed for total morphine consumption, time for first request of rescue analgesia, sedation scores, hemodynamics and side effects for 24h postoperatively. Morphine added to bupivacaine in TAP block compared to bupivacaine alone reduced total morphine consumption (5.33±1.28mg) (10.70±3.09mg) respectively (p0.05). Addition of morphine to bupivacaine in TAP block is effective method for pain management in patients undergoing major abdominal cancer surgery without serious side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of fundal height and handheld ultrasound-measured abdominal circumference to screen for fetal growth abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haragan, Adriane F.; Hulsey, Thomas C.; Hawk, Angela F.; Newman, Roger B.; Chang, Eugene Y.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to compare fundal height and handheld ultrasound–measured fetal abdominal circumference (HHAC) for the prediction of fetal growth restriction (FGR) or large for gestational age. STUDY DESIGN This was a diagnostic accuracy study in nonanomalous singleton pregnancies between 24 and 40 weeks’ gestation. Patients underwent HHAC and fundal height measurement prior to formal growth ultrasound. FGR was defined as estimated fetal weight less than 10%, whereas large for gestational age was defined as estimated fetal weight greater than 90%. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared using methods described elsewhere. RESULTS There were 251 patients included in this study. HHAC had superior sensitivity and specificity for the detection of FGR (sensitivity, 100% vs 42.86%) and (specificity, 92.62% vs 85.24%). HHAC had higher specificity but lower sensitivity when screening for LGA (specificity, 85.66% vs 66.39%) and (sensitivity, 57.14% vs 71.43%). CONCLUSION HHAC could prove to be a valuable screening tool in the detection of FGR. Further studies are needed in a larger population. PMID:25818672

  9. A framework for implementation, education, research and clinical use of ultrasound in emergency departments by the Danish Society for Emergency Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Christian B; Nielsen, Klaus; Riishede, Minna

    2014-01-01

    The first Danish Society for Emergency Medicine (DASEM) recommendations for the use of clinical ultrasound in emergency departments has been made. The recommendations describes what DASEM believes as being current best practice for training, certification, maintenance of acquired competencies...

  10. Diagnostic value of CT compared to ultrasound in the evaluation of acute abdominal pain in children younger than 10 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Dola, Tamar; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of ultrasound compared to CT in evaluating acute abdominal pain of different causes in children 10 years of age and under, hospital records and imaging files of 4052 patients under age of 10 who had imaging for abdominal pain were reviewed. One-hundred-thirty-two patients (3 %), (74 males/58 females) who underwent ultrasound and CT within 24 h were divided by age: group I, ages 0-48 months (25 patients); group II, 49-84 months (53 patients); and group III, 85-120 months (54 patients). Diagnoses at ultrasound, CT, and discharge were compared. Cases of a change in diagnosis following CT and impact of the changed diagnosis on patient management were assessed. Non-diagnostic ultrasound or a diagnostic conundrum was present in a small percentage (3 %) of our patients. In the group of patients imaged with two modalities, CT changed the diagnosis in 73/132 patients (55.3 %). Patient management changed in 63/132 patients (47.7 %). CT changed the diagnosis in 46/64 patients with surgical conditions (71.8 %, p diagnostic or equivocal US in a small percentage of patients is probably sufficient to justify the additional radiation burden.

  11. Diagnostic errors related to acute abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medford-Davis, Laura; Park, Elizabeth; Shlamovitz, Gil; Suliburk, James; Meyer, Ashley N D; Singh, Hardeep

    2016-04-01

    Diagnostic errors in the emergency department (ED) are harmful and costly. We reviewed a selected high-risk cohort of patients presenting to the ED with abdominal pain to evaluate for possible diagnostic errors and associated process breakdowns. We conducted a retrospective chart review of ED patients >18 years at an urban academic hospital. A computerised 'trigger' algorithm identified patients possibly at high risk for diagnostic errors to facilitate selective record reviews. The trigger determined patients to be at high risk because they: (1) presented to the ED with abdominal pain, and were discharged home and (2) had a return ED visit within 10 days that led to a hospitalisation. Diagnostic errors were defined as missed opportunities to make a correct or timely diagnosis based on the evidence available during the first ED visit, regardless of patient harm, and included errors that involved both ED and non-ED providers. Errors were determined by two independent record reviewers followed by team consensus in cases of disagreement. Diagnostic errors occurred in 35 of 100 high-risk cases. Over two-thirds had breakdowns involving the patient-provider encounter (most commonly history-taking or ordering additional tests) and/or follow-up and tracking of diagnostic information (most commonly follow-up of abnormal test results). The most frequently missed diagnoses were gallbladder pathology (n=10) and urinary infections (n=5). Diagnostic process breakdowns in ED patients with abdominal pain most commonly involved history-taking, ordering insufficient tests in the patient-provider encounter and problems with follow-up of abnormal test results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Advances in point-of-care ultrasound in pediatric emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Rachel A; Levy, Jason A

    2014-06-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become an integral part of emergency medicine practice. Research evaluating POCUS in the care of pediatric patients has improved the understanding of its potential role in clinical care. Recent work has investigated the ability of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians to perform a wide array of diagnostic and procedural applications in POCUS ultrasound. Studies have demonstrated that PEM providers are able to identify an array of diseases, including intussusception, pyloric stenosis and appendicitis. Novel applications of ultrasound, such as a cardiac evaluation in the acutely ill patient or identification of skull fractures in the assessment of a patient with head injury, have shown excellent promise in recent studies. These novel applications have the potential to reshape pediatric diagnostic algorithms. Key applications in PEM have been investigated in the recent publications. Further exploration of the ability to integrate ultrasound into routine practice will require larger-scale studies and continued growth of education in the field. The use of ultrasound in clinical practice has the potential to improve safety and efficiency of care in the pediatric emergency department.

  13. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms.

  14. Feasibility of dynamic cardiac ultrasound transmission via mobile phone for basic emergency teleconsultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Tae Ho; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Kang, Bo Seung

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the feasibility of using a camcorder mobile phone for teleconsulting about cardiac echocardiography. The diagnostic performance of evaluating left ventricle (LV) systolic function was measured by three emergency medicine physicians. A total of 138 short echocardiography video sequences (from 70 subjects) was selected from previous emergency room ultrasound examinations. The measurement of LV ejection fraction based on the transmitted video displayed on a mobile phone was compared with the original video displayed on the LCD monitor of the ultrasound machine. The image quality was evaluated using the double stimulation impairment scale (DSIS). All observers showed high sensitivity. There was an improvement in specificity with the observer's increasing experience of cardiac ultrasound. Although the image quality of video on the mobile phone was lower than that of the original, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicated that there was no significant difference in diagnostic performance. Immediate basic teleconsulting of echocardiography movies is possible using current commercially-available mobile phone systems.

  15. The Accuracy of Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Detecting Small Bowel Obstruction in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pourmand

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiological imaging plays an essential role in the evaluation of a patient with suspected small bowel obstruction (SBO. In a few studies, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS has been utilized as a primary imaging modality in patients with suspected SBO. POCUS has been shown to be an accurate tool in the diagnosis of SBO with multiple research studies noting a consistent high sensitivity with a range of 94–100% and specificity of 81–100%. Specific sonographic findings that increase the likelihood of SBO include dilatation of small bowel loops > 25 mm, altered intestinal peristalsis, increased thickness of the bowel wall, and intraperitoneal fluid accumulation. Studies also reported that emergency physicians could apply this technique with limited and short-term ultrasound training. In this article, we aim to review the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound examinations performed by emergency physicians in patients with suspected SBO.

  16. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in gastrointestinal hemorrhage and ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, J.I.; Torres, E.; Martinez-Cuesta, A. [Department of Radiology, Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, Avda Pio XII, s/n, Apt. 192, 31080 Pamplona (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    Radiologist and radiological techniques play a crucial role in imaging and interventional procedures in gastrointestinal hemorrhage and ischemia. They are involved in emergency situations that may lead to the death of the patient. Therefore correct diagnosis and treatment are absolutely decisive. We have a great potential in tools of diagnosis, with angiography serving not only as the gold standard for diagnosis even offering a potentially effective treatment for various pathologies. Nevertheless, other techniques have developed greatly during the past decade, including in standard protocols for the management of vascular pathologies such as those discussed here. Ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging and their applications in the vascular field such as in as Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography provide sensitivity as high as that of angiography for detecting vascular-dependent lesions and for evaluating and excluding other causes of acute or chronic abdomen disorders. This contribution evaluates clinical aspects, various imaging techniques, and interventional effectiveness related to gastrointestinal hemorrhage and ischemia. (orig.)

  17. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in gastrointestinal hemorrhage and ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, J.I.; Torres, E.; Martinez-Cuesta, A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiologist and radiological techniques play a crucial role in imaging and interventional procedures in gastrointestinal hemorrhage and ischemia. They are involved in emergency situations that may lead to the death of the patient. Therefore correct diagnosis and treatment are absolutely decisive. We have a great potential in tools of diagnosis, with angiography serving not only as the gold standard for diagnosis even offering a potentially effective treatment for various pathologies. Nevertheless, other techniques have developed greatly during the past decade, including in standard protocols for the management of vascular pathologies such as those discussed here. Ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging and their applications in the vascular field such as in as Doppler ultrasound, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography provide sensitivity as high as that of angiography for detecting vascular-dependent lesions and for evaluating and excluding other causes of acute or chronic abdomen disorders. This contribution evaluates clinical aspects, various imaging techniques, and interventional effectiveness related to gastrointestinal hemorrhage and ischemia. (orig.)

  18. Sac Angiography and Glue Embolization in Emergency Endovascular Aneurysm Repair for Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Yuya, E-mail: r06118@hotmail.co.jp; Nishimura, Jun-ichi, E-mail: jun-ichi-n@nifty.com; Hase, Soichiro, E-mail: haseman@hotmail.co.jp; Yamasaki, Motoshige, E-mail: genyamasaki@gmail.com [Kawasaki Saiwai Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to demonstrate a sac angiography technique and evaluate the feasibility of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of the ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) sac in emergency endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in hemodynamically unstable patients.MethodsA retrospective case series of three patients in whom sac angiography was performed during emergency EVAR for ruptured AAA was reviewed. After stent graft deployment, angiography within the sac of aneurysm (sac angiography) was performed by manually injecting 10 ml of contrast material through a catheter to identify the presence and site of active bleeding. In two patients, sac angiography revealed active extravasation of the contrast material, and NBCA embolization with a coaxial catheter system was performed to achieve prompt sealing.ResultsSac angiography was successful in all three patients. In the two patients who underwent NBCA embolization for aneurysm sac bleeding, follow-up computed tomography (CT) images demonstrated the accumulation of NBCA consistent with the bleeding site in preprocedural CT images.ConclusionsEVAR is associated with a potential risk of ongoing bleeding from type II or IV endoleaks into the disrupted aneurysm sac in patients with severe coagulopathy. Therefore, sac angiography and NBCA embolization during emergency EVAR may represent a possible technical improvement in the treatment of ruptured AAA in hemodynamically unstable patients.

  19. Emergency ultrasound in the detection of pediatric long-bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barata, Isabel; Spencer, Robert; Suppiah, Ara; Raio, Christopher; Ward, Mary Frances; Sama, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Long-bone fractures represent one of the most commonly sustained injuries following trauma and account for nearly 4% of emergency department visits in the United States each year. These fractures are associated with a significant risk of bleeding and neurovascular compromise. Delays in their identification and treatment can lead to loss of limb and even death. Although emergency physicians currently rely predominantly on radiography for the examination of long-bone injuries, emergency ultrasound has several advantages over radiography and may be useful in the identification of long-bone fractures. Ultrasound is rapid, noninvasive, and cost-effective. Unlike radiography, ultrasound does not expose children to ionizing radiation, which has been linked to cancer. The goal of this study was to assess the agreement between emergency physicians' and radiologists' final assessments of suspected long-bone fractures using emergency ultrasound and radiography, respectively, in the pediatric population. This is a prospective study involving a convenience sample of pediatric patients (fracture. Suspected fractures were characterized by swelling, erythema, and localized pain. Patients who had a history of fracture, extremity deformity, orthopedic hardware in the traumatized area, or an open fracture were excluded from this study. Each investigator received limited, focused training in the use of ultrasonography for fracture identification and localization. This training consisted of a brief didactic session and video review of normal and fractured long-bones. A total of 53 subjects (mean age, 10.2 [SD, 3.8] years; 56.6% were male) were enrolled, which corresponded to 98 ultrasound examinations. Sixty-nine scans (70.4%) involved bones of the upper extremity, and 29 (29.6%) the lower extremity. Radiography identified a total of 43 fractures. The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in the detection of long-bone fractures were 95.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82

  20. Characterization of the mechanical behavior and pathophysiological state of abdominal aortic aneurysms based on 4D ultrasound strain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittek, Andreas; Blase, Christopher; Derwich, Wojciech; Schmitz-Rixen, Thomas; Fritzen, Claus-Peter

    2017-06-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) are a degenerative disease of the human aortic wall that may lead to weakening and eventually rupture of the wall with high mortality rates. Since the currently established criterion for surgical or endovascular treatment of the disease is imprecise in the individual case and treatment is not free of complications, the need for additional patient-individual biomarkers for short-term AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making. Time resolved 3D ultrasound combined with speckle tracking algorithms is a novel non-invasive medical imaging technique that provides full-field displacement and strain measurements of aortic and aneurysmal wall motion. This is patient-individual information that has not been used so far to assess wall strength and rupture risk. The current study uses simple statistical indices of the heterogeneous spatial distribution of in-plane strain components as biomarkers for the pathological state of the aortic and aneurysmal wall. The pathophysiological rationale behind this approach are the known changes in microstructural composition of the aortic wall with progression of AAA development that results in increased stiffening and heterogeneity of the walls mechanical properties and in decreased wall strength. In a comparative analysis of the aortic wall motion of young volunteers without known cardiovascular diseases, aged arteriosclerotic patients without AAA, and AAA patients, mean values of all in-plane strain components were significantly reduced, and the heterogeneity of circumferential strain was significantly increased in the AAA group compared to both other groups. The capacity of the proposed method to differentiate between wall motion of aged, arteriosclerotic patients and AAA patients is a promising step towards a new method for in vivo assessment of AAA wall strength or stratification of AAA rupture risk as basis for improved clinical decision making on surgical or endovascular

  1. Retained Products of Conception: An Atypical Presentation Diagnosed Immediately with Bedside Emergency Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Adkins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retained products of conception is an important diagnosis to consider in patients presenting with postpartum complaints. Bedside ultrasound is a rapid, accurate, noninvasive modality to evaluate these patients. Objective. To report an atypical case of retained products of conception diagnosed with bedside ultrasound in the emergency department. Case Report. A 27-year-old female who was 1-month postpartum presented with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, and no fever. At the time of initial H&P, bedside ultrasound revealed echogenic material within the endometrial cavity with blood flow seen by color Doppler consistent with retained products of conception. The bedside ultrasound rapidly narrowed the differential and allowed a definitive diagnosis immediately. Ob/Gyn was consulted and dilation and curettage was performed in the operating room. Conclusions. Retained products of conception is an important diagnosis for the emergency physician to consider in at-risk patients. The sonographic findings are easily obtained and interpreted by emergency physicians. Earlier diagnosis of this disease process should lead to more focused patient evaluations and management.

  2. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice; Sebbane, Mustapha; Molinari, Nicolas; Riou, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10 -6 ) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10 -6 ) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  3. Systematic unenhanced CT for acute abdominal symptoms in the elderly patients improves both emergency department diagnosis and prompt clinical management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millet, Ingrid; Pages-Bouic, Emma; Curros-Doyon, Fernanda; Taourel, Patrice [CHU Lapeyronie, Department of Medical Imaging, Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Sebbane, Mustapha [Department of Emergency Medicine, CHU Lapeyronie, Montpellier (France); Molinari, Nicolas [Department of Medical Information and Statistics, CHU Montpellier (France); Riou, Bruno [GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, Department of Emergency Medicine and Surgery, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    To assess the added-value of systematic unenhanced abdominal computed tomography (CT) on emergency department (ED) diagnosis and management accuracy compared to current practice, in elderly patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal symptoms. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained. This prospective study included 401 consecutive patients 75 years of age or older, admitted to the ED with acute abdominal symptoms, and investigated by early systematic unenhanced abdominal CT scan. ED diagnosis and intended management before CT, after unenhanced CT, and after contrast CT if requested, were recorded. Diagnosis and management accuracies were evaluated and compared before CT (clinical strategy) and for two conditional strategies (current practice and systematic unenhanced CT). An expert clinical panel assigned a final diagnosis and management after a 3-month follow-up. Systematic unenhanced CT significantly improved the accurate diagnosis (76.8% to 85%, p=1.1 x 10{sup -6}) and management (88.5% to 95.8%, p=2.6 x 10{sup -6}) rates compared to current practice. It allowed diagnosing 30.3% of acute unsuspected pathologies, 3.4% of which were unexpected surgical procedure requirement. Systematic unenhanced abdominal CT improves ED diagnosis accuracy and appropriate management in elderly patients presenting with acute abdominal symptoms compared to current practice. (orig.)

  4. Intra­‑abdominal adhesions in ultrasound. Part I: The visceroperitoneal bordeline, anatomy and the method of examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It needs to be emphasized that ultrasonography is a primary test performed in order to evaluate the abdominal wall and structures located in their vicinity. It allows for the determination of the anatomy and lesions in this localization. Thorough knowledge con‑ cerning the ultrasound anatomy of the tested structures constitutes a basis of all diagnos‑ tic successes. Therefore, this part of the article is devoted to this subject matter. The pos‑ sibility to diagnose intra-abdominal adhesions with ultrasound is underestimated and rarely used. The aim of this paper is to discuss and document the ultrasound anatomy of the posterior surface of the abdominal wall as well as to present techniques directed at the detection of adhesions, in particular the visceroperitoneal ones. The posterior surface of the abdominal wall constitutes an extensive tissue area of complex structure, with folds and ligaments surrounded by various amounts of the epiperitoneal fat. In some places, this tissue separates the components of the fascia and peritoneum complex. The ultra‑ sound manifestation of this complex is two hyperechogenic lines placed parallelly to each other in the places where they are not separated by the accumulated adipose tissue. Another factor which separates the peritoneum from the viscera is of dynamic character. It is a so-called visceral slide induced by easy or deep breathing. Its size should not be lower than 1 cm and the deflections gradually and symmetrically diminish from the epi‑ gastric to hypogastric region. Last but not least, the evaluation of the reciprocal relation of the abdominal wall with viscera may be aided by rhythmical manual compressions on the abdominal wall (ballottement sign performed below the applied ultrasound trans‑ ducer. During this test, the size of the visceral slide in relation to the abdominal wall is observed. The maneuver is usually performed in uncooperative patients or those with shallow breath. The

  5. Association of race and ethnicity with management of abdominal pain in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tiffani J; Weaver, Matthew D; Borrero, Sonya; Davis, Esa M; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Zuckerbraun, Noel S; Kraemer, Kevin L

    2013-10-01

    To determine if race/ethnicity-based differences exist in the management of pediatric abdominal pain in emergency departments (EDs). Secondary analysis of data from the 2006-2009 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey regarding 2298 visits by patients ≤ 21 years old who presented to EDs with abdominal pain. Main outcomes were documentation of pain score and receipt of any analgesics, analgesics for severe pain (defined as ≥ 7 on a 10-point scale), and narcotic analgesics. Secondary outcomes included diagnostic tests obtained, length of stay (LOS), 72-hour return visits, and admission. Of patient visits, 70.1% were female, 52.6% were from non-Hispanic white, 23.5% were from non-Hispanic black, 20.6% were from Hispanic, and 3.3% were from "other" racial/ethnic groups; patients' mean age was 14.5 years. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusting for confounders revealed that non-Hispanic black patients were less likely to receive any analgesic (odds ratio [OR]: 0.61; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43-0.87) or a narcotic analgesic (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.18-0.81) than non-Hispanic white patients (referent group). This finding was also true for non-Hispanic black and "other" race/ethnicity patients with severe pain (ORs [95% CI]: 0.43 [0.22-0.87] and 0.02 [0.00-0.19], respectively). Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic patients were more likely to have a prolonged LOS than non-Hispanic white patients (ORs [95% CI]: 1.68 [1.13-2.51] and 1.64 [1.09-2.47], respectively). No significant race/ethnicity-based disparities were identified in documentation of pain score, use of diagnostic procedures, 72-hour return visits, or hospital admissions. Race/ethnicity-based disparities exist in ED analgesic use and LOS for pediatric abdominal pain. Recognizing these disparities may help investigators eliminate inequalities in care.

  6. Health outcomes in US children with abdominal pain at major emergency departments associated with race and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Louise; Haberland, Corinna; Thurm, Cary; Bhattacharya, Jay; Park, K T

    2015-01-01

    Over 9.6 million ED visits occur annually for abdominal pain in the US, but little is known about the medical outcomes of these patients based on demographics. We aimed to identify disparities in outcomes among children presenting to the ED with abdominal pain linked to race and SES. Data from 4.2 million pediatric encounters of abdominal pain were analyzed from 43 tertiary US children's hospitals, including 2.0 million encounters in the emergency department during 2004-2011. Abdominal pain was categorized as functional or organic abdominal pain. Appendicitis (with and without perforation) was used as a surrogate for abdominal pain requiring emergent care. Multivariate analysis estimated likelihood of hospitalizations, radiologic imaging, ICU admissions, appendicitis, appendicitis with perforation, and time to surgery and hospital discharge. Black and low income children had increased odds of perforated appendicitis (aOR, 1.42, 95% CI, 1.32- 1.53; aOR, 1.20, 95% CI 1.14 - 1.25). Blacks had increased odds of an ICU admission (aOR, 1.92, 95% CI 1.53 - 2.42) and longer lengths of stay (aHR, 0.91, 95% CI 0.86 - 0.96) than Whites. Minorities and low income also had lower rates of imaging for their appendicitis, including CT scans. The combined effect of race and income on perforated appendicitis, hospitalization, and time to surgery was greater than either separately. Based on race and SES, disparity of health outcomes exists in the acute ED setting among children presenting with abdominal pain, with differences in appendicitis with perforation, length of stay, and time until surgery.

