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Sample records for embryonic craniofacial mesenchymal

  1. The suture provides a niche for mesenchymal stem cells of craniofacial bones

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    Zhao, Hu; Feng, Jifan; Ho, Thach-Vu; Grimes, Weston; Urata, Mark; Chai, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue undergoes constant turnover supported by stem cells. Recent studies showed that perivascular mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to the turnover of long bones. Craniofacial bones are flat bones derived from a different embryonic origin than the long bones. The identity and regulating niche for craniofacial bone MSCs remain unknown. Here, we identify Gli1+ cells within the suture mesenchyme as the major MSC population for craniofacial bones. They are not associated with vasculature, give rise to all craniofacial bones in the adult and are activated during injury repair. Gli1+ cells are typical MSCs in vitro. Ablation of Gli1+ cells leads to craniosynostosis and arrest of skull growth, indicating these cells are an indispensible stem cell population. Twist1+/− mice with craniosynostosis show reduced Gli1+ MSCs in sutures, suggesting that craniosynostosis may result from diminished suture stem cells. Our study indicates that craniofacial sutures provide a unique niche for MSCs for craniofacial bone homeostasis and repair. PMID:25799059

  2. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

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    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  3. Correlations Between the Morphology of Sonic Hedgehog Expression Domains and Embryonic Craniofacial Shape.

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    Xu, Qiuping; Jamniczky, Heather; Hu, Diane; Green, Rebecca M; Marcucio, Ralph S; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Mio, Washington

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative analysis of gene expression domains and investigation of relationships between gene expression and developmental and phenotypic outcomes are central to advancing our understanding of the genotype-phenotype map. Gene expression domains typically have smooth but irregular shapes lacking homologous landmarks, making it difficult to analyze shape variation with the tools of landmark-based geometric morphometrics. In addition, 3D image acquisition and processing introduce many artifacts that further exacerbate the problem. To overcome these difficulties, this paper presents a method that combines optical projection tomography scanning, a shape regularization technique and a landmark-free approach to quantify variation in the morphology of Sonic hedgehog expression domains in the frontonasal ectodermal zone (FEZ) of avians and investigate relationships with embryonic craniofacial shape. The model reveals axes in FEZ and embryonic-head morphospaces along which variation exhibits a sharp linear relationship at high statistical significance. The technique should be applicable to analyses of other 3D biological structures that can be modeled as smooth surfaces and have ill-defined shape.

  4. Comparative gene expression analysis of avian embryonic facial structures reveals new candidates for human craniofacial disorders.

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    Brugmann, S A; Powder, K E; Young, N M; Goodnough, L H; Hahn, S M; James, A W; Helms, J A; Lovett, M

    2010-03-01

    Mammals and birds have common embryological facial structures, and appear to employ the same molecular genetic developmental toolkit. We utilized natural variation found in bird beaks to investigate what genes drive vertebrate facial morphogenesis. We employed cross-species microarrays to describe the molecular genetic signatures, developmental signaling pathways and the spectrum of transcription factor (TF) gene expression changes that differ between cranial neural crest cells in the developing beaks of ducks, quails and chickens. Surprisingly, we observed that the neural crest cells established a species-specific TF gene expression profile that predates morphological differences between the species. A total of 232 genes were differentially expressed between the three species. Twenty-two of these genes, including Fgfr2, Jagged2, Msx2, Satb2 and Tgfb3, have been previously implicated in a variety of mammalian craniofacial defects. Seventy-two of the differentially expressed genes overlap with un-cloned loci for human craniofacial disorders, suggesting that our data will provide a valuable candidate gene resource for human craniofacial genetics. The most dramatic changes between species were in the Wnt signaling pathway, including a 20-fold up-regulation of Dkk2, Fzd1 and Wnt1 in the duck compared with the other two species. We functionally validated these changes by demonstrating that spatial domains of Wnt activity differ in avian beaks, and that Wnt signals regulate Bmp pathway activity and promote regional growth in facial prominences. This study is the first of its kind, extending on previous work in Darwin's finches and provides the first large-scale insights into cross-species facial morphogenesis.

  5. Neuroblastoma cells injected into experimental mature teratoma reveal a tropism for embryonic loose mesenchyme.

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    Jamil, S; Cedervall, J; Hultman, I; Ali, R; Margaryan, N V; Rasmuson, A; Johnsen, J I; Sveinbjörnsson, B; Dalianis, T; Kanter, L; Orrego, A; Strizzi, L; Hendrix, M J C; Sandstedt, B; Kogner, P; Ahrlund-Richter, L

    2013-09-01

    Embryonic neural tumors are responsible for a disproportionate number of cancer deaths in children. Although dramatic improvements in survival for pediatric malignancy has been achieved in previous years advancements seem to be slowing down. For the development of new enhanced therapy and an increased understanding of the disease, pre-clinical models better capturing the neoplastic niche are essential. Tumors of early childhood present in this respect a particular challenge. Here, we explore how components of the embryonic process in stem‑cell induced mature teratoma can function as an experimental in vivo microenvironment instigating the growth of injected childhood neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines. Three human NB cell lines, IMR-32, Kelly and SK-N-BE(2), were injected into mature pluripotent stem cell‑induced teratoma (PSCT) and compared to xenografts of the same cell lines. Proliferative NB cells from all lines were readily detected in both models with a typical histology of a poorly differentiated NB tumor with a variable amount of fibrovascular stroma. Uniquely in the PSCT microenvironment, NB cells were found integrated in a non‑random fashion. Neuroblastoma cells were never observed in areas with well-differentiated somatic tissue i.e. bone, muscle, gut or areas of other easily identifiable tissue types. Instead, the three cell lines all showed initial growth exclusively occurring in the embryonic loose mesenchymal stroma, resulting in a histology recapitulating NB native presentation in vivo. Whether this reflects the 'open' nature of loose mesenchyme more easily giving space to new cells compared to other more dense tissues, the rigidity of matrix providing physical cues modulating NB characteristics, or if embryonic loose mesenchyme may supply developmental cues that attracted or promoted the integration of NB, remains to be tested. We tentatively hypothesize that mature PSCT provide an embryonic niche well suited for in vivo studies on NB.

  6. Odd-skipped related genes regulate differentiation of embryonic limb mesenchyme and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells.

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    Stricker, Sigmar; Mathia, Susanne; Haupt, Julia; Seemann, Petra; Meier, Julia; Mundlos, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    The regulation of progenitor cell differentiation to a specific tissue type is one of the fundamental questions of biology. Here, we identify Osr1 and Osr2, 2 closely related genes encoding zinc finger transcription factors, as being strongly expressed in irregular connective tissue (ICT) fibroblasts in the chicken embryo, suitable as a developmental marker. We provide evidence that both Osr1 and Osr2 regulate mesenchymal cell-type differentiation. Both Osr1 and Osr2 can promote the formation of ICT, a cell type of so far unknown molecular specification, while suppressing differentiation of other tissues such as cartilage and tendon from uncommitted progenitors. Conversely, knockdown of either Osr gene alone or in combination reverses this effect, thereby leading to decreased differentiation of ICT fibroblasts and increased chondrogenesis in vitro. This indicates that Osr genes play a pivotal role in ICT fibroblast differentiation. Undifferentiated mesenchymal cells reside in the adult body in the form of mesenchymal stem cells in the bone marrow cavity. Using bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) isolated from chicken fetal long bones, we show that Osr1 and Osr2 have an intrinsic role in BMSC differentiation similar to their role in early embryonic development, that is, the enforcement of CT fibroblast differentiation and the repression of other cell types as exemplified here by osteoblast differentiation.

  7. Human embryonic stem cell derived mesenchymal progenitors express cardiac markers but do not form contractile cardiomyocytes.

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    Christophe M Raynaud

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitors or stromal cells have shown promise as a therapeutic strategy for a range of diseases including heart failure. In this context, we explored the growth and differentiation potential of mesenchymal progenitors (MPs derived in vitro from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs. Similar to MPs isolated from bone marrow, hESC derived MPs (hESC-MPs efficiently differentiated into archetypical mesenchymal derivatives such as chondrocytes and adipocytes. Upon treatment with 5-Azacytidine or TGF-β1, hESC-MPs modified their morphology and up-regulated expression of key cardiac transcription factors such as NKX2-5, MEF2C, HAND2 and MYOCD. Nevertheless, NKX2-5+ hESC-MP derivatives did not form contractile cardiomyocytes, raising questions concerning the suitability of these cells as a platform for cardiomyocyte replacement therapy. Gene profiling experiments revealed that, although hESC-MP derived cells expressed a suite of cardiac related genes, they lacked the complete repertoire of genes associated with bona fide cardiomyocytes. Our results suggest that whilst agents such as TGF-β1 and 5-Azacytidine can induce expression of cardiac related genes, but treated cells retain a mesenchymal like phenotype.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

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    Varga, Nora [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva [Department of Immunology, Medical and Health Science Centre, University of Debrecen, Debrecen (Hungary); Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary); Apati, Agota, E-mail: apati@kkk.org.hu [Membrane Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Semmelweis University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  9. Derivation of Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem-like cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Mahmood, Amer; Harkness, Linda; Abdallah, Basem

    2012-01-01

    Derivation of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) is a pre-requisite for their use in clinical applications. However, there is no standard protocol for differentiating hESC into osteoblastic cells. The aim of this study was to identify the emergence of a human...... stromal (mesenchymal, skeletal) stem cell (hMSC)-like population, known to be osteoblastic cell precursors and to test their osteoblastic differentiation capacity in ex vivo cultures and in vivo. We cultured hESC in a feeder-free environment using serum replacement and as suspension aggregates (embryoid...... bodies; hEBs). Over a 20 day developmental period, the hEBs demonstrated increasing enrichment for cells expressing hMSC markers: CD29, CD44, CD63, CD56, CD71, CD73, CD105, CD106 and CD166 as revealed by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry (FACS) analysis. Ex vivo differentiation of h...

  10. Blockage of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition Is Required for Embryonic Stem Cell Derivation

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    Mehdi Totonchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent cells emanate from the inner cell mass (ICM of the blastocyst and when cultivated under optimal conditions immortalize as embryonic stem cells (ESCs. The fundamental mechanism underlying ESC derivation has, however, remained elusive. Recently, we have devised a highly efficient approach for establishing ESCs, through inhibition of the MEK and TGF-β pathways. This regimen provides a platform for dissecting the molecular mechanism of ESC derivation. Via temporal gene expression analysis, we reveal key genes involved in the ICM to ESC transition. We found that DNA methyltransferases play a pivotal role in efficient ESC generation. We further observed a tight correlation between ESCs and preimplantation epiblast cell-related genes and noticed that fundamental events such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition blockage play a key role in launching the ESC self-renewal program. Our study provides a time course transcriptional resource highlighting the dynamics of the gene regulatory network during the ICM to ESC transition.

  11. A porous membrane-mediated isolation of mesenchymal stem cells from human embryonic stem cells.

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    Hong, Ki-Sung; Bae, Daekyeong; Choi, Youngsok; Kang, Sun-Woong; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Hoon Taek; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2015-03-01

    Pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) acquire mesenchymal characteristics during the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Here, we report a simple and an efficient isolation method for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from hESCs undergoing EMT using a commercialized porous membrane transwell culture insert. Suspension culture of hESC colonies results in the formation of embryoid bodies, which adhered on the upper compartment of 8 μm porous membrane in the presence of EMG2-MV media. The population migrating through the permeable membrane to the lower compartment not only exhibited EMT markers but also expressed high levels of a panel of typical MSC surface antigen markers, and demonstrated multipotent differentiation capability. In addition, they have a prolonged proliferation capacity without characteristics and chromosomal changes. Furthermore, the isolated MSCs significantly enhanced cardiac functions in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI) as measured by the left ventricle wall thickness (MI control, 32.9%±3.2% vs. hESCs-MSCs, 38.7%±2.4%), scar length (MI control, 46.1%±2.5% vs. hESCs-MSCs, 41.8%±1.3%), fibrosis area (MI control, 34.3%±1.6% vs. hESCs-MSCs, 28.9%±3.5%), and capillary density. Our findings demonstrate an ease with which hESCs-MSCs can be effectively isolated using the porous membrane, which overcomes the lack of availability of MSCs for therapeutic applications in various diseased animal models.

  12. Human dental follicle cells express embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells markers.

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    Lima, Rodrigo Lopes; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde Carvalho; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Bolognese, Ana Maria; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; Souza, Margareth Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify and characterize dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) by analyzing expression of embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells surface markers. Design Dental follicle cells (DFCs) were evaluated by immunocytochemistry using embryonic stem cells markers (OCT4 and SOX2), mesenchmal stem cells (MSCs) markers (Notch1, active Notch1, STRO, CD44, HLA-ABC, CD90), neural stem cells markers (Nestin and β-III-tubulin), neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) markers (p75 and HNK1) and a glial cells marker (GFAP). RT-PCR was performed to identify the expression of OCT4 and NANOG in DFCs and dental follicle tissue. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis revealed that a significant proportion of the DFCs evaluated expressed human embryonic stem cells marker OCT4 (75%) whereas NANOG was weakly expressed. A considerable amount of MSCs (90%) expressed Notch1, STRO, CD44 and HLA-ABC. However, they were weakly positive for CD90. Moreover, it was possible to demonstrate that dental follicle contains a significant proportion of neural stem/progenitors cells, expressing β-III-tubulin (90%) and nestin (70%). Interestingly, immunocytochemistry showed DFCs positive for p75 (50%), HNK1 (cells. This is the first study reporting the presence of NCSCs and glial-like cells in the dental follicle. The results of the present study suggest the occurrence of heterogeneous populations of stem cells, particularly neural stem/progenitor cells, in the dental follicle, Therefore, the human dental follicle might be a promising source of adult stem cells for regenerative purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

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    Mthunzi, Patience; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank

    2011-10-01

    Owing to their self renewal and pluripotency properties, stem cells can efficiently advance current therapies in tissue regeneration and/or engineering. Under appropriate culture conditions in vitro, pluripotent stem cells can be primed to differentiate into any cell type some examples including neural, cardiac and blood cells. However, there still remains a pressing necessity to answer the biological questions concerning how stem cell renewal and how differentiation programs are operated and regulated at the genetic level. In stem cell research, an urgent requirement on experimental procedures allowing non-invasive, marker-free observation of growth, proliferation and stability of living stem cells under physiological conditions exists. Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly administering fs laser pulses onto the cell plasma membrane induces transient submicrometer holes, thereby promoting cytosolic uptake of the surrounding extracellular matter. To display a chemical-free cell transfection procedure that utilises micro-litre scale volumes of reagents, we report for the first time on 70 % transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells using the enhanced green fluorescing protein (EGFP) DNA plasmid. We also show how varying the average power output during optical transfection influences cell viability, proliferation and cytotoxicity in embryonic stem cells. The impact of utilizing objective lenses of different numerical aperture (NA) on the optical transfection efficiency in ES-E14TG2a cells is presented. Finally, we report on embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation. The produced specialized cell types could thereafter be characterized and used for cell based therapies.

  14. Maintenance of human embryonic stem cells in mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media augments hematopoietic specification.

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    Ramos-Mejía, Verónica; Fernández, Agustín F; Ayllón, Verónica; Real, Pedro J; Bueno, Clara; Anderson, Per; Martín, Francisco; Fraga, Mario F; Menendez, Pablo

    2012-06-10

    The realization of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) as a model for human developmental hematopoiesis and in potential cell replacement strategies relies on an improved understanding of the extrinsic and intrinsic factors regulating hematopoietic-specific hESC differentiation. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are multipotent cells of mesodermal origin that form a part of hematopoietic stem cell niches and have an important role in the regulation of hematopoiesis through production of secreted factors and/or cell-to-cell interactions. We have previously shown that hESCs may be successfully maintained feeder free using hMSC-conditioned media (MSC-CM). Here, we hypothesized that hESCs maintained in MSC-CM may be more prone to differentiation toward hematopoietic lineage than hESCs grown in standard human foreskin fibroblast-conditioned media. We report that specification into hemogenic progenitors and subsequent hematopoietic differentiation and clonogenic progenitor capacity is robustly enhanced in hESC lines maintained in MSC-CM. Interestingly, co-culture of hESCs on hMSCs fully abrogates hematopoietic specification of hESCs, thus suggesting that the improved hematopoietic differentiation is mediated by MSC-secreted factors rather than by MSC-hESC physical interactions. To investigate the molecular mechanism involved in this process, we analyzed global (LINE-1) methylation and genome-wide promoter DNA methylation. hESCs grown in MSC-CM showed a decrease of 17% in global DNA methylation and a promoter DNA methylation signature consisting of 45 genes commonly hypomethylated and 102 genes frequently hypermethylated. Our data indicate that maintenance of hESCs in MSC-CM robustly augments hematopoietic specification and that the process seems mediated by MSC-secreted factors conferring a DNA methylation signature to undifferentiated hESCs which may influence further predisposition toward hematopoietic specification.

  15. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of EGFP-Labeled Neural Crest Cells From Murine Embryonic Craniofacial Tissue

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    Saurabh Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the early stages of embryogenesis, pluripotent neural crest cells (NCC are known to migrate from the neural folds to populate multiple target sites in the embryo where they differentiate into various derivatives, including cartilage, bone, connective tissue, melanocytes, glia, and neurons of the peripheral nervous system. The ability to obtain pure NCC populations is essential to enable molecular analyses of neural crest induction, migration, and/or differentiation. Crossing Wnt1-Cre and Z/EG transgenic mouse lines resulted in offspring in which the Wnt1-Cre transgene activated permanent EGFP expression only in NCC. The present report demonstrates a flow cytometric method to sort and isolate populations of EGFP-labeled NCC. The identity of the sorted neural crest cells was confirmed by assaying expression of known marker genes by TaqMan Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR. The molecular strategy described in this report provides a means to extract intact RNA from a pure population of NCC thus enabling analysis of gene expression in a defined population of embryonic precursor cells critical to development.

  16. Differential bone-forming capacity of osteogenic cells from either embryonic stem cells or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

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    Both, Sanne Karijn; van Apeldoorn, Aart A.; Jukes, J.M.; Englund, Mikael C.O.; Hyllner, Johan; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; de Boer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    For more than a decade, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been used in bone tissue-engineering research. More recently some of the focus in this field has shifted towards the use of embryonic stem cells. While it is well known that hMSCs are able to form bone when implanted subcutaneously in

  17. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived From Limb Bud Can Differentiate into All Three Embryonic Germ Layers Lineages

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    Jiao, Fei; Wang, Juan; Dong, Zhao-lun; Wu, Min-juan; Zhao, Ting-bao; Li, Dan-dan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from many sources, including adults and fetuses. Previous studies have demonstrated that, compared with their adult counterpart, fetal MSCs with several remarkable advantages may be a better resource for clinical applications. In this study, we successfully isolated a rapidly proliferating cell population from limb bud of aborted fetus and termed them “human limb bud–derived mesenchymal stem cells” (hLB-MSCs). Characteristics of their morphology, phenotype, cell cycle, and differentiation properties were analyzed. These adherent cell populations have a typically spindle-shaped morphology. Flow cytometry analysis showed that hLB-MSCs are positive for CD13, CD29, CD90, CD105, and CD106, but negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD34, CD45, CD45RA, and HLA-DR. The detection of cell cycle from different passages indicated that hLB-MSCs have a similar potential for propagation during long culture in vitro. The most novel finding here is that, in addition to their mesodermal differentiation (osteoblasts and adipocytes), hLB-MSCs can also differentiated into extramesenchymal lineages, such as neural (ectoderm) and hepatic (endoderm) progenies. These results indicate that hLB-MSCs have a high level of plasticity and can differentiate into cell lineages from all three embryonic layers in vitro. PMID:22775353

  18. Deletion of a conserved regulatory element required for Hmx1 expression in craniofacial mesenchyme in the dumbo rat: a newly identified cause of congenital ear malformation

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    Lely A. Quina

    2012-11-01

    Hmx1 is a homeodomain transcription factor expressed in the developing eye, peripheral ganglia, and branchial arches of avian and mammalian embryos. Recent studies have identified a loss-of-function allele at the HMX1 locus as the causative mutation in the oculo-auricular syndrome (OAS in humans, characterized by ear and eye malformations. The mouse dumbo (dmbo mutation, with similar effects on ear and eye development, also results from a loss-of-function mutation in the Hmx1 gene. A recessive dmbo mutation causing ear malformation in rats has been mapped to the chromosomal region containing the Hmx1 gene, but the nature of the causative allele is unknown. Here we show that dumbo rats and mice exhibit similar neonatal ear and eye phenotypes. In midgestation embryos, dumbo rats show a specific loss of Hmx1 expression in neural-crest-derived craniofacial mesenchyme (CM, whereas Hmx1 is expressed normally in retinal progenitors, sensory ganglia and in CM, which is derived from mesoderm. High-throughput resequencing of 1 Mb of rat chromosome 14 from dmbo/dmbo rats, encompassing the Hmx1 locus, reveals numerous divergences from the rat genomic reference sequence, but no coding changes in Hmx1. Fine genetic mapping narrows the dmbo critical region to an interval of ∼410 kb immediately downstream of the Hmx1 transcription unit. Further sequence analysis of this region reveals a 5777-bp deletion located ∼80 kb downstream in dmbo/dmbo rats that is not apparent in 137 other rat strains. The dmbo deletion region contains a highly conserved domain of ∼500 bp, which is a candidate distal enhancer and which exhibits a similar relationship to Hmx genes in all vertebrate species for which data are available. We conclude that the rat dumbo phenotype is likely to result from loss of function of an ultraconserved enhancer specifically regulating Hmx1 expression in neural-crest-derived CM. Dysregulation of Hmx1 expression is thus a candidate mechanism for congenital ear

  19. [Embryonic odontogenesis in vertebrates. A mini-review].

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    Elsen, L; Carels, C E L

    2008-02-01

    Although the molecular cascades that control craniofacial development are still largely unknown, the generation of mutant animal models and the identification of gene mutations that cause human craniofacial syndromes have recently given significant insight into how the unique structure of the head develops. Craniofacial structures are formed from the prechordal mesoderm, the craniofacial ectoderm as well as the neural crest cells which develop on the dorsal side of the neural tube. Normal craniofacial morphology as well as normal (in number and in morphology) tooth organs develop as a consequence of complex interactions between these embryonic tissues. A series of inductive and reciprocal signals between the epithelium and mesenchyme determine the growth, the form and the ultimate differentiation of tissues and organs. Genetic research has shown the involvement of numerous developmental genes encoding a variety of transcription factors, growth factors and receptors. Mutations have been associated with, among others, non-syndromal forms of cleft palate, agenesis of tooth organs and abnormalities in the cranial bones.

  20. Mesenchymal and embryonic characteristics of stem cells obtained from mouse dental pulp

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    Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Cruz, Gabriela Silva; de Jesus, Alan Araújo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several studies have demonstrated that human dental pulp is a source of mesenchymal stem cells. To better understand the biological properties of these cells we isolated and characterized stem cells from the dental pulp of EGFP transgenic mice. METHODS: The pulp tissue was gently...... abnormalities was evaluated by G banding. RESULTS: The mouse dental pulp stem cells (mDPSC) were highly proliferative, plastic-adherent, and exhibited a polymorphic morphology predominantly with stellate or fusiform shapes. The presence of cell clusters was observed in cultures of mDPSC. Some cells were...... separated from the roots of teeth extracted from C57BL/6 mice, and cultured under appropriate conditions. Flow cytometry, RT-PCR, light microscopy (staining for alkaline phosphatase) and immunofluorescence were used to investigate the expression of stem cell markers. The presence of chromosomal...

  1. Lysyl oxidase-like 3b is Critical for Cartilage Maturation During Zebrafish Craniofacial Development

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    van Boxtel, Antonius L.; Gansner, John M.; Hakvoort, Henk W.J.; Snell, Heather; Legler, Juliette; Gitlin, Jonathan D.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate craniofacial development requires coordinated morphogenetic interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the differentiating chondrocytes essential for cartilage formation. Recent studies reveal a critical role for specific lysyl oxidases in ECM integrity required for embryonic development. We now demonstrate that loxl3b is abundantly expressed within the head mesenchyme of the zebrafish and is critically important for maturation of neural crest derived cartilage elements. Histological and ultrastructural analysis of cartilage elements in loxl3b morphant embryos reveals abnormal maturation of cartilage and altered chondrocyte morphology. Spatiotemporal analysis of craniofacial markers in loxl3b morphant embryos shows that cranial neural crest cells migrate normally into the developing pharyngeal arches but that differentiation and condensation markers are aberrantly expressed. We further show that the loxl3b morphant phenotype is not due to P53 mediated cell death but likely to be due to reduced chondrogenic progenitor cell proliferation within the pharyngeal arches. Taken together, these data demonstrate a novel role for loxl3b in the maturation of craniofacial cartilage and can provide new insight into the specific genetic factors important in the pathogenesis of craniofacial birth defects. PMID:21244857

  2. Controlled surface topography regulates collective 3D migration by epithelial-mesenchymal composite embryonic tissues.

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    Song, Jiho; Shawky, Joseph H; Kim, YongTae; Hazar, Melis; LeDuc, Philip R; Sitti, Metin; Davidson, Lance A

    2015-07-01

    Cells in tissues encounter a range of physical cues as they migrate. Probing single cell and collective migratory responses to physically defined three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments and the factors that modulate those responses are critical to understanding how tissue migration is regulated during development, regeneration, and cancer. One key physical factor that regulates cell migration is topography. Most studies on surface topography and cell mechanics have been carried out with single migratory cells, yet little is known about the spreading and motility response of 3D complex multi-cellular tissues to topographical cues. Here, we examine the response to complex topographical cues of microsurgically isolated tissue explants composed of epithelial and mesenchymal cell layers from naturally 3D organized embryos of the aquatic frog Xenopus laevis. We control topography using fabricated micropost arrays (MPAs) and investigate the collective 3D migration of these multi-cellular systems in these MPAs. We find that the topography regulates both collective and individual cell migration and that dense MPAs reduce but do not eliminate tissue spreading. By modulating cell size through the cell cycle inhibitor Mitomycin C or the spacing of the MPAs we uncover how 3D topographical cues disrupt collective cell migration. We find surface topography can direct both single cell motility and tissue spreading, altering tissue-scale processes that enable efficient conversion of single cell motility into collective movement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hyaluronan esters drive Smad gene expression and signaling enhancing cardiogenesis in mouse embryonic and human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margherita Maioli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of molecules chemically modifying the expression of crucial orchestrator(s of stem cell commitment may have significant biomedical impact. We have recently developed hyaluronan mixed esters of butyric and retinoic acids (HBR, turning cardiovascular stem cell fate into a high-yield process. The HBR mechanism(s remain still largely undefined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We show that in both mouse embryonic stem (ES cells and human mesenchymal stem cells from fetal membranes of term placenta (FMhMSCs, HBR differentially affected the patterning of Smad proteins, one of the major conductors of stem cell cardiogenesis. Real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that in both cell types HBR enhanced gene and protein expression of Smad1,3, and 4, while down-regulating Smad7. HBR acted at the transcriptional level, as shown by nuclear run-off experiments in isolated nuclei. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that HBR increased the fluorescent staining for Smad1,3, and 4, confirming that the transcriptional action of HBR encompassed the upregulation of the encoded Smad proteins. Chromatin immune precipitation and transcriptional analyses showed that HBR increased the transcription of the cardiogenic gene Nkx-2.5 through Smad4 binding to its own consensus Smad site. Treatment of mouse ES cells and FMhMSCs with HBR led to the concomitant overexpression of both Smad4 and α-sarcomeric actinin. Smad4 silencing by the aid of lentiviral-mediated Smad4 shRNA confirmed a dominant role of Smad4 in HBR-induced cardiogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The use of HBR may pave the way to novel combinatorial strategies of molecular and stem cell therapy based on fine tuning of targeted Smad transciption and signaling leading to a high-throughput of cardiogenesis without the needs of gene transfer technologies.

  4. Craniofacial Microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstetter, Kathleyn A; Patel, Krishna G

    2016-11-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) encompasses a broad spectrum of phenotypes. It is thought to result from defective development of the first and second pharyngeal arch structures, and generally presents with anomalies of the mandible and other facial bones, ears, and overlying soft tissues. The cause of CFM is thought to involve both extrinsic and genetic risk factors. Several classification systems have been developed to help stratify patients based on the severity of their defects. Treatment of patients includes repair of bony asymmetry as well as soft tissue defects and auricular anomalies. Surgical intervention is individualized based on each patient's deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phthalazinone Pyrazole Enhances the Hepatic Functions of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocyte-Like Cells via Suppression of the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young-Jun; Kim, Hyemin; Kim, Ji-Woo; Song, Chang-Woo; Kim, Dae-Sung; Yoon, Seokjoo; Park, Han-Jin

    2017-12-13

    During liver development, nonpolarized hepatic progenitor cells differentiate into mature hepatocytes with distinct polarity. This polarity is essential for maintaining the intrinsic properties of hepatocytes. The balance between the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) plays a decisive role in differentiation of polarized hepatocytes. In this study, we found that phthalazinone pyrazole (PP), a selective inhibitor of Aurora-A kinase (Aurora-A), suppressed the EMT during the differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) from human embryonic stem cells. The differentiated HLCs treated with PP at the hepatoblast stage showed enhanced hepatic morphology and functions, particularly with regard to the expression of drug metabolizing enzymes. Moreover, we found that these effects were mediated though suppression of the AKT pathway, which is involved in induction of the EMT, and upregulation of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α expression rather than Aurora-A inhibition. In conclusion, these findings provided insights into the regulatory role of the EMT on in vitro hepatic maturation, suggesting that inhibition of the EMT may drive transformation of hepatoblast cells into mature and polarized HLCs.

  6. Intact wound repair activity of human mesenchymal stem cells after YM155 mediated selective ablation of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Keun-Tae; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Kim, C-Yoon; Kim, Eun-Young; Heo, Si-Hyun; Cho, Seung-Ju; Hong, Ki-Sung; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2017-05-01

    Risk of teratoma formation during human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-based cell therapy is one of the technical hurdles that must be resolved before their wider clinical application. To this end, selective ablation of undifferentiated hPSCs has been achieved using small molecules whose application should be safe for differentiated cells derived from the hPSCs. However, the functional safety of such small molecules in the cells differentiated from hPSCs has not yet been extensively validated. We used the survivin inhibitor YM155, which induced highly selective cell death of hPSCs for ablating undifferentiated hESCs after differentiation to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and examined whether hMSCs remained fully functional after being exposed by YM155. We demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) remained fully functional in vitro and in vivo, while hESCs were selectively ablated. These results suggest that a single treatment with YM155 after differentiation of hMSCs would be a valid approach for teratoma-free cell therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Isolation and characterization of exosome from human embryonic stem cell-derived c-myc-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Ruenn Chai; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Padmanabhan, Jayanthi; Choo, Andre; De Kleijn, Dominique P V; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently the cell type of choice in many cell therapy trials. The number of therapeutic applications for MSCs registered as product IND submissions with the FDA and initiation of registered clinical trials has increased substantially in recent years, in particular

  8. Evidence for embryonic stem-like signature and epithelial-mesenchymal transition features in the spheroid cells derived from lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudi, Raheleh; Madjd, Zahra; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Najafi, Ali; Korourian, Alireza; Shariftabrizi, Ahmad; Samadikuchaksaraei, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Identification of the cellular and molecular aspects of lung cancer stem cells (LCSCs) that are suggested to be the main culprit of tumor initiation, maintenance, drug resistance, and relapse is a prerequisite for targeted therapy of lung cancer. In the current study, LCSCs subpopulation of A549 cells was enriched, and after characterization of the spheroid cells, complementary DNA (cDNA) microarray analysis was applied to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the spheroid and parental cells. Microarray results were validated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), flow cytometry, and western blotting. Our results showed that spheroid cells had higher clonogenic potential, up-regulation of stemness gene Sox2, loss of CD44 expression, and gain of CD24 expression compared to parental cells. Among a total of 160 genes that were differentially expressed between the spheroid cells and the parental cells, 104 genes were up-regulated and 56 genes were down-regulated. Analysis of cDNA microarray revealed an embryonic stem cell-like signature and over-expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated genes in the spheroid cells. cDNA microarray results were validated at the gene expression level using qRT-PCR, and further validation was performed at the protein level by flow cytometry and western blotting. The embryonic stem cell-like signature in the spheroid cells supports two important notions: maintenance of CSCs phenotype by dedifferentiating mechanisms activated through oncogenic pathways and the origination of CSCs from embryonic stem cells (ESCs). PI3/AKT3, as the most common up-regulated pathway, and other pathways related to aggressive tumor behavior and EMT process can confer to the spheroid cells' high potential for metastasis and distant seeding.

  9. HIF-2α and Oct4 have synergistic effects on survival and myocardial repair of very small embryonic-like mesenchymal stem cells in infarcted hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoheng; Zhao, Lan; Wang, Jiahong; Chen, Nannan; Yan, Jian; Pan, Xin

    2017-01-12

    Poor cell survival and limited functional benefits have restricted mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) efficacy for treating myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that a better understanding of stem cell biology is needed. The transcription factor HIF-2α is an essential regulator of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, which can interact with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) transcription factor Oct4 and modulate its signaling. Here, we obtained very small embryonic-like mesenchymal stem cells (vselMSCs) from MI patients, which possessed the very small embryonic-like stem cells' (VSELs) morphology as well as ESCs' pluripotency. Using microarray analysis, we compared HIF-2α-regulated gene profiles in vselMSCs with ESC profiles and determined that HIF-2α coexpressed Oct4 in vselMSCs similarly to ESCs. However, this coexpression was absent in unpurified MSCs (uMSCs). Under hypoxic condition, vselMSCs exhibited stronger survival, proliferation and differentiation than uMSCs. Transplantation of vselMSCs caused greater improvement in cardiac function and heart remodeling in the infarcted rats. We further demonstrated that HIF-2α and Oct4 jointly regulate their relative downstream gene expressions, including Bcl2 and Survivin; the important pluripotent markers Nanog, Klf4, and Sox2; and Ang-1, bFGF, and VEGF, promoting angiogenesis and engraftment. Importantly, these effects were generally magnified by upregulation of HIF-2α and Oct4 induced by HIF-2α or Oct4 overexpression, and the greatest improvements were elicited after co-overexpressing HIF-2α and Oct4; overexpressing one transcription factor while silencing the other canceled this increase, and HIF-2α or Oct4 silencing abolished these effects. Together, these findings demonstrated that HIF-2α in vselMSCs cooperated with Oct4 in survival and function. The identification of the cooperation between HIF-2α and Oct4 will lead to deeper characterization of the downstream targets of this interaction in vselMSCs and will

  10. ESSA1 embryonic stem like cells from gilthead seabream: a new tool to study mesenchymal cell lineage differentiation in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Vijayakumar; Laizé, Vincent; Gavaia, Paulo J; Leonor Cancela, M

    2012-10-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are a promising tool for generation of transgenic animals and an ideal experimental model for in vitro studies of embryonic cell development, differentiation and gene manipulation. Here we report the development and initial characterization of a pluripotent embryonic stem like cell line, designated as ESSA1, derived from blastula stage embryos of the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata, L). ESSA1 cells are cultured in Leibovitz's L-15 medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum and, unlike other ES cells, without a feeder layer. They have a round or polygonal morphology, grow exponentially in culture and form dense colonies. ESSA1 cells also exhibit intense alkaline phosphatase activity, normal karyotype and are positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) markers for up to 30 passages. Upon treatment with all-trans retinoic acid, ESSA1 cells differentiate into neuron-like, oligodendritic, myocyte and melanocyte cells; they can also form embryoid bodies when seeded in bacteriological plates, a characteristic usually associated with pluripotency. The capacity of ESSA1 cells to differentiate into osteoblastic, chondroblastic or osteoclastic cell lineages and to produce a mineralized extracellular matrix in vitro was demonstrated through histochemical techniques and further confirmed by immunocytochemistry using lineage-specific markers. Furthermore, ESSA1 cells can be used to produce chimera, where they contribute to the development of a variety of tissues including the trunk and gut of zebrafish embryos and fry. Thus, ESSA1 cells represent a promising model for investigating bone-lineage cell differentiation in fish and also highlight the potential of piscine stem cell research. Copyright © 2012 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection

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    Yoneda, T.; Urade, M.; Sakuda, M.; Miyazaki, T.

    1986-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis in HEMP cells, whereas EGF showed no effect on these activities in HEMP-RV cells. Growth of HEMP-RV cells was slightly reduced compared with that of HEMP cells. EGF stimulated growth of HEMP cells and to a lesser extent of HEMP-RV cells. Binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to cell-surface receptors in HEMP-RV cells was, to our surprise, twice as much as that in HEMP cells. However, internalization of bound /sup 125/I-EGF in HEMP-RV cells was profoundly diminished. Thus, persistent RV infection causes not only changes in HEMP cell growth and differentiation but a decrease in or loss of HEMP cell responsiveness to EGF. The effects of persistent RV infection on palatal cell differentiation as well as growth may be responsible for the pathogenesis of congenital rubella. Furthermore, since HEMP cells appear to be closely related to osteoblasts, these results suggest a mechanism for RV-induced osseous abnormalities manifested in congenital rubella patients.

  12. Human embryonic mesenchymal stem cell-derived conditioned medium rescues kidney function in rats with established chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne van Koppen

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major health care problem, affecting more than 35% of the elderly population worldwide. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. Beneficial effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC have been described, however it is unclear whether the MSCs themselves or their secretome is required. We hypothesized that MSC-derived conditioned medium (CM reduces progression of CKD and studied functional and structural effects in a rat model of established CKD. CKD was induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (SNX combined with L-NNA and 6% NaCl diet in Lewis rats. Six weeks after SNX, CKD rats received either 50 µg CM or 50 µg non-CM (NCM twice daily intravenously for four consecutive days. Six weeks after treatment CM administration was functionally effective: glomerular filtration rate (inulin clearance and effective renal plasma flow (PAH clearance were significantly higher in CM vs. NCM-treatment. Systolic blood pressure was lower in CM compared to NCM. Proteinuria tended to be lower after CM. Tubular and glomerular damage were reduced and more glomerular endothelial cells were found after CM. DNA damage repair was increased after CM. MSC-CM derived exosomes, tested in the same experimental setting, showed no protective effect on the kidney. In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that administration of MSC-CM has a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function shown by decreased progression of CKD and reduced hypertension and glomerular injury.

  13. Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Agarwal, Divyansh; Taylor, Jesse A

    2016-06-01

    Applicants for craniofacial surgery fellowships utilize Internet-based resources like the San Francisco (SF) Match to manage applications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accessibility and content of craniofacial surgery fellowship websites (CSFWs). A list of available craniofacial surgery fellowships was compiled from directories of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery (ACSFS) and SF Match. Accessibility of CSFWs was assessed via links from these directories and a Google search. Craniofacial surgery fellowship websites were evaluated on education and recruitment content and compared via program characteristics. Twenty-four of the 28 US-based craniofacial surgery fellowship programs had a CSFW (86%). The ACSFS and SF Match databases had limited CSFW accessibility, but a Google search revealed most CSFWs had the top search result (76%). In total, CSFWs provided an average of 39% of education and recruitment variables. While most programs provided fellowship program descriptions (96%), application links (96%), and faculty listings (83%), relatively few provided rotation schedules (13%), fellow selection process information (13%), or interview dates (8%). CSFW content did not vary by program location, faculty size, accreditation status, or institutional affiliations (P > 0.05). Craniofacial surgery fellowships often lack readily accessible websites from national program lists and have limited information for interested applicants. The consistent lack of online information across programs suggests future opportunities exist to improve these educational resources.

  14. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate blocks triethylene glycol dimethacrylate-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by suppressing extracellular signal-regulated kinase in human dental pulp and embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Hsien; Deng, Yi-Ting; Kuo, Mark Yen-Ping; Liu, Cheing-Meei; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng

    2013-11-01

    Methacrylate resin-based materials could release components into adjacent environment even after polymerization. The major components leached include triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA). TEGDMA has been shown to induce the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). However, the mechanisms are not completely understood. The aims of this study were to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying TEGDMA-induced COX-2 in 2 oral cell types, the primary culture of human dental pulp (HDP) cells and the human embryonic palatal mesenchymal (HEPM) pre-osteoblasts, and to propose potential strategy to prevent or ameliorate the TEGDMA-induced inflammation in oral tissues. TEGDMA-induced COX-2 expression and its signaling pathways were assessed by Western blot analyses in HDP and HEPM cells. The inhibition of TEGDMA-induced COX-2 protein expression using various dietary phytochemicals was investigated. COX-2 protein expression was increased after exposure to TEGDMA at concentrations as low as 5 μmol/L. TEGDMA-induced COX-2 expression was associated with reaction oxygen species, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways in HDP and HEPM cells. The activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was directly associated with reactive oxygen species. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate suppressed TEGDMA-induced COX-2 expression by inhibiting phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Cells exposed to low concentrations of TEGDMA may induce inflammatory responses of the adjacent tissues, and this should be taken into consideration during common dental practice. Green tea, which has a long history of safe beverage consumption, may be a useful agent for the prevention or treatment of TEGDMA-induced inflammation in oral tissues. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Embryonic stem cells markers SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog expression and their correlations with epithelial-mesenchymal transition in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiren Luo

    Full Text Available Expression of embryonic stem cells (ESCs markers (SOX2, OCT4, Nanog and Nestin is crucial for progression of various human malignancies. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression and prognostic impact of these molecules in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC patients by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In the present study, we found that the expression levels of SOX2, OCT4 and Nanog were highly expressed in NPC compared with the non-tumorous tissues. Furthermore, these proteins correlated significantly with several clinicalpathological factors and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-associated indicators (E-cadherin/N-cadherin and Snail. In multivariate analyses, high expression of OCT4 (P = 0.013 and Nanog (P = 0.040, but not that of SOX2, was associated with worse survival and had strongly independent prognostic effects. Of note, OCT4 and Nanog were more frequently located at the invasive front of tumors, and correlated significantly with various aggressive behaviors including T classification, N classification, M classification and clinical stage. Furthermore, patients with co-expression of OCT4 and Nanog in the invasive front had significantly worse survival (P = 0.005. Interestingly, at the invasive front, these molecules correlated significantly with Nestin expression in endothelial cells (P<0.001. These findings provide evidence that ESCs biomarkers OCT4 and Nanog serves as independent prognostic factors for NPC. Additionally, cancer cells in the invasive front of NPC acquiring ESCs-like features should be maintained by vascular niches.

  16. Neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells require Wnt signaling for their development and drive invagination of the telencephalic midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshik Choe

    Full Text Available Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric region and produced ectopic smooth muscle cells instead of generating dermal and calvarial mesenchyme. In contrast, constitutive expression of stabilized ß-catenin in neural crest cells increased the number of mesenchymal lineage precursors suggesting that ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the expansion of neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, the loss of neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs leads to failure of telencephalic midline invagination and causes ventricular system defects. This study shows that ß-catenin signaling is required for the switch of neural crest cells to MSCs and mediates the expansion of MSCs to drive the formation of mesenchymal structures of the head. Furthermore, loss of these structures causes striking defects in forebrain morphogenesis.

  17. Lysyl oxidase-like 3b is critical for proliferation of chondrogenic progenitor cells during Zebrafish craniofacial development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boxtel, A.L.; Gansner, J.M.; Hakvoort, H.; Snell, H.; Legler, J.; Gitlin, J.D.

    2011-01-01

    Vertebrate craniofacial development requires coordinated morphogenetic interactions between the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the differentiating chondrocytes essential for cartilage formation. Recent studies reveal a critical role for specific lysyl oxidases in ECM integrity required for embryonic

  18. Neuroembryology and functional anatomy of craniofacial clefts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewings Ember

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The master plan of all vertebrate embryos is based on neuroanatomy. The embryo can be anatomically divided into discrete units called neuromeres so that each carries unique genetic traits. Embryonic neural crest cells arising from each neuromere induce development of nerves and concomitant arteries and support the development of specific craniofacial tissues or developmental fields. Fields are assembled upon each other in a programmed spatiotemporal order. Abnormalities in one field can affect the shape and position of developing adjacent fields. Craniofacial clefts represent states of excess or deficiency within and between specific developmental fields. The neuromeric organization of the embryo is the common denominator for understanding normal anatomy and pathology of the head and neck. Tessier′s observational cleft classification system can be redefined using neuroanatomic embryology. Reassessment of Tessier′s empiric observations demonstrates a more rational rearrangement of cleft zones, particularly near the midline. Neuromeric theory is also a means to understand and define other common craniofacial problems. Cleft palate, encephaloceles, craniosynostosis and cranial base defects may be analyzed in the same way.

  19. Craniofacial reconstruction - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Craniofacial reconstruction - series—Normal anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/ ...

  20. Six2 Plays an Intrinsic Role in Regulating Proliferation of Mesenchymal Cells in the Developing Palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis O. Okello

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Cleft palate is a common congenital abnormality that results from defective secondary palate (SP formation. The Sine oculis-related homeobox 2 (Six2 gene has been linked to abnormalities of craniofacial and kidney development. Our current study examined, for the first time, the specific role of Six2 in embryonic mouse SP development. Six2 mRNA and protein expression were identified in the palatal shelves from embryonic days (E12.5 to E15.5, with peak levels during early stages of palatal shelf outgrowth. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC showed that Six2 protein is abundant throughout the mesenchyme in the oral half of each palatal shelf, whereas there is a pronounced decline in Six2 expression by mesenchyme cells in the nasal half of the palatal shelf by stages E14.5–15.5. An opposite pattern was observed in the surface epithelium of the palatal shelf. Six2 expression was prominent at all stages in the epithelial cell layer located on the nasal side of each palatal shelf but absent from the epithelium located on the oral side of the palatal shelf. Six2 is a putative downstream target of transcription factor Hoxa2 and we previously demonstrated that Hoxa2 plays an intrinsic role in embryonic palate formation. We therefore investigated whether Six2 expression was altered in the developing SP of Hoxa2 null mice. Reverse transcriptase PCR and Western blot analyses revealed that Six2 mRNA and protein levels were upregulated in Hoxa2−/− palatal shelves at stages E12.5–14.5. Moreover, the domain of Six2 protein expression in the palatal mesenchyme of Hoxa2−/− embryos was expanded to include the entire nasal half of the palatal shelf in addition to the oral half. The palatal shelves of Hoxa2−/− embryos displayed a higher density of proliferating, Ki-67 positive palatal mesenchyme cells, as well as a higher density of Six2/Ki-67 double-positive cells. Furthermore, Hoxa2−/− palatal mesenchyme cells in culture displayed both increased

  1. Development of an embryonic skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage in a sea cucumber reveals the trajectory of change for the evolution of novel structures in echinoderms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Brenna S; Wright, Erin P; Exner, Cameron; Kitazawa, Chisato; Hinman, Veronica F

    2012-08-09

    The mechanisms by which the conserved genetic "toolkit" for development generates phenotypic disparity across metazoans is poorly understood. Echinoderm larvae provide a great resource for understanding how developmental novelty arises. The sea urchin pluteus larva is dramatically different from basal echinoderm larval types, which include the auricularia-type larva of its sister taxon, the sea cucumbers, and the sea star bipinnaria larva. In particular, the pluteus has a mesodermally-derived larval skeleton that is not present in sea star larvae or any outgroup taxa. To understand the evolutionary origin of this structure, we examined the molecular development of mesoderm in the sea cucumber, Parastichopus parvimensis. By comparing gene expression in sea urchins, sea cucumbers and sea stars, we partially reconstructed the mesodermal regulatory state of the echinoderm ancestor. Surprisingly, we also identified expression of the transcription factor alx1 in a cryptic skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage in P. parvimensis. Orthologs of alx1 are expressed exclusively within the sea urchin skeletogenic mesenchyme, but are not expressed in the mesenchyme of the sea star, which suggests that alx1+ mesenchyme is a synapomorphy of at least sea urchins and sea cucumbers. Perturbation of Alx1 demonstrates that this protein is necessary for the formation of the sea cucumber spicule. Overexpression of the sea star alx1 ortholog in sea urchins is sufficient to induce additional skeleton, indicating that the Alx1 protein has not evolved a new function during the evolution of the larval skeleton. The proposed echinoderm ancestral mesoderm state is highly conserved between the morphologically similar, but evolutionarily distant, auricularia and bipinnaria larvae. However, the auricularia, but not bipinnaria, also develops a simple skelotogenic cell lineage. Our data indicate that the first step in acquiring these novel cell fates was to re-specify the ancestral mesoderm into

  2. Development of an embryonic skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage in a sea cucumber reveals the trajectory of change for the evolution of novel structures in echinoderms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCauley Brenna S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms by which the conserved genetic “toolkit” for development generates phenotypic disparity across metazoans is poorly understood. Echinoderm larvae provide a great resource for understanding how developmental novelty arises. The sea urchin pluteus larva is dramatically different from basal echinoderm larval types, which include the auricularia-type larva of its sister taxon, the sea cucumbers, and the sea star bipinnaria larva. In particular, the pluteus has a mesodermally-derived larval skeleton that is not present in sea star larvae or any outgroup taxa. To understand the evolutionary origin of this structure, we examined the molecular development of mesoderm in the sea cucumber, Parastichopus parvimensis. Results By comparing gene expression in sea urchins, sea cucumbers and sea stars, we partially reconstructed the mesodermal regulatory state of the echinoderm ancestor. Surprisingly, we also identified expression of the transcription factor alx1 in a cryptic skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage in P. parvimensis. Orthologs of alx1 are expressed exclusively within the sea urchin skeletogenic mesenchyme, but are not expressed in the mesenchyme of the sea star, which suggests that alx1+ mesenchyme is a synapomorphy of at least sea urchins and sea cucumbers. Perturbation of Alx1 demonstrates that this protein is necessary for the formation of the sea cucumber spicule. Overexpression of the sea star alx1 ortholog in sea urchins is sufficient to induce additional skeleton, indicating that the Alx1 protein has not evolved a new function during the evolution of the larval skeleton. Conclusions The proposed echinoderm ancestral mesoderm state is highly conserved between the morphologically similar, but evolutionarily distant, auricularia and bipinnaria larvae. However, the auricularia, but not bipinnaria, also develops a simple skelotogenic cell lineage. Our data indicate that the first step in acquiring these novel

  3. Development of an embryonic skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage in a sea cucumber reveals the trajectory of change for the evolution of novel structures in echinoderms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanisms by which the conserved genetic “toolkit” for development generates phenotypic disparity across metazoans is poorly understood. Echinoderm larvae provide a great resource for understanding how developmental novelty arises. The sea urchin pluteus larva is dramatically different from basal echinoderm larval types, which include the auricularia-type larva of its sister taxon, the sea cucumbers, and the sea star bipinnaria larva. In particular, the pluteus has a mesodermally-derived larval skeleton that is not present in sea star larvae or any outgroup taxa. To understand the evolutionary origin of this structure, we examined the molecular development of mesoderm in the sea cucumber, Parastichopus parvimensis. Results By comparing gene expression in sea urchins, sea cucumbers and sea stars, we partially reconstructed the mesodermal regulatory state of the echinoderm ancestor. Surprisingly, we also identified expression of the transcription factor alx1 in a cryptic skeletogenic mesenchyme lineage in P. parvimensis. Orthologs of alx1 are expressed exclusively within the sea urchin skeletogenic mesenchyme, but are not expressed in the mesenchyme of the sea star, which suggests that alx1+ mesenchyme is a synapomorphy of at least sea urchins and sea cucumbers. Perturbation of Alx1 demonstrates that this protein is necessary for the formation of the sea cucumber spicule. Overexpression of the sea star alx1 ortholog in sea urchins is sufficient to induce additional skeleton, indicating that the Alx1 protein has not evolved a new function during the evolution of the larval skeleton. Conclusions The proposed echinoderm ancestral mesoderm state is highly conserved between the morphologically similar, but evolutionarily distant, auricularia and bipinnaria larvae. However, the auricularia, but not bipinnaria, also develops a simple skelotogenic cell lineage. Our data indicate that the first step in acquiring these novel cell fates was to re-specify the

  4. Latrophilin-2 is a novel component of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition within the atrioventricular canal of the embryonic chicken heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Sally E; Scholz, Matthew J; Greer, Kevin A; Hubbard, Antony D; Darnell, Diana K; Antin, Parker B; Klewer, Scott E; Runyan, Raymond B

    2006-12-01

    Endothelial cells in the atrioventricular canal of the heart undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to form heart valves. We surveyed an on-line database (http://www.geisha.arizona.edu/) for clones expressed during gastrulation to identify novel EMT components. One gene, latrophilin-2, was identified as expressed in the heart and appeared to be functional in EMT. This molecule was chosen for further examination. In situ localization showed it to be expressed in both the myocardium and endothelium. Several antisense DNA probes and an siRNA for latrophilin-2 produced a loss of EMT in collagen gel cultures. Latrophilin-2 is a putative G-protein-coupled receptor and we previously identified a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein signal transduction pathway. Microarray experiments were performed to examine whether these molecules were related. After treatment with antisense DNA against latrophilin-2, expression of 1,385 genes and ESTs was altered. This represented approximately 12.5% of the microarray elements. In contrast, pertussis toxin altered only 103 (0.9%) elements of the array. There appears to be little overlap between the two signal transduction pathways. Latrophilin-2 is thus a novel component of EMT and provides a new avenue for investigation of this cellular process. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia - A review of current management techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadavalli Guruprasad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibrous dysplasia is a pathologic condition of bone of unknown etiology with no apparent familial, hereditary or congenital basis. Lichtenstein first coined the term in 1938 and in 1942 he and Jaffe separated it from other fibro-osseous lesions. It is a bone tumor that, although benign, has the potential to cause significant cosmetic and functional disturbance, particularly in the craniofacial skeleton. Its management poses significant challenges to the surgeon. Craniofacial fibrous dysplasia is 1 of 3 types of fibrous dysplasia that can affect the bones of the craniofacial complex, including the mandible and maxilla. Fibrous dysplasia is a skeletal developmental disorder of the bone-forming mesenchyme that manifests as a defect in osteoblastic differentiation and maturation. It is a lesion of unknown etiology, uncertain pathogenesis, and diverse histopathology. Fibrous dysplasia represents about 2, 5% of all bone tumors and over 7% of all benign tumours. Over the years, we have gained a better understanding of its etiology, clinical behavior, and both surgical and non-surgical treatments.

  6. Osteomas of the craniofacial region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to present the clinical features of a case series of osteomas in the craniofacial region and to compare them with those described in the dental literatures. A retrospective study of 18 patients diagnosed with osteomas in the craniofacial region was performed. The age, gender, location, symptoms, and the radiological findings were recorded. There were 13 women and 5 men from 18 years to 69 years of age (mean age, 42{+-}27 years). Fourteen osteomas were found in the mandible (78%), two in frontal sinus, one in sphenoid bone, and one in maxilla. Osteomas are benign tumors composed of mature compact bone or cancellous bone. They are essentially restricted to the craniofacial skeleton and rarely, if ever, are diagnosed in other bones.

  7. Making headway: the roles of Hox genes and neural crest cells in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2003-04-14

    Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  8. RSK2 Is a Modulator of Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Marangoni, Pauline; Pilgram, Coralie; Langer, Arnaud; Kuntz, Thibaut; Demassue, Julie; Morkmued, Supawich; Choquet, Philippe; Constantinesco, André; Bornert, Fabien; Schmittbuhl, Matthieu; Pannetier, Solange; Viriot, Laurent; Hanauer, André; Dollé, Pascal; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Background The RSK2 gene is responsible for Coffin-Lowry syndrome, an X-linked dominant genetic disorder causing mental retardation, skeletal growth delays, with craniofacial and digital abnormalities typically associated with this syndrome. Craniofacial and dental anomalies encountered in this rare disease have been poorly characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined, using X-Ray microtomographic analysis, the variable craniofacial dysmorphism and dental anomalies present in Rsk2 knockout mice, a model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, as well as in triple Rsk1,2,3 knockout mutants. We report Rsk mutation produces surpernumerary teeth midline/mesial to the first molar. This highly penetrant phenotype recapitulates more ancestral tooth structures lost with evolution. Most likely this leads to a reduction of the maxillary diastema. Abnormalities of molar shape were generally restricted to the mesial part of both upper and lower first molars (M1). Expression analysis of the four Rsk genes (Rsk1, 2, 3 and 4) was performed at various stages of odontogenesis in wild-type (WT) mice. Rsk2 is expressed in the mesenchymal, neural crest-derived compartment, correlating with proliferative areas of the developing teeth. This is consistent with RSK2 functioning in cell cycle control and growth regulation, functions potentially responsible for severe dental phenotypes. To uncover molecular pathways involved in the etiology of these defects, we performed a comparative transcriptomic (DNA microarray) analysis of mandibular wild-type versus Rsk2-/Y molars. We further demonstrated a misregulation of several critical genes, using a Rsk2 shRNA knock-down strategy in molar tooth germs cultured in vitro. Conclusions This study reveals RSK2 regulates craniofacial development including tooth development and patterning via novel transcriptional targets. PMID:24416220

  9. RSK2 is a modulator of craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Laugel-Haushalter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The RSK2 gene is responsible for Coffin-Lowry syndrome, an X-linked dominant genetic disorder causing mental retardation, skeletal growth delays, with craniofacial and digital abnormalities typically associated with this syndrome. Craniofacial and dental anomalies encountered in this rare disease have been poorly characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined, using X-Ray microtomographic analysis, the variable craniofacial dysmorphism and dental anomalies present in Rsk2 knockout mice, a model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome, as well as in triple Rsk1,2,3 knockout mutants. We report Rsk mutation produces surpernumerary teeth midline/mesial to the first molar. This highly penetrant phenotype recapitulates more ancestral tooth structures lost with evolution. Most likely this leads to a reduction of the maxillary diastema. Abnormalities of molar shape were generally restricted to the mesial part of both upper and lower first molars (M1. Expression analysis of the four Rsk genes (Rsk1, 2, 3 and 4 was performed at various stages of odontogenesis in wild-type (WT mice. Rsk2 is expressed in the mesenchymal, neural crest-derived compartment, correlating with proliferative areas of the developing teeth. This is consistent with RSK2 functioning in cell cycle control and growth regulation, functions potentially responsible for severe dental phenotypes. To uncover molecular pathways involved in the etiology of these defects, we performed a comparative transcriptomic (DNA microarray analysis of mandibular wild-type versus Rsk2-/Y molars. We further demonstrated a misregulation of several critical genes, using a Rsk2 shRNA knock-down strategy in molar tooth germs cultured in vitro. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals RSK2 regulates craniofacial development including tooth development and patterning via novel transcriptional targets.

  10. Dental approach to craniofacial syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    The paper consists of three parts. Part 1: Definition of Syndromes. Focus is given to craniofacial syndromes in which abnormal traits in the dentition are associated symptoms. In the last decade, research has concentrated on phenotype, genotype, growth, development, function, and treatment. Part ...

  11. Biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevlin, R; McArdle, A; Atashroo, D; Walmsley, G G; Senarath-Yapa, K; Zielins, E R; Paik, K J; Longaker, M T; Wan, D C

    2014-12-01

    Conditions such as congenital anomalies, cancers, and trauma can all result in devastating deficits of bone in the craniofacial skeleton. This can lead to significant alteration in function and appearance that may have significant implications for patients. In addition, large bone defects in this area can pose serious clinical dilemmas, which prove difficult to remedy, even with current gold standard surgical treatments. The craniofacial skeleton is complex and serves important functional demands. The necessity to develop new approaches for craniofacial reconstruction arises from the fact that traditional therapeutic modalities, such as autologous bone grafting, present myriad limitations and carry with them the potential for significant complications. While the optimal bone construct for tissue regeneration remains to be elucidated, much progress has been made in the past decade. Advances in tissue engineering have led to innovative scaffold design, complemented by progress in the understanding of stem cell-based therapy and growth factor enhancement of the healing cascade. This review focuses on the role of biomaterials for craniofacial bone engineering, highlighting key advances in scaffold design and development. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  12. [Craniofacial prostheses for facial defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, P A

    2010-06-01

    Craniofacial prostheses (or epitheses) are artificial substitutes for facial defects. Today, prostheses made of silicone are state-of-the-art. They may be fixed anatomically (to already existing structures), mechanically (to spectacle frames), chemically (using adhesives), or surgically (to osseointegrated titanium implants). With the existing extraoral implant systems, prostheses may be securely anchored to the bone regardless of size and location of the defect. The classic atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation by avoidance of any heat trauma to the bone. This review outlines the indications and contra-indications as well as advantages and disadvantages of craniofacial prostheses and their retention methods in various facial regions. It summarizes the basic principles of extraoral implantology in respect to implant positioning and the management of children and radiated patients.

  13. Craniofacial features in Goldenhar syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, C; Reddy, R Sudhakara; Uloopi, K S; Madhuri, V; Sekhar, R Chandra

    2009-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome also known as oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome was first reported by Dr Maurice Goldenhar in 1952. It is a rare disease entity characterized by craniofacial anomalies such as hypoplasia of the mandible and malar bones, microtia, and vertebral anomalies. The etiology of this disease still remains unclear and occurs as sporadic. This report presents goldenhar syndrome in a 12-year-old male patient.

