WorldWideScience

Sample records for elucidation dna interaction

  1. Transcription initiation complex structures elucidate DNA opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaschka, C; Hantsche, M; Dienemann, C; Burzinski, C; Plitzko, J; Cramer, P

    2016-05-19

    Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes begins with assembly of the RNA polymerase (Pol) II initiation complex and promoter DNA opening. Here we report cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of yeast initiation complexes containing closed and open DNA at resolutions of 8.8 Å and 3.6 Å, respectively. DNA is positioned and retained over the Pol II cleft by a network of interactions between the TATA-box-binding protein TBP and transcription factors TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIIE, and TFIIF. DNA opening occurs around the tip of the Pol II clamp and the TFIIE 'extended winged helix' domain, and can occur in the absence of TFIIH. Loading of the DNA template strand into the active centre may be facilitated by movements of obstructing protein elements triggered by allosteric binding of the TFIIE 'E-ribbon' domain. The results suggest a unified model for transcription initiation with a key event, the trapping of open promoter DNA by extended protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts.

  2. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-01-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  3. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Peng, Chengbin; Li, Yue; Zhang, Zhaolei

    2013-09-01

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k=8∼10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/kmerHMM.

  4. DNA motif elucidation using belief propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2013-06-29

    Protein-binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughout platform that can measure the DNA-binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. A typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all the possible DNA k-mers (k = 8 ?10); such comprehensive binding affinity data usually need to be reduced and represented as motif models before they can be further analyzed and applied. Since proteins can often bind to DNA in multiple modes, one of the major challenges is to decompose the comprehensive affinity data into multimodal motif representations. Here, we describe a new algorithm that uses Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) and can derive precise and multimodal motifs using belief propagations. We describe an HMM-based approach using belief propagations (kmerHMM), which accepts and preprocesses PBM probe raw data into median-binding intensities of individual k-mers. The k-mers are ranked and aligned for training an HMM as the underlying motif representation. Multiple motifs are then extracted from the HMM using belief propagations. Comparisons of kmerHMM with other leading methods on several data sets demonstrated its effectiveness and uniqueness. Especially, it achieved the best performance on more than half of the data sets. In addition, the multiple binding modes derived by kmerHMM are biologically meaningful and will be useful in interpreting other genome-wide data such as those generated from ChIP-seq. The executables and source codes are available at the authors\\' websites: e.g. http://www.cs.toronto.edu/?wkc/kmerHMM. 2013 The Author(s).

  5. Elucidation of polymer induced DNA condensation. Visualisation at the single molecular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Alison Laura

    2002-01-01

    DNA condensation is a phenomenon that has stimulated interest from biologists, physicists, and polymer chemists for decades. At the cellular level, this process is key to the packing of DNA within the nuclear envelope, and the exposure of the appropriate nucleic acid sequences in order for transcription to occur, and proteins to be produced. The advent of gene therapy has led to an invigoration of this subject area. In order to successfully deliver to, and transfect target cells, many delivery vectors condense the therapeutic DNA into small compact particles. The nature of these particles have a considerable influence on the ultimate expression of the administered nucleic acid material. In addition, at its most fundamental, DNA itself is a classical polyelectrolyte polymer, the behaviour of which has applicability to other charged polymeric systems. There are two core interwound themes to this investigation; the visualisation of DNA condensate morphology at ultra-resolution, and the elucidation of the mechanisms of formation of these structures. The technique of atomic force microscopy is central to these investigations. Methodologies have been devised allowing the visualisation of the tertiary structure and conformational behaviour of individual DNA condensates in near in situ conditions. Condensation of the nucleic acid material has been induced by two classes of cation; small molecular cations, like those found within eukaryotic cells, and a range of cationic polymers. The cationic polymers investigated all have considerable potential as gene delivery vectors. The resultant DNA condensates have been assessed and contrasted in terms of their tertiary morphology, lateral dimensions, and structural volume. Assessments have also been made regarding the influence of the molecular architecture of the cationic moiety and the nature of the input nucleic acid material on the resultant DNA condensates. With regard to the elucidation of the mechanisms of DNA condensate

  6. Elucidating polyploidization of bermudagrasses as assessed by organelle and nuclear DNA markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsen, Osman; Ceylan, Ahmet

    2011-12-01

    Clarification of relationships among ploidy series of Cynodon accessions could be beneficial to bermudagrass breeding programs, and would enhance our understanding of the evolutionary biology of this warm season grass species. This study was initiated to elucidate polyploidization among Cynodon accessions with different ploidy series collected from Turkey based on chloroplast and nuclear DNA. Forty Cynodon accessions including 7 diploids, 3 triploids, 10 tetraploids, 11 pentaploids, and 9 hexaploids were analyzed using chloroplast DNA restriction fragment-length polymorphism (cpDNA RFLP), chloroplast DNA simple sequence repeat (cpDNA SSR), and nuclear DNA markers based on neighbor-joining (NJ) and principle component analyses (PCA). All three-marker systems with two statistical algorithms clustered the diploids apart from the other ploidy levels. Assuming autopolyploidy, spontaneous polyploidization followed by rapid diversification among the higher ploidy levels than the diploids is likely in Cynodon's evolution. Few tetraploid and hexaploid accessions were clustered with or closely to the group of diploids, supporting the hypothesis above. Eleven haplotypes as estimated by cpDNA RFLP and SSR markers were detected. This study indicated that the diploids had different organelle genome from the rest of the ploidy series and provided valuable insight into relationships among ploidy series of Cynodon accessions based on cp and nuclear DNAs.

  7. Self-Supporting Nanodiamond Gels: Elucidating Colloidal Interactions Through Rheology_

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Prajesh; Tripathi, Anurodh; Vogel, Nancy A.; Rojas, Orlando J.; Raghavan, Sriunivasa R.; Khan, Saad A.

    This work investigates the colloidal interactions and rheological behavior of nanodiamond (ND) dispersions. While ND represents a promising class of nanofiller due to its high surface area, superior mechanical strength, tailorable surface functionality and biocompatibility, much remains unknown about the behavior of ND dispersions. We hypothesize that controlling interactions in ND dispersions will lead to highly functional systems with tunable modulus and shear response. Steady and dynamic rheology techniques are thus employed to systematically investigate nanodiamonds dispersed in model polar and non-polar media. We find that low concentrations of ND form gels almost instantaneously in a non-polar media. In contrast, ND's in polar media show a time-dependent behavior with the modulus increasing with time. We attribute the difference in behavior to variations in inter-particle interactions as well as the interaction of the ND with the media. Large steady and oscillatory strains are applied to ND colloidal gels to investigate the role of shear in gel microstructure breakdown and recovery. For colloidal gels in non-polar medium, the incomplete recovery of elastic modulus at high strain amplitudes indicates dominance of particle-particle interactions; however, in polar media the complete recovery of elastic modulus even at high strain amplitudes indicates dominance of particle-solvent interactions. These results taken together provide a platform to develop self-supporting gels with tunable properties in terms of ND concentration, and solvent type.

  8. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. mtDNA depletion myopathy: elucidation of the tissue specificity in the mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Ann; Shaag, Avraham; Elpeleg, Orly

    2003-05-01

    Decreased mitochondrial thymidine kinase (TK2) activity is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and respiratory chain dysfunction and is manifested by isolated, fatal skeletal myopathy. Other tissues such as liver, brain, heart, and skin remain unaffected throughout the patients' life. In order to elucidate the mechanism of tissue specificity in the disease we have investigated the expression of the mitochondrial deoxynucleotide carrier, the mtDNA content and the activity of TK2 in mitochondria of various tissues. Our results suggest that low basal TK2 activity combined with a high requirement for mitochondrial encoded proteins in muscle predispose this tissue to the devastating effect of TK2 deficiency.

  10. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage Phi29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-06-20

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine(3+) causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation.

  11. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  12. Active Interaction Mapping as a tool to elucidate hierarchical functions of biological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Jean-Claude; Kramer, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Subramani, Suresh

    2017-07-03

    Increasingly, various 'omics data are contributing significantly to our understanding of novel biological processes, but it has not been possible to iteratively elucidate hierarchical functions in complex phenomena. We describe a general systems biology approach called Active Interaction Mapping (AI-MAP), which elucidates the hierarchy of functions for any biological process. Existing and new 'omics data sets can be iteratively added to create and improve hierarchical models which enhance our understanding of particular biological processes. The best datatypes to further improve an AI-MAP model are predicted computationally. We applied this approach to our understanding of general and selective autophagy, which are conserved in most eukaryotes, setting the stage for the broader application to other cellular processes of interest. In the particular application to autophagy-related processes, we uncovered and validated new autophagy and autophagy-related processes, expanded known autophagy processes with new components, integrated known non-autophagic processes with autophagy and predict other unexplored connections.

  13. Research Techniques Made Simple: Emerging Methods to Elucidate Protein Interactions through Spatial Proximity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yonglu; Khavari, Paul A

    2017-12-01

    Interactions between proteins are essential for fundamental cellular processes, and the diversity of such interactions enables the vast variety of functions essential for life. A persistent goal in biological research is to develop assays that can faithfully capture different types of protein interactions to allow their study. A major step forward in this direction came with a family of methods that delineates spatial proximity of proteins as an indirect measure of protein-protein interaction. A variety of enzyme- and DNA ligation-based methods measure protein co-localization in space, capturing novel interactions that were previously too transient or low affinity to be identified. Here we review some of the methods that have been successfully used to measure spatially proximal protein-protein interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Studies on sildenafil citrate (Viagra) interaction with DNA using electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sakandar; Nawaz, Haq; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) with DNA was studied by using an electrochemical DNA biosensor. The binding mechanism of sildenafil citrate was elucidated by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry at DNA-modified glassy carbon electrode. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak area or peak current was used as an indicator for the interaction in 0.2M acetate buffer (pH 5). The binding constant (K) values obtained were 2.01+/-0.05 x 10(5) and 1.97+/-0.01 x 10(5)M(-1) with constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. A linear dependence of the guanine peak area or peak current was observed within the range of 1-40 microM sildenafil citrate with slope=-2.74 x 10(-4)s/microM, r=0.989 and slope=-2.78 x 10(-3)microA/microM, r=0.995 by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. Additionally, binding constant values for sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction were determined for the pH range of 4-8 and in biological fluids (serum and urine) at pH 5. The influence of sodium and calcium ions was also studied to elucidate the mechanism of sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction under different solution conditions. The present study may prove to be helpful in extending our understanding of the anticancer activity of sildenafil citrate from cellular to DNA level.

  15. Physical manipulation of single-molecule DNA using microbead and its application to analysis of DNA-protein interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2009-01-01

    We carried out an individual DNA manipulation using an optical trapping for a microbead. This manipulation system is based on a fluorescent microscopy equipped with an IR laser. Both ends of linear DNA molecule were labeled with a biotin and a thiol group, respectively. Then the biotinylated end was attached to a microbead, and the other was immobilized on a thiol-linkable glass surface. We controlled the form of an individual DNA molecule by moving the focal point of IR laser, which trapped the microbead. In addition, we applied single-molecule approach to analyze DNA hydrolysis. We also used microchannel for single-molecule observation of DNA hydrolysis. The shortening of DNA in length caused by enzymatic hydrolysis was observed in real-time. The single-molecule DNA manipulation should contribute to elucidate detailed mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions

  16. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interacti...

  17. Elucidation of the antibacterial mechanism of the Curvularia haloperoxidase system by DNA microarray profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, E.H.; Schembri, Mark; Klemm, Per

    2004-01-01

    was the wild type. Our results demonstrate that DNA microarray technology cannot be used as the only technique to investigate the mechanisms of action of new antimicrobial compounds. However, by combining DNA microarray analysis with the subsequent creation of knockout mutants, we were able to pinpoint one...

  18. Elucidation of the mechanism of X-ray induced DNA duplication observed in human Gorlin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, J.; Suzuki, N.; Kita, K.; Sugaya, S.

    2004-01-01

    A phenomenon in which DNA synthesis level increases rapidly after x-ray irradiation has found out in the cells which originate in Gorlin patients. A gene, by which an expression level changes after x-ray irradiation, is searched in the human Gorlin cells by the mRNA differential display method. The DNA synthesis level decreases in normal human cell after x-ray irradiation of 2 Gy dose, but increases twice in the Gorlin cell. Expression levels of gene SMT3A, however decrease clearly in the Gorlin cells after the irradiation. The relations between expression levels of gene SMT3M, a protein like ubichitin, and DNA synthesis levels are searched. DNA synthesis activity in normal human cells, which are treated by antisese oligonucleotide and suppressed expression of the genes SMT3A, increases after x-ray irradiation. An increase of the DNA synthesis level after the irradiation is not a phenomenon in particular cells, but indicates the possibility of general phenomena in normal human cells. It is reported that the gene SMT3A combines with a glycosylase which operates in DNA repairing process. The protein modification of gene SMT3A indicates a possibility for controlling of stress protection mechanism in the cells. (M. Suetake)

  19. PMA-PhyloChip DNA Microarray to Elucidate Viable Microbial Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Stam, Christina N.; Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Since the Viking missions in the mid-1970s, traditional culture-based methods have been used for microbial enumeration by various NASA programs. Viable microbes are of particular concern for spacecraft cleanliness, for forward contamination of extraterrestrial bodies (proliferation of microbes), and for crew health/safety (viable pathogenic microbes). However, a "true" estimation of viable microbial population and differentiation from their dead cells using the most sensitive molecular methods is a challenge, because of the stability of DNA from dead cells. The goal of this research is to evaluate a rapid and sensitive microbial detection concept that will selectively estimate viable microbes. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have shown promise for reducing time to detection for a wide range of applications. The proposed method is based on the use of a fluorescent DNA intercalating agent, propidium monoazide (PMA), which can only penetrate the membrane of dead cells. The PMA-quenched reaction mixtures can be screened, where only the DNA from live cells will be available for subsequent PCR reaction and microarray detection, and be identified as part of the viable microbial community. An additional advantage of the proposed rapid method is that it will detect viable microbes and differentiate from dead cells in only a few hours, as opposed to less comprehensive culture-based assays, which take days to complete. This novel combination approach is called the PMA-Microarray method. DNA intercalating agents such as PMA have previously been used to selectively distinguish between viable and dead bacterial cells. Once in the cell, the dye intercalates with the DNA and, upon photolysis under visible light, produces stable DNA adducts. DNA cross-linked in this way is unavailable for PCR. Environmental samples suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead microbial cells/spores will be treated with PMA, and then incubated

  20. Elucidation of the compatible interaction between banana and Meloidogyne incognita via high-throughput proteome profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyafaznim Al-Idrus

    Full Text Available With a diverse host range, Meloidogyne incognita (root-knot nematode is listed as one of the most economically important obligate parasites of agriculture. This nematode species establishes permanent feeding sites in plant root systems soon after infestation. A compatible host-nematode interaction triggers a cascade of morphological and physiological process disruptions of the host, leading to pathogenesis. Such disruption is reflected by altered gene expression in affected cells, detectable using molecular approaches. We employed a high-throughput proteomics approach to elucidate the events involved in a compatible banana- M. incognita interaction. This study serves as the first crucial step in developing natural banana resistance for the purpose of biological-based nematode management programme. We successfully profiled 114 Grand naine root proteins involved in the interaction with M. incognita at the 30th- and 60th- day after inoculation (dai. The abundance of proteins involved in fundamental biological processes, cellular component organisation and stress responses were significantly altered in inoculated root samples. In addition, the abundance of proteins in pathways associated with defence and giant cell maintenance in plants such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, glycolysis and citrate cycle were also implicated by the infestation.