  7. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... completed. Young children may need additional preparation. When scheduling an ultrasound for yourself or your child, ask ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  8. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  9. Predicting need for additional CT scan in children with a non-diagnostic ultrasound for appendicitis in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Takuya; Maeda, Shigenobu; Goldman, Ran D; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed to determine which children with suspected appendicitis should be considered for a computerized tomography (CT) scan after a non-diagnostic ultrasound (US) in the Emergency Department (ED). We retrospectively reviewed patients 0-18year old, who presented to the ED with complaints of abdominal pain, during 2011-2015 and while in the hospital had both US and CT. We recorded demographic and clinical data and outcomes, and used univariate and multivariate methods for comparing patients who did and didn't have appendicitis on CT after non-diagnostic US. Multivariate analysis was performed using logistic regression to determine what variables were independently associated with appendicitis. A total of 328 patients were enrolled, 257 with non-diagnostic US (CT: 82 had appendicitis, 175 no-appendicitis). Younger children and those who reported vomiting or had right lower abdominal quadrant (RLQ) tenderness, peritoneal signs or White Blood Cell (WBC) count >10,000 in mm 3 were more likely to have appendicitis on CT. RLQ tenderness (Odds Ratio: 2.84, 95%CI: 1.07-7.53), peritoneal signs (Odds Ratio: 11.37, 95%CI: 5.08-25.47) and WBC count >10,000 in mm 3 (Odds Ratio: 21.88, 95%CI: 7.95-60.21) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Considering CT with 2 or 3 of these predictors would have resulted in sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 67%, positive predictive value of 57% and negative predictive value of 96% for appendicitis. Ordering CT should be considered after non-diagnostic US for appendicitis only when children meet at least 2 predictors of RLQ tenderness, peritoneal signs and WBC>10,000 in mm 3 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ULTRASOUND GUIDED TRANSVERSUS ABDOMINIS PLANE BLOCK VERSUS STANDARD ANALGESIC CARE FOR POSTOPERATIVE PAIN RELIEF FOLLOWING TOTAL ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY, AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Joseph

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The transversus abdominis plane (TAP block is a technique which blocks the sensory nerves supplying the anterior abdominal wall. This prospective cohort study was done to evaluate the effectiveness of TAP block for postoperative pain in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty patients of ASA Grade 1 and 2 undergoing open abdominal hysterectomy were prospectively allocated into Group A and Group B. Group A patients (n = 30, received ultrasound guided TAP block along with 1 gm paracetamol 8th hourly and tramadol 1 mg/ kg as rescue analgesic. Group B patients (n = 30 received standard analgesic care with 1 gm paracetamol 8th hourly and tramadol 1 mg/ kg as rescue analgesic. TAP block was performed on completion of surgery in Group A patients by instilling 20 ml of 0.25% levobupivacaine into the transversus abdominis plane on each side under ultrasound guidance. Postoperatively Verbal Numerical Rating Scale, Sedation score, Nausea categorical scoring scale at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours and total tramadol requirement in first 24 hours were assessed in each group. RESULTS Verbal Numerical Rating Scale score was significantly reduced in Group A compared to Group B at 2, 4, 6 and 24 hours postoperatively and there was no difference in scores 12 hours postoperatively. Nausea was significantly lower in Group A patients at 2, 4 and 6 hours postoperatively with no difference at 12 and 24 hours postoperatively. There was significant difference in the sedation scale at 4, 6 and 24 hours postoperatively and no difference between both groups at 2 hours and 12 hours postoperatively. Total tramadol requirement in first 24 hours postoperatively was significantly lower in Group A compared to Group B (60.83 ± 14.208 mg Vs. 121.67 ± 19.402 mg, P value< 0.00. CONCLUSION Ultrasound guided TAP block along with standard analgesic care provided better analgesia as compared to standard analgesic care alone in the first 24

  11. The CT frequencies of various non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies in hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis patients and the general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ergün, Tarkan; Lakadamyal, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the frequency of non-traumatic acute abdominal emergencies in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (peritoneal dialysis (PD) and haemodialysis (HD)) patients and in the general population as diagnosed by computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: The abdominal CT findings of ESRD patients with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain during the years 2001–2010 have been retrospectively evaluated. Thirty-three HD (14 females, 19 males, mean age: 62 ± 10.5) and 22 PD patients (12 females, 10 males, mean age: 59 ± 9.4) with acute abdominal pathology based on their CT scans have been included into the study. In addition, 127 individuals (68 females, 59 males, mean age: 40.7 ± 12.8) with normal renal functions who presented with non-traumatic acute abdominal pain diagnosed with an acute abdominal pathology based on their CT scans have been prospectively evaluated during the years 2009–2010. Results: While the most frequent etiology in PD patients was peritonitis (45.4%), acute pancreatitis (13.6%) and perforation (18.1), and in HD patients it was nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia (18.1%) and spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding (21.2%). The basic causes of acute abdomen in the general population were ureteral stone (34.6%) and appendicitis (18.1%). Conclusions: The causes of acute abdominal pain in ESRD patients is significantly different when compared to the general population. And within this special patient population the etiology of acute abdomen differs depending on the renal replacement therapy modality they are receiving. Thus, the causes of acute abdomen in PD patients are mostly peritonitis, acute pancreatitis, and perforation, while being mostly nonocclusive mesenteric ischemia and spontaneous intraabdominal bleeding in patients receiving HD therapy.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound coil placement of gastric varices: Emerging modality for recurrent bleeding gastric varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Harwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices are the probable source of bleeding in 10-36% of patients, with acute variceal bleeding and carry high mortality and rebleeding rates. Till date, cyanoacrylate glue injection is considered as the standard of care but has high complication rate. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS guided coil placement is a new emerging technique of management of gastric varices. In this case report, we detail the EUS guided coil placement for management of gastric varices after failed glue injections.

  13. Abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordany, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    Abdominal injury is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. Ten percent of trauma-related deaths are due to abdominal injury. Thousands of children are involved in auto accidents annually; many suffer severe internal injury. Child abuse is a second less frequent but equally serious cause of internal abdominal injury. The descriptions of McCort and Eisenstein and their associates in the 1960s first brought to attention the frequency and severity of visceral injury as important manifestations of the child abuse syndrome. Blunt abdominal trauma often causes multiple injuries; in the past, many children have been subjected to exploratory surgery to evaluate the extent of possible hidden injury. Since the advent of noninvasive radiologic imaging techniques including radionuclide scans and ultrasound and, especially, computed tomography (CT), the radiologist has been better able to assess (accurately) the extent of abdominal injury and thus allow conservative therapy in many cases. Penetrating abdominal trauma occurs following gunshot wounds, stabbing, and other similar injury. This is fortunately, a relatively uncommon occurrence in most pediatric centers and will not be discussed specifically here, although many principles of blunt trauma diagnosis are valid for evaluation of penetrating abdominal trauma. If there is any question that a wound has extended intraperitonelly, a sinogram with water-soluble contrast material allows quick, accurate diagnosis. The presence of large amounts of free intraperitoneal gas suggests penetrating injury to the colon or other gas-containing viscus and is generally considered an indication for surgery

  14. Point-of-care ultrasound education for non-physician clinicians in a resource-limited emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Lori A; Muruganandan, Krithika M; Bisanzo, Mark C; Sebikali, Mugisha J; Dreifuss, Bradley A; Hammerstedt, Heather S; Nelson, Sara W; Nayabale, Irene; Adhikari, Srikar; Shah, Sachita P

    2015-08-01

    To describe the outcomes and curriculum components of an educational programme to train non-physician clinicians working in a rural, Ugandan emergency department in the use of POC ultrasound. The use of point-of-care ultrasound was taught to emergency care providers through lectures, bedsides teaching and hands-on practical sessions. Lectures were tailored to care providers' knowledge base and available therapeutic means. Every ultrasound examination performed by these providers was recorded over 4.5 years. Findings of these examinations were categorised as positive, negative, indeterminate or procedural. Other radiologic studies ordered over this same time period were also recorded. A total of 22,639 patients were evaluated in the emergency department by emergency care providers, and 2185 point-of-care ultrasound examinations were performed on 1886 patients. Most commonly used were the focused assessment with sonography in trauma examination (53.3%) and echocardiography (16.4%). Point-of-care ultrasound studies were performed more frequently than radiology department-performed studies. Positive findings were documented in 46% of all examinations. We describe a novel curriculum for point-of-care ultrasound education of non-physician emergency practitioners in a resource-limited setting. These non-physician clinicians integrated ultrasound into clinical practice and utilised this imaging modality more frequently than traditional radiology department imaging with a large proportion of positive findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Human Cystic Echinococcosis in the Cusco Region of the Peruvian Highlands Diagnosed Using Focused Abdominal Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarozzi, Francesca; Hou, Amy; Morales, Maria Luisa; Giordani, Maria Teresa; Vilca, Freddy; Mozo, Karen; Bascope, Ruben; White, A Clinton; Brunetti, Enrico; Chen, Lin; Cabada, Miguel M

    2017-06-01

    AbstractLatin America is among the highly endemic regions for cystic echinococcosis (CE). In Peru, an estimated 1,139 disability-adjusted life years are lost annually from surgical treatment of CE. This is comparable with the combined total for Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, and Chile. The prevalence of human infection has been investigated in the central Peruvian Andes, but there are no community-based screening data from other regions of Peru. We carried out a population survey in January 2015 using abdominal ultrasound to estimate the prevalence of abdominal CE in the Canas and Canchis provinces, in the Cusco region of Peru. Among 1,351 subjects screened, 41 (3%) had CE. There was significant variation between communities with similar socioeconomic features in a small geographical area. A history of CE was reported by 4.1% of the screened subjects, among whom 30.3% still had CE on ultrasound. Among patients reporting previous CE treatment, 14.9% had CE in active stages. Limited education, community of residence, and knowing people with CE in the community were associated with CE. These results demonstrate a significant burden of CE in the region and suggest the need for further investigations, control activities, and optimization of clinical management for CE in this area.

  16. Analgesic effect of ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block after total abdominal hysterectomy: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røjskjaer, Jesper O; Gade, Erik; Kiel, Louise B; Lind, Morten N; Pedersen, Lars M; Kristensen, Billy B; Rasmussen, Yvonne H; Foss, Nicolai B

    2015-03-01

    To assess the effect of bilateral ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block with ropivacaine compared with placebo as part of a multimodal analgesic regimen. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial following the CONSORT criteria. Hvidovre University Hospital. Forty-six women scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy. Women received either ropivacaine 0.75%, 20 mL (n = 24) or 0.9% saline, 20 mL (n = 24) in the transversus abdominis plane on each side. Primary outcome was the 24-h postoperative morphine consumption. Secondary outcomes were pain scores at rest and during coughing, postoperative nausea and vomiting at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h, and time to first mobilization. There was no difference in the mean 24-h postoperative morphine consumption between the two groups (p = 0.733). The ropivacaine group had significantly lower median pain scores at 1 h (p = 0.008) and 2 h (p = 0.027) postoperatively at rest and at 8 h (p = 0.028) during coughing. There was no significant difference in other secondary outcomes. There was no reduction in 24-h morphine consumption when using an ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block in women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. As part of a multimodal regimen the transversus abdominis plane block showed some effect on pain scores at rest only in the early postoperative period. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Randomized multicentre feasibility trial of intermediate care versus standard ward care after emergency abdominal surgery (InCare trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Andersen, M; Waldau, T; Wetterslev, J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency abdominal surgery carries a considerable risk of death and postoperative complications. Early detection and timely management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim was to evaluate the effect and feasibility of intermediate care compared with standard ward care...... ward within 24 h of emergency abdominal surgery. Participants were randomized to either intermediate care or standard surgical ward care after surgery. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: In total, 286 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. The trial...... was terminated after the interim analysis owing to slow recruitment and a lower than expected mortality rate. Eleven (7·6 per cent) of 144 patients assigned to intermediate care and 12 (8·5 per cent) of 142 patients assigned to ward care died within 30 days of surgery (odds ratio 0·91, 95 per cent c.i. 0·38 to 2...

  18. An investigation of the reproducibility of ultrasound measures of abdominal muscle activation in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Chris G.; Latimer, Jane; Hodges, Paul W.; Shirley, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) measures are used by clinicians and researchers to evaluate improvements in activity of the abdominal muscles in patients with low back pain. Studies evaluating the reproducibility of these US measures provide some information; however, little is known about the reproducibility of these US measures over time in patients with low back pain. The objectives of this study were to estimate the reproducibility of ultrasound measurements of automatic activation of the lateral abdominal wall muscles using a leg force task in patients with chronic low back pain. Thirty-five participants from an existing randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled trial participated in the study. A reproducibility analysis was undertaken from all patients using data collected at baseline and after treatment. The reproducibility of measurements of thickness, muscle activation (thickness changes) and muscle improvement/deterioration after intervention (differences in thickness changes from single images made before and after treatment) was analysed. The reproducibility of static images (thickness) was excellent (ICC2,1 = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.96–0.97, standard error of the measurement (SEM) = 0.04 cm, smallest detectable change (SDC) = 0.11 cm), the reproducibility of thickness changes was moderate (ICC2,1 = 0.72, 95% CI 0.65–0.76, SEM = 15%, SDC 41%), while the reproducibility of differences in thickness changes from single images with statistical adjustment for duplicate measures was poor (ICC2,1 = 0.44, 95% CI 0.33–0.58, SEM = 21%, SDC = 66.5%). Improvements in the testing protocol must be performed in order to enhance reproducibility of US as an outcome measure for abdominal muscle activation. PMID:19415347

  19. Realtime ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy in emergency setting: the glass ceiling has been broken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Parli Raghavan; Vijai, M N; Shouche, Sachin

    2017-01-01

    In recent years ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy (USPCT) has become a routine practice in critical care units. Its safety and superiority over conventional percutaneous tracheostomy and bronchoscopic guided PCT is proven to be non-inferior in elective cases. However its role in emergency percutaneous tracheostomy has never been studied, since percutaneous tracheostomy itself remains an enigma in accessing emergency airway. There is no report of use of ultrasound guided percutaneous tracheostomy in emergency setting so far in the literature. We report our early experience with USPCT in emergency setting. Sixteen adult patients who required access to an emergency surgical airway after failure to accomplish emergency oro-tracheal intubation were the study population. Their airway was accessed by USPCT. Recorded data included clinical and demographic data including time taken to perform the procedure and complications. Short term and long term follow ups for a period of 2 years were done for the survivors. Twelve male and four female patients underwent the procedure and the average time of the procedure was 3.6 min with no failures nor conversions to surgical tracheostomy and no complications. The average oxygen saturation was 86% and average Glasgow coma scale was 8.4. This time period included the oxygen insufflation time. 10 patients were decannulated while six patients died due to the pathology of the disease itself. There were no complications in either short term or long term follow up. USPCT has a definitive role in emergency both in trauma and non-trauma setting. It is safe, feasible and faster in experienced hands. Use of USPCT in emergency setting has further narrowed the list of contraindications of percutaneous tracheostomy.

  20. Effect of body mass index on shifts in ultrasound-based image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy for abdominal malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Mehee; Fuller, Clifton D.; Wang, Samuel J.; Siddiqi, Ather; Wong, Adrian; Thomas, Charles R.; Fuss, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: We investigated whether corrective shifts determined by daily ultrasound-based image-guidance correlate with body mass index (BMI) of patients treated with image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) for abdominal malignancies. The utility of daily image-guidance, particularly for patients with BMI > 25.0, is examined. Materials and methods: Total 3162 ultrasound-directed shifts were performed in 86 patients. Direction and magnitude of shifts were correlated with pretreatment BMI. Bivariate statistical analysis and analysis of set-up correction data were performed using systematic and random error calculations. Results: Total 2040 daily alignments were performed. Average 3D vector of set-up correction for all patients was 12.1 mm/fraction. Directional and absolute shifts and 3D vector length were significantly different between BMI cohorts. 3D displacement averaged 4.9 mm/fraction and 6.8mm/fraction for BMI ≤ 25.0 and BMI > 25.0, respectively. Systematic error in all axes and 3D vector was significantly greater for BMI > 25.0. Differences in random error were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Set-up corrections derived from daily ultrasound-based IG-IMRT of abdominal tumors correlated with BMI. Daily image-guidance may improve precision of IMRT delivery with benefits assessed for the entire population, particularly patients with increased habitus. Requisite PTV margins suggested in the absence of daily image-guidance are significantly greater in patients with BMI > 25.0.

  1. Superior Reproducibility of the Leading to Leading Edge and Inner to Inner Edge Methods in the Ultrasound Assessment of Maximum Abdominal Aortic Diameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgbjerg, Jens; Bøgsted, Martin; Lindholt, Jes S; Behr-Rasmussen, Carsten; Hørlyck, Arne; Frøkjær, Jens B

    2018-02-01

    Controversy exists regarding optimal caliper placement in ultrasound assessment of maximum abdominal aortic diameter. This study aimed primarily to determine reproducibility of caliper placement in relation to the aortic wall with the three principal methods: leading to leading edge (LTL), inner to inner edge (ITI), and outer to outer edge (OTO). The secondary aim was to assess the mean difference between the OTO, ITI, and LTL diameters and estimate the impact of using either of these methods on abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) prevalence in a screening program. Radiologists (n=18) assessed the maximum antero-posterior abdominal aortic diameter by completing repeated caliper placements with the OTO, LTL, and ITI methods on 50 still abdominal aortic images obtained from an AAA screening program. Inter-observer reproducibility was calculated as the limit of agreement with the mean (LoA), which represents expected deviation of a single observer from the mean of all observers. Intra-observer reproducibility was assessed averaging the LoA for each observer with their repeated measurements. Based on data from an AAA screening trial and the estimated mean differences between the three principal methods, AAA prevalence was estimated using each of the methods. The inter-observer LoA of the OTO, ITI, and LTL was 2.6, 1.9, and 1.9 mm, whereas the intra-observer LoA was 2.0, 1.6, and 1.5 mm, respectively. Mean differences of 5.0 mm were found between OTO and ITI measurements, 2.6 mm between OTO and LTL measurements, and 2.4 mm between LTL and ITI measurements. The prevalence of AAA almost doubled using OTO instead of ITI, while the difference between ITI and LTL was minor (3.3% vs. 4.0% AAA). The study shows superior reproducibility of LTL and ITI compared with the OTO method of caliper placement in ultrasound determination of maximum abdominal aortic diameter, and the choice of caliper placement method significantly affects the prevalence of AAAs in screening programs

  2. Immediate Emergency Department Diagnosis of Pyloric Stenosis with Point-of-care Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Dorinzi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A 15-day-old male who was born at term presented with non-bilious projectile vomiting. He was nontoxic and his abdomen was benign without masses. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS showed hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (HPS. Typical findings include target sign; pyloric muscle thickness greater than three millimeters (mm; channel length greater than 15–18 mm; and lack of gastric emptying. The patient was admitted; consultative ultrasound (US was negative, but repeated 48 hours later for persistent vomiting. This second US was interpreted as HPS, which was confirmed surgically. Pyloromyotomy was successful. Few reports describe POCUS by general emergency physicians to diagnose HPS. Here, we emphasize the value in repeat US for patients with persistent symptoms.

  3. Ultrasound study of scrotal pathology presenting as acute scrotal pain in the emergency room setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozano, C.; Serrano, C.; Revilla, Y.; Miralles, M.; Pozo, G. del; Lopez, U.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this reports is to review the most significant ultrasonographic features of the clinical entries that most frequently present as acute scrotal pain in childhood. We review 145 cases of acute scrotal referred by the emergency unit to the Radiology Service over a four-year period (1992-1995). All the patients were studied by B-mode ultrasound and the great majority also underwent color duplex-Doppler ultrasound. A wide variety of diseases were recorded, comprised of epididymitis (n=38), epididymo-orchitis (n=24), hydrocele (n=26), testicular torsion (n=9), cord cyst (n=9), epididymal cyst (n=7), persisting peritoneal-vagina fistula (n=6), hydatid torsion (n=4), sheath hematoma (n=4), laceration (n=4), hematocele (n=3), varicocele (n=3), epididymal hematoma (n=2), testicular hematoma (n=2), tumor (n=2) and inguinoscrotal hernia (n=2). (Author) 20 refs

  4. A rare diagnosis of abdominal pain presentation in the emergency department: Idiopathic omental bleeding: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Hung; Liu, Kuan-Ting; Wen, Chun-Kai

    2017-12-01

    Idiopathic omental bleeding is a rare cause of acute abdomen, with only a few reported cases. It usually presents with abdominal pain and may be life-threatening. As it rarely occurs, it may not be considered initially during patient presentation. A 35-year-old male came to our emergency department with abdominal pain present for around 5 to 6 hours. The patient complained of left upper quadrant abdominal pain after eating breakfast. The only associated symptom was 3 episodes of vomiting up food. Physical examination revealed mild left upper quadrant abdominal tenderness without muscle guarding or rebounding pain. Blood examination showed leukocytosis with neutrophil predominance and C reactive protein elevation. The pain was persistent and relief was not obtained by medication. Computed tomography showed a large lobular-contour homogenous slightly hyperdense lesion without enhancement along the greater curvature of the stomach in the lesser sac. A surgeon was consulted and laparotomy was suggested. Hematoma was found at Morrison pouch, subsplenic fossa, and lesser sac under operation. Laparotomy and ligation for hemostasis. The patient was discharged with stable condition after 7 days of hospitalization. This diagnosis should be considered in patients presenting with epigastric pain and vomiting after eating while in the emergency department because this disease might be life-threatening. This case highlights 2 important learning points. First, idiopathic omental bleeding could occur after eating in patients without underlying disease or trauma history, and this disease should be taken into consideration when acute abdomen occurs. Second, emergent laparotomy is indicated if the cause of acute abdomen is not clear. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... GI) contrast exams and ultrasound are preferred for evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in babies, such as ...

  6. Atypical Presentation of a Type 2 Endoleak following Emergency Open Repair of a Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sharma

    Full Text Available : Background: An endoleak is a common complication following EVAR. Specifically, a Type 2 endoleak occurs because of retrograde flow from lumbar vessels outside the endograft within the aneurysm sac. Even though it is common following EVAR, it has not been identified as a complication following open ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA repair. Report: A 73-year-old male underwent open repair of a ruptured AAA. Five months later, computed tomography revealed filling from a lumbar vessel mimicking a Type 2 “endoleak.” The initial ultrasound showed a single pair of lumbar vessels with aneurysm sac expansion 8 weeks later. The “endoleak” and expanding sac were treated, and the 2-year surveillance demonstrated sac shrinkage. Discussion: Because endoleak is a complication after EVAR, this case provides a unique presentation of Type 2 “endoleak” physiology following open repair of a ruptured AAA. It is believed that it is necessary to expand the list of possible complications after open ruptured AAA repair to include “endoleaks.” Keywords: Endoleak: EVAR, Ruptured aneurysm, Open abdominal aortic aneurysm

  7. Can ultrasound extended emergency (EFAST) replace the chest radiograph in the initial approach to trauma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre Jimenez, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity diagnosed between ultrasound Extended emergency (EFAST) and portable radiography was compared. Life-threatening pathologies are detected in the initial approach to trauma, through an analysis comparative between EFAST and portable chest radiography. So, the need or not both studies or if the use of EFAST as the only diagnostic method in primary evaluation of trauma can be limited. The study has concluded that the EFAST can be used as the only tool for polytrauma patients, although in this analysis the sample has been very small [es

  8. THE VALUE OF BEDSIDE ULTRASOUND IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF THYROTOXICOSIS AND THYROTOXIC CARDIAC EMERGENCIES- A SHORT-TERM STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Mushthaque P; Kunhi Kannan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many times in ICU patient’s thyrotoxicosis is suspected and its diagnosis is hindered by many fallacies of clinical examination and lab reports. This happens especially with cardiac emergencies. The role of Ultrasound examination of thyroid in ICU patients admitted for different causes needs to be studied elaborately. AIM To assess the thyrotoxic burden in the ICU of suspected thyroid disease in patients; find out the benefit of thyroid ultrasound in evaluating...

  9. Emergency ultrasound and echocardiography in patients with infarct-related cardiogenic shock : A survey among members of the German Society of Medical Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, G; Hempel, D; Pfister, R; Janssens, U

    2018-04-09

    Current international and national guidelines promote the use of emergency echocardiography in patients with cardiogenic shock. We assessed whether these recommendations are followed in clinical practice of infarct-related cardiogenic shock patients. For this purpose we conducted a web-based survey among all members of the German Society of Medical Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine (DGIIN); 40% of the DGIIN members completed the survey. Participants reported that in their department emergency echocardiography/ultrasound is performed on most patients in infarct-related cardiogenic shock presenting to the emergency department/chest pain unit or intensive care unit (58.6% versus 81.4%). Only 33% stated that on patients admitted directly to the catheterization laboratory emergency ultrasound/echocardiography is applied in their institution. Local availability of a standardized algorithm was lacking in the majority of departments (77.2%). A great proportion (38.3%) of participants stated that they personally had no formal training in emergency ultrasound. In order to meet the demands of the current guidelines, in addition to integration of ultrasound examinations into diagnostic algorithms, a structured training of all emergency and intensive care physicians is necessary.