  14. Craniofacial features in Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay C

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome also known as oculo-auriculo-vertebral syndrome was first reported by Dr Maurice Goldenhar in 1952. It is a rare disease entity characterized by craniofacial anomalies such as hypoplasia of the mandible and malar bones, microtia, and vertebral anomalies. The etiology of this disease still remains unclear and occurs as sporadic. This report presents goldenhar syndrome in a 12-year-old male patient.

  15. Craniofacial reconstruction following oncologic resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasono, Matthew M; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to reliably reconstruct complex and sizable wounds has decreased the morbidity of skull base surgery substantially, preventing major complications and allowing treatment of tumors previously considered inoperable. Addressing facial nerve function with static and dynamic procedures as well as fabrication of craniofacial prostheses to replace delicate facial landmarks has further increased surgeons' ability to restore the appearance and function of the face. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Embryonic senescence and laminopathies in a progeroid zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshimizu, Eriko; Imamura, Shintaro; Qi, Jie; Toure, Jamal; Valdez, Delgado M; Carr, Christopher E; Hanai, Jun-ichi; Kishi, Shuji

    2011-03-30

    Mutations that disrupt the conversion of prelamin A to mature lamin A cause the rare genetic disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a group of laminopathies. Our understanding of how A-type lamins function in vivo during early vertebrate development through aging remains limited, and would benefit from a suitable experimental model. The zebrafish has proven to be a tractable model organism for studying both development and aging at the molecular genetic level. Zebrafish show an array of senescence symptoms resembling those in humans, which can be targeted to specific aging pathways conserved in vertebrates. However, no zebrafish models bearing human premature senescence currently exist. We describe the induction of embryonic senescence and laminopathies in zebrafish harboring disturbed expressions of the lamin A gene (LMNA). Impairments in these fish arise in the skin, muscle and adipose tissue, and sometimes in the cartilage. Reduced function of lamin A/C by translational blocking of the LMNA gene induced apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and craniofacial abnormalities/cartilage defects. By contrast, induced cryptic splicing of LMNA, which generates the deletion of 8 amino acid residues lamin A (zlamin A-Δ8), showed embryonic senescence and S-phase accumulation/arrest. Interestingly, the abnormal muscle and lipodystrophic phenotypes were common in both cases. Hence, both decrease-of-function of lamin A/C and gain-of-function of aberrant lamin A protein induced laminopathies that are associated with mesenchymal cell lineages during zebrafish early development. Visualization of individual cells expressing zebrafish progerin (zProgerin/zlamin A-Δ37) fused to green fluorescent protein further revealed misshapen nuclear membrane. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor reduced these nuclear abnormalities and significantly prevented embryonic senescence and muscle fiber damage induced by zProgerin. Importantly, the adult Progerin fish survived and remained fertile with

  17. Embryonic senescence and laminopathies in a progeroid zebrafish model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eriko Koshimizu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations that disrupt the conversion of prelamin A to mature lamin A cause the rare genetic disorder Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome and a group of laminopathies. Our understanding of how A-type lamins function in vivo during early vertebrate development through aging remains limited, and would benefit from a suitable experimental model. The zebrafish has proven to be a tractable model organism for studying both development and aging at the molecular genetic level. Zebrafish show an array of senescence symptoms resembling those in humans, which can be targeted to specific aging pathways conserved in vertebrates. However, no zebrafish models bearing human premature senescence currently exist. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the induction of embryonic senescence and laminopathies in zebrafish harboring disturbed expressions of the lamin A gene (LMNA. Impairments in these fish arise in the skin, muscle and adipose tissue, and sometimes in the cartilage. Reduced function of lamin A/C by translational blocking of the LMNA gene induced apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and craniofacial abnormalities/cartilage defects. By contrast, induced cryptic splicing of LMNA, which generates the deletion of 8 amino acid residues lamin A (zlamin A-Δ8, showed embryonic senescence and S-phase accumulation/arrest. Interestingly, the abnormal muscle and lipodystrophic phenotypes were common in both cases. Hence, both decrease-of-function of lamin A/C and gain-of-function of aberrant lamin A protein induced laminopathies that are associated with mesenchymal cell lineages during zebrafish early development. Visualization of individual cells expressing zebrafish progerin (zProgerin/zlamin A-Δ37 fused to green fluorescent protein further revealed misshapen nuclear membrane. A farnesyltransferase inhibitor reduced these nuclear abnormalities and significantly prevented embryonic senescence and muscle fiber damage induced by zProgerin. Importantly, the adult

  18. The emerging roles of ribosome biogenesis in craniofacial development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam P Ross

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are a transient, migratory cell population, which originates during neurulation at the neural folds and contributes to the majority of tissues, including the mesenchymal structures of the craniofacial skeleton. The deregulation of the complex developmental processes that guide migration, proliferation, and differentiation of neural crest cells may result in a wide range of pathological conditions grouped together as neurocristopathies. Recently, due to their multipotent properties neural crest stem cells have received considerable attention as a possible source for stem cell based regenerative therapies. This exciting prospect underlines the need to further explore the developmental programs that guide neural crest cell differentiation. This review explores the particular importance of ribosome biogenesis defects in this context since a specific interface between ribosomopathies and neurocristopathies exists as evidenced by disorders such as Treacher-Collins-Franceschetti syndrome and Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

  19. Ciliopathy Protein Tmem107 Plays Multiple Roles in Craniofacial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cela, P; Hampl, M; Shylo, N A; Christopher, K J; Kavkova, M; Landova, M; Zikmund, T; Weatherbee, S D; Kaiser, J; Buchtova, M

    2018-01-01

    A broad spectrum of human diseases called ciliopathies is caused by defective primary cilia morphology or signal transduction. The primary cilium is a solitary organelle that responds to mechanical and chemical stimuli from extracellular and intracellular environments. Transmembrane protein 107 (TMEM107) is localized in the primary cilium and is enriched at the transition zone where it acts to regulate protein content of the cilium. Mutations in TMEM107 were previously connected with oral-facial-digital syndrome, Meckel-Gruber syndrome, and Joubert syndrome exhibiting a range of ciliopathic defects. Here, we analyze a role of Tmem107 in craniofacial development with special focus on palate formation, using mouse embryos with a complete knockout of Tmem107. Tmem107-/- mice were affected by a broad spectrum of craniofacial defects, including shorter snout, expansion of the facial midline, cleft lip, extensive exencephaly, and microphthalmia or anophthalmia. External abnormalities were accompanied by defects in skeletal structures, including ossification delay in several membranous bones and enlargement of the nasal septum or defects in vomeronasal cartilage. Alteration in palatal shelves growth resulted in clefting of the secondary palate. Palatal defects were caused by increased mesenchymal proliferation leading to early overgrowth of palatal shelves followed by defects in their horizontalization. Moreover, the expression of epithelial stemness marker SOX2 was altered in the palatal shelves of Tmem107-/- animals, and differences in mesenchymal SOX9 expression demonstrated the enhancement of neural crest migration. Detailed analysis of primary cilia revealed region-specific changes in ciliary morphology accompanied by alteration of acetylated tubulin and IFT88 expression. Moreover, Shh and Gli1 expression was increased in Tmem107-/- animals as shown by in situ hybridization. Thus, TMEM107 is essential for proper head development, and defective TMEM107 function leads

  20. [Craniofacial bone abnormalities in von Recklinghausen neurofibromatosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abassi-Bakir, D; Graiess-Tlili, K; Turky, A; Gharbi, H; Bouzaiene, M; Kraiem, C; Bakir, A

    1995-01-01

    Cases of cranio-facial bone anomalies were observed in 40 cases of neurofibromatosis. The cranio-facial skeletal manifestations are numerous and varied. Radiographic investigation is important to confirm the diagnosis, when neurologic and cutaneous signs are absent. The diagnosis should be easily confirmed by a conventional radiographic study.

  1. Early Airway Intervention for Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Lauren A; Sidman, James D; Roby, Brianne

    2016-11-01

    This article reviews the presentation of children with craniofacial anomalies by the most common sites of airway obstruction. Major craniofacial anomalies may be categorized into those with midface hypoplasia, mandible hypoplasia, combined midface and mandible hypoplasia, and midline deformities. Algorithms of airway interventions are provided to guide the initial management of these complex patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Craniofacial proportions and anthropometric measurements among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Untreated children with growth hormone deficiency (GHD) have typical somatic features, including short stature, acromicria and distinctive craniofacial features including small head circumference. Patients and Methods: By using a cross sectional study design, we investigated the effect of GHD on craniofacial ...

  3. Analysis of the Fgfr2C342Y mouse model shows condensation defects due to misregulation of Sox9 expression in prechondrocytic mesenchyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Peskett

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Syndromic craniosynostosis caused by mutations in FGFR2 is characterised by developmental pathology in both endochondral and membranous skeletogenesis. Detailed phenotypic characterisation of features in the membranous calvarium, the endochondral cranial base and other structures in the axial and appendicular skeleton has not been performed at embryonic stages. We investigated bone development in the Crouzon mouse model (Fgfr2C342Y at pre- and post-ossification stages to improve understanding of the underlying pathogenesis. Phenotypic analysis was performed by whole-mount skeletal staining (Alcian Blue/Alizarin Red and histological staining of sections of CD1 wild-type (WT, Fgfr2C342Y/+ heterozygous (HET and Fgfr2C342Y/C342Y homozygous (HOM mouse embryos from embryonic day (E12.5-E17.5 stages. Gene expression (Sox9, Shh, Fgf10 and Runx2 was studied by in situ hybridisation and protein expression (COL2A1 by immunohistochemistry. Our analysis has identified severely decreased osteogenesis in parts of the craniofacial skeleton together with increased chondrogenesis in parts of the endochondral and cartilaginous skeleton in HOM embryos. The Sox9 expression domain in tracheal and basi-cranial chondrocytic precursors at E13.5 in HOM embryos is increased and expanded, correlating with the phenotypic observations which suggest FGFR2 signalling regulates Sox9 expression. Combined with abnormal staining of type II collagen in pre-chondrocytic mesenchyme, this is indicative of a mesenchymal condensation defect. An expanded spectrum of phenotypic features observed in the Fgfr2C342Y/C342Y mouse embryo paves the way towards better understanding the clinical attributes of human Crouzon–Pfeiffer syndrome. FGFR2 mutation results in impaired skeletogenesis; however, our findings suggest that many phenotypic aberrations stem from a primary failure of pre-chondrogenic/osteogenic mesenchymal condensation and link FGFR2 to SOX9, a principal regulator of

  4. All-Trans Retinoic Acid-Induced Craniofacial Malformation Model: A Prenatal and Postnatal Morphological Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weicai; Jian, Yutao; Cai, Bin; Wang, Miao; Chen, Mu; Huang, Hongzhang

    2017-07-01

    To characterize the prenatal and postnatal craniofacial bone development in mouse model of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exposure at different ages by a quantitative and morphological analysis of skull morphology. Pregnant mice were exposed to ATRA at embryonic day 10 (E10) and 13 (E13) by oral gavage. Skulls of mice embryos at E19.5 and adult mice at postnatal day 35 (P35) were collected for high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) imaging scanning and section HE staining. Reconstruction and measurement of mouse skulls were performed for prenatal and postnatal analysis of the control and ATRA-exposed mice. Craniofacial malformations in mouse models caused by ATRA exposure were age dependent. ATRA exposure at E10 induced cleft palate in 81.8% of the fetuses, whereas the palatine bone of E13-exposed mice was intact. Inhibitions of maxilla and mandible development with craniofacial asymmetry induced were observed at E19.5 and P35. Compared with control and E13-exposed mice, the palatine bones of E10-exposed mice were not elevated and were smaller in dimension. Some E10-exposed mice exhibited other craniofacial abnormalities, including premature fusion of mandibular symphysis with a missing mandibular incisor and a smaller mandible. Severe deviated snouts and amorphous craniofacial suture were detected in E13-exposed mice at P35. These morphological variations in E10- and E13-exposed mice suggested that ATRA was teratogenic in craniofacial bone development in mice and the effect was age dependent.

  5. Alcohol exposure induces chick craniofacial bone defects by negatively affecting cranial neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guang; Lin, Zhuangling; Wu, Yushi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Meng; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Chuai, Manli; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-11-05

    Excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy could lead to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). However, the molecular mechanism leading to craniofacial abnormality, a feature of FAS, is still poorly understood. The cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) contribute to the formation of the craniofacial bones. Therefore, NCCs exposed to ethanol was investigated - using chick embryos and in vitro explant culture as experimental models. We demonstrated that exposure to 2% ethanol induced craniofacial defects, which includes parietal defect, in the developing chick fetus. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that ethanol treatment downregulated Ap-2ɑ, Pax7 and HNK-1 expressions by cranial NCCs. Using double-immunofluorescent stainings for Ap-2ɑ/pHIS3 and Ap-2ɑ/c-Caspase3, we showed that ethanol treatment inhibited cranial NCC proliferation and increased NCC apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, ethanol treatment of the dorsal neuroepithelium increased Laminin, N-Cadherin and Cadherin 6B expressions while Cadherin 7 expression was repressed. In situ hybridization also revealed that ethanol treatment up-regulated Cadherin 6B expression but down-regulated slug, Msx1, FoxD3 and BMP4 expressions. In summary, our experimental results demonstrated that ethanol treatment interferes with the production of cranial NCCs by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of these cells. In addition, ethanol affected the delamination, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration of cranial NCCs, which may have contributed to the etiology of the craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Using Zebrafish to Test the Genetic Basis of Human Craniofacial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, R Grecco; Eames, B Frank

    2017-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) opened an innovative and productive avenue to investigate the molecular basis of human craniofacial disease. However, GWASs identify candidate genes only; they do not prove that any particular one is the functional villain underlying disease or just an unlucky genomic bystander. Genetic manipulation of animal models is the best approach to reveal which genetic loci identified from human GWASs are functionally related to specific diseases. The purpose of this review is to discuss the potential of zebrafish to resolve which candidate genetic loci are mechanistic drivers of craniofacial diseases. Many anatomic, embryonic, and genetic features of craniofacial development are conserved among zebrafish and mammals, making zebrafish a good model of craniofacial diseases. Also, the ability to manipulate gene function in zebrafish was greatly expanded over the past 20 y, enabling systems such as Gateway Tol2 and CRISPR-Cas9 to test gain- and loss-of-function alleles identified from human GWASs in coding and noncoding regions of DNA. With the optimization of genetic editing methods, large numbers of candidate genes can be efficiently interrogated. Finding the functional villains that underlie diseases will permit new treatments and prevention strategies and will increase understanding of how gene pathways operate during normal development.

  7. Craniofacial morphology in Muenke syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Mette Kirstine; Hermann, Nuno V; Darvann, Tron A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the severity of the cranial phenotype in Muenke syndrome infants with unicoronal synostosis is greater than in infants with nonsyndromic unicoronal synostosis. A total of 23 infants were included in the study. All infants included in the study had......-Muenke patients. The study indicates differences with regard to severity of increased digital markings and craniofacial asymmetry between the infants with Muenke syndrome and the infants with nonsyndromic unilateral coronal synostosis....... of the calvaria, cranial base, and maxillary complex. Increased digital markings were more severe posteriorly in Muenke patients than in non-Muenke patients. The Muenke patients with unilateral coronal synostosis showed a somewhat more severe asymmetry in the anterior part of the skull than the non...

  8. Working with DICOM craniofacial images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Dan; Cevidanes, Lucia S H; Proffit, William R

    2009-09-01

    The increasing use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) requires changes in our diagnosis and treatment planning methods as well as additional training. The standard for digital computed tomography images is called digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM). In this article we discuss the following concepts: visualization of CBCT images in orthodontics, measurement in CBCT images, creation of 2-dimensional radiographs from DICOM files, segmentation engines and multimodal images, registration and superimposition of 3-dimensional (3D) images, special applications for quantitative analysis, and 3D surgical prediction. CBCT manufacturers and software companies are continually working to improve their products to help clinicians diagnose and plan treatment using 3D craniofacial images.

  9. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Fariña, DDS, Med

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen.

  10. Head development. Craniofacial genetics makes headway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, J M

    1995-04-01

    Studies of neural crest migration in animal models, and of human syndromes in which craniofacial development is abnormal, are helping us to understand both prenatal and postnatal development of the head.

  11. Orthognathic Surgery in Craniofacial Microsomia: Treatment Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Salvador; Torrealba, Ramón; Nuñez, Marcelo; Uribe, Francisca

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Craniofacial microsomia is a broad term that covers a variety of craniofacial malformation conditions that are caused by alterations in the derivatives of the first and second pharyngeal arches. In general terms, diverse therapeutic alternatives are proposed according to the growth stage and the severity of the alteration. When craniofacial growth has concluded, conventional orthognathic surgery (Le Fort I osteotomy, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, and genioplasty) provides good alternatives for MI and MIIA type cases. Reconstruction of the mandibular ramus and temporomandibular joint before orthognathic surgery is the indicated treatment for cases MIIB and MIII. The goal of this article is to establish a surgical treatment algorithm for orthognathic surgery on patients with craniofacial microsomia, analyzing the points that allow the ideal treatment for each patient to be chosen. PMID:25674375

  12. Engineering human cell spheroids to model embryonic tissue fusion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions drive embryonic fusion events during development and upon perturbation can result in birth defects. Cleft palate and neural tube defects can result from genetic defects or environmental exposures during development, yet very little is known abo...

  13. Data for human cell spheroid model of embryonic tissue fusion in vitro.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions drive embryonic fusion events during development and upon perturbation can result in birth defects. Cleft palate and neural tube...

  14. Pancreatic mesenchyme regulates epithelial organogenesis throughout development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limor Landsman

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The developing pancreatic epithelium gives rise to all endocrine and exocrine cells of the mature organ. During organogenesis, the epithelial cells receive essential signals from the overlying mesenchyme. Previous studies, focusing on ex vivo tissue explants or complete knockout mice, have identified an important role for the mesenchyme in regulating the expansion of progenitor cells in the early pancreas epithelium. However, due to the lack of genetic tools directing expression specifically to the mesenchyme, the potential roles of this supporting tissue in vivo, especially in guiding later stages of pancreas organogenesis, have not been elucidated. We employed transgenic tools and fetal surgical techniques to ablate mesenchyme via Cre-mediated mesenchymal expression of Diphtheria Toxin (DT at the onset of pancreas formation, and at later developmental stages via in utero injection of DT into transgenic mice expressing the Diphtheria Toxin receptor (DTR in this tissue. Our results demonstrate that mesenchymal cells regulate pancreatic growth and branching at both early and late developmental stages by supporting proliferation of precursors and differentiated cells, respectively. Interestingly, while cell differentiation was not affected, the expansion of both the endocrine and exocrine compartments was equally impaired. To further elucidate signals required for mesenchymal cell function, we eliminated β-catenin signaling and determined that it is a critical pathway in regulating mesenchyme survival and growth. Our study presents the first in vivo evidence that the embryonic mesenchyme provides critical signals to the epithelium throughout pancreas organogenesis. The findings are novel and relevant as they indicate a critical role for the mesenchyme during late expansion of endocrine and exocrine compartments. In addition, our results provide a molecular mechanism for mesenchymal expansion and survival by identifying β-catenin signaling as an

  15. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amsterdam Adam

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells occurs within the pharyngeal arches. Substantial efforts have led to the identification of several genes required for craniofacial skeletal development such as the endothelin-1 (edn1 signaling pathway that is required for lower jaw formation. However, many essential genes required for craniofacial development remain to be identified. Results Through screening a collection of insertional zebrafish mutants containing approximately 25% of the genes essential for embryonic development, we present the identification of 15 essential genes that are required for craniofacial development. We identified 3 genes required for hyomandibular development. We also identified zebrafish models for Campomelic Dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. To further demonstrate the utility of this method, we include a characterization of the wdr68 gene. We show that wdr68 acts upstream of the edn1 pathway and is also required for formation of the upper jaw equivalent, the palatoquadrate. We also present evidence that the level of wdr68 activity required for edn1 pathway function differs between the 1st and 2nd arches. Wdr68 interacts with two minibrain-related kinases, Dyrk1a and Dyrk1b, required for embryonic growth and myotube differentiation, respectively. We show that a GFP-Wdr68 fusion protein localizes to the nucleus with Dyrk1a in contrast to an engineered loss of function mutation Wdr68-T284F that no longer accumulated in the cell nucleus and failed to rescue wdr68 mutant animals. Wdr68 homologs appear to exist in all eukaryotic genomes. Notably, we found that the Drosophila wdr68 homolog CG14614 could substitute for the vertebrate wdr68 gene even though insects lack the NC cell lineage. Conclusion This work represents a systematic

  16. Hearing Loss in Children With Craniofacial Microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ryan M; Saltzman, Babette S; Norton, Susan J; Harrison, Robert G; Heike, Carrie L; Luquetti, Daniela V; Sie, Kathleen C Y

    2017-11-01

      To evaluate the association between craniofacial phenotype and hearing loss in children with craniofacial microsomia.   Retrospective cohort study.   Tertiary care children's hospital.   Individuals with craniofacial microsomia.   Ear-specific audiograms and standardized phenotypic classification of facial characteristics.   A total of 79 participants were included in the study. The mean age was 9 years (range, 1 to 23 years) and approximately 60% were boys. Facial anomalies were bilateral in 39 participants and unilateral in 40 participants (24 right, 16 left). Microtia (hypoplasia of the ear) was the most common feature (94%), followed by mandibular hypoplasia (76%), soft tissue deficiency (60%), orbital hypoplasia or displacement (53%), and facial nerve palsy (32%). Sixty-five individuals had hearing loss (12 bilateral and 53 unilateral). Hearing loss was conductive in 73% of affected ears, mixed in 10%, sensorineural in 1%, and indeterminate in 16%. Hypoplasia of the ear or mandible was frequently associated with ipsilateral hearing loss, although contralateral hearing loss occurred in 8% of hemifaces.   Hearing loss is strongly associated with malformations of the ipsilateral ear in craniofacial microsomia and is most commonly conductive. Hearing loss can occur contralaterally to the side with malformations in children with apparent hemifacial involvement. Children with craniofacial microsomia should receive early diagnostic hearing assessments.

  17. Craniofacial neurofibromatosis: treatment of the midface deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Dhruv; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Tsai, Yueh-Ju; Yu, Chung-Chih; Chen, Hung Chang; Chen, Yu-Ray; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting

    2014-07-01

    Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis is a benign but devastating disease. While the most common location of facial involvement is the orbito-temporal region, patients often present with significant mid-face deformities. We reviewed our experience with Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis from June 1981 to June 2011 and included patients with midface soft tissue deformities defined as gross alteration of nasal or upper lip symmetry. Data reviewed included the medical records and photobank. Over 30 years, 52 patients presented to and underwent surgical management for Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis at the Chang Gung Craniofacial Center. 23 patients (43%) demonstrated gross mid-facial deformities at initial evaluation. 55% of patients with lip deformities and 28% of patients with nasal deformities demonstrated no direct tumour involvement. The respective deformity was solely due to secondary gravitational effects from neurofibromas of the cheek subunit. Primary tumour infiltration of the nasal and/or labial subunits was treated with excision followed by various methods of reconstruction including lower lateral cartilage repositioning, forehead flaps, free flaps, and/or oral commissure suspension. Soft tissue deformities of the midface are very common in patients with Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis and profoundly affect overall aesthetic outcomes. Distinguishing primary from secondary involvement of the midface assists in surgical decision making. Copyright © 2013 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Craniofacial morphology and obstructive sleep apnoea : a cephalometric analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; Hovinga, B; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    The craniofacial morphology of 31 male patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) and 37 healthy male subjects were compared using cephalometric evaluation of lateral skull radiographs. The aim was to evaluate which cephalometric variables related to craniofacial morphology

  19. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Frederickson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best

  20. Craniofacial ontogeny in Centrosaurus apertus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederickson, Joseph A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Centrosaurus apertus, a large bodied ceratopsid from the Late Cretaceous of North America, is one of the most common fossils recovered from the Belly River Group. This fossil record shows a wide diversity in morphology and size, with specimens ranging from putative juveniles to fully-grown individuals. The goal of this study was to reconstruct the ontogenetic changes that occur in the craniofacial skeleton of C. apertus through a quantitative cladistic analysis. Forty-seven cranial specimens were independently coded in separate data matrices for 80 hypothetical multistate growth characters and 130 hypothetical binary growth characters. Both analyses yielded the max-limit of 100,000 most parsimonious saved trees and the strict consensus collapsed into large polytomies. In order to reduce conflict resulting from missing data, fragmentary individuals were removed and the analyses were rerun. Among both the complete and the reduced data sets the multistate analyses recovered a shorter tree with a higher consistency index (CI) than the additive binary data sets. The arrangement within the trees shows a progression of specimens with a recurved nasal horn in the least mature individuals, followed by specimens with straight nasal horns in relatively more mature individuals, and finally specimens with procurved nasal horns in the most mature individuals. The most mature individuals are further characterized by the reduction of the cranial horn ornamentations in late growth stages, a trait that similarly occurs in the growth of other dinosaurs. Bone textural changes were found to be sufficient proxies for relative maturity in individuals that have not reached adult size. Additionally, frill length is congruent with relative maturity status and makes an acceptable proxy for ontogenetic status, especially in smaller individuals. In adult-sized individuals, the fusion of the epiparietals and episquamosals and the orientation of the nasal horn are the best indicators of relative

  1. Making Headway: The Roles of Hox Genes and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Trainor

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  2. Unfavourable results with distraction in craniofacial skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distraction osteogenesis has revolutionised the management of craniofacial abnormalities. The technique however requires precise planning, patient selection, execution and follow-up to achieve consistent and positive results and to avoid unfavourable results. The unfavourable results with craniofacial distraction stem from many factors ranging from improper patient selection, planning and use of inappropriate distraction device and vector. The present study analyses the current standards and techniques of distraction and details in depth the various errors and complications that may occur due to this technique. The commonly observed complications of distraction have been detailed along with measures and suggestions to avoid them in clinical practice.

  3. Craniofacial characteristics of children with mild hypodontia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vucic, S.; Dhamo, B.; Kuijpers, M.A.R.; Jaddoe, V.W.; Hofman, A.; Wolvius, E.B.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of our study was to evaluate the craniofacial characteristics of children with mild hypodontia using conventional and principal component (PC) analysis. METHODS: We used radiographic images of 124 children (8-12 years old) with up to 4 missing teeth (55 boys, 69 girls) and of

  4. A mathematical model applied to craniofacial growth.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, Robert de

    1993-01-01

    Decisions are made by orthodontists on the basis of diagnostic and prognostic considerations. An intervention is made if the craniofacial complex displays atypicalities and the future development is expected to be more desirable with tiran without an intervention. The specification of the

  5. Discrimination among adults with craniofacial conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rachel M

    2014-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to establish the level of perceived discrimination experienced by adults with congenital craniofacial conditions in Australia and to examine predictors of discrimination. Specifically, this study tested whether social support mediates the relationship between discrimination and health. Adults (n = 93) who had been treated at the Australian Craniofacial Unit, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide for congenital craniofacial conditions (not including cleft lip and/or palate) completed questionnaires examining satisfaction with life, quality of life, anxiety and depression, self-esteem, satisfaction with social support, and satisfaction with appearance. A substantial minority of adults with congenital craniofacial conditions reported that they experience discrimination almost every day in a range of areas. Higher reports of discrimination were related to older age, being male, and less education. Other factors related to higher discrimination included lower levels of satisfaction with life, self-esteem, satisfaction with appearance and mental quality of life, as well as higher levels of anxiety and depression. Social support partially mediated the relationship between discrimination and mental health outcomes. The current study shows that discrimination experiences continue into adulthood confirming the importance of ensuring patients are well supported both by psychosocial services as well as within their own social support networks.

  6. Immigrants into society. Children with craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, S H; Bernstein, N R; Kapp, K A

    1981-01-01

    Some of the adaptive coping styles of children with craniofacial anomalies are discussed. Three cases of children with microtia are described to illustrate developmental pathways used in adapting to their deformities. The complexity of the chronic medical and psychological challenges these children face is illustrated and discussed. In contrast to previous frameworks dealing with the problems of deviance and stigmatization, we use a psychological historical framework, drawing an analogy to Handlin's work on immigration. These children are born into a world that considers them strange and abhorent. They can be considered aliens entering a society of normal, non-disfigured people. The craniofacial center is conceptualized as a "naturalization" office where highly valued health care professionals are counted upon to reconstruct facial appearance and function. An enduring attachment and bonding process to the staff takes place, and the center becomes of considerable importance to the craniofacial patient's identity. The craniofacial patient often has to carry the pain of social isolation and stigma. Physicians caring for these children should be cognizant of their coping styles; so that development can be directed to move away from deviance to successful "immigration into the country of normals" and adaptation to life.

  7. Prevention of craniofacial injuries in ice hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldi, C R

    1991-10-01

    Prior to 1975, craniofacial injuries were the most frequent of all ice hockey injuries. Through the cooperative efforts of hockey administrators, health professionals, sports standards organizations, and the introduction of mandatory protective equipment playing rules craniofacial injuries in youth, high school, and college hockey players in the United States have been almost eliminated. Blind eye injuries, once a major problem, no longer occur in players wearing certified full face protectors. The saving in health care costs for treating eye injuries alone is estimated to be upwards of $10 million annually. Despite the phenomenal success of amateur hockey organizations in eliminating most craniofacial injuries, such injuries continue to occur in recreational, "Old Timers," major junior, and professional hockey players because of failure to use the most effective types of protective equipment. The system established in the United States for preventing craniofacial injuries in the sports of ice hockey that involves youth, high school, and college hockey associations along with standards setting and certification procedures can serve as a model for all amateur sports throughout the world.

  8. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  9. Craniofacial Neurofibromatosis: a case report | Onyenyirionwu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a 21 year old boy with Neurofibromatosis (NF 1-GROUP 1) affecting the craniofacial region and hoe he was subsequently managed to emphasize that the condition is a complicated one and should be dealt with by those experienced with this condition. Jnl of Med Investigation & Practice Vol.3 2001: 12-14 ...

  10. Circulatory CNP Rescues Craniofacial Hypoplasia in Achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, S; Nakao, Kazumasa; Koyama, N; Isobe, Y; Ueda, Y; Kanai, Y; Kondo, E; Fujii, T; Miura, M; Yasoda, A; Nakao, Kazuwa; Bessho, K

    2017-12-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common genetic form of human dwarfism, characterized by midfacial hypoplasia resulting in occlusal abnormality and foramen magnum stenosis, leading to serious neurologic complications and hydrocephalus. Currently, surgery is the only way to manage jaw deformity, neurologic complications, and hydrocephalus in patients with achondroplasia. We previously showed that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a potent stimulator of endochondral bone growth of long bones and vertebrae and is also a potent stimulator in the craniofacial region, which is crucial for midfacial skeletogenesis. In this study, we analyzed craniofacial morphology in a mouse model of achondroplasia, in which fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) is specifically activated in cartilage ( Fgfr3ach mice), and investigated the mechanisms of jaw deformities caused by this mutation. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of CNP on the maxillofacial area in these animals. Fgfr3ach mice exhibited midfacial hypoplasia, especially in the sagittal direction, caused by impaired endochondral ossification in craniofacial cartilage and by premature closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis, an important growth center in craniomaxillofacial skeletogenesis. We crossed Fgfr3ach mice with transgenic mice in which CNP is expressed in the liver under the control of the human serum amyloid-P component promoter, resulting in elevated levels of circulatory CNP ( Fgfr3ach/SAP-Nppc-Tg mice). In the progeny, midfacial hypoplasia in the sagittal direction observed in Fgfr3ach mice was improved significantly by restoring the thickness of synchondrosis and promoting proliferation of chondrocytes in the craniofacial cartilage. In addition, the foramen magnum stenosis observed in Fgfr3ach mice was significantly ameliorated in Fgfr3ach/SAP-Nppc-Tg mice due to enhanced endochondral bone growth of the anterior intraoccipital synchondrosis. These results clearly demonstrate the therapeutic potential of

  11. Elastic Properties of Chimpanzee Craniofacial Cortical Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharpure, Poorva; Kontogiorgos, Elias D; Opperman, Lynne A; Ross, Callum F; Strait, David S; Smith, Amanda; Pryor, Leslie C; Wang, Qian; Dechow, Paul C

    2016-12-01

    Relatively few assessments of cranial biomechanics formally take into account variation in the material properties of cranial cortical bone. Our aim was to characterize the elastic properties of chimpanzee craniofacial cortical bone and compare these to the elastic properties of dentate human craniofacial cortical bone. From seven cranial regions, 27 cylindrical samples were harvested from each of five chimpanzee crania. Assuming orthotropy, axes of maximum stiffness in the plane of the cortical plate were derived using modified equations of Hooke's law in a Mathcad program. Consistent orientations among individuals were observed in the zygomatic arch and alveolus. The density of cortical bone showed significant regional variation (P  E2  > E1 . Shear moduli were significantly different among regions (P < 0.001). The pattern by which chimpanzee cranial cortical bone varies in elastic properties resembled that seen in humans, perhaps suggesting that the elastic properties of craniofacial bone in fossil hominins can be estimated with at least some degree of confidence. Anat Rec, 299:1718-1733, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Nanomaterials for Craniofacial and Dental Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Zhou, T; Lin, S; Shi, S; Lin, Y

    2017-07-01

    Tissue engineering shows great potential as a future treatment for the craniofacial and dental defects caused by trauma, tumor, and other diseases. Due to the biomimetic features and excellent physiochemical properties, nanomaterials are of vital importance in promoting cell growth and stimulating tissue regeneration in tissue engineering. For craniofacial and dental tissue engineering, the frequently used nanomaterials include nanoparticles, nanofibers, nanotubes, and nanosheets. Nanofibers are attractive for cell invasion and proliferation because of their resemblance to extracellular matrix and the presence of large pores, and they have been used as scaffolds in bone, cartilage, and tooth regeneration. Nanotubes and nanoparticles improve the mechanical and chemical properties of scaffold, increase cell attachment and migration, and facilitate tissue regeneration. In addition, nanofibers and nanoparticles are also used as a delivery system to carry the bioactive agent in bone and tooth regeneration, have better control of the release speed of agent upon degradation of the matrix, and promote tissue regeneration. Although applications of nanomaterials in tissue engineering remain in their infancy with numerous challenges to face, the current results indicate that nanomaterials have massive potential in craniofacial and dental tissue engineering.

  13. Craniofacial and Dental Findings in Cystinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassim, CW; Gautam, P; Domingo, DL; Balog, JZ; Guadagnini, JP; Gahl, WA; Hart, TC

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder with developmental and mineralization anomalies as part of its clinical presentation. The objective of this study was to provide the first systematic assessment of the craniofacial and dental characteristics associated with cystinosis. Study Design Oral and radiographic evaluations were performed on 73 patients with cystinosis. Analyses of cephalometry (n=20), taurodontism (n=47), caries (n=47), enamel defects (n=48), soft tissue anomalies (n=48), and dental age (n=41) were performed on the cystinosis group, and compared with age- and sex- comparable controls or standards. Results Cystinosis patients manifested relative mandibular deficiency, an increased facial height, and a reduced airway space. Taurodontism and enamel defects were significantly more prevalent in cystinosis patients compared with controls (p<0.0001 and p=0.027, respectively). Children (aged < 15 years) with cystinosis also demonstrated a significant delay, of almost 9 months, of their dental development (p<0.001). Conclusion Novel craniofacial and dental features are associated with cystinosis. Craniofacial deficiencies may influence the swallowing and respiratory complications seen in cystinosis. Renal pathology and associated mineral imbalance may explain the dental root and enamel anomalies found in cystinosis patients; the developmental delays in cystinosis include delayed dental formation. PMID:20233313

  14. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES. METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%. Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%, abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%, prominent occiput (52%, posteriorly rotated (46% and low set ears (44%, and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%. Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%, orofacial clefts (12%, preauricular tags (10%, facial palsy (4%, encephalocele (4%, absence of external auditory canal (2% and asymmetric face (2%. One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature.

  15. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano M.; Rosa, Rosana Cardoso M.; Lorenzen, Marina Boff; Zen, Paulo Ricardo G.; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES). METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%). Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%), abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%), prominent occiput (52%), posteriorly rotated (46%) and low set ears (44%), and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%). Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%), orofacial clefts (12%), preauricular tags (10%), facial palsy (4%), encephalocele (4%), absence of external auditory canal (2%) and asymmetric face (2%). One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS) or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature. PMID:24142310

  16. Analysis of Craniofacial Images using Computational Atlases and Deformation Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Ólafsdóttir, Hildur; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Larsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The topic of this thesis is automatic analysis of craniofacial images. The methods proposed and applied contribute to the scientific knowledge about different craniofacial anomalies, in addition to providing tools for detailed and robust analysis of craniofacial images for clinical and research purposes. The basis for most of the applications is non-rigid image registration. This approach brings one image into the coordinate system of another resulting in a deformation field describing the an...

  17. Craniofacial similarity analysis through sparse principal component analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli Zhao

    Full Text Available The computer-aided craniofacial reconstruction (CFR technique has been widely used in the fields of criminal investigation, archaeology, anthropology and cosmetic surgery. The evaluation of craniofacial reconstruction results is important for improving the effect of craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we used the sparse principal component analysis (SPCA method to evaluate the similarity between two sets of craniofacial data. Compared with principal component analysis (PCA, SPCA can effectively reduce the dimensionality and simultaneously produce sparse principal components with sparse loadings, thus making it easy to explain the results. The experimental results indicated that the evaluation results of PCA and SPCA are consistent to a large extent. To compare the inconsistent results, we performed a subjective test, which indicated that the result of SPCA is superior to that of PCA. Most importantly, SPCA can not only compare the similarity of two craniofacial datasets but also locate regions of high similarity, which is important for improving the craniofacial reconstruction effect. In addition, the areas or features that are important for craniofacial similarity measurements can be determined from a large amount of data. We conclude that the craniofacial contour is the most important factor in craniofacial similarity evaluation. This conclusion is consistent with the conclusions of psychological experiments on face recognition and our subjective test. The results may provide important guidance for three- or two-dimensional face similarity evaluation, analysis and face recognition.

  18. Orthodontics and foetal pathology: a personal view on craniofacial patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the essentials of studies on the craniofacial skeleton performed over 17 years. It presents data from research into foetal pathology resulting in new views on craniofacial patterning and/or fields for further discussion. The fields described cover all areas seen on profile...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control the activity of other genes and cannot regulate the differentiation of neural crest cells. A lack of specialization of neural crest cells leads to the impaired growth of craniofacial bones, nerve tissue, and muscles seen in craniofacial-deafness-hand ...

  20. Craniofacial dysmorphology: Studies in honor of Samuel Pruzansky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, M.M.; Rollnick, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 31 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Regional Specification of Cell-Specific Gene Expression During Craniofacial Development; Timing Cleft Palate Closure - Age Should Not Be the Sole Determinant; Excess of Parental Non-Righthandedness in Children with Right-Sided Cleft Lip: A Preliminary Report; and The Application of Roentgencephalometry to the Study of Craniofacial Anomalies.

  1. Achondroplasia: Craniofacial manifestations and considerations in dental management

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Saleem, Afnan; Al-Jobair, Asma

    2010-01-01

    Achondroplasia is the most common form of skeletal dysplasia dwarfism that manifests with stunted stature and disproportionate limb shortening. Achondroplasia is of dental interest because of its characteristic craniofacial features which include relative macrocephaly, depressed nasal bridge and maxillary hypoplasia. Presence of large head, implanted shunt, airway obstruction and difficulty in head control require special precautions during dental management. Craniofacial manifestations and c...

  2. Photographic protocol for image acquisition in craniofacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heike, Carrie L; Stueckle, Laura P; Stuhaug, Erik T; Pimenta, Luiz A; Drake, Amelia F; Vivaldi, Daniela; Sie, Kathleen C Y; Birgfeld, Craig B

    2011-12-30

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital condition associated with orbital, mandibular, ear, nerve, and soft tissue anomalies. We present a standardized, two-dimensional, digital photographic protocol designed to capture the common craniofacial features associated with CFM. © 2011 Heike et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  3. Serotonin 2B receptor signaling is required for craniofacial morphogenesis and jaw joint formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisoli, Elisa; De Lucchini, Stefania; Nardi, Irma; Ori, Michela

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a neuromodulator that plays many different roles in adult and embryonic life. Among the 5-HT receptors, 5-HT2B is one of the key mediators of 5-HT functions during development. We used Xenopus laevis as a model system to further investigate the role of 5-HT2B in embryogenesis, focusing on craniofacial development. By means of gene gain- and loss-of-function approaches and tissue transplantation assays, we demonstrated that 5-HT2B modulates, in a cell-autonomous manner, postmigratory skeletogenic cranial neural crest cell (NCC) behavior without altering early steps of cranial NCC development and migration. 5-HT2B overexpression induced the formation of an ectopic visceral skeletal element and altered the dorsoventral patterning of the branchial arches. Loss-of-function experiments revealed that 5-HT2B signaling is necessary for jaw joint formation and for shaping the mandibular arch skeletal elements. In particular, 5-HT2B signaling is required to define and sustain the Xbap expression necessary for jaw joint formation. To shed light on the molecular identity of the transduction pathway acting downstream of 5-HT2B, we analyzed the function of phospholipase C beta 3 (PLC) in Xenopus development and showed that PLC is the effector of 5-HT2B during craniofacial development. Our results unveiled an unsuspected role of 5-HT2B in craniofacial development and contribute to our understanding of the interactive network of patterning signals that is involved in the development and evolution of the vertebrate mandibular arch.

  4. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from pluripotent stem cells through a neural crest lineage using small molecule compounds with defined media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Fukuta

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCCs are an embryonic migratory cell population with the ability to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types that contribute to the craniofacial skeleton, cornea, peripheral nervous system, and skin pigmentation. This ability suggests the promising role of NCCs as a source for cell-based therapy. Although several methods have been used to induce human NCCs (hNCCs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, further modifications are required to improve the robustness, efficacy, and simplicity of these methods. Chemically defined medium (CDM was used as the basal medium in the induction and maintenance steps. By optimizing the culture conditions, the combination of the GSK3β inhibitor and TGFβ inhibitor with a minimum growth factor (insulin very efficiently induced hNCCs (70-80% from hPSCs. The induced hNCCs expressed cranial NCC-related genes and stably proliferated in CDM supplemented with EGF and FGF2 up to at least 10 passages without changes being observed in the major gene expression profiles. Differentiation properties were confirmed for peripheral neurons, glia, melanocytes, and corneal endothelial cells. In addition, cells with differentiation characteristics similar to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were induced from hNCCs using CDM specific for human MSCs. Our simple and robust induction protocol using small molecule compounds with defined media enabled the generation of hNCCs as an intermediate material producing terminally differentiated cells for cell-based innovative medicine.

  5. Mesenchymal fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling regulates palatal shelf elevation during secondary palate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Karuppaiah, Kannan; Ornitz, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Palatal shelf elevation is an essential morphogenetic process during secondary palate closure and failure or delay of palatal shelf elevation is a common cause of cleft palate, one of the most common birth defects in humans. Here, we studied the role of mesenchymal fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling during palate development by conditional inactivation of Fgfrs using a mesenchyme-specific Dermo1-Cre driver. We showed that Fgfr1 is expressed throughout the palatal mesenchyme and Fgfr2 is expressed in the medial aspect of the posterior palatal mesenchyme overlapping with Fgfr1. Mesenchyme-specific disruption of Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 affected palatal shelf elevation and resulted in cleft palate. We further showed that both Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 are expressed in mesenchymal tissues of the mandibular process but display distinct expression patterns. Loss of mesenchymal FGFR signaling reduced mandibular ossification and lower jaw growth resulting in abnormal tongue insertion in the oral-nasal cavity. We propose a model to explain how redundant Fgfr1 and Fgfr2 expression in the palatal and mandibular mesenchyme regulates shelf medial wall protrusion and growth of the mandible to coordinate the craniofacial tissue movements that are required for palatal shelf elevation. PMID:26250517

  6. Novel composite implant in craniofacial bone reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Matti J; Vallittu, Pekka K; Vuorinen, Ville; Aho, Allan A J; Puntala, Antti; Aitasalo, Kalle M J

    2012-02-01

    Bioactive glass (BAG) and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) have been used in clinical applications. Antimicrobial BAG has the ability to attach chemically to surrounding bone, but it is not possible to bend, drill or shape BAG during the operation. PMMA has advantages in terms of shaping during the operation, but it does not attach chemically to the bone and is an exothermic material. To increase the usefulness of BAG and PMMA in skull bone defect reconstructions, a new composite implant containing BAG and PMMA in craniofacial reconstructions is presented. Three patients had pre-existing large defects in the calvarial and one in the midface area. An additive manufacturing (AM) model was used preoperatively for treatment planning and custom-made implant production. The trunk of the PMMA implant was coated with BAG granules. Clinical and radiological follow-up was performed postoperatively at 1 week, and 3, 6 and 12 months, and thereafter annually up to 5 years. Computer tomography (CT) and positron emission tomography (PET-CT) were performed at 12 and 24 months postoperatively. Uneventful clinical recovery with good esthetic and functional outcome was seen. CT and PET-CT findings supported good clinical outcome. The BAG-PMMA implant seems to be a promising craniofacial reconstruction alternative. However, more clinical experience is needed.

  7. Importance of deubiquitinases in zebrafish craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, William Ka Fai

    2017-06-10

    Deconjugation of ubiquitin and/or ubiqutin-like modified substrates is essential to maintain a sufficient free ubiquitin within the cell. Deubiquitinases (DUBs) play a key role in the process. Besides, DUBs also play several important regulatory roles in cellular processes. However, our knowledge of their developmental roles are limited. The report here aims to study their potential roles in craniofacial development. Based on the previous genome-wide study in 2009, we selected 36 DUBs to perform the morpholino (MO) knockdown in this study, followed by the Alcian blue cartilage staining at 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) larvae to investigate the facial development. Results classified the tested DUBs into three groups, in which 28% showed unchanged phenotype (Class 1); 22% showed mild changes on the branchial arches (Class 2A); 31% had malformation on branchial arches and ethmoid plate (Class 2B); and 19% had severe changes in most of the facial structures (Class 3). Lastly, we used uchl3 morphant as an example to show that our screening data could be useful for further functional studies. To summarize, we identified new craniofacial developmental role of 26 DUBs in the zebrafish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9)-pituitary homeobox 2 (PITX2) pathway mediates transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling to regulate cell proliferation in palatal mesenchyme during mouse palatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Tung, Lily; Urata, Mark; Hacia, Joseph G; Pelikan, Richard; Suzuki, Akiko; Ramenzoni, Liza; Chaudhry, Obaid; Parada, Carolina; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A; Chai, Yang

    2012-01-20

    Cleft palate represents one of the most common congenital birth defects. Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling plays crucial functions in regulating craniofacial development, and loss of TGFβ receptor type II in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial malformations, including cleft palate in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice). Here we have identified candidate target genes of TGFβ signaling during palatal formation. These target genes were selected based on combining results from gene expression profiles of embryonic day 14.5 palates from Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice and previously identified cleft palate phenotypes in genetically engineered mouse models. We found that fibroblast growth factor 9 (Fgf9) and transcription factor pituitary homeobox 2 (Pitx2) expressions are significantly down-regulated in the palate of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice, and Fgf9 and Pitx2 loss of function mutations result in cleft palate in mice. Pitx2 expression is down-regulated by siRNA knockdown of Fgf9, suggesting that Fgf9 is upstream of Pitx2. We detected decreased expression of both cyclins D1 and D3 in the palates of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice, consistent with the defect in cell proliferation. Significantly, exogenous FGF9 restores expression of cyclins D1 and D3 in a Pitx2-dependent manner and rescues the cell proliferation defect in the palatal mesenchyme of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Our study indicates that a TGFβ-FGF9-PITX2 signaling cascade regulates cranial neural crest cell proliferation during palate formation.

  9. Craniofacial morphology in unoperated infants with isolated cleft palate. A cephalometric analysis in three projections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N.V.; Kreiborg, S.; Jensen, B.L.

    58th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, Minneapolis, Craniofacial morphology, unoperated infants, isolated cleft palate, cephalometric analysis, three projections......58th Annual Meeting of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association, Minneapolis, Craniofacial morphology, unoperated infants, isolated cleft palate, cephalometric analysis, three projections...

  10. Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolarová, Marie M; Poulton, Donald; Aubert, Maryse M; Oh, HeeSoo; Ellerhorst, Thomas; Mosby, Terezie; Tolar, Miroslav; Boyd, Robert L

    2006-10-01

    There is no doubt modern genetics have greatly influenced our professional and personal lives during the last decade. Uncovering genetic causes of many medical and dental pathologies is helping to narrow the diagnosis and select a treatment plan that would provide the best outcome. Importantly, having an understanding of multifactorial etiology helps direct our attention toward prevention. We now understand much better our own health problems. In some cases, we can modify our lifestyle and diet in order to prevent "environmental factors" from triggering the mutated genes inherited from our parents. Good examples are diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. If we realize we might have inherited genes for cardiovascular problems from several ancestors who had heart attacks, we already know that these genes will make us only "susceptible" for disease. Those who exercise, watch one's weight, diet, and carefully monitor one's lifestyle will very likely--though possessing "susceptibility genes"--stay healthier and, maybe, will never experience any cardiovascular problems. In principle, the same applies for craniofacial anomalies, especially for nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate. One needs to understand genetic and environmental causes of nonsyndromic orofacial clefts in order to prevent them. With all this in mind, the Pacific Craniofacial Team and Cleft Prevention Program have been established at the Department of Orthodontics, University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco. A partnership with Rotaplast International, Inc., has made it possible for the faculty, orthodontic residents, and students to participate in 27 multidisciplinary cleft medical missions in underdeveloped and developing countries by donating professional and educational services, and, last but not least, by collecting valuable data and specimens to further research. A significant number of research studies, including 15 master of science theses, have been accomplished in

  11. E-cigarette aerosol exposure can cause craniofacial defects in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Since electronic cigarette (ECIG introduction to American markets in 2007, vaping has surged in popularity. Many, including women of reproductive age, also believe that ECIG use is safer than traditional tobacco cigarettes and is not hazardous when pregnant. However, there are few studies investigating the effects of ECIG exposure on the developing embryo and nothing is known about potential effects on craniofacial development. Therefore, we have tested the effects of several aerosolized e-cigarette liquids (e-cigAM in an in vivo craniofacial model, Xenopus laevis, as well as a mammalian neural crest cell line. Results demonstrate that e-cigAM exposure during embryonic development induces a variety of defects, including median facial clefts and midface hypoplasia in two of e-cigAMs tested e-cigAMs. Detailed quantitative analyses of the facial morphology revealed that nicotine is not the main factor in inducing craniofacial defects, but can exacerbate the effects of the other e-liquid components. Additionally, while two different e-cigAMs can have very similar consequences on facial appearances, there are subtle differences that could be due to the differences in e-cigAM components. Further assessment of embryos exposed to these particular e-cigAMs revealed cranial cartilage and muscle defects and a reduction in the blood supply to the face. Finally, the expression of markers for vascular and cartilage differentiation was reduced in a mammalian neural crest cell line corroborating the in vivo effects. Our work is the first to show that ECIG use could pose a potential hazard to the developing embryo and cause craniofacial birth defects. This emphasizes the need for more testing and regulation of this new popular product.

  12. Bone tissue bioprinting for craniofacial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Pallab; Ozbolat, Veli; Ayan, Bugra; Dhawan, Aman; Ozbolat, Ibrahim T

    2017-11-01

    Craniofacial (CF) tissue is an architecturally complex tissue consisting of both bone and soft tissues with significant patient specific variations. Conditions of congenital abnormalities, tumor resection surgeries, and traumatic injuries of the CF skeleton can result in major deficits of bone tissue. Despite advances in surgical reconstruction techniques, management of CF osseous deficits remains a challenge. Due its inherent versatility, bioprinting offers a promising solution to address these issues. In this review, we present and analyze the current state of bioprinting of bone tissue and highlight how these techniques may be adapted to serve regenerative therapies for CF applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 2424-2431. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Third molar agenesis and craniofacial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, María José; Vicente, Ascensión; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-05-01

    To test the null hypothesis that agenesis of wisdom teeth is not related with any particular craniofacial morphology. Ninety-seven patients (aged 13-19 years) were selected and divided into three groups: (1) bilateral agenesis of maxillary third molars, (2) bilateral agenesis of mandibular third molars, and (3) control group without agenesis. Presence or absence of third molars was determined using ortopantomographs. Cephalometric analysis was carried out from lateral teleradiographs, which included linear, angular, and proportional measurements. When data obtained were distributed normally it was analyzed by means of single-factor variance analysis and the Scheffé test (P classification in 58.8% of cases. The hypothesis is rejected. Agenesis of the maxillary third molars was related to a reduced mandibular plane angle. Patients with agenesis of the mandibular third molars showed a diminished lower third and a mandibular morphology characteristic of the brachyfacial pattern.

  14. Vertical Craniofacial Morphology and its Relation to Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavia, Paula Furlan; Rodrigues Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the association between craniofacial morphology and temporomandibular disorders in adults. The influence of different craniofacial morphologies on painful temporomandibular disorders was also evaluated. A total of 200 subjects were selected, including 100 with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and 100 without TMD (control), diagnosed by research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders. All subjects were submitted to lateral cephalometric radiographs, and classified as brachyfacial, mesofacial, or dolichofacial by Ricketts' analysis. Data were analysed by Tukey-Kramer and Chi-square tests. No association between craniofacial morphology and TMD was found (P = 0.6622). However, brachyfacial morphology influences the presence of painful TMD (P = 0.0077). Craniofacial morphology is not related to temporomandibular disorders in general.

  15. Associations between the Cervical Vertebral Column and Craniofacial Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To summarize recent studies on morphological deviations of the cervical vertebral column and associations with craniofacial morphology and head posture in nonsyndromic patients and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Design. In these recent studies, visual assessment of the cerv......Aim. To summarize recent studies on morphological deviations of the cervical vertebral column and associations with craniofacial morphology and head posture in nonsyndromic patients and in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Design. In these recent studies, visual assessment...... of the cervical vertebral column and cephalometric analysis of the craniofacial skeleton were performed on profile radiographs of subjects with neutral occlusion, patients with severe skeletal malocclusions and patients with OSA. Material from human triploid foetuses and mouse embryos was analysed histologically....... Results. Recent studies have documented associations between fusion of the cervical vertebral column and craniofacial morphology, including head posture in patients with severe skeletal malocclusions. Histological studies on prenatal material supported these findings. Conclusion. It is suggested...

  16. Craniofacial morphological differences between Down syndrome and maxillary deficiency children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silva Jesuino, Flávia Aline; Valladares-Neto, José

    2013-01-01

    Maxillary deficiency is one of the facial features of Down syndrome (DS). Differences in craniofacial morphology between DS and nonsyndromic skeletal Class III malocclusion with maxillary deficiency remain unclear...

  17. The influence of craniofacial morphology on mandibular border movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Tomoki; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Shiraga, Noriko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Deguchi, Toru; Miyawaki, Shouichi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Although they are widely used as diagnostic signs of temporomandibular disorders, mandibular border movements reflect not only condylar movement, but also other factors. In the present study, the authors investigated the effect of craniofacial morphology on three different mandibular border movements: maximum jaw opening, maximum jaw protrusion, and maximum jaw laterotrusion. One hundred female subjects were selected from outpatients visiting the orthodontic clinic of Okayama University Hospital. The mandibular border movements were measured using an optical recording system in three dimensions as six degrees of freedom. The craniofacial morphology was evaluated using lateral cephalograms. The results suggest that craniofacial morphology had different influences on each mandibular border movement. In particular, during maximum jaw laterotrusion, lower incisor movement strongly reflected condylar movement, and the influence of craniofacial morphology on mandibular border movement was minimal. Therefore, lower incisor movement during maximum jaw laterotrusion appears suitable to evaluate condylar movement.

  18. Stem cells: Update and impact on craniofacial surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, Benjamin; Glotzbach, Jason; Wong, Victor; Nelson, Emily; Hyun, Jeong; Wan, Derrick C.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    With the rapidly expanding field of tissue engineering, surgeons have been eager to apply these principles to craniofacial surgery. Tissue engineering strategies combine the use of a cell type placed on a scaffold and subsequently implanted in vivo to address a tissue defect or tissue dysfunction. In this review we will discuss the current clinical need for skeletal and soft tissue engineering faced by craniofacial surgeons and subsequently we will explore cell types and scaffold designs bein...

  19. The aponeurotic tension model of craniofacial growth in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standerwick, Richard G; Roberts, W Eugene

    2009-05-22

    Craniofacial growth is a scientific crossroad for the fundamental mechanisms of musculoskeletal physiology. Better understanding of growth and development will provide new insights into repair, regeneration and adaptation to applied loads. Traditional craniofacial growth concepts are insufficient to explain the dynamics of airway/vocal tract development, cranial rotation, basicranial flexion and the role of the cranial base in expression of facial proportions. A testable hypothesis is needed to explore the physiological pressure propelling midface growth and the role of neural factors in expression of musculoskeletal adaptation after the cessation of anterior cranial base growth. A novel model for craniofacial growth is proposed for: 1. brain growth and craniofacial adaptation up to the age of 20; 2. explaining growth force vectors; 3. defining the role of muscle plasticity as a conduit for craniofacial growth forces; and 4. describing the effect of cranial rotation in the expression of facial form.Growth of the viscerocranium is believed to be influenced by the superficial musculoaponeurotic systems (SMAS) of the head through residual tension in the occipitofrontalis muscle as a result of cephalad brain growth and cranial rotation. The coordinated effects of the regional SMAS develop a craniofacial musculoaponeurotic system (CFMAS), which is believed to affect maxillary and mandibular development.

  20. Gender and Satisfaction with Appearance in Children with Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Danielle N; Waljee, Jennifer; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Buchman, Steven; Warschausky, Seth

    2015-12-01

    Although children with craniofacial anomalies appear to have relatively high self-esteem, research has identified gender differences in psychosocial outcomes, including self-concept, suggesting that girls with craniofacial anomalies may be at an increased risk. In addition, though parents make important medical and aesthetic decisions for their children, it is unclear whether they are attuned to their children's perceptions of their appearance. The current study assessed self-ratings and parent proxy ratings of child satisfaction with the appearance of both the face and the body among 74 children with craniofacial anomalies (50 percent boys). Data were collected in a multidisciplinary clinic setting. The authors identified that ratings provided by parents and children, and particularly parents and daughters, were uncorrelated. Furthermore, whereas girls' dissatisfaction with the appearance of their faces was associated with negative psychosocial outcomes, these associations were not significant among boys. Finally, results obtained for satisfaction with the appearance of the face were largely replicated for satisfaction with appearance of the body, suggesting that children with craniofacial anomalies and their parents may apply more holistic criteria to evaluating their appearance. Considered together, the findings of this study highlight the importance of engaging both parents and children in discussions about craniofacial anomalies and possible reconstruction and suggest the need for future research on the intersection of gender and craniofacial anomalies in child psychosocial functioning.

  1. Opinion leaders and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby D; Papay, Frank A; Moores, Neal; Meisler, Eileen; Zins, James E

    2014-01-01

    In health care, it is widely known that evidence-based medicine (EBM) has a significant impact on clinical practice, and opinion leaders can enhance the clinician's application of EBM in various disciplines. In this article, we examine the existence and impact of opinion leaders in craniofacial surgery as well as barriers to evidence-based practice. We compiled the answers of an Internet questionnaire, which was sent to 102 craniofacial surgeons. Our results demonstrate that opinion leaders most definitely can be identified in craniofacial surgery. They are tightly connected to their field's social network and promote EBM. In this survey, 44% of craniofacial surgeons reported that their greatest obstacle to clinical decision making in the management of nonsyndromic synostosis was lack of surgical consensus. In addition, craniofacial surgeons stated that EBM and opinion leaders are the most influential factors that caused them to change their management of craniosynostosis. We expect that the use of opinion leaders can further enhance the uptake of EBM in craniofacial surgery.

  2. THE OLD AND NEW FACE OF CRANIOFACIAL RESEARCH: How animal models inform human craniofacial genetic and clinical data

    OpenAIRE

    Van Otterloo, Eric; Williams, Trevor; Artinger, Kristin B.

    2016-01-01

    The craniofacial skeletal structures that comprise the human head develop from multiple tissues that converge to form the bones and cartilage of the face. Because of their complex development and morphogenesis, many human birth defects arise due to disruptions in these cellular populations. Thus, determining how these structures normally develop is vital if we are to gain a deeper understanding of craniofacial birth defects and devise treatment and prevention options. In this review, we will ...

  3. Telomere stability and telomerase in mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Graakjaer, Jesper; Kølvrå, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive genetic material that cap and thereby protect the ends of chromosomes. Each time a cell divides, telomeres get shorter. Telomere length is mainly maintained by telomerase. This enzyme is present in high concentrations in the embryonic stem cells and in fast growing...... embryonic cells, and declines with age. It is still unclear to what extent there is telomerase in adult stem cells, but since these are the founder cells of cells of all the tissues in the body, understanding the telomere dynamics and expression of telomerase in adult stem cells is very important....... In the present communication we focus on telomere expression and telomere length in stem cells, with a special focus on mesenchymal stem cells. We consider different mechanisms by which stem cells can maintain telomeres and also focus on the dynamics of telomere length in mesenchymal stem cells, both the overall...