  1. Thymidine kinase 2 enzyme kinetics elucidate the mechanism of thymidine-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ren; Wang, Liya

    2014-10-07

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein, synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently translocated into the mitochondrial matrix, where it catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine (dT) and deoxycytidine (dC). The kinetics of dT phosphorylation exhibits negative cooperativity, but dC phosphorylation follows hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The two substrates compete with each other in that dT is a competitive inhibitor of dC phosphorylation, while dC acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of dT phosphorylation. In addition, TK2 is feedback inhibited by dTTP and dCTP. TK2 also phosphorylates a number of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapy and thus plays an important role in mitochondrial toxicities caused by nucleoside analogues. Deficiency in TK2 activity due to genetic alterations causes devastating mitochondrial diseases, which are characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion or multiple deletions in the affected tissues. Severe TK2 deficiency is associated with early-onset fatal mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, while less severe deficiencies result in late-onset phenotypes. In this review, studies of the enzyme kinetic behavior of TK2 enzyme variants are used to explain the mechanism of mtDNA depletion caused by TK2 mutations, thymidine overload due to thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, and mitochondrial toxicity caused by antiviral thymidine analogues.

  2. Predicting Variation of DNA Shape Preferences in Protein-DNA Interaction in Cancer Cells with a New Biophysical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmanov, Kirill; Wang, Junbai

    2017-09-18

    DNA shape readout is an important mechanism of transcription factor target site recognition, in addition to the sequence readout. Several machine learning-based models of transcription factor-DNA interactions, considering DNA shape features, have been developed in recent years. Here, we present a new biophysical model of protein-DNA interactions by integrating the DNA shape properties. It is based on the neighbor dinucleotide dependency model BayesPI2, where new parameters are restricted to a subspace spanned by the dinucleotide form of DNA shape features. This allows a biophysical interpretation of the new parameters as a position-dependent preference towards specific DNA shape features. Using the new model, we explore the variation of DNA shape preferences in several transcription factors across various cancer cell lines and cellular conditions. The results reveal that there are DNA shape variations at FOXA1 (Forkhead Box Protein A1) binding sites in steroid-treated MCF7 cells. The new biophysical model is useful for elucidating the finer details of transcription factor-DNA interaction, as well as for predicting cancer mutation effects in the future.

  3. Three reciprocally monophyletic mtDNA lineages elucidate the taxonomic status of Grant's gazelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline Deidre; Arctander, Peter; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2008-01-01

    are discussed in reference to the four currently recognised subspecies. We suggest Grant's gazelles be raised to the superspecies Nanger (granti) comprising three taxonomic units corresponding to the three mtDNA lineages. There was no evidence of gene flow between the notata and granti lineages, despite...... their geographic proximity, suggesting reproductive isolation. These constitute evolutionary significant units within the adaptive evolutionary framework. Due to its restricted geographic distribution and genetic and morphological distinctiveness, we suggest the petersii lineage be raised to the species Nanger...

  4. Elucidating Small-Scale Animal-Fluid Interactions in the Deep Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katija, K.; Sherman, A.; Graves, D.; Kecy, C. D.; Klimov, D.; Robison, B. H.

    2016-02-01

    The midwater region of the ocean (below the euphotic zone and above the benthos) is one of the largest ecosystems on our planet, yet remains one of the least explored. Little-known marine organisms that inhabit midwater have developed life strategies that contribute to their evolutionary success, and understanding interactions with their physical, fluid environment will shed light on these strategies. Although significant advances in underwater vehicle technologies have improved access to midwater, small-scale, in situ fluid mechanics measurement methods that seek to quantify the interactions that midwater organisms have with their physical environment are lacking. Here we present DeepPIV, an instrumentation package affixed to remotely operated vehicles that quantifies fluid motions from the surface of the ocean down to 4000 m depths. Utilizing ambient suspended particulate, fluid-structure interactions can be evaluated on a range of marine organisms in midwater and on the benthos. As a proof of concept for DeepPIV, we targeted giant larvaceans (Bathochordaeus stygias) in Monterey Bay that create mucus houses to filter food. Once mucus houses become clogged, they are abandoned by the larvacean, and are left to sink to the ocean bottom; in Monterey Bay, sinking mucus houses contribute to nearly a third of the particulate on the ocean bottom. Little is known about the structure of these mucus houses and the function they play in selectively filtering particles. Using DeepPIV, we reveal the complex structures and flows generated within larvacean mucus houses, which are used to ultimately elucidate how these structures function.

  5. Isolation and structure elucidation of an interaction product of aminotadalafil found in an illegal health food product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häberli, Adrian; Girard, Philippe; Low, Min-Yong; Ge, Xiaowei

    2010-09-21

    An interaction product of aminotadalafil was isolated from an illegal health food product. The structure of the interaction product was elucidated by means of IR, NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The hitherto unknown compound was characterized as condensation product of aminotadalafil and hydroxymethylfuraldehyde and is probably the result of a drug-excipient incompatibility. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushita, Y.; Murakawa, T.; Shimamura, K.; Oishi, M.; Ohyama, T.; Kurita, N.

    2015-01-01

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA

  7. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Y., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Murakawa, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Shimamura, K., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Oishi, M., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Ohyama, T., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp; Kurita, N., E-mail: kurita@cs.tut.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  8. Interaction of sulforaphane with DNA and RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Abassi Joozdani

    Full Text Available Sulforaphane (SFN is an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and anti-cancer activities. However, the antioxidant and anticancer mechanism of sulforaphane is not well understood. In the present research, we reported binding modes, binding constants and stability of SFN-DNA and -RNA complexes by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR and UV-Visible spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic evidence showed DNA intercalation with some degree of groove binding. SFN binds minor and major grooves of DNA and backbone phosphate (PO2, while RNA binding is through G, U, A bases with some degree of SFN-phosphate (PO2 interaction. Overall binding constants were estimated to be K(SFN-DNA=3.01 (± 0.035×10(4 M(-1 and K(SFN-RNA= 6.63 (±0.042×10(3 M(-1. At high SFN concentration (SFN/RNA = 1/1, DNA conformation changed from B to A occurred, while RNA remained in A-family structure.

  9. Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bybee, M D; Miller, G H; Trebotich, D

    2005-01-01

    Microfluidic devices are becoming state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection, continuous monitoring, and drug delivery. Numerical algorithms which can simulate flows of complex fluids within these devices are needed for their development and optimization. A method is being developed at LLNL by Trebotich et. al. [30] for simulations of DNA-laden flows in complex microscale geometries such as packed bed reactors and pillar chips. In this method an incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods, and the DNA is represented by a bead-rod polymer model. The fluid and polymer are coupled through a body force. In its current state, polymer-surface interactions are treated as elastic collisions between beads and surface, and polymer-polymer interactions are neglected. Implementation of polymer-polymer interactions is the main objective of this work. It is achieved by two methods: (1) a rigid constraint whereby rods elastically bounce off one another, and (2) a smooth potential acting between rods. In addition, a smooth potential is also implemented for the polymer-surface interactions. Background information will also be presented as well as related work by other researchers

  10. Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bybee, M D; Miller, G H; Trebotich, D

    2005-12-20

    Microfluidic devices are becoming state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection, continuous monitoring, and drug delivery. Numerical algorithms which can simulate flows of complex fluids within these devices are needed for their development and optimization. A method is being developed at LLNL by Trebotich et. al. [30] for simulations of DNA-laden flows in complex microscale geometries such as packed bed reactors and pillar chips. In this method an incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with Cartesian grid embedded boundary methods, and the DNA is represented by a bead-rod polymer model. The fluid and polymer are coupled through a body force. In its current state, polymer-surface interactions are treated as elastic collisions between beads and surface, and polymer-polymer interactions are neglected. Implementation of polymer-polymer interactions is the main objective of this work. It is achieved by two methods: (1) a rigid constraint whereby rods elastically bounce off one another, and (2) a smooth potential acting between rods. In addition, a smooth potential is also implemented for the polymer-surface interactions. Background information will also be presented as well as related work by other researchers.

  11. Interactions within the mammalian DNA methyltransferase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenhofer-Murray Ann E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In mammals, epigenetic information is established and maintained via the postreplicative methylation of cytosine residues by the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Dnmt1 is required for maintenance methylation whereas Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are responsible for de novo methylation. Contrary to Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b, the isolated C-terminal region of Dnmt1 is catalytically inactive, despite the presence of the sequence motifs typical of active DNA methyltransferases. Deletion analysis has revealed that a large part of the N-terminal domain is required for enzymatic activity. Results The role played by the N-terminal domain in this regulation has been investigated using the yeast two-hybrid system. We show here the presence of an intra-molecular interaction in Dnmt1 but not in Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b. This interaction was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and was localized by deletion mapping. Furthermore, a systematic analysis of interactions among the Dnmt family members has revealed that DNMT3L interacts with the C-terminal domain of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Conclusions The lack of methylating ability of the isolated C-terminal domain of Dnmt1 could be explained in part by a physical interaction between N- and C-terminal domains that apparently is required for activation of the catalytic domain. Our deletion analysis suggests that the tertiary structure of Dnmt1 is important in this process rather than a particular sequence motif. Furthermore, the interaction between DNMT3L and the C-terminal domains of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b suggests a mechanism whereby the enzymatically inactive DNMT3L brings about the methylation of its substrate by recruiting an active methylase.

  12. Interactions within the mammalian DNA methyltransferase family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot, Jean B; Ehrenhofer-Murray, Ann E; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2003-01-01

    Background In mammals, epigenetic information is established and maintained via the postreplicative methylation of cytosine residues by the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt1, Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Dnmt1 is required for maintenance methylation whereas Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b are responsible for de novo methylation. Contrary to Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b, the isolated C-terminal region of Dnmt1 is catalytically inactive, despite the presence of the sequence motifs typical of active DNA methyltransferases. Deletion analysis has revealed that a large part of the N-terminal domain is required for enzymatic activity. Results The role played by the N-terminal domain in this regulation has been investigated using the yeast two-hybrid system. We show here the presence of an intra-molecular interaction in Dnmt1 but not in Dnmt3a or Dnmt3b. This interaction was confirmed by immunoprecipitation and was localized by deletion mapping. Furthermore, a systematic analysis of interactions among the Dnmt family members has revealed that DNMT3L interacts with the C-terminal domain of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b. Conclusions The lack of methylating ability of the isolated C-terminal domain of Dnmt1 could be explained in part by a physical interaction between N- and C-terminal domains that apparently is required for activation of the catalytic domain. Our deletion analysis suggests that the tertiary structure of Dnmt1 is important in this process rather than a particular sequence motif. Furthermore, the interaction between DNMT3L and the C-terminal domains of Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b suggests a mechanism whereby the enzymatically inactive DNMT3L brings about the methylation of its substrate by recruiting an active methylase. PMID:12777184

  13. Elucidating the evolutionary conserved DNA-binding specificities of WRKY transcription factors by molecular dynamics and in vitro binding assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Harter, Klaus; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein family in plants that is involved in the regulation of developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli. The question arises how stimulus-specific responses are mediated given that the highly conserved WRKY DNA-binding domain (DBD) exclusively recognizes the ‘TTGACY’ W-box consensus. We speculated that the W-box consensus might be more degenerate and yet undetected differences in the W-box consensus of WRKYs of different evolutionary descent exist. The phylogenetic analysis of WRKY DBDs suggests that they evolved from an ancestral group IIc-like WRKY early in the eukaryote lineage. A direct descent of group IIc WRKYs supports a monophyletic origin of all other group II and III WRKYs from group I by loss of an N-terminal DBD. Group I WRKYs are of paraphyletic descent and evolved multiple times independently. By homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro DNA–protein interaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with AtWRKY50 (IIc), AtWRKY33 (I) and AtWRKY11 (IId) DBDs, we revealed differences in DNA-binding specificities. Our data imply that other components are essentially required besides the W-box-specific binding to DNA to facilitate a stimulus-specific WRKY function. PMID:23975197

  14. Pharmacogenomic study using bio- and nanobioelectrochemistry: Drug-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin

    2016-04-01

    Small molecules that bind genomic DNA have proven that they can be effective anticancer, antibiotic and antiviral therapeutic agents that affect the well-being of millions of people worldwide. Drug-DNA interaction affects DNA replication and division; causes strand breaks, and mutations. Therefore, the investigation of drug-DNA interaction is needed to understand the mechanism of drug action as well as in designing DNA-targeted drugs. On the other hand, the interaction between DNA and drugs can cause chemical and conformational modifications and, thus, variation of the electrochemical properties of nucleobases. For this purpose, electrochemical methods/biosensors can be used toward detection of drug-DNA interactions. The present paper reviews the drug-DNA interactions, their types and applications of electrochemical techniques used to study interactions between DNA and drugs or small ligand molecules that are potentially of pharmaceutical interest. The results are used to determine drug binding sites and sequence preference, as well as conformational changes due to drug-DNA interactions. Also, the intention of this review is to give an overview of the present state of the drug-DNA interaction cognition. The applications of electrochemical techniques for investigation of drug-DNA interaction were reviewed and we have discussed the type of qualitative or quantitative information that can be obtained from the use of each technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ionizing radiation interactions with DNA: nanodosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bug, Marion; Nettelbeck, Heidi; Hilgers, Gerhard; Rabus, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The metrology of ionizing radiation is based on measuring values that are averaged over macroscopic volume elements, for instance the energy dose is defined as ratio of the energy deposited on the absorber and the absorber mass. For biological or medical radiation effects the stochastic nature of radiation interaction id of main importance, esp. the interaction of ionizing radiation with the DNA as the genetic information carrier. For radiotherapy and risk evaluation purposes a comprehensive system of radiation weighing factors and other characteristics, like radiation quality or relative biological efficacy was developed. The nanodosimetry is aimed to develop a metrological basis relying on physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionizing radiation tracks. The article includes the development of experimental nanodosimetric methods, the respective calibration techniques, Monte-Carlo simulation of the particle track microstructure and the correlation nanodosimetry and biological efficiency.