  10. Focused cardiac ultrasound in the emergency department for patients admitted with respiratory symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, C. B.

    2015-01-01

    In patients admitted with respiratory failure, a large proportion is diagnosed incorrectly in the emergency department and an even larger proportion seems to receive inappropriate treatment. Inappropriate initial treatment of these patients in the emergency department is associated with increased...... triage, patients with cardiac arrest, patients with undifferentiated shock, patients with cardiopulmonary instability, patients with respiratory symptoms, trauma patients with suspected cardiac injuries, and assessment of the fluid status before fluid loading. When using focused cardiac ultrasound (US......) in patients with respiratory symptoms, the typical objectives would be to identify pericardial effusion and enlargement of cardiac cavities, to estimate global systolic left-ventricular function, and to assess the volume status. The routine use of focused cardiac US in patients with respiratory symptoms may...

  11. Removal of emerging contaminants by simultaneous application of membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondes, Mona Freda N.; Naddeo, Vincenzo; Belgiorno, Vincenzo; Ballesteros, Florencio

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Above 99% of the emerging contaminants were removed in the USAMe process. • Influence of PAC dose and US frequency on removal is studied. • Improved performance is due to PAC adsorption enhancement and sonolytic degradation. • US irradiation improved efficiency and delayed declines in the removal of contaminants. • Performance of the hybrid process is better under lower frequency ultrasound irradiation. -- Abstract: Advanced wastewater treatment is necessary to effectively remove emerging contaminants (ECs) with chronic toxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, and the capability to induce the proliferation of highly resistant microbial strains in the environment from before wastewater disposal or reuse. This paper investigates the efficiency of a novel hybrid process that applies membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation simultaneously to remove ECs. Diclofenac, carbamazepine, and amoxicillin are chosen for this investigation because of their assessed significant environmental risks. Removal mechanisms and enhancement effects are analysed in single and combined processes. The influence of adsorbent dose and ultrasonic frequency to EC removal are also investigated. Results suggest that adsorption is probably the main removal mechanism and is affected by the nature of ECs and the presence of other components in the mixture. Almost complete removals are achieved in the hybrid process for all ECs

  12. Removal of emerging contaminants by simultaneous application of membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Secondes, Mona Freda N. [Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines – Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Naddeo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vnaddeo@unisa.it [Sanitary and Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Fisciano 84084 (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Belgiorno, Vincenzo [Sanitary and Environmental Engineering Division (SEED), Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, Fisciano 84084 (Saudi Arabia) (Italy); Ballesteros, Florencio [Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines – Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Above 99% of the emerging contaminants were removed in the USAMe process. • Influence of PAC dose and US frequency on removal is studied. • Improved performance is due to PAC adsorption enhancement and sonolytic degradation. • US irradiation improved efficiency and delayed declines in the removal of contaminants. • Performance of the hybrid process is better under lower frequency ultrasound irradiation. -- Abstract: Advanced wastewater treatment is necessary to effectively remove emerging contaminants (ECs) with chronic toxicity, endocrine disrupting effects, and the capability to induce the proliferation of highly resistant microbial strains in the environment from before wastewater disposal or reuse. This paper investigates the efficiency of a novel hybrid process that applies membrane ultrafiltration, activated carbon adsorption, and ultrasound irradiation simultaneously to remove ECs. Diclofenac, carbamazepine, and amoxicillin are chosen for this investigation because of their assessed significant environmental risks. Removal mechanisms and enhancement effects are analysed in single and combined processes. The influence of adsorbent dose and ultrasonic frequency to EC removal are also investigated. Results suggest that adsorption is probably the main removal mechanism and is affected by the nature of ECs and the presence of other components in the mixture. Almost complete removals are achieved in the hybrid process for all ECs.

  13. Semi-automatic motion compensation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound images from abdominal organs for perfusion analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schafer, S.; Nylund, K.; Saevik, F.; Engjom, T.; Mézl, M.; Jiřík, Radovan; Dimcevski, G.; Gilja, O.H.; Tönnies, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 63, AUG 1 (2015), s. 229-237 ISSN 0010-4825 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/2380 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : ultrasonography * motion analysis * motion compensation * registration * CEUS * contrast-enhanced ultrasound * perfusion * perfusion modeling Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 1.521, year: 2015

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound in the evaluation of chronic upper abdominal pain of unknown etiology: a retrospective chart review examining the efficacy of EUS in determining a new diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michelle B; Ramirez, Jonathan C; De La Rosa, Lisa M; Wood, Adam S; Desai, Shiv; Arjunan, Ananth; Song, Juhee; Erickson, Richard A

    2015-02-01

    To explore the utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in the evaluation of chronic upper abdominal pain (UAP) of undetermined etiology. Chronic UAP is a common problem with a challenging diagnosis and management. The role of EUS in the diagnosis of UAP may minimize additional testing; however, few studies describe the percentage of new diagnoses yielded in these patients. We conducted a retrospective analysis by reviewing electronic medical records at Scott and White Memorial Hospital, Texas A&M Health Sciences Center for patients with abdominal pain for ≥ 12 months not explained by previous workup referred for EUS for chronic UAP from January 1, 1998 through October 1, 2007. Patients with previous EUS in past 12 months were excluded from the study. Patient demographic data and imaging performed 6 months before and 24 months after EUS were reviewed and results documented. EUS was successful at diagnosing a new clinical etiology of chronic UAP in 33 patients (8.89%) with previous workup that was unrevealing for a definitive diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses included pancreaticobiliary tree abnormalities, chronic pancreatitis, and fatty liver disease. Our results support the fact that the majority of patients UAP with prior imaging will have no identifiable organic etiology found on EUS to explain their pain; however, we suggest that EUS be considered in patients with suspected pancreatic or biliary pathology.

  15. Study on value of Extended-Focused Abdominal Scan For Trauma (e-FAST performed by non-radiologist emergency care doctors in Management of Trauma at Emergency Trauma Centre, Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya,Galle, Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne RW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and usefulness of ultrasound in the hands of emergency physicians and medical officers who are non-radiologistsin assessing Trauma patients at Emergency Trauma Centre(ETC at Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya, Galle, Sri Lanka Methodology We performed an observational study on Trauma patients admitted to Emergency Department at Teaching Hospital, Karapitiya from 1.12.2014 to 31.12.2014 who fulfilled indications for e-FAST using a specially designed performa. Accuracy of eFAST was tested by comparing the original with subsequent imaging, clinical decision by surgeons, findings at surgery or more than one of the above. Results 69 patients fulfilled the entry criteria.Nineteen of the scans were performed by consultants while rest was done by senior medical officers. All of them were trained in eFAST. Of the 20 scans which were positive there were four pneumothoraxes and one haemothorax. 15 scans which were positive for intraperitoneal free fluid were later. Out of 49 Patients who had negative scans 47 did not require surgery or any interventions. Other two required laparotomy later. Sensitivity and specificity ofeFast was 90.4% and 97.9% respectively. Positive predictive value was 95.0% while Negative predictive value was at 95.9% . Conclusions eFAST is a rapidand reliable alternative in detecting free intra-abdominal fluid as well as pneumotorax and haemothorax. It is a safe decision making tool which can be used with confidence and accuracy after brief training and experience by non radiologists which will reduce morbidity and mortality in trauma patients of Sri Lanka.

  16. Emergency Department Patient Perceptions of Transvaginal Ultrasound for Complications of First-Trimester Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panebianco, Nova; Shofer, Frances; O'Conor, Katie; Wihbey, Tristan; Mulugeta, Lakeisha; Baston, Cameron M; Suzuki, Evan; Alghamdi, Adel; Dean, Anthony

    2018-01-30

    Emergency department (ED) transvaginal ultrasound (US) is underused in clinical practice. This study assessed pregnant women's perceptions of ED transvaginal US in terms of pain, embarrassment, anxiety, and willingness to receive the procedure. Secondary variables include physicians' perceptions of patients' experiences. Women undergoing US examinations for complications of first-trimester pregnancy were prospectively surveyed before any US and after ED and/or radiology transvaginal US. Patients' and physicians' assessments of pain, embarrassment, and anxiety were measured with visual analog scales (0-100). A total of 398 women were enrolled. In the pre-US survey, the median anxiety score was 14 (interquartile range, 3-51), and 96% of patients were willing to have an ED transvaginal US if necessary. Of those who had ED transvaginal US, 96% would agree to have another examination. Patients reported minimal pain/embarrassment, and there was no difference if performed in the ED versus radiology (median pain, 11.5 versus 13; P = .433; median embarrassment, 7 versus 4; P = .345). Of the 48 who had both ED and radiology transvaginal US, 85% thought the ED transvaginal US was worthwhile. Physicians accurately assessed patient's embarrassment and pain (mean differences, 3.5 and -1.9, respectively; P > .25 for both); however, they overestimated them relative to the pelvic examination (mean difference for embarrassment, 12.8; P < .0001; pain, 8.0; P = .01). Pregnant ED patients report low levels of anxiety, pain, and embarrassment, and after ED transvaginal US, 96% would agree to have the examination again. There is no difference in pain/embarrassment between ED and radiology transvaginal US. Emergency department physicians accurately assessed patients' pain and embarrassment with ED transvaginal US but overestimated them compared to the pelvic examination. © 2018 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  17. Prevalence and sonographic changes compatible with fatty liver disease in patients referred for abdominal ultrasound examination in Aracaju, SE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josilda Ferreira Cruz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To estimate the prevalence and evaluate sonographic findings compatible with changes consistent with hepatic steatosis in patients referred for abdominal ultrasonography at four reference centers in Aracaju, SE, Brazil. Materials and Methods: Prospective, descriptive survey, with analytical and quantitative approach, comprising abdominal ultrasonography scans performed with a convex, dynamic 3.75 MHz transducer. Liver dimensions and parenchymal echotexture were evaluated, classifying hepatic steatosis into grades (1, 2 or 3. The SPSS® 22.0 software was used for statistical analysis, adopting p < 0.05 as significance level. Results: A total of 800 individuals (561 women and 239 men were evaluated. The prevalence of steatosis was 29.1%, and the male patients were most affected, presenting with more advanced grades of disease (p = 0.021, as follows: 119 grade 1 (51.0%; 94 grade 2 (40.4%; and 20 grade 3 (8.6%. The median age patients' was 46 years. Conclusion: In the present study sample, the prevalence of hepatic steatosis was high, particularly in the male patients. Ultrasonography is suggested as a first choice for the diagnosis of this condition, considering its wide availability, low cost and absence of side effects or risks to the patient.

  18. Magnesium sulphate as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane block in patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy under subarachnoid block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Rana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Transversus abdominis plane (TAP block has proven to be an effective component of multimodal analgesic regimens for a variety of abdominal procedures. Magnesium sulphate (MgSO4 N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist has the potential to be an ideal adjuvant in TAP block. We studied the efficacy of MgSO4as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in TAP block in patients scheduled for total abdominal hysterectomy (TAH under subarachnoid block (SAB. Methods: Sixty-five women belonging to American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1 or 2, aged between 35 and 70 years, scheduled for TAH under SAB were recruited. Patients in Group B (n = 32 received 18 mL 0.25% bupivacaine (45 mg with 2 mL normal saline (NS, whereas those in Group BM (n = 33 received 18 mL 0.25% bupivacaine (45 mg with 1.5 mL (150 mg MgSO4and 0.5 mL NS in the ultrasound (USG-guided TAP block performed on each side after the completion of the surgery under SAB. They were evaluated for pain at 0, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h, time to first rescue analgesic and duration of postoperative analgesia were noted. Results: The post-operative visual analogue scale (VAS scores were lower in Group BM at 4, 6 and 12 h (P < 0.05. Mean duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in Group BM with lesser requirement of rescue analgesic (P < 0.05 up to 12 h. Conclusion: MgSO4 (150 mg as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in USG-guided TAP block reduces post-operative pain scores, prolongs the duration of analgesia and decreases demands for rescue analgesics.

  19. Ultrasound-guided rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks for perioperative analgesia in upper abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Abdelsalam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Regional anesthetic techniques can be used to alleviate postoperative pain in patients undergoing major upper abdominal surgery. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of bilateral ultrasound (US-guided rectus sheath (RS and transversus abdominis plane (TAP blocks for better perioperative analgesia. Patients and Methods: It is a prospective, observer-blinded, randomized clinical study. 40 eligible patients undergoing elective liver resection or Whipple procedure were included. All patients received a standardized anesthetic technique. Group 1 (n = 20 received preincisional US-guided bilateral RS and TAP blocks using 20 ml volume of bupivacaine 0.25% for each, and group 2 (n = 20 received local wound infiltration at end of surgery with 40 ml of bupivacaine 0.25%. A standardized postoperative analgesic regimen composed of intravenous paracetamol and a morphine patient-controlled analgesia (PCA. The use of intraoperative fentanyl and recovery room morphine boluses, PCA-administered morphine, pain scores as well as number of patients′ experienced postoperative nausea and vomiting in the ward at 6 and 24 h were recorded. Results: Group 1 patients received a significantly lower cumulative intraoperative fentanyl, significantly lesser boluses of morphine in postanesthesia care unit, as well, significantly lower cumulative 24 h postoperative morphine dosage than the group 2 patients. Pain visual analog scale scores were significantly lower at both 6 and 24 h postoperatively in TAP group when compared with the no-TAP group. There were no complications related to the TAP block procedures. No signs or symptoms of local anesthetic systemic toxicity were detected. Conclusion: The combination of bilateral US-guided RS and TAP blocks provides excellent perioperative analgesia for major upper abdominal surgery.

  20. Feasibility and safety of ultrasound-guided nerve block for management of limb injuries by emergency care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeev Bhoi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients require procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA for the treatment of acute traumatic injuries. PSA has complications. Ultrasound (US guided peripheral nerve block is a safe alternative. Aim: Ultrasound guided nerve blocks for management of traumatic limb emergencies in Emergency Department (ED. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study conducted in ED. Materials and Methods: Patients above five years requiring analgesia for management of limb emergencies were recruited. Emergency Physicians trained in US guided nerve blocks performed the procedure. Statistical analysis: Effectiveness of pain control, using visual analogue scale was assessed at baseline and at 15 and 60 minutes after the procedure. Paired t test was used for comparison. Results: Fifty US guided nerve blocks were sciatic- 4 (8%, femoral-7 (14%, brachial- 29 (58%, median -6 (12%, and radial 2 (4% nerves. No patients required rescue PSA. Initial median VAS score was 9 (Inter Quartile Range [IQR] 7-10 and at 1 hour was 2(IQR 0-4. Median reduction in VAS score was 7.44 (IQR 8-10(75%, 1-2(25% (P=0.0001. Median procedure time was 9 minutes (IQR 3, 12 minutes and median time to reduction of pain was 5 minutes (IQR 1,15 minutes. No immediate or late complications noticed at 3 months. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks can be safely and effectively performed for upper and lower limb emergencies by emergency physicians with adequate training.

  1. Ostomy-related complications after emergent abdominal surgery: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Elisabet; Persson, Eva; Carlsson, Eva; Hallén, Anne-Marie; Fingren, Jeanette; Berndtsson, Ina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate ostomy-related complications and describe ostomy configuration in patients undergoing acute abdominal surgery. The study sample comprised 144 patients with a median age of 67 years (IOR: 53.5-78 years) who underwent an intestinal ostomy as part of an acute abdominal surgical procedure. The research setting was the surgical and gynecological clinics at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden. Ostomy configuration, diameter, height, and the presence of stomal and peristomal complications were assessed by a WOC nurse 1 to 2 times while in hospital, once at the ostomy outpatient clinic 2 weeks after discharge, and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months following ostomy creation. The types of ostomies evaluated were end colostomy (58%), end ileostomy (18%), loop ileostomy (17%), and loop colostomy (7%). Most stomal or peristomal complications occurred within 1 year after surgery (31 of 57; 54.4%). Necrosis, separation, and stenosis were most common in patients with an end colostomy. Peristomal skin complications occurred in 45% of subjects during the first 6 months after surgery. The ostomy's diameter decreased significantly during the hospital course and over the first 2 weeks following hospital discharge in patients with end colostomy (Postomy had peristomal skin problems ranging between 21% and 57% over this time period. The frequency of using a pouching system that incorporated convexity was highest in the case of loop ileostomy, used in 67% at 6 months. During the first 2 weeks after discharge, the physical configuration of the ostomy evolves and the pouching system must be frequently adjusted by a WOC nurse. Stomal and peristomal complications are prevalent during the first 2 postoperative years and especially during the first 6 months.

  2. Use of cadaver models in point-of-care emergency ultrasound education for diagnostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia, Brita E; Briese, Beau; Williams, Sarah R; Gharahbaghian, Laleh

    2012-10-01

    As the use of bedside emergency ultrasound (US) increases, so does the need for effective US education. To determine 1) what pathology can be reliably simulated and identified by US in human cadavers, and 2) feasibility of using cadavers to improve the comfort of emergency medicine (EM) residents with specific US applications. This descriptive, cross-sectional survey study assessed utility of cadaver simulation to train EM residents in diagnostic US. First, the following pathologies were simulated in a cadaver: orbital foreign body (FB), retrobulbar (RB) hematoma, bone fracture, joint effusion, and pleural effusion. Second, we assessed residents' change in comfort level with US after using this cadaver model. Residents were surveyed regarding their comfort level with various US applications. After brief didactic sessions on the study's US applications, participants attempted to identify the simulated pathology using US. A post-lab survey assessed for change in comfort level after the training. Orbital FB, RB hematoma, bone fracture, joint effusion, and pleural effusion were readily modeled in a cadaver in ways typical of a live patient. Twenty-two residents completed the pre- and post-lab surveys. After training with cadavers, residents' comfort improved significantly for orbital FB and RB hematoma (mean increase 1.6, pcadavers helpful. Cadavers can simulate orbital FB, RB hematoma, bone fracture, joint effusion, and pleural effusion, and in our center improved the comfort of residents in identifying all but pleural effusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal and pelvic ultrasound study of the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus Estudo ultrassonográfico abdominal e pélvico de lobo-guará (Chrysocyon brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana D. Guimarães

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the ultrasound characterization of the abdominal and pelvic regions of five maned wolves kept in captivity at the Triage Center of Wild Animals of the Federal University of Viçosa (Centro de Triagem de Animais Silvestres, Universidade Federal de Viçosa. This characterization included descriptions of ultrasonographic aspects and measurements of various structures using B-mode ultrasound. Biometric data were collected to assess the existence of significant linear correlations between these measurements and the measurements obtained by ultrasound. Additionally, hematological and serum biochemistry evaluations of the animals were performed. The ultrasound findings were similar to those available in the literature on domestic dogs, which were used for comparison as a result of the lack of published data regarding maned wolves. The latter species showed characteristics closely resembling those of the former, differing in the spleen and left renal cortex echogenicities, in the appearance of the prostatic and testicular regions and in the hepatic portal vein morphology. In the current study, the biometric values were similar to those previously published; however, no data regarding thoracic perimeter, modified crown-rump length or thoracic depth were found in the literature for this Canidae species. Statistical analysis showed the existence of a strong negative correlation between the modified crown-rump length and left renal length, between the modified crown-rump length and the right renal volume, between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the cranial pole of the left adrenal gland and between the thoracic perimeter and the height at the caudal pole of the left adrenal gland. Laboratory findings, including segmented neutrophil, eosinophil, monocyte and lymphocyte counts and the serum levels of glucose, ALT, alkaline phosphatase, urea, total protein, globulin, creatine phosphokinase, triglyceride, sodium

  4. Volumetry and biomechanical parameters detected by 3D and 2D ultrasound in patients with and without an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batagini, Nayara Cioffi; Ventura, Carlos Augusto Pinto; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Tachibana, Adriano; da Silva, Erasmo Simão

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the ability of ultrasound (US) with 3D properties to evaluate volumetry and biomechanical parameters of the aorta in patients with and without abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Thirty-one patients with normal aortas (group 1), 46 patients with AAA measuring 3.0-5.5 cm (group 2) and 31 patients with AAA ⩾ 5.5 cm (group 3) underwent a 2D/3D-US examination of the infra-renal aorta, and the images were post-processed prior to being analyzed. In the maximum diameter, the global circumferential strain and the global maximum rotation assessed by 2D speckle-tracking algorithms were compared among the three groups. The volumetry data obtained using 3D-US from 40 AAA patients were compared with the volumetry data obtained by a contemporary computed tomography (CT) scan. The median global circumferential strain was 2.0% (interquartile range (IR): 1.0-3.0), 1.0% (IR: 1.0-2.0) and 1.0% (IR: 1.0-1.75) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p volumetry and biomechanical characteristics of AAA. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Classifying Endoleaks After Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aorta Aneurysms: Preliminary Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo; Lagana, Domenico; Recaldini, Chiara; Mangini, Monica; Bertolotti, Elena; Caronno, Roberto; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Annibale Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in endoleak classification after endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to computed tomography angiography (CTA). From May 2001 to April 2003, 10 patients with endoleaks already detected by CTA underwent CEUS with Sonovue (registered) to confirm the CTA classification or to reclassify the endoleak. In three conflicting cases, the patients were also studied with conventional angiography. CEUS confirmed the CTA classification in seven cases (type II endoleaks). Two CTA type III endoleaks were classified as type II using CEUS and one CTA type II endoleak was classified as type I by CEUS. Regarding the cases with discordant classification, conventional angiography confirmed the ultrasound classification. Additionally, CEUS documented the origin of type II endoleaks in all cases. After CEUS reclassification of endoleaks, a significant change in patient management occurred in three cases. CEUS allows a better attribution of the origin of the endoleak, as it shows the flow in real time. CEUS is more specific than CTA in endoleak classification and gives more accurate information in therapeutic planning

  6. The challenging image-guided abdominal mass biopsy: established and emerging techniques 'if you can see it, you can biopsy it'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainani, Nisha I; Arellano, Ronald S; Shyn, Paul B; Gervais, Debra A; Mueller, Peter R; Silverman, Stuart G

    2013-08-01

    Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of abdominal masses is among the most commonly performed procedures in interventional radiology. While most abdominal masses are readily amenable to percutaneous biopsy, some may be technically challenging for a number of reasons. Low lesion conspicuity, small size, overlying or intervening structures, motion, such as that due to respiration, are some of the factors that can influence the ability and ultimately the success of an abdominal biopsy. Various techniques or technologies, such as choice of imaging modality, use of intravenous contrast and anatomic landmarks, patient positioning, organ displacement or trans-organ approach, angling CT gantry, triangulation method, real-time guidance with CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound, sedation or breath-hold, pre-procedural image fusion, electromagnetic tracking, and others, when used singularly or in combination, can overcome these challenges to facilitate needle placement in abdominal masses that otherwise would be considered not amenable to percutaneous biopsy. Familiarity and awareness of these techniques allows the interventional radiologist to expand the use of percutaneous biopsy in clinical practice, and help choose the most appropriate technique for a particular patient.