  4. Craniofacial morphology in unilateral hemifacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongkosuwito, E M; van Neck, J W; Wattel, E; van Adrichem, L N; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M

    2013-12-01

    Hemifacial microsomia (HFM) is a complex three-dimensional congenital condition that is characterized by mandibular hypoplasia and unilateral or bilateral microtia; although, other facial structures may be affected. Little is known about craniofacial growth and morphology in patients with HFM; therefore, we examined 75 HFM patients by means of a cephalometric analysis in a longitudinal study on serial lateral cephalograms. We hypothesized that the growth of several facial structures on both sides of HFM patients would be different compared to Dutch controls. We determined patients with HFM had more retruded mandibles and maxillae and a more vertical morphology compared to the reference population. In addition, there was a more retruded and vertical pattern on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and in patients with a severe condition compared to those with a mild condition. 'Mild' HFM patients were more similar to the Dutch reference population than the 'severe' HFM patients. Individual HFM growth curves showed very high inter-variability, further strengthening the need for individualized treatment plans that consider all three dimensions and the severity of the condition. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Distinguishing Goldenhar Syndrome from Craniofacial Microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuin, Jorien; Tahiri, Youssef; Paliga, James T; Taylor, Jesse A; Bartlett, Scott P

    2015-09-01

    Goldenhar syndrome is characterized by the typical features of craniofacial microsomia (CFM) with the addition of epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies. The aim of this study is to examine the objective differences between patients carrying a diagnosis of Goldenhar syndrome to those diagnosed with CFM. Thus, we performed an Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective chart review on all patients who presented with a diagnosis of CFM or Goldenhar syndrome from January 1990 to December 2012. Demographic, diagnosis, OMENS+ classification, accompanying diagnoses, and radiographic data were collected. For subjective analysis, subgroups were designed based on the diagnosis Goldenhar syndrome or CFM per history. For objective analysis, subgroups were designed based on the presence of epibulbar dermoids and/or vertebral anomalies. The cohorts were compared with respect to associated medical abnormalities and severity of CFM features. One hundred thirty eight patients met inclusion criteria. Epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies were seen in 17% and 34% of the patients, respectively. Only 10 patients (7.2%) had both epibulbar dermoids and vertebral anomalies. The subjective "Goldenhar" group (N = 44, 32%) was found to have a higher percentage of bilaterally affected patients (P = 0.001), a more severe mandibular deformity (P = Goldenhar syndrome remain unclear, thereby making clinical use of the term "Goldenhar" inconsequential. Goldenhar syndrome is over diagnosed subjectively in patients who show more severe CFM features.

  6. Differences in neural crest sensitivity to ethanol account for the infrequency of anterior segment defects in the eye compared with craniofacial anomalies in a zebrafish model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Jessica; Williams, Antionette L; Chawla, Bahaar; Apsey, Christian; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2017-09-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) exposure during pregnancy is associated with craniofacial and neurologic abnormalities, but infrequently disrupts the anterior segment of the eye. In these studies, we used zebrafish to investigate differences in the teratogenic effect of ETOH on craniofacial, periocular, and ocular neural crest. Zebrafish eye and neural crest development was analyzed by means of live imaging, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay, immunostaining, detection of reactive oxygen species, and in situ hybridization. Our studies demonstrated that foxd3-positive neural crest cells in the periocular mesenchyme and developing eye were less sensitive to ETOH than sox10-positive craniofacial neural crest cells that form the pharyngeal arches and jaw. ETOH increased apoptosis in the retina, but did not affect survival of periocular and ocular neural crest cells. ETOH also did not increase reactive oxygen species within the eye. In contrast, ETOH increased ventral neural crest apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production in the facial mesenchyme. In the eye and craniofacial region, sod2 showed high levels of expression in the anterior segment and in the setting of Sod2 knockdown, low levels of ETOH decreased migration of foxd3-positive neural crest cells into the developing eye. However, ETOH had minimal effect on the periocular and ocular expression of transcription factors (pitx2 and foxc1) that regulate anterior segment development. Neural crest cells contributing to the anterior segment of the eye exhibit increased ability to withstand ETOH-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. These studies explain the rarity of anterior segment dysgenesis despite the frequent craniofacial abnormalities in fetal alcohol syndrome. Birth Defects Research 109:1212-1227, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Cranio-facial clefts in pre-hispanic America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius-Nunez, A L; Wasiak, D T

    2015-10-01

    Among the representations of congenital malformations in Moche ceramic art, cranio-facial clefts have been portrayed in pottery found in Moche burials. These pottery vessels were used as domestic items during lifetime and funerary offerings upon death. The aim of this study was to examine archeological evidence for representations of cranio-facial cleft malformations in Moche vessels. Pottery depicting malformations of the midface in Moche collections in Lima-Peru were studied. The malformations portrayed on pottery were analyzed using the Tessier classification. Photographs were authorized by the Larco Museo.Three vessels were observed to have median cranio-facial dysraphia in association with midline cleft of the lower lip with cleft of the mandible. ML001489 portrays a median cranio-facial dysraphia with an orbital cleft and a midline cleft of the lower lip extending to the mandible. ML001514 represents a median facial dysraphia in association with an orbital facial cleft and a vertical orbital dystopia. ML001491 illustrates a median facial cleft with a soft tissue cleft. Three cases of midline, orbital and lateral facial clefts have been portrayed in Moche full-figure portrait vessels. They represent the earliest registries of congenital cranio-facial malformations in ancient Peru. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Three-dimensional spiral CT of craniofacial malformations in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binaghi, S. [Payerne Hopital, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Service de Radiodiagnostic et Radiologie Interventionnelle, Lausanne (Switzerland); Gudinchet, F. [Payerne Hopital, Lausanne (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiology; Rilliet, B. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2000-12-01

    Objective. To assess the value of three-dimensional CT (3D CT) in the diagnosis and management of suspected paediatric craniofacial malformations. Materials and methods. Twenty-eight children (12 girls, 16 boys) with a mean age of 4 years, suffering from craniofacial or cervical malformations, underwent craniofacial spiral CT. 3D reformatting was performed using an independent workstation. Results. 3D CT allowed the preoperative evaluation of 16 patients with craniosynostosis and the post-surgical management of 2 patients. 3D CT clearly depicted malformations of the skull base involving the petrous bone in seven patients (four cases of Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome, one case of Treacher-Collins syndrome and two cases of Crouzon's disease). Four patients with craniofacial clefts were also evaluated. Radiological findings were confirmed by the clinical and intraoperative findings in all patients that underwent surgical treatment. Movement artefacts and ''Lego effect'' related to abrupt change of cranial vault border were encountered and are discussed. Conclusions. 3D CT of the skull can safely and reliably identify paediatric craniofacial malformations involving bone, and it should be used as morphological mapping to help the surgeon in planning surgical treatment. (orig.)

  9. 76 FR 1444 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  10. 78 FR 36556 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  11. 78 FR 39740 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  12. 75 FR 7485 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  13. 78 FR 67178 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-11-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  14. 76 FR 28996 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2011-05-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  15. 77 FR 40369 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2012-07-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  16. 77 FR 6812 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  17. 76 FR 78013 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2011-12-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  18. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

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    2013-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information concerning individuals associated... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special...

  19. 77 FR 74676 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2012-12-17

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  20. 75 FR 8976 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

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    2010-02-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and Disorders Research, National Institutes of...

  1. 77 FR 10540 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Diseases and Disorders Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 14, 2012. Jennifer S...

  2. 75 FR 28031 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Teleconference Review of R03 Applications for Mechanisms, Models, Measurements, and...

  3. Porcine embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane

    2008-01-01

    The development of porcine embryonic stem cell lines (pESC) has received renewed interest given the advances being made in the production of immunocompatible transgenic pigs. However, difficulties are evident in the production of pESCs in-vitro. This may largely be attributable to differences...

  4. Craniofacial characteristics in cri-du-chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; Rodríguez-Caballero, Angela; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Guerra-López, Noelia; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo; Solano-Reina, Enrique; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze craniofacial characteristics from lateral head profile radiographs of patients with cri-du-chat (CdC) syndrome. The craniofacial morphology of 10 CdC patients was evaluated using standard cephalometric methods, measuring 39 craniofacial variables on cephalometric x-ray images. The principal characteristics were skeletal class II malocclusion, caused by mandibular retrognathism, dental biprotrusion, and a small upper airway. Additionally, 70% of patients had a steep palatal plane angle; the cranial base angle was flattened, also in 70% of patients. Results indicated that the deletion of 5p had an impact on the cranial base, maxilla, mandible, and upper airway, causing distinctive features to become apparent through irregular growth. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Psychosocial adaptation in children and adolescents with craniofacial malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda-García, J M; Ortíz-de la Rosa, L T; Fajardo-Gutiérrez, A; Cardenas-Zetina, J A

    1997-01-01

    To determine children's perception of their own psychosocial functioning, to compare it with their parents' perception, and determine the type and rate of their psychopathological syndromes and family functioning, and to investigate correlation among these data. Nineteen children with craniofacial deformities and their parents responded to the Columbia Impairment Scale, the Child Behavior Checklist and the McMaster General Functioning Subscale. Psychosocial impairment is a trend in children with craniofacial deformities. There is a correlation between children's and parents' perception of the patient's psychosocial adaptation, global psychopathology and externalizing and aggressive syndromes. A less strong correlation was found with internalizing, somatization and attention deficit syndromes, and with family functioning. Craniofacial deformities in childhood pose special risks for psychosocial adjustment due to type of illness and environmental and family factors.

  6. Growth hormone therapy and craniofacial bones: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G

    2013-09-01

    Growth hormone (GH) has significant effects on linear bone growth, bone mass and bone metabolism. The primary role of GH supplementation in children with GH deficiency, those born small for gestational age or with other types of disorders in somatic development is to increase linear growth. However, GH therapy seems to elicit varying responses in the craniofacial region. Whereas the effects of GH administration on somatic development are well documented, comparatively little is known of its effects on the craniofacial region. The purpose of this review was to search the literature and compile results from both animal and human studies related to the impact of GH on craniofacial growth. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Residents' Perceptions of Plastic Surgeons as Craniofacial Surgery Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denadai, Rafael; Muraro, Carlos Alberto Salomão; Raposo-Amaral, Cassio Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    To assess residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists in Brazil. Brazilian residents were asked to choose 1 or 2 specialists that they perceived to be an expert for 14 craniofacial surgery-related scenarios. Both an overall analysis (all 14 scenarios) and subanalysis (each scenario separately) were performed. Response patterns were distributed as "plastic surgeons alone," "plastic surgeons combined with other specialists," or "without plastic surgeons." Overall, plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P plastic surgeons were chosen more (all P surgery-related scenarios and also demonstrated that "plastic surgeons alone" and "without plastic surgeons" were selected more (all P surgery residents and male residents chose more (all P plastic surgeons as experts than their peers. Residents' perceptions of plastic surgeons as craniofacial surgery specialists are limited in Brazil.

  8. Automated analysis of craniofacial morphology using magnetic resonance images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mallar Chakravarty

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of craniofacial morphology is of interest to scholars working in a wide variety of disciplines, such as anthropology, developmental biology, and medicine. T1-weighted (anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI provide excellent contrast between soft tissues. Given its three-dimensional nature, MRI represents an ideal imaging modality for the analysis of craniofacial structure in living individuals. Here we describe how T1-weighted MR images, acquired to examine brain anatomy, can also be used to analyze facial features. Using a sample of typically developing adolescents from the Saguenay Youth Study (N = 597; 292 male, 305 female, ages: 12 to 18 years, we quantified inter-individual variations in craniofacial structure in two ways. First, we adapted existing nonlinear registration-based morphological techniques to generate iteratively a group-wise population average of craniofacial features. The nonlinear transformations were used to map the craniofacial structure of each individual to the population average. Using voxel-wise measures of expansion and contraction, we then examined the effects of sex and age on inter-individual variations in facial features. Second, we employed a landmark-based approach to quantify variations in face surfaces. This approach involves: (a placing 56 landmarks (forehead, nose, lips, jaw-line, cheekbones, and eyes on a surface representation of the MRI-based group average; (b warping the landmarks to the individual faces using the inverse nonlinear transformation estimated for each person; and (3 using a principal components analysis (PCA of the warped landmarks to identify facial features (i.e. clusters of landmarks that vary in our sample in a correlated fashion. As with the voxel-wise analysis of the deformation fields, we examined the effects of sex and age on the PCA-derived spatial relationships between facial features. Both methods demonstrated significant sexual dimorphism in

  9. Automated Analysis of Craniofacial Morphology Using Magnetic Resonance Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Aleong, Rosanne; Leonard, Gabriel; Perron, Michel; Pike, G. Bruce; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of craniofacial morphology is of interest to scholars working in a wide variety of disciplines, such as anthropology, developmental biology, and medicine. T1-weighted (anatomical) magnetic resonance images (MRI) provide excellent contrast between soft tissues. Given its three-dimensional nature, MRI represents an ideal imaging modality for the analysis of craniofacial structure in living individuals. Here we describe how T1-weighted MR images, acquired to examine brain anatomy, can also be used to analyze facial features. Using a sample of typically developing adolescents from the Saguenay Youth Study (N = 597; 292 male, 305 female, ages: 12 to 18 years), we quantified inter-individual variations in craniofacial structure in two ways. First, we adapted existing nonlinear registration-based morphological techniques to generate iteratively a group-wise population average of craniofacial features. The nonlinear transformations were used to map the craniofacial structure of each individual to the population average. Using voxel-wise measures of expansion and contraction, we then examined the effects of sex and age on inter-individual variations in facial features. Second, we employed a landmark-based approach to quantify variations in face surfaces. This approach involves: (a) placing 56 landmarks (forehead, nose, lips, jaw-line, cheekbones, and eyes) on a surface representation of the MRI-based group average; (b) warping the landmarks to the individual faces using the inverse nonlinear transformation estimated for each person; and (3) using a principal components analysis (PCA) of the warped landmarks to identify facial features (i.e. clusters of landmarks) that vary in our sample in a correlated fashion. As with the voxel-wise analysis of the deformation fields, we examined the effects of sex and age on the PCA-derived spatial relationships between facial features. Both methods demonstrated significant sexual dimorphism in craniofacial

  10. Grainyhead-like Transcription Factors in Craniofacial Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinelli, M R; de Vries, M E; Jane, S M; Dworkin, S

    2017-10-01

    Craniofacial development in vertebrates involves the coordinated growth, migration, and fusion of several facial prominences during embryogenesis, processes governed by strict genetic and molecular controls. A failure in any of the precise spatiotemporal sequences of events leading to prominence fusion often leads to anomalous facial, skull, and jaw formation-conditions termed craniofacial defects (CFDs). Affecting approximately 0.1% to 0.3% of live births, CFDs are a highly heterogeneous class of developmental anomalies, which are often underpinned by genetic mutations. Therefore, identifying novel disease-causing mutations in genes that regulate craniofacial development is a critical prerequisite to develop new preventive or therapeutic measures. The Grainyhead-like ( GRHL) transcription factors are one such gene family, performing evolutionarily conserved roles in craniofacial patterning. The antecedent member of this family, Drosophila grainyhead ( grh), is required for head skeleton development in fruit flies, loss or mutation of Grhl family members in mouse and zebrafish models leads to defects of both maxilla and mandible, and recently, mutations in human GRHL3 have been shown to cause or contribute to both syndromic (Van Der Woude syndrome) and nonsyndromic palatal clefts. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding the craniofacial-specific function of the Grainyhead-like family in multiple model species, identify some of the major target genes regulated by the Grhl transcription factors in craniofacial patterning, and, by examining animal models, draw inferences as to how these data will inform the likely roles of GRHL factors in human CFDs comprising palatal clefting. By understanding the molecular networks regulated by Grhl2 and Grhl3 target genes in other systems, we can propose likely pathways that mediate the effects of these transcription factors in human palatogenesis.

  11. 78 FR 45934 - The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Strategic Plan Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... lead Federal agency for research and research training on oral, dental and craniofacial diseases and... revolutionizing how we understand, prevent, diagnose and manage dental, oral, and craniofacial diseases and... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  12. Magnesium and Embryonic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Komiya, Yuko; Su, Li-Ting; Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Habas, Raymond; Runnels, Loren W.

    2014-01-01

    Important for energy metabolism, neurotransmission, bone stability, and other cellular functions, Mg2+ has well-established and undisputedly critical roles in adult tissues. Its contributions to early embryonic development are less clearly understood. For decades it has been known that gestational Mg2+ deficiency in rodents produces teratogenic effects. More recent studies have linked deficiency in this vital cation to birth defects in humans, including spina bifida, a neural fold closure def...

  13. Craniofacial and temporal bone CT findings in cleidocranial dysplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Guido E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Clinica Alemana de Santiago, Departamento de Imagenes, Santiago (Chile); Caruso, Paul A.; Curtin, Hugh D. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Small, Juan E. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Jyung, Robert W. [Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and Harvard Medical School, Department of Otology, Boston, MA (United States); Troulis, Maria J. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Boston, MA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Cleidocranial dysplasia (CCD) is a multistructural polyostotic genetic disorder that results from mutation of the CBFA1 gene. Hearing loss is a frequent finding in CCD. We describe the CT craniofacial findings in CCD and provide a comprehensive discussion of the CT temporal bone findings in these patients. (orig.)

  14. Analysis of the 50 most cited papers in craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahiri, Youssef; Fleming, Tara M; Greathouse, Travis; Tholpady, Sunil S

    2015-12-01

    The intent of this study is to discuss the most prominent literature in craniofacial surgery. To do so, using the ISI Web of Science, a ranking by average number of citations per year of the top 50 craniofacial surgery articles was compiled. All plastic surgery journals listed in the "Surgery" category in the ISI Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports 2013 Science Edition were considered. Journal of publication, country of origin, collaborating institutions, topic of interest, and level of evidence were analyzed. The total number of citations ranged from 47 to 1017. Average number of citations per year ranged from 46.2 to 8.6. The oldest article in the top 50 was published in 1988 and the most recent in 2009. The majority of the articles came from Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery with 28 of the 50. The majority of the articles, originated from the United States (56%). Reconstruction of acquired defects was the most commonly examined topic at 46.2%; followed by articles discussing reconstruction of congenital defects (23.1%). The most common level of evidence was level 3. This extensive examination of the craniofacial literature highlights the important part that craniofacial surgery takes in the field of plastic surgery. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CRANIOFACIAL MORPHOLOGY AND DENTAL OCCLUSION IN ADULTS WITH OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Harsløf, Torben

    AIMS: To compare craniofacial characteristics and variation in dental occlusion according to severity of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). OI is a rare inherited disease with fragility of bone and teeth because of abnormalities in the formation of collagen. METHODS: A total of 73 patients...

  16. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and craniofacial form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dibbets, JMH; vanderWeele, LT

    Signs and symptoms attributed to temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were registered in 170 persons at an average age of 12.5 years. One hundred and ten were reexamined at an average age of 26.4 years. Craniofacial form was defined on standardized lateral cephalograms, taken at the time points

  17. Surgical treatment of craniofacial haemangioma in children | Aly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/purpose Infantile haemangiomas are the most common tumours of infancy, with an incidence of up to 12%. The craniofacial area is affected in 60% of cases, which represents a therapeutic challenge. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the indications, results and complications of early surgical ...

  18. Development of a 3D co-culture model using human stem cells for studying embryonic palatal fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphogenetic tissue fusion is a critical and complex event in embryonic development and failure of this event leads to birth defects, such as cleft palate. Palatal fusion requires adhesion and subsequent dissolution of the medial epithelial layer of the mesenchymal palatal shelv...

  19. Growth hormone positive effects on craniofacial complex in Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juloski, Jovana; Dumančić, Jelena; Šćepan, Ivana; Lauc, Tomislav; Milašin, Jelena; Kaić, Zvonimir; Dumić, Miroslav; Babić, Marko

    2016-11-01

    Turner syndrome occurs in phenotypic females with complete or partial absence of X chromosome. The leading symptom is short stature, while numerous but mild stigmata manifest in the craniofacial region. These patients are commonly treated with growth hormone to improve their final height. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of long-term growth hormone therapy on craniofacial morphology in Turner syndrome patients. In this cross-sectional study cephalometric analysis was performed on 13 lateral cephalograms of patients with 45,X karyotype and the average age of 17.3 years, who have received growth hormone for at least two years. The control group consisted of 13 Turner syndrome patients naive to growth hormone treatment, matched to study group by age and karyotype. Sixteen linear and angular measurements were obtained from standard lateral cephalograms. Standard deviation scores were calculated in order to evaluate influence of growth hormone therapy on craniofacial components. In Turner syndrome patients treated with growth hormone most of linear measurements were significantly larger compared to untreated patients. Growth hormone therapy mainly influenced posterior face height, mandibular ramus height, total mandibular length, anterior face height and maxillary length. While the increase in linear measurements was evident, angular measurements and facial height ratio did not show statistically significant difference. Acromegalic features were not found. Long-term growth hormone therapy has positive influence on craniofacial development in Turner syndrome patients, with the greatest impact on posterior facial height and mandibular ramus. However, it could not compensate X chromosome deficiency and normalize craniofacial features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Roles of RNA Polymerase I and III Subunits Polr1c and Polr1d in Craniofacial Development and in Zebrafish Models of Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin E Noack Watt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome biogenesis is a global process required for growth and proliferation of all cells, yet perturbation of ribosome biogenesis during human development often leads to tissue-specific defects termed ribosomopathies. Transcription of the ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs by RNA polymerases (Pol I and III, is considered a rate limiting step of ribosome biogenesis and mutations in the genes coding for RNA Pol I and III subunits, POLR1C and POLR1D cause Treacher Collins syndrome, a rare congenital craniofacial disorder. Our understanding of the functions of individual RNA polymerase subunits, however, remains poor. We discovered that polr1c and polr1d are dynamically expressed during zebrafish embryonic development, particularly in craniofacial tissues. Consistent with this pattern of activity, polr1c and polr1d homozygous mutant zebrafish exhibit cartilage hypoplasia and cranioskeletal anomalies characteristic of humans with Treacher Collins syndrome. Mechanistically, we discovered that polr1c and polr1d loss-of-function results in deficient ribosome biogenesis, Tp53-dependent neuroepithelial cell death and a deficiency of migrating neural crest cells, which are the primary progenitors of the craniofacial skeleton. More importantly, we show that genetic inhibition of tp53 can suppress neuroepithelial cell death and ameliorate the skeletal anomalies in polr1c and polr1d mutants, providing a potential avenue to prevent the pathogenesis of Treacher Collins syndrome. Our work therefore has uncovered tissue-specific roles for polr1c and polr1d in rRNA transcription, ribosome biogenesis, and neural crest and craniofacial development during embryogenesis. Furthermore, we have established polr1c and polr1d mutant zebrafish as models of Treacher Collins syndrome together with a unifying mechanism underlying its pathogenesis and possible prevention.

  1. Reprogramming of mesenchymal stem cells by oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Josiane E; Garcia, Christina B

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) originate from embryonic mesoderm and give rise to the multiple lineages of connective tissues. Transformed MSCs develop into aggressive sarcomas, some of which are initiated by specific chromosomal translocations that generate fusion proteins with potent oncogenic properties. The sarcoma oncogenes typically prime MSCs through aberrant reprogramming. They dictate commitment to a specific lineage but prevent mature differentiation, thus locking the cells in a state of proliferative precursors. Deregulated expression of lineage-specific transcription factors and controllers of chromatin structure play a central role in MSC reprogramming and sarcoma pathogenesis. This suggests that reversing the epigenetic aberrancies created by the sarcoma oncogenes with differentiation-related reagents holds great promise as a beneficial addition to sarcoma therapies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The transcription factor snail controls epithelial-mesenchymal transitions by repressing E-cadherin expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, A; Pérez-Moreno, M A; Rodrigo, I

    2000-01-01

    , occurring concomitantly with the cellular acquisition of migratory properties following downregulation of expression of the adhesion protein E-cadherin. Here we show that mouse Snail is a strong repressor of transcription of the E-cadherin gene. Epithelial cells that ectopically express Snail adopt...... a fibroblastoid phenotype and acquire tumorigenic and invasive properties. Endogenous Snail protein is present in invasive mouse and human carcinoma cell lines and tumours in which E-cadherin expression has been lost. Therefore, the same molecules are used to trigger epithelial-mesenchymal transitions during......The Snail family of transcription factors has previously been implicated in the differentiation of epithelial cells into mesenchymal cells (epithelial-mesenchymal transitions) during embryonic development. Epithelial-mesenchymal transitions are also determinants of the progression of carcinomas...

  3. Magnesium and embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiya, Yuko; Su, Li-Ting; Chen, Hsiang-Chin; Habas, Raymond; Runnels, Loren W

    2014-01-01

    Important for energy metabolism, neurotransmission, bone stability, and other cellular functions, Mg(2+) has well-established and undisputedly critical roles in adult tissues. Its contributions to early embryonic development are less clearly understood. For decades it has been known that gestational Mg(2+) deficiency in rodents produces teratogenic effects. More recent studies have linked deficiency in this vital cation to birth defects in humans, including spina bifida, a neural fold closure defect in humans that occurs at an average rate of 1 per 1000 pregnancies. The first suggestion that Mg(2+) may be playing a more specific role in early development arose from studies of the TRPM7 and TRPM6 ion channels. TRPM7 and TRPM6 are divalent-selective ion channels in possession of their own kinase domains that have been implicated in the control of Mg(2+) homeostasis in vertebrates. Disruption of the functions of these ion channels in mice as well as in frogs interferes with gastrulation, a pivotal process during early embryonic development that executes the emergence of the body plan and closure of the neural tube. Surprisingly, gastrulation defects produced by depletion of TRPM7 can be prevented by Mg(2+) supplementation, indicating an essential role for Mg(2+) in gastrulation and neural fold closure. The aim of this review is to summarize the data emerging from molecular genetic, biochemical and electrophysiological studies of TRPM6 and TRPM7 and provide a model of how Mg(2+), through these unique channel-kinases, may be impacting early embryonic development.

  4. Craniofacial CT findings of Gorham-Stout disease and generalized lymphatic anomaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroki; Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Gifu (Japan); Ozeki, Michio; Fukao, Toshiyuki [Gifu University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Gifu (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    The present study aimed to assess the craniofacial CT imaging features for differentiating between Gorham-Stout disease (GSD) and generalized lymphatic anomaly (GLA). Seven patients with GSD and four patients with GLA were included in this study. All patients underwent CT examinations that encompassed the craniofacial bones. The presence, distribution, and type of craniofacial osteolysis were assessed. The clinical symptoms that were associated with craniofacial osteolysis were also reviewed. Craniofacial osteolysis including cranial osteolysis was seen in four of seven (57 %) patients with GSD and in three of four (75 %) patients with GLA. Facial osteolysis was seen in two (29 %) patients with GSD, but this was not observed in patients with GLA. Among patients with craniofacial osteolysis, those with GSD showed diffuse involvement, whereas those with GLA showed multifocal involvement. The craniofacial osteolysis of GSD could be classified into three patterns: medullary involvement, thinning bone, and disappearing bone. The clinical symptoms of craniofacial osteolysis were observed in all patients with GSD but were not present in patients with GLA. Craniofacial involvement was observed in both groups. The craniofacial osteolysis of GSD showed diffuse involvement with clinical symptoms, whereas that of GLA showed multifocal involvement without clinical symptoms. (orig.)

  5. Creating a virtual surgical atlas of craniofacial procedures: Part II. Surgical animations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Roberto L; Deluccia, Nicholette; Oliker, Aaron; McCarthy, Joseph G

    2010-12-01

    Craniofacial surgery can be challenging to teach and learn. To augment the intraoperative learning experience for surgical trainees and to provide a resource for practicing craniofacial surgeons to review uncommonly performed procedures before entering the operating room, a series of three-dimensional animations were created encompassing the most commonly performed craniofacial procedures. Previously created three-dimensional craniofacial digital models were used to create digital animations of craniofacial surgical procedures using Maya 8.5. Digital models were altered systematically within Maya to recreate the ordered steps of each craniofacial procedure. Surgical tools were imported into Maya for use in the animations using computer-aided manufacturing files obtained directly from the manufacturer. Nine craniofacial procedures were animated: genioplasty, bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, intraoral vertical ramus osteotomy, Le Fort I osteotomy, unifocal mandibular distraction, mandibular transport distraction, fronto-orbital advancement with cranial vault remodeling, Le Fort III advancement/distraction, and monobloc advancement/distraction. All major surgical steps are demonstrated, including exposure, execution of the osteotomy, displacement of the bone composite, and the predicted morphologic changes to the craniofacial contour. Throughout the surgical animation, the view of the surgeon in the operating room is incorporated to reproduce the vantage of the surgeon, and the overlying tissue is rendered transparent to illustrate critical underlying anatomical relationships. The first virtual surgical atlas of craniofacial procedures is presented. These animations should serve as a resource for trainees and practicing surgeons in preparation for craniofacial surgical procedures.

  6. Craniofacial divergence by distinct prenatal growth patterns in Fgfr2 mutant mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Differences in cranial morphology arise due to changes in fundamental cell processes like migration, proliferation, differentiation and cell death driven by genetic programs. Signaling between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) affect these processes during head development and mutations in FGFRs result in congenital diseases including FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes. Current research in model organisms focuses primarily on how these mutations change cell function local to sutures under the hypothesis that prematurely closing cranial sutures contribute to skull dysmorphogenesis. Though these studies have provided fundamentally important information contributing to the understanding of craniosynostosis conditions, knowledge of changes in cell function local to the sutures leave change in overall three-dimensional cranial morphology largely unexplained. Here we investigate growth of the skull in two inbred mouse models each carrying one of two gain-of-function mutations in FGFR2 on neighboring amino acids (S252W and P253R) that in humans cause Apert syndrome, one of the most severe FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes. We examine late embryonic skull development and suture patency in Fgfr2 Apert syndrome mice between embryonic day 17.5 and birth and quantify the effects of these mutations on 3D skull morphology, suture patency and growth. Results We show in mice what studies in humans can only infer: specific cranial growth deviations occur prenatally and worsen with time in organisms carrying these FGFR2 mutations. We demonstrate that: 1) distinct skull morphologies of each mutation group are established by E17.5; 2) cranial suture patency patterns differ between mice carrying these mutations and their unaffected littermates; 3) the prenatal skull grows differently in each mutation group; and 4) unique Fgfr2-related cranial morphologies are exacerbated by late embryonic growth patterns. Conclusions Our analysis of

  7. Inactivation of LAR family phosphatase genes Ptprs and Ptprf causes craniofacial malformations resembling Pierre-Robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Katherine; Uetani, Noriko; Hendriks, Wiljan; Tremblay, Michel L; Bouchard, Maxime

    2013-08-01

    Leukocyte antigen related (LAR) family receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) regulate the fine balance between tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation that is crucial for cell signaling during development and tissue homeostasis. Here we show that LAR RPTPs are required for normal development of the mandibular and maxillary regions. Approximately half of the mouse embryos lacking both Ptprs (RPTPσ) and Ptprf (LAR) exhibit micrognathia (small lower jaw), cleft palate and microglossia/glossoptosis (small and deep tongue), a phenotype closely resembling Pierre-Robin sequence in humans. We show that jaw bone and cartilage patterning occurs aberrantly in LAR family phosphatase-deficient embryos and that the mandibular arch harbors a marked decrease in cell proliferation. Analysis of signal transduction in embryonic tissues and mouse embryonic fibroblast cultures identifies an increase in Bmp-Smad signaling and an abrogation of canonical Wnt signaling associated with loss of the LAR family phosphatases. A reactivation of β-catenin signaling by chemical inhibition of GSK3β successfully resensitizes LAR family phosphatase-deficient cells to Wnt induction, indicating that RPTPs are necessary for normal Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Together these results identify LAR RPTPs as important regulators of craniofacial morphogenesis and provide insight into the etiology of Pierre-Robin sequence.

  8. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchita Tyagi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the kidney is a very rare entity with no definite treatment protocol. Herein, we describe one such case with discussion of its diagnosis and management. The patient had a well circumscribed mass in right kidney extending into the inferior vena cava and metastasis to both the lungs. Right nephrectomy was performed and the histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis to be renal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. After surgical removal of the tumor, the patient was given chemotherapy with Cisplatin and Epirubicin, following which there was significant regression of lung nodules.

  9. Severe macroglossia after posterior fossa and craniofacial surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouaoud, J; Joly, A; Picard, A; Thierry, B; Arnaud, E; James, S; Hennessy, I; McGarvey, B; Cairet, P; Vecchione, A; Vergnaud, E; Duracher, C; Khonsari, R H

    2018-01-01

    Massive swelling of the tongue can occur after posterior fossa and craniofacial surgery. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the occurrence of such severe postoperative macroglossia, but this phenomenon is still poorly understood. Severe postoperative macroglossia can be a life-threatening condition due to upper airway obstruction. Three cases of severe postoperative macroglossia that occurred after cervical spine, craniofacial, and posterior fossa surgical procedures are reported here. These cases required specialized maxillofacial management and a prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Causal factors involved in this condition are reported, in order to highlight appropriate prevention and treatment options adapted to the management of paediatric patients. An overview of the current literature on severe postoperative macroglossia in paediatric populations is also provided. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An unusual complication after craniofacial surgery for Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay A Lune

    2014-01-01

    A case of Apert syndrome who had undergone craniofacial surgery elsewhere 4 years back presented to us with purulent discharge near the lateral orbital margin of right orbit, watering and redness of the right eye. He had telltale signs of this syndrome in the form of skull deformities such as brachycephaly, frontal bony prominence, mid-face hypoplasia, proptosis and syndactyly of both hands and feet. There was a surgical scar of previous craniofacial surgery over the bi-coronal region. He had a discharging granuloma over the lateral orbital margin and the adjacent lower eyelid had developed cicatricial ectropion. X-ray and computed tomography scan orbit confirmed the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis of the underlying zygomatic bone at the site of miniplate and screw fixation of the earlier surgery. He was treated with excision of granuloma and extraction of loose screw and infected miniplate while ectropion was corrected by rotation advancement of temporal skin flap.

  11. Car sunshade-induced craniofacial injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardoli Mojtaba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the case of a man who sustained a craniofacial injury after spontaneous lateral airbag deployment resulting in his face being struck by a car sunshade. This highlights the potential damage that can be caused by any object placed between a lateral airbag and a car occupant. Case presentation We report the case of a 33-year-old Caucasian man who was the driver in a frontal collision. He had opened the car sunshade and turned it 90° towards the left. As he was driving, he struck a bus, causing the driver's lateral airbag to spontaneously deploy. The airbag pushed the sunshade against his face and injured him. Conclusions Car sunshades can cause significant craniofacial injury. We suggest that sunshade design must be improved to reduce the risk of potential injuries to car occupants. We recommend a new, safer sunshade design.

  12. Ciliopathy Protein Tmem107 Plays Multiple Roles in Craniofacial Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Celá, Petra; Hampl, Marek; Shylo, N.; Christopher, K. J.; Kavková, M.; Landová, Marie; Zikmund, T.; Weatherbee, S. D.; Kaiser, J.; Buchtová, Marcela

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 97, č. 1 (2018), s. 108-117 ISSN 0022-0345 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-37368G; GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : craniofacial anomalies * growth/development * mineralized tissue/development * orofacial clefts * cell signaling Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 4.755, year: 2016

  13. Exceptional Rare Giant Craniofacial Chondroid Tumor in Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Si; Jia, Bangsheng; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2017-02-01

    We present a rare case of giant soap bubble-shaped cystic lesion in the craniofacial region in an adult female. Histopathologic examination revealed the tumor consisted of 3 components including chondroblastoma, chondromyxoid fibroma, and hemorrhagic aneurysmal bone cyst. The present case is rare in terms of size, location, and histopathologic diagnosis, which is probably the result of underdeveloped health care in the remote place. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Craniofacial and dental anomalies among mentally challenged children

    OpenAIRE

    Megha Jain; Sudheendra U Shridhar; Sandeep Gupta; Raju Ragavendra, T; Sowmya Kasetty

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of craniofacial and dental anomalies among different developmental disorders in mentally challenged subjects of various special schools. Material and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted in four rehabilitation centers for mentally disabled subjects in Bhopal City. Atotal o f296 subjects with age range of 5-15 years were screened and findings were recorded in specially prepared proforma. Results: Among 296 subjects, 73 were of Down′s syndrome (DS), 16...

  15. A Biomechanical Analysis Of Craniofacial Form And Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyen, Ordean J.

    1989-04-01

    In vivo measures of bite force and bone strain obtained in growing African green monkeys (Cercopeithecus aethiops) are being used to study skull biology and geometry. Strain values and distributional patterns seen in association with forceful jaw elevation are inconsistent with conventional explanations linking upper facial morphology with masticatory function and/or using beam models of craniofacial architecture. These results mandate careful use of notions about skeletal geometry based on static analyses that have not been experimentally verified using in vivo procedures.

  16. Concise review: mesenchymal stem cells for diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Inverardi, Luca; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have already made their mark in the young field of regenerative medicine. Easily derived from many adult tissues, their therapeutic worth has already been validated for a number of conditions. Unlike embryonic stem cells, neither their procurement nor their use is deemed controversial. Here we review the potential use of MSCs for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus, a devastating chronic disease in which the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (the β-cells) are the target of an autoimmune process. It has been hypothesized that stem cell-derived β-cells may be used to replenish the islet mass in diabetic patients, making islet transplantation (a form of cell therapy that has already proven effective at clinically restoring normoglycemia) available to millions of prospective patients. Here we review the most current advances in the design and application of protocols for the differentiation of transplantable β-cells, with a special emphasis in analyzing MSC potency according to their tissue of origin. Although no single method appears to be ripe enough for clinical trials yet, recent progress in reprogramming (a biotechnological breakthrough that relativizes the thus far insurmountable barriers between embryonal germ layers) bodes well for the rise of MSCs as a potential weapon of choice to develop personalized therapies for type 1 diabetes.

  17. Antibacterial coating on biocomposites for cranio-facial reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Madalina Anca; Vodnar, Dan; Prodan, Doina; Rotaru, Horatiu; Roman, Calin Rares; Sorcoi, Lidia Adriana; Baciut, Grigore; Campian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that implants are sterilized, antiseptic techniques are applied and systemic antibiotics are routinely administered prior to and after craniofacial surgery, infection rates between 3% and 40% are still reported for alloplastic implants, urging for implant removal. The present study focuses on the development of a fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) implant for craniofacial reconstruction with antimicrobial properties. A new fiber-reinforced composite coated with gentamicin was developed and tested for bacterial adherence and antibacterial efficiency, using two of the most involved bacterial strains in the postoperative infections: Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacteria were efficiently inactivated in direct contact with gentamicin coatings (p0.05 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa: β = -0.921; p=0.255>0.05), a negative relation was observed, indicating the reversed relation between the antibiotic dosage and the bacterial adherence. The results of the two applied microbiological protocols used in the study suggested that gentamicin eluting coating inhibited not only the bacterial growth, but also led to a lower initial bacterial adhesion to the surface of the implant. Thus, antibiotic coating of craniofacial implants may reduce the infection rate related to reconstructive surgery.

  18. Penetrating craniofacial injuries in children with wooden and metal chopsticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Hyuck; Cho, Ki Hong; Shin, Yong Sam; Kim, Se Hyuck; Ahn, Young Hwan; Cho, Kyung Gi; Yoon, Soo Han

    2006-01-01

    Penetrating craniofacial injuries with chopsticks in children are peculiar accidents in the Oriental culture. All 10 cases previously reported were caused by wooden chopsticks that required surgical operations. However, there are no reported injuries with metal chopsticks in the past literature which should have been as common as that of wooden chopstick injuries in Asia. We evaluated the difference of injury patterns and clinical observations between wooden and metal chopstick injuries. We reviewed 6 treated children with penetrating craniofacial injuries from chopsticks: one wooden and five metal chopsticks. One child who had penetration through the nasal cavity presented with temporary rhinorrhea, another with mild hemiparesis, and one child with temporary upward gaze limitation of the left eye. Radiological examination revealed 1 patient with epidural hemorrhage, 1 patient with minimal subdural hemorrhage, and 4 with intracerebral hemorrhage that were fortunately too small to receive surgery. We performed surgical procedure only for a child who had a wooden chopstick that had impacted into the temporal cortex. We followed up all 6 children for more than 1 year, and found that all had fully recovered to near-normal neurological status. We observed that penetrating craniofacial injuries with metal chopsticks rarely require surgical intervention and usually results in good outcome because the resultant wound is usually small without broken fragments compared to injuries with wooden chopsticks. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition in prostate cancer: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Micaela; Rossetti, Sabrina; Cavaliere, Carla; D'Aniello, Carmine; Malzone, Maria Gabriella; Vanacore, Daniela; Franco, Rossella Di; Mantia, Elvira La; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Muscariello, Raffaele; Berretta, Massimiliano; Perdonà, Sisto; Muto, Paolo; Botti, Gerardo; Bianchi, Attilio Antonio Montano; Veneziani, Bianca Maria; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a main urological disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Radical prostatectomy and radiotherapy are potentially curative for localized prostate cancer, while androgen deprivation therapy is the initial systemic therapy for metastatic prostate disease. However, despite temporary response, most patients relapse and evolve into castration resistant cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex gradual process that occurs during embryonic development and/or tumor progression. During this process, cells lose their epithelial characteristics and acquire mesenchymal features. Increasing evidences indicate that EMT promotes prostate cancer metastatic progression and it is closely correlated with increased stemness and drug resistance. In this review, we discuss the main molecular events that directly or indirectly govern the EMT program in prostate cancer, in order to better define the role and the mechanisms underlying this process in prostate cancer progression and therapeutic resistance. PMID:28430640

  20. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: Understanding the basic concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Babu Ghanta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is described as a rapid and reversible process of change of cell phenotype seen during embryonic development, organ fibrosis, and tumor progression. EMT was first described by Gary Greenberg and Elizabeth Hay in 1982. During EMT the epithelial cells alter their cell polarity, reorganize their cytoskeleton thus become isolated and motile. Depending upon the biological context in which they occur, EMT is divided into three types namely EMT type I, II, III. The article describes the process of EMT implicated in the oral cavity as in palate and root development (type I EMT, gingival fibromatosis and oral sub-mucous fibrosis (type II EMT, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (type III EMT. The reverse process of EMT is called as mesenchymal-epithelial transition seen in association with kidney formation.

  1. The Drivers of Academic Success in Cleft and Craniofacial Centers: A 10-Year Analysis of over 2000 Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, Natalie M; Massie, Jonathan P; Stern, Marleigh J; Alperovich, Michael; Runyan, Christopher M; Staffenberg, David A; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Grayson, Barry H; Diaz-Siso, J Rodrigo; Flores, Roberto L

    2017-02-01

    Cleft and craniofacial centers require significant investment by medical institutions, yet variables contributing to their academic productivity remain unknown. This study characterizes the elements associated with high academic productivity in these centers. The authors analyzed cleft and craniofacial centers accredited by the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. Variables such as university affiliation; resident training; number of plastic surgery, oral-maxillofacial, and dental faculty; and investment in a craniofacial surgery, craniofacial orthodontics fellowship program, or both, were obtained. Craniofacial and cleft-related research published between July of 2005 and June of 2015 was identified. A stepwise multivariable linear regression analysis was performed to measure outcomes of total publications, summative impact factor, basic science publications, total journals, and National Institutes of Health funding. One hundred sixty centers were identified, comprising 920 active faculty, 34 craniofacial surgery fellowships, and eight craniofacial orthodontic fellowships; 2356 articles were published in 191 journals. Variables most positively associated with a high number of publications were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.608), craniofacial surgery fellowships (β = 0.231), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.213), and university affiliation (β = 0.165). Variables most positively associated with high a number of journals were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.550), university affiliation (β = 0.251), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.230), and craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.218). Variables most positively associated with a high summative impact factor were craniofacial surgery and craniofacial orthodontics fellowships (β = 0.648), craniofacial surgery fellowship (β = 0.208), number of plastic surgery faculty (β = 0.207), and university affiliation

  2. Human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Basem; Kassem, Moustapha

    2008-01-01

    introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  3. Wdr68 requires nuclear access for craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyan Wang

    Full Text Available Wdr68 is a highly conserved scaffolding protein required for craniofacial development and left-right asymmetry. A Ras-Map3k-Wdr68-Dyrk1 signaling relay may mediate these and other diverse signaling events important in development and disease. While the sub-cellular localization of Wdr68 has been shown to be dependent on that of its interaction partners, it is not clear where Wdr68 activity is required during development. Here we show that while a GFP-Wdr68 fusion functionally substituted for craniofacial development in the zebrafish, that a Nuclear Export Signal (NES fusion protein (GFPNESWdr68 failed to support craniofacial development. As control for NES activity, we show that while GFP-Wdr68 exhibited a pan-cellular distribution in C2C12 cells, the GFPNESWdr68 fusion predominantly localized to the cell cytoplasm, as expected. Interestingly, while GFP-Wdr68 and RFP-Dyrk1a co-localized to the cell nucleus as expected based on the known sub-cellular localization for Dyrk1a, we found that the GFPNESWdr68 fusion redistributed RFP-Dyrk1a to the cell cytoplasm potentially disconnecting the Ras/Dyrk1 signal relay from further downstream targets. Consistent with a nuclear role in gene regulation, we also found that while a transcriptional activation domain fusion, CebpFlagWdr68, functionally substituted for endogenous Wdr68 for craniofacial development, that a transcriptional repression domain fusion, MadFlagWdr68, failed to support craniofacial development. Dyrk1b is required for myogenin (myog expression in differentiating mouse C2C12 cells and here we report that wdr68 is also important for myog expression in differentiating C2C12 cells. Using a C2C12 cell myog promoter-reporter system, we found that Wdr68 overexpression increased reporter activity while moderate expression levels of MadFlagWdr68 interfered with reporter activity. Taken together, these findings support a nuclear role for Wdr68-containing complexes.

  4. 3D craniofacial registration using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yucong; Zhao, Junli; Deng, Qingqiong; Duan, Fuqing

    2017-01-01

    Craniofacial registration is used to establish the point-to-point correspondence in a unified coordinate system among human craniofacial models. It is the foundation of craniofacial reconstruction and other craniofacial statistical analysis research. In this paper, a non-rigid 3D craniofacial registration method using thin-plate spline transform and cylindrical surface projection is proposed. First, the gradient descent optimization is utilized to improve a cylindrical surface fitting (CSF) for the reference craniofacial model. Second, the thin-plate spline transform (TPST) is applied to deform a target craniofacial model to the reference model. Finally, the cylindrical surface projection (CSP) is used to derive the point correspondence between the reference and deformed target models. To accelerate the procedure, the iterative closest point ICP algorithm is used to obtain a rough correspondence, which can provide a possible intersection area of the CSP. Finally, the inverse TPST is used to map the obtained corresponding points from the deformed target craniofacial model to the original model, and it can be realized directly by the correspondence between the original target model and the deformed target model. Three types of registration, namely, reflexive, involutive and transitive registration, are carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed craniofacial registration algorithm. Comparison with the methods in the literature shows that the proposed method is more accurate.

  5. Endothelial-mesenchymal transition and its contribution to the emergence of stem cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Damian; Kalluri, Raghu

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells can demonstrate considerable plasticity to generate other cell types during embryonic development and disease progression. This process occurs through a cell differentiation mechanism known as endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). The generation of mesenchymal cells from endothelium is a crucial step in endothelial cell differentiation to several lineages including fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, mural cells, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. Such differentiation patterns have been observed in systems of cardiac development, fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy, heterotopic ossification and cancer. Here we describe the EndMT program and discuss the current evidence of EndMT-mediated acquisition of stem cell characteristics and multipotent differentiation capabilities. PMID:22554794

  6. Embryonic mortality in buffalo cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Neglia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In buffalo species embryonic mortality is considered one of the major causes of fertility loss, especially in the animals that are not mated during their reproductive period. Embryonic loss in animals mated by artificial insemination (AI is 20-40% during seasons characterized by high number of light hours. Also in buffalo naturally mated the incidence of embryonic mortality is about 20% and a higher incidence is observed between 28- 60 days of gestation in buffaloes that conceive during increasing daylight length. A reduced capacity to secrete progesterone seems to explain in part this embryonic mortality but other as yet unidentified factors contribute between 40-50% to the embryonic losses. Treatments with hCG, GnRH agonist or progesterone on Days 5 after AI not always reduce embryonic mortality in buffalo species. Embryonic mortality in buffaloes appears to occur later (Day 25-40 than in cattle and P4 treatments should perhaps be applied later in buffaloes.

  7. Sprouty2 controls proliferation of palate mesenchymal cells via fibroblast growth factor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Kaori [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Taketomi, Takaharu, E-mail: taketomi@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshizaki, Keigo [Section of Orthodontics, Division of Oral Health, Growth and Development, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Arai, Shinsaku [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Sanui, Terukazu [Section of Periodontology, Division of Oral Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshiga, Daigo [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), CREST, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Nakamura, Seiji [Section of Oral and Maxillofacial Oncology, Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Sciences, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1 Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} Sprouty2-deficient mice exhibit cleft palate as a result of failure of palatal shelf elevation. {yields} We examined palate cell proliferation in Sprouty2-deficient mice. {yields} Palate mesenchymal cell proliferation was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice. {yields} Sprouty2 plays roles in murine palatogenesis by regulating cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Cleft palate is one of the most common craniofacial deformities. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) plays a central role in reciprocal interactions between adjacent tissues during palatal development, and the FGF signaling pathway has been shown to be inhibited by members of the Sprouty protein family. In this study, we report the incidence of cleft palate, possibly caused by failure of palatal shelf elevation, in Sprouty2-deficient (KO) mice. Sprouty2-deficient palates fused completely in palatal organ culture. However, palate mesenchymal cell proliferation estimated by Ki-67 staining was increased in Sprouty2 KO mice compared with WT mice. Sprouty2-null palates expressed higher levels of FGF target genes, such as Msx1, Etv5, and Ptx1 than WT controls. Furthermore, proliferation and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation in response to FGF was enhanced in palate mesenchymal cells transfected with Sprouty2 small interfering RNA. These results suggest that Sprouty2 regulates palate mesenchymal cell proliferation via FGF signaling and is involved in palatal shelf elevation.

  8. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  9. Magnesium alloys as a biomaterial for degradable craniofacial screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah E; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2014-05-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as potential biomaterials for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available pure Mg and alloy AZ31 in vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg and AZ31 screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (∼40N). A finite-element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and this model can be used for future Mg alloy screw design. Then, Mg and AZ31 screws were implanted for 4, 8 and 12weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12weeks. Microcomputed tomography was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg/AZ31 degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histological analysis was also completed for the Mg and AZ31 at 12weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg and AZ31 screws. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31; however, bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg and AZ31 screws in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg alloys for craniofacial applications. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome: New insights on craniofacial and dental features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadh, Wael; Kiukkonen, Anu; Nieminen, Pekka; Arte, Sirpa; Hurmerinta, Kirsti; Rice, David P

    2017-04-01

    Blepharocheilodontic (BCD) syndrome is a rare condition characterized by bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), eyelid abnormalities, and oligodontia. Despite orofacial clefting and oligodontia being central features of the condition, detailed reports of dental and craniofacial characteristics are scarce. The aim of this study was to analyze the dental and craniofacial features in a group of patients with BCD syndrome (three of which were related). Cephalometric radiographic analyses were performed on BCD syndrome patients (all radiographs taken at age 8 years) and compared to 40 randomly selected age-matched controls (20 non-syndromic BCLP, 20 non-cleft). Also, we assessed clinical records, photographs, dental study casts, and dental radiographs to determine the extent and pattern of tooth agenesis, dental morphology and malocclusion. BCD syndrome patients showed a very severe skeletal III malocclusion (maxillary-mandibular sagittal discrepancy) and reduced anterior lower face measurement compared to non-syndromic BCLP and non-cleft controls (P = 0.001, P = 0.027). All patients exhibited oligodontia (mean number of missing permanent teeth 13.7, range 7-17). All patients exhibited missing upper central and lateral incisor, upper canine and premolar teeth. Variations in dental morphology included taurodontism, conical-shaped teeth, and notching of the incisal edges. All patients had a short and narrow maxilla which translated into anterior and posterior cross bites. We conclude that, in our BCD syndrome group, the craniofacial skeletal defects are more severe than patients with BCLP. The pattern of tooth agenesis is unusual as it included teeth that are normally highly resistant to agenesis, namely upper central incisor and canine teeth. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 77 FR 74674 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal...

  12. 76 FR 38193 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal information... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel, Review of PAR-11-144 NIDCR U01...

  13. 75 FR 26762 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ... Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings Pursuant to section 10(d) of the... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal... Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; RFA (DE-10-003). Date: June 7, 2010...

  14. 78 FR 50066 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.... App.), notice is ] hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Dental and Craniofacial Research... disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property such as patentable material, and personal...

  15. 75 FR 65495 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Interagency Pain Research Coordinating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... Federal agencies relevant to the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of pain and diseases and disorders... resume. Dated: October 18, 2010. Amy Adams, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research...

  16. 78 FR 59708 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and Disorders Research, National Institutes of...

  17. 77 FR 64815 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and Disorders Research, National...

  18. 78 FR 28234 - National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special... Microbiome's Role in Health and Disease (U54). Date: June 11-12, 2013. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda...

  19. 77 FR 10539 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research Notice... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel; Review of RFA DE 12-006 and -007 Oral Diseases in Medically Compromised Patients (R21, R01...

  20. Cephalometric analysis of craniofacial morphology and growth in unrepaired isolated cleft palate patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, Y.; Yang, C.; Schreuder, W.H.; Shi, J.; Bing, S.; Zheng, Q.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study is to analyze the craniofacial morphology in patients with unrepaired isolated cleft palate (UICP) at childhood, adolescence and adulthood, in order to assess the influence of nonsurgical factors on the craniofacial growth in these patients. Material and methods

  1. 75 FR 7486 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research... personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research Special Emphasis Panel Review of R01 Application for RFA- DE-10-001, Oral Mucosal Vaccination against HIV Infection...

  2. The Future in Craniofacial Surgery: Computer-Assisted Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Schendel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in computers, prototyping, and imaging, especially over the last 10 years, have permitted the adoption of three-dimensional imaging protocols in the health care field. In this article, the authors present an integrated simulation system for craniofacial surgical planning and treatment. Image fusion technology, which involves combining different imaging modalities, was utilized to create a realistic prototype and virtual image that can be manipulated in real time. The resultant data can then be shared over the Internet with distantly located practitioners.

  3. The Future in Craniofacial Surgery: Computer-Assisted Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Stephen A.; Hazan-Molina, Hagai; Rachmiel, Adi; Aizenbud, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in computers, prototyping, and imaging, especially over the last 10 years, have permitted the adoption of three-dimensional imaging protocols in the health care field. In this article, the authors present an integrated simulation system for craniofacial surgical planning and treatment. Image fusion technology, which involves combining different imaging modalities, was utilized to create a realistic prototype and virtual image that can be manipulated in real time. The resultant data can then be shared over the Internet with distantly located practitioners. PMID:23908836

  4. First molar health status in different craniofacial relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linjawi AI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Amal I Linjawi Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia Objective: To investigate the association between the health status of permanent first molars and different craniofacial relationships among adolescents. Study design: This is a retrospective study on patients’ records aged 11–15 years. Sex, skeletal relationship, vertical growth pattern, malocclusion, overjet, and overbite were assessed. The health status of permanent first molars was recorded from the orthopantomograms and intraoral photographs as “sound” and “not sound”. Chi-square, Mann–Whitney U and Kruskal–Wallis tests, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used to analyze and correlate the assessed variables. Significance level was set at P<0.05. Results: A total of 210 records were evaluated; 81 were male, 68 had Class I and 91 had Class II skeletal relationships. More than half of the subjects had normal (n=67 to moderate deep bite (n=72; normal (n=91, moderately increased (n=54, to severely increased (n=50 overjet; and Class I (n=106 and Class II division 1 (n=75 malocclusion. Significant differences were found in the health status of the permanent first molars with respect to sex (P=0.034, vertical growth pattern (P=0.01, and overbite (P=0.047. Strong correlations were only found between the health status of the permanent first molars and the following variables: sex (P=0.036 and vertical growth pattern (P=0.004. Significant correlation was further found between the upper left first molar health status and sex (P=0.019 and the lower right first molar health status and the vertical growth pattern (P=0.001. No significant association was found with the anteroposterior craniofacial relationships (P>0.05. Conclusion: Sex difference and vertical growth patterns were found to be potential predictors of the health status of the permanent first molars. No significant association was found with the

  5. The radiologic features of fibrous dysplasia of the craniofacial bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obisesan, A A; Lagundoye, S B; Daramola, J O; Ajagbe, H A; Oluwasanmi, J O

    1977-12-01

    The radiographs of twenty-five patients (eight males, seventeen females) with histologically proven craniofacial fibrous dysplasia were analyzed. The lesions could be classified into six radiologic types: (1) peau d'orange, (2) whorled plaquelike, (3) diffuse sclerotic, (4) cystlike (multilocular or unilocular), (5) pagetoid, and (6) chalky types. The peau d'orange type was by far the most common (40 per cent) followed by the plaquelike (20 per cent, cystlike (16 per cent), and sclerotic (12 per cent). Most of the patients were young, with 60 per cent being underthe age of 20 years and 96 per cent under the age of 40 years.

  6. Molecular signatures of the primitive prostate stem cell niche reveal novel mesenchymal-epithelial signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Blum

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Signals between stem cells and stroma are important in establishing the stem cell niche. However, very little is known about the regulation of any mammalian stem cell niche as pure isolates of stem cells and their adjacent mesenchyme are not readily available. The prostate offers a unique model to study signals between stem cells and their adjacent stroma as in the embryonic prostate stem cell niche, the urogenital sinus mesenchyme is easily separated from the epithelial stem cells. Here we investigate the distinctive molecular signals of these two stem cell compartments in a mammalian system.We isolated fetal murine urogenital sinus epithelium and urogenital sinus mesenchyme and determined their differentially expressed genes. To distinguish transcripts that are shared by other developing epithelial/mesenchymal compartments from those that pertain to the prostate stem cell niche, we also determined the global gene expression of epidermis and dermis of the same embryos. Our analysis indicates that several of the key transcriptional components that are predicted to be active in the embryonic prostate stem cell niche regulate processes such as self-renewal (e.g., E2f and Ap2, lipid metabolism (e.g., Srebp1 and cell migration (e.g., Areb6 and Rreb1. Several of the enriched promoter binding motifs are shared between the prostate epithelial/mesenchymal compartments and their epidermis/dermis counterparts, indicating their likely relevance in epithelial/mesenchymal signaling in primitive cellular compartments. Based on differential gene expression we also defined ligand-receptor interactions that may be part of the molecular interplay of the embryonic prostate stem cell niche.We provide a comprehensive description of the transcriptional program of the major regulators that are likely to control the cellular interactions in the embryonic prostatic stem cell niche, many of which may be common to mammalian niches in general. This study provides a

  7. Molecular signatures of the primitive prostate stem cell niche reveal novel mesenchymal-epithelial signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Roy; Gupta, Rashmi; Burger, Patricia E; Ontiveros, Christopher S; Salm, Sarah N; Xiong, Xiaozhong; Kamb, Alexander; Wesche, Holger; Marshall, Lisa; Cutler, Gene; Wang, Xiangyun; Zavadil, Jiri; Moscatelli, David; Wilson, E Lynette

    2010-09-30

    Signals between stem cells and stroma are important in establishing the stem cell niche. However, very little is known about the regulation of any mammalian stem cell niche as pure isolates of stem cells and their adjacent mesenchyme are not readily available. The prostate offers a unique model to study signals between stem cells and their adjacent stroma as in the embryonic prostate stem cell niche, the urogenital sinus mesenchyme is easily separated from the epithelial stem cells. Here we investigate the distinctive molecular signals of these two stem cell compartments in a mammalian system. We isolated fetal murine urogenital sinus epithelium and urogenital sinus mesenchyme and determined their differentially expressed genes. To distinguish transcripts that are shared by other developing epithelial/mesenchymal compartments from those that pertain to the prostate stem cell niche, we also determined the global gene expression of epidermis and dermis of the same embryos. Our analysis indicates that several of the key transcriptional components that are predicted to be active in the embryonic prostate stem cell niche regulate processes such as self-renewal (e.g., E2f and Ap2), lipid metabolism (e.g., Srebp1) and cell migration (e.g., Areb6 and Rreb1). Several of the enriched promoter binding motifs are shared between the prostate epithelial/mesenchymal compartments and their epidermis/dermis counterparts, indicating their likely relevance in epithelial/mesenchymal signaling in primitive cellular compartments. Based on differential gene expression we also defined ligand-receptor interactions that may be part of the molecular interplay of the embryonic prostate stem cell niche. We provide a comprehensive description of the transcriptional program of the major regulators that are likely to control the cellular interactions in the embryonic prostatic stem cell niche, many of which may be common to mammalian niches in general. This study provides a comprehensive source

  8. OVOL2 Maintains the Transcriptional Program of Human Corneal Epithelium by Suppressing Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Kitazawa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In development, embryonic ectoderm differentiates into neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm using poorly understood mechanisms. Here, we show that the transcription factor OVOL2 maintains the transcriptional program of human corneal epithelium cells (CECs, a derivative of the surface ectoderm, and that OVOL2 may regulate the differential transcriptional programs of the two lineages. A functional screen identified OVOL2 as a repressor of mesenchymal genes to maintain CECs. Transduction of OVOL2 with several other transcription factors induced the transcriptional program of CECs in fibroblasts. Moreover, neuroectoderm derivatives were found to express mesenchymal genes, and OVOL2 alone could induce the transcriptional program of CECs in neural progenitors by repressing these genes while activating epithelial genes. Our data suggest that the difference between the transcriptional programs of some neuroectoderm- and surface ectoderm-derivative cells may be regulated in part by a reciprocally repressive mechanism between epithelial and mesenchymal genes, as seen in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  9. [Chin morphology in subjects with different vertical skeletal craniofacial pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pei-Zeng; Wu, Wei

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate whether there is difference with regard to chin morphology in subjects with different vertical skeletal craniofacial pattern and the relationship among them. The sample was composed of 80 adolescents who denied orthodontic treatment history and presented Class I skeletal pattern, aged (12.69+/-0.70) years. They were divided into three groups according to mandibular plane angle: High angle group (21 cases, FH/MP> or = 32 degrees), average angle group(43 cases, 22 degrees pattern were evaluated. In addition, chin dimensions studied included height, depth, ratio (depth/height), angle, and so on. They were compared between different groups with One-Way ANOVA. Correlation was analyzed between vertical skeletal craniofacial pattern and chin morphology. SNA, SNB and ANB presented no significant difference among three groups. Compared with the low angle group, high angle subjects exhibited increased chin height, depth/height ratio, concavity and decreased chin angle. Therefore the chin looked lathier and less protrusive in high angle group. Positive correlation was found between mandibular plane angle and chin height, concavity, curvature (Pskeletal pattern, which deserves to be taken into consideration in orthodontic treatment planning.