  16. From nonspecific DNA-protein encounter complexes to the prediction of DNA-protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Gao

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DNA-protein interactions are involved in many essential biological activities. Because there is no simple mapping code between DNA base pairs and protein amino acids, the prediction of DNA-protein interactions is a challenging problem. Here, we present a novel computational approach for predicting DNA-binding protein residues and DNA-protein interaction modes without knowing its specific DNA target sequence. Given the structure of a DNA-binding protein, the method first generates an ensemble of complex structures obtained by rigid-body docking with a nonspecific canonical B-DNA. Representative models are subsequently selected through clustering and ranking by their DNA-protein interfacial energy. Analysis of these encounter complex models suggests that the recognition sites for specific DNA binding are usually favorable interaction sites for the nonspecific DNA probe and that nonspecific DNA-protein interaction modes exhibit some similarity to specific DNA-protein binding modes. Although the method requires as input the knowledge that the protein binds DNA, in benchmark tests, it achieves better performance in identifying DNA-binding sites than three previously established methods, which are based on sophisticated machine-learning techniques. We further apply our method to protein structures predicted through modeling and demonstrate that our method performs satisfactorily on protein models whose root-mean-square Calpha deviation from native is up to 5 A from their native structures. This study provides valuable structural insights into how a specific DNA-binding protein interacts with a nonspecific DNA sequence. The similarity between the specific DNA-protein interaction mode and nonspecific interaction modes may reflect an important sampling step in search of its specific DNA targets by a DNA-binding protein.

  17. A proteomics strategy to elucidate functional protein-protein interactions applied to EGF signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.; Ong, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can reveal protein-protein interactions on a large scale, but it has been difficult to separate background binding from functionally important interactions and still preserve weak binders. To investigate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we em...

  18. DNA-Conjugated Organic Chromophores in DNA Stacking Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic ch...... review presents those efforts in the design of intercalators/organic chromophores as oligonucleotide conjugates that form a foundation for the generation of novel nucleic acid architectures......Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic...

  19. Annonalide and derivatives: Semisynthesis, cytotoxic activities and studies on interaction of annonalide with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ricardo A; Gomes, Akenaton O C V; de Brito, Maria V; Dos Santos, Ana L P; da Silva, Gladyane S; de Lima, Leandro B; Nunes, Fátima M; de Mattos, Marcos C; de Oliveira, Fátima C E; do Ó Pessoa, Cláudia; de Moraes, Manoel O; de Fátima, Ângelo; Franco, Lucas L; Silva, Marina de M; Dantas, Maria Dayanne de A; Santos, Josué C C; Figueiredo, Isis M; da Silva-Júnior, Edeíldo F; de Aquino, Thiago M; de Araújo-Júnior, João X; de Oliveira, Maria C F; Leslie Gunatilaka, A A

    2018-02-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the pimarane diterpene annonalide (1) and nine of its semisynthetic derivatives (2-10) was investigated against the human tumor cell lines HL-60 (leukemia), PC-3 (prostate adenocarcinoma), HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma), SF-295 (glioblastoma) and HCT-116 (colon cancer), and normal mouse fibroblast (L929) cells. The preparation of 2-10 involved derivatization of the side chain of 1 at C-13. Except for 2, all derivatives are being reported for the first time. Most of the tested compounds presented IC 50 s below 4.0 μM, being considered potential antitumor agents. The structures of all new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses including 2D NMR and HRMS. Additionally, the interaction of annonalide (1) with ctDNA was evaluated using spectroscopic techniques, and the formation of a supramolecular complex with the macromolecule was confirmed. Competition assays with fluorescent probes (Hoechst and ethidium bromide) and theoretical studies confirmed that 1 interacts preferentially via DNA intercalation with stoichiometric ratio of 1:1 (1:ctDNA). The ΔG value was calculated as -28.24 kJ mol -1 , and indicated that the interaction process occurs spontaneously. Docking studies revealed that van der Walls is the most important interaction in 1-DNA and EB-DNA complexes, and that both ligands (1 and EB) interact with the same DNA residues (DA6, DA17 and DT19). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Biomolecule-nanoparticle interactions: Elucidation of the thermodynamics by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Lau, Boris L T

    2016-05-01

    Nanomaterials (NMs) are often exposed to a broad range of biomolecules of different abundances. Biomolecule sorption driven by various interfacial forces determines the surface structure and composition of NMs, subsequently governs their functionality and the reactivity of the adsorbed biomolecules. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a nondestructive technique that quantifies thermodynamic parameters through in-situ measurement of the heat absorption or release associated with an interaction. This review highlights the recent applications of ITC in understanding the thermodynamics of interactions between various nanoparticles (NPs) and biomolecules. Different aspects of a typical ITC experiment that are crucial for obtaining accurate and meaningful data, as well as the strengths, weaknesses, and challenges of ITC applications to NP research were discussed. ITC reveals the driving forces behind biomolecule-NP interactions and the effects of the physicochemical properties of both NPs and biomolecules by quantifying the crucial thermodynamics parameters (e.g., binding stoichiometry, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG). Complimentary techniques would strengthen the interpretation of ITC results for a more holistic understanding of biomolecule-NP interactions. The thermodynamic information revealed by ITC and its complimentary characterizations is important for understanding biomolecule-NP interactions that are fundamental to the biomedical and environmental applications of NMs and their toxicological effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of high-throughput mass spectrometry to elucidate host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2008-12-01

    New improvements to mass spectrometry include increased sensitivity, improvements in analyzing the collected data, and most important, from the standpoint of this review, a much higher throughput allowing analysis of many samples in a single day. This short review describes how host-pathogen interactions can be dissected by mass spectrometry using Salmonella as a model system. The approach allowed direct identification of the majority of annotate Salmonella proteins, how expression changed under various in vitro growth conditions, and how this relates to virulence and expression within host cell cells. One of the most significant findings is that a very high percentage of the all annotated genes (>20%) are regulated post-transcriptionally. In addition, new and unexpected interactions have been identified for several Salmonella virulence regulators that involve protein-protein interactions suggesting additional functions of the regulator in coordinating virulence expression. Overall high throughput mass spectrometer provides a new view of pathogen-host interaction emphasizing the protein products and defining how protein interactions determine the outcome of infection.

  2. Use of high-throughput mass spectrometry to elucidate host pathogen interactions in Salmonella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Shi, Liang; Yoon, Hyunjin; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2008-12-01

    Capabilities in mass spectrometry are evolving rapidly, with recent improvements in sensitivity, data analysis, and most important, from the standpoint of this review, much higher throughput allowing analysis of many samples in a single day. This short review describes how these improvements in mass spectrometry can be used to dissect host-pathogen interactions using Salmonella as a model system. This approach enabled direct identification of the majority of annotated Salmonella proteins, quantitation of expression changes under various in vitro growth conditions, and new insights into virulence and expression of Salmonella proteins within host cell cells. One of the most significant findings is that a very high percentage of the all annotated genes (>20%) in Salmonella are regulated post-transcriptionally. In addition, new and unexpected interactions have been identified for several Salmonella virulence regulators that involve protein-protein interactions, suggesting additional functions of these regulators in coordinating virulence expression. Overall high throughput mass spectrometry provides a new view of pathogen-host interactions emphasizing the protein products and defining how protein interactions determine the outcome of infection.

  3. Reduction theories elucidate the origins of complex biological rhythms generated by interacting delay-induced oscillations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuhiro Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Time delay is known to induce sustained oscillations in many biological systems such as electroencephalogram (EEG activities and gene regulations. Furthermore, interactions among delay-induced oscillations can generate complex collective rhythms, which play important functional roles. However, due to their intrinsic infinite dimensionality, theoretical analysis of interacting delay-induced oscillations has been limited. Here, we show that the two primary methods for finite-dimensional limit cycles, namely, the center manifold reduction in the vicinity of the Hopf bifurcation and the phase reduction for weak interactions, can successfully be applied to interacting infinite-dimensional delay-induced oscillations. We systematically derive the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation and the phase equation without delay for general interaction networks. Based on the reduced low-dimensional equations, we demonstrate that diffusive (linearly attractive coupling between a pair of delay-induced oscillations can exhibit nontrivial amplitude death and multimodal phase locking. Our analysis provides unique insights into experimentally observed EEG activities such as sudden transitions among different phase-locked states and occurrence of epileptic seizures.

  4. Intersegmental interactions in supercoiled DNA: atomic force microscope study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Miloseska, Lela; Potaman, Vladimir N.; Sinden, Richard R.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2003-10-15

    Intersegmental interactions in DNA facilitated by the neutralization of electrostatic repulsion was studied as a function of salt concentration and DNA supercoiling. DNA samples with defined superhelical densities were deposited onto aminopropyl mica at different ionic conditions and imaged in air after drying of the samples. Similar to hydrodynamic data, we did not observe a collapse of supercoiled DNA, as proposed earlier by cryo-EM studies. Instead, the formation of the contacts between DNA helices within supercoiled loops with no visible space between the duplexes was observed. The length of such close contacts increased upon increasing NaCl concentration. DNA supercoiling was a critical factor for the stabilization of intersegmental contacts. Implications of the observed effect for understanding DNA compaction in the cell and for regulation DNA transactions via interaction of distantly separated DNA regions are discussed.

  5. Elucidation of the Interaction Mechanism with Liposomes of gH625-Peptide Functionalized Dendrimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falanga, Annarita; Tarallo, Rossella; Carberry, Thomas; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Weck, Marcus; Galdiero, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that amide-based dendrimers functionalized with the membrane-interacting peptide gH625 derived from the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) envelope glycoprotein H enter cells mainly through a non-active translocation mechanism. Herein, we investigate the interaction between the peptide-functionalized dendrimer and liposomes composed of PC/Chol using fluorescence spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and surface plasmon resonance to get insights into the mechanism of internalization. The affinity for the membrane bilayer is very high and the interaction between the peptide-dendrimer and liposomes took place without evidence of pore formation. These results suggest that the presented peptidodendrimeric scaffold may be a promising material for efficient drug delivery. PMID:25423477

  6. Elucidating Host-Pathogen Interactions Based on Post-Translational Modifications Using Proteomics Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Jers, Carsten; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    can be efficiently applied to gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms involved. The measurement of the proteome and post-translationally modified proteome dynamics using mass spectrometry, results in a wide array of information, such as significant changes in protein expression, protein...... display host specificity through a complex network of molecular interactions that aid their survival and propagation. Co-infection states further lead to complications by increasing the microbial burden and risk factors. Quantitative proteomics based approaches and post-translational modification analysis...... pathogen interactions....

  7. Elucidating the interaction of clofazimine with bovine liver catalase; a comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular docking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Masihuz; Nusrat, Saima; Zakariya, Syed Mohammad; Khan, Mohsin Vahid; Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays, understanding of interface between protein and drugs has become an active research area of interest. These types of interactions provide structural guidelines in drug design with greater clinical efficacy. Thus, structural changes in catalase induced by clofazimine were monitored by various biophysical techniques including UV-visible spectrometer, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and dynamic light scattering techniques. Increase in absorption spectra (UV-visible spectrum) confers the complex formation between drug and protein. Fluorescence quenching with a binding constants of 2.47 × 10 4  M -1 revealed that clofazimine binds with protein. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, the distance (r) between the protein (donor) and drug (acceptor) was found to be 2.89 nm. Negative Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°) revealed that binding process is spontaneous. In addition, an increase in α-helicity was observed by far-UV circular dichroism spectra by adding clofazimine to protein. Dynamic light scattering results indicate that topology of bovine liver catalase was slightly altered in the presence of clofazimine. Hydrophobic interactions are the main forces between clofazimine and catalase interaction as depicted by molecular docking studies. Apart from hydrophobic interactions, some hydrogen bonding was also observed during docking method. The results obtained from the present study may establish abundant in optimizing the properties of ligand-protein mixtures relevant for numerous formulations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Elucidation of relaxin-3 binding interactions in the extracellular loops of RXFP3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross eBathgate

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Relaxin-3 is a highly conserved neuropeptide in vertebrate species and binds to the Class A G protein-coupled receptor RXFP3. Relaxin-3 is involved in a wide range of behaviours, including feeding, stress responses, arousal and cognitive processes and therefore targeting of RXFP3 may be relevant for a range of neurological diseases. Structural knowledge of RXFP3 and its interaction with relaxin-3 would both increase our understanding of ligand recognition in GPCRs that respond to protein ligands and enable acceleration of the design of drug leads. In this study we have used comparative sequence analysis, molecular modelling and receptor mutagenesis to investigate the binding site of the native ligand human relaxin-3 (H3 relaxin on the human RXFP3 receptor. Previous structure function studies have demonstrated that arginine residues in the H3 relaxin B-chain are critical for binding interactions with the receptor extracellular loops and/or N-terminal domain. Hence we have concentrated on determining the ligand interacting sites in these domains and have focussed on glutamic (E and aspartic acid (D residues in these regions that may form electrostatic interactions with these critical arginine residues. Conserved D/E residues identified from vertebrate species multiple sequence alignments were mutated to Ala in human RXFP3 to test the effect of loss of amino acid side chain on receptor binding using both Eu-labelled relaxin-3 agonist. Finally data from mutagenesis experiments have been used in ligand docking simulations to a homology model of human RXFP3 based on the peptide-bound CXCR4 structure. These studies have resulted in a model of the relaxin-3 interaction with RXFP3 which will inform further interrogation of the agonist binding site.

  9. Effect of Astringent Stimuli on Salivary Protein Interactions Elucidated by Complementary Proteomics Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delius, Judith; Médard, Guillaume; Kuster, Bernhard; Hofmann, Thomas

    2017-03-15

    The interaction of astringent substances with salivary proteins, which results in protein precipitation, is considered a key event in the molecular mechanism underlying the oral sensation of puckering astringency. As the chemical nature of orally active astringents is diverse and the knowledge of their interactions with salivary proteins rather fragmentary, human whole saliva samples were incubated with suprathreshold and isointensity solutions of the astringent polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, the multivalent metal salt iron(III) sulfate, the amino-functionalized polysaccharide chitosan, and the basic protein lysozyme. After separation of the precipitated proteins, the proteins affected by the astringents were identified and relatively quantified for the first time by complementary bottom-up and top-down mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches. Major salivary target proteins, which may be involved in astringency perception, are reported here for each astringent stimulus.