  7. An Evaluation of Complications in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin OZAKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: In emergency departments, emergency physicians frequently have to perform central venous access. In cases where peripheral venous access is not possible, central venous access is required for dialysis, fulfillment of urgent fluid need, or central venous pressure measurement. This study was carried out to evaluate the emergence of complications in the process of and in the 15 days following the insertion of central venous catheter under ultrasound guidance in the emergency department. Methods: For this study, patients who presented to the emergency department over a period of eight months with an urgent need for central catheter were examined prospectively. Age, gender, and accompanying diseases of patients as well as the type, time, duration, and indication of the venous access were recorded. Furthermore, the amount of experience of the physician was taken into consideration. Results: In the emergency department, physicians performed ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion for 74 patients (40 men and 34 women. For access, internal jugular vein was used in 65 (87.8% patients, and femoral vein was used in 9 (12.2% patients. The reason for access was urgent dialysis need in 55 (74.3%, CVP measurement in 3 (4.1%, fluid support due to severe hypovolemia in 6 (8.1%, and difficulty of peripheral venous access in 10 (13.5% patients. None of the patients developed complications in the process of or after the insertion. Patients did not have infections related to the catheter in 15 days following the insertion. Conclusions: Central venous access is frequently required in emergency departments. The risk of complication is little if any in ultrasonographyguided access carried out under appropriate conditions. ÖZET: Amaç: Acil servislerde acil tıp hekimlerince santral damar yolu işlemi sık uygulanır. Periferik damar yolu açılamadığı hallerde, diyaliz, acil sıvı ihtiyacı veya santral venöz basınç

  8. Abdominal cerebrospinal fluid pseudocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathi, Ramon; Sage, Michael; Slavotinek, John; Hanieh, Ahmad

    2004-01-01

    A case of an abdominal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pseudocyst in a patient with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt is reported to illustrate this known but rare complication. In the setting of a VP shunt, the frequency of abdominal CSF pseudocyst formation is approximately 3.2%, often being precipitated by a recent inflammatory or infective process or recent surgery. Larger pseudocysts tend to be sterile, whereas smaller pseudocysts are more often infected. Ultrasound and CTeach have characteristic findings Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  9. Ultrasound-assisted extraction method for the simultaneous determination of emerging contaminants in freshwater sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Diana Nara Ribeiro; Grosseli, Guilherme Martins; Mozeto, Antonio Aparecido; Carneiro, Renato Lajarim; Fadini, Pedro Sergio

    2015-10-01

    Sediments are the fate of several emerging organic contaminants, such as pharmaceuticals, personal care products and hormones, and therefore an important subject in environmental monitoring studies. In the present work, a simple and sensitive method was developed, validated and applied for the simultaneous extraction of atenolol, caffeine, carbamazepine, diclofenac, ibuprofen, naproxen, propranolol, triclosan, estrone, 17-β-estradiol and 17-α-ethinylestradiol using ultrasound-assisted extraction from freshwater sediment samples followed by solid-phase extraction clean-up and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection. The solvent type and extraction pH were evaluated to obtain the highest recoveries of the compounds. The best method shows absolute recoveries between 54.0 and 94.4% at 50 ng/g concentration. The method exhibits good precision with relative standard deviation ranging from 1.0-16%. The detection and quantification limits ranged from 0.006-0.067 and 0.016-0.336 ng/g, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to freshwater sediment samples collected from different sites in Jundiaí River basin of São Paulo State, Brazil. The compounds atenolol, caffeine, propranolol and triclosan were detected in all the sampling sites with concentrations of 13.8, 41.0, 28.5 and 176 ng/g, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Competency Assessment in Senior Emergency Medicine Residents for Core Ultrasound Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jessica N; Kendall, John; Smalley, Courtney

    2015-11-01

    Quality resident education in point-of-care ultrasound (POC US) is becoming increasingly important in emergency medicine (EM); however, the best methods to evaluate competency in graduating residents has not been established. We sought to design and implement a rigorous assessment of image acquisition and interpretation in POC US in a cohort of graduating residents at our institution. We evaluated nine senior residents in both image acquisition and image interpretation for five core US skills (focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST), aorta, echocardiogram (ECHO), pelvic, central line placement). Image acquisition, using an observed clinical skills exam (OSCE) directed assessment with a standardized patient model. Image interpretation was measured with a multiple-choice exam including normal and pathologic images. Residents performed well on image acquisition for core skills with an average score of 85.7% for core skills and 74% including advanced skills (ovaries, advanced ECHO, advanced aorta). Residents scored well but slightly lower on image interpretation with an average score of 76%. Senior residents performed well on core POC US skills as evaluated with a rigorous assessment tool. This tool may be developed further for other EM programs to use for graduating resident evaluation.

  11. Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Access in the Emergency Department: Patient-Centered Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Boniface

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To assess characteristics, satisfaction, and disposition of emergency department (ED patients who successfully received ultrasound (US-guided peripheral intravenous (IV access. Methods: This is a prospective observational study among ED patients who successfully received US-guided peripheral IV access by ED technicians. Nineteen ED technicians were taught to use US guidance to obtain IV access. Training sessions consisted of didactic instruction and hands-on practice. The US guidance for IV access was limited to patients with difficult access. After successfully receiving an US-guided peripheral IV, patients were approached by research assistants who administered a 10-question survey. Disposition information was collected after the conclusion of the ED visit by accessing patients’ electronic medical record. Results: In total, 146 surveys were completed in patients successfully receiving US-guided IVs. Patients reported an average satisfaction with the procedure of 9.2 of 10. Forty-two percent of patients had a body mass index (BMI of greater than 30, and 17.8% had a BMI of more than 35. Sixty-two percent reported a history of central venous catheter placement. This patient population averaged 3 ED visits per year in the past year. Fifty-three percent of the patients were admitted. Conclusion: Patients requiring US-guided IVs in our ED are discharged home at the conclusion of their ED visit about half of the time. These patients reported high rates of both difficult IV access and central venous catheter placement in the past. Patient satisfaction with US-guided IVs was very high. These data support the continued use of US-guided peripheral IVs in this patient population. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:475–477.

  12. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute biliary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menu, Yves; Vuillerme, Marie-Pierre [Department of Radiology, Hopital Beaujon, 92118 Clichy Cedex (France)

    2002-10-01

    Imaging is the standard method for the evaluation of emergency bile ducts and gallbladder diseases. Imaging may help to treat the patient also. In acute cholecystitis, association of clinical and sonographic data is accurate for the diagnosis, even when the patient is examined by a junior radiologist. Computed tomography may be required for those patients with unusual presentation such as emphysematous cholecystitis, perforation, or abscess. Acalculous cholecystitis is a challenging problem. It sometimes requires percutaneous cholecystostomy for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In patients with acute cholangitis, sonography remains the first step for imaging, but its diagnostic accuracy is disappointing. This is related to low sensitivity, despite a high specificity. Computed tomography carries a slightly better sensitivity, and again a high specificity but overall accuracy is not sufficient. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and endosonography are the best methods for the detection. Both have advantages and limitations, including cost and availability, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains necessary for therapeutic purposes, especially stone extraction. In conclusion, emergency radiologists should be able to put the patient through multiple imaging modalities in order to make a prompt diagnosis with no delay, and be aware of the therapeutic options, including cooperation between radiologist, endoscopist, and surgeon. (orig.)

  13. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute biliary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menu, Yves; Vuillerme, Marie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Imaging is the standard method for the evaluation of emergency bile ducts and gallbladder diseases. Imaging may help to treat the patient also. In acute cholecystitis, association of clinical and sonographic data is accurate for the diagnosis, even when the patient is examined by a junior radiologist. Computed tomography may be required for those patients with unusual presentation such as emphysematous cholecystitis, perforation, or abscess. Acalculous cholecystitis is a challenging problem. It sometimes requires percutaneous cholecystostomy for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In patients with acute cholangitis, sonography remains the first step for imaging, but its diagnostic accuracy is disappointing. This is related to low sensitivity, despite a high specificity. Computed tomography carries a slightly better sensitivity, and again a high specificity but overall accuracy is not sufficient. Magnetic resonance cholangiography and endosonography are the best methods for the detection. Both have advantages and limitations, including cost and availability, but endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography remains necessary for therapeutic purposes, especially stone extraction. In conclusion, emergency radiologists should be able to put the patient through multiple imaging modalities in order to make a prompt diagnosis with no delay, and be aware of the therapeutic options, including cooperation between radiologist, endoscopist, and surgeon. (orig.)

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in upper and lower extremity long bone fractures of emergency department trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Delirroyfard, Ali; Mazdaie, Behnaz; Bagherzadegan, Elnaz

    2017-08-01

    Long bone fractures are common injuries caused by trauma. Some studies have demonstrated that ultrasound has a high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of upper and lower extremity long bone fractures. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of ultrasound compared with plain radiography in diagnosis of upper and lower extremity long bone fractures in traumatic patients. This cross-sectional study assessed 100 patients admitted to the emergency department of Imam Khomeini Hospital, Ahvaz, Iran with trauma to the upper and lower extremities, from September 2014 through October 2015. In all patients, first ultrasound and then standard plain radiography for the upper and lower limb was performed. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 21 to determine the specificity and sensitivity. The mean age of patients with upper and lower limb trauma were 31.43±12.32 years and 29.63±5.89 years, respectively. Radius fracture was the most frequent compared to other fractures (27%). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predicted value, and negative predicted value of ultrasound compared with plain radiography in the diagnosis of upper extremity long bones were 95.3%, 87.7%, 87.2% and 96.2%, respectively, and the highest accuracy was observed in left arm fractures (100%). Tibia and fibula fractures were the most frequent types compared to other fractures (89.2%). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ultrasound compared with plain radiography in the diagnosis of upper extremity long bone fractures were 98.6%, 83%, 65.4% and 87.1%, respectively, and the highest accuracy was observed in men, lower ages and femoral fractures. The results of this study showed that ultrasound compared with plain radiography has a high accuracy in the diagnosis of upper and lower extremity long bone fractures.

  15. Non-invasive characterization of polyurethane-based tissue constructs in a rat abdominal repair model using high frequency ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiao; Takanari, Keisuke; Hong, Yi; Lee, Kee-Won; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Wang, Yadong; Wagner, William R; Kim, Kang

    2013-04-01

    The evaluation of candidate materials and designs for soft tissue scaffolds would benefit from the ability to monitor the mechanical remodeling of the implant site without the need for periodic animal sacrifice and explant analysis. Toward this end, the ability of non-invasive ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) to assess temporal mechanical property changes in three different types of porous, biodegradable polyurethane scaffolds was evaluated in a rat abdominal wall repair model. The polymers utilized were salt-leached scaffolds of poly(carbonate urethane) urea, poly(ester urethane) urea and poly(ether ester urethane) urea at 85% porosity. A total of 60 scaffolds (20 each type) were implanted in a full thickness muscle wall replacement in the abdomens of 30 rats. The constructs were ultrasonically scanned every 2 weeks and harvested at weeks 4, 8 and 12 for compression testing or histological analysis. UEI demonstrated different temporal stiffness trends among the different scaffold types, while the stiffness of the surrounding native tissue remained unchanged. The changes in average normalized strains developed in the constructs from UEI compared well with the changes of mean compliance from compression tests and histology. The average normalized strains and the compliance for the same sample exhibited a strong linear relationship. The ability of UEI to identify herniation and to characterize the distribution of local tissue in-growth with high resolution was also investigated. In summary, the reported data indicate that UEI may allow tissue engineers to sequentially evaluate the progress of tissue construct mechanical behavior in vivo and in some cases may reduce the need for interim time point animal sacrifice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Combined lysis of thrombus with ultrasound and systemic tissue plasminogen activator for emergent revascularization in acute ischemic stroke (CLOTBUST-ER)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellinger, Peter D; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Barreto, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    events. CONCLUSIONS: Since intravenous recombinant tissue-plasminogen-activator remains the only medical therapy to reverse ischemic stroke applicable in the emergency department, our trial will determine if the additional use of transcranial ultrasound improves functional outcomes in patients...

  17. Ultrasound pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  18. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D' Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria [Department of Radiology, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy); Falconi, Massimo [Department of Surgery, University Hospital ' ' G.B. Rossi' ' , Piazza L.A. Scuro 10, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  19. Non-traumatic abdominal emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procacci, Carlo; Mansueto, Giancarlo; D'Onofrio, Mirko; Gasparini, Anna; Ferrara, Rosa Maria; Falconi, Massimo

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic emergency, unrelated to traumatic events, can occur as a consequence of the more significant pancreatic pathologies (acute and chronic pancreatitis, tumors) or of the interventional or surgical treatment carried out as therapy for the above-mentioned lesions. Acute pancreatic conditions are represented by pancreatic infections, the involvement of organs, structures, and adjacent spaces within the pancreatic disease, and, lastly, vascular complications. Acute pancreatic conditions are common in pancreatic diseases and can be catastrophic; even if there is a gamut in the severity of clinical presentation, each can be potentially life threatening. Immediate radiological detection of the lesions together with a correct therapeutic percutaneous radiological approach whenever an interventional procedure is preferable to surgery or, when performed before surgery, whenever it can optimize its results, is of fundamental importance in the management of these patients. This article focuses on the essential role of radiology and the integration of imaging and intervention in acute pancreatic conditions. (orig.)

  20. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børglum, Jens; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    been introduced with success. Future research should also investigate the effect of specific abdominal wall blocks on neuroendocrine and inflammatory stress response after surgery.  Summary USG abdominal wall blocks in adults are commonplace techniques today. Most abdominal wall blocks are assigned......Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research.......  Recent findings Ultrasound guidance is now considered the golden standard for abdominal wall blocks in adults, even though some landmark-based blocks are still being investigated. The efficiency of USG transversus abdominis plane blocks in relation to many surgical procedures involving the abdominal wall...

  1. [Common abdominal emergency cases a the end of the 20th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozsos, I

    1998-06-21

    Despite the marked decline in mortality of acute appendicitis over the past 50 years, the rate of perforation and negative appendectomy remains unchanged. The most effective means of controlling human suffering and economic cost associated with appendicitis is the identification and correction of factors responsible for perforation. Negative appendectomy rates have been relatively stable over the decades. Progress in diagnosis and diagnostic imaging still has not provided a foolproof non-invasive test to rule out the presence of appendicitis accurately. Clinical assessment determines the treatment and the clinical observation should be done by the surgeon. The use of H2-receptor antagonists has not reduced emergency admission of patients with duodenal ulcer. Mortality associated with perforated peptic ulcer remains high in spite of advances in surgical management. The patients with acute obstructed cholecystitis usually reach the surgeon with more advanced stage of the disease which results in increased morbidity and subsequently increased cost for undergoing cholecystectomy. If the patient develops severe diffuse peritonitis, the mortality could reach 30%. This is in spite of aggressive surgical treatment, potent antibiotics, modern intensive care and diagnostic procedures. To improve the results, more advanced treatment to avoid the development of peritonitis and more effective antibiotics to control the inflammation will be needed.

  2. Appendicitis following blunt abdominal trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Travis

    2017-09-01

    Appendicitis is a frequently encountered surgical problem in the Emergency Department (ED). Appendicitis typically results from obstruction of the appendiceal lumen, although trauma has been reported as an infrequent cause of acute appendicitis. Intestinal injury and hollow viscus injury following blunt abdominal trauma are well reported in the literature but traumatic appendicitis is much less common. The pathophysiology is uncertain but likely results from several mechanisms, either in isolation or combination. These include direct compression/crush injury, shearing injury, or from indirect obstruction of the appendiceal lumen by an ileocecal hematoma or traumatic impaction of stool into the appendix. Presentation typically mirrors that of non-traumatic appendicitis with nausea, anorexia, fever, and right lower quadrant abdominal tenderness and/or peritonitis. Evaluation for traumatic appendicitis requires a careful history and physical exam. Imaging with ultrasound or computed tomography is recommended if the history and physical do not reveal an acute surgical indication. Treatment includes intravenous antibiotics and surgical consultation for appendectomy. This case highlights a patient who developed acute appendicitis following blunt trauma to the abdomen sustained during a motor vehicle accident. Appendicitis must be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in any patient who presents to the ED with abdominal pain, including those whose pain begins after sustaining blunt trauma to the abdomen. Because appendicitis following trauma is uncommon, timely diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The effects of body mass index on complications and mortality after emergency abdominal operations: The obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Elizabeth R; Dilektasli, Evren; Haltmeier, Tobias; Beale, Elizabeth; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2017-11-01

    Recent literature suggests that obesity is protective in critically illness. This study addresses the effect of BMI on outcomes after emergency abdominal surgery (EAS). Retrospective, ACS-NSQIP analysis. All patients that underwent EAS were included. The study population was divided into five groups based on BMI; regression models were used to evaluate the role of obesity in morbidity and mortality. 101,078 patients underwent EAS; morbidity and mortality were 19.5% and 4.5%, respectively. Adjusted mortality was higher in underweight patients (AOR 1.92), but significantly lower in all obesity groups (AOR's 0.73, 0.66, 0.70, 0.70 respectively). Underweight and class III obesity was associated with increased complications (AOR 1.47 and 1.30), while mild obesity was protective (AOR 0.92). Underweight patients undergoing EAS have increased morbidity and mortality. Although class III obesity is associated with increased morbidity, overweight and class I obesity were protective. All grades of obesity may be protective against mortality after EAS relative to normal weight patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Abdominal and Pelvic CT

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an experienced radiologist can diagnose many causes of abdominal pain or injury from trauma with very high accuracy, ... Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ... Ultrasound - Abdomen X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract X-ray ( ...

  5. Impact of Targeted Preoperative Optimization on Clinical Outcome in Emergency Abdominal Surgeries: A Prospective Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ashish; Debbarma, Miltan; Narang, Neeraj; Saxena, Anudeep; Mahobia, Mamta; Tomar, Gaurav Singh

    2018-01-01

    Perforation peritonitis continues to be one of the most common surgical emergencies that need a surgical intervention most of the times. Anesthesiologists are invariably involved in managing such cases efficiently in perioperative period. The assessment and evaluation of Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score at presentation and 24 h after goal-directed optimization, administration of empirical broad-spectrum antibiotics, and definitive source control postoperatively. Outcome assessment in terms of duration of hospital stay and mortality in with or without optimization was also measured. It is a prospective, randomized, double-blind controlled study in hospital setting. One hundred and one patients aged ≥18 years, of the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical Status I and II (E) with clinical diagnosis of perforation peritonitis posted for surgery were enrolled. Enrolled patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group A is optimized by goal-directed optimization protocol in the preoperative holding room by anesthesiology residents whereas in Group S, managed by surgery residents in the surgical wards without any fixed algorithm. The assessment of APACHE II score was done as a first step on admission and 24 h postoperatively. Duration of hospital stay and mortality in both the groups were also measured and compared. Categorical data are presented as frequency counts (percent) and compared using the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test. The statistical significance for categorical variables was determined by Chi-square analysis. For continuous variables, a two-sample t -test was applied. The mean APACHE II score on admission in case and control groups was comparable. Significant lowering of serial scores in case group was observed as compared to control group ( P = 0.02). There was a significant lowering of mean duration of hospital stay seen in case group (9.8 ± 1.7 days) as compared to control group ( P = 0

  6. Crucial factors and emerging concepts in ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, Bart; Dewitte, Heleen; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2012-12-28

    Time and space controlled drug delivery still remains a huge challenge in medicine. A novel approach that could offer a solution is ultrasound guided drug delivery. “Ultrasonic drug delivery” is often based on the use of small gas bubbles (so-called microbubbles) that oscillate and cavitate upon exposure to ultrasound waves. Some microbubbles are FDA approved contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and are nowadays widely investigated as promising drug carriers. Indeed, it has been observed that upon exposure to ultrasound waves, microbubbles may (a) release the encapsulated drugs and (b) simultaneously change the structure of the cell membranes in contact with the microbubbles which may facilitate drug entrance into cells. This review aims to highlight (a) major factors known so far which affect ultrasonic drug delivery (like the structure of the microbubbles, acoustic settings, etc.) and (b) summarizes the recent preclinical progress in this field together with a number of promising new concepts and applications.

  7. Ultrasound of Jugular Veins for Assessment of Acute Dyspnea in Emergency Departments and for the Assessment of Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzadok, Batsheva; Shapira, Shay; Tal-Or, Eran

    2018-05-01

    When a patient arrives at the emergency department (ED) presenting with symptoms of acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), it is possible to reach a definitive diagnosis through many different venues, including medical history, physical examination, echocardiography, chest X-ray, and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become a mainstream tool for diagnosis and treatment in the field of emergency medicine, as well as in various other departments in the hospital setting. Currently, the main methods of diagnosis of ADHF using POCUS are pleural B-lines and inferior vena cava (IVC) width and respiratory variation. To examine the potential use and benefits of bedside ultrasound of the jugular veins in the evaluation of dyspneic patients for identification of ADHF. A blood BNP level was drawn from each participant at time of recruitment. The area and size of the internal jugular vein (IJV) during inspiration and expiration were examined. Our results showed that the respiratory area change of the IJVs had a specificity and sensitivity of nearly 70% accuracy rate in indentifying ADHF in our ED. Ultrasound of the IJV may be a useful tool for the diagnosis of ADHF because it is easy to measure and requires little skill. It is also not affected by patient body habitus.

  8. Tuberculosis abdominal Abdominal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    T. Rubio; M. T. Gaztelu; A. Calvo; M. Repiso; H. Sarasíbar; F. Jiménez Bermejo; A. Martínez Echeverría

    2005-01-01

    La tuberculosis abdominal cursa con un cuadro inespecífico, con difícil diagnóstico diferencial respecto a otras entidades de similar semiología. Presentamos el caso de un varón que ingresa por presentar dolor abdominal, pérdida progresiva y notoria de peso corporal y fiebre de dos meses de evolución. El cultivo de la biopsia de colon mostró presencia de bacilo de Koch.Abdominal tuberculosis develops according to a non-specific clinical picture, with a difficult differential diagnosis with re...

  9. Emergency medicine physicians' and pediatricians' use of computed tomography in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Paul Francis

    2014-05-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding emergency department (ED) provider type and computed tomography (CT) scan use in the evaluation of pediatric patients with abdominal pain without trauma. The purpose of this retrospective single community hospital study was to determine if there was a difference in CT use between emergency medicine physicians (EMPs) and pediatricians (PEDs) in all patients younger than 18 years with abdominal pain without trauma who presented to the ED during the study period. The study included 165 patients. EMPs saw 83 patients and used CT in 31 compared with PEDs who saw 82 patients and used CT in 12 (P = .002). EMPs used CT significantly more frequently than PEDs in the designated sample. Economic pressures may cause changes in ED provider type in community and rural hospitals and this study shows that ED provider type may affect medical decision making, including CT use.