  10. Craniofacial Skeletal Dysplasia of Opposite-sex Dizygotic Twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ting Chou

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal dysplasia can lead to different skeletal malocclusions. Both environmental factors and heredity contribute to the formation of malocclusions. There are strong familial tendencies in the development of Angle's Class II and III malocclusions. Cases such as opposite-typed (Class II and III malocclusions with skeletal and dentoalveolar discordance in siblings or dizygotic (DZ twins have seldom been reported. We describe the rare case of a pair of opposite-sex DZ twins with completely different skeletal malocclusions, and discuss the clinical considerations for treatment. The patients were twins aged 13 years and 4 months. The girl had mandibular prognathism and a Class III dentoskeletal relationship, whereas the boy had skeletal Class II with mandibular retrusion. Several morphological traits have been implicated with hormonal effect. However, there was no evidence of whether the masculinization effect had any impact on jaw size in the female fetus or whether this effect lasted into adolescence. We suggest that, although DZ twins share the same growth environment, genetic or other unknown extrinsic factors can result in discordance of characteristics of the craniofacial skeleton, dentition, and occlusion.

  11. Craniofacial Surgery and Adverse Outcomes: An Inquiry Into Medical Negligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svider, Peter F; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Folbe, Adam J; Carron, Michael A; Zuliani, Giancarlo F; Shkoukani, Mahdi A

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate factors contributing to medical negligence relevant to craniofacial surgery. Retrospective analysis of verdict and settlement reports on the Westlaw legal database for outcome, awards, physician defendants, and other specific factors raised in malpractice litigation. Of 42 verdicts and settlement reports included, 52.4% were resolved with either an out-of-court settlement or plaintiff verdict, with aggregate payments totaling $50.1M (in 2013 dollars). Median settlements and jury-awarded damages were $988,000 and $555,000, respectively. Payments in pediatric cases ($1.2M) were significantly higher. Plastic surgeons, oral surgeons, and otolaryngologists were the most commonly named defendants. The most common alleged factors included intraoperative negligence (69.0%), permanent deficits (54.8%), requiring additional surgery (52.4%), missed/delayed diagnosis of a complication (42.9%), disfigurement/scarring (28.6%), postoperative negligence (28.6%), and inadequate informed consent (20.6% of surgical cases). Failure to diagnose a fracture (19.0%) and cleft-reparative procedures (14.3%) were the most frequently litigated entities. Medical negligence related to craniofacial surgery involves plaintiffs in a wide age range as well as physician defendants in numerous specialties, and proceedings resolved with settlement and plaintiff verdict involve substantial payments. Cases with death, allegedly permanent injuries, and pediatric plaintiffs had significantly higher payments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Craniofacial and dental anomalies among mentally challenged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of craniofacial and dental anomalies among different developmental disorders in mentally challenged subjects of various special schools. Material and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted in four rehabilitation centers for mentally disabled subjects in Bhopal City. Atotal o f296 subjects with age range of 5-15 years were screened and findings were recorded in specially prepared proforma. Results: Among 296 subjects, 73 were of Down′s syndrome (DS, 168 of mental retardation (MR, 31 of autism (AT and 24 of cerebral Palsy (CP. The anomalies were found to be predominant in syndromic mental disability compared to non-syndromic disorders. High vault palate was the most common developmental anomaly amongst all the four disabilities. Gingivitis & hypersalivation was noted as an additional finding in all the subgroups. Conclusion: Craniofacial and dental anomalies usually supplement mentally challenged children, leading to poor performance of stomatognathic complex. Therefore critical appraisal of oral health status of such subjects is imperative.

  13. Rare Bone Diseases and Their Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B.L.; Ramnitz, M.S.; Gafni, R.I.; Burke, A.B.; Boyce, A.M.; Lee, J.S.; Wright, J.T.; Akintoye, S.O.; Somerman, M.J.; Collins, M.T.

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. PMID:24700690

  14. Rare bone diseases and their dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B L; Ramnitz, M S; Gafni, R I; Burke, A B; Boyce, A M; Lee, J S; Wright, J T; Akintoye, S O; Somerman, M J; Collins, M T

    2014-07-01

    Hereditary diseases affecting the skeleton are heterogeneous in etiology and severity. Though many of these conditions are individually rare, the total number of people affected is great. These disorders often include dental-oral-craniofacial (DOC) manifestations, but the combination of the rarity and lack of in-depth reporting often limit our understanding and ability to diagnose and treat affected individuals. In this review, we focus on dental, oral, and craniofacial manifestations of rare bone diseases. Discussed are defects in 4 key physiologic processes in bone/tooth formation that serve as models for the understanding of other diseases in the skeleton and DOC complex: progenitor cell differentiation (fibrous dysplasia), extracellular matrix production (osteogenesis imperfecta), mineralization (familial tumoral calcinosis/hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia syndrome, hypophosphatemic rickets, and hypophosphatasia), and bone resorption (Gorham-Stout disease). For each condition, we highlight causative mutations (when known), etiopathology in the skeleton and DOC complex, and treatments. By understanding how these 4 foci are subverted to cause disease, we aim to improve the identification of genetic, molecular, and/or biologic causes, diagnoses, and treatment of these and other rare bone conditions that may share underlying mechanisms of disease. © International & American Associations for Dental Research.

  15. A Comparison Between Craniofacial Templates of Iranian and Western Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Hosseinzadeh Nik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Templates are very useful tools for diagnosis of malocclusions. A number of templates have been provided for some populations in previous years. Since craniofacial characteristics of different ethnic groups are not the same, each population needs its own norms. The aim of this study was to provide orthodontic craniofacial templates for 8-16 year old Iranian boys and compare dentoskeletal features between Iranian and western populations. 3330 boys with the age range of 8-16 years were examined in Tehran, and 107 cases were finally chosen for the study and their lateral cephalograms were traced. Since there is no universal, consensus about the selection of one specific point or line for cephalometric superimposition, both the sella nasion (SN and basion nasion (Ba-N lines were chosen for this purpose. Based on both SN and Ba-N lines, a template was prepared for each age. Simple linear regression analysis was used to evaluate the angles and the multivariant regression analysis for evaluation of landmark vectors. Posterior cranial base, maxillary and mandibular lengths, upper and lower anterior facial heights (N-ANS and ANS-Me and posterior facial height (S-Go are greater in Iranian population. But anterior cranial base, height and inclination of the incisors and molar height are similar in two populations.

  16. Morphological integration of the skull in craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtsmeier, J T; Deleon, V B

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVES - To understand how surgical interventions impact the organization and internal integration of the major components of the skull, we address the functional and developmental relationships during perinatal development. METHODS - A number of methods for quantifying modularity and integration of morphological data are available. Here, measures derived from three-dimensional computed tomographic (CT) images are used to investigate the statistical relationships among measures of the cranial vault, face and cranial base. First, we establish the pattern of associations among quantitative measures in a sample of children unaffected by a craniofacial anomaly. We statistically compare these normative patterns of cranial integration to those of a sample of children with a facial anomaly (complete unilateral complete cleft lip and palate), and to children with a neurocranial anomaly (isolated sagittal synostosis). Finally, we test whether surgery affects the strength and pattern of associations among measures within the cranial base in the affected children. RESULTS - Our analyses reveal strong internal integration of the cranial base in unaffected children and in our samples of unoperated cleft lip and palate, and sagittal synostosis. Post-operatively, the magnitude of integration of the cranial base is reduced relative to the pre-operative condition in both samples of children with craniofacial anomalies. CONCLUSION - Our results show how the cranial base adjusts to its broader structural context, and provides added support for the developmental and structural integration of cranial base with both cranial vault and face.

  17. The use of craniofacial superimposition for disaster victim identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Caroline; Lofthouse, Amy

    2015-07-01

    Skull-to-face comparison is utilised for human identification where there is a suspected identity and the usual methods of identification, such as DNA or dental comparison, are not possible or practical. This research aimed to compare the reliability of manual and computerised craniofacial superimposition techniques and to establish the application of these techniques for disaster victim identification, where there may be a large database of passport-style images, such as the MPUB Interpol database. Twenty skulls (10 females; 10 males) were utilised from the William Bass Skeletal Collection at the University of Tennessee and compared to face pools of 20 face photographs of similar sex, age and ethnic group. A traditional manual photographic method and a new 3D computer-based method were used. The results suggested that profile and three-quarter views of the ante-mortem face were the most valuable for craniofacial superimposition. However, the poor identification rate achieved using images in frontal view suggests that the MPUB Interpol database would not be optimal for disaster victim identification, and passport-style images do not provide enough distinguishing facial detail. This suggests that multiple ante-mortem images with a variety of facial expression should be utilised for identification purposes. There was no significant difference in success between the manual and computer methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hippo Pathway: An Emerging Regulator of Craniofacial and Dental Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Martin, J F

    2017-10-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Hippo signaling pathway is a vital regulator of organ size that fine-tunes cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. A number of important studies have revealed critical roles of Hippo signaling and its effectors Yap (Yes-associated protein) and Taz (transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif) in tissue development, homeostasis, and regeneration, as well as in tumorigenesis. In addition, recent studies have shown evidence of crosstalk between the Hippo pathway and other key signaling pathways, such as Wnt signaling, that not only regulates developmental processes but also contributes to disease pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the major discoveries in the field of Hippo signaling and what has been learned about its regulation and crosstalk with other signaling pathways, with a particular focus on recent findings involving the Hippo-Yap pathway in craniofacial and tooth development. New and exciting studies of the Hippo pathway are anticipated that will significantly improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of human craniofacial and tooth development and disease and will ultimately lead to the development of new therapies.

  19. MicroRNA Regulation of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed L. Abba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a central regulatory program that is similar in many aspects to several steps of embryonic morphogenesis. In addition to its physiological role in tissue repair and wound healing, EMT contributes to chemo resistance, metastatic dissemination and fibrosis, amongst others. Classically, the morphological change from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype is characterized by the appearance or loss of a group of proteins which have come to be recognized as markers of the EMT process. As with all proteins, these molecules are controlled at the transcriptional and translational level by transcription factors and microRNAs, respectively. A group of developmental transcription factors form the backbone of the EMT cascade and a large body of evidence shows that microRNAs are heavily involved in the successful coordination of mesenchymal transformation and vice versa, either by suppressing the expression of different groups of transcription factors, or otherwise acting as their functional mediators in orchestrating EMT. This article dissects the contribution of microRNAs to EMT and analyzes the molecular basis for their roles in this cellular process. Here, we emphasize their interaction with core transcription factors like the zinc finger enhancer (E-box binding homeobox (ZEB, Snail and Twist families as well as some pluripotency transcription factors.

  20. Behaviour of human mesenchymal stem cells on chemically synthesized HA-PCL scaffolds for hard tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Antò, Vincenzo; Raucci, Maria Grazia; Guarino, Vincenzo; Martina, Stefano; Valletta, Rosa; Ambrosio, Luigi

    2016-02-01

    Our goal was to characterize the response of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to a novel composite scaffold for bone tissue engineering. The hydroxyapatite-polycaprolactone (HA-PCL) composite scaffolds were prepared by a sol-gel method at room temperature and the scaffold morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to validate the synthesis process. The response of two different lines of hMSCs, bone-marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) in terms of cell proliferation and differentiation into the osteoblastic phenotype, was evaluated using Alamar blue assay, SEM, histology and alkaline phosphatase activity. Our results indicate that tissue engineering by means of composite HA-PCL scaffolds may represent a new therapeutic strategy to repair craniofacial bone defects. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 30-year International Pediatric Craniofacial Surgery Partnership: Evolution from the "Third World" Forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jordan W; Skirpan, Jan; Stanek, Beata; Kowalczyk, Maciej; Bartlett, Scott P

    2016-04-01

    Craniofacial diseases constitute an important component of the surgical disease burden in low- and middle-income countries. The consideration to introduce craniofacial surgery into such settings poses different questions, risks, and challenges compared with cleft or other forms of plastic surgery. We report the evolution, innovations, and challenges of a 30-year international craniofacial surgery partnership. We retrospectively report a partnership between surgeons at the Uniwersytecki Szpital Dzieciecy in Krakow, Poland, and a North American craniofacial surgeon. We studied patient conditions, treatment patterns, and associated complications, as well as program advancements and limitations as perceived by surgeons, patient families, and hospital administrators. Since partnership inception in 1986, the complexity of cases performed increased gradually, with the first intracranial case performed in 1995. In the most recent 10-year period (2006-2015), 85 patients have been evaluated, with most common diagnoses of Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and single-suture craniosynostosis. In the same period, 55 major surgical procedures have been undertaken, with LeFort III midface distraction, posterior vault distraction, and frontoorbital advancement performed most frequently. Key innovations have been the employment of craniofacial distraction osteogenesis, the use of Internet communication and digital photography, and increased understanding of how craniofacial morphology may improve in the absence of surgical intervention. Ongoing challenges include prohibitive training pathways for pediatric plastic surgeons, difficulty in coordinating care with surgeons in other institutions, and limited medical and material resources. Safe craniofacial surgery can be introduced and sustained in a resource-limited setting through an international partnership.

  2. [Concept of mesenchymal stem cells: bring more insights into functional research of MSC].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Hua

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have generated great interest among researchers and physicians due to their unique biological characteristics and potential clinical applications. Here, I propose for the first time the concept of a hierarchical system which is composed of all mesenchymal stem cells from post-embryonic subtotipotent stem cells to MSC progenitors. Post-embryonic subtotipotent stem cells are left-over cells during embryonic development and are on the top of the hierarchy. MSC system is a combination of cells that are derived from different stages of embryonic development, possess different differentiation potential and ultimately give rise to cells that share a similar set of phenotypic markers. The concept of MSC system has important implications: (1) it entirely explains the three important biological characteristics of MSC: stem cell properties of MSC, MSC as components of tissue microenvironment and immunomodulatory functions of MSC. (2) It balances immune responses and tissue metabolism. (3) It could provide tissue-specific stem cells for clinical application with high efficiency and safety. In a word, this concept constitutes an important part of the biological properties of MSC and will help researchers gain better insight into MSC.

  3. CITED1 Expression in Wilms' Tumor and Embryonic Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold N. Lovvorn, III

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Wilms' tumors, or nephroblastomas, are thought to arise from abnormal postnatal retention and dysregulated differentiation of nephrogenic progenitor cells that originate as a condensed metanephric mesenchyme within embryonic kidneys. We have previously shown that the transcriptional regulator CITED1 (CBP/p300-interacting transactivators with glutamic acid [E]/aspartic acid [D]-rich C-terminal domain is expressed exclusively in these nephrogenic progenitor cells and is downregulated as they differentiate to form nephronic epithelia. In the current study, we show that CITED1 expression persists in blastemal cell populations of both experimental rat nephroblastomas and human Wilms' tumors, and that primary human Wilms' tumors presenting with disseminated disease show the highest level of CITED1 expression. Unlike the predominantly cytoplasmic subcellular localization of CITED1 in the normal developing kidney, CITED1 is clearly detectable in the nuclear compartment of Wilms' tumor blastema. These findings indicate that CITED1 is a marker of primitive blastema in Wilms' tumors and suggest that persistent expression and/or altered subcellular localization of CITED1 in the condensed metanephric mesenchyme could play a role in Wilms' tumor initiation and pathogenesis.

  4. IL-1 beta and TGF beta 2 synergistically induce endothelial to mesenchymal transition in an NF kappa B-dependent manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maleszewska, Monika; Moonen, Jan-Renier A. J.; Huijkman, Nicolette; van de Sluis, Bart; Krenning, Guido; Harmsen, Martin C.

    Endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to fibrotic diseases. The main inducer of EndMT is TGF beta signaling. TGF beta 2 is the dominant isoform in the physiological embryonic EndMT, but its role in the pathological EndMT in the context of inflammatory co-stimulation is not known.

  5. Generation of stomach tissue from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Taka-aki K; Ninomiya, Naoto; Sekine, Mari; Komazaki, Shinji; Wang, Pi-Chao; Asashima, Makoto; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-08-01

    Successful pluripotent stem cell differentiation methods have been developed for several endoderm-derived cells, including hepatocytes, β-cells and intestinal cells. However, stomach lineage commitment from pluripotent stem cells has remained a challenge, and only antrum specification has been demonstrated. We established a method for stomach differentiation from embryonic stem cells by inducing mesenchymal Barx1, an essential gene for in vivo stomach specification from gut endoderm. Barx1-inducing culture conditions generated stomach primordium-like spheroids, which differentiated into mature stomach tissue cells in both the corpus and antrum by three-dimensional culture. This embryonic stem cell-derived stomach tissue (e-ST) shared a similar gene expression profile with adult stomach, and secreted pepsinogen as well as gastric acid. Furthermore, TGFA overexpression in e-ST caused hypertrophic mucus and gastric anacidity, which mimicked Ménétrier disease in vitro. Thus, in vitro stomach tissue derived from pluripotent stem cells mimics in vivo development and can be used for stomach disease models.

  6. Apoptosis during embryonic tissue remodeling is accompanied by cell senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, Carlos I.; Garcia-Riart, Beatriz; Montero, Juan A.; Rodriguez-León, Joaquín; Garcia-Porrero, Juan A; Hurle, Juan M.

    2015-01-01

    This study re-examined the dying process in the interdigital tissue during the formation of free digits in the developing limbs. We demonstrated that the interdigital dying process was associated with cell senescence, as deduced by induction of β-gal activity, mitotic arrest, and transcriptional up-regulation of p21 together with many components of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We also found overlapping domains of expression of members of the Btg/Tob gene family of antiproliferative factors in the regressing interdigits. Notably, Btg2 was up-regulated during interdigit remodeling in species with free digits but not in the webbed foot of the duck. We also demonstrate that oxidative stress promoted the expression of Btg2, and that FGF2 and IGF1 which are survival signals for embryonic limb mesenchyme inhibited Btg2 expression. Btg2 overexpression in vivo and in vitro induced all the observed changes during interdigit regression, including oxidative stress, arrest of cell cycle progression, transcriptional regulation of senescence markers, and caspase-mediated apoptosis. Consistent with the central role of p21 on cell senescence, the transcriptional effects induced by overexpression of Btg2 are attenuated by silencing p21. Our findings indicate that cell senescence and apoptosis are complementary processes in the regression of embryonic tissues and share common regulatory signals. PMID:26568417

  7. Stature estimation from craniofacial anthropometry in Bangladeshi Garo adult females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Z; Banu, L A; Alam, M M; Rahman, M F

    2012-07-01

    Estimation of stature is an important tool in forensic examination especially in unknown, highly decomposed, fragmentary and mutilated human remains. When the evidences are skeletal remains; forensic anthropology has put forward means to estimate the stature from the skeletal and even from fragmentary bones. Sometimes, craniofacial remains are brought in for forensic and postmortem examination. In such a situation, estimation of stature becomes equally important along with other parameters like age, sex, race, etc. Today, anthropometry plays an important role in industrial design, clothing design, ergonomics and architecture where statistical data about the distribution of body dimensions in the population are used to optimize products. It is well established that a single standard of craniofacial aesthetics is not appropriate for application to diverse racial and ethnic groups. Bangladesh is a country not only for the Bengalis; the country harbours many cultures and people of different races because of the colonial rules of the past regimes. Like other ethnic groups, the Garos (study subjects) have their own set of language, social structure, cultures and economic activities and religious values. In the above context, the present study was attempted to establish ethnic specific anthropometric data for the Bangladeshi Garo adult females. The study also attempted to find out the correlation of the craniofacial dimensions with stature and to determine multiplication factors. The study was an observational, cross-sectional and primarily descriptive in nature with some analytical components. The study was carried out with a total number of one hundred Garo adult females, aged between 25-45 years. Craniofacial dimension such as head circumference, head length, facial height from 'nasion' to 'gnathion', bizygomatic breadth and stature were measured using a measuring tape, spreading caliper, steel plate and steel tape and sliding caliper. The data were then statistically

  8. Functional coupling constrains craniofacial diversification in Lake Tanganyika cichlids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Masahito; Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; Kolm, Niclas

    2015-01-01

    Functional coupling, where a single morphological trait performs multiple functions, is a universal feature of organismal design. Theory suggests that functional coupling may constrain the rate of phenotypic evolution, yet empirical tests of this hypothesis are rare. In fish, the evolutionary transition from guarding the eggs on a sandy/rocky substrate (i.e. substrate guarding) to mouthbrooding introduces a novel function to the craniofacial system and offers an ideal opportunity to test the functional coupling hypothesis. Using a combination of geometric morphometrics and a recently developed phylogenetic comparative method, we found that head morphology evolution was 43% faster in substrate guarding species than in mouthbrooding species. Furthermore, for species in which females were solely responsible for mouthbrooding the males had a higher rate of head morphology evolution than in those with bi-parental mouthbrooding. Our results support the hypothesis that adaptations resulting in functional coupling constrain phenotypic evolution. PMID:25948565

  9. Craniofacial morphology of orthodontically untreated patients living in Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, U; Dannhauer, K H

    1996-08-01

    The subject of this study is an analysis of the possible specific ethnic characteristics of the craniofacial morphology within the Saxon population. For this purpose we analyzed, in a cephalometric cross-sectional study, lateral cephalometric radiographs taken between 1992 and 1994 of 10,047 orthodontically untreated native Saxon patients. The cephalometric analysis used was a synthesis of several classic procedures as applied at Leipzig University. Among the sagittal parameters there was a relatively high prevalence of mandibular retrognathism and skeletal distal jaw relationship. The vertical parameters displayed a relatively good balance between vertical and horizontal growth patterns. With respect to sexual dimorphism, the differences in the angular parameters and in the indices of relationship were only moderate and so almost irrelevant in clinical terms. Among the age-related changes, the focus is on the increase in the degree of prognathism of both jaws and the anterior rotation of the mandible.

  10. Implant-retained craniofacial prostheses for facial defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federspil, Philipp A.

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial prostheses, also known as epistheses, are artificial substitutes for facial defects. The breakthrough for rehabilitation of facial defects with implant-retained prostheses came with the development of the modern silicones and bone anchorage. Following the discovery of the osseointegration of titanium in the 1950s, dental implants have been made of titanium in the 1960s. In 1977, the first extraoral titanium implant was inserted in a patient. Later, various solitary extraoral implant systems were developed. Grouped implant systems have also been developed which may be placed more reliably in areas with low bone presentation, as in the nasal and orbital region, or the ideally pneumatised mastoid process. Today, even large facial prostheses may be securely retained. The classical atraumatic surgical technique has remained an unchanged prerequisite for successful implantation of any system. This review outlines the basic principles of osseointegration as well as the main features of extraoral implantology. PMID:22073096

  11. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS). Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them.

  12. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. D. Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial microsomia (CFM includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS. Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract. The peculiarity of this case is the presence of the bilateral total congenital cataract, in association with CFM. There is absence of epibulbar dermoid or lipodermoid in the eyes, although the child had features of GHS. In addition to it, anesthetic intubation was smooth in this case. Any case diagnosed with CFM and/or GHS needs treatment through multidisciplinary approach, consultation in ophthalmology department is one of them.

  13. Breathing mode influence on craniofacial development and head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambi-Rocha, Annel; Cabrera-Domínguez, Mª Eugenia; Domínguez-Reyes, Antonia

    2017-08-14

    The incidence of abnormal breathing and its consequences on craniofacial development is increasing, and is not limited to children with adenoid faces. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cephalometric differences in craniofacial structures and head posture between nasal breathing and oral breathing children and teenagers with a normal facial growth pattern. Ninety-eight 7-16 year-old patients with a normal facial growth pattern were clinically and radiographically evaluated. They were classified as either nasal breathing or oral breathing patients according to the predominant mode of breathing through clinical and historical evaluation, and breathing respiratory rate predomination as quantified by an airflow sensor. They were divided in two age groups (G1: 7-9) (G2: 10-16) to account for normal age-related facial growth. Oral breathing children (8.0±0.7 years) showed less nasopharyngeal cross-sectional dimension (MPP) (p=0.030), whereas other structures were similar to their nasal breathing counterparts (7.6±0.9 years). However, oral breathing teenagers (12.3±2.0 years) exhibited a greater palate length (ANS-PNS) (p=0.049), a higher vertical dimension in the lower anterior face (Xi-ANS-Pm) (p=0.015), and a lower position of the hyoid bone with respect to the mandibular plane (H-MP) (p=0.017) than their nasal breathing counterparts (12.5±1.9 years). No statistically significant differences were found in head posture. Even in individuals with a normal facial growth pattern, when compared with nasal breathing individuals, oral breathing children present differences in airway dimensions. Among adolescents, these dissimilarities include structures in the facial development and hyoid bone position. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Biomedical discovery acceleration, with applications to craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Sonia M; Tipney, Hannah; Feng, Weiguo; Baumgartner, William A; Kasliwal, Priyanka; Schuyler, Ronald P; Williams, Trevor; Spritz, Richard A; Hunter, Lawrence

    2009-03-01

    The profusion of high-throughput instruments and the explosion of new results in the scientific literature, particularly in molecular biomedicine, is both a blessing and a curse to the bench researcher. Even knowledgeable and experienced scientists can benefit from computational tools that help navigate this vast and rapidly evolving terrain. In this paper, we describe a novel computational approach to this challenge, a knowledge-based system that combines reading, reasoning, and reporting methods to facilitate analysis of experimental data. Reading methods extract information from external resources, either by parsing structured data or using biomedical language processing to extract information from unstructured data, and track knowledge provenance. Reasoning methods enrich the knowledge that results from reading by, for example, noting two genes that are annotated to the same ontology term or database entry. Reasoning is also used to combine all sources into a knowledge network that represents the integration of all sorts of relationships between a pair of genes, and to calculate a combined reliability score. Reporting methods combine the knowledge network with a congruent network constructed from experimental data and visualize the combined network in a tool that facilitates the knowledge-based analysis of that data. An implementation of this approach, called the Hanalyzer, is demonstrated on a large-scale gene expression array dataset relevant to craniofacial development. The use of the tool was critical in the creation of hypotheses regarding the roles of four genes never previously characterized as involved in craniofacial development; each of these hypotheses was validated by further experimental work.

  15. Biomedical discovery acceleration, with applications to craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M Leach

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The profusion of high-throughput instruments and the explosion of new results in the scientific literature, particularly in molecular biomedicine, is both a blessing and a curse to the bench researcher. Even knowledgeable and experienced scientists can benefit from computational tools that help navigate this vast and rapidly evolving terrain. In this paper, we describe a novel computational approach to this challenge, a knowledge-based system that combines reading, reasoning, and reporting methods to facilitate analysis of experimental data. Reading methods extract information from external resources, either by parsing structured data or using biomedical language processing to extract information from unstructured data, and track knowledge provenance. Reasoning methods enrich the knowledge that results from reading by, for example, noting two genes that are annotated to the same ontology term or database entry. Reasoning is also used to combine all sources into a knowledge network that represents the integration of all sorts of relationships between a pair of genes, and to calculate a combined reliability score. Reporting methods combine the knowledge network with a congruent network constructed from experimental data and visualize the combined network in a tool that facilitates the knowledge-based analysis of that data. An implementation of this approach, called the Hanalyzer, is demonstrated on a large-scale gene expression array dataset relevant to craniofacial development. The use of the tool was critical in the creation of hypotheses regarding the roles of four genes never previously characterized as involved in craniofacial development; each of these hypotheses was validated by further experimental work.

  16. Systematic Reviews in Craniofacial Trauma-Strengths and Weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Cedric; Januszyk, Michael; Wan, Derrick C; Momeni, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Despite substantial advances in the management of craniofacial trauma, numerous clinical questions remain. These are increasingly being answered using systematic reviews (SRs). However, caution is warranted as their validity and role in influencing clinical practice has been called into question. A PubMed search was performed in October 2014 to identify SRs published up to and including September 2014 in 35 scientific journals. Two authors independently reviewed the literature and extracted data from included studies. Discrepancies were resolved by consensus. Assessment of multiple systematic reviews (AMSTAR) was used to determine the quality of SRs. The initial search retrieved 3080 articles of which 3051 articles were excluded after screening title and abstract. After full-text review of the remaining 29 articles, 3 additional articles were excluded, thus, leaving 26 SRs for final analysis. Regression analysis demonstrated that the overall number of published SRs increased significantly throughout the period analyzed (P = 0.022). The median AMSTAR score of all SRs was 4.5, consistent with a "poor-to-fair" quality. The interobserver agreement was high, as evidenced by a mean κ of 0.91. Although there appeared to be a trend toward an increase in AMSTAR score by year over the period analyzed, this failed to reach statistical significance in terms of median (P = 0.36) or absolute (P = 0.26) counts. A tremendous opportunity exists for improvements in the quality of SRs focusing on craniofacial trauma. In addition to familiarizing authors with quality criteria for SRs, adoption of strict reporting criteria by scientific journals may result in long-term improvements in the quality of reporting.

  17. Postnatal craniofacial ontogeny in neandertals and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Frank L'Engle; Cofran, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    Neandertals and humans are closely related but differ noticeably in adult morphology. Previous work has been equivocal as to the contribution of postnatal growth and development to these differences. Due to disparate preservation, most analyses focus on specific anatomies, reconstructed fossils, or limited sample sizes. The objective of this research is to highlight the importance of postnatal growth in expressing Neandertal-human distinctions in the craniofacial skeleton, using a large and unreconstructed Neandertal sample. A resampling approach is utilized to compare relative size change in 20 craniofacial dimensions between Neandertals (n = 42) and humans (n = 262). The large number of immature Neandertal samples within and between dental stages provides the necessary variation to test for growth differences. Nested resampling using human-human comparisons assesses the likelihood of observing human-Neandertal growth differences under the null hypothesis of similar ontogenetic variation. Humans and Neandertals undergo comparable levels of overall size change. However, we identify growth differences for a number of traits, helping explain some of the unique features of this fossil taxon. Nested resampling shows it is unlikely that a Neandertal-like maturation would be observed in a random ontogenetic sample of humans. Growth during adolescence appears to be fundamental in the expression of some Neandertal anatomies. Neandertal upper facial and nasal breadths appear to have expanded rapidly after puberty to account for differences between preadolescents and adults, and Neandertals and humans. Mandibular growth differences may relate to anterior tooth use to process foods and paramastication during Neandertal maturation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Sella turcica-Its importance in orthodontics and craniofacial morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haritha Pottipalli Sathyanarayana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The sella turcica is a structure which can be readily seen on lateral cephalometric radiographs and sella point is routinely traced for various cephalometric analyses. The search was carried out using the following key words (sella turcica, bridging of sella, size, shape of sella turcica and with the following search engine (Pubmed, Cochrane, Google scholar. The morphology is very important for the cephalometric position of the reference point sella, not only for evaluating craniofacial morphology, but also when growth changes and orthodontic treatment results are to be evaluated. This makes it a good source of additional diagnostic information related to pathology of the pituitary gland, or to various syndromes that affect the craniofacial region. Clinicians should be familiar with the normal radiographic anatomy and morphologic variability of this area, in order to recognize and investigate deviations that may reflect pathological situations, even before these become clinically apparent. During embryological development, the sella turcica area is the key point for the migration of the neural crest cells to the frontonasal and maxillary developmental fields. The neural crest cells are involved in the formation and development of sella turcica and teeth. The size of sella turcica ranges from 4 to 12 mm for the vertical and 5 to 16 mm for the anteroposterior dimension. There are many classification systems regarding the shape of sella turcica. Majority of the studies show that about 67% of the subjects had normal appearance and about 33% showed variations. The prevalence of sella turcica bridging is high in class III malocclusions and dental anomalies.

  19. Evaluation of ICD-9-CM codes for craniofacial microsomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquetti, Daniela V; Saltzman, Babette S; Vivaldi, Daniela; Pimenta, Luiz A; Hing, Anne V; Cassell, Cynthia H; Starr, Jacqueline R; Heike, Carrie L

    2012-12-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is a congenital condition characterized by microtia and mandibular underdevelopment. Healthcare databases and birth defects surveillance programs could be used to improve knowledge of CFM. However, no specific International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code exists for this condition, which makes standardized data collection challenging. Our aim was to evaluate the validity of existing ICD-9-CM codes to identify individuals with CFM. Study sample eligibility criteria were developed by an expert panel and matched to 11 ICD-9-CM codes. We queried hospital discharge data from two craniofacial centers and identified a total of 12,254 individuals who had ≥1 potentially CFM-related code(s). We reviewed all (n = 799) medical records identified at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and 500 randomly selected records at Seattle Children's Hospital (SCH). Individuals were classified as a CFM case or non-case. Thirty-two individuals (6%) at SCH and 93 (12%) at UNC met the CFM eligibility criteria. At both centers, 59% of cases and 95% of non-cases had only one code assigned. At both centers, the most frequent codes were 744.23 (microtia), 754.0 and 756.0 (nonspecific codes), and the code 744.23 had a positive predictive value (PPV) >80% and sensitivity >70%. The code 754.0 had a sensitivity of 3% (PPV <1%) at SCH and 36% (PPV = 5%) at UNC, whereas 756.0 had a sensitivity of 38% (PPV = 5%) at SCH and 18% (PPV = 26%) at UNC. These findings suggest the need for a specific CFM code to facilitate CFM surveillance and research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Embryonic hematopoiesis under microscopic observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaus, Anna; Robin, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are at the origin of adult hematopoiesis, providing an organism with all blood cell types needed throughout life. During embryonic development a first wave of hematopoiesis (independent of HSCs) allows the survival and growth of the embryo until birth. A second wave

  1. MORN5 expression during craniofacial development and its interaction with the BMP and TGFB pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Cela

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available MORN5 (MORN repeat containing 5 is encoded by a locus positioned on chromosome 17 in the chicken genome. The MORN motif is found in multiple copies in several proteins including junctophilins or phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinase family and the MORN proteins themselves are found across the animal and plant kingdoms. MORN5 protein has a characteristic punctate pattern in the cytoplasm in immunofluorescence imaging. Previously, MORN5 was found among differentially expressed genes in a microarray profiling experiment of the chicken embryo head. Here, we provided in situ hybridization to analyse, in detail, the MORN5 expression in chick craniofacial structures. The expression of MORN5 was first observed at stage HH17-18 (E2.5. MORN5 expression gradually appeared on either side of the primitive oral cavity, within the maxillary region. At stage HH20 (E3, prominent expression was localised in the mandibular prominences lateral to the midline. From stage HH20 up to HH29 (E6, there was strong expression in restricted regions of the maxillary and mandibular prominences. The frontonasal mass (in the midline of the face expresses MORN5, starting at HH27 (E5. The expression was concentrated in the corners or globular processes, which will ultimately fuse with the cranial edges of the maxillary prominences. MORN5 expression was maintained in the fusion zone up to stage HH29. In sections in situs, MORN5 expression was localised preferentially in the mesenchyme. We examined signals that regulate MORN5 expression in the face based on a previous microarray study. Here we validated the array results with in situ hybridization and QPCR. MORN5 was downregulated 24h after Noggin and/or RA treatment. We also determined that BMP pathway genes are downstream of MORN5 following siRNA knockdown. Based on these results, we conclude that MORN5 is both regulated by and required for BMP signalling. The restricted expression of MORN5 in the lip fusion zone shown here

  2. PATHOGENESIS OF METHANOL-INDUCED CRANIOFACIAL DEFECTS IN C57BL/6J MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Methanol administered to C57BL/6J mice during gastrulation causes severe craniofacial dysmorphology. We describe dysmorphogenesis, cell death, cell cycle assessment, and effects on development of cranial ganglia and nerves observed following administration of methanol...

  3. 76 FR 20693 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... Emphasis Panel; Review RFA-DE-12-001, NIDCR Behavioral or Social Intervention Planning and Pilot Data Grant..., National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, One Democracy Plaza, Room 670, Bethesda, MD 20892...

  4. 77 FR 29673 - National Institute of Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... Dental & Craniofacial Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal..., [email protected] . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.121, Oral Diseases and...

  5. Identifying craniofacial features associated with prenatal exposure to androgens and testing their relationship with brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marečková, Klára; Chakravarty, Mallar M; Lawrence, Claire; Leonard, Gabriel; Perusse, Daniel; Perron, Michel; Pike, Bruce G; Richer, Louis; Veillette, Suzanne; Pausova, Zdenka; Paus, Tomáš

    2015-11-01

    We used magnetic resonance (MR) images obtained in same-sex and opposite-sex dizygotic twins (n = 119, 8 years of age) to study possible effects of prenatal androgens on craniofacial features. Using a principal component analysis of 19 craniofacial landmarks placed on the MR images, we identified a principal component capturing craniofacial features that distinguished females with a presumed differential exposure to prenatal androgens by virtue of having a male (vs. a female) co-twin (Cohen's d = 0.76). Subsequently, we tested the possibility that this craniofacial "signature" of prenatal exposure to androgens predicts brain size, a known sexually dimorphic trait. In an independent sample of female adolescents (singletons; n = 462), we found that the facial signature predicts up to 8% of variance in brain size. These findings are consistent with the organizational effects of androgens on brain development and suggest that the facial signature derived in this study could complement other indirect measures of prenatal exposure to androgens.

  6. Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensman, H.; Goransson, H.; Leuchowius, K.J.; Stromberg, S.; Ponten, F.; Isaksson, A.; Rutteman, G.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074076663; Heldin, N.; Pejler, G.; Hellmen, E.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive expression of craniofacial related homeobox genes in canine mammary sarcomas Journal Breast Cancer Research and Treatment Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 0167-6806 (Print) 1573-7217 (Online) Issue Volume 118, Number 2 / November, 2009 Category Preclinical Study DOI

  7. Airway Management of Patients With Craniofacial Abnormalities: 10-year Experience at a Teaching Hospital in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lun Chen

    2009-09-01

    Conclusion: Managing the airway of patients with craniofacial abnormalities can potentially be difficult. It should be carried out by experienced anesthesiologists, with assistance from an otolaryngologist when necessary. A variety of different airway devices should be available if needed.

  8. [Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the mandible].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, R; Benhammou, A; Benbouzid, M-A; El Edghiri, H; Boulaich, M; Essakali, L; Kzadri, M

    2007-04-01

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare form of chondrosarcoma and mandibular localization is rare. We report a case of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the mandible in a 23-year-old patient who consulted for a voluminous tumor of the right mandible. Radiological findings suggested a malignant tumor. A hemimandibulectomy and a pelvectomy were performed. The histological assessment showed zones of neoplastic cartilage and small ovoid cells, typical of mesenchymal chondrosarcoma. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of skeletal and extra skeletal origin. The most frequent localizations are the femur, the ribs, and facial bones. Histologically, these tumors have a typical biphasic pattern consisting of both small cells and islands of atypical cartilage. Because of its rich vascular component, this lesion has often been confused with hemangiopericytoma. Surgery is the usual treatment. The prognosis is very poor with a high risk of relapse and metastasis.

  9. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    OpenAIRE

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Scott E Fraser; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.

    2011-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression pat...

  10. 3-Dimensional Morphologic Analysis of the Craniofacial Skeletal Complex Using Geometry-Based Superimposition and Normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Jay Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Introduction : Cephalometrics is a radiographic technique used to analyze craniofacial structures for diagnostic or analytic purposes. However, conventional cephalometrics has many limitations, including the fact that it is entirely landmark-dependent and based on a 2-dimensional image. In previous studies, Fourier descriptors have been used to describe part of the craniofacial structure. However, these studies are insufficient providing a complete set of information to fully analyze craniof...

  11. Body Image and Quality of Life in Adolescents With Craniofacial Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crerand, Canice E; Sarwer, David B; Kazak, Anne E; Clarke, Alexandra; Rumsey, Nichola

    2017-01-01

      To evaluate body image in adolescents with and without craniofacial conditions and to examine relationships between body image and quality of life.   Case-control design.   A pediatric hospital's craniofacial center and primary care practices.   Seventy adolescents with visible craniofacial conditions and a demographically matched sample of 42 adolescents without craniofacial conditions.   Adolescents completed measures of quality of life and body image including satisfaction with weight, facial and overall appearance, investment in appearance (importance of appearance to self-worth), and body image disturbance (appearance-related distress and impairment in functioning).   Adolescents with craniofacial conditions reported lower appearance investment (P appearance, greater body image disturbance, and lower weight satisfaction compared with males (P body image disturbance was associated with lower quality of life (P body image disturbance, or satisfaction with appearance.   Body image and quality of life in adolescents with craniofacial conditions are similar to nonaffected youth. Relationships between body image and quality of life emphasize that appearance perceptions are important to adolescents' well-being regardless of whether they have a facial disfigurement. Investment in one's appearance may explain variations in body image satisfaction and serve as an intervention target, particularly for females.

  12. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  13. Imaging features of undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver: a series of 15 children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabor, Flaviu; Franchi-Abella, Stephanie; Pariente, Daniele [Bicetre Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Merli, Laura [Bambino Gesu Children' s Hospital, Unit of Hepato-Biliary and Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery and Transplantation Centre, Rome (Italy); Adamsbaum, Catherine [Bicetre Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Paris Sud University, Faculty of Medicine, Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Universite Paris-Saclay, LTCI, CNRS, Telecom Paris Tech, Paris (France)

    2016-11-15

    Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma of the liver is a rare malignant mesenchymal tumour occurring mostly in children ages 6-10 years. The discrepancy between its solid appearance on US and cystic-like appearance on CT has been described. To study the imaging particularities and similarities among our cases of undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma and to report the errors in initial diagnoses. We conducted a retrospective study of 15 children with undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma diagnosed or referred to our hospital during 1997-2015 and analysed the clinical, biological and imaging data. We identified eight boys and seven girls ages 9 months to 14 years. Ten children presented with abdominal pain. Alpha-fetoprotein was slightly increased in one. Initial US and CT had been performed for all, while additional MRI had been done in two children. Initial CT demonstrated a hypoattenuated mass in all. Rupture was seen in five and intratumoural bleeding in seven children. Tumour volumes reduced during neoadjuvant chemotherapy in 10 children. Undifferentiated embryonal sarcoma might be suggested in a non-secreting unifocal tumour with well-defined borders, fluid-filled spaces on US, hypoattenuation and serpiginous vessels on CT, and if there are signs of internal bleeding or rupture on CT or MRI. (orig.)

  14. Production of embryonic and fetal-like red blood cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Jung Chang

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into embryonic and fetal type of red blood cells that sequentially express three types of hemoglobins recapitulating early human erythropoiesis. We report here that we have produced iPS from three somatic cell types: adult skin fibroblasts as well as embryonic and fetal mesenchymal stem cells. We show that regardless of the age of the donor cells, the iPS produced are fully reprogrammed into a pluripotent state that is undistinguishable from that of hESCs by low and high-throughput expression and detailed analysis of globin expression patterns by HPLC. This suggests that reprogramming with the four original Yamanaka pluripotency factors leads to complete erasure of all functionally important epigenetic marks associated with erythroid differentiation regardless of the age or the tissue type of the donor cells, at least as detected in these assays. The ability to produce large number of erythroid cells with embryonic and fetal-like characteristics is likely to have many translational applications.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Clinical Applications in Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hsun; Liu, Hwan-Wun; Wu, Kun-Chi; Ding, Dah-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative joint disorder characterized by articular cartilage destruction and osteophyte formation. Chondrocytes in the matrix have a relatively slow turnover rate, and the tissue itself lacks a blood supply to support repair and remodeling. Researchers have evaluated the effectiveness of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering for treating osteoarthritis. All sources of stem cells, including embryonic, induced pluripotent, fetal, and adult stem cells, have potential use in stem cell therapy, which provides a permanent biological solution. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord show considerable promise for use in cartilage repair. MSCs can be sourced from any or all joint tissues and can modulate the immune response. Additionally, MSCs can directly differentiate into chondrocytes under appropriate signal transduction. They also have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory paracrine effects. This article reviews the current clinical applications of MSCs and future directions of research in osteoarthritis.

  16. A multidisciplinary treatment of patients with craniofacial disorders. Own experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtyńska, Elżbieta; Bączkowski, Bohdan; Przybyłowska, Dorota; Cierech, Mariusz; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta; Zadurska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Oral rehabilitation of patients with craniofacial disorders is a great challenge and needs a multidisciplinary approach. This is due to the diverse etiology of the disease and severity of changes in tissues and organs. Congenital absence of tooth germs manifested in the form of oligodontia or anodontia, the presence of persistent deciduous teeth in ectodermal dysplasia (ED), cleft lip and hard palate or cancer-induced changes in the tissues of the stomatognathic system are the most common causes of these disorders. The observed abnormalities are responsible for functional disorders of musculo-articular system, speech and chewing. In addition, noticeable adverse changes in the appearance have a huge psychological impact on patients and their well-being. Therefore, the treatment of these medical conditions should begin in childhood and comprise interdisciplinary rehabilitation, involving prosthetics and orthodontics supported by surgery, as well as speech or laryngological therapy. In this paper the interdisciplinary treatment of patients with oral hard and soft tissues disorders during ectodermal dysplasia is discussed. Early oral rehabilitation can restore lost or abnormally shaped tissues and proper functions of the masticatory system. It can also have a positive impact on further physical and psychological development of patients.

  17. Central nervous system anomalies in craniofacial microsomia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renkema, R W; Caron, C J J M; Wolvius, E B; Dunaway, D J; Forrest, C R; Padwa, B L; Koudstaal, M J

    2018-01-01

    Extracraniofacial anomalies, including central nervous system (CNS) anomalies, may occur in craniofacial microsomia (CFM). This systematic review was performed to provide an overview of the literature on the prevalence and types of CNS anomalies and developmental disorders in CFM, in order to improve the recognition and possible treatment of these anomalies. A systematic search was conducted and data on the number of patients, patient characteristics, type and prevalence of CNS anomalies or developmental delay, and correlations between CFM and CNS anomalies were extracted. Sixteen papers were included; 11 of these described developmental disorders. The most common reported anomalies were neural tube defects, corpus callosum agenesis or hypoplasia, intracranial lipoma, Arnold-Chiari malformations, hydrocephaly, ventriculomegaly, and cerebral hypoplasia. The prevalence of CNS anomalies in CFM varied from 2% to 69%. The prevalence of developmental disorders, such as intellectual disability, language or speech developmental delay, and neuropsychomotor delay, varied from 8% to 73%. This study suggests that CNS anomalies and developmental disorders are seen in a substantial proportion of patients with CFM. Further research should focus on determining which features of CFM are correlated with CNS anomalies to allow adequate screening and timely care. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  18. Craniofacial and Dental Features in Six Children With Cherubism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoor, Patricia; Suomalainen, Anni; Kemola, W; Arte, Sirpa

    2017-10-01

    Cherubism is an autosomal-dominant benign bone disorder, characterized by fibro-osseous lesions in the mandible and maxilla commonly caused by mutations in the SH3-binding protein 2-gene. The purpose of the authors' study was to analyze craniofacial and dental features of children diagnosed with cherubism, describe their treatment, and assess their dental age compared with norms for Finnish children. Six children were diagnosed, followed up and treated due to dental and skeletal disorders caused by cherubsim. The patients were followed up for an average of 91.5 months with emphasis on the skeletal changes and development of dentition. The treatment consisted of minor orthodontic treatment, dental extractions, and exposures. One patient underwent cosmetic mandibular surgery. All patients had lesions in the lower jaw and 5 of 6 patients had lesions in the maxilla as well. The patients were characterized by varying swelling of the jaws, premature loss of deciduous teeth in the affected area and widely spaced, displaced, un-erupted, or absent permanent teeth. The dental age was delayed at younger age but near to normal or even a little ahead at older age. Even though cherubism affects the jaws, jaw positions, and malocclusion, no common dentofacial proportions associated with the disease could be confirmed by cephalometric analysis. The surgical interventions did not provoke adverse reactions or local growth of the lesions.

  19. Bone markers in craniofacial bone deformations and dysplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Seifert

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of bony deformations and dysplasias are often present in the facial skeleton. Bone defects can be either localized or general. Quite often they are not only present in the skull but also can be found in other parts of the skeleton. In many cases the presence and levels of specific bone markers should be measured in order to fully describe their activity and presence in the skeleton. Fibrous dysplasia (FD is the most common one in the facial skeleton; however, other bone deformations regarding bone growth and activity can also be present. Every clinician should be aware of all common, rare and uncommon bony diseases and conditions such as cherubism, Paget’s disease, osteogenesis imperfecta and others related to genetic conditions. We present standard (calcium, parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, alkaline phosphatase, vitamin D and specialized bone markers (pyridinium, deoxypyridinium, hydroxyproline, RANKL/RANK/OPG pathway, growth hormone, insulin-like growth hormone-1 that can be used to evaluate, measure or describe the processes occurring in craniofacial bones.

  20. The nervous system orchestrates and integrates craniofacial development: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj eFried

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Development of a head is a dazzlingly complex process: a number of distinct cellular sources including cranial ecto- and endoderm, mesoderm and neural crest contribute to facial and other structures. In the head, an extremely fine-tuned developmental coordination of CNS, peripheral neural components, sensory organs and a musculo-skeletal apparatus occurs, which provides protection and functional integration. The face can to a large extent be considered as an assembly of sensory systems encased and functionally fused with appendages represented by jaws. Here we review how the developing brain, neurogenic placodes and peripheral nerves influence the morphogenesis of surrounding tissues as a part of various general integrative processes in the head. The mechanisms of this impact, as we understand it now, span from the targeted release of the morphogens necessary for shaping to providing a niche for cellular sources required in later development. In this review we also discuss the most recent findings and ideas related to how peripheral nerves and nerve-associated cells contribute to craniofacial development, including teeth, during the post- neural crest period and potentially in regeneration.

  1. Dual embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors: clinical implications in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gamba Garib

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Cleft lip and palate are craniofacial anomalies highly prevalent in the overall population. In oral clefts involving the alveolar ridge, variations of number, shape, size and position are observed in maxillary lateral incisors. The objective of this manuscript is to elucidate the embryonic origin of maxillary lateral incisors in order to understand the etiology of these variations.Contextualization: The hypothesis that orofacial clefts would split maxillary lateral incisor buds has been previously reported. However, recent studies showed that maxillary lateral incisors have dual embryonic origin, being partially formed by both the medial nasal process and the maxillary process. In other words, the mesial half of the lateral incisor seems to come from the medial nasal process while the distal half of the lateral incisor originates from the maxillary process. In cleft patients, these processes do not fuse, which results in different numerical and positional patterns for lateral incisors relating to the alveolar cleft. In addition to these considerations, this study proposes a nomenclature for maxillary lateral incisors in patients with cleft lip and palate, based on embryology and lateral incisors position in relation to the alveolar cleft.Conclusion:Embryological knowledge on the dual origin of maxillary lateral incisors and the use of a proper nomenclature for their numerical and positional variations renders appropriate communication among professionals and treatment planning easier, in addition to standardizing research analysis.

  2. Hypoxia activated EGFR signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Misra

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process which requires the conversion of polarized epithelial cells to mesenchymal cells, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. EMT is essential during embryonic morphogenesis and has been implicated in the progression of primary tumors towards metastasis. Hypoxia is known to induce EMT; however the molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Using the A431 epithelial cancer cell line, we show that cells grown under hypoxic conditions migrated faster than cells grown under normal oxygen environment. Cells grown under hypoxia showed reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM probably due to reduced number of Vinculin patches. Growth under hypoxic conditions also led to down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin expression. The increased motility of cells grown under hypoxia could be due to redistribution of Rac1 to the plasma membrane as opposed to increased expression of Rac1. EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor is a known inducer of EMT and growth of A431 cells in the absence of oxygen led to increased expression of EGFR (EGF Receptor. Treatment of A431 cells with EGF led to reduced cell adhesion to ECM, increased cell motility and other EMT characteristics. Furthermore, this transition was blocked by the monoclonal antibody Cetuximab. Cetuximab also blocked the hypoxia-induced EMT suggesting that cell growth under hypoxic conditions led to activation of EGFR signaling and induction of EMT phenotype.

  3. A systematic review of the oral and craniofacial manifestations of cri du chat syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuera-Flores, José-Ramón; Casttellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Serrera-Figallo, María Ángeles; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Machuca-Portillo, Guillermo

    2016-07-01

    Cri du chat syndrome is an autosomal disorder. Because it affects few people in the population it is considered a rare disease, yet it is one of the most common autosomal chromosomal syndromes in humans. It entails pathognomonic alterations that affect the craniofacial and oral anatomy of patients. The aim of this study is to review these craniofacial and oral abnormalities in patients with Cri du chat syndrome. The PubMed Medline database was searched using two different strategies. First, we used "Dentistry" and "Cri du chat" as keywords; second, we used "Cri du chat" and "craniofacial." Seven articles in which the main orofacial and cranio-skeletal characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome were described were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Cri du Chat syndrome entails pathognomonic characteristics in the craniofacial area (epicanthus, short philtrum, and wide nasal bridge), the oral area (mandibular retrognathism and anterior open bite) and the cranial region (alterations at the cranial base angle and a small upper airway). However, more studies on larger samples are needed to specify the orofacial and craniofacial characteristics of patients with Cri du chat syndrome more accurately. Clin. Anat. 29:555-560, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The face, the future, and dental practice: how research in craniofacial biology will influence patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, G C; Brook, A H

    2014-06-01

    It has been a privilege to assemble a group of Australian and international researchers to produce a special issue of the Australian Dental Journal that reflects the cutting edge of research in different aspects of craniofacial biology, and also considers how these advances will influence future education and practice within dentistry. The aim of this special issue is to provide a collection of concept papers and critical reviews on key topics that cover both fundamental and applied research in craniofacial biology and to consider the clinical implications. To do this, four questions have been addressed that lead to the four sections of this issue. These are: How have we come to the present exciting position in craniofacial biology with breakthroughs over the past 50 years? What are current fundamental research topics that are helping us to understand more about craniofacial and general development, possibly leading to future clinical developments? What are the current applied research topics that will influence future clinical practice? Looking forward, what new developments in craniofacial biology may come about that will change the face of dental education and practice? The refereed papers in this special issue are grouped into the four sections that seek to respond to these demanding questions. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  5. Crude oil exposures reveal roles for intracellular calcium cycling in haddock craniofacial and cardiac development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørhus, Elin; Incardona, John P.; Karlsen, Ørjan; Linbo, Tiffany; Sørensen, Lisbet; Nordtug, Trond; van der Meeren, Terje; Thorsen, Anders; Thorbjørnsen, Maja; Jentoft, Sissel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Meier, Sonnich

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that crude oil exposure affects cardiac development in fish by disrupting excitation-contraction (EC) coupling. We previously found that eggs of Atlantic haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus) bind dispersed oil droplets, potentially leading to more profound toxic effects from uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Using lower concentrations of dispersed crude oil (0.7-7 μg/L ∑PAH), here we exposed a broader range of developmental stages over both short and prolonged durations. We quantified effects on cardiac function and morphogenesis, characterized novel craniofacial defects, and examined the expression of genes encoding potential targets underlying cardiac and craniofacial defects. Because of oil droplet binding, a 24-hr exposure was sufficient to create severe cardiac and craniofacial abnormalities. The specific nature of the craniofacial abnormalities suggests that crude oil may target common craniofacial and cardiac precursor cells either directly or indirectly by affecting ion channels and intracellular calcium in particular. Furthermore, down-regulation of genes encoding specific components of the EC coupling machinery suggests that crude oil disrupts excitation-transcription coupling or normal feedback regulation of ion channels blocked by PAHs. These data support a unifying hypothesis whereby depletion of intracellular calcium pools by crude oil-derived PAHs disrupts several pathways critical for organogenesis in fish.

  6. Customized Polymethyl Methacrylate Implants for the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Osseous Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Fernandes da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial defects represent alterations in the anatomy and morphology of the cranial vault and the facial bones that potentially affect an individual’s psychological and social well-being. Although a variety of techniques and restorative procedures have been described for the reconstruction of the affected area, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, a biocompatible and nondegradable acrylic resin-based implant, is the most widely used alloplastic material for such craniomaxillofacial reconstruction. The aim of this study was to describe a technique for aesthetic and functional preoperative customized reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects from a small series of patients offered by the Brazilian public health system. Three adult male patients attended consultation with chief complaints directly related to their individual craniofacial bone defects. With the aid of multislice computed tomography scans and subsequent fabrication of the three-dimensional craniofacial prototype, custom-made PMMA implants were fabricated preoperatively. Under general anesthesia, with access to the craniofacial defects with a coronal approach, the PMMA implants were adapted and fixated to the facial skeleton with titanium plates and screws. Postoperative evaluation demonstrated uneventful recovery and an excellent aesthetic result. Customized prefabricated PMMA implants manufactured over the rapid prototyping models proved to be effective and feasible.

  7. [Rational use of distraction osteogenesis in craniofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreschi, P; Wolber, A; Bennis, Y; Vinchon, M; Martinot-Duquennoy, V

    2016-10-01

    Distraction osteogenesis, initially developed by Ilizarov for limb, is the tissular extension caused by the progressive space of the osseous pieces following an osteotomy. Distraction is osteogenesic and histogenic. Twenty-five years ago, at the instigation of McCarthy, this technique was used to handle the craniofacial malformations in the various floors of the face : mandibular, mediofacial and cranial. The most wide-spread protocols respect a latency period from 0 to 7 days, a rhythm of distraction from 1 to 2mm a day in 2 at 4 times and a period of consolidation from 4 to 8 weeks. Distraction is the result of the inventiveness of the pioneers then the work to always adapt to the multiple complex clinical situations. The surgeon has to choose between internal or external materials allowing a mono- or multi-vectorial extension, in osseous and/or dental anchoring. The mandibular distraction is very effective for the treatment of the secondary obstructive syndromes in the unilateral or bilateral severe hypomandibular malformations. She also allows desobstruction of the superior airways within the framework of the mediofacial hypoplasies as well as the secondary treatment of the growth defects in cleft lips and palates. Finally, the distraction osteogenesis enhanced reliability of the fronto-facial advancement in early and secondary treatment of craniofaciosynostosis. This is a real support of the facial growth, which has to be included in a plan of global treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Patterns of mesenchymal condensation in a multiscale, discrete stochastic model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Christley

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Cells of the embryonic vertebrate limb in high-density culture undergo chondrogenic pattern formation, which results in the production of regularly spaced "islands" of cartilage similar to the cartilage primordia of the developing limb skeleton. The first step in this process, in vitro and in vivo, is the generation of "cell condensations," in which the precartilage cells become more tightly packed at the sites at which cartilage will form. In this paper we describe a discrete, stochastic model for the behavior of limb bud precartilage mesenchymal cells in vitro. The model uses a biologically motivated reaction-diffusion process and cell-matrix adhesion (haptotaxis as the bases of chondrogenic pattern formation, whereby the biochemically distinct condensing cells, as well as the size, number, and arrangement of the multicellular condensations, are generated in a self-organizing fashion. Improving on an earlier lattice-gas representation of the same process, it is multiscale (i.e., cell and molecular dynamics occur on distinct scales, and the cells are represented as spatially extended objects that can change their shape. The authors calibrate the model using experimental data and study sensitivity to changes in key parameters. The simulations have disclosed two distinct dynamic regimes for pattern self-organization involving transient or stationary inductive patterns of morphogens. The authors discuss these modes of pattern formation in relation to available experimental evidence for the in vitro system, as well as their implications for understanding limb skeletal patterning during embryonic development.