  10. Elucidating the interaction between light competition and herbivore feeding patterns using functional–structural plant modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jorad; Poelman, Erik H; Anten, Niels; Evers, Jochem B

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant’s competitive success is determined by the spatial distribution of its resources in the canopy. The spatial distribution of herbivory in the canopy in turn differs between herbivore species as the level of herbivore specialization determines their response to the distribution of resources and defences in the canopy. Here, we investigated to what extent competition for light affects plant susceptibility to herbivores with different feeding preferences. Methods To quantify interactions between herbivory and competition, we developed and evaluated a 3-D spatially explicit functional–structural plant model for Brassica nigra that mechanistically simulates competition in a dynamic light environment, and also explicitly models leaf area removal by herbivores with different feeding preferences. With this novel approach, we can quantitatively explore the extent to which herbivore feeding location and light competition interact in their effect on plant performance. Key Results Our results indicate that there is indeed a strong interaction between levels of plant–plant competition and herbivore feeding preference. When plants did not compete, herbivory had relatively small effects irrespective of feeding preference. Conversely, when plants competed, herbivores with a preference for young leaves had a strong negative effect on the competitiveness and subsequent performance of the plant, whereas herbivores with a preference for old leaves did not. Conclusions Our study predicts how plant susceptibility to herbivory depends on the composition of the herbivore community and the level of plant competition, and highlights the importance of considering

  11. Elucidating the interaction between light competition and herbivore feeding patterns using functional-structural plant modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jorad; Poelman, Erik H; Anten, Niels; Evers, Jochem B

    2018-01-24

    Plants usually compete with neighbouring plants for resources such as light as well as defend themselves against herbivorous insects. This requires investment of limiting resources, resulting in optimal resource distribution patterns and trade-offs between growth- and defence-related traits. A plant's competitive success is determined by the spatial distribution of its resources in the canopy. The spatial distribution of herbivory in the canopy in turn differs between herbivore species as the level of herbivore specialization determines their response to the distribution of resources and defences in the canopy. Here, we investigated to what extent competition for light affects plant susceptibility to herbivores with different feeding preferences. To quantify interactions between herbivory and competition, we developed and evaluated a 3-D spatially explicit functional-structural plant model for Brassica nigra that mechanistically simulates competition in a dynamic light environment, and also explicitly models leaf area removal by herbivores with different feeding preferences. With this novel approach, we can quantitatively explore the extent to which herbivore feeding location and light competition interact in their effect on plant performance. Our results indicate that there is indeed a strong interaction between levels of plant-plant competition and herbivore feeding preference. When plants did not compete, herbivory had relatively small effects irrespective of feeding preference. Conversely, when plants competed, herbivores with a preference for young leaves had a strong negative effect on the competitiveness and subsequent performance of the plant, whereas herbivores with a preference for old leaves did not. Our study predicts how plant susceptibility to herbivory depends on the composition of the herbivore community and the level of plant competition, and highlights the importance of considering the full range of dynamics in plant-plant-herbivore interactions

  12. Elucidation of Type of Molecular Interactions for the Imprinting of Shikimic Acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beng, Y.C.; Nor Azah Yusof

    2016-01-01

    During the preparation of shikimic acid imprinted polymer, the effect of rebinding solution water content on the rebinding performance of shikimic acid (SA) imprinted polymer was studied. Result showed that the highest affinity toward SA was in a 100 % aqueous rebinding solution, suggesting that the interactions occurred between SA and the polymer were ionic and/ or hydrophobic in nature. Further study on the effect of rebinding solution pH to the SA imprinted polymer rebinding performance showed that the performance of the SA imprinted polymer depended on the rebinding solution pH and the highest affinity occurred at pH 4.0; this confirmed that ionic interaction played an important role in the rebinding of SA. Taking into account the deductions made from the combined results of the rebinding solution water content and effect of pH, together with observation of the red shift in the SA spectral during ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic titration experiments, suggest that the specificity shown by SA imprinted polymer in the aqueous solution was due to both ionic and π-π hydrophobic interactions. (author)

  13. Hair Dye–DNA Interaction: Plausible Cause of Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Maiti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hair dye is one of the most popular cosmetic products which are used more widely and frequently to improve an individual’s appearance. Although the genotoxic effects of dye ingredients are widely reported, hair dye in its usable form is not reported extensively. In this contribution, we report the possible mode of interaction of hair dye with DNA which leads to genotoxicity. The effect of dye DNA interaction was studied on the most popular and globally used hair dye with Calf Thymus DNA and plasmid DNA. This interaction of dye DNA was studied by spectroscopic analyses and gel electrophoresis. The result had shown positive interaction of dye with DNA. Gel electrophoresis study confirms the binding of dye with DNA which results in linearization and fragmentation of the plasmid DNA. Dye–DNA interaction causes fragmentation and oxidation of DNA in absence of any catalyst, implies high toxicity of commercial hair dyes. Thus, it can be deduced from the present studies that hair dye in its usable form may lead to its penetration through skin affecting genomic DNA possesses genotoxic property and can be treated as one of the most common mutagen.

  14. Interactions of radionuclides and CO2 with clays: elucidating mechanisms at nano-scale level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    In order to predict and regulate the environmental impact of human activities such as uranium mining and radioactive waste disposal, it is necessary to understand the behavior of actinides in the environment because their interaction with clay mineral is an important factor to control the migration of radionuclide in the environment. The behavior of actinides in the soil is mainly the surface adsorption interactions, which change the forms of radioactive elements and reduces the mobility of actinides in the natural systems. Therefore, it is important to search how the actinides interact with clay mineral such as the fundamental process of surface precipitation. Uranium is the predominant heavy metal content of the final waste in the nuclear fuel cycle (≥95% UO 2 ). In addition, uranium is a major contaminant in the soil, subsurface and groundwater as a result of human activity. Under standard environmental conditions, the most stable chemical form of U(VI) is the uranyl ion UO 2 2+ , which is potentially very mobile and readily complexes with organic and inorganic matter. On the other hand, carbon dioxide is an important greenhouse gas, warming the earth's surface to a higher temperature by reducing outward radiation. However, problems may occur when the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases increases. Amounts of carbon dioxide were produced since the industrial revolution, which is behind the significant global warming and rising sea level. Clay minerals are of great practical importance here, in storage of carbon dioxide due to its hydraulic permeability and ability to retain mobile species. We have chosen kaolinite and montmorillonite as prototypes of clay minerals of 1:1 and 2:1. Classical Monte Carlo (MC) and molecular dynamics (MD) methods have been used in this work in order to understand the adsorption behaviour of radionuclide and carbon dioxide in clays surface. In this thesis, we will investigate first the adsorption of uranyl on kaolinite

  15. Elucidation of intermolecular interaction of bovine serum albumin with Fenhexamid: A biophysical prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Lou, Yan-Yue; Zhou, Kai-Li; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-03-01

    Fenhexamid, as a hydroxyanilide, is widely applied to control Botrytis cinerea for protecting crops and fruits. But it could adversely affect human and animals health due to accumulation of residues in food production. Here, the affinity characteristics of fenhexamid on bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied via a series of spectroscopic methods such as steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV), synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS), 3D fluorescence spectroscopy, and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The experimental results illustrated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA induced by fenhexamid was a static quenching. The binding constant (K b ) of fenhexamid with BSA was 2.399 × 10 4  M -1 at 298 K and the combination ratio was about 1:1. The competitive experiment demonstrated that fenhexamid was binding on the BSA at site II (subdomain IIIA), which was confirmed by the molecular docking studies. The negative values of thermodynamic parameter (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 and ΔG 0 ) revealed that the reaction of fenhexamid with BSA could proceed spontaneously, the van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding interaction conducted the main effect, and the binding process was enthalpy-driven. What's more, the 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS) and sucrose binding studies were also performed and further verified the binding force between BSA and fenhexamid. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Elucidating the Solvation Structure and Dynamics of Lithium Polysulfides Resulting from Competitive Salt and Solvent Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Murugesan, Vijayakumar; Shin, Yongwoo; Han, Kee Sung; Lau, Kah Chun; Chen, Junzheng; Liu, Jun; Curtiss, Larry A.; Mueller, Karl T.; Persson, Kristin A.

    2017-04-10

    Fundamental molecular level understanding of functional properties of liquid solutions provides an important basis for designing optimized electrolytes for numerous applica-tions. In particular, exhaustive knowledge of solvation structure, stability and transport properties is critical for developing stable electrolytes for fast charging and high energy density next-generation energy storage systems. Here we report the correlation between solubility, solvation structure and translational dynamics of a lithium salt (Li-TFSI) and polysulfides species using well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). It is observed that the polysulfide chain length has a significant effect on the ion-ion and ion-solvent interaction as well as on the diffusion coefficient of the ionic species in solution. In particular, extensive cluster formation is observed in lower order poly-sulfides (Sx2-; x≤4), whereas the longer polysulfides (Sx2-; x>4) show high solubility and slow dynamics in the solu-tion. It is observed that optimal solvent/salt ratio is essen-tial to control the solubility and conductivity as the addi-tion of Li salt increases the solubility but decreases the mo-bility of the ionic species. This work provides a coupled theoretical and experimental study of bulk solvation struc-ture and transport properties of multi-component electro-lyte systems, yielding design metrics for developing optimal electrolytes with improved stability and solubility.

  17. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yantao; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Lei; Jiang, Dayu; Cui, Yuncheng

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K A ) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level

  18. Interaction of E. coli DNA with tobacco mesophyll protoplasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyn, R.F.

    1975-01-01

    This chapter is part of a dissertation dealing with the interaction of DNA with protoplasts. Having established the length of time during which tobacco mesophyll protoplasts do not synthesize DNA following their isolation, it is important to know the extent of DNA uptake just before the onset of DNA synthesis (and possible integration) and to find optimal conditions for this uptake. Therefore, the association of E. coli DNA with tobacco protoplasts was studied. Care should be taken with the interpretation of ''uptake'' results: adsorption phenomena play a very important role and may do so at the plasmalemma of naked protoplasts. To solve the problems involved, the use of radiation-damaged DNA was attempted. With E. coli DNA possessing a large number of thymine containing pyrimidine dimers, the loss of dimers from DNA recovered from treated protoplasts was tested in order to obtain an indication of ''real'' uptake. The results are reported

  19. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  20. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Masudur; Neff, David; Green, Nathaniel; Norton, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material. PMID:28335324

  1. [BMIM][PF6] Incorporation Doubles CO2 Selectivity of ZIF-8: Elucidation of Interactions and Their Consequences on Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinik, F Pelin; Altintas, Cigdem; Balci, Volkan; Koyuturk, Burak; Uzun, Alper; Keskin, Seda

    2016-11-16

    Experiments were combined with atomically detailed simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to understand the effect of incorporation of an ionic liquid (IL), 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM][PF 6 ]), into a metal organic framework (MOF with a zeolitic imidazolate framework), ZIF-8, on the CO 2 separation performance. The interactions between [BMIM][PF 6 ] and ZIF-8 were examined in deep detail, and their consequences on CO 2 /CH 4 , CO 2 /N 2 , and CH 4 /N 2 separation have been elucidated by using experimental measurements complemented by DFT calculations and atomically detailed simulations. Results suggest that IL-MOF interactions strongly affect the gas affinity of materials at low pressure, whereas available pore volume plays a key role for gas adsorption at high pressures. Direct interactions between IL and MOF lead to at least a doubling of CO 2 /CH 4 and CO 2 /N 2 selectivities of ZIF-8. These results provide opportunities for rational design and development of IL-incorporated MOFs with exceptional selectivity for target gas separation applications.

  2. Probe DNA-Cisplatin Interaction with Solid-State Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Li, Wei; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Pengye; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua; Nanopore Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of DNA-cisplatin interaction is essential for clinical application and novel drug design. As an emerging single-molecule technology, solid-state nanopore has been employed in biomolecule detection and probing DNA-molecule interactions. Herein, we reported a real-time monitoring of DNA-cisplatin interaction by employing solid-state SiN nanopores. The DNA-cisplatin interacting process is clearly classified into three stages by measuring the capture rate of DNA-cisplatin adducts. In the first stage, the negative charged DNA molecules were partially discharged due to the bonding of positive charged cisplatin and forming of mono-adducts. In the second stage, forming of DNA-cisplatin di-adducts with the adjacent bases results in DNA bending and softening. The capture rate increases since the softened bi-adducts experience a lower barrier to thread into the nanopores. In the third stage, complex structures, such as micro-loop, are formed and the DNA-cisplatin adducts are aggregated. The capture rate decreases to zero as the aggregated adduct grows to the size of the pore. The characteristic time of this stage was found to be linear with the diameter of the nanopore and this dynamic process can be described with a second-order reaction model. We are grateful to Laboratory of Microfabrication, Dr. Y. Yao, and Prof. R.C. Yu (Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences) for technical assistance.

  3. Photosensitive interaction of RSU 1069 with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.I.; Knox, R.J.; Skolimowski, I.M.; Zahoor, A.; Knight, R.C.

    1984-08-01

    RSU 1069 is a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer with an aziridine-containing side chain. In light (360 nm) the absorbance maximum of the nitro group at 325 nm disappears, which is accompanied by expulsion of the nitro group as the nitrite ion. This photosensitive effect was used to determine separately the damage of DNA induced by the reduced nitro group and the alkylating property of the aziridine. The aziridine-induced DNA damage is maximized in the dark when the nitro group is either absent (electrolytically reduced prior to the addition of DNA) or non functional (unreduced). In the light, damage is reduced. Typical DNA damage includes helix disruption leading to single strand breaks and the release of thymidine. Alkaline filter elution studies show evidence only for strand breakage and none for cross-linking indicating the drug is capable of mono-functional alkylation only.

  4. Photosensitive interaction of RSU 1069 with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, D.I.; Knox, R.J.; Skolimowski, I.M.; Zahoor, A.; Knight, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    RSU 1069 is a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer with an aziridine-containing side chain. In light (360 nm) the absorbance maximum of the nitro group at 325 nm disappears, which is accompanied by expulsion of the nitro group as the nitrite ion. This photosensitive effect was used to determine separately the damage of DNA induced by the reduced nitro group and the alkylating property of the aziridine. The aziridine-induced DNA damage is maximized in the dark when the nitro group is either absent (electrolytically reduced prior to the addition of DNA) or non functional (unreduced). In the light, damage is reduced. Typical DNA damage includes helix disruption leading to single strand breaks and the release of thymidine. Alkaline filter elution studies show evidence only for strand breakage and none for cross-linking indicating the drug is capable of mono-functional alkylation only

  5. Analysis of DNA interactions using single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzefeld, Markus; Walhorn, Volker; Anselmetti, Dario; Sewald, Norbert

    2013-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions are involved in many biochemical pathways and determine the fate of the corresponding cell. Qualitative and quantitative investigations on these recognition and binding processes are of key importance for an improved understanding of biochemical processes and also for systems biology. This review article focusses on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy and its application to the quantification of forces and binding mechanisms that lead to the formation of protein-DNA complexes. AFM and dynamic force spectroscopy are exciting tools that allow for quantitative analysis of biomolecular interactions. Besides an overview on the method and the most important immobilization approaches, the physical basics of the data evaluation is described. Recent applications of AFM-based force spectroscopy to investigate DNA intercalation, complexes involving DNA aptamers and peptide- and protein-DNA interactions are given.