  10. A 4D ultrasound real-time tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under breath-hold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sihono, Dwi Seno Kuncoro; Vogel, Lena; Thoelking, Johannes; Wenz, Frederik; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Wertz, Hansjoerg [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Weiss, Christel [University of Heidelberg, Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Lohr, Frank [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Az. Ospedaliero-Universitaria di Modena, Struttura Complessa di Radioterapia, Dipartimento di Oncologia, Modena (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    To evaluate a novel four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound (US) tracking system for external beam radiotherapy of upper abdominal lesions under computer-controlled deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). The tracking accuracy of the research 4D US system was evaluated using two motion phantoms programmed with sinusoidal and breathing patterns to simulate free breathing and DIBH. Clinical performance was evaluated with five healthy volunteers. US datasets were acquired in computer-controlled DIBH with varying angular scanning angles. Tracked structures were renal pelvis (spherical structure) and portal/liver vein branches (non-spherical structure). An external marker was attached to the surface of both phantoms and volunteers as a secondary object to be tracked by an infrared camera for comparison. Phantom measurements showed increased accuracy of US tracking with decreasing scanning range/increasing scanning frequency. The probability of lost tracking was higher for small scanning ranges (43.09% for 10 and 13.54% for 20 ).The tracking success rates in healthy volunteers during DIBH were 93.24 and 89.86% for renal pelvis and portal vein branches, respectively. There was a strong correlation between marker motion and US tracking for the majority of analyzed breath-holds: 84.06 and 88.41% of renal pelvis target results and 82.26 and 91.94% of liver vein target results in anteroposterior and superoinferior directions, respectively; Pearson's correlation coefficient was between 0.71 and 0.99. The US system showed a good tracking performance in 4D motion phantoms. The tracking capability of surrogate structures for upper abdominal lesions in DIBH fulfills clinical requirements. Further investigation in a larger cohort of patients is underway. (orig.) [German] Evaluation eines neuen vierdimensionalen (4D) Ultraschall(US)-Tracking-Systems fuer die externe Strahlentherapie von Oberbauchlaesionen unter computergesteuertem tiefem Atemanhalt (DIBH). Die Tracking-Genauigkeit des 4D

  11. The value of the abdominal radiograph in the assessment of the acute abdomen- work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, R.; Kew, J.; Davies, R.P.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The value of the abdominal radiograph in the assessment of the acute abdomen was evaluated for those patients who also had abdominal ultrasound and/or CT. The value of each modality in patient management is reviewed. Retrospective review of 52 consecutive patients presented to a tertiary hospital emergency department with acute abdominal pain who underwent abdominal radiographs (AXR) and abdominal ultrasound (US) and / or computed tomography (CT) within 24 hours of presentation was undertaken. There were 37 males and 15 females. The mean age was 53 years (range 18-95y). Abdominal radiographs were reviewed by two radiologists.Two patients had two separate admissions one week apart. There were 35 normal abdominal radiographs. 19 studies showed clinically relevant abnormalities. Of the normal group, 14 out of 21 patients had abnormal findings on CT and 8 out of 16 had abnormal US examinations. Of the 19 patients with abnormal AXR, 17 out of 19 patients had abnormal CT and 2 out of 5 had abnormal ultrasound examinations. There were 5 cases where both CT scan and US was performed. The positive and negative predictive value for AXR vs CT scan was 89% and 33% respectively and for AXR vs US scan was 40% and 50% respectively. For patients with normal AXR and abnormal CT, there was only one case (a non calcified abdominal aortic aneurysm) which might have required immediate surgical intervention. The preliminary results suggest that the abnormal radiograph is sensitive in the detection of relevant abnormalities in the acute abdomen in the context of appropriate clinical selection. Both CT and ultrasound provide additional diagnostic accuracy for some indications.A further 50 patients are being reviewed and the combined results will be presented. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that is used to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached to the scanner ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your ... Outside links: For the convenience of our users, RadiologyInfo .org provides links to ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... well as the type of body structure and composition of body tissue through which the sound travels. A small ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a ... as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us ... they move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). ... Do you have a personal ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... guide the insertion of a catheter or other drainage device and helps assure safe and accurate placement and fluid drainage for diagnosis and/or relief of patient discomfort. ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... hours prior to the exam and avoid urinating so that his or her bladder is reasonably full ... A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... completed within 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? ... and easily tolerated by most patients. Your child will lie on his or her back on an ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... an examination table that can be tilted or moved. Patients may be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact ...

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

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  12. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Jose M. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: jmpjesus@yahoo.com; Madureira, Antonio J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Vieira, Alberto [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal); Ramos, Isabel [Department of Radiology, Hospital de S. Joao, Porto (Portugal)

    2005-08-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis.

  13. Abdominal tuberculosis: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Jose M.; Madureira, Antonio J.; Vieira, Alberto; Ramos, Isabel

    2005-01-01

    Radiological findings of abdominal tuberculosis can mimic those of many different diseases. A high level of suspicion is required, especially in high-risk population. In this article, we will describe barium studies, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) findings of abdominal tuberculosis (TB), with emphasis in the latest. We will illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis and describe imaging features that differentiate it from other inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, particularly lymphoma and Crohn's disease. As tuberculosis can affect any organ in the abdomen, emphasis is placed to ileocecal involvement, lymphadenopathy, peritonitis and solid organ disease (liver, spleen and pancreas). A positive culture or hystologic analysis of biopsy is still required in many patients for definitive diagnosis. Learning objectives:1.To review the relevant pathophysiology of abdominal tuberculosis. 2.Illustrate CT findings that can help in the diagnosis

  14. Evaluation of a point-of-care ultrasound scan list in a resource-limited emergency centre in Addis Ababa Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Stachura

    2017-09-01

    Discussion: In this urban, low-resource, academic EC in Ethiopia, POCUS provided clinically relevant information for patient management, particularly for polytrauma, undifferentiated shock and undifferentiated dyspnea. Results have subsequently been used to develop a locally relevant emergency department ultrasound curriculum for Ethiopia’s first emergency medicine residency program.

  15. Establishing the accuracy and acceptability of abdominal ultrasound to define the foetal head position in the second stage of labour: a validation study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramphul, Meenakshi

    2012-09-01

    To compare the diagnosis of the foetal head position in the second stage of labour by ultrasound scan performed by a novice sonographer and by clinical assessment, to that of an expert sonographer (gold standard); and to evaluate the acceptability of ultrasound in the second stage of labour to women and clinicians.

  16. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child...

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of History, Physical Examination, Laboratory Tests, and Point-of-care Ultrasound for Pediatric Acute Appendicitis in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbas, Roshanak; Hanna, Mark; Shah, Jay; Sinert, Richard

    2017-05-01

    Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common surgical emergency in children. Accurate and timely diagnosis is crucial but challenging due to atypical presentations and the inherent difficulty of obtaining a reliable history and physical examination in younger children. The aim of this study was to determine the utility of history, physical examination, laboratory tests, Pediatric Appendicitis Score (PAS) and Emergency Department Point-of-Care Ultrasound (ED-POCUS) in the diagnosis of AA in ED pediatric patients. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis and used a test-treatment threshold model to identify diagnostic findings that could rule in/out AA and obviate the need for further imaging studies, specifically computed tomography (CT) scan, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and radiology department ultrasound (RUS). We searched PubMed, EMBASE, and SCOPUS up to October 2016 for studies on ED pediatric patients with abdominal pain. Quality Assessment Tool for Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) was used to evaluate the quality and applicability of included studies. Positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) for diagnostic modalities were calculated and when appropriate data was pooled using Meta-DiSc. Based on the available literature on the test characteristics of different imaging modalities and applying the Pauker-Kassirer method we developed a test-treatment threshold model. Twenty-one studies were included encompassing 8,605 patients with weighted AA prevalence of 39.2%. Studies had variable quality using the QUADAS-2 tool with most studies at high risk of partial verification bias. We divided studies based on their inclusion criteria into two groups of "undifferentiated abdominal pain" and abdominal pain "suspected of AA." In patients with undifferentiated abdominal pain, history of "pain migration to right lower quadrant (RLQ)" (LR+ = 4.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.59-6.44) and presence of "cough/hop pain" in the physical

  18. Abdominal aortic feminism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortimer, Alice Emily

    2014-11-14

    A 79-year-old woman presented to a private medical practice 2 years previously for an elective ultrasound screening scan. This imaging provided the evidence for a diagnosis of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to be made. Despite having a number of recognised risk factors for an AAA, her general practitioner at the time did not follow the guidance set out by the private medical professional, that is, to refer the patient to a vascular specialist to be entered into a surveillance programme and surgically evaluated. The patient became symptomatic with her AAA, was admitted to hospital and found to have a tender, symptomatic, 6 cm leaking AAA. She consented for an emergency open AAA repair within a few hours of being admitted to hospital, despite the 50% perioperative mortality risk. The patient spent 4 days in intensive care where she recovered well. She was discharged after a 12 day hospital stay but unfortunately passed away shortly after her discharge from a previously undiagnosed gastric cancer. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. Child with Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajalakshmi; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2018-01-01

    Abdominal pain is one of the common symptoms reported by children in urgent care clinics. While most children tend to have self-limiting conditions, the treating pediatrician should watch out for underlying serious causes like intestinal obstruction and perforation peritonitis, which require immediate referral to an emergency department (ED). Abdominal pain may be secondary to surgical or non-surgical causes, and will differ as per the age of the child. The common etiologies for abdominal pain presenting to an urgent care clinic are acute gastro-enteritis, constipation and functional abdominal pain; however, a variety of extra-abdominal conditions may also present as abdominal pain. Meticulous history taking and physical examination are the best tools for diagnosis, while investigations have a limited role in treating benign etiologies.

  20. Assessing the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings in senior patients presenting to the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabousi, Abdullah; Patlas, Michael N; Meshki, Malek; Monteiro, Sandra; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal and pelvic CT findings for patients 65 years of age and older, when compared with all other scanned adult Emergency Department (ED) patients, at a single tertiary care hospital. Our hypothesis was that there is an increased prevalence and clinical relevance of positive abdominal/pelvic CT findings in senior patients. A research ethics board-approved retrospective review of all adult patients who underwent an emergency CT of the abdomen and pelvis for acute nontraumatic abdominal and/or pelvic signs and symptoms was performed. Two thousand one hundred two patients between October 1, 2011, and September 30, 2013, were reviewed. Six hundred thirty-one patients were included in the 65 group (209 men and 253 women; mean age 77.6, age range 65-99). Overall, there were more positive CT findings for patients 65 group (257 positive cases, 55.6 %), which was a statistically significant difference (p 65 group, there were no statistically significant differences in the clinical/surgical relevance of the positive CT findings between the two groups. The findings of our retrospective study therefore refute our hypothesis that there is an increased prevalence of positive abdominal CT findings in patients >65. This may be related to ED physicians at our institution being more hesitant to order CT examinations for the younger population, presumably due to radiation concerns. However, older patients in our series were more likely to present with complicated appendicitis, and a lower threshold for ordering CT examinations of the abdomen and pelvis in this patient population should therefore be considered.

  1. Development of a reliable simulation-based test for diagnostic abdominal ultrasound with a pass/fail standard usable for mastery learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mia L; Nielsen, Kristina R; Albrecht-Beste, Elisabeth

    2018-01-01

    training can benefit from competency-based education based on reliable tests. • This simulation-based test can differentiate between competency levels of ultrasound examiners. • This test is suitable for competency-based education, e.g. mastery learning. • We provide a pass/fail standard without false...... from The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Four groups of experience levels were constructed: Novices (medical students), trainees (first-year radiology residents), intermediates (third- to fourth-year radiology residents) and advanced (physicians with ultrasound...

  2. Emergency assessment of patients with acute abdominal pain using low-dose CT with iterative reconstruction: a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Becker, Minerva; Becker, Christoph D.; Zaidi, Habib; Platon, Alexandra [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Radiology, Geneva (Switzerland); Halfon Poletti, Alice; Rutschmann, Olivier T. [University Hospital of Geneva, Department of Community, Primary Care and Emergency Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Perneger, Thomas [University Hospital of Geneva, Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-08-15

    To determine if radiation dose delivered by contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for acute abdominal pain can be reduced to the dose administered in abdominal radiography (<2.5 mSv) using low-dose CT (LDCT) with iterative reconstruction algorithms. One hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients requiring CECT for acute abdominal pain were included, and their body mass index (BMI) was calculated. CECT was immediately followed by LDCT. LDCT series was processed using 1) 40% iterative reconstruction algorithm blended with filtered back projection (LDCT-IR-FBP) and 2) model-based iterative reconstruction algorithm (LDCT-MBIR). LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR images were reviewed independently by two board-certified radiologists (Raters 1 and 2). Abdominal pathology was revealed on CECT in 120 (79%) patients. In those with BMI <30, accuracies for correct diagnosis by Rater 1 with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR, when compared to CECT, were 95.4% (104/109) and 99% (108/109), respectively, and 92.7% (101/109) and 100% (109/109) for Rater 2. In patients with BMI ≥30, accuracies with LDCT-IR-FBP and LDCT-MBIR were 88.1% (37/42) and 90.5% (38/42) for Rater 1 and 78.6% (33/42) and 92.9% (39/42) for Rater 2. The radiation dose delivered by CT to non-obese patients with acute abdominal pain can be safely reduced to levels close to standard radiography using LDCT-MBIR. (orig.)

  3. Impact of point-of-care ultrasound on clinical decision-making at an urban emergency department in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Teri Ann; Amato, Stas; Kulola, Irene; Chen, Chuan-Jay Jeffrey; Mfinanga, Juma; Sawe, Hendry Robert

    2018-01-01

    Point of care ultrasound (PoCUS) is an efficient, inexpensive, safe, and portable imaging modality that can be particularly useful in resource-limited settings. However, its impact on clinical decision making in such settings has not been well studied. The objective of this study is to describe the utilization and impact of PoCUS on clinical decision making at an urban emergency department in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. This was a prospective descriptive cross-sectional study of patients receiving PoCUS at Muhimbili National Hospital's Emergency Medical Department (MNH EMD). Data on PoCUS studies during a period of 10 months at MNH EMD was collected on consecutive patients during periods when research assistants were available. Data collected included patient age and sex, indications for ultrasound, findings, interpretations, and provider-reported diagnostic impression and disposition plan before and after PoCUS. Descriptive statistics, including medians and interquartile ranges, and counts and percentages, are reported. Pearson chi squared tests and p-values were used to evaluate categorical data for significant differences. PoCUS data was collected for 986 studies performed on 784 patients. Median patient age was 32 years; 56% of patients were male. Top indications for PoCUS included trauma, respiratory presentations, and abdomino-pelvic pain. The most frequent study types performed were eFAST, cardiac, and obstetric or gynaecologic studies. Overall, clinicians reported that the use of PoCUS changed either diagnostic impression or disposition plan in 29% of all cases. Rates of change in diagnostic impression or disposition plan increased to 45% in patients for whom more than one PoCUS study type was performed. In resource-limited emergency care settings, PoCUS can be utilized for a wide range of indications and has substantial impact on clinical decision making, especially when more than one study type is performed.

  4. Effect of intermediate care on mortality following emergency abdominal surgery. The InCare trial: study protocol, rationale and feasibility of a randomised multicentre trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vester-Andersen Morten

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency abdominal surgery carries a 15% to 20% short-term mortality rate. Postoperative medical complications are strongly associated with increased mortality. Recent research suggests that timely recognition and effective management of complications may reduce mortality. The aim of the present trial is to evaluate the effect of postoperative intermediate care following emergency major abdominal surgery in high-risk patients. Methods and design The InCare trial is a randomised, parallel-group, non-blinded clinical trial with 1:1 allocation. Patients undergoing emergency laparotomy or laparoscopic surgery with a perioperative Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score of 10 or above, who are ready to be transferred to the surgical ward within 24 h of surgery are allocated to either intermediate care for 48 h, or surgical ward care. The primary outcome measure is all-cause 30-day mortality. We aim to enrol 400 patients in seven Danish hospitals. The sample size allows us to detect or refute a 34% relative risk reduction of mortality with 80% power. Discussion This trial evaluates the benefits and possible harm of intermediate care. The results may potentially influence the survival of many high-risk surgical patients. As a pioneer trial in the area, it will provide important data on the feasibility of future large-scale randomised clinical trials evaluating different levels of postoperative care. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01209663

  5. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun; Song, Mi Kyong

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi Kyong [Yonsei University, Biostatistics Collaboration Unit, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. (orig.)

  7. One Stage Emergency Pancreatoduodenectomy for Isolated Injury to Pancreatic Head Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Sumanta Kumar Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Major pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma by itself is a relatively rare occurrence, and in vast majority of cases (95%) it is associated with injury to adjacent major vessels and organs; thus making isolated major pancreatic injury even rarer. While most pancreatic injuries are managed by simple measures like debridement and drainage, complex proximal injury poses surgical challenge regarding surgical skill and judgement. Disproportionate approach at any stage of management ...

  8. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    of CEUS is indeed promising. However, no ultrasound contrast agent manufactured today is registered for pediatric use in Europe. The contrast agent SonoVue(®) has recently been approved by the FDA under the name of Lumason(®) to be used in hepatic investigations in adults and children. This article...... help reduce radiation exposure and use of iodinated contrast agents in pediatrics, thereby potentially reducing complications in routine imaging.......In pediatrics ultrasound has long been viewed more favorably than imaging that exposes patients to radiation and iodinated contrast or requires sedation. It is child-friendly and diagnostic capabilities have been improved with the advent of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). The application...

  9. Screening Models for Cardiac Risk Evaluation in Emergency Abdominal Surgery. I. Evaluation of the Intraoperative Period Risk based on Data from the Preoperative Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Matveev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A classification of intraoperative cardio-vascular complications (CVC was performed, based on data from 466 patients subjected to emergency surgery, due to severe abdominal surgical diseases or traumas, in accordance with the severe criteria of ACC/AHA for CVC in noncardiac surgery. There were 370 intraoperative CVC registered, distributed as follows: groups with low risk (148, moderate risk (200, and high risk (22. Patient groups were formed, according to the CVC risk level, during the intraoperative period, for which the determinant factor for the group distribution of patients was the complication with the highest risk. Individual data was collected for each patient, based on 65 indices: age, physical status, diseases, surgical interventions, anaesthesiological information, intra and postoperative cardio-vascular complications, disease outcome, causes of death, cardiovascular disease anamnesis, anamnesis of all other nonsurgical diseases present, laboratory results, results from all imaging and instrumental examinations, etc. On the basis of these indices, a new distribution of the risk factors was implemented, into groups with different levels of risk of CVC during intraoperative period. This result is a solid argument, substantiating the proposal to introduce these adjustments for determining the severity of CVC in the specific conditions of emergency abdominal surgery.

  10. Traumatic injuries: imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Grozaj, Ana M.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Roos, Justus E.; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Marincek, Borut

    2002-01-01

    The availability of new imaging modalities has altered the diagnostic approach to patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma. Computed tomography and ultrasound have largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Ultrasound is used in most trauma centers as the initial imaging technique for the detection of hemoperitoneum and helps to determine the need for emergency laparotomy. Computed tomography allows for an accurate diagnosis of a wide range of traumatic abdominal and pelvic conditions. The speed of single-detector helical and multi-detector row CT (MDCT) permits a rapid CT examination of the seriously ill patient in the emergency room. In particular, the technology of MDCT permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, which is a great advance in the rapid assessment of the multiple-injured patient. The evolving concepts in trauma care promoting non-operative management of liver and splenic injuries creates the need for follow-up cross-sectional imaging studies in these patients. Computed tomography and, less frequently, MR or ultrasound, are used for this purpose. (orig.)

  11. Traumatic injuries: imaging of abdominal and pelvic injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weishaupt, Dominik; Grozaj, Ana M.; Willmann, Juergen K.; Roos, Justus E.; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Marincek, Borut [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-06-01

    The availability of new imaging modalities has altered the diagnostic approach to patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma. Computed tomography and ultrasound have largely replaced diagnostic peritoneal lavage. Ultrasound is used in most trauma centers as the initial imaging technique for the detection of hemoperitoneum and helps to determine the need for emergency laparotomy. Computed tomography allows for an accurate diagnosis of a wide range of traumatic abdominal and pelvic conditions. The speed of single-detector helical and multi-detector row CT (MDCT) permits a rapid CT examination of the seriously ill patient in the emergency room. In particular, the technology of MDCT permits multiple, sequential CT scans to be quickly obtained in the same patient, which is a great advance in the rapid assessment of the multiple-injured patient. The evolving concepts in trauma care promoting non-operative management of liver and splenic injuries creates the need for follow-up cross-sectional imaging studies in these patients. Computed tomography and, less frequently, MR or ultrasound, are used for this purpose. (orig.)

  12. Aggressive malignant abdominal mesothelioma: Clinical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hassan, Ahmad M.; Al-Saigh, Abdulrehman A.

    2004-01-01

    A 32-year-old Filipino female, working as an x-ray technician, presented to the Emergency Room (ER) with acute abdominal pain for one day. The pain was mainly on the left side and left hypochondrium. She had recurring abdominal pain before but not significant to worry her. She also complained of abdominal distension, which she noticed one week ago. Abdominal examination revealed fullness in the left hypochondrium with marked tenderness but negative rebound. Abdominal ultrasound (US) showed a huge mass mainly in the left hypochondrium. The origin of the mass cannot be identified by US. A computerized tomography scan showed a mass in the left side of the abdomen crossing the midline with a necrotic centre. The hospital course of the patient runs smoothly, and she was discharged after 7-days and referred to an Oncology Center. Abdominal mesothelioma is a neoplasm arising from the mesothelial surface lining the abdominal cavity. It is less frequent than that of the pleura. It is a rapidly growing and fatal malignancy with a median survival of less than 1-year. The relation between pleural malignant mesothelioma and asbestos is well recognized since it was described in 19602 but implication of asbestos exposure in the etiology of the peritoneal type is less obvious. This patient history is giving no obvious exposure to asbestos but as she is working in the Radiology Department as an x-ray technician she is well exposed to x-ray, but the effect of radioactivity on induction of mesothelioma is still disputed.4 There are several reports linking malignant mesothelioma to radioactivity due to radiation therapy.The fibrous mesothelioma (sarcomatous), as in this case, which is difficult to diagnose microscopically, looks like a fibroma, unless helped by tissue culture. The treatment options of malignant mesothelioma include surgery, intraperitoneal chemotherapy and whole abdominal radiation or multimodality therapy, which were suggested that might prolong the survival in

  13. Heterotopic gastric mucosa associated with abdominal abscess formation, hypotension, and acute abdominal pain in a puppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobleman, Bridget N; Sinnott, Virginia B

    2014-01-01

    To describe the presence of heterotopic gastric mucosa forming an abscess associated with acute abdominal pain and shock in a puppy. A 7-month-old male intact Shih-Tzu was presented to the emergency service for evaluation of a 12-hour history of vomiting and lethargy progressing to weakness. On presentation, the puppy was obtunded and hypotensive. Radiographs revealed an ill-defined mid-ventral abdominal mass. Ultrasound revealed an echogenic, fluid-filled mass associated with the jejunum. The puppy had an exploratory celiotomy and a 2 × 4 cm oval fluid-filled soft tissue mass was found to be intimately associated, but not communicating with, a section of the mid-jejunum. The mass and associated jejunum were removed via enterectomy. Histopathology of the resected mass revealed heterotopic gastric mucosa; bacterial culture of the fluid contained in the mass revealed heavy growth of Escherichia coli. The puppy recovered from surgery, was discharged from the hospital, and has had no further complications from this episode. Heterotopic gastric mucosa is commonly found incidentally on necropsy. When it has been associated with acute gastrointestinal signs, mechanical intestinal obstruction with or without perforation was noted. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of heterotopic gastric mucosa leading to abscess formation and acute abdominal pain in the dog. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  14. Clinical abdominal palpation for predicting oligohydramnios in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. In view of the scarcity of ultrasound in low-resource settings, to evaluate abdominal palpation for prediction of oligohydramnios in suspected prolonged pregnancy, using the ultrasound-obtained amniotic fluid index (AFI) as a gold standard, taking into account maternal and fetal factors that may affect amniotic fluid ...