  9. FGF10: A multifunctional mesenchymal-epithelial signaling growth factor in development, health, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    The FGF family comprises 22 members with diverse functions in development and health. FGF10 specifically activates FGFR2b in a paracrine manner with heparan sulfate as a co-factor. FGF10and FGFR2b are preferentially expressed in the mesenchyme and epithelium, respectively. FGF10 is a mesenchymal signaling molecule in the epithelium. FGF10 knockout mice die shortly after birth due to the complete absence of lungs as well as fore- and hindlimbs. FGF10 is also essential for the development of multiple organs. The phenotypes of Fgf10 knockout mice are very similar to those of FGFR2b knockout mice, indicating that FGF10 acts as a ligand that is specific to FGFR2b in mouse multi-organ development. FGF10 also plays roles in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, the repair of tissue injury, and embryonic stem cell differentiation. In humans, FGF10 loss-of-function mutations result in inherited diseases including aplasia of lacrimal and salivary gland, lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital syndrome, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. FGF10 is also involved in the oncogenicity of pancreatic and breast cancers. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in FGF10 are also potential risk factors for limb deficiencies, cleft lip and palate, and extreme myopia. These findings indicate that FGF10 is a crucial paracrine signal from the mesenchyme to epithelium for development, health, and disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Bioactive Nano-fibrous Scaffold for Vascularized Craniofacial Bone Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabha, Rahul Damodaran; Kraft, David Christian Evar; Harkness, Linda

    2017-01-01

    and biocompatibility properties of the new scaffold material. Our results indicate PVA-PCL-HAB scaffolds support attachment and growth of stromal stem cells; (human bone marrow skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSC)). In addition, the scaffold supported in vitro osteogenic...... the limitation of cell penetration of electrospun scaffolds and improve on its osteoconductive nature, in this study, we fabricated a novel electrospun composite scaffold of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) - poly (ε) caprolactone (PCL) - Bioceramic (HAB), namely, PVA-PCL-HAB. The scaffold prepared by dual...... electrospinning of PVA and PCL with HAB overcomes reduced cell attachment associated with hydrophobic poly (ε) caprolactone (PCL) by combination with a hydrophilic polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and the bioceramic (HAB) can contribute to enhance osteo-conductivity. We characterized the physicochemical...

  11. Self-assembled monolayer facilitates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mimicking odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muni, Tanvi; Mrksich, Milan; George, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell interactions are vital for embryonic organ development and normal function of differentiated cells and tissues. In this study we have developed a self-assembled monolayer-based co-culture system to study tooth morphogenesis. Specifically, we designed a 2-D microenvironment present in the dental tissue by creating a well-structured, laterally organized epithelial and mesenchymal cell co-culture system by patterning the cell-attachment substrate. Chemical modifications were used to develop tunable surface patterns to facilitate epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mimicking the developing tooth. Such a design promoted interactions between monolayer's of the 2 cell types and provided signaling cues that resulted in cellular differentiation and mineralized matrix formation. Gene expression analysis showed that these co-cultures mimicked in-vivo conditions than monolayer cultures of a single cell type.

  12. Targeting epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype for gastro-intestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Harn, Horng-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (G-I) cancers are one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Symptoms relate to the organ affected in the G-I tract are non-specific, making early detection and effective treatment difficult to achieve. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a reversible and dynamical process, can disperse cells in embryos, form mesenchymal cells in injured tissues, and regulate embryonic stem cell differentiation. A variety of signaling molecules and distinct pathways are involved in the initiation and progression of EMT. Recent evidence has established that EMT may endow G-I cancer cells with the capacity to invade surrounding tissues, resist apoptosis, migrate to distant organs, and develop chemoresistance. Targeting these signaling molecules and pathways associated with EMT may provide clinicians with a new approach to the treatment of G-I malignancy.

  13. Cytomegalovirus-induced embryopathology: mouse submandibular salivary gland epithelial-mesenchymal ontogeny as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Jing

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human studies suggest, and mouse models clearly demonstrate, that cytomegalovirus (CMV is dysmorphic to early organ and tissue development. CMV has a particular tropism for embryonic salivary gland and other head mesenchyme. CMV has evolved to co-opt cell signaling networks so to optimize replication and survival, to the detriment of infected tissues. It has been postulated that mesenchymal infection is the critical step in disrupting organogenesis. If so, organogenesis dependent on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions would be particularly vulnerable. In this study, we chose to model the vulnerability by investigating the cell and molecular pathogenesis of CMV infected mouse embryonic submandibular salivary glands (SMGs. Results We infected E15 SMG explants with mouse CMV (mCMV. Active infection for up to 12 days in vitro results in a remarkable cell and molecular pathology characterized by atypical ductal epithelial hyperplasia, apparent epitheliomesenchymal transformation, oncocytic-like stromal metaplasia, β-catenin nuclear localization, and upregulation of Nfkb2, Relb, Il6, Stat3, and Cox2. Rescue with an antiviral nucleoside analogue indicates that mCMV replication is necessary to initiate and maintain SMG dysmorphogenesis. Conclusion mCMV infection of embryonic mouse explants results in dysplasia, metaplasia, and, possibly, anaplasia. The molecular pathogenesis appears to center around the activation of canonical and, perhaps more importantly, noncanonical NFκB. Further, COX-2 and IL-6 are important downstream effectors of embryopathology. At the cellular level, there appears to be a consequential interplay between the transformed SMG cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix, resulting in the nuclear translocation of β-catenin. From these studies, a tentative framework has emerged within which additional studies may be planned and performed.

  14. Robotic surgery in oral and maxillofacial, craniofacial and head and neck surgery: a systematic review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceulaer, J. de; Clercq, C. de; Swennen, G.R.J.

    2012-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature concerning robotic surgery in oral and maxillofacial (OMF), craniofacial and head and neck surgery was performed. The objective was to give a clear overview of the different anatomical areas of research in the field of OMF, craniofacial and head and neck

  15. Craniofacial changes in patients with Class III malocclusion treated with the RAMPA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Yasushi; Banabilh, Saeed M; Singh, G Dave

    2010-01-01

    The underlying etiology of Class III malocclusion may be associated with cranial base morphology. The aim of this study is to test the efficacy of a Right-Angled Maxillary Protraction Appliance (RAMPA) System in Asian subjects with Class III malocclusions. 27 homologous landmarks were digitized from lateral cephalographs for 10 pre-pubertal Japanese children (mean age 95 months) with skeletal Class III malocclusion prior to and after RAMPA treatment. The mean, pre- and post-treatment craniofacial configurations were computed using Procrustes superimposition, and subjected to principal components analysis (PCA), and finite-element analysis (FEA). The mean treatment time was 22.5 months. All patients showed significant craniofacial change with correction of anterior and/or posterior crossbite. The mean, pre- and post-treatment craniofacial configurations were statistically different when tested using PCA (p Class III malocclusions.

  16. 3D visualisation in craniofacial surgery. 3D-Darstellungen fuer die Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, R.; Hoehne, K.H. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Mathematik und Datenverarbeitung in der Medizin); Hoeltje, W.J. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Norddeutsches Zentrum fuer Kranio-Faciale Anomalien); Tiede, U.

    1991-10-01

    3D visualisation from tomographic image sequences has turned out to be a useful addition to diagnosis and surgical planning in craniofacial surgery. However, its clinical use still suffers from the very large variety of different methods and parameters from which the surgeon may choose. This is true not only of the data acquisition but also for of documentation of the results. Furthermore, there is no standardisation of procedures according to classes of malformations. This papier presents a systematic investigation of these problems. It proposes a standardisation of craniofacial malformations and describes an optimisation of the procedure of 3D visualisation. The procedure described has become a standard tool for craniofacial surgery in our hospital. (orig.).

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of craniofacial bones using three-dimensional computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Ichiro; Ohura, Takehiko; Kimura, Chu (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine) (and others)

    1989-08-01

    Three-dimensional computer tomography (3DCT) was performed in patients with various diseases to visualize stereoscopically the deformity of the craniofacial bones. The data obtained were analyzed by the 3DCT analyzing system. A new coordinate system was established using the median sagittal plane of the face (a plane passing through sella, nasion and basion) on the three-dimensional image. Three-dimensional profilograms were prepared for detailed analysis of the deformation of craniofacial bones for cleft lip and palate, mandibular prognathia and hemifacial microsomia. For patients, asymmetry in the frontal view and twist-formed complicated deformities were observed, as well as deformity of profiles in the anteroposterior and up-and-down directions. A newly developed technique allows three-dimensional visualization of changes in craniofacial deformity. It would aid in determining surgical strategy, including crani-facial surgery and maxillo-facial surgery, and in evaluating surgical outcome. (N.K.).

  18. Orientation of craniofacial planes and temporomandibular disorder in young adults with normal occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancaglini, R; Colombo-Bolla, G; Gherlone, E F; Radaelli, G

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between orientation of craniofacial planes relative to the true horizontal and temporomandibular disorder (TMD), in normal occlusion. Fourteen university dental students, with full natural dentition and bilateral Angle Class I occlusion, who exhibited signs and symptoms of TMD, were compared with 14 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Frontal and lateral photographs were taken in natural head position with the subject standing up, clenching a Fox plane and having a facial arch positioned. Photographs were examined by a standardized image analysis. Inter-pupillary axis, Frankfurt, occlusal and Camper planes were evaluated. In frontal view, the Frankfurt plane was right rotated relative to the true horizontal both in TMD subjects (P weak association exists between the orientation of craniofacial planes in natural head position and signs and symptoms of TMD. Furthermore, they suggest that, within this population, TMD might be mainly associated with head posture rather than with craniofacial morphology.

  19. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Woo Choi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  20. Clinical application of three-dimensional printing technology in craniofacial plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Woo; Kim, Namkug

    2015-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models.

  1. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namkug

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to medicine via computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing. To investigate the current status of 3D printing technology and its clinical application, a systematic review of the literature was conducted. In addition, the benefits and possibilities of the clinical application of 3D printing in craniofacial surgery are reviewed, based on personal experiences with more than 500 craniofacial cases conducted using 3D printing tactile prototype models. PMID:26015880

  2. Flood, disaster, and turmoil: social issues in cleft and craniofacial care and crisis relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Ronald P; van Aalst, John A; Fox, Lynn; Stein, Margot; Moses, Michael; Cassell, Cynthia H

    2011-11-01

    To examine social issues in the conduct of cleft and craniofacial care through relief programs in disrupted crisis contexts. Social, health policy, and ethical analyses. At best, craniofacial team care is multidisciplinary, coordinated, and sustained, requiring a long-term relationship between team members, patients, and families. Disasters and societal turmoil interrupt such relationships, causing craniofacial care to become a secondary concern. Providing craniofacial team care in a crisis setting requires rebuilding disrupted coordination and communication. Crisis relief care involves a complex set of expectations and responsibilities and raises issues such as (1) quality assurance, infection control, appropriate standards of care, and follow-up care/continuity; (2) equity of access to services and clinical ethics in the context of war and/or deprivation; (3) training of visitors in the local nation or site; (4) disciplinary composition of teams, interprofessional communication/rivalry, and credentials of clinicians; (5) ownership of the site and local visitor relations; (6) fundraising and marketing strategies; and (7) ethical issues in the doctor-patient relationship. Specific ethical standards for international cleft and craniofacial care delivery also apply to domestic and global crisis relief contexts. Guidance on issues related to professional experience, informed consent, and continuity of care will help care providers address social and ethical issues raised in crisis relief programs. This paper proposes that the Position Paper of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) on International Treatment Programs should be used as a template to develop and disseminate a set of standards that apply to crisis relief.

  3. Cryopreservation of embryonic axes of groundnut ( Arachis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An efficient cryopreservation protocol was developed for groundnut embryonic axes using vitrification technique. Embryonic axes obtained from seeds of four groundnut genotypes were dehydrated in Plant Vitrification Solution (PVS2) solution for different durations (0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) before plunged into liquid nitrogen ...

  4. Second heart field and the development of the outflow tract in human embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan-Ping; Li, Hai-Rong; Cao, Xi-Mei; Wang, Qin-Xue; Qiao, Cong-Jin; Ya, Jing

    2013-04-01

    The second heart field (SHF) is indicated to contribute to the embryonic heart development. However, less knowledge is available about SHF development of human embryo due to the difficulty of collecting embryos. In this study, serial sections of human embryos from Carnegie stage 10 (CS10) to CS16 were stained with antibodies against Islet-1 (Isl-1), Nkx2.5, GATA4, myosin heavy chain (MHC) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) to observe spatiotemporal distribution of SHF and its contribution to the development of the arterial pole of cardiac tube. Our findings suggest that during CS10 to CS12, SHF of the human embryo is composed of the bilateral pharyngeal mesenchyme, the central mesenchyme of the branchial arch and splanchnic mesoderm of the pericardial cavity dorsal wall. With development, SHF translocates and consists of ventral pharyngeal mesenchyme and dorsal wall of the pericardial cavity. Hence, the SHF of human embryo shows a dynamic spatiotemporal distribution pattern. The formation of the Isl-1 positive condense cell prongs provides an explanation for the saddle structure formation at the distal pole of the outflow tract. In human embryo, the Isl-1 positive cells of SHF may contribute to the formation of myocardial outflow tract (OFT) and the septum during different development stages. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  5. The society for craniofacial genetics and developmental biology 39th annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jennifer L; Albertson, Craig; Harris, Matthew P; Lozanoff, Scott; Marcucio, Ralph S; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Trainor, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    The Society for Craniofacial Genetics and Developmental Biology (SCGDB) aims to promote education, research, and communication, about normal and abnormal development of the tissues and organs of the head. Membership of the SCGDB is broad and diverse-including clinicians, orthodontists, scientists, and academics-but with all members sharing an interest in craniofacial biology. Each year, the SCGDB hosts a meeting where members can share their latest research, exchange ideas and resources, and build on or establish new collaborations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Sox2 acts as a rheostat of epithelial to mesenchymal transition during neural crest development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos eMandalos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of self-renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells into the cranial neural crest (CNC pool ensures proper head development, guided by signaling pathways such as BMPs, FGFs, Shh and Notch. Here, we show that murine Sox2 plays an essential role in controlling progenitor cell behavior during craniofacial development. A Conditional by Inversion Sox2 allele (Sox2COIN has been employed to generate an epiblast ablation of Sox2 function (Sox2EpINV. Sox2EpINV/+(H haploinsufficient and conditional (Sox2EpINV/mosaic mutant embryos proceed beyond gastrulation and die around E11. These mutant embryos exhibit severe anterior malformations, with hydrocephaly and frontonasal truncations, which could be attributed to the deregulation of CNC progenitor cells during their epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This irregularity results in an exacerbated and aberrant migration of Sox10+ NCC in the branchial arches and frontonasal process of the Sox2 mutant embryos. These results suggest a novel role for Sox2 as a regulator of the epithelial to mesenchymal transitions that are important for the cell flow in the developing head.

  7. Formation and differentiation of multiple mesenchymal lineages during lung development is regulated by beta-catenin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stijn P De Langhe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of ss-catenin signaling in mesodermal lineage formation and differentiation has been elusive.To define the role of ss-catenin signaling in these processes, we used a Dermo1(Twist2(Cre/+ line to target a floxed beta-catenin allele, throughout the embryonic mesenchyme. Strikingly, the Dermo1(Cre/+; beta-catenin(f/- conditional Knock Out embryos largely phenocopy Pitx1(-/-/Pitx2(-/- double knockout embryos, suggesting that ss-catenin signaling in the mesenchyme depends mostly on the PITX family of transcription factors. We have dissected this relationship further in the developing lungs and find that mesenchymal deletion of beta-catenin differentially affects two major mesenchymal lineages. The amplification but not differentiation of Fgf10-expressing parabronchial smooth muscle progenitor cells is drastically reduced. In the angioblast-endothelial lineage, however, only differentiation into mature endothelial cells is impaired.Taken together these findings reveal a hierarchy of gene activity involving ss-catenin and PITX, as important regulators of mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation.

  8. Mini-review: hyaluronidases in early embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, C D

    1984-09-01

    The foregoing discussion indicates that hyaluronidases probably play an important part in the control of development. In morphogenesis, they may be involved in epithelial-mesenchymal inductive interactions, in non-malignant invasion when one tissue displaces another in normal development, in controlling cell movements, in modulating changes of shape of cells and sheets of cells, in controlling the permeability of tissues and regulating the ionic environment within the embryo. There is also evidence indicating that hyaluronidases are involved in the initiation of cytodifferentiation pathways, perhaps via direct or indirect effects upon the cell division cycle and histone-DNA interactions. The evidence presented indicates that hyaluronidases are important repeatedly at different stages of embryonic development and differentiation, where periods of high activity follow others of reduced activity in localized regions of the embryo. Some new results were also presented, showing the presence of different hyaluronidase activities at early stages of chick embryo development. The highest levels of hyaluronidase activity were found in the primitive streak and mesoderm.

  9. A Novel Role of CDX1 in Embryonic Epicardial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huan; Shen, Ting; Yang, Yanqin; Sun, Yun; Tang, Nannan; Ni, Ting; Zhu, Jun; Mailman, Richard B.; Wang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism that regulates epicardial development has yet to be understood. In this study, we explored the function of CDX1, a Caudal-related family member, in epicardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and in the migration and the differentiation of epicardium-derived progenitors into vascular smooth muscle cells. We detected a transient expression of CDX1 in murine embryonic hearts at 11.5 days post coitum (dpc). Using a doxycycline-inducible CDX1 mouse model, primary epicardium, and ex vivo heart culture, we further demonstrated that ectopic expression of CDX1 promoted epicardial EMT. In addition, a low-dose CDX1 induction led to enhanced migration and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells into α-SMA+ vascular smooth muscles. In contrast, either continued high-level induction of CDX1 or CDX1 deficiency attenuated the ability of epicardium-derived cells to migrate and to mature into smooth muscles induced by TGF-β1. Further RNA-seq analyses showed that CDX1 induction altered the transcript levels of genes involved in neuronal development, angiogenesis, and cell adhesions required for EMT. Our data have revealed a previously undefined role of CDX1 during epicardial development, and suggest that transient expression of CDX1 promotes epicardial EMT, whereas subsequent down-regulation of CDX1 after 11.5 dpc in mice is necessary for further subepicardial invasion of EPDCs and contribution to coronary vascular endothelium or smooth muscle cells. PMID:25068460

  10. A novel role of CDX1 in embryonic epicardial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chu

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism that regulates epicardial development has yet to be understood. In this study, we explored the function of CDX1, a Caudal-related family member, in epicardial epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and in the migration and the differentiation of epicardium-derived progenitors into vascular smooth muscle cells. We detected a transient expression of CDX1 in murine embryonic hearts at 11.5 days post coitum (dpc. Using a doxycycline-inducible CDX1 mouse model, primary epicardium, and ex vivo heart culture, we further demonstrated that ectopic expression of CDX1 promoted epicardial EMT. In addition, a low-dose CDX1 induction led to enhanced migration and differentiation of epicardium-derived cells into α-SMA+ vascular smooth muscles. In contrast, either continued high-level induction of CDX1 or CDX1 deficiency attenuated the ability of epicardium-derived cells to migrate and to mature into smooth muscles induced by TGF-β1. Further RNA-seq analyses showed that CDX1 induction altered the transcript levels of genes involved in neuronal development, angiogenesis, and cell adhesions required for EMT. Our data have revealed a previously undefined role of CDX1 during epicardial development, and suggest that transient expression of CDX1 promotes epicardial EMT, whereas subsequent down-regulation of CDX1 after 11.5 dpc in mice is necessary for further subepicardial invasion of EPDCs and contribution to coronary vascular endothelium or smooth muscle cells.

  11. Effects of fractions from biodegraded Alaska North Slope crude oil on embryonic inland silversides, Menidia beryllina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middaugh, D P; Chapman, P J; Shelton, M E; McKenney Jr, C L; Courtney, L A

    2002-02-01

    Embryonic inland silversides, Meinida beryllina, were exposed to neutral, water-soluble fractions (WSFs) resulting from microbial degradation of artificially weathered Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude oil. Three individual microbes obtained from Prince William Sound, Alaska, and designated Phe#6 (enriched on phenanthrene), Hexaco#2 (enriched on the straight-chain alkane, hexacosane), and EI2V (grown by enrichment on Bushnell-Haas medium containing 0.2% pristane, a branched alkane) were used to individually biodegrade weathered ANS crude oil for 14 days in darkness in 20-L glass carboys containing nutrient enriched, sterilized 20% salinity sea water at 20 +/- 1 degrees C. Neutral WSFs resulting from biodegradation of ANS (lot 521) by each microbe were recovered and weighted. Neutral WSFs recovered were: 1.76 mg/L for Phe#6, 1.85 mg/L for Hexaco#2, and 13.02 mg/L for the EI2V microbe. Embryo toxicity and teratogenicity tests revealed that exposure of embryos to the WSFs from the EI2V incubation (with a total recovered neutral fraction approximately seven times greater than the Phe#6 and Hexaco#2 incubations) resulted in the most severe responses in craniofacial, cardiovascular, and skeletal organ systems. The total neutral WSFs recovered from the EI2V biodegradation of weathered ANS 521 were subfractionated into saturated (eluted with hexane), aromatic (eluted with CH2Cl2), polar (eluted with ethyl ether), and recombined (saturated + aromatic + polar) fractions. Developing fish embryos were then exposed to each subfraction and the recombined subfractions. The polar subfraction and recombined subfractions proved to be the most embryo toxic and teratogenic. They resulted in statistically significant (p < or = 0.05) responses (compared to controls) for craniofacial, cardiovascular, skeletal, and total severity effects in one or both tests with these subfractions.

  12. Mesenchymal progenitor cells for the osteogenic lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Noriaki; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal progenitors of the osteogenic lineage provide the flexibility for bone to grow, maintain its function and homeostasis. Traditionally, colony-forming-unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) have been regarded as surrogates for mesenchymal progenitors; however, this definition cannot address the function of these progenitors in their native setting. Transgenic murine models including lineage-tracing technologies based on the cre-lox system have proven to be useful in delineating mesenchymal progenitors in their native environment. Although heterogeneity of cell populations of interest marked by a promoter-based approach complicates overall interpretation, an emerging complexity of mesenchymal progenitors has been revealed. Current literatures suggest two distinct types of bone progenitor cells; growth-associated mesenchymal progenitors contribute to explosive growth of bone in early life, whereas bone marrow mesenchymal progenitors contribute to the much slower remodeling process and response to injury that occurs mainly in adulthood. More detailed relationships of these progenitors need to be studied through further experimentation.

  13. Detection, characterization, and spontaneous differentiation in vitro of very small embryonic-like putative stem cells in adult mammalian ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parte, Seema; Bhartiya, Deepa; Telang, Jyoti; Daithankar, Vinita; Salvi, Vinita; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect, characterize, and study differentiation potential of stem cells in adult rabbit, sheep, monkey, and menopausal human ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Two distinct populations of putative stem cells (PSCs) of variable size were detected in scraped OSE, one being smaller and other similar in size to the surrounding red blood cells in the scraped OSE. The smaller 1-3 μm very small embryonic-like PSCs were pluripotent in nature with nuclear Oct-4 and cell surface SSEA-4, whereas the bigger 4-7 μm cells with cytoplasmic localization of Oct-4 and minimal expression of SSEA-4 were possibly the tissue committed progenitor stem cells. Pluripotent gene transcripts of Oct-4, Oct-4A, Nanog, Sox-2, TERT, and Stat-3 in human and sheep OSE were detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The PSCs underwent spontaneous differentiation into oocyte-like structures, parthenote-like structures, embryoid body-like structures, cells with neuronal-like phenotype, and embryonic stem cell-like colonies, whereas the epithelial cells transformed into mesenchymal phenotype by epithelial-mesenchymal transition in 3 weeks of OSE culture. Germ cell markers like c-Kit, DAZL, GDF-9, VASA, and ZP4 were immuno-localized in oocyte-like structures. In conclusion, as opposed to the existing view of OSE being a bipotent source of oocytes and granulosa cells, mammalian ovaries harbor distinct very small embryonic-like PSCs and tissue committed progenitor stem cells population that have the potential to develop into oocyte-like structures in vitro, whereas mesenchymal fibroblasts appear to form supporting granulosa-like somatic cells. Research at the single-cell level, including complete gene expression profiling, is required to further confirm whether postnatal oogenesis is a conserved phenomenon in adult mammals.

  14. Customized "In-Office" Three-Dimensional Printing for Virtual Surgical Planning in Craniofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Bernardino M; Chiodo, Michael V; Patel, Parit A

    2015-07-01

    Virtual surgical planning using three-dimensional (3D) printing technology has improved surgical efficiency and precision. A limitation to this technology is that production of 3D surgical models requires a third-party source, leading to increased costs (up to $4000) and prolonged assembly times (averaging 2-3 weeks). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, cost, and production time of customized skull models created by an "in-office" 3D printer for craniofacial reconstruction. Two patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction with the assistance of "in-office" 3D printing technology. Three-dimensional skull models were created from a bioplastic filament with a 3D printer using computed tomography (CT) image data. The cost and production time for each model were measured. For both patients, a customized 3D surgical model was used preoperatively to plan split calvarial bone grafting and intraoperatively to more efficiently and precisely perform the craniofacial reconstruction. The average cost for surgical model production with the "in-office" 3D printer was $25 (cost of bioplastic materials used to create surgical model) and the average production time was 14  hours. Virtual surgical planning using "in office" 3D printing is feasible and allows for a more cost-effective and less time consuming method for creating surgical models and guides. By bringing 3D printing to the office setting, we hope to improve intraoperative efficiency, surgical precision, and overall cost for various types of craniofacial and reconstructive surgery.

  15. Diffuse noxious inhibitory control evoked by tonic craniofacial pain in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sowman, Paul Fredrick; Wang, Kelun; Svensson, P

    2011-01-01

    Tonic pain in one body segment can inhibit the perception of pain in another body segment. This phenomenon is mediated by diffuse noxious inhibitory controls (DNIC), and its efficacy in craniofacial regions is investigated in this study. A compressive device that evoked a tonic, moderate...

  16. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run Lei

    Full Text Available The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development.

  17. Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis in 51 cases of holoprosencephaly: craniofacial anatomy, associated malformations, and genetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenghoefer, M.; Ettema, A.M.; Sina, F.; Geipel, A.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hansmann, H.; Borstlap, W.A.; Berge, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the prenatal ultrasound findings of the craniofacial and extracephalic anatomy, the postnatal pathological findings, and the genetic anomalies in 51 cases of holoprosencephaly (HPE). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1990 and 2005, a collective of 51 fetuses with tentative

  18. Radiography, Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Craniofacial Structures in Pig

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyllar, M.; Štembírek, Jan; Putnová, I.; Stehlík, L.; Odehnalová, S.; Buchtová, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 6 (2014), s. 435-452 ISSN 0340-2096 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP304/08/P289 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : craniofacial structures in pig Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 0.672, year: 2014

  19. Dental and Craniofacial Anomalies Associated with Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome with PITX2 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Dressler

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS (OMIM Nr.: 180500 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder (1  :  200000 with genetic and morphologic variability. Glaucoma is associated in 50% of the patients. Craniofacial and dental anomalies are frequently reported with ARS. The present study was designed as a multidisciplinary analysis of orthodontic, ophthalmologic, and genotypical features. A three-generation pedigree was ascertained through a family with ARS. Clinically, radiographic and genetic analyses were performed. Despite an identical genotype in all patients, the phenotype varies in expressivity of craniofacial and dental morphology. Screening for PITX2 and FOXC1 mutations by direct DNA-sequencing revealed a P64L missense mutation in PITX2 in all family members, supporting earlier reports that PITX2 is an essential factor in morphogenesis of teeth and craniofacial skeleton. Despite the fact that the family members had identical mutations, morphologic differences were evident. The concomitant occurrence of rare dental and craniofacial anomalies may be early diagnostic indications of ARS. Early detection of ARS and elevated intraocular pressure (IOP helps to prevent visual field loss.

  20. Intrinsic effects of congenital cleft palate on craniofacial morphology and growth characteristics in puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Kudo, Motonori; Yamamoto, Yuko

    2010-09-01

    Of the 12 children in prepuberty (then aged 9 years) with unoperated submucous cleft palate where we previously found a characteristic morphology of the maxilla, we examined changes in the maxillary morphology in their puberty (until age 14 years), aiming to determine the intrinsic effects of congenital cleft palate on their craniofacial morphology and growth characteristics, which also involve the formation of cranioface, by retrospectively comparing their findings and those of noncleft children with normal occlusion. Twelve Japanese children (7 girls and 5 boys) with unoperated submucous cleft palate at age 14 years were examined cephalometrically. None of them had undergone dentofacial orthopedic treatment of the maxilla. Their craniofacial morphologic characteristics were compared with those of 60 Japanese noncleft children aged 14 years (30 girls and 30 boys) with normal occlusion. The results were nearly identical to the previous findings when they were 9 years old: the maxillary length was short, the anterior part of the maxilla being retruded and the posterior part of the maxilla being in anterior position in the cleft children at age 14 years, compared with the noncleft children. In the craniofacial growth changes between the ages 9 and 14 years, an increase in the posterior upper facial height was markedly small, and the inclination of the palatal plane was promoted in the cleft children, compared with the noncleft children. We confirmed that the intrinsic effects of congenital cleft were influential on the morphology of cranioface and its growth changes, which also involve craniofacial formation.

  1. Undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijpers, M.; Poels, P.J.P.; Vaandrager, J.M.; Hoog, M. de; Berg, S.W. van den; Hoeve, H.J.; Joosten, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Children with syndromal craniofacial synostosis have a high risk for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can relieve symptoms and morbidity. Little is known about the development and natural history of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome through life. The aim of this study

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea prevents the expected difference in craniofacial growth of boys and girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ligia Juliano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It was to compare cephalometric measures of mouth-breather boys and girls and with the cephalometric pattern observed in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS patients. METHODS: Craniofacial measurements of lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained from 144 children aged 7-14 years were compared between boys and girls, and both were compared to cephalometric pattern of OSAS patients. RESULTS: Mouth-breather boys and girls had no gender differences regarding to craniofacial morphology while nose-breather boys and girls showed those expected differences. Nose-breather boys presented a more retruded mandible and proinclined upper incisor when compared to nose-breather girls, but mouth-breather boys and girls had no differences. The measure NS.GoGn was the only variable with an interaction with gender and breathing. CONCLUSIONS: There were no cephalometric difference in mouth breather-boys and girls related to normal growth, suggesting that oral breathing make the same craniofacial morphology and both have craniofacial morphology close to that of OSAS patients.

  3. Dental and craniofacial findings in 91 individuals with agenesis of permanent maxillary canines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvedsen, K P; Kjær, I

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Agenesis of maxillary permanent canines is a rare form of agenesis (prevalence 0.07-0.13%). The aetiology is still unknown. The purpose was to focus on dentitions and craniofacial profiles in individuals with maxillary canine agenesis. METHOD: From 91 individuals (10-18 years of age) 91 Orth...

  4. Craniofacial morphological characteristics of Chinese adults with normal occlusion and different skeletal divergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Danna; Gao, Hui; Ren, Yijin

    The aim of the present study was to examine the craniofacial morphologic characteristics of different vertical dysplasias in a population of Chinese adults with normal occlusion. Sixty-nine subjects (39 males and 30 females) were selected from 800 healthy students between 18 and 24 years of age.

  5. Inheritance of craniofacial features in Colombian families with class III malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Otero

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available L Otero, L Quintero, D Champsaur, E SimancaPontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, ColombiaIntroduction: The inheritance of class III malocclusion has been well documented, but the inheritance of craniofacial structures in Colombian families with this malocclusion has been not yet reported.Patients and methods: The study sample of 25 families comprised 186 untreated orthodontic individuals from 8 to 60 years old. Pedigrees were drawn using Cyrillic software. Complete family histories for each proband were ascertained and the affection status of relatives was confirmed by lateral cephalograms and facial and dental photographs. Analysis of variance and odds ratio test for each parameter was performed to estimate inheritance from parents to offspring and to determine similar phenotypic features in relatives.Results: The analysis of the pedigrees suggests autosomal dominant inheritance. The craniofacial characteristics that showed more resemblance between parents and offspring were middle facial height, shorter anterior cranial base and mandibular prognathism. In contrast the protrusion of upper lip and maxillary retrusion were the phenotypic features that contributed to class III in the majority of families.Conclusion: Knowledge of the inheritance of craniofacial phenotypes in class III malocclusion will enable the design of new therapies to treat this malocclusion.Keywords: inheritance, craniofacial, phenotype, class III malocclusion

  6. A one-year review of craniofacial injuries in amateur soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozoglu, Sinan; Tozoglu, Ummuhan

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the rate of craniofacial injuries in amateur soccer and help us better understand the nature of these injuries. Retrospective study was carried out using records from the patients with craniofacial injuries associated with soccer activities. All data were collected on the basis of sex, age, type and anatomic site of the injury. In the one-year period of this study, 11/53 cases with craniofacial injuries associated with soccer activities have been treated in our clinic. The highest incidence was in the 18 to 24 year age group (mean age 20.7) with male propensity. The majority of the patients suffered from dento-alveolar fractures (36%), followed by temporomandibular joint disorders (27%), mandibular fractures (27%), and nasal fractures (9%). The most common cause of the fractures was impact against another player (63.6%), followed by impact against equipment (18.2%) and impact against the ground (18.2%). These results show that there is a high risk of potential oral and craniofacial injury during soccer activities.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Sandra A.; Van Dijk, Monique; Van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    Background: The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. Methods: During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40

  8. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous propacetamol vs rectal paracetamol in children after major craniofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, Sandra A.; van Dijk, Monique; van Leeuwen, Pim; Searle, Susan; Anderson, Brian J.; Tibboel, Dick; Mathot, Ron A. A.

    2008-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects of intravenous and rectal paracetamol were compared in nonventilated infants after craniofacial surgery in a double-blind placebo controlled study. During surgery all infants (6 months-2 years) received a rectal loading dose of 40 mg.kg(-1) paracetamol 2 h

  9. Effect of chemotherapy on survival of craniofacial osteosarcoma: a systematic review of 201 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeele, L. E.; Kostense, P. J.; van der Waal, I.; Snow, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the possible value of chemotherapy in the treatment of craniofacial osteosarcoma (CFOS). In a systematic review, data of 201 patients (age, 36.6 +/- 19.0 years [mean +/- SD]) from 20 uncontrolled series on CFOS indexed in Medline and Excerpta Medica between 1974 and 1994 were pooled; 180

  10. Speech characteristics in a Ugandan child with a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft: a case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anke Luyten; K. Bettens; D. Balumukad; K. van Lierde; H. Vermeersch; A. Hodges; M. Tungotyo; W. Bauters; G. Galiwango; S. de Ley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the speech characteristics in an English-speaking Ugandan boy of 4.5 years who has a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft (unilateral lip, alveolar, palatal, nasal and maxillary cleft, and associated hypertelorism). Closure of the lip together with the closure

  11. Effectiveness of the cervical vertebral maturation method to predict postpeak circumpubertal growth of craniofacial structures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fudalej, P.S.; Bollen, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Our aim was to assess effectiveness of the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method to predict circumpubertal craniofacial growth in the postpeak period. METHODS: The CVM stage was determined in 176 subjects (51 adolescent boys and 125 adolescent girls) on cephalograms taken at the

  12. Finite element growth analysis for the craniofacial skeleton in patients with cleft lip and palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Akiko; Takeshita, Satoshi; Publico, Andre S; Moss, Melvin L; Tanaka, Eiji; Ishino, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Mineo; Tanne, Kazuo

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the differences in the nature of craniofacial growth between subjects with normal occlusion and patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (CLP) in terms of the size, shape and principal growth direction of craniofacial skeleton using finite element method (FEM). Lateral cephalograms were taken of 40 subjects as normal group and 178 patients as CLP group. These subjects were divided into seven developmental ages of 4-, 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, 14- and 18-year-old. For the finite element analysis, the craniofacial complex was discretized into seven structures or elements with three nodal points in each after tracing each lateral cephalogram on acetate paper. For each stage, the growth parameters in CLP group were compared to those in normal group. The growth of upper facial skeleton and maxillary complex was more remarkably inhibited in CLP than in normal group. Especially, the growth inhibition of posterior maxillary complex in a vertical direction was remarkable in CLP group at any ages. Difference in the size and shape of entire mandibular skeleton between CLP and normal groups was not apparent. It is suggested that grow timing and peak velocity, an essential and key determinant to the success in orthodontic treatment, have been clarified in this study more clearly than in previous studies. It is hopefully anticipated to explore some key determinants to predict individual growth of the craniofacial skeleton near future.

  13. The FaceBase Consortium: A comprehensive program to facilitate craniofacial research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheiser, Harry; Aronow, Bruce J.; Artinger, Kristin; Beaty, Terri H.; Brinkley, James F.; Chai, Yang; Clouthier, David; Cunningham, Michael L.; Dixon, Michael; Donahue, Leah Rae; Fraser, Scott E.; Hallgrimsson, Benedikt; Iwata, Junichi; Klein, Ophir; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Murray, Stephen; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Postlethwait, John; Potter, Steven; Shapiro, Linda; Spritz, Richard; Visel, Axel; Weinberg, Seth M.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The FaceBase Consortium consists of ten interlinked research and technology projects whose goal is to generate craniofacial research data and technology for use by the research community through a central data management and integrated bioinformatics hub. Funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) and currently focused on studying the development of the middle region of the face, the Consortium will produce comprehensive datasets of global gene expression patterns, regulatory elements and sequencing; will generate anatomical and molecular atlases; will provide human normative facial data and other phenotypes; conduct follow up studies of a completed genome-wide association study; generate independent data on the genetics of craniofacial development, build repositories of animal models and of human samples and data for community access and analysis; and will develop software tools and animal models for analyzing and functionally testing and integrating these data. The FaceBase website (http://www.facebase.org) will serve as a web home for these efforts, providing interactive tools for exploring these datasets, together with discussion forums and other services to support and foster collaboration within the craniofacial research community. PMID:21458441

  14. Increased levels of apoptosis in the prefusion neural folds underlie the craniofacial disorder, Treacher Collins syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, J; Brakebusch, C; Fässler, R

    2000-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of human craniofacial development that results from loss-of-function mutations in the gene TCOF1. Although this gene has been demonstrated to encode the nucleolar phosphoprotein treacle, the developmental mechanism underlying TCS...

  15. A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N Schock

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, cellular projections that function to transduce molecular signals during development. Loss of functional primary cilia has a particularly profound effect on the developing craniofacial complex, causing several anomalies including craniosynostosis, micrognathia, midfacial dysplasia, cleft lip/palate and oral/dental defects. Development of the craniofacial complex is an intricate process that requires interactions between several different tissues including neural crest cells, neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm. To understand the tissue-specific requirements for primary cilia during craniofacial development we conditionally deleted three separate intraflagellar transport genes, Kif3a, Ift88 and Ttc21b with three distinct drivers, Wnt1-Cre, Crect and AP2-Cre which drive recombination in neural crest, surface ectoderm alone, and neural crest, surface ectoderm and neuroectoderm, respectively. We found that tissue-specific conditional loss of ciliary genes with different functions produces profoundly different facial phenotypes. Furthermore, analysis of basic cellular behaviors in these mutants suggests that loss of primary cilia in a distinct tissue has unique effects on development of adjacent tissues. Together, these data suggest specific spatiotemporal roles for intraflagellar transport genes and the primary cilium during craniofacial development.

  16. Cranio-facial and Ocular Morphometrics of the Male Greater Cane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Linear measurements were determined on each eyeball using digital vernier calliper, measuring rule and a piece of twine. Cranio-facial parameters assessed included distance between medial canthi, height of the incisor, extent of oral commissures, width and length of the pinnae. All measured parameters were correlated ...

  17. Craniofacial dysostosis. Staging of reconstruction and management of the midface deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posnick, J C

    1991-07-01

    Crouzon's and Apert's syndromes are the most common of the craniofacial dysostosis syndromes. A team approach is required to achieve effective patient management. The team evaluation begins shortly after birth and follows the patient through infancy, childhood, and adolescence into early adulthood. The role of each team member varies according to the patient's age and individual circumstances. For example, in infancy and early childhood, constant combined reassessment by the pediatrician, neurosurgeon, ophthalmologist, neuroradiologist, and craniofacial surgeon is essential. Later in adolescence, the role of the ophthalmologist, neuroradiologist, and neurosurgeon becomes less important, whereas that of the orthodontist, speech pathologist, maxillofacial surgeon, and psychosocial team becomes more dominant. Major craniofacial centers should be encouraged to develop protocols for patient management and to follow a consistent prospective process of collecting data. Meeting these objectives allows us to learn from the past. During the past decade since the introduction of the modern era of craniofacial surgery by Tessier in 1967, craniomaxillofacial surgery has advanced in many ways: through the use of autogenous cranial bone grafts for onlay or interpositional use; refinements in bone stabilization techniques that include miniplate and microplate and screw fixation rather than direct wires; the reintroduction of creative osteotomies for the management of midface deficiency (monobloc and monobloc bipartition); the development of CT scanning techniques applied to the craniofacial skeleton for both qualitative and quantitative measurement; and the presence of the dedicated craniofacial anesthetist whose meticulous monitoring, airway management, and fluid replacement allows for the safe execution of complex total midface osteotomies. The recognition of the need for a staged surgical approach to the correction of the deformities caused by Apert's and Crouzon's syndromes

  18. Implications of TGFβ on transcriptome and cellular biofunctions of palatal mesenchyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan eZhu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of the palate comprises sequential stages of growth, elevation and fusion of the palatal shelves. The mesenchymal component of palates plays a major role in early phases of palatogenesis, such as growth and elevation. Failure in these steps may result in cleft palate, the second most common birth defect in the world. These early stages of palatogenesis require precise and chronological orchestration of key physiological processes, such as growth, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis. There is compelling evidence for the vital role of TGFβ-mediated regulation of palate development. We hypothesized that the isoforms of TGFβ regulate different cellular biofunctions of the palatal mesenchyme to various extents. Human embryonic palatal mesenchyme (HEPM cells were treated with TGFβ1, β2, and β3 for microarray-based gene expression studies in order to identify the roles of TGFβ in the transcriptome of the palatal mesenchyme. Following normalization and modeling of 28,869 human genes, 566 transcripts were detected as differentially expressed in TGFβ-treated HEPM cells. Out of these altered transcripts, 234 of them were clustered in cellular biofunctions, including growth and proliferation, development, morphology, movement, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Biological interpretation and network analysis of the genes active in cellular biofunctions were performed using IPA. Among the differentially expressed genes, 11 of them were previously identified as being crucial for palatogenesis (EDN1, INHBA, LHX8, PDGFC, PIGA, RUNX1, SNAI1, SMAD3, TGFβ1, TGFβ2, and TGFβR1. These genes were used for a merged interaction network with cellular behaviors. Overall, we have determined that more than 2% of human transcripts were differentially expressed in response to TGFβ treatment in HEPM cells. Our results suggest that both TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 orchestrate major cellular biofunctions within the palatal mesenchyme in vitro by

  19. Craniofacial anomalies associated with hypospadias. Description of a hospital based population in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Escobar, Rebeca; Zarante, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Hypospadias is a congenital abnormality of the penis, in which there is incomplete development of the distal urethra. There are numerous reports showing na increase of prevalence of hypospadias. Association of craniofacial malformations in patients diagnosed with hypospadias is rare. The aim of this study is to describe the association between hypospadias and craniofacial congenital anomalies. A retrospective review of the Latin-American collaborative study of congenital malformations (ECLAMC) data was performed between January 1982 and December 2011. We included children diagnosed with associated hypospadias and among them we selected those that were associated with any craniofacial congenital anomaly. Global prevalence was 11.3 per 10.000 newborns. In this population a total of 809 patients with 1117 associated anomalies were identified. On average there were 1.7 anomalies per patient. Facial anomalies were present in 13.2%. The most commonly major facial anomaly associated to hypospadias was cleft lip/palate with 52 cases. We identified that 18% have an association with other anomalies, and found an association between craniofacial anomalies and hypospadias in 0.59 cases/10.000 newborns. Hypospadias is the most common congenital anomaly affecting the genitals. Its association with other anomalies is rare. It has been reported that other malformations occur in 29.3% of the cases with hypospadias. The more proximal the meatus, the higher the risk for having another associated anomaly. Associated hypospadias are rare, and it is important to identify the concurrent occurrence of craniofacial anomalies to better treat patients that might need a multidisciplinary approach. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  20. Ellis Van Creveld2 is Required for Postnatal Craniofacial Bone Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Mohammed K; Zhang, Honghao; Ohyama, Yoshio; Venkitapathi, Sundharamani; Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Haruko; Ray, Manas; Scott, Greg; Tsuji, Takehito; Kunieda, Tetsuo; Mishina, Yuji; Mochida, Yoshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a genetic disorder with mutations in either EVC or EVC2 gene. Previous case studies reported that EvC patients underwent orthodontic treatment, suggesting the presence of craniofacial bone phenotypes. To investigate whether a mutation in EVC2 gene causes a craniofacial bone phenotype, Evc2 knockout (KO) mice were generated and cephalometric analysis was performed. The heads of wild type (WT), heterozygous (Het) and homozygous Evc2 KO mice (1-, 3-, and 6-week-old) were prepared and cephalometric analysis based on the selected reference points on lateral X-ray radiographs was performed. The linear and angular bone measurements were then calculated, compared between WT, Het and KO and statistically analyzed at each time point. Our data showed that length of craniofacial bones in KO was significantly lowered by ∼20% to that of WT and Het, the growth of certain bones, including nasal bone, palatal length, and premaxilla was more affected in KO, and the reduction in these bone length was more significantly enhanced at later postnatal time points (3 and 6 weeks) than early time point (1 week). Furthermore, bone-to-bone relationship to cranial base and cranial vault in KO was remarkably changed, i.e. cranial vault and nasal bone were depressed and premaxilla and mandible were developed in a more ventral direction. Our study was the first to show the cause-effect relationship between Evc2 deficiency and craniofacial defects in EvC syndrome, demonstrating that Evc2 is required for craniofacial bone development and its deficiency leads to specific facial bone growth defect. Anat Rec, 299:1110-1120, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Computer vision and soft computing for automatic skull-face overlay in craniofacial superimposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campomanes-Álvarez, B Rosario; Ibáñez, O; Navarro, F; Alemán, I; Botella, M; Damas, S; Cordón, O

    2014-12-01

    Craniofacial superimposition can provide evidence to support that some human skeletal remains belong or not to a missing person. It involves the process of overlaying a skull with a number of ante mortem images of an individual and the analysis of their morphological correspondence. Within the craniofacial superimposition process, the skull-face overlay stage just focuses on achieving the best possible overlay of the skull and a single ante mortem image of the suspect. Although craniofacial superimposition has been in use for over a century, skull-face overlay is still applied by means of a trial-and-error approach without an automatic method. Practitioners finish the process once they consider that a good enough overlay has been attained. Hence, skull-face overlay is a very challenging, subjective, error prone, and time consuming part of the whole process. Though the numerical assessment of the method quality has not been achieved yet, computer vision and soft computing arise as powerful tools to automate it, dramatically reducing the time taken by the expert and obtaining an unbiased overlay result. In this manuscript, we justify and analyze the use of these techniques to properly model the skull-face overlay problem. We also present the automatic technical procedure we have developed using these computational methods and show the four overlays obtained in two craniofacial superimposition cases. This automatic procedure can be thus considered as a tool to aid forensic anthropologists to develop the skull-face overlay, automating and avoiding subjectivity of the most tedious task within craniofacial superimposition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Osteoinduction of umbilical cord and palate periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells on poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid nanomicrofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Montserrat; Pappa, Andrew K; Roden, Katherine S; Krochmal, Daniel J; van Aalst, John A

    2014-01-01

    The need for tissue-engineered bone to treat complex craniofacial bone defects secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma, and cancer extirpation is sizeable. Traditional strategies for treatment have focused on autologous bone in younger patients and bone substitutes in older patients. However, the capacity for merging new technologies, including the creation of nanofiber and microfiber scaffolds with advances in natal sources of stem cells, is crucial to improving our treatment options. The advantages of using smaller diameter fibers for scaffolding are 2-fold: the similar fiber diameters mimic the in vivo extracellular matrix construct and smaller fibers also provide a dramatically increased surface area for cell-scaffold interactions. In this study, we compare the capacity for a polymer with Federal Drug Administration approval for use in humans, poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) from Delta polymer, to support osteoinduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) harvested from the umbilical cord (UC) and palate periosteum (PP). Proliferation of both UC- and PP-derived MSCs was improved on PLGA scaffolds. The PLGA scaffolds promoted UC MSC differentiation (indicated by earlier gene expression and higher calcium deposition), but not in PP-derived MSCs. Umbilical cord-derived MSCs on the PLGA nanomicrofiber scaffolds have potential clinical utility in providing solutions for craniofacial bone defects, with the added benefit of earlier availability.

  3. Femtosecond laser pulses for chemical-free embryonic and mesenchymal stem cell differentiation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available . Femtosecond (fs) laser pulses have been reported to non-invasively deliver exogenous materials, including foreign genetic species into both multipotent and pluripotent stem cells successfully. Through this multi-photon facilitated technique, directly...

  4. Cleaved Slit directs embryonic muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordan, Elly; Volk, Talila

    2015-01-01

    The formation of functional musculoskeletal system relies on proper connectivity between muscles and their corresponding tendon cells. In Drosophila, larval muscles are born during early embryonic stages, and elongate toward tendons that are embedded within the ectoderm in later. The Slit/Robo signaling pathway had been implicated in the process of muscle elongation toward tendons. Here we discuss our recent findings regarding the critical contribution of Slit cleavage for immobilization and stabilization of the Slit signal on the tendon cells. Slit cleavage produces 2 polypeptides, the N-terminal Slit-N, which is extremely stable, undergoes oligomerization, and associates with the tendon cell surfaces, and the C-terminal Slit-C, which rapidly degrades. Slit cleavage leads to immobilization of Slit signaling on tendons, leading to a short-range repulsion, which eventually arrest further muscle elongation. Robo2, which is co-expressed with Slit by the tendon cells facilitates Slit cleavage. This activity does not require the cytoplasmic signaling domain of Robo2. We suggest that Robo2-dependent Slit cleavage, and the formation of Slit-N oligomers on the tendon cell surfaces direct muscle elongation, and provide a stop signal for the approaching muscle, through binding to Robo and Robo3 receptors expressed by the muscles.

  5. Long-term oral-appliance therapy in obstructive sleep apnea : A cephalometric study of craniofacial changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doff, M. H. J.; Hoekema, A.; Pruim, G. J.; Slater, J. J. R. Huddleston; Stegenga, B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this randomized controlled study was to cephalometrically assess possible changes in craniofacial morphology associated with long term use of an adjustable oral appliance compared with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with the obstructive sleep

  6. Craniofacial resection for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck. Laryngoscope 2005;115:931-937

    OpenAIRE

    Backous, D D.; DeMonte, F.; El-Naggar, A; Wolf, P; Weber, R S.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis: We reviewed our experience with craniofacial resection for advanced, nonmelanoma skin cancer of the head and neck to determine prognostic factors, local control rate, disease free survival, morbidity, and mortality.

  7. A PCA-Based method for determining craniofacial relationship and sexual dimorphism of facial shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Mingquan; Maddock, Steve; He, Taiping; Wang, Xingce; Deng, Qingqiong

    2017-11-01

    Previous studies have used principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate the craniofacial relationship, as well as sex determination using facial factors. However, few studies have investigated the extent to which the choice of principal components (PCs) affects the analysis of craniofacial relationship and sexual dimorphism. In this paper, we propose a PCA-based method for visual and quantitative analysis, using 140 samples of 3D heads (70 male and 70 female), produced from computed tomography (CT) images. There are two parts to the method. First, skull and facial landmarks are manually marked to guide the model's registration so that dense corresponding vertices occupy the same relative position in every sample. Statistical shape spaces of the skull and face in dense corresponding vertices are constructed using PCA. Variations in these vertices, captured in every principal component (PC), are visualized to observe shape variability. The correlations of skull- and face-based PC scores are analysed, and linear regression is used to fit the craniofacial relationship. We compute the PC coefficients of a face based on this craniofacial relationship and the PC scores of a skull, and apply the coefficients to estimate a 3D face for the skull. To evaluate the accuracy of the computed craniofacial relationship, the mean and standard deviation of every vertex between the two models are computed, where these models are reconstructed using real PC scores and coefficients. Second, each PC in facial space is analysed for sex determination, for which support vector machines (SVMs) are used. We examined the correlation between PCs and sex, and explored the extent to which the choice of PCs affects the expression of sexual dimorphism. Our results suggest that skull- and face-based PCs can be used to describe the craniofacial relationship and that the accuracy of the method can be improved by using an increased number of face-based PCs. The results show that the accuracy of

  8. Defining Population-Specific Craniofacial Fracture Patterns and Resource Use in Geriatric Patients: A Comparative Study of Blunt Craniofacial Fractures in Geriatric versus Nongeriatric Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundinger, Gerhard S; Bellamy, Justin L; Miller, Devin T; Christy, Michael R; Bojovic, Branko; Dorafshar, Amir H

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that mechanisms of injury, fracture patterns, and burden to the health care system differ between geriatric and nongeriatric populations sustaining blunt-force craniofacial trauma. A 5-year retrospective chart review of patient records and computed tomographic imaging was performed. Demographic and outcome data were extracted for equally numbered samples of blunt-mechanism facial fracture patients aged 60 years or older (geriatric), and adult patients aged 18 to 59 years (adult nongeriatric). Comparisons were made between these two populations using t tests and multivariable logistic regression. One thousand eighty-seven geriatric and 1087 nongeriatric patients were included. Geriatric patients were significantly more likely to be Caucasian, female, and have sustained fractures as the result of falling. They also had significantly longer hospital stays, were more likely to die, and were more likely to be discharged to home with services. Mandible fractures and panfacial fractures were significantly more common in the nongeriatric population. Geriatric age was associated with doubled length of hospitalization for patients with midface fractures. Logistic regression revealed that significantly higher incidences of orbital floor, maxillary, and condylar fractures in geriatric patients were dependent on geriatric age status, rather than mechanism of injury alone. Resource allocation for geriatric patients with craniofacial trauma should differ from that of their nongeriatric adult counterparts, with more resources allocated to supportive care during hospitalization and assistive care after discharge. The authors' data indicate that structural and biological changes in the craniofacial skeleton contribute to differences in fracture location independent of mechanism of injury. Risk, II.

  9. Research of TGF-beta1 Inducing Lung Adencarcinoma PC9 Cells to Mesenchymal Cells Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng CHEN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT not only correlated with embryonic development but also could promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1 has been identified as the main inducer of tumor EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on EMT and PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in lung adencarcinoma PC9 cells. Methods Cultured PC9 cells were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 48 h. The morphological changes were observed under phase-contrast microscopy; EMT relative marker protein changes were assessed by Western blot and immunoflurescence staining. In addition, the expression of AKT and P-AKT were also measured by Western blot. Results The data showed that TGF-β1 could induce PC9 morphological alteration from epithelial to mesenchymal and upregulate the expression of mesenchymal maker protein Fibronectin. Obviously, the expression of P-AKT was downregulated by TGF-β1 treatment for 48 h. Conclusion TGF-β1 might induce EMT of PC9 cells , accompanied by the changes of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

  10. Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition by transactivation of Twist1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Xin-Hong [Department of Breast Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Department of Pathology, The Basic Medical College of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Lv, Xin-Quan [Department of Pathology, The Basic Medical College of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Li, Hui-Xiang, E-mail: Lihuixiang1955@163.com [Department of Pathology, The Basic Medical College of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. • Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition through transactivation of Twist1 expression. - Abstract: The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a highly conserved cellular program, plays an important role in normal embryogenesis and cancer metastasis. Twist1, a master regulator of embryonic morphogenesis, is overexpressed in breast cancer and contributes to metastasis by promoting EMT. In exploring the mechanism underlying the increased Twist1 in breast cancer cells, we found that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 5(Sox5) is up-regulation in breast cancer cells and depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, depletion of Sox5 in breast cancer cells caused a dramatic decrease in Twist1 and chromosome immunoprecipitation assay showed that Sox5 can bind directly to the Twist1 promoter, suggesting that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. We further demonstrated that knockdown of Sox5 up-regulated epithelial phenotype cell biomarker (E-cadherin) and down-regulated mesenchymal phenotype cell biomarkers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and Fibronectin 1), resulting in suppression of EMT. Our study suggests that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression and plays an important role in the regulation of breast cancer progression.

  11. Identification of the benign mesenchymal tumor gene HMGA2 in lymphangiomyomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Armiento, Jeanine; Imai, Kazushi; Schiltz, John; Kolesnekova, Natalya; Sternberg, David; Benson, Kathleen; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Smolarek, Theresa; Vundavalli, Murty; Sonnet, Joshua; Szabolcs, Matthias; Chada, Kiran

    2007-03-01

    The normal expression pattern of HMGA2, an architectural transcription factor, is primarily restricted to cells of the developing mesenchyme before their overt differentiation during organogenesis. A detailed in situ hybridization analysis showed that the undifferentiated mesoderm of the embryonic lung expressed Hmga2 but it was not expressed in the newborn or adult lung. Previously, HMGA2 was shown to be misexpressed in a number of benign, differentiated mesenchymal tumors including lipomas, uterine leiomyomas, and pulmonary chondroid hamartomas. Here, we show that HMGA2 is misexpressed in pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis (LAM), a severe disorder of unknown etiology consisting of lymphatic smooth muscle cell proliferation that results in the obstruction of airways, lymphatics, and vessels. Immunohistochemistry was done with antibodies to HMGA2 and revealed expression in lung tissue samples obtained from 21 patients with LAM. In contrast, HMGA2 was not expressed in sections of normal adult lung or other proliferative interstitial lung diseases, indicating that the expression of HMGA2 in LAM represents aberrant gene activation and is not due solely to an increase in cellular proliferation. In vivo studies in transgenic mice show that misexpression of HMGA2 in smooth muscle cells resulted in increased proliferation of these cells in the lung surrounding the epithelial cells. Therefore, similar to the other mesenchymal neoplasms, HMGA2 misexpression in the smooth muscle cell leads to abnormal proliferation and LAM tumorigenesis. These results suggest that HMGA2 plays a central role in the pathogenesis of LAM and is a potential candidate as a therapeutic target.

  12. Mesenchymal and induced pluripotent stem cells: general insights and clinical perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomer HD

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Helena D Zomer,1 Atanásio S Vidane,1 Natalia N Gonçalves,1 Carlos E Ambrósio2 1Department of Surgery, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil; 2Department of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Animal Sciences and Food Engineering, University of São Paulo, Pirassununga, SP, Brazil Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells have awakened a great deal of interest in regenerative medicine due to their plasticity, and immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. They are high-yield and can be acquired through noninvasive methods from adult tissues. Moreover, they are nontumorigenic and are the most widely studied. On the other hand, induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells can be derived directly from adult cells through gene reprogramming. The new iPS technology avoids the embryo destruction or manipulation to generate pluripotent cells, therefore, are exempt from ethical implication surrounding embryonic stem cell use. The pre-differentiation of iPS cells ensures the safety of future approaches. Both mesenchymal stem cells and iPS cells can be used for autologous cell transplantations without the risk of immune rejection and represent a great opportunity for future alternative therapies. In this review we discussed the therapeutic perspectives using mesenchymal and iPS cells. Keywords: cell transplantation, cell therapy, iPS, MSC

  13. (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and (/sup 3/H)proline radioautography of embryonic mouse dental basement membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osman, M.; Ruch, J.V.

    1981-01-01

    (/sup 3/H)proline and (/sup 3/H)glucosamine radioautography was performed to analyze the labeling pattern of mouse embryonic dental basement membrane before and during odontoblast terminal differentiation. Sixteen- and eighteen-day-old first lower molars and trypsin-isolated enamel organs, as well as EDTA-isolated dental papillae, were used. Continuous labeling for 12 to 24 hr was required with (/sup 3/H)proline to obtain a clear labeling of epithelial-mesenchymal junction in intact tooth germs or accumulation of surface label in trypsin-isolated enamel organs. With (/sup 3/H)glucosamine, after 6-hr labeling, the epithelial-mesenchymal junction was heavily labeled and the trypsin-isolated enamel organs accumulated substantial amounts of surface label, corresponding to the redeposited basement membrane. At Day 16 stage, these labels always had a uniform distribution and decreased during chase without any redistribution. At Day 18 stage, when the terminal differentiation of odontoblasts occurred the label accumulated in a unique pattern: much more label was at the epithelial surface corresponding to the top of the cusps than in the apical parts. During chase and only in intact tooth germs epithelial surfaces which had labeled poorly during pulse became labeled, but those labeling heavily during pulse lost label. This pattern existed only in the presence of mesenchyme. EDTA treatment of (/sup 3/H)glucosamine-labeled teeth enabled us to obtain isolated dental papillae with surface label. Distribution of this label was exactly the same as that for the epithelial-mesenchymal junction of intact teeth. During chase, these dental papillae completely lost the surface label. The mesenchyme seen to control the synthesis and/or the degradation of epithelially derived (/sup 3/H)glucosamine-labeled material.

  14. Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldahmash, Abdullah; Zaher, Walid; Al-Nbaheen, May

    2012-01-01

    Human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (hMSC) represent a group of non-hematopoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow stroma and the stroma of other organs including subcutaneous adipose tissue, placenta, and muscles. They exhibit the characteristics of somatic stem cells of self......-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation into mesoderm-type of cells, e.g., to osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and possibly other cell types including hepatocytes and astrocytes. Due to their ease of culture and multipotentiality, hMSC are increasingly employed as a source for cells suitable for a number...