  6. An integrated approach to elucidate the intra-viral and viral-cellular protein interaction networks of a gamma-herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screens were conducted to elucidate the molecular functions of open reading frames (ORFs encoded by murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68. A library of 84 MHV-68 genes and gene fragments was generated in a Gateway entry plasmid and transferred to Y2H vectors. All possible pair-wise interactions between viral proteins were tested in the Y2H assay, resulting in the identification of 23 intra-viral protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Seventy percent of the interactions between viral proteins were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. To systematically investigate virus-cellular protein interactions, the MHV-68 Y2H constructs were screened against a cellular cDNA library, yielding 243 viral-cellular PPIs involving 197 distinct cellar proteins. Network analyses indicated that cellular proteins targeted by MHV-68 had more partners in the cellular PPI network and were located closer to each other than expected by chance. Taking advantage of this observation, we scored the cellular proteins based on their network distances from other MHV-68-interacting proteins and segregated them into high (Y2H-HP and low priority/not-scored (Y2H-LP/NS groups. Significantly more genes from Y2H-HP altered MHV-68 replication when their expression was inhibited with siRNAs (53% of genes from Y2H-HP, 21% of genes from Y2H-LP/NS, and 16% of genes randomly chosen from the human PPI network; p<0.05. Enriched Gene Ontology (GO terms in the Y2H-HP group included regulation of apoptosis, protein kinase cascade, post-translational protein modification, transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, and IκB kinase/NFκB cascade. Functional validation assays indicated that PCBP1, which interacted with MHV-68 ORF34, may be involved in regulating late virus gene expression in a manner consistent with the effects of its viral interacting partner. Our study integrated Y2H screening with multiple functional validation approaches to create

  7. Synthesis, spectral characterization, antimicrobial, DNA interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KUNCHE SUDEEPA

    2018-05-04

    May 4, 2018 ... structural aspects of FMBC and its Cu(II), Ni(II) and. Zn(II) complexes ... of DNA was down- loaded from protein data bank24 (www.rcsb.org) pdb id: ... the reaction mixture was refluxed on water bath for 4–8 h maintaining the ...

  8. An electrochemical study of neutral red-DNA interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heli, H.; Bathaie, S.Z.; Mousavi, M.F.

    2005-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were used to investigate the interaction of neutral red (NR) with double-stranded calf thymus DNA, in solution as well as using a DNA-modified glassy carbon (GC-DNA) electrode. The results were compared with those obtained from bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The formal potential of NR was more positive when GC-DNA electrode was used although the rate of heterogeneous electron transfer is as high as that of using GC electrode. GC-DNA electrode enables preconcentration of NR for chosen times on the electrode surface, despite the fact that the mass transfer effects in the thin DNA layer adsorbed on the surface was still observed using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. Parameters, such as the diffusion coefficient of NR, binding site size in base pairs and the ratio of the binding constants for the oxidized and reduced forms of the bound species were obtained. A binding isotherm for NR at GC-DNA electrode was obtained from coulometric titrations and gave an affinity constant equal to 2.76 x 10 4 L mol -1 . From the studies of the interaction in solution, the diffusion coefficient of free and DNA-bound NR, binding constant and binding site size of the DNA-NR complex was also obtained simultaneously by non-linear fitting analysis of voltammetric data

  9. Charge-transfer interactions of Cr species with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Matysiak-Brynda, Edyta; Hepel, Maria

    2017-10-01

    Interactions of Cr species with nucleic acids in living organisms depend strongly on Cr oxidation state and the environmental conditions. As the effects of these interactions range from benign to pre-mutagenic to carcinogenic, careful assessment of the hazard they pose to human health is necessary. We have investigated methods that would enable quantifying the DNA damage caused by Cr species under varying environmental conditions, including UV, O 2 , and redox potential, using simple instrumental techniques which could be in future combined into a field-deployable instrumentation. We have employed electrochemical quartz crystal nanogravimetry (EQCN), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) to evaluate the extent of DNA damage expressed in terms of guanine oxidation yield (η) and changes in specific characteristics provided by these techniques. The effects of the interactions of Cr species with DNA were analyzed using a model calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) film on a gold electrode (Au@ctDNA) in different media, including: (i) Cr(VI), (ii) Cr(VI) reduced at -0.2V, (iii) Cr(III)+UV radiation+O 2 , and Cr(III), obtaining the η values: 7.4±1.4, 1.5±0.4, 1.1±0.31%, and 0%, respectively, thus quantifying the hazard posed. The EIS measurements have enabled utilizing the decrease in charge-transfer resistance (R ct ) for ferri/ferrocyanide redox probe at an Au@ctDNA electrode to assess the oxidative ctDNA damage by Cr(VI) species. In this case, circular dichroism indicates an extensive damage to the ctDNA hydrogen bonding. On the other hand, Cr(III) species have not induced any damage to ctDNA, although the EQCN measurements show an electrostatic binding to DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extraction of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA from food: a contribution to the elucidation of acute Chagas disease outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Renata Trotta Barroso; Melandre, Aline Martins; Cabral, Maria Luiza; Branquinho, Maria Regina; Cardarelli-Leite, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Before 2004, the occurrence of acute Chagas disease (ACD) by oral transmission associated with food was scarcely known or investigated. Originally sporadic and circumstantial, ACD occurrences have now become frequent in the Amazon region, with recently related outbreaks spreading to several Brazilian states. These cases are associated with the consumption of açai juice by waste reservoir animals or insect vectors infected with Trypanosoma cruzi in endemic areas. Although guidelines for processing the fruit to minimize contamination through microorganisms and parasites exist, açai-based products must be assessed for quality, for which the demand for appropriate methodologies must be met. Dilutions ranging from 5 to 1,000 T. cruzi CL Brener cells were mixed with 2mL of acai juice. Four Extraction of T. cruzi DNA methods were used on the fruit, and the cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) method was selected according to JRC, 2005. DNA extraction by the CTAB method yielded satisfactory results with regard to purity and concentration for use in PCR. Overall, the methods employed proved that not only extraction efficiency but also high sensitivity in amplification was important. The method for T. cruzi detection in food is a powerful tool in the epidemiological investigation of outbreaks as it turns epidemiological evidence into supporting data that serve to confirm T. cruzi infection in the foods. It also facilitates food quality control and assessment of good manufacturing practices involving acai-based products.

  11. Extraction of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA from food: a contribution to the elucidation of acute Chagas disease outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Trotta Barroso Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Before 2004, the occurrence of acute Chagas disease (ACD by oral transmission associated with food was scarcely known or investigated. Originally sporadic and circumstantial, ACD occurrences have now become frequent in the Amazon region, with recently related outbreaks spreading to several Brazilian states. These cases are associated with the consumption of açai juice by waste reservoir animals or insect vectors infected with Trypanosoma cruzi in endemic areas. Although guidelines for processing the fruit to minimize contamination through microorganisms and parasites exist, açai-based products must be assessed for quality, for which the demand for appropriate methodologies must be met. METHODS: Dilutions ranging from 5 to 1,000 T. cruzi CL Brener cells were mixed with 2mL of acai juice. Four Extraction of T. cruzi DNA methods were used on the fruit, and the cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB method was selected according to JRC, 2005. RESULTS: DNA extraction by the CTAB method yielded satisfactory results with regard to purity and concentration for use in PCR. Overall, the methods employed proved that not only extraction efficiency but also high sensitivity in amplification was important. CONCLUSIONS: The method for T. cruzi detection in food is a powerful tool in the epidemiological investigation of outbreaks as it turns epidemiological evidence into supporting data that serve to confirm T. cruzi infection in the foods. It also facilitates food quality control and assessment of good manufacturing practices involving acai-based products.

  12. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: polymerase chain reaction for Helicobacter DNA is a valuable tool to elucidate the diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, S; Zsikla, V; Frank, A; Willi, N; Cathomas, G

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis has been increasingly reported. Molecular techniques as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may detect bacterial DNA in histologically negative gastritis. To evaluate of Helicobacter PCR in gastric biopsies for the daily diagnostics of Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Over a 5-year period, routine biopsies with chronic gastritis reminiscent of Helicobacter infection, but negative by histology, were tested by using a H. pylori specific PCR. Subsequently, PCR-negative samples were re-evaluated using PCR for other Helicobacter species. Of the 9184 gastric biopsies, 339 (3.7%) with histological-negative gastritis and adequate material were forwarded to PCR analysis for H. pylori and 146 (43.1%) revealed a positive result. In 193 H. pylori DNA-negative biopsies, re-analysis using PCR primers for other Helicobacter species, revealed further 23 (11.9%) positive biopsies, including 4 (2.1%) biopsies with H. heilmannii sensu lato. PCR-positive biopsies showed a higher overall inflammatory score, more lymphoid follicles/aggregates and neutrophils (P gastritis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mutant p53 interactions with supercoiled DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázdová, Marie; Němcová, Kateřina; Činčárová, Lenka; Šebest, Peter; Pivoňková, Hana; Brázda, Václav; Fojta, Miroslav; Paleček, Emil

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2007), s. 639-640 ISSN 0739-1102. [Alban 2007: The 15th Conversation . 19.06.2007-23.06.2007, Albany] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1K04119; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/06/P369; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : mutant p53 * supercoiled DNA * cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  14. Elucidation of Listeria monocytogenes contamination routes in cold-smoked salmon processing plants detected by DNA-based typing methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Huss, Hans Henrik; Ojeniyi, B.

    2001-01-01

    and environment could not be excluded. Contamination of the product occurred in specific areas (the brining and slicing areas). In plant I, the same RAPD type (RAPD type 12) was found over a 4-year period, indicating that an established in-house flora persisted and was not eliminated by routine hygienic......, monocytogenes). A total of 429 strains of L. monocytogenes were subsequently compared by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profiling, and 55 different RAPD types were found. The RAPD types detected on the products were identical to types found on the processing equipment and in the processing environment...... procedures. In plant II, where the prevalence of L, monocytogenes was much tower, no RAPD type persisted over long periods of time, and several different L, monocytogenes RAPD types were isolated. This indicates that persistent strains may be avoided by rigorous cleaning and sanitation; however, due...

  15. Interactions of acetylated histones with DNA as revealed by UV laser induced histone-DNA crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovsky, V.Yu.; Dimitrov, S.I.; Angelov, D.; Pashev, I.G.

    1989-01-01

    The interaction of acetylated histones with DNA in chromatin has been studied by UV laser-induced crosslinking histones to DNA. After irradiation of the nuclei, the covalently linked protein-DNA complexes were isolated and the presence of histones in them demonstrated immunochemically. When chromatin from irradiated nuclei was treated with clostripain, which selectively cleaved the N-terminal tails of core histones, no one of them was found covalently linked to DNA, thus showing that crosslinking proceeded solely via the N-terminal regions. However, the crosslinking ability of the laser was preserved both upon physiological acetylation of histones, known to be restricted to the N-terminal tails, and with chemically acetylated chromatin. This finding is direct evidence that the postsynthetic histone acetylation does not release the N-terminal tails from interaction with DNA

  16. Interaction of nogalamycin and analogs with DNA and other biopolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, W C [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis; Pschigoda, L M; Schpok, S L.F.; Moscowitz, A.; McGovren, J P; Neta, P; Merritt, M V; Li, L H

    1981-01-01

    The interaction with calf thymus DNA of the anthracycline antibiotics, nogalamycin and its analogs, was studied by electronic absorption, circular dichroism (CD), thermal denaturation, solvent partition and pulse radiolysis techniques. The Scatchard, thermal denaturation (..delta..T/sub m/), difference circular dichroism (..delta..CD) and solvent partition binding parameters gave the same order of relative binding on a given lot of DNA, but some parameters were DNA-lot-dependent. In general, molecules containing the sugar moiety nogalose at C-7 or those having the natural or dis stereochemistry of nogalamycin at C-7 bound more strongly to DNA than did the molecules lacking nogalose or those with the opposite configuration at C-7 (con stereochemistry). This stereochemical-binding correlation differs from that found for adriamycin which has the con stereochemistry, but which binds strongly to DNA. Scatchard binding parameters could not be obtained from the pulse radiolysis or solvent partition techniques because of solubility difficulties.

  17. Elucidating the transcription cycle of the UV-inducible hyperthermophilic archaeal virus SSV1 by DNA microarrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froels, Sabrina; Gordon, Paul M.K.; Panlilio, Mayi Arcellana; Schleper, Christa; Sensen, Christoph W.

    2007-01-01

    The spindle-shaped Sulfolobus virus SSV1 was the first of a series of unusual and uniquely shaped viruses isolated from hyperthermophilic Archaea. Using whole-genome microarrays we show here that the circular 15.5 kb DNA genome of SSV1 exhibits a chronological regulation of its transcription upon UV irradiation, reminiscent to the life cycles of bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses. The transcriptional cycle starts with a small UV-specific transcript and continues with early transcripts on both its flanks. The late transcripts appear after the onset of viral replication and are extended to their full lengths towards the end of the approximately 8.5 h cycle. While we detected only small differences in genome-wide analysis of the host Sulfolobus solfataricus comparing infected versus uninfected strains, we found a marked difference with respect to the strength and speed of the general UV response of the host. Models for the regulation of the virus cycle, and putative functions of genes in SSV1 are presented

  18. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaix Morand du Puch, Ch

    2010-10-01

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  19. Energetics of the protein-DNA-water interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marabotti Anna

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the energetics of the interaction between protein and DNA we analyzed 39 crystallographically characterized complexes with the HINT (Hydropathic INTeractions computational model. HINT is an empirical free energy force field based on solvent partitioning of small molecules between water and 1-octanol. Our previous studies on protein-ligand complexes demonstrated that free energy predictions were significantly improved by taking into account the energetic contribution of water molecules that form at least one hydrogen bond with each interacting species. Results An initial correlation between the calculated HINT scores and the experimentally determined binding free energies in the protein-DNA system exhibited a relatively poor r2 of 0.21 and standard error of ± 1.71 kcal mol-1. However, the inclusion of 261 waters that bridge protein and DNA improved the HINT score-free energy correlation to an r2 of 0.56 and standard error of ± 1.28 kcal mol-1. Analysis of the water role and energy contributions indicate that 46% of the bridging waters act as linkers between amino acids and nucleotide bases at the protein-DNA interface, while the remaining 54% are largely involved in screening unfavorable electrostatic contacts. Conclusion This study quantifies the key energetic role of bridging waters in protein-DNA associations. In addition, the relevant role of hydrophobic interactions and entropy in driving protein-DNA association is indicated by analyses of interaction character showing that, together, the favorable polar and unfavorable polar/hydrophobic-polar interactions (i.e., desolvation mostly cancel.