  15. Feasibility of emergency department point-of-care ultrasound for rib fracture diagnosis in minor thoracic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, Élizabeth; Guimont, Chantal; Émond, Marcel; Parent, Marc Charles; Topping, Claude; Kuimi, Brice Lionel Batomen; Boucher, Valérie; Le Sage, Natalie

    2017-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of emergency department (ED) point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) for rib fracture diagnosis in patients with minor thoracic injury (mTI). Secondary objectives were to 1) evaluate patients' pain during the PoCUS procedure, 2) identify the limitations of the use of PoCUS technique, and 3) compare the diagnosis obtained with PoCUS to radiography results. Adult patients who presented with clinical suspicion of rib fractures after mTI were included. All patients underwent PoCUS performed by emergency physicians (EPs) prior to a rib view X-ray. A visual analogue scale (VAS) ranging from 0 to 100 was used to ascertain feasibility, patients' pain and clinicians' degree of certitude. Feasibility was defined as a score of more than 50 on the VAS. We documented the radiologists' interpretation of rib view X-ray. Radiologists were blinded to the PoCUS results. Ninety-six patients were included. A majority (65%) of EPs concluded that the PoCUS technique to diagnose rib fracture was feasible (VAS score > 50). Median score for feasibility was 63. Median score was 31 (Interquartile range [IQR] 5-57) for patients' pain related to the PoCUS. The main limiting factor of the PoCUS technique was pain during patient examination (15%). PoCUS examination appears to be a feasible technique for a rib fracture diagnosis in the ED.

  16. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  17. Comparison of diagnostic performance between single- and multiphasic contrast-enhanced abdominopelvic computed tomography in patients admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain: potential radiation dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shin Hye; You, Je Sung; Song, Mi Kyong; Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate feasibility of radiation dose reduction by optimal phase selection of computed tomography (CT) in patients who visited the emergency department (ED) for abdominal pain. We included 253 patients who visited the ED for abdominal pain. They underwent multiphasic CT including precontrast, late arterial phase (LAP), and hepatic venous phase (HVP). Three image sets (HVP, precontrast + HVP, and precontrast + LAP + HVP) were reviewed. Two reviewers determined the most appropriate diagnosis with five-point confidence scale. Diagnostic performances were compared among image sets by weighted-least-squares method or DeLong's method. Linear mixed model was used to assess changes of diagnostic confidence and radiation dose. There was no difference in diagnostic performance among three image sets, although diagnostic confidence level was significantly improved after review of triphasic images compared with both HVP images only or HVP with precontrast images (confidence scale, 4.64 ± 0.05, 4.66 ± 0.05, and 4.76 ± 0.04 in the order of the sets; overall P = 0.0008). Similar trends were observed in the subgroup analysis for diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease and cholecystitis. There is no difference between HVP-CT alone and multiphasic CT for the diagnosis of causes of abdominal pain in patients admitted to the ED without prior chronic disease or neoplasia. • There was no difference in diagnostic performance of HVP CT and multiphasic CT. • The diagnostic confidence level was improved after review of the LAP images. • HVP CT can achieve diagnostic performance similar to that of multiphasic CT, while minimizing radiation.

  18. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves, E-mail: frederico.mancuso@grupofleury.com.br [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira [Disciplina de Medicina de Urgência - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando [Disciplina de Cardiologia - Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Unifesp), São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  19. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and ...

  3. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico José Neves Mancuso

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.

  4. Bedside Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Small Bowel Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Anshus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: An elderly female with no history of prior abdominal surgeries presented to the emergency department (ED with acute onset of abdominal pain and distention. Upon arrival, she began having large volume bilious emesis. While waiting for a computed tomography (CT scan of her abdomen and pelvis, a point of care ultrasound (POCUS was performed which showed evidence of a small bowel obstruction (SBO. The patient had a nasogastric tube placed that put out over two liters of bilious contents. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of SBO from a left inguinal hernia and the patient was admitted to the surgical service. Significant findings: The POCUS utilizing the low frequency curvilinear probe demonstrates fluid-filled, dilated bowel loops greater than 2.5cm with to-and-fro peristalsis, and thickened bowel walls greater than 3mm, concerning for SBO. Discussion: Gastrointestinal obstruction is a common diagnosis in the ED, accounting for approximately 15% of all ED visits for acute abdominal pain.1 SBO accounts for approximately 80% of all obstructions.2 In the diagnosis of SBO, studies show that abdominal x-rays have a sensitivity of 66-77% and specificity of 50-57%,3 CT scans have a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%,4 and ultrasound has a sensitivity of 88% and specificity of 96%.5 While CT scan remains a widely accepted modality for diagnosing SBO, ultrasound is more cost effective, well tolerated, does not involve ionizing radiation, and can be done in a timely manner at the patient’s bedside. Ultrasound can also identify transition points as well as distinguish between functional and mechanical obstruction.6 In addition to SBO, ultrasound can be used to diagnose external hernias, intussusception, tumors, superior mesenteric artery (SMA syndrome, foreign bodies, bezoars, and ascariasis.7

  5. Diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of pleural and lung ultrasound in discriminating cardiogenic causes of acute dyspnea in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibinel, Gian Alfonso; Casoli, Giovanna; Elia, Fabrizio; Padoan, Monica; Pivetta, Emanuele; Lupia, Enrico; Goffi, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Dyspnea is a common symptom in patients admitted to the Emergency Department (ED), and discriminating between cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic dyspnea is often a clinical dilemma. The initial diagnostic work-up may be inaccurate in defining the etiology and the underlying pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and reproducibility of pleural and lung ultrasound (PLUS), performed by emergency physicians at the time of a patient's initial evaluation in the ED, in identifying cardiac causes of acute dyspnea. Between February and July 2007, 56 patients presenting to the ED with acute dyspnea were prospectively enrolled in this study. In all patients, PLUS was performed by emergency physicians with the purpose of identifying the presence of diffuse alveolar-interstitial syndrome (AIS) or pleural effusion. All scans were later reviewed by two other emergency physicians, expert in PLUS and blinded to clinical parameters, who were the ultimate judges of positivity for diffuse AIS and pleural effusion. A random set of 80 recorded scannings were also reviewed by two inexperienced observers to assess inter-observer variability. The entire medical record was independently reviewed by two expert physicians (an emergency medicine physician and a cardiologist) blinded to the ultrasound (US) results, in order to determine whether, for each patient, dyspnea was due to heart failure, or not. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive/negative predictive values were obtained; likelihood ratio (LR) test was used. Cohen's kappa was used to assess inter-observer agreement. The presence of diffuse AIS was highly predictive for cardiogenic dyspnea (sensitivity 93.6%, specificity 84%, positive predictive value 87.9%, negative predictive value 91.3%). On the contrary, US detection of pleural effusion was not helpful in the differential diagnosis (sensitivity 83.9%, specificity 52%, positive predictive value 68.4%, negative predictive value 72.2%). Finally

  6. Diagnostic Accuracy of Focused Assessment with Sonography for Blunt Abdominal Trauma in Pediatric Patients Performed by Emergency Medicine Residents versus Radiology Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Heydari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST has been shown to be useful to detect intraperitoneal free fluid in patients with blunt abdominal trauma (BAT. Objective: We compared the diagnostic accuracy of FAST performed by emergency medicine residents (EMRs and radiology residents (RRs in pediatric patients with BAT. Method: In this prospective study, pediatric patients with BAT and high energy trauma who were referred to the emergency department (ED at Al-Zahra and Kashani hospitals in Isfahan, Iran, were evaluated using FAST, first by EMRs and subsequently by RRs. The reports provided by the two resident groups were compared with the final outcome based on the results of the abdominal computed tomography (CT, operative exploration, and clinical observation. Results: A total of 101 patients with a median age of 6.75 ± 3.2 years were enrolled in the study between January 2013 and May 2014. These patients were evaluated using FAST, first by EMRs and subsequently by RRs. A good diagnostic agreement was noted between the results of the FAST scans performed by EMRs and RRs (κ = 0.865, P < 0.001. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy in evaluating the intraperitoneal free fluid were 72.2%, 85.5%, 52%, 93.3%, and 83.2%, respectively, when FAST was performed by EMRs and 72.2%, 86.7%, 54.2%, 93.5%, and 84.2%, respectively, when FAST was performed by RRs. No significant differences were seen between the EMR- and RR-performed FAST. Conclusion: In this study, FAST performed by EMRs had acceptable diagnostic value, similar to that performed by RRs, in patients with BAT.

  7. Splenic Rupture Diagnosed with Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient with Shock in the Emergency Department Following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Mulkerin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with near syncope and worsening left flank and shoulder pain. He had undergone a difficult colonoscopy two days prior due to a tortuous colon. Initial vital signs were normal. He looked uncomfortable and had significant left upper quadrant abdominal tenderness with guarding. Thirty minutes after ED arrival, his blood pressure dropped to 73/59 mmHg, requiring aggressive fluid resuscitation. Bedside focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST exam demonstrated free fluid in the abdomen with mixed echogenicity of the spleen, suggestive of splenic injury. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a large subcapsular splenic hematoma with active extravasation and surrounding intraperitoneal free fluid (Figure, Video. He was admitted to the surgical intensive care unit. Hemorrhage continued after interventional radiology performed embolization of the splenic artery. He then required laparoscopic splenectomy on hospital day 2 to control bleeding. He subsequently did well and was discharged on hospital day 10.

  8. Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Using a Pocket-Size Device in the Emergency Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Frederico José Neves; Siqueira, Vicente Nicoliello; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gois, Aécio Flavio Teixeira; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Camargo; Campos, Orlando

    2014-10-28

    Background: Cardiovascular urgencies are frequent reasons for seeking medical care. Prompt and accurate medical diagnosis is critical to reduce the morbidity and mortality of these conditions. Objective: To evaluate the use of a pocket-size echocardiography in addition to clinical history and physical exam in a tertiary medical emergency care. Methods: One hundred adult patients without known cardiac or lung diseases who sought emergency care with cardiac complaints were included. Patients with ischemic changes in the electrocardiography or fever were excluded. A focused echocardiography with GE Vscan equipment was performed after the initial evaluation in the emergency room. Cardiac chambers dimensions, left and right ventricular systolic function, intracardiac flows with color, pericardium, and aorta were evaluated. Results: The mean age was 61 ± 17 years old. The patient complaint was chest pain in 51 patients, dyspnea in 32 patients, arrhythmia to evaluate the left ventricular function in ten patients, hypotension/dizziness in five patients and edema in one patient. In 28 patients, the focused echocardiography allowed to confirm the initial diagnosis: 19 patients with heart failure, five with acute coronary syndrome, two with pulmonary embolism and two patients with cardiac tamponade. In 17 patients, the echocardiography changed the diagnosis: ten with suspicious of heart failure, two with pulmonary embolism suspicious, two with hypotension without cause, one suspicious of acute coronary syndrome, one of cardiac tamponade and one of aortic dissection. Conclusion: The focused echocardiography with pocket-size equipment in the emergency care may allow a prompt diagnosis and, consequently, an earlier initiation of the therapy.Fundamento: As urgências cardiovasculares são causas importantes de procura por atendimento médico, sendo fundamentais a rapidez e a precisão no diagnóstico para diminuir sua morbimortalidade. Objetivo: Avaliar o uso da ecocardiografia

  9. Secondary abdominal appendicular pregnancy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosso Mićo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The case report describes a 29-year-old nulliparous woman that was admitted at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the Clinical Hospital Osijek complaining of mild abdominal pain without vaginal discharge. Case Outline. The patient’s menstrual cycle was irregular, from 30-45 days. An ultrasound examination showed suspicion of an ectopic pregnancy with a βHCG level of 1358 IU/L. Due to the presence of liquid in the pouch of Douglas the patient underwent emergency laparoscopy, which showed the presence of tumor mass between the right Fallopian tube and the appendix. These two structures associated with adhesions corresponded to secondary implantation after spontaneous tubal abortion which was confirmed by histopathologic analysis. Conclusion. Laparoscopy has emerged as the “gold standard” in the diagnosis and treatment of ectopic pregnancy, in this case the secondary abdominal pregnancy. From the diagnostic point of view, all women of reproductive age should be considered pregnant until proven otherwise, also keeping in mind that ectopic pregnancies can have different locations and many clinical features.

  10. Successful emergency pain control for posterior rib fractures with ultrasound-guided erector spinae plane block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftig, Josh; Mantuani, Daniel; Herring, Andrew A; Dixon, Brittany; Clattenburg, Eben; Nagdev, Arun

    2017-12-28

    The Eastern Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Trauma Anesthesiology Society Guidelines recommend prompt and effective multimodal analgesia for rib fractures that combines regional anesthesia (RA) techniques with pharmacotherapy to treat pain, optimize pulmonary function, and reduce opioid related complications. However, RA techniques such as epidurals and paravertebral blocks, are generally underutilized or unavailable for emergency department (ED) patients. The recently described serratus anterior plane block (SAPB) is a promising technique, but failures with posterior rib fractures have been observed. The erector spinae plane block (ESPB) is conceptually similar to the SAPB, but targets the posterior thorax making it likely more effective for ED patients with posterior rib fractures. Our initial experience demonstrates consistent success with the ESPB for traumatic posterior rib fracture analgesia. Herein, we present the first description of the ESPB utilized in the ED. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adult abdominal hernias.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Kevin P

    2014-06-01

    Educational Objectives and Key Points. 1. Given that abdominal hernias are a frequent imaging finding, radiologists not only are required to interpret the appearances of abdominal hernias but also should be comfortable with identifying associated complications and postrepair findings. 2. CT is the imaging modality of choice for the assessment of a known adult abdominal hernia in both elective and acute circumstances because of rapid acquisition, capability of multiplanar reconstruction, good spatial resolution, and anatomic depiction with excellent sensitivity for most complications. 3. Ultrasound is useful for adult groin assessment and is the imaging modality of choice for pediatric abdominal wall hernia assessment, whereas MRI is beneficial when there is reasonable concern that a patient\\'s symptoms could be attributable to a hernia or a musculoskeletal source. 4. Fluoroscopic herniography is a sensitive radiologic investigation for patients with groin pain in whom a hernia is suspected but in whom a hernia cannot be identified at physical examination. 5. The diagnosis of an internal hernia not only is a challenging clinical diagnosis but also can be difficult to diagnose with imaging: Closed-loop small-bowel obstruction and abnormally located bowel loops relative to normally located small bowel or colon should prompt assessment for an internal hernia.

  12. Effects of Student-Performed Point-of-Care Ultrasound on Physician Diagnosis and Management of Patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udrea, Daniel S; Sumnicht, Andrew; Lo, Deanna; Villarreal, Logan; Gondra, Stephanie; Chyan, Richard; Wisham, Audra; Dinh, Vi Am

    2017-07-01

    Despite the increasing integration of ultrasound training into medical education, there is an inadequate body of research demonstrating the benefits and practicality of medical student-performed point-of-care ultrasound (SP-POCUS) in the clinical setting. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects that SP-POCUS can have on physician diagnosis and management of patients in the emergency department, with a secondary purpose of evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of SP-POCUS. SP-POCUS examinations were performed in the emergency department by medical students who completed year one of a 4-year medical school curriculum with integrated ultrasound training. Scans were evaluated by an emergency physician who then completed a survey to record any changes in diagnosis and management. A total of 641 scans were performed on the 482 patients enrolled in this study. SP-POCUS resulted in a change in management in 17.3% of scans performed. For 12.4% of scans, SP-POCUS discovered a new diagnosis. SP-POCUS reduced time to disposition 33.5% of the time. Because of SP-POCUS, physicians avoided ordering an additional imaging study for 53.0% of the scans performed. There was 94.7% physician agreement with SP-POCUS diagnosis. This study showed that SP-POCUS is feasible and may potentially have a meaningful impact on physician diagnosis and management of patients in the emergency department. In addition, the implementation of SP-POCUS could serve as an ideal method of developing ultrasound skills in medical school while positively impacting patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  14. The evaluation of the role of ultrasonography and ultrasound-guided aspiration as an initial screening test in blunt abdominal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, Hassan D.I.; Dar, Manzoor A.; Shukla, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    The role of ultrasonography (US) as an initial screening test was evaluated in 3000 consecutive cases of blunt abdominal trauma (BAT). Seventy-three were positive for free fluid collection or organ injury. US-guided aspiration was used to rule out the hollow visceral injury in those referred to nonsurgical therapy. Sixty patients underwent laparotomy. These included 53 clinically unstable patients, three stable patients with positive US-guided aspiration for bile or intestinal contents and four who deteriorated upon conservative treatment. The remaining patients with US negative for fluid had some evidence of abdominal injury on clinical examination. Ultrasonoraphy complemented the clinical examination. Both the sensitivity and specificity of US for the detection of free fluid were 100%. The overall sensitivity was 92% in spleen injuries, 88% in liver injuries and 100% in kidney injuries, with positive predictive value of 96%, 100% and 100% and a specificity of 97%, 100% and 100% respectively. Retrospective correlation of US with laparotomy findings regarding free fluid showed that 50-100 mL of free fluid was minimal, 100-500 mL significant. Thirteen patients completed conservative treatment with an uneventful course in hospital. Both the US findings and the clinical condition of the patient should be considered in decision-making in BAT. Unnecessary laparotomies can be avoided when the major bleeding site is not in the abdomen and such patients can be safely observed after excluding the hollow visceral injury by US-guided aspiration. US, being rapid to perform, sensitive and easily repeatable, is quite useful as an initial screening test in BAT patients. (author)

  15. One Stage Emergency Pancreatoduodenectomy  for Isolated Injury to Pancreatic Head Following Blunt Abdominal Trauma: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumanta Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Major pancreatic injury following blunt abdominal trauma by itself is a relatively rare occurrence, and in vast majority of cases (95%) it is associated with injury to adjacent major vessels and organs; thus making isolated major pancreatic injury even rarer. While most pancreatic injuries are managed by simple measures like debridement and drainage, complex proximal injury poses surgical challenge regarding surgical skill and judgement. Disproportionate approach at any stage of management can contribute  to high mortality and morbidity. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy plays a limited but important role in managing serious trauma to proximal pancreas and duodenum. Author presents a case where isolated injury to head of pancreas required emergency pancreatoduodenectomy. After a bizarre road accident, a middle aged male underwent emergency laparotomy for intraperitoneal bleeding and during exploration a deep transverse laceration with ampullary disruption was found in the head of the organ. Duodenum in all its part was intact and there was no other injury. The nature and site of injury made emergency pancreatoduodenectomy the only viable option. Leaking pancreatojejunostomy enhances infective complications that lead to late mortality. To circumvent this problem there is enthusiasm for staged surgery with resection and tube pancreatostomy in first stage, leaving the difficult anastomosis for a later date, However, if the patient is haemodynamically stable and operated reasonably early, one stage pancreatoduodenectomy gives good result and avoids repeating surgery with inherent problems and reduces hospital stay. For successful management of pancreatic trauma it is essential to make early diagnosis of duct disruption, with sound application of operative skill and judgement by treating surgeon.

  16. The ultrasound-guided nerve blocks of abdominal wall contributed to anesthetic management of cholecystectomy in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy without using muscle relaxants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Masato; Kuzumoto, Naoya; Akasaki, Yuka; Morioka, Masayo; Nakayama, Kana; Matsuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Kimoto, Katsuhiro; Shimomura, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a progressive neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The sensitivity to non-depolarizing muscle relaxant in a patient with muscle dystrophy is reportedly higher than that in normal individuals, and the duration of the effect is known to be prolonged. In this report, we present the case of a 58-year-old man with BMD who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy for symptomatic cholelithiasis under total intravenous anesthesia without the use of muscle-relaxant drugs and supplemented with regional anesthesia. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol, remifentanil, and fentanyl; ultrasound-guided bilateral rectus sheath block (RSB) and right-sided subcostal transversus abdominis plane block (TAP) were performed. The procedure required conversion to open surgery because of hard conglutination; intraoperative and postoperative periods were uneventful. Adequate analgesia was maintained after extubation because of the effect of RSB and TAP.

  17. [Diagnostic imaging and acute abdominal pain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljekvist, Mads Svane; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-19

    Acute abdominal pain is a common clinical condition. Clinical signs and symptoms can be difficult to interpret, and diagnostic imaging may help to identify intra-abdominal disease. Conventional X-ray, ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen vary in usability between common surgical causes of acute abdominal pain. Overall, conventional X-ray cannot confidently diagnose or rule out disease. US and CT are equally trustworthy for most diseases. US with subsequent CT may enhance diagnostic precision. Magnetic resonance seems promising for future use in acute abdominal imaging.

  18. Comparative Characteristics of the Results of Evacuation to Healthcare Facilities and Treatment Outcomes of Children Who Applied for First Aid With Acute Abdominal Pains. The Case of an Emergency Medical Setting of an Average Municipal Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina А. Romanova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Despite the active development of diagnostic capabilities, the problems of diagnosis at the pre-hospital stage with abdominal pain remain unresolved. Objective. Our aim was to analyze the results of evacuation to healthcare facilities as well as treatment outcomes (conservative and surgical of hospitalized children who applied for first aid with acute abdominal pain, in order to identify possible shortcomings in the existing diagnostic algorithm and its optimization. Methods. The results of treatment outcomes for children with acute abdominal pain at the pre-hospital stage and evacuation to healthcare facilities by visiting teams for the period 2014–2015. are presented by the example of the State Institution «Engels Emergency Medical Setting». Results. Difficulties in routing children to the necessary healthcare facilities (surgical or somatic are due to the complexities of differential diagnosis of the disease in children with acute abdominal pain at the pre-hospital stage. Conclusion. The main task of the primary care and emergency physician at the pre-hospital stage, whose decision determines the direction of the diagnostic search, timeliness and adequacy of the subsequent treatment measures, is to give a correct assessment of abdominal pain syndrome. 

  19. Diagnosis of an Omphalocele with 3 Dimension Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vural Dagli

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Fetal omphalocele is a congenital defect of the abdominal wall that allows some of the abdominal organs to protrude through it. It might be associated with chromosomal abnormalities and fetal anomalies.Two dimension (2D ultrasound is the main diagnosis\tmethod. 3D ultrasound can make the diagnosis easier. In this case report we present an omphalocele diagnosed with ultrasound prenatally. We discuss the role of 2D and 3D ultrasound while diagnosing omphalocele prenatally.

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of examining many of the body's internal organs, including but not limited to the: heart and blood vessels, including the abdominal aorta and its major branches liver gallbladder spleen ...

  1. Diagnostic value of ultrasonography in evaluation and management of acute abdominal conditions in the paediatric age group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Khalid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aims of this study have been elaborated below: (1 to enumerate the common causes of acute abdominal emergencies by ultrasonography in paediatric patients; (2 to establish the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography in evaluation of acute abdominal conditions in children and to illustrate the associated ultrasonographic findings; (3 and, to discuss the role of ultrasonography in guiding the mode of intervention in these cases. Patients and Methods: This prospective study of ultrasonographic examination in 146 paediatric patients presenting with acute onset abdominal pain at the emergency/paediatric outpatient department section of Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College & Hospital, Aligarh, between June 2006 and December 2007, using 3.75 MHz and 8 MHz transducers of the ADARA (Siemens machine. Results : Common causes of acute abdominal emergencies in pediatric patients as noted on ultrasonography included nonspecific pain (28%, abdominal abscess (21%, acute appendicitis (7% and intussusception (7%. Ultrasonography was diagnostic in 45.2% cases and supportive in 12.3% of the cases. As for as the final outcome, ultrasonography prevented surgery in almost 20% cases and laparotomy was avoided in 7% of the patients as ultrasound guided interventions in the form of abscess aspiration were carried out. Conclusion: Ultrasonography evaluation of children with acute abdominal pain, helps in making significant changes in the management plan of the patients, and also reveals various clinically unsuspected diseases.