  15. The ribosome biogenesis factor Nol11 is required for optimal rDNA transcription and craniofacial development in Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John N Griffin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of ribosomes is ubiquitous and fundamental to life. As such, it is surprising that defects in ribosome biogenesis underlie a growing number of symptomatically distinct inherited disorders, collectively called ribosomopathies. We previously determined that the nucleolar protein, NOL11, is essential for optimal pre-rRNA transcription and processing in human tissue culture cells. However, the role of NOL11 in the development of a multicellular organism remains unknown. Here, we reveal a critical function for NOL11 in vertebrate ribosome biogenesis and craniofacial development. Nol11 is strongly expressed in the developing cranial neural crest (CNC of both amphibians and mammals, and knockdown of Xenopus nol11 results in impaired pre-rRNA transcription and processing, increased apoptosis, and abnormal development of the craniofacial cartilages. Inhibition of p53 rescues this skeletal phenotype, but not the underlying ribosome biogenesis defect, demonstrating an evolutionarily conserved control mechanism through which ribosome-impaired craniofacial cells are removed. Excessive activation of this mechanism impairs craniofacial development. Together, our findings reveal a novel requirement for Nol11 in craniofacial development, present the first frog model of a ribosomopathy, and provide further insight into the clinically important relationship between specific ribosome biogenesis proteins and craniofacial cell survival.

  16. Cytomegalovirus induces abnormal chondrogenesis and osteogenesis during embryonic mandibular development

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    Bringas Pablo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human clinical studies and mouse models clearly demonstrate that cytomegalovirus (CMV disrupts normal organ and tissue development. Although CMV is one of the most common causes of major birth defects in humans, little is presently known about the mechanism(s underlying CMV-induced congenital malformations. Our prior studies have demonstrated that CMV infection of first branchial arch derivatives (salivary glands and teeth induced severely abnormal phenotypes and that CMV has a particular tropism for neural crest-derived mesenchyme (NCM. Since early embryos are barely susceptible to CMV infection, and the extant evidence suggests that the differentiation program needs to be well underway for embryonic tissues to be susceptible to viral infection and viral-induced pathology, the aim of this study was to determine if first branchial arch NCM cells are susceptible to mCMV infection prior to differentiation of NCM derivatives. Results E11 mouse mandibular processes (MANs were infected with mouse CMV (mCMV for up to 16 days in vitro. mCMV infection of undifferentiated embryonic mouse MANs induced micrognathia consequent to decreased Meckel's cartilage chondrogenesis and mandibular osteogenesis. Specifically, mCMV infection resulted in aberrant stromal cellularity, a smaller, misshapen Meckel's cartilage, and mandibular bone and condylar dysmorphogenesis. Analysis of viral distribution indicates that mCMV primarily infects NCM cells and derivatives. Initial localization studies indicate that mCMV infection changed the cell-specific expression of FN, NF-κB2, RelA, RelB, and Shh and Smad7 proteins. Conclusion Our results indicate that mCMV dysregulation of key signaling pathways in primarily NCM cells and their derivatives severely disrupts mandibular morphogenesis and skeletogenesis. The pathogenesis appears to be centered around the canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways, and there is unusual juxtaposition of abnormal stromal

  17. Uncoupled embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues compromise blastocyst development after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

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    Séverine A Degrelle

    Full Text Available Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is the most efficient cell reprogramming technique available, especially when working with bovine species. Although SCNT blastocysts performed equally well or better than controls in the weeks following embryo transfer at Day 7, elongation and gastrulation defects were observed prior to implantation. To understand the developmental implications of embryonic/extra-embryonic interactions, the morphological and molecular features of elongating and gastrulating tissues were analysed. At Day 18, 30 SCNT conceptuses were compared to 20 controls (AI and IVP: 10 conceptuses each; one-half of the SCNT conceptuses appeared normal while the other half showed signs of atypical elongation and gastrulation. SCNT was also associated with a high incidence of discordance in embryonic and extra-embryonic patterns, as evidenced by morphological and molecular "uncoupling". Elongation appeared to be secondarily affected; only 3 of 30 conceptuses had abnormally elongated shapes and there were very few differences in gene expression when they were compared to the controls. However, some of these differences could be linked to defects in microvilli formation or extracellular matrix composition and could thus impact extra-embryonic functions. In contrast to elongation, gastrulation stages included embryonic defects that likely affected the hypoblast, the epiblast, or the early stages of their differentiation. When taking into account SCNT conceptus somatic origin, i.e. the reprogramming efficiency of each bovine ear fibroblast (Low: 0029, Med: 7711, High: 5538, we found that embryonic abnormalities or severe embryonic/extra-embryonic uncoupling were more tightly correlated to embryo loss at implantation than were elongation defects. Alternatively, extra-embryonic differences between SCNT and control conceptuses at Day 18 were related to molecular plasticity (high efficiency/high plasticity and subsequent pregnancy loss. Finally

  18. Early Craniofacial Morphology and Growth in Children With Nonsyndromic Robin Sequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N. V.; Kreiborg, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Craniofacial morphology and growth comparisons in children with untreated nonsyndromic Robin Sequence (RS) and a control group with unilateral incomplete cleft lip (UICL) in which the lip was surgically closed at 2 months of age. Material: The 52 children (7 RS and 45 UICL) included...... in the study were drawn from a group representing all Danish cleft children born 1976 through 1981. The ages of the children were 2 and 22 months at the time of examination 1 and 2, respectively. Method: The method of investigation was three-projection cephalometry. Craniofacial morphology was analyzed...... by means of linear, angular, and area variables. Growth at a specific anatomical location in a patient was defined as the displacement vector from the coordinate of the corresponding landmark at examination I to its coordinate at examination 2. Results: The most striking findings in the RS group were...

  19. Craniofacial skeletal pattern: is it really correlated with the degree of adenoid obstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feres, Murilo Fernando Neuppmann; Muniz, Tomas Salomão; de Andrade, Saulo Henrique; Lemos, Maurilo de Mello; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the cephalometric pattern of children with and without adenoid obstruction. The sample comprised 100 children aged between four and 14 years old, both males and females, subjected to cephalometric examination for sagittal and vertical skeletal analysis. The sample also underwent nasofiberendoscopic examination intended to objectively assess the degree of adenoid obstruction. The individuals presented tendencies towards vertical craniofacial growth, convex profile and mandibular retrusion. However, there were no differences between obstructive and non-obstructive patients concerning all cephalometric variables. Correlations between skeletal parameters and the percentage of adenoid obstruction were either low or not significant. Results suggest that specific craniofacial patterns, such as Class II and hyperdivergency, might not be associated with adenoid hypertrophy.

  20. The ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP modulates protein phosphatase 2A activity in craniofacial development.

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    Meike Hoffmeister

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly is a common developmental disorder in humans characterised by incomplete brain hemisphere separation and midface anomalies. The etiology of holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous with environmental and genetic causes, but for a majority of holoprosencephaly cases the genes associated with the pathogenesis could not be identified so far. Here we report the generation of knockout mice for the ubiquitin E3 ligase NOSIP. The loss of NOSIP in mice causes holoprosencephaly and facial anomalies including cleft lip/palate, cyclopia and facial midline clefting. By a mass spectrometry based protein interaction screen we identified NOSIP as a novel interaction partner of protein phosphatase PP2A. NOSIP mediates the monoubiquitination of the PP2A catalytic subunit and the loss of NOSIP results in an increase in PP2A activity in craniofacial tissue in NOSIP knockout mice. We conclude, that NOSIP is a critical modulator of brain and craniofacial development in mice and a candidate gene for holoprosencephaly in humans.

  1. The Contributions of the Ribosome Biogenesis Protein Utp5/WDR43 to Craniofacial Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondalle, S.B.; Baserga, S.J.; Yelick, P.C.

    2016-01-01

    Fairly recently, it was recognized that human ribosomopathies—developmental defects caused by mutations in ribosome biogenesis proteins—can exhibit tissue-specific defects rather than the expected global defects. This apparent anomaly—that seemingly ubiquitously expressed and required ribosomal proteins can have distinct functions in cell and tissue differentiation—has spurred new areas of research focused on better understanding translational mechanisms, biogenesis, and function in diverse cell types. This renewed appreciation for, and need to better understand, roles for ribosomal proteins in human development and disease has identified surprising similarities and differences in a variety of human ribosomopathies. Here, we discuss ribosomal protein functions in health and disease, focusing on the ribosome biogenesis protein Utp5/WDR43. New and exciting research in this field is anticipated to provide insight into a variety of previously understudied craniofacial dysostoses and result in significantly improved knowledge and understanding of roles for translational machinery in human craniofacial development and disease. PMID:27221611

  2. Dry needling for management of pain in the upper quarter and craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietrys, David M; Palombaro, Kerstin M; Mannheimer, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Dry needling is a therapeutic intervention that has been growing in popularity. It is primarily used with patients that have pain of myofascial origin. This review provides background about dry needling, myofascial pain, and craniofacial pain. We summarize the evidence regarding the effectiveness of dry needling. For patients with upper quarter myofascial pain, a 2013 systematic review and meta-analysis of 12 randomized controlled studies reported that dry needling is effective in reducing pain (especially immediately after treatment) in patients with upper quarter pain. There have been fewer studies of patients with craniofacial pain and myofascial pain in other regions, but most of these studies report findings to suggest the dry needling may be helpful in reducing pain and improving other pain related variables such as the pain pressure threshold. More rigorous randomized controlled trials are clearly needed to more fully elucidate the effectiveness of dry needling.

  3. Prevention of Cutaneous Tissue Contracture During Removal of Craniofacial Implant Superstructures for CT and MRI Studies

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    Maureen Sullivan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Head and neck cancer patients who have lost facial parts following surgical intervention frequently require craniofacial implant retained facial prostheses for restoration. Many craniofacial implant patients require computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans as part of their long-term follow-up care. Consequently removal of implant superstructures and peri-abutment tissue management is required for those studies. The purpose of the present paper was to describe a method for eliminating cranial imaging artifacts in patients with craniofacial implants.Material and Methods: Three patients wearing extraoral implant retained facial prostheses needing either computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies were discussed. Peri-implant soft tissues contracture after removal of percutaneous craniofacial implant abutments during computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies was prevented using a method proposed by authors. The procedure involves temporary removal of the supra-implant components prior to imaging and filling of the tissue openings with polyvinyl siloxane dental impression material.Results: Immediately after filling of the tissue openings with polyvinyl siloxane dental impression material patients were sent for the imaging studies, and were asked to return for removal of the silicone plugs and reconnection of all superstructure hardware after imaging procedures were complete. The silicone plugs were easily removed with a dental explorer. The percutaneous abutments were immediately replaced and screwed into the implants which were at the bone level.Conclusions: Presented herein method eliminates the source of artifacts and prevents contracture of percutaneous tissues upon removal of the implant abutments during imaging.

  4. Pdgfra protects against ethanol-induced craniofacial defects in a zebrafish model of FASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Neil; Wetherill, Leah; Lovely, C. Ben; Swartz, Mary E.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2013-01-01

    Human birth defects are highly variable and this phenotypic variability can be influenced by both the environment and genetics. However, the synergistic interactions between these two variables are not well understood. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is the umbrella term used to describe the wide range of deleterious outcomes following prenatal alcohol exposure. Although FASD are caused by prenatal ethanol exposure, FASD are thought to be genetically modulated, although the genes regulating sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis are largely unknown. To identify potential ethanol-sensitive genes, we tested five known craniofacial mutants for ethanol sensitivity: cyp26b1, gata3, pdgfra, smad5 and smoothened. We found that only platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (pdgfra) interacted with ethanol during zebrafish craniofacial development. Analysis of the PDGF family in a human FASD genome-wide dataset links PDGFRA to craniofacial phenotypes in FASD, prompting a mechanistic understanding of this interaction. In zebrafish, untreated pdgfra mutants have cleft palate due to defective neural crest cell migration, whereas pdgfra heterozygotes develop normally. Ethanol-exposed pdgfra mutants have profound craniofacial defects that include the loss of the palatal skeleton and hypoplasia of the pharyngeal skeleton. Furthermore, ethanol treatment revealed latent haploinsufficiency, causing palatal defects in ∼62% of pdgfra heterozygotes. Neural crest apoptosis partially underlies these ethanol-induced defects in pdgfra mutants, demonstrating a protective role for Pdgfra. This protective role is mediated by the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Collectively, our results suggest a model where combined genetic and environmental inhibition of PI3K/mTOR signaling leads to variability within FASD. PMID:23861062

  5. Low-amplitude craniofacial EMG power spectral density and 3D muscle reconstruction from MRI

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    Lukas Wiedemann

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving EEG signal interpretation, specificity, and sensitivity is a primary focus of many current investigations, and the successful application of EEG signal processing methods requires a detailed knowledge of both the topography and frequency spectra of low-amplitude, high-frequency craniofacial EMG. This information remains limited in clinical research, and as such, there is no known reliable technique for the removal of these artifacts from EEG data. The results presented herein outline a preliminary investigation of craniofacial EMG high-frequency spectra and 3D MRI segmentation that offers insight into the development of an anatomically-realistic model for characterizing these effects. The data presented highlights the potential for confounding signal contribution from around 60 to 200 Hz, when observed in frequency space, from both low and high-amplitude EMG signals. This range directly overlaps that of both low γ (30-50 Hz and high γ (50-80 Hz waves, as defined traditionally in standatrd EEG measurements, and mainly with waves presented in dense-array EEG recordings. Likewise, average EMG amplitude comparisons from each condition highlights the similarities in signal contribution of low-activity muscular movements and resting, control conditions. In addition to the FFT analysis performed, 3D segmentation and reconstruction of the craniofacial muscles whose EMG signals were measured was successful. This recapitulation of the relevant EMG morphology is a crucial first step in developing an anatomical model for the isolation and removal of confounding low-amplitude craniofacial EMG signals from EEG data. Such a model may be eventually applied in a clinical setting to ultimately help to extend the use of EEG in various clinical roles.

  6. Craniofacial morphology in ancient and modern Greeks through 4,000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagrigorakis, Manolis J; Kousoulis, Antonis A; Synodinos, Philippos N

    2014-01-01

    Multiple 20th century studies have speculated on the anthropological similarities of the modern inhabitants of Greece with their ancient predecessors. The present investigation attempts to add to this knowledge by comparing the craniofacial configuration of 141 ancient (dating around 2,000-500 BC) and 240 modern Greek skulls (the largest material among relevant national studies). Skulls were grouped in age at death, sex, era and geographical categories; lateral cephalograms were taken and 53 variables were measured and correlated statistically. The craniofacial measurements and measurements of the basic quadrilateral and cranial polygon were compared in various groups using basic statistical methods, one-way ANOVA and assessment of the correlation matrices. Most of the measurements for both sexes combined followed an akin pattern in ancient and modern Greek skulls. Moreover, sketching and comparing the outline of the skull and upper face, we observed a clock-wise movement. The present study confirms that the morphological pattern of Greek skulls, as it changed during thousands of years, kept some characteristics unchanged, with others undergoing logical modifications. The analysis of our results allows us to believe that the influence upon the craniofacial complex of the various known factors, including genetic or environmental alterations, is apt to alter its form to adapt to new conditions. Even though 4,000 years seems too narrow a span to provoke evolutionary insights using conventional geometric morphometrics, the full presentation of our results makes up a useful atlas of solid data. Interpreted with caution, the craniofacial morphology in modern and ancient Greeks indicates elements of ethnic group continuation within the unavoidable multicultural mixtures.

  7. The Effects Of Snoring On Craniofacial Morphology, Head Posture And Sagittal Curvature Of Vertebrae

    OpenAIRE

    Benkli, Dr. Yasin Atakan; OKTAY, Prof. Dr. Hüsamettin

    2013-01-01

    The effect of function on structure has long been known in orthodontic literature and still been discussed on. It is accepted that our vital function, namely respiration, and associated disorders as snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome( OSAS) have effects on dentofacial anatomic regions as well as on medical and social well being. The effects of snoring on craniofacial structures and posture have been investigated by several researchers. This literature review aims to give knowledge a...

  8. Genomic factors that shape craniofacial outcome and neural crest vulnerability in FASD

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    Susan M. Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE causes distinctive facial characteristics in some pregnancies and not others; genetic factors may contribute to this differential vulnerability. Ethanol disrupts multiple events of neural crest development including induction, survival, migration, and differentiation. Animal models and genomic approaches have substantially advanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these facial changes. PAE during gastrulation produces craniofacial changes corresponding with human fetal alcohol syndrome. These result because PAE reduces prechordal plate extension and suppresses sonic hedgehog, leading to holoprosencephaly and malpositioned facial primordia. Haploinsufficiency in sonic hedgehog signaling increases vulnerability to facial deficits and may influence some PAE pregnancies. In contrast, PAE during early neurogenesis produces facial hypoplasia, preceded by neural crest reductions due to significant apoptosis. Factors mediating this apoptosis include intracellular calcium mobilization, elevated reactive oxygen species, and loss of trophic support from β-catenin/calcium, sonic hedgehog, and mTOR signaling. Genomewide SNP analysis links PDGF receptor genes with facial outcomes in human PAE. Multiple genomic-level comparisons of ethanol-sensitive and –resistant early embryos, in both mouse and chick, independently identify common candidate genes that may potentially modify craniofacial vulnerability, including ribosomal proteins, proteosome, RNA splicing, and focal adhesion. In summary, research using animal models with genome-level differences in ethanol vulnerability, as well as targeted loss- and gain-of-function mutants, has clarified the mechanisms mediating craniofacial change in PAE. The findings additionally suggest that craniofacial deficits may represent a gene-ethanol interaction for some affected individuals. Genetic-level changes may prime individuals toward greater sensitivity or resistance to

  9. Reliable classification of facial phenotypic variation in craniofacial microsomia: a comparison of physical exam and photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgfeld, Craig B; Heike, Carrie L; Saltzman, Babette S; Leroux, Brian G; Evans, Kelly N; Luquetti, Daniela V

    2016-03-31

    Craniofacial microsomia is a common congenital condition for which children receive longitudinal, multidisciplinary team care. However, little is known about the etiology of craniofacial microsomia and few outcome studies have been published. In order to facilitate large, multicenter studies in craniofacial microsomia, we assessed the reliability of phenotypic classification based on photographs by comparison with direct physical examination. Thirty-nine children with craniofacial microsomia underwent a physical examination and photographs according to a standardized protocol. Three clinicians completed ratings during the physical examination and, at least a month later, using respective photographs for each participant. We used descriptive statistics for participant characteristics and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) to assess reliability. The agreement between ratings on photographs and physical exam was greater than 80 % for all 15 categories included in the analysis. The ICC estimates were higher than 0.6 for most features. Features with the highest ICC included: presence of epibulbar dermoids, ear abnormalities, and colobomas (ICC 0.85, 0.81, and 0.80, respectively). Orbital size, presence of pits, tongue abnormalities, and strabismus had the lowest ICC, values (0.17 or less). There was not a strong tendency for either type of rating, physical exam or photograph, to be more likely to designate a feature as abnormal. The agreement between photographs and physical exam regarding the presence of a prior surgery was greater than 90 % for most features. Our results suggest that categorization of facial phenotype in children with CFM based on photographs is reliable relative to physical examination for most facial features.

  10. Impact of a Cleft and Craniofacial Center on an Academic Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourtaheri, Navid; Kearney, Aaron; Wan, Derrick C; Lakin, Gregory

    2017-10-01

    The contributions of all physician specialties and ancillary services involved in cleft and craniofacial center care must be evaluated to fairly assess the financial impact of a cleft and craniofacial center. The authors hypothesized that the cleft and craniofacial center generates profitable downstream productivity for the academic health system. This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who presented to a cleft and craniofacial center in the first quarter of 2011. Analysis included all health system encounters for each patient over a 2-year period using the electronic medical record and health system financial database. Sixty-two patients were seen (mean age, 11.4 years; 38 boys and 24 girls; 18 new and 44 established patients). Over 2 years, there were 618 health system encounters (599 outpatient and 19 inpatient encounters), 68 hospital days, and 110 procedures. The most common physician specialty was plastic surgery [312 encounters (50.5 percent)] and the most common ancillary service was speech therapy [256 encounters (41.4 percent)]. The overall reimbursement rate was 39.9 percent, with a majority payor-mix of government payors (62.1 percent). The total profit margin percentage from all encounters was 13.7 percent, which was greater for managed care compared with government payor (38.9 percent versus -10.8 percent; p = 0.022), inpatient compared to outpatient (24.5 percent versus -2.8 percent; p center generated profitable downstream productivity for the academic health system with referrals to 39 different physician and nonphysician specialties. Health system providers and the business team should align to analyze the center, enhance patient outcomes, and improve specialty care access for patients.

  11. Characteristics of associated craniofacial trauma in patients with head injuries: An experience with 100 cases

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    Rajendra Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Facial fractures and concomitant cranial injuries carry the significant potential for mortality and neurological morbidity mainly in young adults. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of head injuries and associated facial injuries, the management options and outcome following cranio-facial trauma. Methods: This retrospective review was performed at Justice K. S. Hegde Charitable Hospital, and associated A. B. Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental sciences, Deralakatte, Mangalore. Following Ethical Committee approval, hospital charts and radiographs of 100 consecutive patients of cranio-facial trauma managed at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Neurosurgery between January 2004 and December 2004 were reviewed. Results: Majority of the patients were in the 2nd to 4th decade (79% with a male to female ratio of -8.09:1. Road traffic accidents were the common cause of craniofacial trauma in present study (54% followed by fall from height (30%. Loss of consciousness was the most common clinical symptom (62% followed by headache (33%. Zygoma was the most commonly fractured facial bone 48.2% (alone 21.2%, in combination 27.2%. Majority of patients had mild head injury and managed conservatively in present series. Causes of surgical intervention for intracranial lesions were compound depressed fracture, contusion and intracranial hematoma. Operative indications for facial fractures were displaced facial bone fractures. Major causes of mortality were associated systemic injuries. Conclusion: Adult males are the most common victims in craniofacial trauma, and road traffic accidents were responsible for the majority. Most of the patients sustained mild head injuries and were managed conservatively. Open reduction and internal fixation with miniplates was used for displaced facial bone fractures.

  12. An overview of recent advances in designing orthopedic and craniofacial implants

    OpenAIRE

    Mantripragada, Venkata P.; Lecka-Czernik, Beata; Ebraheim, Nabil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2013-01-01

    Great deal of research is still going on in the field of orthopedic and craniofacial implant development to resolve various issues being faced by the industry today. Despite several disadvantages of the metallic implants, they continue to be used, primarily because of their superior mechanical properties. In order to minimize the harmful effects of the metallic implants and its by-products, several modifications are being made to these materials, for instance nickel-free stainless steel, coba...

  13. Study Of 50 Cases With Craniofacial Trauma Who Experienced Head Injuries

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    Ali Mesgarzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that cranial injuries associated with facial fractures may cause a great risk of mortality and neurological morbidity, which mainly occurs in young adults. Aims and objectives: Study of the features of facial injuries associated with head injuries, discussing the management options and detecting the outcomes following craniofacial trauma. Methods: This is a retrospective study carried out at Imam reza and Shohada Hospitals. Radiographs and hospital data of 50 patients with craniofacial trauma between January 2013 and December 2014, managed at the Oral and Maxillofacial surgery department were gathered and analyzed. Results: The greatest number of the patients had 20 to 50 years old (68% and most of them were male. (M/F ratio was 6.09:1. The most prevalent causes of the trauma in this study were the motor vehicle accidents (44% and falling from height (36%, respectively. The most common bone fracture among the patients was the zygomatic bone fx (38.2%. Among the symptoms which the patients presented, Loss of the consciousness (52% and headache (43% showed the highest prevalence. Compound depressed fractures, contusions and intracranial hematoma were the leading causes of the surgical intervention for intracranial lesions. A high number of patients who have died in this study had associated systemic injuries. Displaced facial bone fracture were the indications for operation in facial fractures. Conclusions: The majority of the patients with craniofacial trauma were the adult males and the leading cause of trauma were road traffic accidents. A high number of the patients had mild head injuries and required only a conservational therapy.     Keywords:  head injury; craniofacial trauma; facial fracture

  14. Aminocaproic acid administration is associated with reduced perioperative blood loss and transfusion in pediatric craniofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G; Taylor, J A; Fiadjoe, J E; Vincent, A M; Pruitt, E Y; Bartlett, S P; Stricker, P A

    2016-02-01

    Severe blood loss is a common complication of craniofacial reconstruction surgery. The antifibrinolytic ε-aminocaproic acid (EACA) reduces transfusion requirements in children undergoing cardiac surgery and in older children undergoing spine surgery. Tranexamic acid (TXA), another antifibrinolytic with a similar mechanism of action, has been shown to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in children undergoing craniofacial surgery. However, TXA has been associated with an increase in post-operative seizures and is more expensive than EACA. There is currently little published data evaluating the efficacy of EACA in children undergoing craniofacial surgery. This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected data from our craniofacial perioperative registries for children under 6 years of age who underwent anterior or posterior cranial vault reconstruction. We compared calculated blood loss, blood donor exposures, and post-operative drain output between subjects who received EACA and those who did not. The registry queries returned data from 152 subjects. Eighty-six did not receive EACA and 66 received EACA. The EACA group had significantly lower calculated blood loss (82 ± 43 vs. 106 ± 63 ml/kg, P = 0.01), fewer intraoperative blood donor exposures (median 2, interquartile range 1-2 vs. median 2, interquartile range 1-3; P = 0.02) and lower surgical drain output in the first post-operative 24 h (28 ml/kg vs. 37 ml/kg, P = 0.001) than the non-EACA group. In this analysis of prospectively captured observational data, EACA administration was associated with less calculated blood loss, intraoperative blood donor exposures, and post-operative surgical drain output. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination.

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    Luisa F Pallares

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW. We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi, where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population.

  16. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallares, Luisa F; Carbonetto, Peter; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Parker, Clarissa C; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Palmer, Abraham A; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-11-01

    The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW). We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi), where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population.

  17. Evaluation of Craniofacial Morphology of Children with Dental Fluorosis in Early Permanent Dentition Period

    OpenAIRE

    Dogan, Alev Aksoy; Bolpaca, Pinar

    2009-01-01

    Objectives High intake of fluoride (>1.5 mg/L) for a prolonged period may lead to skeletal fluorosis as well as dental fluorosis. The aim of this study was to compare the craniofacial characteristics of children with dental fluorosis in early permanent dentition period to those without fluorosis. Methods Two hundred and sixteen children in early permanent dentition (girls:121, boys:95) were included in the study. Study group was composed of 124 children with dental fluorosis who was born and ...

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyten, Frank P

    2004-09-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that every tissue contains stem cells. Our understanding of the biology of stem cells reveals that these cell populations have a critical role in the homeostasis and repair of tissues. Besides the local stem cell niches, additional compartments in the body such as the bone marrow may serve as reservoirs for stem cell populations. On more extensive tissue damage, and guided by local repair responses, "reparative" cell populations are mobilized from more distant stem cell reservoirs and migrate to the site of injury, thereby contributing in many aspects of local tissue repair. Osteoarthritis has long been regarded as an imbalance between destructive and reparative processes. The lack of repair of the weight-bearing articular cartilage and the associated subchondral bone changes are considered of critical importance in the progression of the disease. Recent findings indicate a depletion and/or functional alteration of mesenchymal stem cell populations in osteoarthritis. These preliminary data suggest that in joint diseases such as osteoarthritis, it is of importance to investigate further the involvement of the stem cell pool in the mechanisms contributing to joint homeostasis and driving disease progression. In view of the emerging body of evidence pointing to a potential therapeutic utility of stem cell technology, it is not surprising that local delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has been explored as a therapeutic approach in animal models of osteoarthritis. Copyright 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  19. Central nervous system mesenchymal chondrosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvati, M.; Frati, A.; Piccirilli, M.; Agrillo, A.; Brogna, C.; Occhiogrosso, G.; Giangaspero, F. [INM Neuromed IRCCS, Pozzilli (Italy). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Caroli, E. [Policlinico S. Andrea, Rome (Italy). Dept. of Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery

    2005-06-15

    Central nervous system mesenchymal chondrosarcomas are rare malignant tumors that constitute a separate entity from the classical chondrosarcoma and myxoid variant. Clinical behaviour of central nervous system chondrosarcomas is still unknown. We describe two rare examples of intracranial mesenchymal chondrosarcoma with a review of the literature, in an attempt to clarify the clinical characteristics, prognosis and treatment of choice of these unusual tumors. Among the 55 reported cases, 23 had postoperative radiotherapy. Although there is no statistical significance according to the Log-Rank test (p=0.7), the patients treated with radiation therapy seem to have a better chance of survival. Patients who had adjuvant chemotherapy (only 5) showed survival times similar to those patients who had none. Although clinical behaviour of central nervous system chondrosarcomas remains to be defined, data from our series as well as literature show that radical removal is the best therapeutic choice. In addition, patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy seem to show a trend toward increased survival.

  20. Growth and morphogenesis of embryonic mouse organs on non-coated and extracellular matrix-coated Biopore membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, P.; Klement, B. J.; Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    Embryonic mouse salivary glands, pancreata, and kidneys were isolated from embryos of appropriate gestational age by microdissection, and were cultured on Biopore membrane either non-coated or coated with type I collagen or Matrigel. As expected, use of Biopore membrane allowed high quality photomicroscopy of the living organs. In all organs extensive mesenchymal spreading was observed in the presence of type I collagen or Matrigel. However, differences were noted in the effects of extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings on epithelial growth and morphogenesis: salivary glands were minimally affected, pancreas morphogenesis was adversely affected, and kidney growth and branching apparently was enhanced. It is suggested that these differences in behaviour reflect differences in the strength of interactions between the mesenchymal cells and their surrounding endogenous matrix, compared to the exogenous ECM macromolecules. This method will be useful for culture of these and other embryonic organs. In particular, culture of kidney rudiments on ECM-coated Biopore offers a great improvement over previously used methods which do not allow morphogenesis to be followed in vitro.

  1. A web-based instruction module for interpretation of craniofacial cone beam CT anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, B A; Jacobs, R; Scarfe, W C; Al-Rawi, W T

    2007-09-01

    To develop a web-based module for learner instruction in the interpretation and recognition of osseous anatomy on craniofacial cone-beam CT (CBCT) images. Volumetric datasets from three CBCT systems were acquired (i-CAT, NewTom 3G and AccuiTomo FPD) for various subjects using equipment-specific scanning protocols. The datasets were processed using multiple software to provide two-dimensional (2D) multiplanar reformatted (MPR) images (e.g. sagittal, coronal and axial) and three-dimensional (3D) visual representations (e.g. maximum intensity projection, minimum intensity projection, ray sum, surface and volume rendering). Distinct didactic modules which illustrate the principles of CBCT systems, guided navigation of the volumetric dataset, and anatomic correlation of 3D models and 2D MPR graphics were developed using a hybrid combination of web authoring and image analysis techniques. Interactive web multimedia instruction was facilitated by the use of dynamic highlighting and labelling, and rendered video illustrations, supplemented with didactic textual material. HTML coding and Java scripting were heavily implemented for the blending of the educational modules. An interactive, multimedia educational tool for visualizing the morphology and interrelationships of osseous craniofacial anatomy, as depicted on CBCT MPR and 3D images, was designed and implemented. The present design of a web-based instruction module may assist radiologists and clinicians in learning how to recognize and interpret the craniofacial anatomy of CBCT based images more efficiently.

  2. Effects of reverse headgear on pharyngeal airway in patients with different vertical craniofacial features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloş Tuncer, Burcu; Ulusoy, Çağrı; Tuncer, Cumhur; Türköz, Çağrı; Kale Varlik, Selin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reverse headgear (RH) on pharyngeal airway morphology in two groups of Class III patients with different vertical craniofacial features in comparison with an untreated Class III group. Seventeen subjects (9 males, 8 females; mean age 11.3 ± 0.98 years) with optimum vertical growth and 17 subjects (10 males, 7 females, mean age 11.5 ± 1.1 years) with a vertical growth pattern treated with a removable intra-oral appliance and a Delaire type facemask were included. An untreated Class III control group of 11 subjects (8 males, 3 females, mean age 9.1 ± 1.1 years) was included to compare the treated groups. The paired t-test for intragroup and one-way ANOVA for intergroup comparisons were performed. The relationships between changes in the craniofacial morphology and airway were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. The airway dimensions at the adenoid side and soft palate were increased in the treatment groups compared to the control group (p < 0.05). The nasopharyngeal area demonstrated a significant difference in normodivergent and control subjects (p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the airway morphology due to different vertical features. The effect of RH treatment on the sagittal airway dimensions revealed no significant difference between different vertical craniofacial features in the short term.

  3. Effects of reverse headgear on pharyngeal airway in patients with different vertical craniofacial features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu BALOŞ TUNCER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of reverse headgear (RH on pharyngeal airway morphology in two groups of Class III patients with different vertical craniofacial features in comparison with an untreated Class III group. Seventeen subjects (9 males, 8 females; mean age 11.3 ± 0.98 years with optimum vertical growth and 17 subjects (10 males, 7 females, mean age 11.5 ± 1.1 years with a vertical growth pattern treated with a removable intra-oral appliance and a Delaire type facemask were included. An untreated Class III control group of 11 subjects (8 males, 3 females, mean age 9.1 ± 1.1 years was included to compare the treated groups. The paired t-test for intragroup and one-way ANOVA for intergroup comparisons were performed. The relationships between changes in the craniofacial morphology and airway were assessed by Spearman correlation analysis. The airway dimensions at the adenoid side and soft palate were increased in the treatment groups compared to the control group (p < 0.05. The nasopharyngeal area demonstrated a significant difference in normodivergent and control subjects (p < 0.05. No significant difference was found in the airway morphology due to different vertical features. The effect of RH treatment on the sagittal airway dimensions revealed no significant difference between different vertical craniofacial features in the short term.

  4. Influence of masseter muscle thickness on buccal corridor space and craniofacial morphology: A correlative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harneet Kaur

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of masseter muscle thickness on buccal corridor space and underlying craniofacial morphology. Materials and Methods: Forty-six young adults (23 males and 23 females in the age group of 18–23 years having intact dentitions and Class I molar relationship were included in the study. Masseter muscle thickness was measured using ultrasonography in relaxed, smiling, and contracted states. Posed smile photographs were taken to measure the buccal corridor space. Standardized frontal and lateral cephalograms were taken to determine craniofacial morphology in all three dimensions. Results: The mean masseter muscle thickness was 10.54 (±1.92 mm, 12.00 (±2.06 mm, and 14.04 (±1.99 mm in relaxed, smiling, and contracted states, respectively. Statistically significant correlation also was noted between masseter muscle thickness, during contracted state and buccal corridor width ratio. There was a strong association of masseter muscle thickness on both vertical as well as transverse craniofacial morphologies. Conclusions: Masseter muscle thickness is positively correlated with the buccal corridor width and influences both vertical as well as transverse facial dimensions.

  5. [Relationship between Body Height and Craniofacial Lines Measured by CT in Southwest Han Males].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Meng; Luo, Ying-zhen; Fan, Fei; Yun, Li-bing; Deng, Zhen-hua

    2016-04-01

    To establish regression model between craniofacial lines and body height by measuring craniofacial lines in Southwest Han males using CT and to accumulate data for the study of forensic anthropology. Head CT data of 273 Han males in Southwest were collected and 7 craniofacial lines were determined. Multiplanar reconstruction and volume rendering were performed by image post-processing software and the selected lines were measured. The relationship between each measuring indicator and body height was analyzed using SPSS 21.0 software. The regression equation of body height estimation was established and 50 samples were selected again and put into the mathematics models to verify its accuracy. The linear regression equations of 7 lines were established (P estimate (SEE) were 4.597-5.023 cm. The correlation coefficients of the multiple linear regression equation were 0.494-0.524 and the SEE were 4.418-4.458 cm. The return tests showed that the highest ± 1SEE accuracy of the multiple regression equation: y = 83.959+3.589 x6+2.573 x2, were 30%; and the highest ± 2SEE accuracy of the multiple regression equation: y = 72.646+3.316 x6+1.586 x2+1.553 x4+2.211 x3, were 92%. There is significant linear correlation between 7 selected lines and the stature in this study, and the plural linear regression equation established could be applied for estimating the stature of Southwest Han males.

  6. Craniofacial characteristics in unilateral complete cleft lip and palate patients with congenitally missing teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-Ting; Ko, Ellen Wen-Ching; Chen, Philip Kuo-Ting; Huang, Chiung-Shing

    2013-09-01

    Congenitally missing permanent teeth are common in patients with clefts. This retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the craniofacial characteristics in patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate with congenitally missing permanent teeth. A series of 73 consecutive patients with nonsyndromic unilateral complete cleft lip and palate were enrolled. Evaluation of congenitally missing permanent teeth was based on the panoramic films taken from 7 to 11 years of age. The cephalometric films taken around 9 years of age were used to compare the craniofacial morphology in patients with no congenitally missing permanent teeth (n = 20) and 1 (n = 25), 2 (n = 18), and 3 (n = 10) congenitally missing permanent teeth. The Spearman correlation coefficient was used to assess the association of increased numbers of congenitally missing permanent teeth with each cephalometric parameter. Anterior facial height, distance from the maxillary incisor and first molar to the palatal plane, and overjet decreased as the number of congenitally missing permanent teeth increased in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Unilateral cleft lip and palate patients with congenitally missing permanent teeth have a unique craniofacial morphology with a reduced vertical dimension. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influences of palatoplasty by the push-back procedure on craniofacial morphology and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Kudo, Motonori; Yamamoto, Yuko

    2012-12-01

    For patients with a cleft palate, the push-back procedure which accompanies posterior shifting of palatal flap is thought to be most effective way of. achieving adequate velopharyngeal function. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influences of the push-back procedure on the craniofacial morphology and its growth. Using cephalometry we compared the craniofacial morphology and growth of three groups of Japanese children, living in the same region (Hokkaido, Japan). 1) 28 children (13 girls and 15 boys) with operated submucous cleft palates at the ages of 9 and 14 respectively. 2) 12 age-matched children (7 girls and 5 boys) with unoperated submucous cleft palates. 3) 60 age-matched non-cleft children (30 girls and 30 boys) with normal occlusion. None of them received dentofacial orthopaedic treatment. While the patients who had been operated on had significant differences in posterior upper facial height and inclination of the palatal plane when compared with non-cleft children or unoperated cleft children, they showed no statistically significant difference in anteroposterior positioning of anterior part of the maxilla, compared with the unoperated. The influences of palatoplasty by the push-back procedure with posterior positioning of the palatal flaps on craniofacial morphology are additional to the cleft palate, and of minor concern. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 3D-Printing Technologies for Craniofacial Rehabilitation, Reconstruction, and Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Ethan L; Farris, Ashley L; Hung, Ben P; Dias, Miguel; Garcia, Juan R; Dorafshar, Amir H; Grayson, Warren L

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of craniofacial defects can present many challenges due to the variety of tissue-specific requirements and the complexity of anatomical structures in that region. 3D-printing technologies provide clinicians, engineers and scientists with the ability to create patient-specific solutions for craniofacial defects. Currently, there are three key strategies that utilize these technologies to restore both appearance and function to patients: rehabilitation, reconstruction and regeneration. In rehabilitation, 3D-printing can be used to create prostheses to replace or cover damaged tissues. Reconstruction, through plastic surgery, can also leverage 3D-printing technologies to create custom cutting guides, fixation devices, practice models and implanted medical devices to improve patient outcomes. Regeneration of tissue attempts to replace defects with biological materials. 3D-printing can be used to create either scaffolds or living, cellular constructs to signal tissue-forming cells to regenerate defect regions. By integrating these three approaches, 3D-printing technologies afford the opportunity to develop personalized treatment plans and design-driven manufacturing solutions to improve aesthetic and functional outcomes for patients with craniofacial defects.

  9. The comparative study of craniofacial structural characteristic of individuals with different types of cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Da-wei; Shi, Bing; Wang, Heng-jian; Zheng, Qian

    2007-10-01

    To compare craniofacial structural characteristic of individuals with different types of cleft palate and to lay a foundation for better treatment protocol for patients with cleft palate, we chose a sample consisting of 12 patients with Treacher Collin syndrome, 15 patients with Pierre Robin sequence, 40 patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate, and 40 patients with isolated cleft palate who met certain criteria. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were obtained from each subject. A total of 22 variables, comprising 11 angular, 9 linear, and 2 ratio measurements, were studied. The z-scores were analyzed during paired Student t test. The data showed us that there seems to be no difference in craniofacial structures between patients with isolated cleft palate and normal persons. Patients with unilateral complete cleft lip and palate who had only cleft lip repaired exhibit such characteristics as midface retrusion, relatively excessive lower facial height, and more obtuse gonial angle. The cranial base areas of individuals with Treacher Collin syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence are similar to those of normal persons. Mandibular hypoplasia in both vertical and horizontal dimensions and maxillary retrusion can be found in patients with Treacher Collin syndrome, while only mandibular hypoplasia in the horizontal dimension can be found in patients with Pierre Robin sequence. The developmental deficiency of craniofacial structures seems to be a separate deformity, not the direct outcome of cleft palate defect.

  10. Oral and craniofacial manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: Case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Elif Bahar; Koruyucu, Mine; Kürklü, Esma; Çifter, Muhsin; Gençay, Koray; Seymen, Figen; Tüysüz, Beyhan

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this case series was to determine the oral, dental and craniofacial features of patients with EvC syndrome. Eight patients with EvC syndrome were enrolled. A complete family history, pedigree analysis, detailed medical history were collected. Findings of clinical examination, including craniofacial and orodental manifestations, and radiological investigations were thoroughly studied. All eight patients had characteristic face, hypertrophic frenulum, conical and peg-shaped teeth, hypodontia of deciduous and/or permanent teeth and also skeletal dysplasia, small chest, short stature and hypoplastic nails. Additionally dysmorphic filtrum, serrated appearance of gingiva, diastema, enamel hypoplasia, microdontia, taurodontism, single rooted permanent molar, delayed eruption and high caries rate were observed with varying degrees. Cephalometric evaluation revealed skeletal Class III growth pattern in four subjects and Class II growth pattern in one subject. Evaluation of craniofacial and orodental anomalies of EvC syndrome is required for accurate differential diagnosis from other congenital syndromes. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Visual pathway-related horizontal reference plane for three-dimensional craniofacial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Y H; Kim, B C; Park, K R; Yon, J Y; Kim, H J; Tak, H J; Piao, Z; Kim, M K; Lee, S H

    2012-11-01

    To construct three-dimensional (3D) horizontal reference planes based on visual pathway and to determine their stability and reliability by analyzing the structural patterns of normal and dysmorphology for 3D craniofacial analysis. Thirty-six subjects with maxillofacial dysmorphology and malocclusion, and eight normal controls. MATERIALS AND METHODS POPULATION: On the 3D computed tomographic images of the subjects, the visual pathway-based planes, including the orbital axis plane (OAP), visual axis plane (VAP), and the optical axis plane (OpAP), were constructed and evaluated. The OAP, but not the VAP and OpAP, showed the ideal relationship between the midsagittal and posterior maxillary plane, and properly described the different patterns of maxillofacial dysmorphology with craniofacial plane 1 of Delaire's analysis and the occlusal plane. The proposed visual pathway-related horizontal reference planes, and in particular the OAP, seem to correctly express the visual axis and the position of the head in natural head position and can be used as a horizontal reference plane for the 3D analysis of craniofacial dysmorphology and anthropology. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Ethnical evaluation of Bangladeshi young adults in terms of morphometrically-analyzed craniofacial skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Md. Rizvi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphometric study for the craniofacial relations and variations in humans have long been used to differentiate various racial groups in physical anthropology. The objective of this study was to describe the morphological features of craniofacial skeleton in Bangladeshi young adults and to compare it with already reported standards for the Caucasian population as well as cephalometric values of other Indian races using Steiner′s reference norms. The study was conducted for 52 Bangladeshi young adults (27 male and 25 females, aged 21-27 years, having balanced and harmonious facial profiles, clinically acceptable occlusion with permanent dentition and no history of orthodontic treatment. Lateral cephalograms taken of these subjects were used for a series of morphometric analyses. Bangladeshi subjects were more protrusive skeletally and dentally than Caucasians. Furthermore, the mandibular plane angle was smaller in Bangladeshi subjects than in the Caucasians. Present results also suggest that the Astrics, Dravidians, and Armenoid who penetrated into Bengal in the early ages may have contributed substantially to the morphogenesis of craniofacial skeleton in the present Bengalis. The results of this study support the idea that a single standard of facial esthetics should not be applied to all racial and ethnic groups.

  13. Craniofacial Reconstruction by a Cost-Efficient Template-Based Process Using 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Msallem, MD, DMD

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Craniofacial defects often result in aesthetic and functional deficits, which affect the patient’s psyche and wellbeing. Patient-specific implants remain the optimal solution, but their use is limited or impractical due to their high costs. This article describes a fast and cost-efficient workflow of in-house manufactured patient-specific implants for craniofacial reconstruction and cranioplasty. As a proof of concept, we present a case of reconstruction of a craniofacial defect with involvement of the supraorbital rim. The following hybrid manufacturing process combines additive manufacturing with silicone molding and an intraoperative, manual fabrication process. A computer-aided design template is 3D printed from thermoplastics by a fused deposition modeling 3D printer and then silicone molded manually. After sterilization of the patient-specific mold, it is used intraoperatively to produce an implant from polymethylmethacrylate. Due to the combination of these 2 straightforward processes, the procedure can be kept very simple, and no advanced equipment is needed, resulting in minimal financial expenses. The whole fabrication of the mold is performed within approximately 2 hours depending on the template’s size and volume. This reliable technique is easy to adopt and suitable for every health facility, especially those with limited financial resources in less privileged countries, enabling many more patients to profit from patient-specific treatment.

  14. Cephalometric analysis of craniofacial morphology and growth in unrepaired isolated cleft palate patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Yang, Chao; Schreuder, Willem Hans; Shi, Jiayu; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the craniofacial morphology in patients with unrepaired isolated cleft palate (UICP) at childhood, adolescence and adulthood, in order to assess the influence of nonsurgical factors on the craniofacial growth in these patients. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms of 106 non-syndromic UICP patients and 102 normal matched controls were obtained and analyzed. Patients and controls were divided into three subgroups: children (5-7 years), adolescents (12-14 years), and adults (>18 years). UICP patients in childhood showed a shortened cranial basal length; reduced bony nasopharyngeal height; short maxillary depth and height with a posterior positioned maxilla and an increased width of the nasal cavity, maxilla and orbit; and a shortened mandibular length and height. UICP patients in adulthood showed a normal nasopharyngeal and mandibular morphology. However, the patients in this subgroup still showed a shortened cranial basal length, and short maxillary depth and anterior height with increased width of the nasal cavity, maxilla and orbit. Craniofacial morphology and growth in patients with UICP were significantly affected by nonsurgical factors. Growth of the cranial base and upper face were absolutely reduced, while growth of the bony nasopharynx and mandible were only postponed. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Partnership of Medical Genetics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery When Evaluating Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela E

    2015-12-01

    A medical geneticist who has an interest in craniofacial anomalies forms a natural partnership with an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, which facilitates patient care. Using complementary diagnostic and therapeutic skills, the search for a recognizable pattern can lead to a syndrome diagnosis. After the initial examination, there is usually genetic testing to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Once established, care coordination and genetic counseling can be provided for the parents and the patient. Enrolling the patient into a research study could be helpful to understand the diagnosis but, in some circumstances, might not have immediate clinical relevance. A multidisciplinary craniofacial team is generally necessary for long-term management. This article discusses illustrative patients evaluated from 2007 through 2011 with the senior oral and maxillofacial surgeon at the Massachusetts General Hospital (Leonard B. Kaban, DMD, MD). These include single patients with the Nablus mask-like facies syndrome and auriculo-condylar syndrome and a series of 20 patients with Gorlin syndrome followed by a multispecialty team. A successful collaboration between a medical geneticist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon optimizes the treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biocompatibility of adhesive complex coacervates modeled after the Sandcastle glue of P. californica for craniofacial reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Brent D.; Shao, Hui; Stewart, Russell J.; Tresco, Patrick A.

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial reconstruction would benefit from a degradable adhesive capable of holding bone fragments in three-dimensional alignment and gradually being replaced by new bone without loss of alignment or volume changes. Modeled after a natural adhesive secreted by the sandcastle worm, we studied the biocompatibility of adhesive complex coacervates in vitro and in vivo with two different rat calvarial models. We found that the adhesive was non-cytotoxic and supported the attachment, spreading, and migration of a commonly used osteoblastic cell line over the course of several days. In animal studies we found that the adhesive was capable of maintaining three-dimensional bone alignment in freely moving rats over a 12 week indwelling period. Histological evidence indicated that the adhesive was gradually resorbed and replaced by new bone that became lamellar across the defect without loss of alignment, changes in volume, or changes in the adjacent uninjured bone. The presence of inflammatory cells was consistent with what has been reported with other craniofacial fixation methods including metal plates, screws, tacks, calcium phosphate cements and cyanoacrylate adhesives. Collectively, the results suggest that the new bioadhesive formulation is degradable, osteoconductive and appears suitable for use in the reconstruction of craniofacial fractures. PMID:20950851

  17. UTX-guided neural crest function underlies craniofacial features of Kabuki syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpargel, Karl B; Starmer, Joshua; Wang, Chaochen; Ge, Kai; Magnuson, Terry

    2017-10-24

    Kabuki syndrome, a congenital craniofacial disorder, manifests from mutations in an X-linked histone H3 lysine 27 demethylase (UTX/KDM6A) or a H3 lysine 4 methylase (KMT2D). However, the cellular and molecular etiology of histone-modifying enzymes in craniofacial disorders is unknown. We now establish Kabuki syndrome as a neurocristopathy, whereby the majority of clinical features are modeled in mice carrying neural crest (NC) deletion of UTX, including craniofacial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, and postnatal growth retardation. Female UTX NC knockout (FKO) demonstrates enhanced phenotypic severity over males (MKOs), due to partial redundancy with UTY, a Y-chromosome demethylase-dead homolog. Thus, NC cells may require demethylase-independent UTX activity. Consistently, Kabuki causative point mutations upstream of the JmjC domain do not disrupt UTX demethylation. We have isolated primary NC cells at a phenocritical postmigratory timepoint in both FKO and MKO mice, and genome-wide expression and histone profiling have revealed UTX molecular function in establishing appropriate chromatin structure to regulate crucial NC stem-cell signaling pathways. However, the majority of UTX regulated genes do not experience aberrations in H3K27me3 or H3K4me3, implicating alternative roles for UTX in transcriptional control. These findings are substantiated through demethylase-dead knockin mutation of UTX, which supports appropriate facial development. Published under the PNAS license.

  18. Lyophilized Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF Promotes Craniofacial Bone Regeneration through Runx2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-drying is an effective means to control scaffold pore size and preserve its composition. The purpose of the present study was to determine the applicability of lyophilized Platelet-rich fibrin (LPRF as a scaffold for craniofacial tissue regeneration and to compare its biological effects with commonly used fresh Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF. LPRF caused a 4.8-fold ± 0.4-fold elevation in Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2 expression in alveolar bone cells, compared to a 3.6-fold ± 0.2-fold increase when using fresh PRF, and a more than 10-fold rise of alkaline phosphatase levels and mineralization markers. LPRF-induced Runx2 expression only occurred in alveolar bone and not in periodontal or dental follicle cells. LPRF also caused a 1.6-fold increase in osteoblast proliferation (p < 0.001 when compared to fresh PRF. When applied in a rat craniofacial defect model for six weeks, LPRF resulted in 97% bony coverage of the defect, compared to 84% for fresh PRF, 64% for fibrin, and 16% without scaffold. Moreover, LPRF thickened the trabecular diameter by 25% when compared to fresh PRF and fibrin, and only LPRF and fresh PRF resulted in the formation of interconnected trabeculae across the defect. Together, these studies support the application of lyophilized PRF as a biomimetic scaffold for craniofacial bone regeneration and mineralized tissue engineering.

  19. Assessment of the developmental and neurotoxicity of the mosquito control larvicide, pyriproxyfen, using embryonic zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lisa; Gonnerman, Greg; Simonich, Michael T; Tanguay, Robert L

    2016-11-01

    In 2014, as an attempt to address the Zika health crisis by controlling the mosquito population, Brazil took the unprecedented action of applying a chemical larvicide, pyriproxyfen, to drinking water sources. The World Health Organization has established an acceptable daily intake of pyriproxyfen to be 100 μg per kg of body weight per day, but studies have demonstrated that at elevated doses (>5000 mg/kg), there are adverse effects in mice, rats and dogs. To better understand the potential developmental toxicity of pyriproxyfen, we utilized the embryonic zebrafish. Our results demonstrate that the concentration resulting in 50% of animals presenting adverse morphological effects (EC50), including craniofacial defects, was 5.2 μM for daily renewal exposure, and above this concentration, adverse behavioral effects were also observed in animals that followed a static exposure regimen. Thus, zebrafish data suggest that the developmental toxicity of pyriproxyfen may not be limited to insects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Migratory properties of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmar, Thomas; Entschladen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells raise great expectations in regenerative medicine due to their capacity to regenerate damaged tissues, thereby restoring organ tissue integrity and functionality. Even though it is not yet clear how mesenchymal stem cells are guided to injured tissue it is generally assumed that the directed migration of these cells is facilitated by the same soluble factors that also recruit immune competent cells to inflamed tissue areas. Tumor tissue represents another type of (chronically) inflamed tissue and because of that mesenchymal stem cells are highly attracted. Although some data indicate that esenchymal stem cells might have a beneficial effect on tumor growth due to anti-tumor effects the plethora of data suggest that tumor tissue recruited mesenchymal stem cells rather promote tumor growth and metastasis formation. Nonetheless, the enhanced tumor tropism of mesenchymal stem cells makes them ideal candidates for novel anti-cancer strategies. Like Trojan Horses genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells will deliver their deadly cargo, such as anti-tumor cytokines or oncolytic viruses, into cancerous tissues, thereby destroying the tumor form within. In this chapter we will summarize the current concepts of genetic modification of mesenchymal stem cells for future anti-cancer therapies.

  1. Accelerated craniofacial bone regeneration through dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with dental pulp stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frédéric Chamieh; Anne-Margaux Collignon; Coyac, Benjamin R.; Julie Lesieur; Sandy Ribes; Jérémy Sadoine; Annie Llorens; Antonino Nicoletti; Didier Letourneur; Marie-Laure Colombier; Nazhat, Showan N.; Philippe Bouchard; Catherine Chaussain; Rochefort, Gael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Therapies using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) seeded scaffolds may be applicable to various fields of regenerative medicine, including craniomaxillofacial surgery. Plastic compression of collagen scaffolds seeded with MSC has been shown to enhance the osteogenic differentiation of MSC as it increases the collagen fibrillary density. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the osteogenic effects of dense collagen gel scaffolds seeded with mesenchymal dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) on bone re...

  2. Cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal proliferation is regulated by Msx1-mediated p19(INK4d) expression during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Ito, Yoshihiro; Yeo, Jae Yong; Sucov, Henry M; Maas, Richard; Chai, Yang

    2003-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotential progenitors that contribute to various cell and tissue types during embryogenesis. Here, we have investigated the molecular and cellular mechanism by which the fate of neural crest cell is regulated during tooth development. Using a two- component genetic system for indelibly marking the progeny of neural crest cells, we provide in vivo evidence of a deficiency of CNC-derived dental mesenchyme in Msx1 null mutant mouse embryos. The deficiency of the CNC results from an elevated CDK inhibitor p19(INK4d) activity and the disruption of cell proliferation. Interestingly, in the absence of Msx1, the CNC-derived dental mesenchyme misdifferentiates and possesses properties consistent with a neuronal fate, possibly through a default mechanism. Attenuation of p19(INK4d) in Msx1 null mutant mandibular explants restores mitotic activity in the dental mesenchyme, demonstrating the functional significance of Msx1-mediated p19(INK4d) expression in regulating CNC cell proliferation during odontogenesis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that homeobox gene Msx1 regulates the fate of CNC cells by controlling the progression of the cell cycle. Genetic mutation of Msx1 may alternatively instruct the fate of these progenitor cells during craniofacial development.

  3. Properties of Dental Pulp-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and the Effects of Culture Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Nobuyuki; Noda, Sonoko; Yamamoto, Mioko; Okiji, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells (DPMSCs) highly express mesenchymal stem cell markers and possess the potential to differentiate into neural cells, osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Thus, DPMSCs are considered suitable for tissue regeneration. The colony isolation method has commonly been used to collect relatively large amounts of heterogeneous DPMSCs. Homogenous DPMSCs can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using antibodies against mesenchymal stem cell markers, although this method yields a limited number of cells. Both quality and quantity of DPMSCs are critical to regenerative therapy, and cell culture methods need to be improved. We thus investigated the properties of DPMSCs cultured with different methods. DPMSCs in a three-dimensional spheroid culture system, which is similar to the hanging drop culture for differentiation of embryonic stem cells, showed upregulation of odonto-/osteoblastic markers and mineralized nodule formation. This suggests that this three-dimensional spheroid culturing system for DPMSCs may be suitable for inducing hard tissues. We further examined the effect of cell culture density on the properties of DPMSCs because the properties of stem cells can be altered depending on the cell density. DPMSCs cultured under the confluent cell density condition showed slight downregulation of some mesenchymal stem cell markers compared with those under the sparse condition. The ability of DPMSCs to differentiate into hard tissue-forming cells was found to be enhanced in the confluent condition, suggesting that the confluent culture condition may not be suitable for maintaining the stemness of DPMSCs. When DPMSCs are to be used for hard tissue regeneration, dense followed by sparse cell culture conditions may be a better alternative strategy. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Morphological and cytofluorimetric analysis of adult mesenchymal stem cells expanded ex vivo from periodontal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiani, O; Di Primio, R; Traini, T; Pizzicannella, J; Scarano, A; Piattelli, A; Caputi, S

    2005-01-01

    Many adult tissues contain a population of stem cells that have the ability of regeneration after trauma, disease or aging. Recently, there has been great interest in mesenchymal stem cells and their roles in maintaining the physiological structure of tissues, and their studies have been considered very important and intriguing, after having shown that this cell population can be expanded ex vivo to regenerate tissues not only of the mesenchymal lineage, such as intervertebral disc cartilage, bone, tooth-associated tissue, cardiomyocytes, but also to differentiate into cells derived from other embryonic layers, including neurons. Currently, different efforts have been focused on the identification of odontogenic progenitors from oral tissues. In this study we isolated and characterized a population of homogeneous human mesenchymal stem cells proliferating in culture with an attached well-spread morphology derived from periodontal ligament, a tissue of ectomesenchymal origin, with the ability to form a specialized joint between alveolar bone and tooth. The adherent cells were harvested and expanded ex vivo under specific conditions and analysed by FACScan flow cytometer and morphological analysis was carried out by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Our results displayed highly evident cells with a fibroblast-like morphology and a secretory apparatus, probably indicating that the enhanced function of the secretory apparatus of the mesenchymal stem cells may be associated with the secretion of molecules that are required to survive and proliferate. Moreover, the presence in periodontal ligament of CD90, CD29, CD44,CD166, CD 105, CD13 positive cells, antigens that are also identified as stromal precursors of the bone marrow, indicate that the periodontal ligament may turn out to be a new efficient source of the cells with intrinsic capacity to self-renewal, high ability to proliferate and differentiate, that can be utilized for a new approach to

  5. Embryonic Stem Cells: Isolation, Characterization and Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Michal; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the mammalian blastocyst. Traditionally, these cells have been derived and cultured with mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) supportive layers, which allow their continuous growth in an undifferentiated state. However, for any future industrial or clinical application hESCs should be cultured in reproducible, defined, and xeno-free culture system, where exposure to animal pathogens is prevented. From their derivation in 1998 the methods for culturing hESCs were significantly improved. This chapter wills discuss hESC characterization and the basic methods for their derivation and maintenance.

  6. Three-dimensional epithelial tissues generated from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kyle J; Shamis, Yulia; Carlson, Mark W; Aberdam, Edith; Aberdam, Daniel; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2009-11-01

    The use of pluripotent human embryonic stem (hES) cells for tissue engineering may provide advantages over traditional sources of progenitor cells because of their ability to give rise to multiple cell types and their unlimited expansion potential. We derived cell populations with properties of ectodermal and mesenchymal cells in two-dimensional culture and incorporated these divergent cell populations into three-dimensional (3D) epithelial tissues. When grown in specific media and substrate conditions, two-dimensional cultures were enriched in cells (EDK1) with mesenchymal morphology and surface markers. Cells with a distinct epithelial morphology (HDE1) that expressed cytokeratin 12 and beta-catenin at cell junctions became the predominant cell type when EDK1 were grown on surfaces enriched in keratinocyte-derived extracellular matrix proteins. When these cells were incorporated into the stromal and epithelial tissue compartments of 3D tissues, they generated multilayer epithelia similar to those generated with foreskin-derived epithelium and fibroblasts. Three-dimensional tissues demonstrated stromal cells with morphologic features of mature fibroblasts, type IV collagen deposition in the basement membrane, and a stratified epithelium that expressed cytokeratin 12. By deriving two distinct cell lineages from a common hES cell source to fabricate complex tissues, it is possible to explore environmental cues that will direct hES-derived cells toward optimal tissue form and function.