  20. Structural modelling and molecular dynamics of a multi-stress responsive WRKY TF-DNA complex towards elucidating its role in stress signalling mechanisms in chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Aravind Kumar; Farmer, Rohit; Soren, Khela Ram; P S, Shanmugavadivel; Setti, Aravind

    2017-07-28

    Chickpea is a premier food legume crop with high nutritional quality and attains prime importance in the current era of 795 million people being undernourished worldwide. Chickpea production encounters setbacks due to various stresses and understanding the role of key transcription factors (TFs) involved in multiple stresses becomes inevitable. We have recently identified a multi-stress responsive WRKY TF in chickpea. The present study was conducted to predict the structure of WRKY TF to identify the DNA-interacting residues and decipher DNA-protein interactions. Comparative modelling approach produced 3D model of the WRKY TF with good stereochemistry, local/global quality and further revealed W19, R20, K21, and Y22 motifs within a vicinity of 5 Å to the DNA amongst R18, G23, Q24, K25, Y36, Y37, R38 and K47 and these positions were equivalent to the 2LEX WRKY domain of Arabidopsis. Molecular simulations analysis of reference protein -PDB ID 2LEX, along with Car-WRKY TF modelled structure with the DNA coordinates derived from PDB ID 2LEX and docked using HADDOCK were executed. Root Mean Square (RMS) Deviation and RMS Fluctuation values yielded consistently stable trajectories over 50 ns simulation. Strengthening the obtained results, neither radius of gyration, distance and total energy showed any signs of DNA-WRKY complex falling apart nor any significant dissociation event over 50 ns run. Therefore, the study provides first insights into the structural properties of multi-stress responsive WRKY TF-DNA complex in chickpea, enabling genome wide identification of TF binding sites and thereby deciphers their gene regulatory networks.

  1. Binding and thermodynamics of REV peptide-ctDNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar

    2017-03-01

    The thermodynamics of DNA-ligand binding is important as it provides useful information to understand the details of binding processes. HIV-1 REV response element (RRE) located in the env coding region of the viral genome is reported to be well conserved across different HIV-1 isolates. In this study, the binding characteristics of Calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and REV peptide from HIV-1 were investigated using spectroscopic (UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD)) and isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) techniques. Thermal stability and ligand binding properties of the ctDNA revealed that native ctDNA had a T m of 75.5 °C, whereas the ctDNA-REV peptide complex exhibited an incremental shift in the T m by 8 °C, indicating thermal stability of the complex. CD data indicated increased ellipticity due to large conformational changes in ctDNA molecule upon binding with REV peptide and two binding stoichiometric modes are apparent. The ctDNA experienced condensation due to large conformational changes in the presence of REV peptide and positive B→Ψ transition was observed at higher molar charge ratios. Fluorescence studies performed at several ligand concentrations revealed a gradual decrease in the fluorescence intensity of EtBr-bound ctDNA in response to increasing ligand concentrations. The fluorescence data further confirmed two stoichiometric modes of binding for ctDNA-REV peptide complex as previously observed with CD studies. The binding enthalpies were determined using ITC in the temperature range of 293 K-308 K. The ITC binding isotherm was exothermic at all temperatures examined, with low ΔH values indicating that the ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is driven largely by entropy. The heat capacity change (ΔC p ) was insignificant, an unusual finding in the area of DNA-peptide interaction studies. The variation in the values obtained for ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG with temperature further suggests that ctDNA-REV peptide interaction is entropically

  2. Interactions and Localization of Escherichia coli Error-Prone DNA Polymerase IV after DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Sarita; Popodi, Ellen M; Hanson, Andrew J; Foster, Patricia L

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli's DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB), a member of the Y family of error-prone polymerases, is induced during the SOS response to DNA damage and is responsible for translesion bypass and adaptive (stress-induced) mutation. In this study, the localization of Pol IV after DNA damage was followed using fluorescent fusions. After exposure of E. coli to DNA-damaging agents, fluorescently tagged Pol IV localized to the nucleoid as foci. Stepwise photobleaching indicated ∼60% of the foci consisted of three Pol IV molecules, while ∼40% consisted of six Pol IV molecules. Fluorescently tagged Rep, a replication accessory DNA helicase, was recruited to the Pol IV foci after DNA damage, suggesting that the in vitro interaction between Rep and Pol IV reported previously also occurs in vivo. Fluorescently tagged RecA also formed foci after DNA damage, and Pol IV localized to them. To investigate if Pol IV localizes to double-strand breaks (DSBs), an I-SceI endonuclease-mediated DSB was introduced close to a fluorescently labeled LacO array on the chromosome. After DSB induction, Pol IV localized to the DSB site in ∼70% of SOS-induced cells. RecA also formed foci at the DSB sites, and Pol IV localized to the RecA foci. These results suggest that Pol IV interacts with RecA in vivo and is recruited to sites of DSBs to aid in the restoration of DNA replication. DNA polymerase IV (Pol IV/DinB) is an error-prone DNA polymerase capable of bypassing DNA lesions and aiding in the restart of stalled replication forks. In this work, we demonstrate in vivo localization of fluorescently tagged Pol IV to the nucleoid after DNA damage and to DNA double-strand breaks. We show colocalization of Pol IV with two proteins: Rep DNA helicase, which participates in replication, and RecA, which catalyzes recombinational repair of stalled replication forks. Time course experiments suggest that Pol IV recruits Rep and that RecA recruits Pol IV. These findings provide in vivo evidence

  3. Graphical Presentation of Patient-Treatment Interaction Elucidated by Continuous Biomarkers. Current Practice and Scope for Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Ming; Le, Lien D; Wilson, Rory; Mansmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-09

    Biomarkers providing evidence for patient-treatment interaction are key in the development and practice of personalized medicine. Knowledge that a patient with a specific feature - as demonstrated through a biomarker - would have an advantage under a given treatment vs. a competing treatment can aid immensely in medical decision-making. Statistical strategies to establish evidence of continuous biomarkers are complex and their formal results are thus not easy to communicate. Good graphical representations would help to translate such findings for use in the clinical community. Although general guidelines on how to present figures in clinical reports are available, there remains little guidance for figures elucidating the role of continuous biomarkers in patient-treatment interaction (CBPTI). To combat the current lack of comprehensive reviews or adequate guides on graphical presentation within this topic, our study proposes presentation principles for CBPTI plots. In order to understand current practice, we review the development of CBPTI methodology and how CBPTI plots are currently used in clinical research. The quality of a CBPTI plot is determined by how well the presentation provides key information for clinical decision-making. Several criteria for a good CBPTI plot are proposed, including general principles of visual display, use of units presenting absolute outcome measures, appropriate quantification of statistical uncertainty, correct display of benchmarks, and informative content for answering clinical questions especially on the quantitative advantage for an individual patient with regard to a specific treatment. We examined the development of CBPTI methodology from the years 2000 - 2014, and reviewed how CBPTI plots were currently used in clinical research in six major clinical journals from 2013 - 2014 using the principle of theoretical saturation. Each CBPTI plot found was assessed for appropriateness of its presentation and clinical utility

  4. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA 20 , poly dT 20 , poly dC 20 and the duplex poly dA 20 :dT 20 . Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their purification using strong

  5. Protein and Drug Interactions in the Minor Groove of DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morávek, Z.; Neidle, S.; Schneider, Bohdan

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 5 (2002), s. 1182-1191 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : protein * DNA * interactions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 7.051, year: 2002

  6. Elucidation of IL-1/TGF-beta interactions in mouse chondrocyte cell line by genome-wide gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takahashi, N; Rieneck, K; van der Kraan, P M

    2005-01-01

    To elucidate the antagonism between interleukin-1 (IL-1) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) at the gene expression level, as IL-1 and TGF-beta are postulated to be critical mediators of cartilage degeneration/protection in rheumatic diseases....

  7. Interactions of tetracationic porphyrins with DNA and their effects on DNA cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Natalya Sh.; Yurina, Elena S.; Gubarev, Yury A.; Syrbu, Sergey A.

    2018-06-01

    The interaction of tetracationic porphyrins with DNA was studied using UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy and viscometry, and the particle sizes were determined. Аs cationic porphyrins, two isomer porphyrins, 3,3‧,3″,3‴-(5,10,15,20-Porphyrintetrayl)tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium) (TMPyP3) and 4,4‧,4″,4‴-(5,10,15,20-Porphyrintetrayl)tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium) (TMPyP4), were studied. They differ in the position of NCH3+ group in phenyl ring of the porphyrins and hence, in degree of freedom of rotation of the phenyl rings about the central macrocycle. It was found that intercalated complexes are formed at DNA/porphyrin molar ratios (R) of 2.2 and 3.9 for TMPyP3 и TMPyP4, respectively. Decreasing R up to 0.4 and 0.8 for TMPyP3 и TMPyP4, respectively, leads mainly to formation of outside complexes due to π-π stacking between the porphyrin chromophores interacting electrostatically with phosphate framework of DNA. Each type of the obtained complexes was characterized using Scatchard approach. It was ascertained that the affinity of TMPyP4 to DNA is stronger than TMPyP3, meanwhile the wedge effect of the latter is higher. The differences between the porphyrin isomers become more evident at irradiation of their complexes with DNA. It was established that irradiation of the intercalated complexes results in DNA fragmentation. In the case of TMPyP4, DNA fragments of different size are formed. The irradiation of the outside DNA/porphyrin complexes leads to cleavage of DNA (TMPyP3 and TMPyP4) and partial destruction of the complex due to photolysis of the porphyrin (TMPyP3).

  8. The free-energy cost of interaction between DNA loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lifang; Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Yu, Jianshe

    2017-10-03

    From the viewpoint of thermodynamics, the formation of DNA loops and the interaction between them, which are all non-equilibrium processes, result in the change of free energy, affecting gene expression and further cell-to-cell variability as observed experimentally. However, how these processes dissipate free energy remains largely unclear. Here, by analyzing a mechanic model that maps three fundamental topologies of two interacting DNA loops into a 4-state model of gene transcription, we first show that a longer DNA loop needs more mean free energy consumption. Then, independent of the type of interacting two DNA loops (nested, side-by-side or alternating), the promotion between them always consumes less mean free energy whereas the suppression dissipates more mean free energy. More interestingly, we find that in contrast to the mechanism of direct looping between promoter and enhancer, the facilitated-tracking mechanism dissipates less mean free energy but enhances the mean mRNA expression, justifying the facilitated-tracking hypothesis, a long-standing debate in biology. Based on minimal energy principle, we thus speculate that organisms would utilize the mechanisms of loop-loop promotion and facilitated tracking to survive in complex environments. Our studies provide insights into the understanding of gene expression regulation mechanism from the view of energy consumption.

  9. An NMR study of the covalent and noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scahill, T.A.; Jensen, R.M.; Swenson, D.H.; Hatzenbuhler, N.T.; Petzold, G.; Wierenga, W.; Brahme, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The binding of the antitumor drug CC-1065 has been studied with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This study involves two parts, the elucidation of the covalent binding site of the drug to DNA and a detailed investigation of the noncovalent interactions of CC-1065 with a DNA fragment through analysis of 2D NOE (NOESY) experiments. A CC-1065-DNA adduct was prepared, and an adenine adduct was released upon heating. NMR ( 1 H and 13 C) analysis of the adduct shows that the drug binds to N3 of adenine by reaction of its cyclopropyl group. The reaction pathway and product formed were determined by analysis of the 13 C DEPT spectra. An octamer duplex, d(CGATTAGC·GCTAATCG), was synthesized and used in the interaction study of CC-1065 and the oligomer. The duplex and the drug-octamer complex were both analyzed by 2D spectroscopy (COSY, NOESY). The relative intensity of the NOEs observed between the drug (CC-1065) and the octamer duplex shows conclusively that the drug is located in the minor groove, covalently attached to N3 of adenine 6 and positioned from the 3' → 5' end in relation to strand A [d(CGATTA 6 GC)]. A mechanism for drug binding and stabilization can be inferred from the NOE data and model-building studies

  10. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging SM advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display6 or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide (PAA) thin film to construct a random SM array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies)7 and analyzed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimeter. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured based on the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and antibody binding profiling, were demonstrated. SMI-Seq enables “library vs. library” screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity. PMID:25252978

  11. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Substrate interactions and promiscuity in a viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aathavan, K; Politzer, Adam T; Kaplan, Ariel; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Chemla, Yann R; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Anderson, Dwight L; Bustamante, Carlos

    2009-10-01

    The ASCE (additional strand, conserved E) superfamily of proteins consists of structurally similar ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities involving metabolism and transport of proteins and nucleic acids in all forms of life. A subset of these enzymes consists of multimeric ringed pumps responsible for DNA transport in processes including genome packaging in adenoviruses, herpesviruses, poxviruses and tailed bacteriophages. Although their mechanism of mechanochemical conversion is beginning to be understood, little is known about how these motors engage their nucleic acid substrates. Questions remain as to whether the motors contact a single DNA element, such as a phosphate or a base, or whether contacts are distributed over several parts of the DNA. Furthermore, the role of these contacts in the mechanochemical cycle is unknown. Here we use the genome packaging motor of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage varphi29 (ref. 4) to address these questions. The full mechanochemical cycle of the motor, in which the ATPase is a pentameric-ring of gene product 16 (gp16), involves two phases-an ATP-loading dwell followed by a translocation burst of four 2.5-base-pair (bp) steps triggered by hydrolysis product release. By challenging the motor with a variety of modified DNA substrates, we show that during the dwell phase important contacts are made with adjacent phosphates every 10-bp on the 5'-3' strand in the direction of packaging. As well as providing stable, long-lived contacts, these phosphate interactions also regulate the chemical cycle. In contrast, during the burst phase, we find that DNA translocation is driven against large forces by extensive contacts, some of which are not specific to the chemical moieties of DNA. Such promiscuous, nonspecific contacts may reflect common translocase-substrate interactions for both the nucleic acid and protein translocases of the ASCE superfamily.