  2. Recurrent severe abdominal pain in the pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homme, James L; Foster, Ashley A

    2014-05-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) is a blockage occurring at the junction of the ureter and the renal pelvis. Pediatric patients with UPJO pose a diagnostic challenge when they present to the emergency department (ED) with severe recurrent abdominal pain if there is not a level of suspicion for this condition. Our aim was to review presentation of UPJO to the ED, methods of diagnosis, and treatment of this common but often overlooked condition. We report on 2 patients, a 9-year-old and 3-year-old, who had multiple presentations to health care providers and the ED with intermittent and recurrent abdominal pain. Subsequent testing, including ultrasound (US) and computed tomography (CT) with diuretic-recreated symptoms, revealed UPJO. Open pyeloplasty was performed, resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. UPJO is an important diagnosis to consider when patients present to the ED with recurrent abdominal pain. US can be helpful in suspecting the diagnosis, but often CT, magnetic resonance urography, or diuretic scintigraphy is required for confirmation. Diuretics can be used to aid diagnostic testing by reproducing abdominal pain at the time of imaging. Referral to a urologist for open pyeloplasty is definitive treatment for this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Abdominal Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I find more information and related topics? Functional Abdominal Pain (English, French or Spanish)—from The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN). Gastro Kids , a ...

  4. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic and abdominal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woitek, R.; Asenbaum, U.; Furtner, J.; Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fetal thoracic and abdominal malformations. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cases of suspected pathologies based on fetal ultrasound MRI can be used for more detailed examinations and can be of assistance in the differential diagnostic process. Improved imaging of anatomical structures and of the composition of different tissues by the use of different MRI sequences. Fetal MRI has become a part of clinical routine in thoracic and abdominal malformations and is the basis for scientific research in this field. In cases of thoracic or abdominal malformations fetal MRI provides important information additional to ultrasound to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic evaluation and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  5. Abdominal epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, N.; Razzaq, A.

    2004-01-01

    Abdominal epilepsy (AE) is a rather uncommon clinical entity in children that might create diagnostic confusion especially when it lacks the typical manifestations of an epileptic seizure. We report the case of a young boy having apparently unexplained episodes of paroxysmal abdominal symptoms with no other suggestion of an underlying epileptic disorder. The case also explains how the clinical presentation can be misleading unless a high index of suspicion is maintained to reach the ultimate diagnosis. (author)

  6. Retained Intra-Abdominal Surgical Clamp Complicating Emergency Laparotomy: Incidental Finding on Hysterosalpingogram for Evaluation of Tubal Infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebiyi Gbadebo Adesiyun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The finding of intraperitoneal foreign body complicating surgical intervention broadly remains as an issue of safety in the operative room, a source of emotive concern for the patient, and an upsetting but equally embarrassing situation to the surgeon and the team. However, in the media world, it is a source of sumptuous and captivating headline on the newspaper and to the legal profession, an attractive case to prosecute. A middle age teacher presented with secondary infertility. She had emergency laparotomy fifteen years ago for ruptured tubal ectopic pregnancy in a private hospital and postoperative period was uneventful. Amongst other investigations to find out the cause of infertility, she had hysterosalpingography and a radio-opaque clamp was visualized on the films. She was counselled and had laparotomy. A pair of surgical Kocher clamps was retrieved buried in the mesentery.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  8. Trans-abdominal ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlation for conformal intracavitary brachytherapy in carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahantshetty, Umesh; Khanna, Nehal; Swamidas, Jamema; Engineer, Reena; Thakur, Meenakshi H.; Merchant, Nikhil H.; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Trans-abdominal ultrasonography (US) is capable of determining size, shape, thickness, and diameter of uterus, cervix and disease at cervix or parametria. To assess the potential value of US for image-guided cervical cancer brachytherapy, we compared US-findings relevant for brachytherapy to the corresponding findings obtained from MR imaging. Materials and methods: Twenty patients with biopsy proven cervical cancer undergoing definitive radiotherapy with/without concomitant Cisplatin chemotherapy and suitable for brachytherapy were invited to participate in this study. US and MR were performed in a similar reproducible patient positioning after intracavitary application. US mid-sagittal and axial image at the level of external cervical os was acquired. Reference points D1 to D9 and distances were identified with respect to central tandem and flange, to delineate cervix, central disease, and external surface of the uterus. Results: Thirty-two applications using CT/MR compatible applicators were evaluable. The D1 and D3 reference distances which represent anterior surface had a strong correlation with R = 0.92 and 0.94 (p < 0.01). The D2 and D4 reference distances in contrast, which represent the posterior surface had a moderate (D2) and a strong (D4) correlation with R = 0.63 and 0.82 (p < 0.01). Of all, D2 reference distance showed the least correlation of MR and US. The D5 reference distance representing the fundal thickness from tandem tip had a correlation of 0.98. The reference distances for D6, D7, D8, and D9 had a correlation of 0.94, 0.82, 0.96, and 0.93, respectively. Conclusions: Our study evaluating the use of US, suggests a reasonably strong correlation with MR in delineating uterus, cervix, and central disease for 3D conformal intracavitary brachytherapy planning.

  9. Five-year Retrospective Review of Physician and Non-physician Performed Ultrasound in a Canadian Critical Care Helicopter Emergency Medical Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dochartaigh, Domhnall; Douma, Matthew; MacKenzie, Mark

    2017-01-01

    To describe the use of prehospital ultrasonography (PHUS) to support interventions, when used by physician and non-physician air medical crew (AMC), in a Canadian helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS). A retrospective review was conducted of consecutive patients who underwent ultrasound examination during HEMS care from January 1, 2009 through March 10, 2014. An a priori created data form was used to record patient demographics, type of ultrasound scan performed, ultrasound findings, location of scan, type of interventions supported by PHUS, factors that affected PHUS completion, and quality indicator(s). Data analysis was performed through descriptive statistics, Student's t-test for continuous variables, Z-test for proportions, and Mann-Whitney U Test for nonparametric data. Outcomes included interventions supported by PHUS, factors associated with incomplete scans, and quality indicators associated with PHUS use. Differences between physician and AMC groups were also assessed. PHUS was used in 455 missions, 318 by AMC and 137 by physicians. In combined trauma and medical patients, in the AMC group interventions were supported by PHUS in 26% of cases (95% CI 18-34). For transport physicians the percentage support was found to be significantly greater at 45% of cases (95% CI 34-56) p = reasons included patient obesity, lack of time, patient access, and clinical reasons. Quality indicators associated with PHUS were rarely identified. The use of PHUS by both physicians and non-physicians was found to support interventions in select trauma and medical patients. Key words: emergency medical services; aircraft; helicopter; air ambulance; ultrasonography; emergency care, prehospital; prehospital emergency care.

  10. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Abdominal Wall and Lumbar Multifidus Muscles in Participants Who Practice Pilates: A 1-year Follow-up Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala-Alarcón, Paula; Calvo-Lobo, César; Serrano-Imedio, Ana; Garrido-Marín, Alejandro; Martín-Casas, Patricia; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo

    2018-04-18

    The purpose of this study was to describe ultrasound (US) changes in muscle thickness produced during automatic activation of the transversus abdominis (TrAb), internal oblique (IO), external oblique (EO), and rectus abdominis (RA), as well as the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the lumbar multifidus (LM), after 1 year of Pilates practice. A 1-year follow-up case series study with a convenience sample of 17 participants was performed. Indeed, TrAb, IO, EO, and RA thickness, as well as LM CSA changes during automatic tests were measured by US scanning before and after 1 year of Pilates practice twice per week. Furthermore, quality of life changes using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and US measurement comparisons of participants who practiced exercises other than Pilates were described. Statistically significant changes were observed for the RA muscle thickness reduction during the active straight leg raise test (P = .007). Participants who practiced other exercises presented a larger LM CSA and IO thickness, which was statistically significant (P .05). A direct moderate correlation was observed (r = 0.562, P = .019) between the TrAb thickness before and after a 1-year follow-up. Long-term Pilates practice may reduce the RA thickness automatic activation during active straight leg raise. Furthermore, LM CSA and IO thickness increases were observed in participants who practice other exercise types in conjunction with Pilates. Despite a moderate positive correlation observed for TrAb thickness, the quality of life did not seem to be modified after long-term Pilates practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Abdominal pregnancy - Case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohiltea, R; Radoi, V; Tufan, C; Horhoianu, I A; Bohiltea, C

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal pregnancy, a rare diagnosis, belongs to the ectopic pregnancy group, the leading cause of pregnancy related exitus. The positive diagnosis is very difficult to establish most often in an acute setting, leading to a staggering percent of feto-maternal morbidity and mortality. We present the case of 26-weeks-old abdominal pregnancy with partial feto-placental detachment in a patient, after hysteroscopy and in vitro fertilization, which until the acute symptoms that led to emergency laparotomy went unrecognized. The patient recovered completely and satisfactorily after surgery and, due to the high risk of uterine rupture with regard to a second pregnancy, opted for a surrogate mother. Abdominal pregnancy can be regarded as a difficult to establish diagnosis, with a greater chance in case of increased awareness. It is compulsory to be well informed in order not to be surprised by the diagnosis and to apply the correct treatment immediately as the morbidity and mortality rate is elevated.

  12. Ultrasound of the acute abdomen performed by surgeons in training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J.P.; Grantcharov, T.P.; Eriksen, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    , specificity and kappa-agreement of the surgeon performed ultrasound examination was 1.00 (0.77-1.00), 0.96 (0.79-0.99), 0.94 (0.3-1.00) and 0.40 (0.12-0.77), 0.97 (0.83-0.99), 0.44 (0.00-0.96); respectively. Visualization of the common bile duct was poor having 73% non-diagnostic surgeon-performed ultrasound...... perform valid abdominal ultrasound examinations of patients referred with acute abdominal pain. METHODS: Patients referred with acute abdominal pain had an ultrasound examination by a surgeon in training as well as by an experienced consultant radiologist whose results served as the gold standard. All...... participating surgeons were without any pre-existing ultrasound experience and received one hour of introduction to abdominal ultrasound. RESULTS: Thirty patients underwent 40 surgeon performed and 30 radiologist performed ultrasound examinations. Regarding gallstone and cholecholecystitis the sensitivity...

  13. Anaphylaxis, Intra-Abdominal Infections, Skin Lacerations, and Behavioral Emergencies: A Literature Review of Austere Analogs for a near Earth Asteroid Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chough, Natacha G.; Watkins, Sharmi; Menon, Anil S.

    2012-01-01

    As space exploration is directed towards destinations beyond low-Earth orbit, the consequent new set of medical risks will drive requirements for new capabilities and more resources to ensure crew health. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Conditions List (SMEMCL), developed by the Exploration Medical Capability element of the Human Research Program, addresses the risk of "unacceptable health and mission outcomes due to limitations of in-flight medical capabilities". It itemizes 85 evidence-based clinical requirements for eight different mission profiles and identifies conditions warranting further research and technology development. Each condition is given a clinical priority for each mission profile. Four conditions -- intra-abdominal infections, skin lacerations, anaphylaxis, and behavioral emergencies -- were selected as a starting point for analysis. A systematic literature review was performed to understand how these conditions are treated in austere, limited-resource, space-analog environments (i.e., high-altitude and mountain environments, submarines, military deployments, Antarctica, isolated wilderness environments, in-flight environments, and remote, resource-poor, rural environments). These environments serve as analogs to spaceflight because of their shared characteristics (limited medical resources, delay in communication, confined living quarters, difficulty with resupply, variable time to evacuation). Treatment of these four medical conditions in austere environments provides insight into medical equipment and training requirements for exploration-class missions.

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  18. Abdominal Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jan J

    2016-08-01

    Abdominal infections are an important challenge for the intensive care physician. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, selecting the appropriate regimen is important and, with new drugs coming to the market, correct use is important more than ever before and abdominal infections are an excellent target for antimicrobial stewardship programs. Biomarkers may be helpful, but their exact role in managing abdominal infections remains incompletely understood. Source control also remains an ongoing conundrum, and evidence is increasing that its importance supersedes the impact of antibiotic therapy. New strategies such as open abdomen management may offer added benefit in severely ill patients, but more data are needed to identify its exact role. The role of fungi and the need for antifungal coverage, on the other hand, have been investigated extensively in recent years, but at this point, it remains unclear who requires empirical as well as directed therapy.

  19. ABDOMINAL TRAUMA- CLINICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanaja Ratnakumari Billa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND In the recent times there has been increased incidence of abdominal trauma cases due to several causes. Quick and prompt intervention is needed to decrease the mortality of the patients. So we conducted a study to assess the cause and the management of abdominal trauma cases in our institution. The aim of this study was to know the incidence of blunt and penetrating injuries and their causes, age and sex incidence, importance of various investigations, mode of treatment offered and post-operative complications. To study the cause of death and evolve better management. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study comprises of patients admitted to and operated in various surgical units in the Department of Surgery at Government General Hospital, attached to Guntur Medical College Guntur, from August 2014 to October 2016. RESULTS Increase incidence seen in age group 20-29 years (30%. Male predominance 77.5%. Mechanism of injury–road traffic accidents 65%. Isolated organ injury–colon and rectum 40%. Other associated injuries–chest injuries with rib fractures 7.5%. Complications–wound infection 17.5%. Duration of hospital stay 8–14 days. Bowel injury management–closure of perforation 84.6%. Resection anastomosis 15.38%. CONCLUSION Thorough clinical examination, diagnostic paracentesis, plain X-ray erect abdomen and ultrasound proved to be very helpful in the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries. Spleen is the commonest organ involved in blunt trauma and colon is the commonly injured organ in penetrating abdominal trauma, many patients have associated extremity and axial skeleton injuries. With advances in diagnosis and intensive care technologies, most patients of solid visceral injuries with hemodynamic stability can be managed conservatively. Surgical site infection is the most common complication following surgery. The mortality is high; reason might be patient reaching the hospital late, high incidence of postoperative septic

  20. Ten good reasons to practice ultrasound in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, Daniel; van Hooland, Simon; Elbers, Paul; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, critical care ultrasound has gained its place in the armamentarium of monitoring tools. A greater understanding of lung, abdominal, and vascular ultrasound plus easier access to portable machines have revolutionised the bedside assessment of our ICU patients. Because ultrasound is not only a diagnostic test, but can also be seen as a component of the physical exam, it has the potential to become the stethoscope of the 21st century. Critical care ultrasound is a combination of simple protocols, with lung ultrasound being a basic application, allowing assessment of urgent diagnoses in combination with therapeutic decisions. The LUCI (Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill) consists of the identification of ten signs: the bat sign (pleural line); lung sliding (seashore sign); the A-lines (horizontal artefact); the quad sign and sinusoid sign indicating pleural effusion; the fractal and tissue-like sign indicating lung consolidation; the B-lines and lung rockets indicating interstitial syndromes; abolished lung sliding with the stratosphere sign suggesting pneumothorax; and the lung point indicating pneumothorax. Two more signs, the lung pulse and the dynamic air bronchogram, are used to distinguish atelectasis from pneumonia. The BLUE protocol (Bedside Lung Ultrasound in Emergency) is a fast protocol (respiratory failure. With this protocol, it becomes possible to differentiate between pulmonary oedema, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, and pneumothorax, each showing specific ultrasound patterns and profiles. The FALLS protocol (Fluid Administration Limited by Lung Sonography) adapts the BLUE protocol to be used in patients with acute circulatory failure. It makes a sequential search for obstructive, cardiogenic, hypovolemic, and distributive shock using simple real-time echocardiography in combination with lung ultrasound, with the appearance of B-lines considered to be the endpoint for fluid therapy

  1. Impact of point-of-care ultrasound on quality of care in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhikari S

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Srikar Adhikari,1 Richard Amini,1 Lori A Stolz,1 Michael Blaivas2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson, AZ, 2Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia, SC, USA Abstract: The use of point-of-care (POC ultrasonography has rapidly expanded in recent years, in both academic and community settings. It is one of the few diagnostic modalities that can be performed rapidly at the bedside by a physician and has significant impact on patient outcomes. It is portable, readily accessible, and cost-effective, and has no risk of ionizing radiation. There is an abundance of evidence that supports the use of POC ultrasound by physicians in different subspecialties. Multiple studies have documented the diagnostic accuracy of POC ultrasound and its ability to decrease the time to definitive treatment. As ultrasound technology has advanced, POC ultrasound applications have also evolved from being used solely in patients with blunt abdominal trauma to applications for nearly every clinical scenario imaginable. From performing procedures more safely to diagnosing pathology more quickly, POC ultrasound is radically changing clinical practice, patient outcomes, and the overall quality of patient care a clinician can provide. Recently, there has been a paradigm shift involving a symptom-based approach to POC ultrasound. This unique symptom-based ultrasound approach has led to improved quality of care in a variety of clinical settings. Keywords: point-of-care ultrasound, ultrasonography, bedside ultrasound, emergency physician, emergency department, quality, symptom-based

  2. A Newborn With Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Riham; Drake, Meredith; Gurria Juarez, Juan; Emery, Kathleen H; Shaaban, Aimen F; Szabo, Sara; Sobolewski, Brad

    2017-11-01

    A previously healthy 3-week-old boy presented with 5 hours of marked fussiness, abdominal distention, and poor feeding. He was afebrile and well perfused. His examination was remarkable for localized abdominal tenderness and distention. He was referred to the emergency department in which an abdominal radiograph revealed gaseous distention of the bowel with a paucity of gas in the pelvis. Complete blood cell count and urinalysis were unremarkable. His ongoing fussiness and abnormal physical examination prompted consultation with surgery and radiology. Our combined efforts ultimately established an unexpected diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Ectopic intra-abdominal fascioliasis

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNGÖREN, Ali Ulvi

    2009-01-01

    Human fascioliasis, caused by Fasciola hepatica, is emerging as an important chronic zoonotic disease in many areas of the world, including Turkey. It primarily involves the liver and may also cause severe damage in the tissue. Herein we report on a patient with ectopic intra-abdominal fascioliasis that presented to our clinic with abdominal pain and distention. Physical and radiological examination as well as an exploratory laparotomy revealed a 10 × 10-cm mass in the splenic flexura of the ...

  4. Abdominal compartment syndrome with acute reperfusion syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleeva, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome was recognized clinically in the 19th century when Marey and Burt observed its association with declines in respiratory function. Abdominal compartment syndrome is first used as a medical terminology from Fietsman in a case of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A condition caused by abnormally increased pressure within the abdomen. Causes of abdominal compartment syndrome include trauma, surgery, or infection. Common symptoms: abdominal distension, fast heart rate, insufficient urine production, or low blood pressure Medical procedure: nasogastric intubation Surgery: laparotomy Specialists: radiologist, primary care provider (PCP), surgeon, and emergency medicine doctor [6, 10]. Keywords: Stomach. Gastroparesis . Diabetes Mellitus [bg

  5. The utility of ultrasonography in the the diagnostics and monitoring of treatment of acute abdominal pain in children with neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, U.; Jankowski, B.; Maciaszek, A.; Moron, K.

    2005-01-01

    - 8(6,0%), HL - 4(3%), nephroblastoma - 4(3%), neuroblastoma - 3( 2,2%). Acute abdominal symptoms can have a very different etiology: bacterial, mycotic and virusal infections or continuous infiltration of gastrointestinal tract by tumor. Clinical symptoms of the acute abdominal diseases are very severe, because the oncological patients usually have immunologic deficiency and oblige us to proper clinical observation or to operation procedure, very often as an emergency. The symptoms appeared in the different time of course of oncological diseases. Nonspecific gastrointestinal inflammation with haemorrhage and typhlitis were the main cause of the acute abdominal pain in 71 children with neutropenia during therapy of leukaemia, lymphoma, aplastic anemia and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The accuracy of ultrasound findings verified intraoperatively and by histopathologic examinations was 84%. In all cases the morphological changes were directly related to the signs and symptoms duration. (author)

  6. Performance Accuracy of Hand-on-needle versus Hand-onsyringe Technique for Ultrasound-guided Regional Anesthesia Simulation for Emergency Medicine Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Johnson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ultrasound-guided nerve blocks (UGNB are increasingly used in emergency care. The hand-on-syringe (HS needle technique is ideally suited to the emergency department setting because it allows a single operator to perform the block without assistance. The HS technique is assumed to provide less exact needle control than the alternative two-operator hand-on-needle (HN technique; however this assumption has never been directly tested. The primary objective of this study was to compare accuracy of needle targeting under ultrasound guidance by emergency medicine (EM residents using HN and HS techniques on a standardized gelatinous simulation model. Methods: This prospective, randomized study evaluated task performance. We compared needle targeting accuracy using the HN and HS techniques. Each participant performed a set of structured needling maneuvers (both simple and difficult on a standardized partial-task simulator. We evaluated time to task completion, needle visualization during advancement, and accuracy of needle tip at targeting. Resident technique preference was assessed using a post-task survey. Results: We evaluated 60 tasks performed by 10 EM residents. There was no significant difference in time to complete the simple model (HN vs. HS, 18 seconds vs. 18 seconds, p=0.93, time to complete the difficult model (HN vs. HS, 56 seconds vs. 50 seconds, p=0.63, needle visualization, or needle tip targeting accuracy. Most residents (60% preferred the HS technique. Conclusion: For EM residents learning UGNBs, the HN technique was not associated with superior needle control. Our results suggest that the single-operator HS technique provides equivalent needle control when compared to the two-operator HN technique. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(6:641–646

  7. Cold Abscess of the Anterior Abdominal Wall: An Unusual Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dhar AM, Bhargava S, Bankata S. Isolated abdominal parietal cold abscess diagnosed on ultrasound. Indian J Radiol Imaging. 1999;9:157-8. 8. Dixit R, Dixit K, Shah H, Shah K. Tuberculous abscess of rectus abdominis muscle. Indian J Tuberc 2004;51:231-3. 9. Sharma N, Sharma S. Tuberculosis abscess of the abdominal ...

  8. Seeing Is Believing: Evaluating a Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum for 1st-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bret P; Hojsak, Joanne; Dei Rossi, Elizabeth; Karani, Reena; Narula, Jagat

    2017-01-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound has been a novel addition to undergraduate medical education at a few medical schools. The impact is not fully understood, and few rigorous assessments of educational outcomes exist. This study assessed the impact of a point-of-care ultrasound curriculum on image acquisition, interpretation, and student and faculty perceptions of the course. All 142 first-year medical students completed a curriculum on ultrasound physics and instrumentation, cardiac, thoracic, and abdominal imaging. A flipped classroom model of preclass tutorials and tests augmenting live, hands-on scanning sessions was incorporated into the physical examination course. Students and faculty completed surveys on impressions of the curriculum, and all students under-went competency assessments with standardized patients. The curriculum was a mandatory part of the physical examination course and was taught by experienced clinician-sonographers as well as faculty who do not routinely perform sonography in their clinical practice. Students and faculty agreed that the physical examination course was the right time to introduce ultrasound (87% and 80%). Students demonstrated proper use of the ultrasound machine functions (M score = 91.55), and cardiac, thoracic, and abdominal system assessments (M score = 80.35, 79.58, and 71.57, respectively). Students and faculty valued the curriculum, and students demonstrated basic competency in performance and interpretation of ultrasound. Further study is needed to determine how to best incorporate this emerging technology into a robust learning experience for medical students.