  7. Hereditary intraosseous vascular malformation of the craniofacial region: an apparently novel disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargel, Ibrahim; Cil, Barbaros E; Er, Nuray; Ruacan, Sevket; Akarsu, A Nurten; Erk, Yucel

    2002-04-15

    Primary intraosseous vascular anomaly, previously called intraosseous hemangioma, is a very rare malformation that is usually seen in the vertebral column and in the skull. It is exclusively described in sporadic cases and no hereditary component has yet been reported. The most commonly affected bones in the skull are the mandible and the maxilla, and life-threatening bleeding after a simple tooth extraction is frequently observed. Here, we report two consanguineous families containing a total of four affected patients manifesting primary intraosseous vascular malformation (VMOS (vascular malformation osseous)) of the craniofacial region. The phenotypic expression is remarkably similar in both families. The characteristic findings include severe blood vessel expansions within the craniofacial bones and midline abnormalities such as diastasis recti, supraumbilical raphe, and hiatus hernia. Malformation is restricted to the mandibular and maxillary area in the prepubertal age, and rapid expansion starts after age 12 or 13. A 15-year follow-up of one of the patients demonstrated that the vascular malformation did not extend beyond the craniofacial region despite severe involvement of almost all bones in the skull. Detailed clinical and radiological evaluation provided neither evidence of soft-tissue involvement nor any sign of gross arterial, venous, or combined malformations, indicating that bone changes are a primary rather than a secondary effect due to any other vascular anomaly in the craniofacial region. An antibody against a universal proliferation marker, Ki-67, detected nonproliferative, single-layered endothelial cells, suggesting that this abnormality is a vascular malformation rather than a hemangioma. alpha-actin staining (antibody against perivascular tissue such as smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and/or pericytes) demonstrated that pathologic vessels lost their surrounding supportive tissues, as was previously seen in other types of vascular anomaly

  8. Cervical vertebral column morphology related to craniofacial morphology and head posture in preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arntsen, Torill; Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2011-01-01

    In preorthodontic children with Class II malocclusion and horizontal maxillary overjet, cervical column morphology was examined and related to craniofacial morphology and head posture for the first time....

  9. Relationships between craniocervical posture and pain-related disability in patients with cervico-craniofacial pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva I

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ibai López-de-Uralde-Villanueva,1–4 Hector Beltran-Alacreu,1–3 Alba Paris-Alemany,1–4 Santiago Angulo-Díaz-Parreño,2,3,5 Roy La Touche1–4 1Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Science, 2Research Group on Movement and Behavioral Science and Study of Pain, The Center for Advanced Studies University La Salle, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Aravaca, Madrid, Spain; 3Institute of Neuroscience and Craniofacial Pain (INDCRAN, Madrid, Spain; 4Hospital La Paz Institute for Health Research, IdiPAZ, Madrid, Spain; 5Faculty of Medicine, Universidad San Pablo CEU, Madrid, Spain Objectives: This cross-sectional correlation study explored the relationships between craniocervical posture and pain-related disability in patients with chronic cervico-craniofacial pain (CCFP. Moreover, we investigated the test–retest intrarater reliability of two craniocervical posture measurements: head posture (HP and the sternomental distance (SMD. Methods: Fifty-three asymptomatic subjects and 60 CCFP patients were recruited. One rater measured HP and the SMD using a cervical range of motion device and a digital caliper, respectively. The Spanish versions of the neck disability index and the craniofacial pain and disability inventory were used to assess pain-related disability (neck disability and craniofacial disability, respectively. Results: We found no statistically significant correlations between craniocervical posture and pain-related disability variables (HP and neck disability [r=0.105; P>0.05]; HP and craniofacial disability [r=0.132; P>0.05]; SMD and neck disability [r=0.126; P>0.05]; SMD and craniofacial disability [r=0.195; P>0.05]. A moderate positive correlation was observed between HP and SMD for both groups (asymptomatic subjects, r=0.447; CCFP patients, r=0.52. Neck disability was strongly positively correlated with craniofacial disability (r=0.79; P>0.001. The test–retest intrarater reliability of the HP measurement was high for

  10. Mesenchymal chondrosarcoma--a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi S

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A Case of extraosseous mesenchymal chondrosarcoma occurring in the occipital region in a 26 year old male is being reported. The patient remained free from recurrence on any metastasis even after 2 years of the tumor resection.

  11. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  12. Pitx2 in Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia E. Aranega

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue that represents between 30 and 38% of the human body mass and has important functions in the organism, such as maintaining posture, locomotor impulse, or pulmonary ventilation. The genesis of skeletal muscle during embryonic development is a process controlled by an elaborate regulatory network combining the interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that transform myogenic precursor cells into functional muscle fibers through a finely tuned differentiation program. However, the capacity of generating muscle still remains once these fibers have matured. Adult myogenesis resembles many of the embryonic morphogenetic episodes and depends on the activation of satellite cells that have the potential to differentiate into new muscle fibers. Pitx2 is a member of the bicoid family of homeodomain transcription factors that play an important role in morphogenesis. In the last decade, Pitx2 has emerged as a key element involved in the fine-tuning mechanism that regulates skeletal-muscle development as well as the differentiation and cell fate of satellite cells in adult muscle. Here we present an integrative view of all aspects of embryonic and adult myogenesis in which Pitx2 is involved, from embryonic development to satellite-cell proliferation, fate specification, and differentiation. Those new Pitx2 functions on satellite-cell biology might open new perspectives to develop therapeutic strategies for muscular disorders.

  13. Pitx2 in Embryonic and Adult Myogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Torres, Francisco; Rodríguez-Outeiriño, Lara; Franco, Diego; Aranega, Amelia E

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle is a heterogeneous tissue that represents between 30 and 38% of the human body mass and has important functions in the organism, such as maintaining posture, locomotor impulse, or pulmonary ventilation. The genesis of skeletal muscle during embryonic development is a process controlled by an elaborate regulatory network combining the interplay of extrinsic and intrinsic regulatory mechanisms that transform myogenic precursor cells into functional muscle fibers through a finely tuned differentiation program. However, the capacity of generating muscle still remains once these fibers have matured. Adult myogenesis resembles many of the embryonic morphogenetic episodes and depends on the activation of satellite cells that have the potential to differentiate into new muscle fibers. Pitx2 is a member of the bicoid family of homeodomain transcription factors that play an important role in morphogenesis. In the last decade, Pitx2 has emerged as a key element involved in the fine-tuning mechanism that regulates skeletal-muscle development as well as the differentiation and cell fate of satellite cells in adult muscle. Here we present an integrative view of all aspects of embryonic and adult myogenesis in which Pitx2 is involved, from embryonic development to satellite-cell proliferation, fate specification, and differentiation. Those new Pitx2 functions on satellite-cell biology might open new perspectives to develop therapeutic strategies for muscular disorders.

  14. Embryonic Stem Cells and their Genetic Modification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 2. Embryonic Stem Cells and their Genetic Modification - The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2007. Mitradas M Panicker. General Article Volume 13 Issue 2 February 2008 pp 172-180 ...

  15. Autophagy in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Tra

    Full Text Available Autophagy (macroautophagy is a degradative process that involves the sequestration of cytosolic material including organelles into double membrane vesicles termed autophagosomes for delivery to the lysosome. Autophagy is essential for preimplantation development of mouse embryos and cavitation of embryoid bodies. The precise roles of autophagy during early human embryonic development, remain however largely uncharacterized. Since human embryonic stem cells constitute a unique model system to study early human embryogenesis we investigated the occurrence of autophagy in human embryonic stem cells. We have, using lentiviral transduction, established multiple human embryonic stem cell lines that stably express GFP-LC3, a fluorescent marker for the autophagosome. Each cell line displays both a normal karyotype and pluripotency as indicated by the presence of cell types representative of the three germlayers in derived teratomas. GFP expression and labelling of autophagosomes is retained after differentiation. Baseline levels of autophagy detected in cultured undifferentiated hESC were increased or decreased in the presence of rapamycin and wortmannin, respectively. Interestingly, autophagy was upregulated in hESCs induced to undergo differentiation by treatment with type I TGF-beta receptor inhibitor SB431542 or removal of MEF secreted maintenance factors. In conclusion we have established hESCs capable of reporting macroautophagy and identify a novel link between autophagy and early differentiation events in hESC.

  16. Embryonic Development In Clarias gariepinus (Buchell, 1822 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The embryonic development in Clarias gariepinus was studied under laboratory conditions. The development stages of eggs starting from first cleavage to hatching were examined microscopically. The accurate timing and detailed description of each stage were recorded. Photomicrograph of important stages, segmentation ...

  17. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma of the cervix | Ocheke | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (sarcoma botyroides) of the cervix, which is rare, is described in a 16-yearold. The combined use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery has markedly improved survival in those with this condition. However, our patient did not benefit from this treatment modality due to late presentation ...

  18. Transcriptome Landscapes of Mammalian Embryonic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkhof, B.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis describes research on gene expression profiles from different embryonic stages and cell types to identify genes involved in pluripotency or differentiation in bovine and porcine cells. The results are compared with data from other mammals. RNA expression profiles of morula and blastocyst

  19. From cilia hydrodynamics to zebrafish embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supatto, Willy; Vermot, Julien

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic development involves the cellular integration of chemical and physical stimuli. A key physical input is the mechanical stress generated during embryonic morphogenesis. This process necessitates tensile forces at the tissue scale such as during axis elongation and budding, as well as at the cellular scale when cells migrate and contract. Furthermore, cells can generate forces using motile cilia to produce flow. Cilia-driven flows are critical throughout embryonic development but little is known about the diversity of the forces they exert and the role of the mechanical stresses they generate. In this chapter, through an examination of zebrafish development, we highlight what is known about the role of hydrodynamics mediated by beating cilia and examine the physical features of flow fields from the modeling and experimental perspectives. We review imaging strategies to visualize and quantify beating cilia and the flow they generate in vivo. Finally, we describe the function of hydrodynamics during left-right embryonic patterning and inner ear development. Ideally, continued progress in these areas will help to address a key conceptual problem in developmental biology, which is to understand the interplay between environmental constraints and genetic control during morphogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Physiopathology of human embryonic implantation: clinical incidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Demailly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryo implantation consists of a series of events promoting the invasion of the endometrium and then the uterine arterial system by the extra-embryonic trophoblast. In order for this semi-heterologous implantation to succeed, the endometrium has to first undergo a number of structural and biochemical changes (decidualization. The decidua's various constituents subsequently play a role in the embryonic implantation. The third step is the transformation of the uterine vascular system and the growth of the placenta, which will provide the foetoplacental unit with nutrients. Several physiopathological aspects will be discussed: 1 the implantation window, regulated by maternal and embryonic hormonal secretions and thus influenced by any defects in the latter: dysharmonic luteal phase, 21-hydroxylase block, abnormal integrin expression, 2 the successive trophoblast invasions of uterine vessels which, when defective, lead to early embryo loss or late-onset vascular pathologies, as preeclampsia, 3 the pregnancy's immunological equilibrium, with a spontaneously tolerated semi-allogeneic implant, 4 the impact of pro-coagulant factors (thrombophilia on the pregnancy's progression, 5 the environment of the uterus, ranging from hydrosalpinx to uterine contractions. In summary, the least anatomical or physiological perturbation can interfere with human embryonic implantation - a very particular phenomenon and a true biological paradox.

  1. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia candidate genes derived from embryonic transcriptomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Meaghan K; Longoni, Mauro; Wells, Julie

    2012-01-01

    expression profiling of developing embryonic diaphragms would help identify genes likely to be associated with diaphragm defects. We generated a time series of whole-transcriptome expression profiles from laser captured embryonic mouse diaphragms at embryonic day (E)11.5 and E12.5 when experimental...

  2. Facial phenotyping by quantitative photography reflects craniofacial morphology measured on magnetic resonance imaging in Icelandic sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Schwab, Richard J; Maislin, Greg; Lee, Richard W W; Benedikstdsottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I; Gislason, Thorarinn; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Cistulli, Peter A

    2014-05-01

    (1) To determine whether facial phenotype, measured by quantitative photography, relates to underlying craniofacial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk factors, measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) To assess whether these associations are independent of body size and obesity. Cross-sectional cohort. Landspitali, The National University Hospital, Iceland. One hundred forty patients (87.1% male) from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who had both calibrated frontal and profile craniofacial photographs and upper airway MRI. Mean ± standard deviation age 56.1 ± 10.4 y, body mass index 33.5 ± 5.05 kg/m(2), with on-average severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index 45.4 ± 19.7 h(-1)). N/A. Relationships between surface facial dimensions (photos) and facial bony dimensions and upper airway soft-tissue volumes (MRI) was assessed using canonical correlation analysis. Photo and MRI craniofacial datasets related in four significant canonical correlations, primarily driven by measurements of (1) maxillary-mandibular relationship (r = 0.8, P weight and neck and waist circumference. However, tongue volume was no longer significant, suggesting facial dimensions relate to tongue volume as a result of obesity. Significant associations were found between craniofacial variable sets from facial photography and MRI. This study confirms that facial photographic phenotype reflects underlying aspects of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities associated with OSA. Therefore, facial photographic phenotyping may be a useful tool to assess intermediate phenotypes for OSA, particularly in large-scale studies.

  3. Embryonic development and malformation of lymphatic vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Jörg; Buttler, Kerstin; Rössler, Jochen; Norgall, Susanne; Schweigerer, Lothar; Weich, Herbert A; Papoutsi, Maria

    2007-01-01

    In the human, malformations of lymphatic vessels can be observed as lymphangiectasia, lymphangioma and lymphangiomatosis, with a prevalence of 1.2-2.8 per thousand. Their aetiology is unknown and a causal therapy does not exist. We investigated the origin of lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) in avian and murine embryos, and compared the molecular profile of LECs from normal and malformed lymphatics of children. In avian embryos, Prox1+ lymphangioblasts are located in the confluence of the cranial and caudal cardinal veins, where the jugular lymph sac (JLS) forms. Cell lineage studies show that the JLS is of venous origin. In contrast, the lymphatics of the dermis are derived from mesenchymal lymphangioblasts located in the dermatomes, suggesting a dual origin of LECs in avian embryos. The same may hold true for murine embryos, where Lyve1+ LEC precursors are found in the cardinal veins, and in the mesenchyme. The mesenchymal cells express the pan-leukocyte marker CD45, indicating a cell type with lymphendothelial and leukocyte characteristics. In the human, such cells might give rise to Kaposi's sarcoma. Microarray analyses of LECs from lymphangiomas of children show a large number of regulated genes, such as VEGFR3. Our studies show that lymphvasculogenesis and lymphangiogenesis occur simultaneously in the embryo, and suggest a function for VEGFR3 in lymphangiomas.

  4. Enhanced neuro-therapeutic potential of Wharton's Jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells in comparison with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drela, Katarzyna; Lech, Wioletta; Figiel-Dabrowska, Anna; Zychowicz, Marzena; Mikula, Michał; Sarnowska, Anna; Domanska-Janik, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Substantial inconsistencies in mesenchymal stem (stromal) cell (MSC) therapy reported in early translational and clinical studies may indicate need for selection of the proper cell population for any particular therapeutic purpose. In the present study we have examined stromal stem cells derived either from umbilical cord Wharton's Jelly (WJ-MSC) or bone marrow (BM-MSC) of adult, healthy donors. The cells characterized in accordance with the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) indications as well as other phenotypic and functional parameters have been compared under strictly controlled culture conditions. WJ-MSC, in comparison with BM-MSC, exhibited a higher proliferation rate, a greater expansion capability being additionally stimulated under low-oxygen atmosphere, enhanced neurotrophic factors gene expression and spontaneous tendency toward a neural lineage differentiation commitment confirmed by protein and gene marker induction. Our data suggest that WJ-MSC may represent an example of immature-type "pre-MSC," where a substantial cellular component is embryonic-like, pluripotent derivatives with the default neural-like differentiation. These cells may contribute in different extents to nearly all classical MSC populations adversely correlated with the age of cell donors. Our data suggest that neuro-epithelial markers, like nestin, stage specific embryonic antigens-4 or α-smooth muscle actin expressions, may serve as useful indicators of MSC culture neuro-regeneration-associated potency. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cleft and Craniofacial Care During Military Pediatric Plastic Surgery Humanitarian Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Christopher; Lough, Denver; Lim, Alan; Harshbarger, Raymond J; Kumar, Anand R

    2015-06-01

    Military pediatric plastic surgery humanitarian missions in the Western Hemisphere have been initiated and developed since the early 1990 s using the Medical Readiness Education and Training Exercise (MEDRETE) concept. Despite its initial training mission status, the MEDRETE has developed into the most common and advanced low level medical mission platform currently in use. The objective of this study is to report cleft- and craniofacial-related patient outcomes after initiation and evolution of a standardized treatment protocol highlighting lessons learned which apply to civilian plastic surgery missions. A review of the MEDRETE database for pediatric plastic surgery/cleft and craniofacial missions to the Dominican Republic from 2005 to 2009 was performed. A multidisciplinary team including a craniofacial surgeon evaluated all patients with a cleft/craniofacial and/or pediatric plastic condition. A standardized mission time line included predeployment site survey and predeployment checklist, operational brief, and postdeployment after action report. Deployment data collection, remote patient follow-up, and coordination with larger land/amphibious military operations was used to increase patient follow-up data. Data collected included sex, age, diagnosis, date and type of procedure, surgical outcomes including speech scores, surgical morbidity, and mortality. Five hundred ninety-four patients with cleft/craniofacial abnormalities were screened by a multidisciplinary team including craniofacial surgeons over 4 years. Two hundred twenty-three patients underwent 330 surgical procedures (cleft lip, 53; cleft palate, 73; revision cleft lip/nose, 73; rhinoplasty, 15; speech surgery, 24; orthognathic/distraction, 21; general pediatric plastic surgery, 58; fistula repair, 12). Average follow-up was 30 months (range, 1-60). The complication rate was 6% (n = 13) (palate fistula, lip revision, dental/alveolar loss, revision speech surgery rate). The average pre

  6. Prevalence of snoring and craniofacial features in Malaysian children from hospital-based medical clinic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banabilh, Saeed M; Asha'ari, Zamzil Amin; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Ab

    2008-08-01

    Snoring is considered as the most common clinical symptom of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. However, many snoring studies were done in western population, and data from around Asia is scarce. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of snoring among Malaysian children from hospital-based medical clinic population setting and to compare the craniofacial features of children with and without snoring using cephalometric analysis. A cross-sectional study among children aged 7-15 years were carried out in Hospital Kuala Terengganu. Sleep behavior questionnaire (Berlin questionnaire) was given to 500 children. The respondents were divided into snoring and non-snoring groups. Thirty children from each group were randomly selected to undergo a cephalometric X-ray. For each lateral cephalometric radiograph, 17 parameters consisting bony, soft tissue, and angular measurements were recorded using computer software VixWin2000. Independent t test was used to analyze the data. The results indicated that the whole questionnaire respondents were 317 (46 snoring and 271 non-snoring), hence, the prevalence of snoring in our survey population was 14.51%. The cephalometric X-ray showed that the snoring children manifested a significant different craniofacial features, such as narrow airway at the level of the soft palate and oropharynx (p < 0.05), more inferiorly positioned hyoid bone (p < 0.05), longer vertical airway length from posterior nasal spine to the base of epiglottis (p < 0.05), more protruding maxilla, and anterior-posterior discrepancy of maxilla and mandible (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our snorer children exhibit significant craniofacial differences compared to non-snorer groups.

  7. Determination of craniofacial relation among the subethnic Indian population: A modified approach - (Sagittal relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sumathi Felicita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To measure the linear cephalometric dimensions of anterior and posterior segments of the craniofacial complex sagittally, to establish ratios between different linear dimensions of sagittal segments and check for dimensional balance among the various segments in subjects with normal occlusion, pleasing profile and facial harmony. Setting and Sample Population : Department of Orthodontics, Saveetha University. Lateral cephalograms of 120 subjects of both sexes in the age group of 17-28 years with normal occlusion belonging to Chennai, India Materials and Methods : Linear dimensions of anterior and posterior segments of the craniofacial complex were measured sagittally with the posterior maxillary plane as a key reference plane. Ratios were established between the various parameters in the anterior and posterior region. Results : A ratio of 1:1 was found to exist between the individual and aggregate sagittal segments of the craniofacial complex in both sexes. There was a statistically significant sexual dimorphism in the aggregate lengths(P=0.028,P=0.005.However, the ratio between the anterior cranial floor and effective maxillary length was 2:3 and 5:8 and that between anterior cranial floor to effective mandibular length was 5:8 and 3:5 in females and males respectively. The difference in the above values was not statistically significant. Conclusion : A dimensional balance was found to exist between the maxilla and mandible both at the dentoalveolar and skeletal level with a ratio of 1:1. There was also a dimensional balance between the posterior cranial floor and ramus width. However, there was no architectural balance between the anterior cranial floor and maxilla and mandible.

  8. Investigation of an outbreak of craniofacial deformity in yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes) chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckle, K N; Young, M J; Alley, M R

    2014-09-01

    To investigate an outbreak of severe craniofacial deformity in yellow-eyed penguin (Megadyptes antipodes, hōiho) chicks at a single breeding site on the Otago Peninsula in the South Island of New Zealand. Morbidity and mortality of yellow-eyed penguins breeding on the coastal regions of Otago was monitored from November 2008 to March 2009. Dead chicks and unhatched eggs were recovered and examined. Between October and December 2008 32 eggs were recorded at 17 nests in the Okia Reserve. Eleven chicks survived to about 90 days of age, of which eight were found to have moderate to severe craniofacial deformity. The six most severe chicks were subject to euthanasia and examined in detail at necropsy, and the remaining two affected chicks were released to the wild after a period of care in a rehabilitation centre. Post-mortem samples were analysed for inorganic and organic toxins. The six deformed chicks all had severe shortening of the mandible and maxilla by 20-50 mm. The rostral and caudal regions of the skull were approximately 40 and 80% of normal length, respectively. Other, more variable lesions included cross bill deformity, malformed bill keratin, microphthalmia with misshapen scleral ossicles and oral soft tissue excess thought to be secondary to bony malformations. During the same year, mild sporadic bill deformities were also reported in 10 unrelated chicks from >167 chicks at other breeding sites on the southern Otago coast. Concentrations of organic toxins and heavy metals in body tissues from affected chicks were apparently similar to those in unaffected chicks on other beaches. No cause of this outbreak of craniofacial deformity could be established although the high prevalence at a single site suggests that it was due to an unidentified local teratogen.

  9. A computerized tomography study of the morphological interrelationship between the temporal bones and the craniofacial complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Helder Nunes; Slavicek, Rudolf; Sato, Sadao

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis that the temporal bones are at the center of the dynamics of the craniofacial complex, directly influencing facial morphology, has been put forward long ago. This study examines the role of the spatial positioning of temporal bones (frontal and sagittal inclination) in terms of influencing overall facial morphology. Several 3D linear, angular and orthogonal measurements obtained through computerized analysis of virtual models of 163 modern human skulls reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography images were analyzed and correlated. Additionally, the sample was divided into two subgroups based on the median value of temporal bone sagittal inclination [anterior rotation group (n = 82); posterior rotation group (n = 81)], and differences between groups evaluated. Correlation coefficients showed that sagittal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly (P < 0.01) related to midline flexion, transversal width and anterior–posterior length of the basicranium, to the anterior–posterior positioning of the mandible and maxilla, and posterior midfacial height. Frontal inclination of the temporal bone was significantly related (P < 0.01) to basicranium anterior–posterior and transversal dimensions, and to posterior midfacial height. In comparison with the posterior rotation group, the anterior rotation group presented a less flexed and anterior–posteriorly longer cranial base, a narrower skull, porion and the articular eminence located more superiorly and posteriorly, a shorter posterior midfacial height, the palatal plane rotated clockwise, a more retrognathic maxilla and mandible, and the upper posterior occlusal plane more inclined and posteriorly located. The results suggest that differences in craniofacial morphology are highly integrated with differences in the positional relationship of the temporal bones. The sagittal inclination of the temporal bone seems to have a greater impact on the 3D morphology of the craniofacial complex than

  10. Psychometric evaluation of a motor control test battery of the craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Piekartz, H; Stotz, E; Both, A; Bahn, G; Armijo-Olivo, S; Ballenberger, N

    2017-12-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the structural and known-group validity as well as the inter-rater reliability of a test battery to evaluate the motor control of the craniofacial region. Seventy volunteers without TMD and 25 subjects with TMD (Axes I) per the DC/TMD were asked to execute a test battery consisting of eight tests. The tests were video-taped in the same sequence in a standardised manner. Two experienced physical therapists participated in this study as blinded assessors. We used exploratory factor analysis to identify the underlying component structure of the eight tests. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α), inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient) and construct validity (ie, hypothesis testing-known-group validity) (receiver operating curves) were also explored for the test battery. The structural validity showed the presence of one factor underlying the construct of the test battery. The internal consistency was excellent (0.90) as well as the inter-rater reliability. All values of reliability were close to 0.9 or above indicating very high inter-rater reliability. The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.93 for rater 1 and 0.94 for rater two, respectively, indicating excellent discrimination between subjects with TMD and healthy controls. The results of the present study support the psychometric properties of test battery to measure motor control of the craniofacial region when evaluated through videotaping. This test battery could be used to differentiate between healthy subjects and subjects with musculoskeletal impairments in the cervical and oro-facial regions. In addition, this test battery could be used to assess the effectiveness of management strategies in the craniofacial region. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Craniofacial reconstruction using patient-specific implants polyether ether ketone with computer-assisted planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Oscar J; Lalezarzadeh, Frank; Dayan, Erez; Shin, Joseph; Buchbinder, Daniel; Smith, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Reconstruction of bony craniofacial defects requires precise understanding of the anatomic relationships. The ideal reconstructive technique should be fast as well as economical, with minimal donor-site morbidity, and provide a lasting and aesthetically pleasing result. There are some circumstances in which a patient's own tissue is not sufficient to reconstruct defects. The development of sophisticated software has facilitated the manufacturing of patient-specific implants (PSIs). The aim of this study was to analyze the utility of polyether ether ketone (PEEK) PSIs for craniofacial reconstruction. We performed a retrospective chart review from July 2009 to July 2013 in patients who underwent craniofacial reconstruction using PEEK-PSIs using a virtual process based on computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing. A total of 6 patients were identified. The mean age was 46 years (16-68 y). Operative indications included cancer (n = 4), congenital deformities (n = 1), and infection (n = 1). The mean surgical time was 3.7 hours and the mean hospital stay was 1.5 days. The mean surface area of the defect was 93.4 ± 43.26 cm(2), the mean implant cost was $8493 ± $837.95, and the mean time required to manufacture the implants was 2 weeks. No major or minor complications were seen during the 4-year follow-up. We found PEEK implants to be useful in the reconstruction of complex calvarial defects, demonstrating a low complication rate, good outcomes, and high patient satisfaction in this small series of patients. Polyether ether ketone implants show promising potential and warrant further study to better establish the role of this technology in cranial reconstruction.

  12. Synchrotron Phase Tomography: An Emerging Imaging Method for Microvessel Detection in Engineered Bone of Craniofacial Districts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Giuliani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The engineering of large 3D constructs, such as certain craniofacial bone districts, is nowadays a critical challenge. Indeed, the amount of oxygen needed for cell survival is able to reach a maximum diffusion distance of ~150–200 μm from the original vascularization vector, often hampering the long-term survival of the regenerated tissues. Thus, the rapid growth of new blood vessels, delivering oxygen and nutrients also to the inner cells of the bone grafts, is mandatory for their long-term function in clinical practice. Unfortunately, significant progress in this direction is currently hindered by a lack of methods with which to visualize these processes in 3D and reliably quantify them. In this regard, a challenging method for simultaneous 3D imaging and analysis of microvascularization and bone microstructure has emerged in recent years: it is based on the use of synchrotron phase tomography. This technique is able to simultaneously identify multiple tissue features in a craniofacial bone site (e.g., the microvascular and the calcified tissue structure. Moreover, it overcomes the intrinsic limitations of both histology, achieving only a 2D characterization, and conventional tomographic approaches, poorly resolving the vascularization net in the case of an incomplete filling of the newly formed microvessels by contrast agents. Indeed, phase tomography, being based on phase differences among the scattered X-ray waves, is capable of discriminating tissues with similar absorption coefficients (like vessels and woven bone in defined experimental conditions. The approach reviewed here is based on the most recent experiences applied to bone regeneration in the craniofacial region.

  13. Speech characteristics in a Ugandan child with a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lierde, K M; Bettens, K; Luyten, A; De Ley, S; Tungotyo, M; Balumukad, D; Galiwango, G; Bauters, W; Vermeersch, H; Hodges, A

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the speech characteristics in an English-speaking Ugandan boy of 4.5 years who has a rare paramedian craniofacial cleft (unilateral lip, alveolar, palatal, nasal and maxillary cleft, and associated hypertelorism). Closure of the lip together with the closure of the hard and soft palate (one-stage palatal closure) was performed at the age of 5 months. Objective as well as subjective speech assessment techniques were used. The speech samples were perceptually judged for articulation, intelligibility and nasality. The Nasometer was used for the objective measurement of the nasalance values. The most striking communication problems in this child with the rare craniofacial cleft are an incomplete phonetic inventory, a severely impaired speech intelligibility with the presence of very severe hypernasality, mild nasal emission, phonetic disorders (omission of several consonants, decreased intraoral pressure in explosives, insufficient frication of fricatives and the use of a middorsum palatal stop) and phonological disorders (deletion of initial and final consonants and consonant clusters). The increased objective nasalance values are in agreement with the presence of the audible nasality disorders. The results revealed that several phonetic and phonological articulation disorders together with a decreased speech intelligibility and resonance disorders are present in the child with a rare craniofacial cleft. To what extent a secondary surgery for velopharyngeal insufficiency, combined with speech therapy, will improve speech intelligibility, articulation and resonance characteristics is a subject for further research. The results of such analyses may ultimately serve as a starting point for specific surgical and logopedic treatment that addresses the specific needs of children with rare facial clefts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of a child with a craniofacial anomaly on stability of the parental relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Dane; Pai, Lori; Belfer, Myron L; Mulliken, John B

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine rates of divorce in parents of children with various types of craniofacial anomalies and to analyze possible confounding factors. A 29-question survey was sent to parents of all children evaluated in the Craniofacial Centre between 1992 and 1997. Parents were questioned regarding pre- and postnatal marital stability, whether the child's facial anomaly contributed to divorce, and involvement in the child's welfare. Using deformational posterior plagiocephaly as a control group, rates of divorce vs. non-divorce were compared for craniofacial anomalies, categorized as asymmetric (hemifacial microsomia, unilateral coronal synostosis, cleft lip, cleft lip/palate) or symmetric (syndromic-craniosynostosis, orbital hypertelorism, Treacher Collins syndrome). Major anomalies (hemifacial microsomia, craniosynostosis, orbital hypertelorism, Treacher Collins syndrome) were also compared to minor anomalies (cleft lip, cleft lip/palate). Surveys were sent to both parents in 412 families; 403 surveys were returned; and the results were evaluated in 275 families (67%). Frequency analysis demonstrated an overall divorce rate of 6.8% and 4.9% separation. Anomalies associated with the highest rate of divorce were hemifacial microsomia (24.0%), syndromic craniosynostosis (12.2%), and cleft lip/palate (6.8%). 79% of non-divorced couples reported a strong prenatal relationship, whereas 59% of divorced couples reported a problematic relationship. Following birth of the affected child, 47% of non-divorced couples responded that the bonds became stronger and 41% of divorced couples thought the relationship worsened. Two-sided Fisher exact test comparing control vs. all other anomalies showed significance (p=.030) for rates of divorce. Separation of anomalies into asymmetric vs. symmetric and major vs. minor categories demonstrated no significant difference in divorce rate (p>.05). The mother was more likely to become a child's primary caregiver

  15. Registries and evidence-based medicine in craniofacial and plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Brian C; Lorenzi, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine is a vital process for maintaining and improving quality and value in health care. However, evidence-based practice is most limited by the availability of research and outcomes data. Although randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been identified by numerous research organizations as the criterion standard for research methodology (eg, "level I evidence"), the execution of well-designed RCTs has proved either challenging or impossible in many surgical fields and with rare disease conditions. In particular, craniofacial and plastic surgery has been noted to be lacking in both the number and quality of RCTs. Many reasons are discussed for this dearth of research including inadequate sample size and challenges in randomization, blinding, and clinical equipoise. Yet, data for outcomes assessment are highly valued by surgeons and by consumers and payers. Therefore, alternative and more practical means for research and data collection must be sought. Observational studies of clinical practice are particularly useful for outcomes assessment despite relegation to a lower tier of evidence (eg, "level II evidence"). Functional databases with well-defined processes for data collection, called medical data registries, are an essential informatics tool to collect and store outcomes data and produce high-quality observational, practice-based research studies. A properly designed and implemented registry can provide surgeons with an abundance of data to perform research and quality improvement projects. In fact, registries may be superior in many ways to RCTs for craniofacial and plastic surgeons both pragmatically and functionally. In this commentary, we discuss the production of such registries in the framework of evidence-based practice and the relevant studies in craniofacial surgery.

  16. Exclusion of the PAX2 gene as a candidate gene for Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preston, R.A.; Gorry, M.C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Warman, M. [Harvard Univ., Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Crouzon craniofacial dysostosis (CFD, MIM 123500) is an abnormality of craniofacial development characterized by premature craniosynostosis, maxillary hypoplasia, and shallow orbits. We have mapped the CFD gene locus using a candidate gene approach to a 7 centiMorgan region on chromosome 10q in three CFD families. A maximal multipoint LOD score of 12.33 was achieved for a locus 2 cM distal to the microsatellite marker D10S209. A comparison of several physical, cytogenetic, and linkage maps revealed that the cytogenetic bands, 10q25-q26, most likely contain this CFD locus. The PAX2 gene, which has been mapped near another marker which in turn has been mapped to 10q25, was analyzed as a candidate gene. PAX2 was chosen for analysis because mutations in other members of the PAX gene family have been identified with human craniofacial abnormalities (e.g. Waardenburg syndrome). A YAC contig, consisting of 5 overlapping groups and composed of 11 YACs that spans the entire 7 cM region, was assembled for PAX2 analyses. None of these YACs supported PAX2-specific amplification using primer sets for both the second and third PAX2 exons. Control amplifications for YAC vector sequences produced robust amplifications in all cases. In addition, SSCP analyses of amplification products generated from the second and third PAX2 exons and the 3{prime} untranslated region of the PAX2 gene from both affected and unaffected family members in two of the kindreds failed to reveal any polymorphisms. Although it remains theoretically possible, due to artifacts in the YAC contigs, it is unlikely that PAX2 is the CFD gene.

  17. Evaluation of bone regeneration potential of dental follicle stem cells for treatment of craniofacial defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, Maryam; Bova, Jonathan F; Orooji, Mahdi; Pepping, Jennifer; Qureshi, Ammar; Del Piero, Fabio; Hayes, Daniel; Yao, Shaomian

    2015-11-01

    Stem cell-based tissue regeneration offers potential for treatment of craniofacial bone defects. The dental follicle, a loose connective tissue surrounding the unerupted tooth, has been shown to contain progenitor/stem cells. Dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) have strong osteogenesis capability, which makes them suitable for repairing skeletal defects. The objective of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration capability of DFSCs loaded into polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffold for treatment of craniofacial defects. DFSCs were isolated from the first mandibular molars of postnatal Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded into the PCL scaffold. Cell attachment and cell viability on the scaffold were examined with the use of scanning electron microscopy and alamar blue reduction assay. For in vivo transplantation, critical-size defects were created on the skulls of 5-month-old immunocompetent rats, and the cell-scaffold constructs were transplanted into the defects. Skulls were collected at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation, and bone regeneration in the defects was evaluated with the use of micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and Alamar blue assay demonstrated attachment and proliferation of DFSCs in the PCL scaffold. Bone regeneration was observed in the defects treated with DFSC transplantation but not in the controls without DFSC transplant. Transplanting DFSC-PCL with or without osteogenic induction before transplantation achieved approximately 50% bone regeneration at 8 weeks. Formation of woven bone was observed in the DFSC-PCL treatment group. Similar results were seen when osteogenic-induced DFSC-PCL was transplanted to the critical-size defects. This study demonstrated that transplantation of DFSCs seeded into PCL scaffolds can be used to repair craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Osteoinduction of Umbilical Cord and Palate Periosteum-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Poly-Co-Glycolytic Acid Nano-Microfibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Montserrat; Pappa, Andrew; Roden, Katherine; Krochmal, Daniel J.; van Aalst, John A.

    2014-01-01

    The need for tissue engineered bone to treat complex craniofacial bone defects secondary to congenital anomalies, trauma, and cancer extirpation is sizeable. Traditional strategies for treatment have focused on autologous bone in younger patients and bone substitutes in older patients. However, the capacity for merging new technologies, including the creation of nano and microfiber scaffolds with advances in natal sources of stem cells, is crucial to improving our treatment options. The advantages of using smaller diameter fibers for scaffolding are two-fold: the similar fiber diameters mimic the in vivo extracellular matrix construct;, and smaller fibers also provide a dramatically increased surface area for cell-scaffold interactions. In this study, we compare the capacity for a polymer with Federal Drug Administration (FDA) approval for use in humans, poly-co-glycolytic acid (PLGA) from Delta polymer, to support osteoinduction of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) harvested from the umbilical cord (UC) and palate periosteum (PP). Proliferation of both UC- and PP-derived MSCs was improved on PLGA scaffolds. PLGA scaffolds promoted UC MSC differentiation (indicated by earlier gene expression and higher calcium deposition), but not in PP-derived MSCs. UC-derived MSCs on PLGA nano-micro-fiber scaffolds have potential clinical utility in providing solutions for craniofacial bone defects, with the added benefit of earlier availability. PMID:24691324

  19. Craniofacial bone anomalies in Von Recklinghausen`s neurofibromatosis; Les anomalies osseuses cranio-faciales dans la neurofibromatose de Von Recklinghausen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abassi-Bakir, D.; Gharbi, H.; Kraiem, C.; Graiess-Tlili, K.; Turky, A.; Bouzaiene, M.; Bakir, A. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Sousse (Tunisia)

    1995-12-31

    Cases of cranio-facial bone anomalies were observed in 40 cases of neurofibromatosis. The cranio-facial skeletal manifestations are numerous and varied. Radiographic investigation is important to confirm the diagnosis, when neurologic and cutaneous signs are absent. The diagnosis should be easily confirmed by a conventional radiographic study. (authors). 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Associations between craniofacial morphology, head posture, and cervical vertebral body fusions in men with sleep apnea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanholt, Palle; Petri, Niels; Wildschiødtz, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to analyze craniofacial profiles and head posture in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) subgrouped according to cervical column morphology. METHODS: Seventy-four white men aged 27 to 65 years (mean, 49.0 years) diagnosed with OSA in sleep studies...... by using overnight polysomnography were included. Only patients with apnea-hypopnea index scores between 5.1 and 92.7 (mean, 36.4) were included. Lateral profile radiographs in standardized head posture were taken, and cephalometric analyses of sagittal and vertical jaw relationships were made...

  1. [Benign fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial complex with aneurysmal bone cyst formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraldo, Ana Filipa; Mendes Dos Santos, Carolina; Tavares, Joana; Fernandes Sousa, Rita; Campos, Alexandre; Farias, João Paulo; Pimentel, José; Guedes Campos, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst are controversial osteolytic benign expansive lesions which occur more frequently in the metaphysis of long bones and spine. They are classified as primary or secondary lesions depending on the presence or absence of an associated bone pathology. The engraftment of aneurysmal bone cyst onto benign fibro-osseous lesions is established. However, in the craniofacial complex this combined lesion is rare.The authors present two histologically proven uncommon cases of benign fibro-osseous lesions (fibrous dysplasia and juvenile psammomatoid ossifying fibroma) with aneurysmal bone cyst formation, emphasizing the imaging characteristics of this hybrid entities.

  2. Mineralization defects in cementum and craniofacial bone from loss of bone sialoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, B.L.; Ao, M.; Willoughby, C.; Soenjaya, Y.; Holm, E.; Lukashova, L.; Tran, A. B.; Wimer, H.F.; Zerfas, P.M.; Nociti, F.H.; Kantovitz, K.R.; Quan, B.D.; Sone, E.D.; Goldberg, H.A.; Somerman, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein found in mineralized tissues, including bone, cartilage, tooth root cementum (both acellular and cellular types), and dentin. In order to define the role BSP plays in the process of biomineralization of these tissues, we analyzed cementogenesis, dentinogenesis, and osteogenesis (intramembranous and endochondral) in craniofacial bone in Bsp null mice and wild-type (WT) controls over a developmental period (1-60 days post natal; dpn) by histology, immunohistochemistry, undecalcified histochemistry, microcomputed tomography (microCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Regions of intramembranous ossification in the alveolus, mandible, and calvaria presented delayed mineralization and osteoid accumulation, assessed by von Kossa and Goldner's trichrome stains at 1 and 14 dpn. Moreover, Bsp−/− mice featured increased cranial suture size at the early time point, 1 dpn. Immunostaining and PCR demonstrated that osteoblast markers, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, and osteopontin were unchanged in Bsp null mandibles compared to WT. Bsp−/− mouse molars featured a lack of functional acellular cementum formation by histology, SEM, and TEM, and subsequent loss of Sharpey's collagen fiber insertion into the tooth root structure. Bsp−/− mouse alveolar and mandibular bone featured equivalent or fewer osteoclasts at early ages (1 and 14 dpn), however, increased RANKL immunostaining and mRNA, and significantly increased number of osteoclast-like cells (2-5 fold) were found at later ages (26 and 60 dpn), corresponding to periodontal breakdown and severe alveolar bone resorption observed following molar teeth entering occlusion. Dentin formation was unperturbed in Bsp−/− mouse molars, with no delay in mineralization, no alteration in dentin dimensions, and no differences in odontoblast markers analyzed. No defects were identified

  3. Clinical Application of Three-Dimensional Printing Technology in Craniofacial Plastic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Jong Woo Choi; Namkug Kim

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been particularly widely adopted in medical fields. Application of the 3D printing technique has even been extended to bio-cell printing for 3D tissue/organ development, the creation of scaffolds for tissue engineering, and actual clinical application for various medical parts. Of various medical fields, craniofacial plastic surgery is one of areas that pioneered the use of the 3D printing concept. Rapid prototype technology was introduced in the 1990s to m...

  4. 3-D analysis of tooth formation and eruption in patients with craniofacial anomalies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiborg, Sven; Larsen, Per; Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    -dimensional analysis from orthopantomograms, intra-oral X-rays or cephalometric radiographs. A method for visualization of the developing tooth crowns in three dimensions based on CT-scans of the jaws has been developed (Bro-Nielsen et al., 1996). The purpose of the present study was to apply this new visualization......A number of craniofacial anomalies or syndromes involve severe disturbances of tooth formation and eruption (e.g. Apert syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, tricho-dento-osseous syndrome, cleidocranial dysplasia, and cleft lip and palate). So far, studies of these dental problems have been limited to two...

  5. Clinical evaluation of a newly designed single-stage craniofacial implant: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Mohamed Moataz; Medra, Ahmed; Gauld, John

    2008-11-01

    Placing craniofacial implants in a 2-stage procedure requires an additional second-stage surgery that is tedious for patients and clinicians and results in additional cost. The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate the use of a newly designed craniofacial implant for retaining facial prostheses, placed in a single-stage surgical procedure. Twenty-one newly designed craniofacial implants (OsteoCare Implant System) were placed in 7 patients, all seeking implant-retained auricular prostheses, using a single-stage surgical procedure. Modified O-ring abutments were directly screwed onto the implants at the time of surgery. Plastic washers were attached to the O-ring heads of the exposed abutments to avoid skin overgrowth to allow a single-stage surgical procedure. After a delayed loading period of 4 months, a silicone prosthetic ear was fabricated and retained using clips over the O-ring abutments. Implants and surrounding tissues were clinically evaluated at 1, 6, and 12 months following prosthesis insertion. The following were evaluated: periimplant abutment sebaceous crusting, periimplant abutment exudate, skin thickness, periimplant abutment tissue reaction, and implant mobility. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using the nonparametric Friedman's test for overall comparisons and Wilcoxon signed rank test for post hoc assessment of significance between follow-up periods. None of the implants failed to osseointegrate, providing a survival rate of 100%. Periimplant abutment sebaceous crusting values were significantly reduced at the 12-month test session (P<.05). Periimplant abutment skin thickness was also significantly reduced (P<.05) between the 6- and 12-month, and 1- and 12-month, follow-up visits. No significant difference was found throughout the follow-up period for periimplant abutment exudates and tissue reactions. None of the implants showed any signs of mobility throughout the study period. The use of the single-stage surgical

  6. Type III Klippel-Feil syndrome: case report and review of associated craniofacial anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Sattur, Atul P; Kirty, R N; Thakur, Arpita Rai

    2011-07-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex syndrome of osseous and visceral anomalies that include the classical clinical triad of short neck, limitation of head and neck movements and low posterior hairline. It may also be associated with anomalies of the genitourinary, musculoskeletal, neurologic and cardiac systems. We report a case of type III KFS with associated rib anomalies such as cervical rib, fusion and bifid ribs, scoliosis and fused crossed renal ectopia. The aim of this paper was to summarize all craniofacial anomalies that occur in association with KFS, so that clinicians would be aware of them during diagnosis and treatment planning.

  7. Craniofacial abnormalities in goldenhar syndrome: a case report with review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Kumaresan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum is a rare congenital anomaly of unclear etiology and characterized by craniofacial anomalies such as hemifacial microsomia, auricular, ocular and vertebral anomalies. In many cases, this syndrome goes unnoticed due to a lack of knowledge about its features and because of its associated wide range of overlapping anomalies. Herewith, we present a case of Goldenhar syndrome in a 21-year-old male, who presented all the classical signs of this rare condition. This article also summarizes the characteristic features of patients with Goldenhar syndrome

  8. Craniofacial and dental characteristics of Goldenhar syndrome: a report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuna, Elif B; Orino, Daisuke; Ogawa, Kei; Yildirim, Mine; Seymen, Figen; Gencay, Koray; Maeda, Takahide

    2011-03-01

    We describe the dental and craniofacial anomalies of 2 ethnically distinct patients with Goldenhar syndrome, which is characterized by hemifacial microsomia, facial asymmetry, and ear and dental abnormalities. A 7-year-old Japanese girl and 12-year-old Turkish boy with Goldenhar syndrome were examined clinically and radiographically; both had symptoms of hemifacial microsomia. Multiple organ involvement can limit surgical correction of deformities and affect patient management. Therefore, long-term regular follow-up by a multidisciplinary team is important to monitor the growth and development of patients.

  9. Mechanisms of disease: epithelial-mesenchymal transition and back again: does cellular plasticity fuel neoplastic progression?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina J; Turley, Eva A.; Veiseh, Mandana; Radisky, Derek C.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-02-13

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a conversion that facilitates organ morphogenesis and tissue remodeling in physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing. A similar phenotypic conversion is also detected in fibrotic diseases and neoplasia, which is associated with disease progression. EMT in cancer epithelial cells often seems to be an incomplete and bi-directional process. In this Review, we discuss the phenomenon of EMT as it pertains to tumor development, focusing on exceptions to the commonly held rule that EMT promotes invasion and metastasis. We also highlight the role of the RAS-controlled signaling mediators, ERK1, ERK2 and PI3-kinase, as microenvironmental responsive regulators of EMT.

  10. A Comparison of Culture Characteristics between Human Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Dental Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusoff, Nurul Hidayat; Alshehadat, Saaid Ayesh; Azlina, Ahmad; Kannan, Thirumulu Ponnuraj; Hamid, Suzina Sheikh Abdul

    2015-04-01

    In the past decade, the field of stem cell biology is of major interest among researchers due to its broad therapeutic potential. Stem cells are a class of undifferentiated cells that are able to differentiate into specialised cell types. Stem cells can be classified into two main types: adult stem cells (adult tissues) and embryonic stem cells (embryos formed during the blastocyst phase of embryological development). This review will discuss two types of adult mesenchymal stem cells, dental stem cells and amniotic stem cells, with respect to their differentiation lineages, passage numbers and animal model studies. Amniotic stem cells have a greater number of differentiation lineages than dental stem cells. On the contrary, dental stem cells showed the highest number of passages compared to amniotic stem cells. For tissue regeneration based on animal studies, amniotic stem cells showed the shortest time to regenerate in comparison with dental stem cells.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells as a Potent Cell Source for Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Zomorodian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While small bone defects heal spontaneously, large bone defects need surgical intervention for bone transplantation. Autologous bone grafts are the best and safest strategy for bone repair. An alternative method is to use allogenic bone graft. Both methods have limitations, particularly when bone defects are of a critical size. In these cases, bone constructs created by tissue engineering technologies are of utmost importance. Cells are one main component in the manufacture of bone construct. A few cell types, including embryonic stem cells (ESCs, adult osteoblast, and adult stem cells, can be used for this purpose. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, as adult stem cells, possess characteristics that make them good candidate for bone repair. This paper discusses different aspects of MSCs that render them an appropriate cell type for clinical use to promote bone regeneration.

  12. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is a critical regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Logan A.; Nawshad, Ali; Medici, Damian

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen receptor that is expressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a cellular transformation that mediates many stages of embryonic development and disease. However, the functional significance of this receptor in EMT is unknown. Here we show that Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), a common stimulator of EMT, promotes increased expression of type I collagen and DDR2. Inhibiting expression of COL1A1 or DDR2 with siRNA is sufficient to perturb activity of the NF-βB and LEF-1 transcription factors and to inhibit EMT and cell migration induced by TGF-β1. Furthermore, knockdown of DDR2 expression with siRNA inhibits EMT directly induced by type I collagen. These data establish a critical role for type I collagen-dependent DDR2 signaling in the regulation of EMT. PMID:21477649

  13. Epicardial Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Heart Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Krainock

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The epicardium is an epithelial monolayer that plays a central role in heart development and the myocardial response to injury. Recent developments in our understanding of epicardial cell biology have revealed this layer to be a dynamic participant in fundamental processes underlying the development of the embryonic ventricles, the coronary vasculature, and the cardiac valves. Likewise, recent data have identified the epicardium as an important contributor to reparative and regenerative processes in the injured myocardium. These essential functions of the epicardium rely on both non-cell autonomous and cell-autonomous mechanisms, with the latter featuring the process of epicardial Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. This review will focus on the induction and regulation of epicardial EMT, as it pertains to both cardiogenesis and the response of the myocardium to injury.

  14. Optical pacing of the embryonic heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M. W.; Duke, A. R.; Gu, S.; Doughman, Y.; Chiel, H. J.; Fujioka, H.; Watanabe, M.; Jansen, E. D.; Rollins, A. M.

    2010-09-01

    Light has been used to non-invasively alter the excitability of both neural and cardiac tissue. Recently, pulsed laser light has been shown to be capable of eliciting action potentials in peripheral nerves and in cultured cardiomyocytes. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate optical pacing of an intact heart in vivo. Pulsed 1.875-µm infrared laser light was used to lock the heart rate to the pulse frequency of the laser. A laser Doppler velocimetry signal was used to verify the pacing. At low radiant exposures, embryonic quail hearts were reliably paced in vivo without detectable damage to the tissue, indicating that optical pacing has great potential as a tool with which to study embryonic cardiac dynamics and development. In particular, optical pacing can be used to control the heart rate, thereby altering stresses and mechanically transduced signalling.

  15. Embryonic vaccines against cancer: an early history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Bradley G; Mitchell, Robert A; Harandi, Amir; Eaton, John W

    2009-06-01

    Almost 100 years have passed since the seminal observations of Schöne showing that vaccination of animals with fetal tissue would prevent the growth of transplantable tumors. Many subsequent reports have affirmed the general idea that immunologic rejection of transplantable tumors, as well as prevention of carcinogenesis, may be affected by vaccination with embryonic/fetal material. Following a decade of intense research on this phenomenon during approximately 1964-1974, interest appears to have waned. This earlier experimental work may be particularly pertinent in view of the rising interest in so-called cancer stem cells. We believe that further work - perhaps involving the use of embryonic stem cells as immunogens - is warranted and that the results reviewed herein support the concept that vaccination against the appearance of cancers of all kinds is a real possibility.

  16. Embryonic stem cells and property rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anna-Karin M

    2011-06-01

    This article contributes to the current debate on human embryonic stem cell researchers' possible complicity in the destruction of human embryos and the relevance of such complicity for the issue of commodification of human embryos. I will discuss if, and to what extent, researchers who destroy human embryos, and researchers who merely use human embryos destroyed by others, have moral use rights, and/or moral property rights, in these embryos. I argue that the moral status of the human embryo, however justified, places few restrictions on the latter researchers' use of it, and property rights in it, once it is destroyed. I argue that the former researchers have no property rights in the destroyed embryo but use rights in it to the extent allowed by the legitimate owners of the destroyed embryo. I discuss the implications of this account for previous and current US federal law regulating human embryonic stem cell research.

  17. Cytokine signalling in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David Møbjerg; Kalisz, Mark; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2006-01-01

    Cytokines play a central role in maintaining self-renewal in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells through a member of the interleukin-6 type cytokine family termed leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). LIF activates the JAK-STAT3 pathway through the class I cytokine receptor gp130, which forms a trimeric...... pathways seem to converge on c-myc as a common target to promote self-renewal. Whereas LIF does not seem to stimulate self-renewal in human embryonic stem cells it cannot be excluded that other cytokines are involved. The pleiotropic actions of the increasing number of cytokines and receptors signalling...... via JAKs, STATs and SOCS exhibit considerable redundancy, compensation and plasticity in stem cells in accordance with the view that stem cells are governed by quantitative variations in strength and duration of signalling events known from other cell types rather than qualitatively different stem...

  18. Tooth agenesis and craniofacial morphology in pre-orthodontic children with and without morphological deviations in the upper cervical spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemi, Ashkan; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze differences in prevalence and pattern of tooth agenesis and craniofacial morphology between non syndromic children with tooth agenesis with and without upper cervical spine morphological deviations and to analyze associations between craniofacial morphology and tooth agenesis...... in the two groups together. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-six pre-orthodontic children with tooth agenesis were divided into two groups with (19 children, mean age 11.9) and without (107 children, mean age 11.4) upper spine morphological deviations. Visual assessment of upper spine morphology...... morphological deviations was discussed. The results may be valuable for the early diagnosis and treatment planning of non syndromic children with tooth agenesis....

  19. Craniofacial Morphology and Growth Comparisons in Children With Robin Sequence, Isolated Cleft Palate, and Unilateral Complete Cleft Lip and Palate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, N. V.; Kreiborg, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of early craniofacial morphology and growth in children with nonsyndromic Robin Sequence (RS), isolated cleft palate (ICP), and unilateral complete cleft lip and palate (UCCLP). Subjects: One hundred eight children with cleft: 7 with RS, 53 with ICP, and 48 with UCCLP were...... included in the study. The children were drawn from the group of all Danish children with cleft born 1976 through 1981. Method: Three-projection infant cephalometry. Results: The craniofacial morphology in the RS, ICP, and UCCLP groups had some common characteristics: a wide maxilla with decreased length...

  20. Primordial germ cell development in the marmoset monkey as revealed by pluripotency factor expression: suggestion of a novel model of embryonic germ cell translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeckerle, N; Drummer, C; Debowski, K; Viebahn, C; Behr, R

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic progenitors of sperm and egg cells. Mammalian PGCs are thought to actively migrate from the yolk sac endoderm over long distances across the embryo to reach the somatic genital ridges. The general principles of mammalian PGC development were discovered in mice. In contrast, little is known about PGC development in primates due to extremely limited access to primate embryos. Here, we analyzed 12 well preserved marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) embryos covering the phase from PGC emergence in the endoderm to the formation of the sexually differentiated gonad (embryonic day (E) 50 to E95). We show using immunohistochemistry that the pluripotency factors OCT4A and NANOG specifically mark PGCs throughout the period studied. In contrast, SALL4 and LIN28 were first expressed ubiquitously and only later down-regulated in somatic tissues. We further show, for the first time, that PGCs are located in the endoderm in E50 embryos in close spatial proximity to the prospective genital ridge, making a long-range migration of PGCs dispensable. At E65, PGCs are already present in the primitive gonad, while significantly later embryonic stages still exhibit PGCs at their original endodermal site, revealing a wide spatio-temporal window of PGC distribution. Our findings challenge the 'dogma' of active long-range PGC migration from the endoderm to the gonads. We therefore favor an alternative model based primarily on passive translocation of PGCs from the mesenchyme that surrounds the gut to the prospective gonad through the intercalar expansion of mesenchymal tissue which contains the PGCs. In summary, we (i) show differential pluripotency factor expression during primate embryo development and (ii) provide a schematic model for embryonic PGC translocation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology.

  1. Embryonic mortality in buffalo naturally mated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Campanile

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the incidence of embryonic mortality in three different period of year in buffaloes naturally mated. The trial was carried out in a buffalo farm located in Caserta province between 2000-2006. In this period were registered natural insemination on 200 buffaloes. Pregnancy diagnosis was carried out on Day 30, confirmed on Day 45 and every 15th days until 90 days after natural mating. Buffaloes that were pregnant on Day 30 but not on Day 45 or Day 90 were considered to have undergone embryonic (EM or fetal mortality (FM respectively. EM and FM were 8.8% and 13.4% respectively throughout the experimental period. A high incidence (P<0.01 of FM was found in the transitional period (December-March than in other months of the year. The incidence of embryonic mortality was significantly (P<0.01 higher between 28-60 days of gestation and lower after 71 day of gestation. The higher fetal mortality found in this study could be due the lower serum levels of progesterone normally found in transitional period in buffalo cows.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells avoid allogeneic rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy J Mary

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adult bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells offer the potential to open a new frontier in medicine. Regenerative medicine aims to replace effete cells in a broad range of conditions associated with damaged cartilage, bone, muscle, tendon and ligament. However the normal process of immune rejection of mismatched allogeneic tissue would appear to prevent the realisation of such ambitions. In fact mesenchymal stem cells avoid allogeneic rejection in humans and in animal models. These finding are supported by in vitro co-culture studies. Three broad mechanisms contribute to this effect. Firstly, mesenchymal stem cells are hypoimmunogenic, often lacking MHC-II and costimulatory molecule expression. Secondly, these stem cells prevent T cell responses indirectly through modulation of dendritic cells and directly by disrupting NK as well as CD8+ and CD4+ T cell function. Thirdly, mesenchymal stem cells induce a suppressive local microenvironment through the production of prostaglandins and interleukin-10 as well as by the expression of indoleamine 2,3,-dioxygenase, which depletes the local milieu of tryptophan. Comparison is made to maternal tolerance of the fetal allograft, and contrasted with the immune evasion mechanisms of tumor cells. Mesenchymal stem cells are a highly regulated self-renewing population of cells with potent mechanisms to avoid allogeneic rejection.

  3. Immunological characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia de Vasconcellos Machado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although bone marrow is the main source, mesenchymal stem cells have already been isolated from various other tissues, such as the liver, pancreas, adipose tissue, peripheral blood and dental pulp. These plastic adherent cells are morphologically similar to fibroblasts and have a high proliferative potential. This special group of cells possesses two essential characteristics: self-renewal and differentiation, with appropriate stimuli, into various cell types. Mesenchymal stem cells are considered immunologically privileged, since they do not express costimulatory molecules, required for complete T cell activation, on their surface. Several studies have shown that these cells exert an immunosuppressive effect on cells from both innate and acquired immunity systems. Mesenchymal stem cells can regulate the immune response in vitro by inhibiting the maturation of dendritic cells, as well as by suppressing the proliferation and function of T and B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. These special properties of mesenchymal stem cells make them a promising strategy in the treatment of immune mediated disorders, such as graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune diseases, as well as in regenerative medicine. The understanding of immune regulation mechanisms of mesenchymal stem cells, and also those involved in the differentiation of these cells in various lineages is primordial for their successful and safe application in different areas of medicine.

  4. Defining the expression of marker genes in equine mesenchymal stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah J Guest

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Deborah J Guest1, Jennifer C Ousey1, Matthew RW Smith21Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU; 2Reynolds House Referrals, Greenwood Ellis and Partners, 166 High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 9WS, UKAbstract: Mesenchymal stromal (MS cells have been derived from multiple sources in the horse including bone marrow, adipose tissue and umbilical cord blood. To date these cells have been investigated for their differentiation potential and are currently being used to treat damage to horse musculoskeletal tissues. However, no work has been done in horse MS cells to examine the expression profile of proteins and cell surface antigens that are expressed in human MS cells. The identification of such profiles in the horse will allow the comparison of putative MS cells isolated from different laboratories and different tissues. At present it is difficult to ascertain whether equivalent cells are being used in different reports. Here, we report on the expression of a range of markers used to define human MS cells. Using immunocytochemistry we show that horse MS cells homogenously express collagens, alkaline phosphatase activity, CD44, CD90 and CD29. In contrast, CD14, CD79α and the embryonic stem cell markers Oct-4, SSEA (stage specific embryonic antigen -1, -3, -4, TRA (tumor rejection antigen -1–60 and -1–81 are not expressed. The MS cells also express MHC class I antigens but do not express class II antigens, although they are inducible by treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, equine, gene expression

  5. Congenital sacral mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in a neonate: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mesenchymal chondrosarcomas are rare malignant tumours in children, especially, in neonates. The authors present a case of congenital mesenchymal chondrosarcoma in a 1-day neonate located in sacrum. According to the authors' literature searches, this case is the fi rst congenital sacral mesenchymal ...