  13. Estrogen receptor accessory proteins augment receptor-DNA interaction and DNA bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landel, C C; Potthoff, S J; Nardulli, A M; Kushner, P J; Greene, G L

    1997-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that accessory proteins play an important role in the ability of the estrogen receptor (ER) and other nuclear hormone receptors to modulate transcription when bound to cis-acting hormone response elements in target genes. We have previously shown that four proteins, hsp70, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and two unknown proteins (p48 and p45), copurify with ER that has been isolated by site-specific DNA chromatography (BERE) and influence the interaction of ER with DNA in vitro. To better define the nature of these effects, we used filter binding and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study the ability of these proteins to alter the kinetics of ER-DNA interaction and to influence the ability of ER to bend DNA when bound to an estrogen response element (ERE). The results of both assays indicate that ERE-purified ER, with its four associated proteins (hsp70, PDI, p48, p45), has a greater ability to bind to the vitellogenin A2 ERE than ER purified by estradiol-Sepharose chromatography in the absence (ESeph) or presence (EATP) of ATP, in which p48, p45 (ESeph) and hsp70 (EATP) are removed. Surprisingly, the rates of association and dissociation of ER and ERE were essentially the same for all three mixtures, suggesting that one or more ER-associated proteins, especially p45 and p48, may be required for ER to attain maximum DNA binding activity. In addition, circular permutation and phasing analyses demonstrated that the same ER-associated proteins produced higher order ER-DNA complexes that significantly increased the magnitude of DNA distortion, but did not alter the direction of the ER-induced bend of ERE-containing DNA fragments, which was toward the major groove of the DNA helix. These results suggest that p45 and/or p48 and possibly hsp70, play an important role both in the specific DNA binding and bending activities of ER and thus contribute to the overall stimulation of transcription in target genes that contain cis

  14. DnaA protein DNA-binding domain binds to Hda protein to promote inter-AAA+ domain interaction involved in regulatory inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyamura, Kenji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2011-08-19

    Chromosomal replication is initiated from the replication origin oriC in Escherichia coli by the active ATP-bound form of DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) system, a complex of the ADP-bound Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp, represses extra initiations by facilitating DnaA-bound ATP hydrolysis, yielding the inactive ADP-bound form of DnaA. However, the mechanisms involved in promoting the DnaA-Hda interaction have not been determined except for the involvement of an interaction between the AAA+ domains of the two. This study revealed that DnaA Leu-422 and Pro-423 residues within DnaA domain IV, including a typical DNA-binding HTH motif, are specifically required for RIDA-dependent ATP hydrolysis in vitro and that these residues support efficient interaction with the DNA-loaded clamp·Hda complex and with Hda in vitro. Consistently, substitutions of these residues caused accumulation of ATP-bound DnaA in vivo and oriC-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Leu-422 plays a more important role in these activities than Pro-423. By contrast, neither of these residues is crucial for DNA replication from oriC, although they are highly conserved in DnaA orthologues. Structural analysis of a DnaA·Hda complex model suggested that these residues make contact with residues in the vicinity of the Hda AAA+ sensor I that participates in formation of a nucleotide-interacting surface. Together, the results show that functional DnaA-Hda interactions require a second interaction site within DnaA domain IV in addition to the AAA+ domain and suggest that these interactions are crucial for the formation of RIDA complexes that are active for DnaA-ATP hydrolysis.

  15. DnaA Protein DNA-binding Domain Binds to Hda Protein to Promote Inter-AAA+ Domain Interaction Involved in Regulatory Inactivation of DnaA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyamura, Kenji; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal replication is initiated from the replication origin oriC in Escherichia coli by the active ATP-bound form of DnaA protein. The regulatory inactivation of DnaA (RIDA) system, a complex of the ADP-bound Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp, represses extra initiations by facilitating DnaA-bound ATP hydrolysis, yielding the inactive ADP-bound form of DnaA. However, the mechanisms involved in promoting the DnaA-Hda interaction have not been determined except for the involvement of an interaction between the AAA+ domains of the two. This study revealed that DnaA Leu-422 and Pro-423 residues within DnaA domain IV, including a typical DNA-binding HTH motif, are specifically required for RIDA-dependent ATP hydrolysis in vitro and that these residues support efficient interaction with the DNA-loaded clamp·Hda complex and with Hda in vitro. Consistently, substitutions of these residues caused accumulation of ATP-bound DnaA in vivo and oriC-dependent inhibition of cell growth. Leu-422 plays a more important role in these activities than Pro-423. By contrast, neither of these residues is crucial for DNA replication from oriC, although they are highly conserved in DnaA orthologues. Structural analysis of a DnaA·Hda complex model suggested that these residues make contact with residues in the vicinity of the Hda AAA+ sensor I that participates in formation of a nucleotide-interacting surface. Together, the results show that functional DnaA-Hda interactions require a second interaction site within DnaA domain IV in addition to the AAA+ domain and suggest that these interactions are crucial for the formation of RIDA complexes that are active for DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. PMID:21708944

  16. Cooperative DNA Recognition Modulated by an Interplay between Protein-Protein Interactions and DNA-Mediated Allostery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Merino

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly specific transcriptional regulation depends on the cooperative association of transcription factors into enhanceosomes. Usually, their DNA-binding cooperativity originates from either direct interactions or DNA-mediated allostery. Here, we performed unbiased molecular simulations followed by simulations of protein-DNA unbinding and free energy profiling to study the cooperative DNA recognition by OCT4 and SOX2, key components of enhanceosomes in pluripotent cells. We found that SOX2 influences the orientation and dynamics of the DNA-bound configuration of OCT4. In addition SOX2 modifies the unbinding free energy profiles of both DNA-binding domains of OCT4, the POU specific and POU homeodomain, despite interacting directly only with the first. Thus, we demonstrate that the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity is modulated by an interplay between protein-protein interactions and DNA-mediated allostery. Further, we estimated the change in OCT4-DNA binding free energy due to the cooperativity with SOX2, observed a good agreement with experimental measurements, and found that SOX2 affects the relative DNA-binding strength of the two OCT4 domains. Based on these findings, we propose that available interaction partners in different biological contexts modulate the DNA exploration routes of multi-domain transcription factors such as OCT4. We consider the OCT4-SOX2 cooperativity as a paradigm of how specificity of transcriptional regulation is achieved through concerted modulation of protein-DNA recognition by different types of interactions.

  17. Interactions between low energy electrons and DNA: a perspective from first-principles simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohanoff, Jorge; McAllister, Maeve; Tribello, Gareth A.; Gu, Bin

    2017-09-01

    DNA damage caused by irradiation has been studied for many decades. Such studies allow us to better assess the dangers posed by radiation, and to increase the efficiency of the radiotherapies that are used to combat cancer. A full description of the irradiation process involves multiple size and time scales. It starts with the interaction of radiation—either photons or swift ions—and the biological medium, which causes electronic excitation and ionisation. The two main products of ionising radiation are thus electrons and radicals. Both of these species can cause damage to biological molecules, in particular DNA. In the long run, this molecular level damage can prevent cells from replicating and can hence lead to cell death. For a long time it was assumed that the main actors in the damage process were the radicals. However, experiments in a seminal paper by the group of Leon Sanche in 2000 showed that low-energy electrons (LEE), such as those generated when ionising biological targets, can also cause bond breaks in biomolecules, and strand breaks in plasmid DNA in particular (Boudaiffa et al 2000 Science 287 1658-60). These results prompted a significant amount of experimental and theoretical work aimed at elucidating the role played by LEE in DNA damage. In this Topical Review we provide a general overview of the problem. We discuss experimental findings and theoretical results hand in hand with the aim of describing the physics and chemistry that occurs during the process of radiation damage, from the initial stages of electronic excitation, through the inelastic propagation of electrons in the medium, the interaction of electrons with DNA, and the chemical end-point effects on DNA. A very important aspect of this discussion is the consideration of a realistic, physiological environment. The role played by the aqueous solution and the amino acids from the histones in chromatin must be considered. Moreover, thermal fluctuations must be incorporated when

  18. eMethylsorb: electrochemical quantification of DNA methylation at CpG resolution using DNA-gold affinity interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, Abu Ali Ibn; Howell, Sidney; Carrascosa, Laura G; Rauf, Sakandar; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-11-07

    We report a simple electrochemical method referred to as "eMethylsorb" for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on the base dependent affinity interaction of DNA with gold. The methylation status of DNA is quantified by monitoring the electrochemical current as a function of the relative adsorption level of bisulphite treated DNA samples onto a bare gold electrode. This method can successfully distinguish methylated and unmethylated epigenotypes at single CpG resolution.

  19. Electronic structure of an anticancer drug DC81 and its interaction with DNA base pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Gargi, E-mail: gargi.tiwari@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Dipendra, E-mail: d-11sharma@rediffmail.com; Dwivedi, K. K., E-mail: dwivedikarunesh4@gmail.com [Department of Physics, DDU Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur (India); Dwivedi, M. K., E-mail: dwivedi-ji@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India)

    2016-05-06

    The drug, 8-Hydroxy-7-methoxy-pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4] benzodiazepine-5-one, commonly christened as DC81 belongs to the pyrrolo-[2,1-c][1,4]benzodiazepine (PBDs) family. It is a member of the group of naturally occurring antitumour antibiotics produced by various Streptomyces species. The antitumour activity of DC81 is attributed to its sequence specific interaction with G-C rich DNA region in particular, for Pu-G-Pu motifs. In the present paper, physico-chemical properties DC81 have been carried out using an ab-initio method, HF/6-31G(d,p) with GAMESS program. MEP, HOMO and LUMO surfaces have been scanned. Ionization potential, electron affinity, electronegativity, global hardness and softness of the drug have been calculated. Further, drug-DNA interactions have been examined using modified second order perturbation theory along with multicentred-multipole expansion technique. Results have been discussed in the light of other theoretical and experimental observations. Efforts have been made to elucidate the binding patterns and thereby biological properties of the drug.

  20. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene specific DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ruscio, Annalisa; Ebralidze, Alexander K.; Benoukraf, Touati; Amabile, Giovanni; Goff, Loyal A.; Terragni, Joylon; Figueroa, Maria Eugenia; De Figureido Pontes, Lorena Lobo; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, Pu; Wu, Mengchu; D’Alò, Francesco; Melnick, Ari; Leone, Giuseppe; Ebralidze, Konstantin K.; Pradhan, Sriharsa; Rinn, John L.; Tenen, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    Summary DNA methylation was described almost a century ago. However, the rules governing its establishment and maintenance remain elusive. Here, we present data demonstrating that active transcription regulates levels of genomic methylation. We identified a novel RNA arising from the CEBPA gene locus critical in regulating the local DNA methylation profile. This RNA binds to DNMT1 and prevents CEBPA gene locus methylation. Deep sequencing of transcripts associated with DNMT1 combined with genome-scale methylation and expression profiling extended the generality of this finding to numerous gene loci. Collectively, these results delineate the nature of DNMT1-RNA interactions and suggest strategies for gene selective demethylation of therapeutic targets in disease. PMID:24107992

  1. Organic-Silica Interactions in Saline: Elucidating the Structural Influence of Calcium in Low-Salinity Enhanced Oil Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmond, J L; Juhl, K; Hassenkam, T; Stipp, S L S; Walsh, T R; Rodger, P M

    2017-09-08

    Enhanced oil recovery using low-salinity solutions to sweep sandstone reservoirs is a widely-practiced strategy. The mechanisms governing this remain unresolved. Here, we elucidate the role of Ca 2+ by combining chemical force microscopy (CFM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We probe the influence of electrolyte composition and concentration on the adsorption of a representative molecule, positively-charged alkylammonium, at the aqueous electrolyte/silica interface, for four electrolytes: NaCl, KCl, MgCl 2 , and CaCl 2 . CFM reveals stronger adhesion on silica in CaCl 2 compared with the other electrolytes, and shows a concentration-dependent adhesion not observed for the other electrolytes. Using MD simulations, we model the electrolytes at a negatively-charged amorphous silica substrate and predict the adsorption of methylammonium. Our simulations reveal four classes of surface adsorption site, where the prevalence of these sites depends only on CaCl 2 concentration. The sites relevant to strong adhesion feature the O - silica site and Ca 2+ in the presence of associated Cl - , which gain prevalence at higher CaCl 2 concentration. Our simulations also predict the adhesion force profile to be distinct for CaCl 2 compared with the other electrolytes. Together, these analyses explain our experimental data. Our findings indicate in general how silica wettability may be manipulated by electrolyte concentration.

  2. Interactions between chemical and non-chemical stressors and inherent characteristics to elucidate children’s mental health disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children may be more vulnerable to the combined interactions of chemical and non-chemical stressors from their built, natural, and social environments when compared to adults. When children are exposed to cigarette smoke, bisphenol A (BPA), or organophosphate pesticides, they are...

  3. Interaction of carbon nanoparticles to serum albumin: elucidation of the extent of perturbation of serum albumin conformations and thermodynamical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Samir [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Hossain, Maidul [Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Devi, P. Sujatha [Nano-Structured Materials Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh [Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chaudhuri, Keya, E-mail: keya.chaudhuri@gmail.com [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Strong interaction of serum albumins to CNPs and potential toxicity. ► Partial unfolding and alteration of BSA and HSA secondary structure by CNP. ► Significant insight into design of nanoparticles in biomedical applications. -- Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles continuously generated from industries and vehicles due to incomplete combustion of fuels is one of the potent causes of air pollution. The exposure of this polluted air with carbon nanoparticles, introduced into the bloodstream of animals in the course of respiration, motivated us to study their interaction with plasma proteins, bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin. Carbon nanoparticles with very small size and high purity were synthesized by dehydration of D-glucose using concentrated sulphuric acid as dehydrating agent. These were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy and UV–visible spectroscopy. Carbon nanoparticles-protein interactions were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. The fluorescence quenching constants and thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy change (ΔH°), entropy change (ΔS°) and free energy change (ΔG°) were calculated, which indicated a strong static quenching and primary electrostatic interaction between the carbon nanoparticles and blood proteins. Circular dichroism spectra provided the information about the secondary structure alteration of the proteins in presence of carbon nanoparticles. These findings have shed light towards an understanding of the interactions between carbon nanoparticles and serum proteins which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of carbon nanoparticles, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  4. Interactions between environmental factors and maternal-fetal genetic variations: strategies to elucidate risks of preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereyra, Silvana; Bertoni, Bernardo; Sapiro, Rossana

    2016-07-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is a complex disease in which medical, social, cultural, and hereditary factors contribute to the pathogenesis of this adverse event. Interactions between genes and environmental factors may complicate our understanding of the relative influence of both effects on PTB. To overcome this, we combined data obtained from a cohort of newborns and their mothers with multiplex analysis of inflammatory-related genes and several environmental risk factors of PTB to describe the environmental-genetic influence on PTB. The study aimed to investigate the association between maternal and fetal genetic variations in genes related to the inflammation pathway with PTB and to assess the interaction between environmental factors with these variations. We conducted a case-control study at the Pereira Rossell Hospital Center, Montevideo, Uruguay. The study included 143 mother-offspring dyads who delivered at preterm (gestational ageenvironmental variables. The genes analyzed were: Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), Interleukin 6 (IL6), Interleukin 1 beta (IL1B) and Interleukin 12 receptor beta (IL12RB). We detected a significant interaction between IL1B rs16944 polymorphism in maternal samples and IL6 rs1800795 polymorphism in newborns, emphasizing the role of the interaction of maternal and fetal genomes in PTB. In addition, smoke exposure and premature rupture of membranes (PROM) were significantly different between the premature group and controls. IL1B and IL6 polymorphisms in mothers were significantly associated with PTB when controlling for smoke exposure. TLR4 polymorphism and PROM were significantly associated with PTB when controlling for PROM, but only in the case of severe PTB. Interactions between maternal and fetal genomes may influence the timing of birth. By incorporating environmental data, we revealed genetic associations with PTB, a finding not found when we analyzed genetic data alone. Our results stress the importance of studying the effect of

  5. Electrochemical behavior of antioxidants: Part 3. Electrochemical studies of caffeic Acid–DNA interaction and DNA/carbon nanotube biosensor for DNA damage and protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat Abdel-Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode biosensor was used for electrochemical studies of caffeic acid–dsDNA interaction in phosphate buffer solution at pH 2.12. Caffeic acid, CAF, shows a well-defined cyclic voltammetric wave. Its anodic peak current decreases and the peak potential shifts positively on the addition of dsDNA. This behavior was ascribed to an interaction of CAF with dsDNA giving CAF–dsDNA complex by intercalative binding mode. The apparent binding constant of CAF–dsDNA complex was determined using amperometric titrations. The oxidative damage caused to DNA was detected using the biosensor. The damage caused by the reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radical (·−OH generated by the Fenton system on the DNA-biosensor was detected. It was found that CAF has the capability of scavenging the hydroxide radical and protecting the DNA immobilized on the GCE surface.