  9. Point-of-Care Ultrasound in Necrotizing Acute Pancreatitis Complicated by Perforated Ileum Due to Nonocclusive Mesenteric Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia López-Cuenca

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing acute pancreatitis is the most severe form of pancreatitis, and it is a potentially life-threatening condition. Its diagnosis and severity are based on radiological signs. Although computed tomography is the most used imaging tool, ultrasound can be a quick and useful technique in emergency and intensive care scenarios. The use of abdominal ultrasound is generally limited to ruling out cholecystitis. Bowel gas can limit the accuracy of pancreatic imaging. When the pancreas is visualized, ultrasound can reveal pancreatic enlargement, echotextural changes, and peripancreatic fluid. We present a patient with necrotizing pancreatitis who developed peritonitis due to ileal perforation, where the use of ultrasound as a bedside imaging technique was very useful.

  10. Abdominal angina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.J.; Stewart, J.; Holden, R.W.; Yune, H.Y.; Mail, J.T.; Klatte, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Abdominal angina due to occlusive disease of the mesenteric arteries has been the to become clinically manifest only in the presence of severe disease in at least two of the following vessels: celiac, SMA, and IMA. Still, many patients who gradually develop significant two-vessel disease have few or no associated symptoms. Differences in collateral circulation and in cardiac index account for some of the clinical variation. The usual clinical manifestations include severe post-prandial pain, sitophobia (fear of eating because of the anticipated symptoms), and profound weight loss. Uncommonly, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting may be encountered. Smoking is a common historical feature. Most series document a female predilection. Aside from occasional abdominal bruits and (more commonly) findings of peripheral vascular occlusive disease, the physical exam discloses only cachexia. But the differential diagnosis of profound weight loss is extensive. Therefore, abdominal angina has always created a diagnostic challenge. Multiple imaging modalities are often employed, and a seemingly negative evaluation often culminates in biplane aortography. The latter typically reveals stenoses and/or occlusions in at least two of the three mesenteric arteries. The authors discuss how a variety of surgical treatments, including thromboendarterectomy and bypass grafting, have evolved. Recently reported results have been excellent

  11. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  12. Utility of abdominal ultrasonography in acute painful tables of right iliac Fossa with appendicitis acute suspicion. Maciel Hospital Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dibarboure, P.; Sciuto, P.; Machado, F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute appendicitis is one of the most frequent causes of consultation and of indication of emergency laparotomy in most western countries. Despite its diagnostic being based mainly on clinical examination, there is a certain percentage of patients whose clinical presentation is atypical. In these cases image methods such as the abdominal ultrasound are particularly useful as diagnostic auxiliaries.The objective of this work is to compare the echographic with the Anatomopathological diagnosis in 80 patients who consulted the Hospital Maciel emergency service with episodes of acute appendicitis

  13. Use of a hand-held bladder ultrasound scanner in the assessment of dehydration and monitoring response to treatment in a paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Kevin; Beattie, Tom; Taheri, Sepideh

    2010-10-01

    Dehydration is a common concern in paediatric emergency care. Limited tools are available to assess reduced urine production, which is commonly cited as a reliable marker of dehydration. To evaluate the utility of a hand-held bladder ultrasound scanner in monitoring urine production in children attending the emergency department with suspected dehydration. A prospective pilot study was undertaken on a convenience sample of patients presenting with suspected dehydration. Serial bladder ultrasound scanning was performed to monitor urine output. Dehydration was assessed clinically using the WHO guide to dehydration assessment. Decisions about treatment and admission were made independently of the urine output measurements obtained using the bladder scanner. 45 children were studied. Using the WHO guide, 33 (73%) had mild dehydration, 8 (18%) had moderate dehydration and 4 (9%) had severe dehydration. There was a significant difference in estimated urine production between those admitted and those discharged (0.9±1.2 ml/kg/h vs 1.8±1.5 ml/kg/h, p=0.01) and between those with mild dehydration versus moderate/severe dehydration (2.3±1.5 ml/kg/h vs 0.6±0.7 ml/kg/h, p=0.0011). Urine output had been significantly reduced in those who had received an intravenous fluid bolus compared with those who had not (0.4±0.46 ml/kg/h vs 1.9±1.6 ml/kg/h, p=0.001). The hand-held bladder scanner is a convenient, non-invasive and objective adjunct in the assessment and management of children attending the emergency department with suspected dehydration.

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are ... Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: ...

  17. Feasibility and Diagnostic Accuracy of Point-of-Care Abdominal Sonography by Pocket-Sized Imaging Devices, Performed by Medical Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjesbu, Ingunn E; Laursen, Christian B; Graven, Torbjørn; Holden, Hans Martin; Rømo, Bjørnar; Newton Andersen, Garrett; Mjølstad, Ole Christian; Lassen, Annmarie; Dalen, Håvard

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to study the feasibility and diagnostic performance of bedside ultrasound by examination of the liver, gallbladder, kidneys, and abdominal aorta performed by medical residents with limited experience in ultrasound, on emergency admissions using pocket-sized imaging devices (PSIDs). A total of 199 patients admitted acutely to the medical department at the non-university Levanger Hospital, Norway, during the period from April 4 to June 23, 2011, were consecutively included. Six medical residents, selected by drawing, examined these patients with a PSID at admission. Reference imaging was performed and/or judged at the Department of Radiology. Each resident performed a median of 28 examinations (interquartile range 24-46). Imaging of the kidneys and liver were feasible in 85 and 82% of the cases, and the corresponding values for the gallbladder and abdominal aorta were 79 and 50%, respectively. The sensitivity of medical residents to detect organ pathology with the aid of PSID, ranged between 54% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 29-77%) and 74% (95% CI: 51-88%). Assessment of the aortic dimension showed moderate correlation, with r = 0.38. Examination by PSID by inexperienced residents may allow for early detection of abdominal pathology, but do not appear to be accurate enough to rule out pathology in the abdominal organs. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Blunt abdominal trauma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Deborah; Lee, Lois K

    2012-06-01

    This review will examine the current evidence regarding pediatric blunt abdominal trauma and the physical exam findings, laboratory values, and radiographic imaging associated with the diagnosis of intra-abdominal injuries (IAI), as well as review the current literature on pediatric hollow viscus injuries and emergency department disposition after diagnosis. The importance of the seat belt sign on physical examination and screening laboratory data remains controversial, although screening hepatic enzymes are recommended in the evaluation of nonaccidental trauma to identify occult abdominal organ injuries. Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) has modest sensitivity for hemoperitoneum and IAI in the pediatric trauma patient. Patients with concern for undiagnosed IAI, including bowel injury, may be considered for hospital admission and serial abdominal exams without an increased risk of complications, if an exploratory laparotomy is not performed emergently. Although the FAST exam is not recommended as the sole screening tool to rule out IAI in hemodynamically stable trauma patients, it may be used in conjunction with the physical exam and laboratory findings to identify children at risk for IAI. Children with a normal physical exam and normal abdominal CT may not require routine hospitalization after blunt abdominal trauma.

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  20. Torsion of abdominal appendages presenting with acute abdominal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jaberi, Tareq M.; Gharabeih, Kamal I.; Yaghan, Rami J.

    2000-01-01

    Diseases of abnormal appendages are rare causes of abdominal pain in all age groups. Nine patients with torsion and infraction of abdominal appendages were retrospectively reviewed. Four patients had torsion and infarction of the appendices epiploicae, four patients had torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament. The patient with falciform ligament disease represents the first reported case of primary torsion and infarction of the falciform ligament, and the patient with the transverse colon epiplocia represents the first reported case of vibration-induced appendix epiplocia torsion and infarction. The patient with the falciform ligament disease presented with a tender upper abdominal mass and the remaining patients were operated upon with the preoperative diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The presence of normal appendix with free serosanguinous fluid in the peritoneal cavity should raise the possibility of a disease and calls for further evaluation of the intra-abdominal organs. If the diagnosis is suspected preoperatively, CT scan and ultrasound may lead to a correct diagnosis and possibly conservative management. Laparoscopy is playing an increasing diagnostic and therapeutic role in such situations. (author)

  1. Medical image of the week: massive abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larson M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. An 88 year-old presented to the emergency department with left flank and lower back pain as well as lower abdominal fullness. The fullness had started 2 days prior, but the left flank pain acutely started in the early morning before presenting. He had a history of unmedicated hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and mild vertigo. His review of systems was positive for chills and difficulty urinating but no hematuria. He was a non-smoker, and had undergone orthopedic surgeries but had otherwise avoided emergent hospitalizations. On exam, vitals were unremarkable; there was no flank nor costovertebral angle tenderness; however, a midline pulsatile mass was present. An initial non-contrast CT abdomen/pelvis revealed a massive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA, Figure 1. Follow-up CT angiogram of the AAA can be seen in Figure 2. Upon further questioning, he had undergone a research study some 30 years earlier involving ultrasound to screen for AAA and was told he ...

  2. Physics of Ultrasound. Chapter 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacefield, J. C. [University of Western Ontario, London (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Ultrasound is the most commonly used diagnostic imaging modality, accounting for approximately 25% of all imaging examinations performed worldwide at the beginning of the 21st century. The success of ultrasound may be attributed to a number of attractive characteristics, including the relatively low cost and portability of an ultrasound scanner, the non-ionizing nature of ultrasound waves, the ability to produce real time images of blood flow and moving structures such as the beating heart, and the intrinsic contrast among soft tissue structures that is achieved without the need for an injected contrast agent. The latter characteristic enables ultrasound to be used for a wide range of medical applications, which historically have primarily included cardiac and vascular imaging, imaging of the abdominal organs and, most famously, in utero imaging of the developing fetus. Ongoing technological improvements continue to expand the use of ultrasound for many applications, including cancer imaging, musculoskeletal imaging, ophthalmology and others. The term ultrasound refers specifically to acoustic waves at frequencies greater than the maximum frequency audible to humans, which is nominally 20 kHz. Diagnostic imaging is generally performed using ultrasound in the frequency range of 2–15 MHz. The choice of frequency is dictated by a trade off between spatial resolution and penetration depth, since higher frequency waves can be focused more tightly but are attenuated more rapidly by tissue. The information contained in an ultrasonic image is influenced by the physical processes underlying propagation, reflection and attenuation of ultrasound waves in tissue.

  3. Diagnosis in acute abdominal pain and ongoing abdominal sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiewiet, J.J.S.

    2016-01-01

    Acute abdominal pain is a common reason for presentation at the emergency department. To establish a timely and adequate diagnosis, doctors use the pattern of complaints and physical examination as the basis for the evaluation of a patient. In this thesis we conducted a study that showed that

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  6. Controle de danos no trauma abdominal e lesões associadas: experiência de cinco anos em um serviço de emergência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Martinez Menini Stalhschmidt

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Baseado no conceito de cirurgia para controle de danos (damage control, o presente estudo tem por objetivo analisar, epidemiologicamente, os pacientes submetidos a esta modalidade cirúrgica no Hospital Universitário Cajuru (HUC, em Curitiba, PR. MÉTODO: No período de Janeiro de 2001 à Março de 2005, foram revisados os prontuários de pacientes atendidos no HUC, vítimas de traumatismos diversos, sendo encontrados 39 pacientes submetidos à cirurgia para controle de danos abdominal. RESULTADOS: Dos 39 prontuários de pacientes analisados, 35 foram do sexo masculino (87,74% e quatro do sexo feminino (10,26%. A idade dos pacientes variou de 4 a 73 anos, sendo sua média de 30,35 anos. Trauma penetrante ocorreu em 24 pacientes (61,54%, sendo que 18 destes (46,15% sofreram ferimentos por armas de fogo e seis (15,38%, ferimentos por arma branca. O trauma fechado ocorreu em 15 pacientes, perfazendo um total de 38,46%. O ISS (Injury Severity Score médio dos pacientes foi de 44,03. A quantidade média de hemoderivados utilizados foi de 7,2 unidades papa de hemácias e 4,95 unidades de plasma fresco. O pH médio no intraoperatório foi de 7,1 e o BE (base excess de -14,4. O intervalo de tempo médio entre o início e o término da primeira cirurgia foi de 174,18 minutos (2,9 horas, levando-se em conta outros procedimentos de emergência também efetuados como craniectomias e/ou fixação de pelve e ossos longos. Foram constatados complicações imediatas em 28 pacientes, perfazendo um total de 53,85%. A média de sobrevida foi de 20,51% (n=8 e o tempo médio de permanência na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva (UTI após a primeira cirurgia foi de 41,75 horas (n=24. A maioria dos óbitos (n=17 ocorreu nas primeiras 24 horas de internação. CONCLUSÕES: O Damage Control é de fato uma medida que aumenta a taxa de sobrevida dos pacientes gravemente traumatizados, desde que esses mesmos pacientes tenham uma estabilização dentro das primeiras

  7. Lateral abdominal muscle size at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre in healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linek, Pawel; Saulicz, Edward; Wolny, Tomasz; Myśliwiec, Andrzej; Kokosz, Mirosław

    2015-02-01

    Lateral abdominal wall muscles in children and adolescents have not been characterised to date. In the present report, we examined the reliability of the ultrasound measurement and thickness of the oblique external muscle (OE), oblique internal muscle (OI) and transverse abdominal muscle (TrA) at rest and during abdominal drawing-in manoeuvre (ADIM) on both sides of the body in healthy adolescents. We also determined possible differences between boys and girls and defined any factors-such as body mass, height and BMI-that may affect the thickness of the abdominal muscles. B-mode ultrasound was used to assess OE, OI and TrA on both sides of the body in the supine position. Ultrasound measurements at rest and during ADIM were reliable in this age group (ICC3,3 > 0.92). OI was always the thickest and TrA the thinnest muscle on both sides of the body. In this group, an identical pattern of the contribution of the individual muscles to the structure of the lateral abdominal wall (OI > OE > TrA) was observed. At rest and during ADIM, no statistically significant side-to-side differences were demonstrated in either gender. The body mass constitutes between 30% and <50% of the thickness differences in all muscles under examination at rest and during ADIM. The structure of lateral abdominal wall in adolescents is similar to that of adults. During ADIM, the abdominal muscles in adolescents react similarly to those in adults. This study provided extensive information regarding the structure of the lateral abdominal wall in healthy adolescents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Unusual presentation of antenatal ovarian torsion: free-floating abdominal cysts. Our experience and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampieri, Nicola; Scirè, Gabriella; Zambon, Carla; Ottolenghi, Alberto; Camoglio, Francesco Saverio

    2009-04-01

    Abdominal cystic formations in newborns are relatively common and often diagnostic suspicion arises before birth as a result of ultrasound scans carried out during pregnancy. Prenatal ovarian torsion is a rare condition very difficult to manage in the first days of life. We report and discuss the management of prenatal ovarian torsion with a free-floating abdominal cyst detected on prenatal ultrasound. We recorded the cases of antenatal abdominal cysts detected on ultrasound at the Department of Antenatal Diagnosis between January 2003 and January 2007. Only patients with a free-floating cyst were included in the study. Clinical and surgical findings were then recorded. Two out of 57 patients underwent surgery for a free-floating abdominal cyst during the second day of life. Postnatal ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound, and laparoscopic exploration were useful to identify an unusual presentation of antenatal ovarian torsion with a complete atresia of the Fallopian tube. The cases reported in this study suggest that a good clinical approach to all cases of abdominal cysts detected on prenatal ultrasound scans require postnatal Doppler and abdominal ultrasound with a laparoscopic exploration. Free-floating abdominal cysts are rare but, at the same time, strictly correlated with autoamputation of the ovary/Fallopian tube complex.

  9. Don't Forget the Abdominal Wall: Imaging Spectrum of Abdominal Wall Injuries after Nonpenetrating Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalon, Shanna A; Askari, Reza; Gates, Jonathan D; Patel, Ketan; Sodickson, Aaron D; Khurana, Bharti

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal wall injuries occur in nearly one of 10 patients coming to the emergency department after nonpenetrating trauma. Injuries range from minor, such as abdominal wall contusion, to severe, such as abdominal wall rupture with evisceration of abdominal contents. Examples of specific injuries that can be detected at cross-sectional imaging include abdominal muscle strain, tear, or hematoma, including rectus sheath hematoma (RSH); traumatic abdominal wall hernia (TAWH); and Morel-Lavallée lesion (MLL) (closed degloving injury). These injuries are often overlooked clinically because of (a) a lack of findings at physical examination or (b) distraction by more-severe associated injuries. However, these injuries are important to detect because they are highly associated with potentially grave visceral and vascular injuries, such as aortic injury, and because their detection can lead to the diagnosis of these more clinically important grave traumatic injuries. Failure to make a timely diagnosis can result in delayed complications, such as bowel hernia with potential for obstruction or strangulation, or misdiagnosis of an abdominal wall neoplasm. Groin injuries, such as athletic pubalgia, and inferior costochondral injuries should also be considered in patients with abdominal pain after nonpenetrating trauma, because these conditions may manifest with referred abdominal pain and are often included within the field of view at cross-sectional abdominal imaging. Radiologists must recognize and report acute abdominal wall injuries and their associated intra-abdominal pathologic conditions to allow appropriate and timely treatment. © RSNA, 2017.

  10. Abdominal migraine in childhood: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scicchitano B

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Beatrice Scicchitano,1 Gareth Humphreys,1 Sally G Mitton,2 Thiagarajan Jaiganesh1 1Children's Emergency Department, 2Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, St Georges Hospital, St Georges Healthcare NHS Trust, Tooting, London, United Kingdom Abstract: The childhood condition of abdominal migraine has been described under many different synonyms, including "abdominal epilepsy", "recurrent abdominal pain", "cyclical vomiting syndrome", and "functional gastrointestinal disorder". In the early literature, abdominal migraine is included in the "childhood periodic syndrome", first described by Wyllie and Schlesinger in 1933. Abdominal migraine has emerged over the last century as a diagnostic entity in its own right thanks to the development of well defined diagnostic criteria and its recent inclusion in the International Headache Society's Classification of Headache disorders. Despite this progress, little is known about the pathophysiology of the condition, and the treatment options are poorly defined. Here we summarize the recent literature, with particular focus on establishing the diagnosis of abdominal migraine and its pathophysiology, and suggest an approach to management. Keywords: abdominal migraine, recurrent abdominal pain, abdominal epilepsy, cyclical vomiting

  11. The caval index : an adequate non-invasive ultrasound parameter to predict fluid responsiveness in the emergency department?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Valk, Silke; Olgers, Tycho Joan; Holman, Mirjam; Ismael, Farouq; Ligtenberg, Jack Johannes Maria; ter Maaten, Jan Cornelis

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fluid therapy is the first important step in patients with signs of shock but assessment of the volume status is difficult and invasive measurements are not readily available in the emergency department. We have investigated whether the respiratory variation in diameter of the inferior

  12. Usefulness of Ultrasound Examinations in the Diagnostics of Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staryszak, Joanna; Stopa, Joanna; Kucharska-Miąsik, Iwona; Osuchowska, Magdalena; Guz, Wiesław; Błaż, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is one of the most serious disorders of gastrointestinal tract during neonatal period. Early diagnosis and adequate treatment are essential in the presence of clinical suspicion of NEC. Plain abdominal radiography is currently the modality of choice for initial evaluation of gastrointestinal tract in neonates. However, when the diagnosis is uncertain, abdominal ultrasound with bowel assessment might be an important complementary examination. The aim of the study was to evaluate usefulness of ultrasound in the diagnosis of NEC and its value for implementation of proper treatment. The data of nine neonates diagnosed with NEC, hospitalized at the Provincial Hospital No. 2 in Rzeszow in the period from September 2009 to April 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. Apart from abdominal radiography, abdominal ultrasound with bowel assessment was performed in all nine cases. Imaging findings, epidemiological data, coexisting risk factors and disease course were assessed. Most children in the group were preterm neonates. Findings in plain abdominal radiography were normal or nonspecific. A wider spectrum of findings was demonstrated in all ultrasound examinations and intestinal pneumatosis, a pathognomonic sign for NEC, was more frequently noted than in plain abdominal x-ray. Most children were treated by surgical intervention with resection of necrotic bowel loops and in more than half of the cases location of changes identified during surgery was concordant with ultrasonographic findings. Abdominal ultrasound examination might be helpful in the diagnosis of NEC, especially when plain abdominal radiography findings do not correlate with clinical symptoms. However, abdominal radiography is still considered the modality of choice. The range of morphological changes detectable on ultrasound examination is much wider than in plain abdominal radiography. Ultrasound examination allows for more accurate assessment of changes within intestines and

  13. The Accuracy and Prognostic Value of Point-of-care Ultrasound for Nephrolithiasis in the Emergency Department: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Charles; Teitge, Braden; Ross, Marshall; Young, Paul; Robertson, Helen Lee; Lang, Eddy

    2018-02-10

    Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has been suggested as an initial investigation in the management of renal colic. Our objectives were: 1) to determine the accuracy of POCUS for the diagnosis of nephrolithiasis and 2) to assess its prognostic value in the management of renal colic. The review protocol was registered to the PROSPERO database (CRD42016035331). An electronic database search of MEDLINE, Embase, and PubMed was conducted utilizing subject headings, keywords, and synonyms that address our research question. Bibliographies of included studies and narrative reviews were manually examined. Studies of adult emergency department patients with renal colic symptoms were included. Any degree of hydronephrosis was considered a positive POCUS finding. Accepted criterion standards were computed tomography evidence of renal stone or hydronephrosis, direct stone visualization, or surgical findings. Screening of abstracts, quality assessment with the QUADAS-2 instrument, and data extraction were performed by two reviewers, with discrepancies resolved by consensus with a third reviewer. Test performance was assessed by pooled sensitivity and specificity, calculated likelihood ratios, and a summary receiver operator curve (SROC). The secondary objective of prognostic value was reported as a narrative summary. The electronic search yielded 627 unique titles. After relevance screening, 26 papers underwent full-text review, and nine articles met all inclusion criteria. Of these, five high-quality studies (N = 1,773) were included in the meta-analysis for diagnostic accuracy and the remaining yielded data on prognostic value. The pooled results for sensitivity and specificity were 70.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 67.1%-73.2%) and 75.4% (95% CI = 72.5%-78.2%), respectively. The calculated positive and negative likelihood ratios were 2.85 and 0.39. The SROC generated did not show evidence of a threshold effect. Two of the studies in the meta-analysis found that the

  14. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  15. Limited Abdominal Sonography for Evaluation of Children With Right Lower Quadrant Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munden, Martha M; Wai, Shannon; DiStefano, Michael C; Zhang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether a complete abdominal sonographic examination is necessary in the evaluation of children with right lower quadrant pain that is suspicious for appendicitis in the emergency department and whether performing a limited, more-focused study would miss clinically important disease. With Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective study was performed of 704 patients, from ages 5-19 years, presenting to the emergency department with right lower quadrant pain that was suspicious for appendicitis who underwent a complete abdominal sonographic examination. Data were extracted from the complete abdominal sonographic examination to see whether abnormalities were noted in the pancreas, spleen, and left kidney. Patients' medical charts were reviewed to see whether any positive findings in these organs were clinically important. Of the 65 studies with a finding that would have been missed with a limited study, only 6 were found to be clinically important. Of those, 5 were managed medically and 1 surgically. The chance of missing a potentially important finding using a limited study with our group of patients was 65 of 704 patients (9.2%), with a 95% confidence interval of 7.2% to 11.7%. The chance of missing an abnormality that was clinically important was 6 of 704 patients (0.85%), with a 95% confidence interval of 0.35% to 1.94%. In children older than 5 years with abdominal pain that is suspicious for appendicitis, performing only a limited abdominal sonographic examination that excludes the pancreas, left kidney, and spleen will yield a miss rate for clinically important disease that is acceptably low to justify the savings of examination time. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ... pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: ... fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...