  6. pitx2 Deficiency results in abnormal ocular and craniofacial development in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Liu

    Full Text Available Human PITX2 mutations are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that involves ocular anterior segment defects, dental hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphism and umbilical abnormalities. Characterization of the PITX2 pathway and identification of the mechanisms underlying the anomalies associated with PITX2 deficiency is important for better understanding of normal development and disease; studies of pitx2 function in animal models can facilitate these analyses. A knockdown of pitx2 in zebrafish was generated using a morpholino that targeted all known alternative transcripts of the pitx2 gene; morphant embryos generated with the pitx2(ex4/5 splicing-blocking oligomer produced abnormal transcripts predicted to encode truncated pitx2 proteins lacking the third (recognition helix of the DNA-binding homeodomain. The morphological phenotype of pitx2(ex4/5 morphants included small head and eyes, jaw abnormalities and pericardial edema; lethality was observed at ∼6-8-dpf. Cartilage staining revealed a reduction in size and an abnormal shape/position of the elements of the mandibular and hyoid pharyngeal arches; the ceratobranchial arches were also decreased in size. Histological and marker analyses of the misshapen eyes of the pitx2(ex4/5 morphants identified anterior segment dysgenesis and disordered hyaloid vasculature. In summary, we demonstrate that pitx2 is essential for proper eye and craniofacial development in zebrafish and, therefore, that PITX2/pitx2 function is conserved in vertebrates.

  7. pitx2 Deficiency results in abnormal ocular and craniofacial development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Semina, Elena V

    2012-01-01

    Human PITX2 mutations are associated with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, an autosomal-dominant developmental disorder that involves ocular anterior segment defects, dental hypoplasia, craniofacial dysmorphism and umbilical abnormalities. Characterization of the PITX2 pathway and identification of the mechanisms underlying the anomalies associated with PITX2 deficiency is important for better understanding of normal development and disease; studies of pitx2 function in animal models can facilitate these analyses. A knockdown of pitx2 in zebrafish was generated using a morpholino that targeted all known alternative transcripts of the pitx2 gene; morphant embryos generated with the pitx2(ex4/5) splicing-blocking oligomer produced abnormal transcripts predicted to encode truncated pitx2 proteins lacking the third (recognition) helix of the DNA-binding homeodomain. The morphological phenotype of pitx2(ex4/5) morphants included small head and eyes, jaw abnormalities and pericardial edema; lethality was observed at ∼6-8-dpf. Cartilage staining revealed a reduction in size and an abnormal shape/position of the elements of the mandibular and hyoid pharyngeal arches; the ceratobranchial arches were also decreased in size. Histological and marker analyses of the misshapen eyes of the pitx2(ex4/5) morphants identified anterior segment dysgenesis and disordered hyaloid vasculature. In summary, we demonstrate that pitx2 is essential for proper eye and craniofacial development in zebrafish and, therefore, that PITX2/pitx2 function is conserved in vertebrates.

  8. Association between condylar position and vertical skeletal craniofacial morphology: A cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh

    2017-12-01

    Condylar position may play an important role in the establishment of different craniofacial morphologies. The aim of the present study was to determine the possible association between condylar position and vertical skeletal craniofacial morphology in subjects with normal sagittal skeletal pattern using CBCT. The CBCT images of 45 patients with Class I sagittal skeletal pattern were classified into three balanced groups on the basis of SN-MP angle. Each group contained 15 subjects: low angle, normal angle and high angle. The condylar position was determined for the left and right joints. Chi square test was applied to assess the association between condylar position and vertical skeletal growth pattern. The condyles were more anteriorly-positioned in patients with high angle vertical pattern than in those with normal and low angle vertical pattern. No significant differences were found in condylar position between low angle and normal angle subjects. A significant correlation between condylar position and vertical skeletal pattern was found in the present study. This relationship can be considered for predicting and establishing a proper treatment plan for temporomandibular diseases during orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  9. Sagittal and Vertical Craniofacial Growth Pattern and Timing of Circumpubertal Skeletal Maturation: A Multiple Regression Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Rosso, Luigi; Riatti, Riccardo; Contardo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the associations between the timing of skeletal maturation and craniofacial growth is of primary importance when planning a functional treatment for most of the skeletal malocclusions. This cross-sectional study was thus aimed at evaluating whether sagittal and vertical craniofacial growth has an association with the timing of circumpubertal skeletal maturation. A total of 320 subjects (160 females and 160 males) were included in the study (mean age, 12.3 ± 1.7 years; range, 7.6-16.7 years). These subjects were equally distributed in the circumpubertal cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) stages 2 to 5. Each CVM stage group also had equal number of females and males. Multiple regression models were run for each CVM stage group to assess the significance of the association of cephalometric parameters (ANB, SN/MP, and NSBa angles) with age of attainment of the corresponding CVM stage (in months). Significant associations were seen only for stage 3, where the SN/MP angle was negatively associated with age (β coefficient, -0.7). These results show that hyperdivergent and hypodivergent subjects may have an anticipated and delayed attainment of the pubertal CVM stage 3, respectively. However, such association remains of little entity and it would become clinically relevant only in extreme cases.

  10. Orthognathic Surgeries in Patients With Congenital Craniofacial Anomalies: Profile and Hospitalization Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2015-11-01

    To examine the occurrence of complications in patients with congenital facial anomalies who underwent orthognathic surgeries and to identify the role of patient-related factors in occurrence of complications. Retrospective analysis of hospital discharge database. Nationwide inpatient sample for the years 2004 to 2010. All patients with a diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate or congenital craniofacial anomalies and who had an orthognathic surgery were selected. Orthognathic surgery. Occurrence of complications. During the study period, a total of 8340 patients with congenital craniofacial anomalies underwent orthognathic surgeries. The overall complication rate was 9.1%. Six different complications (bacterial infections, hemorrhage, postoperative pneumonia, iatrogenic-induced complications such as accidental punctures/lacerations or pneumothorax, other infections, and respiratory complications) occurred in at least 1% of all patients having orthognathic surgeries. Ninety-five percent of patients were discharged routinely after surgery. Patients with high comorbid burden are at a higher risk for developing complications (P country and could serve as benchmarks for future well-designed prospective controlled studies to examine risk factors associated with complications for not only orthognathic surgeries but also for a wider range of surgical procedures.

  11. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Dubowitz syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, Andrea; Cantore, Stefania; Tullo, Domenica; Desiate, Apollonia

    2011-01-27

    Dubowitz syndrome is a very rare, autosomal recessive disease characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, a high sloping forehead, facial asymmetry, blepharophimosis, sparse hair and eyebrows, low-set ears and mental retardation. Symptoms vary between patients, but other characteristics include a soft high-pitched voice, dental and craniofacial abnormalities, partial webbing of the fingers and toes, palate deformations, genital abnormalities, eczema, hyperactivity, preference for concrete over abstract thinking, language difficulties and an aversion to crowds. We describe the craniofacial and dental characteristics of a 12-year-old Caucasian Italian boy with both the typical and less common findings of Dubowitz syndrome. Diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome is mainly based on the facial phenotype. Possible conditions for differential diagnosis include Bloom syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, and fetal alcohol syndrome. As there are few reports of this syndrome in the literature, we hope this case report will enable health professionals to recognize the phenotypic alterations of this syndrome, and allow early referral for the necessary multidisciplinary treatments.

  12. Quantitative study of new bone formation in distraction osteogenesis of craniofacial bones by bone scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojvachiranonda, Nond; Tepmongkol, Supatporn; Mahatumarat, Charan

    2007-09-01

    Although distraction osteogenesis is widely accepted as a technique to augment the craniofacial skeleton, timing to start distraction after an osteotomy or to remove distractors is basically based on studies on long bones. Because bone scintigraphy is well known to be the gold standard for quantitative measurement of bone formation, we conducted this pilot study to evaluate its feasibility as a tool for assessing new bone formation by distraction osteogenesis. Five patients with midface hypoplasia and four with mandibular hypoplasia were studied. Each patient had five bone scans: before surgery, 3 and 30 days after stopping distraction, and 3 days before and 3 months after distractor removal. Radiotracer uptake values at distraction sites were measured at 1 and 3 hours. Each uptake value was compared with preoperative study as uptake ratio. A typical pattern of radiotracer uptake ratio was observed in all cases with successful distraction. Uptake rose to the maximum during the consolidation period and remained at or above the preoperative level until the study end point. In one patient who had mandibular distraction and nonunion of the right ramus, there was no uptake peak during early consolidation as seen in the successfully distracted body and in the other cases. Bone scintigraphy was found to be a useful investigation in craniofacial distraction. It showed the dynamic of new bone formation by demonstrating the osteoblastic activity, which is important objective information for determining distraction rate and consolidation duration in each case. It may also be a tool that can predict the outcome of distraction osteogenesis.

  13. Evaluation of Swallow Function in Patients with Craniofacial Microsomia: A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Lande, Lara S; Caron, Cornelia J J M; Pluijmers, Britt I; Joosten, Koen F M; Streppel, Marloes; Dunaway, David J; Koudstaal, Maarten J; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2017-11-04

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) is characterized by underdevelopment of the structures derived from the first and second pharyngeal arches resulting in aesthetic, psychological, and functional problems including feeding and swallowing difficulties. The aim of this study is to gain more insight into swallowing difficulties in patients with CFM. A retrospective study was conducted in the population of patients diagnosed with CFM at three major craniofacial units. Patients with feeding difficulties and those who underwent video fluoroscopic swallow (VFS) studies were included for further analyses. The outcome of the VFS-studies was reviewed with regard to the four phases of swallowing. In our cohort, 13.5% of the 755 patients were diagnosed with swallowing difficulties. The outcome of the VFS-studies of 42 patients showed difficulties in the oral and pharyngeal phases with both thin and thick liquids. Patients with more severe mandibular hypoplasia showed more difficulties to form an appropriate bolus compared to patients who were less severely affected. This is the first study to document swallowing problems in patients with CFM. Difficulties were seen in both the oral and pharyngeal phases. We recommend routine screening for swallowing issues by a speech and language therapist in all patients with CFM and to obtain a VFS-study in patients with a type III mandible.

  14. Mandibular reconstruction in the growing patient with unilateral craniofacial microsomia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluijmers, B I; Caron, C J J M; Dunaway, D J; Wolvius, E B; Koudstaal, M J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to provide an overview of the surgical correction of the mandible in unilateral craniofacial microsomia (UCM) performed in the growing patient, and its long-term outcome and stability. The following databases were searched: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane, and Web of Science. Articles reporting prospective and retrospective studies of patients not older than 16 years (N ≥ 4) who had undergone surgical correction of a craniofacial microsomia spectrum condition using grafts, osteotomies, distraction, or combinations of these, were reviewed. The period of follow-up was selected to be ≥1 year. After inclusion, the articles were evaluated on short- and long-term outcomes, relapse, and any increase in asymmetry following treatment. Thirty of 1611 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Analysis of the surgical mandibular correction of UCM showed that the outcome is not so much treatment-dependent, but patient-dependent, i.e. deformity gradation-dependent. The type I-IIa Pruzansky-Kaban patient had the best results with regard to minimal relapse and/or minimal increase in asymmetry. Single-stage correction of the asymmetry should be postponed until the permanent dentition stage. It can be concluded that in the treatment of the severely hypoplastic mandible, the patient will benefit from a multi-stage treatment protocol if indicated for functional or psychological problems. Copyright © 2013 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  15. Dental and craniofacial characteristics in a patient with Dubowitz syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullo Domenica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dubowitz syndrome is a very rare, autosomal recessive disease characterized by microcephaly, growth retardation, a high sloping forehead, facial asymmetry, blepharophimosis, sparse hair and eyebrows, low-set ears and mental retardation. Symptoms vary between patients, but other characteristics include a soft high-pitched voice, dental and craniofacial abnormalities, partial webbing of the fingers and toes, palate deformations, genital abnormalities, eczema, hyperactivity, preference for concrete over abstract thinking, language difficulties and an aversion to crowds. Case presentation We describe the craniofacial and dental characteristics of a 12-year-old Caucasian Italian boy with both the typical and less common findings of Dubowitz syndrome. Conclusion Diagnosis of Dubowitz syndrome is mainly based on the facial phenotype. Possible conditions for differential diagnosis include Bloom syndrome, Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, and fetal alcohol syndrome. As there are few reports of this syndrome in the literature, we hope this case report will enable health professionals to recognize the phenotypic alterations of this syndrome, and allow early referral for the necessary multidisciplinary treatments.

  16. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Three-Dimensional Craniofacial Models for Midfacial Distraction: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers-Vizena, Carolyn R; Sporn, Susan Flath; Daniels, Kimberly M; Padwa, Bonnie L; Weinstock, Peter

    2017-09-01

      Patient-specific three-dimensional (3D) models are increasingly used to virtually plan rare surgical procedures, providing opportunity for preoperative preparation, better understanding of individual anatomy, and implant prefabrication. The purpose of this study was to assess the benefit of 3D models related to patient safety, operative time, and cost.   Retrospective review.   Academic, tertiary care hospital.   Midfacial distraction was studied as a representative craniofacial operation. A consecutive series of 29 patients who underwent a single type of midfacial distraction was included.   For a subset of patients, computed tomography-derived 3D models were used to study patient-specific anatomy and precontour hardware.   Complications, operative time, blood loss, and estimated cost.   Twenty patients underwent midfacial distraction without and nine with preoperative use of a 3D model. Seven complications occurred in six patients without model use, including premature consolidation (3), cerebrospinal fluid leak (2), and hardware malfunction (2). No complications were reported in the model group. Controlling for surgeon variation, model use resulted in a 31.3-minute (7.8%) reduction in operative time. Time-based cost savings were estimated to be $1036.   Three-dimensional models are valuable for preoperative planning and hardware precontouring in craniofacial surgery, with potential positive effects on complications and operative time. Savings related to operative time and complications may offset much of the cost of the model.

  17. Mandibular movement and frontal craniofacial morphology in orthognathic surgery patients with mandibular deviation and protrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Y; Yamada, K; Fukui, T; Hanada, K; Kohno, S

    2003-04-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between mandibular movement (lateral excursion and masticatory movements) and craniofacial morphology in 16 patients with mandibular deviation, using a six degrees-of-freedom measuring device. (i) Mandibular deviation was found to be significantly related to frontal maxillary and occlusal plane angles. (ii) Three-dimensional non-working condylar and incisal path lengths were longer during the lateral excursion to the non-deviated side than to the deviated side, and the incisal path moved antero-inferior. (iii) The lateral motion range of the incisal path was wider during masticatory movement on the non-deviated side than on the deviated side, and the molar and non-working condylar path lengths corresponding to the lateral range of the incisal path were also longer on the non-deviated side. The group with posterior crossbite showed a significantly smaller horizontal range of incisal path, and also significantly smaller frontal projected incisal and molar path angles during masticatory movement on the deviated side than on the non-deviated side. These results suggest that lateral excursion and masticatory movements could be related to craniofacial morphology and posterior crossbite.

  18. In vitro antimicrobial effects of grape seed extract on peri-implantitis microflora in craniofacial implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Binit; Theerathavaj, M L Srithavaj; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Thaweboon, Boonyanit

    2012-10-01

    To determine the antimicrobial effects of grape seed on peri-implantitis microflora. The grape seed extract was tested against peri-implantitis microflora most commonly found in craniofacial implants including reference strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), Candida albicans (C. albicans) and clinical strains of S. aureus, Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia) and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) by disk diffusion test. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum cidal concentrations (MCC) were determined using modified agar dilution millpore method. The extract was further combined with polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol, and was tested for antimicrobial effects. Grape seed extract showed positive inhibitory effects with S. aureus at MIC of 0.625 mg/mL and MCC of 1.25 mg/mL respectively. However the extracts showed minimal or no reactivity against strains of E. coli, K. pneumonia, C. parapsilosis and C. albicans. The use of grape seed extract in combination with polyethylene glycol and propylene glycol also showed dose dependent inhibitory effect on S. aureus. The results of the study showed that grape seed has potential antimicrobial effects which can be further studied and developed to be used in the treatment of infected skin-abutment interface of craniofacial implants.

  19. Effects on craniofacial growth and development of unilateral botulinum neurotoxin injection into the masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chi-Yang; Chiu, Wan Chi; Liao, Yi-Hsuan; Tsai, Chih-Mong

    2009-02-01

    The effects of botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) on masseter muscles, when injected for cosmetic purposes (volumetric reduction) or treatment of excessive muscle activity (bruxism), have been investigated. However, the full anatomic effects of treatment are not known, particularly with respect to the mandible and relevant anthropometric measurements. The intent of this study was to use unilaterial BoNT/A injections to induce localized masseter atrophy and paresis and then to measure the effects of muscle influence on craniofacial growth and development. Growing male Wistar rats, 30 days old, were studied. The experimental group consisted of 8 rats. One side of the masseter muscle was injected with BoNT/A and the other side of the masseter muscle was injected with saline. The side with BoNT/A belonged to 1 group and the side with saline was the sham group. Three rats without injections was the control. After 45 days, the masseter muscles were dissected and weighed. Dry skulls were prepared, and anthropometric measurements determined. One-way ANOVA showed that the animals maintained their weight in both groups; however, the muscles injected with BoNT/A were smaller than the sham or control muscles. Anthropometric measurements of the bony structures attached to the masseter muscle showed a significant treatment effect. After localized masseter muscle atrophy induced by BoNT/A injection, alterations of craniofacial bone growth and development were seen. The results agree with the functional matrix theory that soft tissues regulate bone growth.

  20. A comparative study of craniofacial morphology of cleft lip children with or without palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Su Beom; Kim, Young Ju; Koh, Kwang Joon [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether any difference existed in craniofacial morphology between cleft children and normal subjects. Thirty three measurements of the various regions of cranium and face were obtained from lateral cephalometric radiograms in 40 cleft children (27 males, 13 females) and 40 normal subjects (23 males, 17 females) in our dental hospital from Jan. 1988 to Dec. 1995. The measurements were compared with those in control subjects who had no history of craniofacial abnormalities.. The obtained results were as follows; l. In the cranium, the cleft children had significantly shorter posterior cranial base length (S-Ba) and total antero-posterior cranial base length (N-Ba) (P<0.05). 2. In the upper face, the cleft children had significantly shorter upper anterior facial height (N-ANS) and upper posterior facial height (Ptm'-SNL) (P<0.05). 3. In the lower face, the cleft children had significantly shorter antero-posterior mandibular length (Pog-Ar) and antero-posterior mandibular body length (Pog-Go) (P<0.05). 4. In the facial profile, the cleft children had significantly shorter total facial height (N-Me) and posterior facial height (S-Go) (P<0.05).

  1. Geometric morphometrics in primatology: craniofacial variation in Homo sapiens and Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J M; Wood, C G; Luboga, S A

    1996-01-01

    Traditionally, morphometric studies have relied on statistical analysis of distances, angles or ratios to investigate morphometric variation among taxa. Recently, geometric techniques have been developed for the direct analysis of landmark data. In this paper, we offer a summary (with examples) of three of these newer techniques, namely shape coordinate, thin-plate spline and relative warp analyses. Shape coordinate analysis detected significant craniofacial variation between 4 modern human populations, with African and Australian Aboriginal specimens being relatively prognathous compared with their Eurasian counterparts. In addition, the Australian specimens exhibited greater basicranial flexion than all other samples. The observed relationships between size and craniofacial shape were weak. The decomposition of shape variation into affine and non-affine components is illustrated via a thin-plate spline analysis of Homo and Pan cranial landmarks. We note differences between Homo and Pan in the degree of prognathism and basicranial flexion and the position and orientation of the foramen magnum. We compare these results with previous studies of these features in higher primates and discuss the utility of geometric morphometrics as a tool in primatology and physical anthropology. We conclude that many studies of morphological variation, both within and between taxa, would benefit from the graphical nature of these techniques.

  2. Immortalized mesenchymal stem cells: an alternative to primary mesenchymal stem cells in neuronal differentiation and neuroregeneration associated studies

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    Gong Min

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can be induced to differentiate into neuronal cells under appropriate cellular conditions and transplanted in brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases animal models for neuroregeneration studies. In contrast to the embryonic stem cells (ESCs, MSCs are easily subject to aging and senescence because of their finite ability of self-renewal. MSCs senescence seriously affected theirs application prospects as a promising tool for cell-based regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study, we established a reversible immortalized mesenchymal stem cells (IMSCs line by using SSR#69 retrovirus expressing simian virus 40 large T (SV40T antigen as an alternative to primary MSCs. Methods The retroviral vector SSR#69 expressing simian virus 40 large T (SV40T antigen was used to construct IMSCs. IMSCs were identified by flow cytometry to detect cell surface makers. To investigate proliferation and differentiation potential of IMSCs, cell growth curve determination and mesodermal trilineage differentiation tests were performed. Neuronal differentiation characteristics of IMSCs were detected in vitro. Before IMSCs transplantation, we excluded its tumorigenicity in nude mice firstly. The Morris water maze tests and shuttle box tests were performed five weeks after HIBD models received cells transplantation therapy. Results In this study, reversible IMSCs were constructed successfully and had the similar morphology and cell surface makers as primary MSCs. IMSCs possessed better ability of proliferation and anti-senescence compared with primary MSCs, while maintained multilineage differentiation capacity. Neural-like cells derived from IMSCs had similar expressions of neural-specific genes, protein expression patterns and resting membrane potential (RMP compared with their counterparts derived from primary MSCs. There was no bump formation in nude mice subcutaneously injected with IMSCs. IMSCs

  3. El polimetilmetacrilato en la reconstrucción craneofacial The polymethylmethacrylate in the craniofacial repair

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    Pedro Ángel Peñón Vivas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available La reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales constituye un reto para el cirujano maxilofacial. Si bien existe una amplia gama de materiales para la reconstrucción, cada cual tiene ventajas y desventajas además de indicaciones para su utilización. Por lo que nos hemos dado a la tarea de emplear el polimetilmetacrilato como una opción económica y efectiva en la reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales. Con este objetivo se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo, no comparativo, en el Servicio de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital Universitario "Miguel Enríquez" en el periodo comprendido desde enero de 2006 a diciembre de 2008. Se incluyeron un total de 14 pacientes, los cuales recibieron tratamiento quirúrgico para la reconstrucción craneofacial mediante el empleo del polimetilmetacrilato. El mayor número de pacientes que recibieron tratamiento quirúrgico para la reconstrucción craneofacial con polimetilmetacrilato se encontró en el grupo de 16 a 25 años de edad, con un predominio del sexo masculino y mayor afectación de los pacientes de color de piel blanca. En todos los casos estudiados la etiología de la deformidad fue traumática; dentro de ellos el mayor por ciento le correspondió a los accidentes viales, seguido de los causados por violencia. El diagnóstico que predominó fue el de las fracturas orbitomalares de grado IV. El piso de órbita fue la localización o estructura más reconstruida. Se presentaron únicamente como complicaciones, la infección y la colección subcutánea. El polimetilmetacrilato es un material económico y efectivo que permite obtener excelentes resultados estéticos y funcionales en la reconstrucción de defectos craneofaciales adquiridos.The repair of craniofacial defects is a challenge for the maxillofacial surgeon. There are a great range of materials for reconstruction, where each has advantages and disadvantages as well as indications for its use. Polymethylmethacrylate is an

  4. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyuan Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and distant site metastasis is the main cause of death in breast cancer patients. There is increasing evidence supporting the role of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT in tumor cell progression, invasion, and metastasis. During the process of EMT, epithelial cancer cells acquire molecular alternations that facilitate the loss of epithelial features and gain of mesenchymal phenotype. Such transformation promotes cancer cell migration and invasion. Moreover, emerging evidence suggests that EMT is associated with the increased enrichment of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs and these CSCs display mesenchymal characteristics that are resistant to chemotherapy and target therapy. However, the clinical relevance of EMT in human cancer is still under debate. This review will provide an overview of current evidence of EMT from studies using clinical human breast cancer tissues and its associated challenges.

  5. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Osteochondral Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Johnathan; Bernhard, Jonathan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are of major interest in regenerative medicine, as they are easily harvested from a variety of sources (including bone marrow and fat aspirates) and they are able to form a range of mesenchymal tissues, in vitro and in vivo. We focus here on the use of MSCs for engineering of cartilage, bone, and complex osteochondral tissue constructs, using protocols that replicate some aspects of natural mesodermal development. For engineering of human bone, we discuss some of the current advances, and highlight the use of perfusion bioreactors for supporting anatomically exact human bone grafts. For engineering of human cartilage, we discuss the limitations of current approaches, and highlight engineering of stratified, mechanically functional human cartilage interfaced with bone by mesenchymal condensation of MSCs. Taken together, current advances enable engineering of physiologically relevant bone, cartilage and osteochondral composites, and physiologically relevant studies of osteochondral development and disease.

  6. Uncovering the post-embryonic functions of gametophytic- and embryonic-lethal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Héctor; Pérez-Pérez, José Manuel; Micol, José Luis

    2011-06-01

    An estimated 500-1 000 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes mutate to embryonic lethality. In addition, several hundred mutations have been identified that cause gametophytic lethality. Thus, a significant fraction of the ∼25,000 protein-coding genes in Arabidopsis are indispensable to the early stages of the diploid phase or to the haploid gametophytic phase. The expression patterns of many of these genes indicate that they also act later in development but, because the mutants die at such early stages, conventional methods limit the study of their roles in adult diploid plants. Here, we describe the toolset that allows researchers to assess the post-embryonic functions of plant genes for which only gametophytic- and embryonic-lethal alleles have been isolated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Constitutively active Notch1 converts cranial neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme to perivascular cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R. Miller

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular/mural cells originate from either the mesoderm or the cranial neural crest. Regardless of their origin, Notch signalling is necessary for their formation. Furthermore, in both chicken and mouse, constitutive Notch1 activation (via expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain is sufficient in vivo to convert trunk mesoderm-derived somite cells to perivascular cells, at the expense of skeletal muscle. In experiments originally designed to investigate the effect of premature Notch1 activation on the development of neural crest-derived olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OECs, we used in ovo electroporation to insert a tetracycline-inducible NotchΔE construct (encoding a constitutively active mutant of mouse Notch1 into the genome of chicken cranial neural crest cell precursors, and activated NotchΔE expression by doxycycline injection at embryonic day 4. NotchΔE-targeted cells formed perivascular cells within the frontonasal mesenchyme, and expressed a perivascular marker on the olfactory nerve. Hence, constitutively activating Notch1 is sufficient in vivo to drive not only somite cells, but also neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme and perhaps developing OECs, to a perivascular cell fate. These results also highlight the plasticity of neural crest-derived mesenchyme and glia.

  8. Canine Mammary Cancer Stem Cells are Radio- and Chemo-Resistant and Exhibit an Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Phenotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Lisa Y., E-mail: lisa.pang@ed.ac.uk; Cervantes-Arias, Alejandro; Else, Rod W.; Argyle, David J. [Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, The University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, EH25 9RG (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-30

    Canine mammary carcinoma is the most common cancer among female dogs and is often fatal due to the development of distant metastases. In humans, solid tumors are made up of heterogeneous cell populations, which perform different roles in the tumor economy. A small subset of tumor cells can hold or acquire stem cell characteristics, enabling them to drive tumor growth, recurrence and metastasis. In veterinary medicine, the molecular drivers of canine mammary carcinoma are as yet undefined. Here we report that putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) can be isolated form a canine mammary carcinoma cell line, REM134. We show that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres, a characteristic of stem cells, and that they express embryonic stem cell markers associated with pluripotency. Moreover, canine CSCs are relatively resistant to the cytotoxic effects of common chemotherapeutic drugs and ionizing radiation, indicating that failure of clinical therapy to eradicate canine mammary cancer may be due to the survival of CSCs. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been associated with cancer invasion, metastasis, and the acquisition of stem cell characteristics. Our results show that canine CSCs predominantly express mesenchymal markers and are more invasive than parental cells, indicating that these cells have a mesenchymal phenotype. Furthermore, we show that canine mammary cancer cells can be induced to undergo EMT by TGFβ and that these cells have an increased ability to form tumorspheres. Our findings indicate that EMT induction can enrich for cells with CSC properties, and provide further insight into canine CSC biology.

  9. Signaling by bone morphogenetic proteins directs formation of an ectodermal signaling center that regulates craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppiano, Silvia; Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2007-12-01

    We previously described a signaling center, the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone (FEZ) that regulates growth and patterning of the frontonasal process (FNP). The FEZ is comprised of FNP ectoderm flanking a boundary between Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Fibroblast growth factor 8 (Fgf8) expression domains. Our objective was to examine BMP signaling during formation of the FEZ. We blocked BMP signaling throughout the FNP prior to FEZ formation by infecting chick embryos at stage 10 (HH10) with a replication-competent avian retrovirus encoding the BMP antagonist Noggin. We assessed gene expression patterns in the FNP 72 h after infection (approximately HH22) and observed that Shh expression was reduced or absent. In the mesenchyme, we observed that Bmp2 transcripts were absent while the Bmp4 expression domain was expanded proximally. In addition to the molecular changes, infected embryos also exhibited facial malformations at 72 and 96 h after infection suggesting that the FEZ did not form. Our data indicate that reduced cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, in the mesenchyme contributed to the phenotype that we observed. Additionally, adding exogenous SHH into the mesenchyme of RCAS-Noggin-infected embryos did not restore Bmp2 and Bmp4 to a normal pattern of expression. These data indicate that BMP signaling mediates interactions between tissues in the FNP that regulate FEZ formation; and that the correct pattern of Bmp2 and Bmp4, but not Bmp7, expression in the FNP mesenchyme requires signaling by the BMP pathway.

  10. FGF10: Type III Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition and Invasion in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhassani, Ali; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Azizi, Ebrahim; Amanpour, Saeid; Muhammadnejad, Samad; Haddadi, Mahnaz; Zekri, Ali; Shirkoohi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Fibroblastic growth factor-10 (FGF-10) has an important role in type I epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) during the embryonic period of life (gastrulation). Since EMT has a critical role during cancer cells invasion and metastasis (type III) this study sought to investigate the possible role of FGF-10 in type III EMT by monitoring breast cancer cell lines' behavior by FGF-10 regulation. Methods: MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines with different levels of FGF10 expression were treated with FGF-10 recombinant protein and FGF-10 siRNA, respectively. Results: The cell viability, migration, colony formation and wound healing have a direct relationship with FGF-10 expression, while FGF-10 expression decreased apoptosis. All mesenchymal factors (such as vimentin, N cadherin, snail, slug, TGF-β) increased due to FGF-10 expression with contrary expression of epithelial markers (such as E-cadherin). Moreover, GSK3β phosphorylation (inactivation) increased with FGF-10 expression. Conclusion: The important role of FGF-10 in type III EMT on cancer cells and initiation of metastasis via various kinds of signaling pathways has been suggested. PMID:25057305

  11. Characterization of mesenchymal progenitor cell populations from non-epithelial oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, S; Higa, K; Igarashi, T; Takaichi, S; Tonogi, M; Shinozaki, N; Shimazaki, J; Yamane, G-y

    2015-04-01

    The characteristics of cell populations extracted from oral mucosal non-epithelial tissues and their ability to differentiate were evaluated in vitro as a potential source of cells for mandibular and corneal regeneration. Oral mucosal non-epithelial cells (OMNECs) were extracted from tissue samples and were studied by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Cells differentiating into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, neurocytes, or keratocytes were characterized by RT-PCR and cell staining. OMNECs expressed CD44, CD90, CD105, CD166, and STRO-1 antigens, which are markers for mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, Oct3/4, c-Myc, Nanog, KLF4, and Rex, which are expressed by embryonic or pluripotent stem cells, were detected by RT-PCR. Expression of CD49d, CD56, and PDGFRα, proteins closely associated with the neural crest, was observed in OMNECs, as was expression of Twist1, Sox9, Snail1 and Snail2, which are early neural crest and neural markers. Specific differentiation markers were expressed in OMNECs after differentiation into osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, or keratocytes. Populations of OMNECs may contain both mesenchymal stem cells and neural crest origin cells and are a potential cell source for autologous regeneration of mandibular or corneal stroma. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ complexes cooperatively regulate mesenchymal stem cell function and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Weiss, Stephen J

    2017-03-04

    Snail and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that play key roles in directing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programs associated with normal development as well as disease progression. More recent work suggests that these EMT-associated transcription factors also modulate the function of both embryonic and adult stem cells. Interestingly, YAP and TAZ, the co-transcriptional effectors of the Hippo pathway, likewise play an important role in stem cell self-renewal and lineage commitment. While direct intersections between the Snail/Slug and Hippo pathways have not been described previously, we recently described an unexpected cooperative interaction between Snail/Slug and YAP/TAZ that controls the self-renewal and differentiation properties of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a cell population critical to bone development. Additional studies revealed that both Snail and Slug are able to form binary complexes with either YAP or TAZ that, together, control YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity and function throughout mouse development. Given the more recent observations that MSC-like cell populations are found in association throughout the vasculature where they participate in tissue regeneration, fibrosis and cancer, the Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ axis is well-positioned to regulate global stem cell function in health and disease.

  13. Mesomere-derived glutamate decarboxylase-expressing blastocoelar mesenchyme cells of sea urchin larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Katow

    2013-12-01

    The ontogenetic origin of blastocoelar glutamate decarboxylase (GAD-expressing cells (GADCs in larvae of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus was elucidated. Whole-mount in situ hybridisation (WISH detected transcription of the gene that encodes GAD in H. pulcherrimus (Hp-gad in unfertilised eggs and all blastomeres in morulae. However, at and after the swimming blastula stage, the transcript accumulation was particularly prominent in clumps of ectodermal cells throughout the embryonic surface. During the gastrula stage, the transcripts also accumulated in the endomesoderm and certain blastocoelar cells. Consistent with the increasing number of Hp-gad transcribing cells, immunoblot analysis indicated that the relative abundance of Hp-Gad increased considerably from the early gastrula stage until the prism stage. The expression pattern of GADCs determined by immunohistochemistry was identical to the pattern of Hp-gad transcript accumulation determined using WISH. In early gastrulae, GADCs formed blastocoelar cell aggregates around the blastopore with primary mesenchyme cells. The increase in the number of blastocoelar GADCs was inversely proportional to the number of ectodermal GADCs ranging from a few percent of total GADCs in early gastrulae to 80% in late prism larvae; this depended on ingression of ectodermal GADCs into the blastocoel. Some of the blastocoelar GADCs were fluorescein-positive in the larvae that developed from the 16-cell stage chimeric embryos; these comprised fluorescein-labeled mesomeres and unlabelled macromeres and micromeres. Our finding indicates that some of the blastocoelar GADCs are derived from the mesomeres and thus they are the new group of mesenchyme cells, the tertiary mesenchyme cells.

  14. Molecular dissection of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in the hair follicle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available De novo hair follicle formation in embryonic skin and new hair growth in adult skin are initiated when specialized mesenchymal dermal papilla (DP cells send cues to multipotent epithelial stem cells. Subsequently, DP cells are enveloped by epithelial stem cell progeny and other cell types to form a niche orchestrating hair growth. Understanding the general biological principles that govern the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions within the DP niche, however, has been hampered so far by the lack of systematic approaches to dissect the complete molecular make-up of this complex tissue. Here, we take a novel multicolor labeling approach, using cell type-specific transgenic expression of red and green fluorescent proteins in combination with immunolabeling of specific antigens, to isolate pure populations of DP and four of its surrounding cell types: dermal fibroblasts, melanocytes, and two different populations of epithelial progenitors (matrix and outer root sheath cells. By defining their transcriptional profiles, we develop molecular signatures characteristic for the DP and its niche. Validating the functional importance of these signatures is a group of genes linked to hair disorders that have been largely unexplored. Additionally, the DP signature reveals novel signaling and transcription regulators that distinguish them from other cell types. The mesenchymal-epithelial signatures include key factors previously implicated in ectodermal-neural fate determination, as well as a myriad of regulators of bone morphogenetic protein signaling. These findings establish a foundation for future functional analyses of the roles of these genes in hair development. Overall, our strategy illustrates how knowledge of the genes uniquely expressed by each cell type residing in a complex niche can reveal important new insights into the biology of the tissue and its associated disease states.

  15. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Pancreatic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wirth

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth-leading cause of cancer death and is characterized by early invasion and metastasis. The developmental program of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is of potential importance for this rapid tumor progression. During EMT, tumor cells lose their epithelial characteristics and gain properties of mesenchymal cells, such as enhanced motility and invasive features. This review will discuss recent findings pertinent to EMT in pancreatic carcinoma. Evidence for and molecular characteristics of EMT in pancreatic carcinoma will be outlined, as well as the connection of EMT to related topics, e.g., cancer stem cells and drug resistance.

  16. Using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System to Evaluate Psychosocial Functioning among Children with Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Danielle N; Waljee, Jennifer; Ranganathan, Kavitha; Buchman, Steven; Warschausky, Seth

    2015-06-01

    Children with craniofacial anomalies are at risk for social exclusion, bullying, and psychological symptoms, all of which are associated with poor developmental and health outcomes. The National Institutes of Health-developed Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments may be useful tools for monitoring psychosocial functioning in clinical settings and for integrating patient and parent perspectives. The current study included 74 children (50 percent male) with craniofacial anomalies recruited through a multidisciplinary clinic. The authors obtained child self-report and parent-proxy ratings of depression, anxiety, and peer relationship quality using National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments. The authors compared sample means to Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments norms and analyzed the reliability of parents' and children's reporting of psychosocial variables. All reliability statistics were satisfactory (α values ranging from 0.74 to 0.96) and sample standard deviations were similar to those obtained in a general population, suggesting that Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments are reliable among children with craniofacial anomalies. In general, children and parents did not report unusual levels of psychological distress; however, they did report poorer peer relationship quality relative to normed data, a trend that was particularly pronounced among boys. National Institutes of Health Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System instruments are efficient and accurate tools for monitoring psychosocial adjustment among children with craniofacial anomalies. It may be especially important to monitor social functioning, particularly among boys.

  17. Does postoperative 'M' technique (R) massage with or without mandarin oil reduce infants' distress after major craniofacial surgery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marjan; Lucas, Cees; Bredero, Hansje; van Adrichem, Leon; Tibboel, Dick; van Dijk, Monique

    2012-01-01

    de jong m., lucas c., bredero h., van adrichem l., tibboel d. & van dijk m. (2011) Does postoperative M technique (R) massage with or without mandarin oil reduce infants distress after major craniofacial surgery? Journal of Advanced Nursing68(6), 17481757. Abstract Aim. This article is a report of a

  18. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    -coding region of BMP4 (rs17563, P = 9.080 × 10(-17)). Three of these loci, containing the genes HMGA2, AJUBA and ADK, also showed evidence of association with craniofacial distances, particularly those indexing facial width. Our results suggest that the genome-wide association approach is a powerful strategy...

  19. Application of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing-Fabricated Artificial Bone in the Reconstruction of Craniofacial Bone Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Weiqiang; Yao, Yuanyuan; Huang, Zixian; Chen, Yuhong; Ji, Chenyang; Zhang, Jinming

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical application of individual craniofacial bone fabrications using computer-assisted design (CAD)-computer-assisted manufacturing technology for the reconstruction of craniofacial bone defects. A total of 8 patients diagnosed with craniofacial bone defects were enrolled in this study between May 2007 and August 2010. After computed tomography scans were obtained, the patients were fitted with artificial bone that was created using CAD software, rapid prototyping technology, and epoxy-methyl acrylate resin and hydroxyapatite materials. The fabrication was fixed to the defect area with titanium screws, and soft tissue defects were repaired if necessary. The fabrications were precisely fixed to the defect areas, and all wounds healed well without any serious complications except for 1 case with intraoral incision dehiscence, which required further treatment. Postoperative curative effects were retrospectively observed after 6 to 48 months, acceptable anatomic and cosmetic outcomes were obtained, and no rejections or other complications occurred. The use of CAD-computer-assisted manufacturing technology-assisted epoxy-methyl acrylate resin and hydroxyapatite composite artificial bone to treat patients with craniofacial bone defects could enable the precise reconstruction of these defects and obtain good anatomic and cosmetic outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Sella turcica morphology and the pituitary gland--a new contribution to craniofacial diagnostics based on histology and neuroradiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Inger

    2012-01-01

    , varying from mild to severe phenotype. The malformation in the sella turcica/pituitary gland can be associated with a malformation within a developmental field that forms the craniofacial region (frontonasal, maxillary, palatal, and mandibular fields), sometimes also involving the brain stem, thymus...

  1. Integration between the face and the mandible of Pongo and the evolution of the craniofacial morphology of orangutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaux, Dimitri; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Coudyzer, Walter; Guy, Franck

    2015-11-01

    Extant Pongo diverges from other hominids by a series of craniofacial morphological features, such as a concave face, a reduced supraorbital torus, or an upwardly orientated palate. These traits are not independent because the skull is a complex integrated structure. The aim of this study is to describe the relationship between the face and mandible of Pongo, in order to examine the link between mandibular structures and the set-up of the unique facial features of orangutans. Using 3D geometric morphometrics, the morphological integration between face and mandible of Pongo is compared to that of the three extant hominids: Homo, Pan, and Gorilla. Pooled within-species partial least squares analyses are computed in order to quantify the patterns and levels of integration. The covariation analyses show unique patterns of integration and levels of correlation in Pongo when compared to other hominids. This study shows that the craniofacial features distinguishing Pongo from African great apes are related to differences in the patterns of integration and levels of correlation between facial and mandibular shape. Changes in important functions may play a part in these modifications of craniofacial integration. This study underlines the importance of the mandible and of the mandibular functions in the development of the unique craniofacial features of Pongo. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Craniofacial morphology of Dutch patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate and noncleft controls at the age of 15 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dungen, G.M.; Ongkosuwito, E.M.; Aartman, I.H.A.; Prahl-Andersen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of craniofacial morphology in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients to that of a noncleft control group at the age of 15 years. Design: A cross-sectional study of cephalometric data. Subjects and Methods: Cephalometric records of 41 consecutive patients (32 boys and 9 girls)

  3. Non-trisomic homeobox gene expression during craniofacial development in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingsley, Cherie N; Allen, Jared R; Baumann, Douglas D; Deitz, Samantha L; Blazek, Joshua D; Newbauer, Abby; Darrah, Andrew; Long, Brad C; Young, Brandon; Clement, Mark; Doerge, R W; Roper, Randall J

    2013-08-01

    Trisomy 21 in humans causes cognitive impairment, craniofacial dysmorphology, and heart defects collectively referred to as Down syndrome. Yet, the pathophysiology of these phenotypes is not well understood. Craniofacial alterations may lead to complications in breathing, eating, and communication. Ts65Dn mice exhibit craniofacial alterations that model Down syndrome including a small mandible. We show that Ts65Dn embryos at 13.5 days gestation (E13.5) have a smaller mandibular precursor but a normal sized tongue as compared to euploid embryos, suggesting a relative instead of actual macroglossia originates during development. Neurological tissues were also altered in E13.5 trisomic embryos. Our array analysis found 155 differentially expressed non-trisomic genes in the trisomic E13.5 mandible, including 20 genes containing a homeobox DNA binding domain. Additionally, Sox9, important in skeletal formation and cell proliferation, was upregulated in Ts65Dn mandible precursors. Our results suggest trisomy causes altered expression of non-trisomic genes in development leading to structural changes associated with DS. Identification of genetic pathways disrupted by trisomy is an important step in proposing rational therapies at relevant time points to ameliorate craniofacial abnormalities in DS and other congenital disorders. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Craniofacial morphology, head posture, and nasal respiratory resistance in obstructive sleep apnoea : An inter-ethnic comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, M.L.; Sandham, John; Ang, PK; Wong, DC; Tan, WC; Huggare, J

    The aim of this study was to measure craniofacial morphology and nasal respiratory resistance (NRR) in Malay, Indian and Chinese subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The sample consisted of 34 male subjects, 27-52 years of age (Malay n = 11, which included five mild and six moderate-severe

  5. Is there an effect of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters in patients with craniofacial anomalies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Caroline; Plomp, Raul G.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Ince, Can; Kulik, Wim; Mathijssen, Irene M. J.; Joosten, Koen F. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) exhibits oxidative stress and inflammation in patients who have a congenital, craniofacial anomaly.This prospective, cross-sectional cohort study included ambulant sleep study data to asses OSAS in patients

  6. WT1 expression in breast cancer disrupts the epithelial/mesenchymal balance of tumour cells and correlates with the metabolic response to docetaxel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artibani, Mara; Sims, Andrew H.; Slight, Joan; Aitken, Stuart; Thornburn, Anna; Muir, Morwenna; Brunton, Valerie G.; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Morrison, Linda R.; Katz, Elad; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Hohenstein, Peter

    2017-01-01

    WT1 is a transcription factor which regulates the epithelial-mesenchymal balance during embryonic development and, if mutated, can lead to the formation of Wilms’ tumour, the most common paediatric kidney cancer. Its expression has also been reported in several adult tumour types, including breast cancer, and usually correlates with poor outcome. However, published data is inconsistent and the role of WT1 in this malignancy remains unclear. Here we provide a complete study of WT1 expression across different breast cancer subtypes as well as isoform specific expression analysis. Using in vitro cell lines, clinical samples and publicly available gene expression datasets, we demonstrate that WT1 plays a role in regulating the epithelial-mesenchymal balance of breast cancer cells and that WT1-expressing tumours are mainly associated with a mesenchymal phenotype. WT1 gene expression also correlates with CYP3A4 levels and is associated with poorer response to taxane treatment. Our work is the first to demonstrate that the known association between WT1 expression in breast cancer and poor prognosis is potentially due to cancer-related epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and poor chemotherapy response. PMID:28345629

  7. Osteoinduction in umbilical cord- and palate periosteum-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Montserrat; Reed, Courtney R; Madan, Gitanjali; van Aalst, John A

    2010-05-01

    Adult abdominoplasty (AA) fat is an ideal source for mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) because it is discarded after surgery, abundant, and easy to harvest. Children however, do not have the same abundant quantities of fat as adults, nor are they likely to undergo a procedure during which fat is routinely discarded. Hence, finding an alternate source for MSCs in children is a reasonable strategy. Two such sources are the palate periosteum (PP) and the umbilical cord (UC). Advantages for PP as a source of MSCs are accessibility during palate repair, ease of harvest, and minimal risk to the patient. The UC, like AA, is a discarded tissue, with a theoretically unlimited supply, which can be harvested in children with craniofacial bone abnormalities in advance of reconstructive procedures. Our objective in this study is to characterize MSCs from 3 sources (AA, PP, and UC) by surface marker prevalence, and to assess osteoinductive capability. Institutional review board approval was obtained for harvest of AA, PP, and UC. The presence of MSCs was determined using immunostaining and flow cytometry for cell surface markers CD73, CD90, CD105, and SSEA-4. Osteogenesis was induced using osteogenic medium. Osteoinduction was evaluated using Alizarin red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction for bone morphogenetic protein-2, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin at 7, 14, and 21 days. MSCs from AA, PP, and UC all stained positive for CD73, CD90, CD105, and SSEA-4. Flow cytometry demonstrated significant differences in expression of CD90 and SSEA-4 but similar values for CD73 and CD105. Following osteoinduction, MSCs from all sources stained positive for calcium deposition. In UC MSCs, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated greater elevation in bone morphogenetic protein-2 and alkaline phosphatase mRNA beginning at day 7 and extending to day 21. Osteocalcin mRNA levels were comparable for all 3 sources of MSCs. For children with craniofacial bone

  8. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnalee Sarmah

    2013-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell, prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a, which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression.

  9. Type I collagen promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition through ILK-dependent activation of NF-κB and LEF-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Damian; Nawshad, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Collagen I has been shown to promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a critical process of embryonic development and disease progression. However, little is known about the signaling mechanisms by which collagen I induces this cellular transformation. Here we show that collagen I causes ILK-dependent phosphorylation of IκB and subsequent nuclear translocation of active NF-κB, which in turn promotes increased expression of the Snail and LEF-1 transcription factors. ILK also causes inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β, a kinase that prevents functional activation of both Snail and LEF-1. These transcription factors alter expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers to initiate EMT and stimulate cell migration. These data provide a foundation for understanding the mechanisms by which collagen I stimulates EMT and identify potential therapeutic targets for suppressing this transition in pathological conditions. PMID:20018240

  10. Embryonic defence mechanisms against glucose-dependent oxidative stress require enhanced expression of Alx3 to prevent malformations during diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Patricia; Mirasierra, Mercedes; Moratalla, Rosario; Vallejo, Mario

    2017-03-24

    Oxidative stress constitutes a major cause for increased risk of congenital malformations associated to severe hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. Mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor ALX3 cause congenital craniofacial and neural tube defects. Since oxidative stress and lack of ALX3 favour excessive embryonic apoptosis, we investigated whether ALX3-deficiency further increases the risk of embryonic damage during gestational hyperglycaemia in mice. We found that congenital malformations associated to ALX3-deficiency are enhanced in diabetic pregnancies. Increased expression of genes encoding oxidative stress-scavenging enzymes in embryos from diabetic mothers was blunted in the absence of ALX3, leading to increased oxidative stress. Levels of ALX3 increased in response to glucose, but ALX3 did not activate oxidative stress defence genes directly. Instead, ALX3 stimulated the transcription of Foxo1, a master regulator of oxidative stress-scavenging genes, by binding to a newly identified binding site located in the Foxo1 promoter. Our data identify ALX3 as an important component of the defence mechanisms against the occurrence of developmental malformations during diabetic gestations, stimulating the expression of oxidative stress-scavenging genes in a glucose-dependent manner via Foxo1 activation. Thus, ALX3 deficiency provides a novel molecular mechanism for developmental defects arising from maternal hyperglycaemia.

  11. Zebrafish con/disp1 reveals multiple spatiotemporal requirements for Hedgehog-signaling in craniofacial development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwend Tyler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate head skeleton is derived largely from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC. Genetic studies in zebrafish and mice have established that the Hedgehog (Hh-signaling pathway plays a critical role in craniofacial development, partly due to the pathway's role in CNCC development. Disruption of the Hh-signaling pathway in humans can lead to the spectral disorder of Holoprosencephaly (HPE, which is often characterized by a variety of craniofacial defects including midline facial clefting and cyclopia 12. Previous work has uncovered a role for Hh-signaling in zebrafish dorsal neurocranium patterning and chondrogenesis, however Hh-signaling mutants have not been described with respect to the ventral pharyngeal arch (PA skeleton. Lipid-modified Hh-ligands require the transmembrane-spanning receptor Dispatched 1 (Disp1 for proper secretion from Hh-synthesizing cells to the extracellular field where they act on target cells. Here we study chameleon mutants, lacking a functional disp1(con/disp1. Results con/disp1 mutants display reduced and dysmorphic mandibular and hyoid arch cartilages and lack all ceratobranchial cartilage elements. CNCC specification and migration into the PA primorida occurs normally in con/disp1 mutants, however disp1 is necessary for post-migratory CNCC patterning and differentiation. We show that disp1 is required for post-migratory CNCC to become properly patterned within the first arch, while the gene is dispensable for CNCC condensation and patterning in more posterior arches. Upon residing in well-formed pharyngeal epithelium, neural crest condensations in the posterior PA fail to maintain expression of two transcription factors essential for chondrogenesis, sox9a and dlx2a, yet continue to robustly express other neural crest markers. Histology reveals that posterior arch residing-CNCC differentiate into fibrous-connective tissue, rather than becoming chondrocytes. Treatments with Cyclopamine, to

  12. Wdr68 Mediates Dorsal and Ventral Patterning Events for Craniofacial Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estibaliz Alvarado

    Full Text Available Birth defects are among the leading causes of infant mortality and contribute substantially to illness and long-term disability. Defects in Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP signaling are associated with cleft lip/palate. Many craniofacial syndromes are caused by defects in signaling pathways that pattern the cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs along the dorsal-ventral axis. For example, auriculocondylar syndrome is caused by impaired Endothelin-1 (Edn1 signaling, and Alagille syndrome is caused by defects in Jagged-Notch signaling. The BMP, Edn1, and Jag1b pathways intersect because BMP signaling is required for ventral edn1 expression that, in turn, restricts jag1b to dorsal CNCC territory. In zebrafish, the scaffolding protein Wdr68 is required for edn1 expression and subsequent formation of the ventral Meckel's cartilage as well as the dorsal Palatoquadrate. Here we report that wdr68 activity is required between the 17-somites and prim-5 stages, that edn1 functions downstream of wdr68, and that wdr68 activity restricts jag1b, hey1, and grem2 expression from ventral CNCC territory. Expression of dlx1a and dlx2a was also severely reduced in anterior dorsal and ventral 1st arch CNCC territory in wdr68 mutants. We also found that the BMP agonist isoliquiritigenin (ISL can partially rescue lower jaw formation and edn1 expression in wdr68 mutants. However, we found no significant defects in BMP reporter induction or pSmad1/5 accumulation in wdr68 mutant cells or zebrafish. The Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGF-β signaling pathway is also known to be important for craniofacial development and can interfere with BMP signaling. Here we further report that TGF-β interference with BMP signaling was greater in wdr68 mutant cells relative to control cells. To determine whether interference might also act in vivo, we treated wdr68 mutant zebrafish embryos with the TGF-β signaling inhibitor SB431542 and found partial rescue of edn1 expression and

  13. Facial Phenotyping by Quantitative Photography Reflects Craniofacial Morphology Measured on Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Icelandic Sleep Apnea Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Kate; Schwab, Richard J.; Maislin, Greg; Lee, Richard W.W.; Benedikstdsottir, Bryndis; Pack, Allan I.; Gislason, Thorarinn; Juliusson, Sigurdur; Cistulli, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: (1) To determine whether facial phenotype, measured by quantitative photography, relates to underlying craniofacial obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) risk factors, measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); (2) To assess whether these associations are independent of body size and obesity. Design: Cross-sectional cohort. Setting: Landspitali, The National University Hospital, Iceland. Participants: One hundred forty patients (87.1% male) from the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who had both calibrated frontal and profile craniofacial photographs and upper airway MRI. Mean ± standard deviation age 56.1 ± 10.4 y, body mass index 33.5 ± 5.05 kg/m2, with on-average severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index 45.4 ± 19.7 h-1). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Relationships between surface facial dimensions (photos) and facial bony dimensions and upper airway soft-tissue volumes (MRI) was assessed using canonical correlation analysis. Photo and MRI craniofacial datasets related in four significant canonical correlations, primarily driven by measurements of (1) maxillary-mandibular relationship (r = 0.8, P photography and MRI. This study confirms that facial photographic phenotype reflects underlying aspects of craniofacial skeletal abnormalities associated with OSA. Therefore, facial photographic phenotyping may be a useful tool to assess intermediate phenotypes for OSA, particularly in large-scale studies. Citation: Sutherland K, Schwab RJ, Maislin G, Lee RW, Benedikstdsottir B, Pack AI, Gislason T, Juliusson S, Cistulli PA. Facial phenotyping by quantitative photography reflects craniofacial morphology measured on magnetic resonance imaging in icelandic sleep apnea patients. SLEEP 2014;37(5):959-968. PMID:24790275

  14. Dynamic Proteomic Profiling of Extra-Embryonic Endoderm Differentiation in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Claire M; Schröter, Christian; Gatto, Laurent; Dikicioglu, Duygu; Fidaner, Isik Baris; Christoforou, Andy; Deery, Michael J; Cho, Lily T Y; Niakan, Kathy K; Martinez-Arias, Alfonso; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2015-09-01

    During mammalian preimplantation development, the cells of the blastocyst's inner cell mass differentiate into the epiblast and primitive endoderm lineages, which give rise to the fetus and extra-embryonic tissues, respectively. Extra-embryonic endoderm (XEN) differentiation can be modeled in vitro by induced expression of GATA transcription factors in mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, we use this GATA-inducible system to quantitatively monitor the dynamics of global proteomic changes during the early stages of this differentiation event and also investigate the fully differentiated phenotype, as represented by embryo-derived XEN cells. Using mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomic profiling with multivariate data analysis tools, we reproducibly quantified 2,336 proteins across three biological replicates and have identified clusters of proteins characterized by distinct, dynamic temporal abundance profiles. We first used this approach to highlight novel marker candidates of the pluripotent state and XEN differentiation. Through functional annotation enrichment analysis, we have shown that the downregulation of chromatin-modifying enzymes, the reorganization of membrane trafficking machinery, and the breakdown of cell-cell adhesion are successive steps of the extra-embryonic differentiation process. Thus, applying a range of sophisticated clustering approaches to a time-resolved proteomic dataset has allowed the elucidation of complex biological processes which characterize stem cell differentiation and could establish a general paradigm for the investigation of these processes. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Development and morphogenesis of human wrist joint during embryonic and early fetal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Ortiz, Raúl; Caba, Octavio; Alvarez, Pablo; Prados, José C; Lomas-Vega, Rafael; Aránega, Antonia; Sánchez-Montesinos, Indalecio; Mérida-Velasco, Juan A

    2012-06-01

    The development of the human wrist joint has been studied widely, with the main focus on carpal chondrogenesis, ligaments and triangular fibrocartilage. However, there are some discrepancies concerning the origin and morphogenetic time-table of these structures, including nerves, muscles and vascular elements. For this study we used serial sections of 57 human embryonic (n = 30) and fetal (n = 27) specimens from O'Rahilly stages 17-23 and 9-14 weeks, respectively. The following phases in carpal morphogenesis have been established: undifferentiated mesenchyme (stage 17), condensated mesenchyme (stages 18 and 19), pre-chondrogenic (stages 19 and 20) and chondrogenic (stages 21 and over). Carpal chondrification and osteogenic processes are similar, starting with capitate and hamate (stage 19) and ending with pisiform (stage 22). In week 14, a vascular bud penetrates into the lunate cartilaginous mold, early sign of the osteogenic process that will be completed after birth. In stage 18, median, ulnar and radial nerves and thenar eminence appear in the hand plate. In stage 21, there are indications of the interosseous muscles, and in stage 22 flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus and lumbrical muscles, transverse carpal ligament and collateral ligaments emerge. In stage 23, the articular disc, radiocarpal and ulnocarpal ligaments and deep palmar arterial arch become visible. Radiate carpal and interosseous ligaments appear in week 9, and in week 10, dorsal radiocarpal ligament and articular capsule are evident. Finally, synovial membrane is observed in week 13. We have performed a complete analysis of the morphogenesis of the structures of the human wrist joint. Our results present new data on nervous and arterial elements and provide the basis for further investigations on anatomical pathology, comparative morphology and evolutionary anthropology. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2012 Anatomical Society.

  16. In Vitro Osteogenic Potential of Green Fluorescent Protein Labelled Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Osteoprogenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intekhab Islam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular therapy using stem cells in bone regeneration has gained increasing interest. Various studies suggest the clinical utility of osteoprogenitors-like mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration. However, limited availability of mesenchymal stem cells and conflicting evidence on their therapeutic efficacy limit their clinical application. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are potentially an unlimited source of healthy and functional osteoprogenitors (OPs that could be utilized for bone regenerative applications. However, limited ability to track hESC-derived progenies in vivo greatly hinders translational studies. Hence, in this study, we aimed to establish hESC-derived OPs (hESC-OPs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP and to investigate their osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro. We fluorescently labelled H9-hESCs using a plasmid vector encoding GFP. The GFP-expressing hESCs were differentiated into hESC-OPs. The hESC-OPsGFP+ stably expressed high levels of GFP, CD73, CD90, and CD105. They possessed osteogenic differentiation potential in vitro as demonstrated by increased expression of COL1A1, RUNX2, OSTERIX, and OPG transcripts and mineralized nodules positive for Alizarin Red and immunocytochemical expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and collagen-I. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs can maintain their GFP expression for the long term and their potential for osteogenic differentiation in vitro. In future, these fluorescently labelled hESC-OPs could be used for noninvasive assessment of bone regeneration, safety, and therapeutic efficacy.

  17. Andrographolide suppresses epithelial mesenchymal transition by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) of lens epithelial cells (LECs) may contribute to the development of posterior capsular opacification (PCO), which leads to visual impairment. Andrographolide has been shown to have therapeutic potential against various cancers. However, its effect on human LECs is still unknown.

  18. Inactivated Mesenchymal Stem Cells Maintain Immunomodulatory Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luk, Franka; de Witte, Samantha F. H.; Korevaar, Sander S.; Roemeling, Marieke; Franquesa, Marcella; Strini, Tanja; van den Engel, Sandra; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Roy, Debashish; Dor, Frank J. M. F.; Horwitz, Edwin M.; de Bruin, Ron W. F.; Betjes, Michiel G. H.; Baan, Carla C.; Hoogduijn, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are studied as a cell therapeutic agent for treatment of various immune diseases. However, therapy with living culture-expanded cells comes with safety concerns. Furthermore, development of effective MSC immunotherapy is hampered by lack of knowledge of the mechanisms of

  19. Mesenchymal stem cell-educated macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Eggenhofer (Elke); M.J. Hoogduijn (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSC) mediate their immunosuppressive effects via a variety of mechanisms. One of these mechanisms involves the induction of macrophages with immunomodulatory capacities. This effect of MSC may be exploited when MSC are used as a cell therapeutic product.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated clinical outcomes following intraoperative use of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in various oral reconstructive procedures. PubMed was searched without language restrictions from 2000 to 2011 using the search words stem cell, oral surgery, tissue engineering, sinus lift...