  6. Use of genotype-environment interactions to elucidate the pattern of maize root plasticity to nitrogen deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengcheng; Zhuang, Zhongjuan; Cai, Hongguang; Cheng, Shuai; Soomro, Ayaz Ali; Liu, Zhigang; Gu, Riliang; Mi, Guohua; Yuan, Lixing; Chen, Fanjun

    2016-03-01

    Maize (Zea mays L.) root morphology exhibits a high degree of phenotypic plasticity to nitrogen (N) deficiency, but the underlying genetic architecture remains to be investigated. Using an advanced BC4 F3 population, we investigated the root growth plasticity under two contrasted N levels and identified the quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with QTL-environment (Q × E) interaction effects. Principal components analysis (PCA) on changes of root traits to N deficiency (ΔLN-HN) showed that root length and biomass contributed for 45.8% in the same magnitude and direction on the first PC, while root traits scattered highly on PC2 and PC3. Hierarchical cluster analysis on traits for ΔLN-HN further assigned the BC4 F3 lines into six groups, in which the special phenotypic responses to N deficiency was presented. These results revealed the complicated root plasticity of maize in response to N deficiency that can be caused by genotype-environment (G × E) interactions. Furthermore, QTL mapping using a multi-environment analysis identified 35 QTLs for root traits. Nine of these QTLs exhibited significant Q × E interaction effects. Taken together, our findings contribute to understanding the phenotypic and genotypic pattern of root plasticity to N deficiency, which will be useful for developing maize tolerance cultivars to N deficiency. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  7. Biophysics of DNA-Protein Interactions From Single Molecules to Biological Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Mark C

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a concise overview of current research on the biophysics of DNA-protein interactions. A wide range of new and classical methods are presented by authors investigating physical mechanisms by which proteins interact with DNA. For example, several chapters address the mechanisms by which proteins search for and recognize specific binding sites on DNA, a process critical for cellular function. Single molecule methods such as force spectroscopy as well as fluorescence imaging and tracking are described in these chapters as well as other parts of the book that address the dynamics of protein-DNA interactions. Other important topics include the mechanisms by which proteins engage DNA sequences and/or alter DNA structure. These simple but important model interactions are then placed in the broader biological context with discussion of larger protein-DNA complexes . Topics include replication forks, recombination complexes, DNA repair interactions, and ultimately, methods to understand the chromatin...

  8. Interaction between DNA Polymerase β and BRCA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Masaoka

    Full Text Available The breast cancer 1 (BRCA1 protein is a tumor suppressor playing roles in DNA repair and cell cycle regulation. Studies of DNA repair functions of BRCA1 have focused on double-strand break (DSB repair pathways and have recently included base excision repair (BER. However, the function of BRCA1 in BER is not well defined. Here, we examined a BRCA1 role in BER, first in relation to alkylating agent (MMS treatment of cells and the BER enzyme DNA polymerase β (pol β. MMS treatment of BRCA1 negative human ovarian and chicken DT40 cells revealed hypersensitivity, and the combined gene deletion of BRCA1 and pol β in DT40 cells was consistent with these factors acting in the same repair pathway, possibly BER. Using cell extracts and purified proteins, BRCA1 and pol β were found to interact in immunoprecipitation assays, yet in vivo and in vitro assays for a BER role of BRCA1 were negative. An alternate approach with the human cells of immunofluorescence imaging and laser-induced DNA damage revealed negligible BRCA1 recruitment during the first 60 s after irradiation, the period typical of recruitment of pol β and other BER factors. Instead, 15 min after irradiation, BRCA1 recruitment was strong and there was γ-H2AX co-localization, consistent with DSBs and repair. The rapid recruitment of pol β was similar in BRCA1 positive and negative cells. However, a fraction of pol β initially recruited remained associated with damage sites much longer in BRCA1 positive than negative cells. Interestingly, pol β expression was required for BRCA1 recruitment, suggesting a partnership between these repair factors in DSB repair.

  9. Dose calculation due to electrons interaction with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark, S; Orion, I; Shani, G [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Laster, B [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Experiments done with gadolinium loaded V79 Chinese Hamster cells, irradiated with thermal neutrons, showed that cells lethality increased by a factor of 1.8 compared to the case where the Gd atoms were located outside the cell.(l) It was obvious that the dramatic increase in cell lethality is due to the emission of Auger electrons following the {sup 157}Gd(n,{gamma}){sup 158}Gd reaction. Electrons of various energies from about 40 keV (very few) to less than 1 keV, are emitted. In the present work, energy absorbed in DNA was calculated, due to interaction of electron of different energies: 30, 15, 10, 8, 5 and 2 keV. The Monte Carlo code EGS4(2) was used for the calculations. The DNA was modeled as a series of alternative layers of sugar (phosphate - C{sub 5}O{sub 5}H{sub 7}P p=1.39gr cm{sup -1}) and water. The sugar layer thickness was assumed 2.5nm and the water layer thickness 10nm. An isotropic electron source was assumed to be located in a water layer and the electrons interactions (absorption and scattering) were calculated in the forward hemisphere. The energy absorbed in a group of 8 layers, (4 sugar and 4 water) was calculated for each one of the electron energies. An interesting fact found in those calculations; when the source electrons energy is 10 keV or more, most of the electrons are absorbed in the DNA-water system, are at energy about 2keV. There is no good explanation for this phenomenon except for assuming that when the electron`s energy reaches a low point of about 2keV, it cannot escape absorption in the medium. 10% of the 10 keV electrons deposit their entire energy in the 8 layers range (authors).

  10. Synthesis and crystal structure elucidation of new copper(II)-based chemotherapeutic agent coupled with 1,2-DACH and orthovanillin: Validated by in vitro DNA/HSA binding profile and pBR322 cleavage pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Mehvash; Afzal, Mohd; Ahmad, Musheer; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2016-08-01

    New copper(II)-based complex (1) was synthesized and characterized by analytical, spectroscopic and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The in vitro binding studies of complex 1 with CT DNA and HSA have been investigated by employing biophysical techniques to examine the binding propensity of 1 towards DNA and HSA. The results showed that 1 avidly binds to CT DNA via electrostatic mode along with the hydrogen bonding interaction of NH2 and CN groups of Schiff base ligand with the base pairs of DNA helix, leads to partial unwinding and destabilization of the DNA double helix. Moreover, the CD spectral studies revealed that complex 1 binds through groove binding interaction that stabilizes the right-handed B-form of DNA. Complex 1 showed an impressive photoinduced nuclease activity generating single-strand breaks in comparison with the DNA cleavage activity in presence of visible light. The mechanistic investigation revealed the efficiency of 1 to cleave DNA strands by involving the generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the time dependent DNA cleavage activity showed that there was gradual increase in the amount of NC DNA on increasing the photoexposure time. However, the interaction of 1 and HSA showed that the change of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of HSA was induced by the microenvironment of Trp residue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural elucidation, molecular representation and solvent interactions of vitrinite-rich and inertinite-rich South African coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Niekerk, Daniel

    the kinetic parameters and it was found that the swelling was governed by relaxation of the coal structure (super-Case II swelling). X-ray computed tomography was conducted confirming anisotropic swelling. The petrographic transitions (maceral-group composition and reflectance) with solvent swelling and extraction were quantified. No changes in the maceral compositions were found, but changes in some coal particles were observed. Random reflectance analysis showed that, for both vitrinite and inertinite, there is a decrease in reflectance values with solvent treatment. Vitrinite reflectograms showed a shift from the dominant reflecting V-types to lower V-types. The inertinite reflectograms exhibited an increase in number of I-types (broadening of reflectrograms). Molecular simulation and visualization approaches to solvent swelling and extraction were performed on the proposed molecular models of vitrinite-rich and inertinite-rich coals. A theoretical extraction yield was determined using solubility parameters and showed agreement with experimental extraction yield trends. Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT) modeling was explored to test whether this method could predict swelling extent. The predicted swelling trends of SAFT were comparable to that of the experimental swelling results. SAFT was found to be a promising tool for solvent-coal interaction predictions. Partially solvent swollen structures were constructed by the addition of solvent molecules to the original coal molecules using a amorphous building approach. This method showed that coal-coal non-bonding interaction changed with the introduction of solvent. A disruption in the van der Waals interaction energies and a change in hydrogen bond distributions were observed in the swollen coal models and quantified. It was concluded that small changes in coal structure translates to significant changes in solvent interaction behavior. These changes were successfully visualized and simulated using

  12. Nature versus nurture: A systematic approach to elucidate gene-environment interactions in the development of myopic refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraldi Utz, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Myopia is the most common eye disorder and major cause of visual impairment worldwide. As the incidence of myopia continues to rise, the need to further understand the complex roles of molecular and environmental factors controlling variation in refractive error is of increasing importance. Tkatchenko and colleagues applied a systematic approach using a combination of gene set enrichment analysis, genome-wide association studies, and functional analysis of a murine model to identify a myopia susceptibility gene, APLP2. Differential expression of refractive error was associated with time spent reading for those with low frequency variants in this gene. This provides support for the longstanding hypothesis of gene-environment interactions in refractive error development.

  13. Nuclear physics research front line by K computer. Elucidation of inter-hadron interactions by lattice QCD simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Takumi

    2013-01-01

    Research of nuclear forces by lattice QCD including inter-hadron interactions is presented. Determination of nuclear forces based on the first principle of QCD means to give underpinning of nuclear physics from the elementary particle standard model. Determining the unknown interactions such as hyperon forces or three-body ones gives large impacts not only to the nuclear physics but also to the universe or astrophysics. In this paper, the most up-to-date achievements as well as the scientific visions of future by using K computer is introduced. The nuclear potential is shown to be determined by the first principle simulation based on the purely fundamental theory without using any input from experiments. When this research is completed, nuclear physics is consolidated in the frame of standard model of elementary particles. The formulation of nuclear potentials was though very problematic but solved by using HAL method. The way to use Nambu-Bethe-Salpeter wave functions to go to the QCD is explained. The results of the lattice QCD simulation are shown about the nuclear force potential of 1 S 0 channel and the scattering phase differences. About the hyperon forces, computer results from the limit of flavor SU(3) where the masses of u, d and s quarks are equal are introduced here. Further studies using different quark masses are necessary and calculation taking the SU(3) breaking into consideration is in progress. The calculation result of triple proton channel is shown as an example of three-body forth, which is another important nuclear force. To let the lattice QCD exert the predicting ability further steps are left. Calculations on real quark masses are considered especially important as the future problem. Confronting the large problem of hadron many-body systems, K computer is the biggest challenging force as well as the new formalism of HAL QCD and Unified Contraction Algorithm (UCA). (S. Funahashi)

  14. Helical chirality: a link between local interactions and global topology in DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youri Timsit

    Full Text Available DNA supercoiling plays a major role in many cellular functions. The global DNA conformation is however intimately linked to local DNA-DNA interactions influencing both the physical properties and the biological functions of the supercoiled molecule. Juxtaposition of DNA double helices in ubiquitous crossover arrangements participates in multiple functions such as recombination, gene regulation and DNA packaging. However, little is currently known about how the structure and stability of direct DNA-DNA interactions influence the topological state of DNA. Here, a crystallographic analysis shows that due to the intrinsic helical chirality of DNA, crossovers of opposite handedness exhibit markedly different geometries. While right-handed crossovers are self-fitted by sequence-specific groove-backbone interaction and bridging Mg(2+ sites, left-handed crossovers are juxtaposed by groove-groove interaction. Our previous calculations have shown that the different geometries result in differential stabilisation in solution, in the presence of divalent cations. The present study reveals that the various topological states of the cell are associated with different inter-segmental interactions. While the unstable left-handed crossovers are exclusively formed in negatively supercoiled DNA, stable right-handed crossovers constitute the local signature of an unusual topological state in the cell, such as the positively supercoiled or relaxed DNA. These findings not only provide a simple mechanism for locally sensing the DNA topology but also lead to the prediction that, due to their different tertiary intra-molecular interactions, supercoiled molecules of opposite signs must display markedly different physical properties. Sticky inter-segmental interactions in positively supercoiled or relaxed DNA are expected to greatly slow down the slithering dynamics of DNA. We therefore suggest that the intrinsic helical chirality of DNA may have oriented the early

  15. μ-PIV/Shadowgraphy measurements to elucidate dynamic physicochemical interactions in a multiphase model of pulmonary airway reopening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Eiichiro

    2010-10-01

    We employ micro-particle image velocimetry (μ-PIV) and shadowgraphy to measure the ensemble-averaged fluid-phase velocity field and interfacial geometry during pulsatile bubble propagation that includes a reverse-flow phase under influence of exogenous lung surfactant (Infasurf). Disease states such as respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are characterized by insufficient pulmonary surfactant concentrations that enhance airway occlusion and collapse. Subsequent airway reopening, driven by mechanical ventilation, may generate damaging stresses that cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). It is hypothesized that reverse flow may enhance surfactant uptake and protect the lung from VILI. The microscale observations conducted in this study will provide us with a significant understanding of dynamic physicochemical interactions that can be manipulated to reduce the magnitude of this damaging mechanical stimulus during airway reopening. Bubble propagation through a liquid-occluded fused glass capillary tube is controlled by linear-motor-driven syringe pumps that provide mean and sinusoidal velocity components. A translating microscope stage mechanically subtracts the mean velocity of the bubble tip in order to hold the progressing bubble tip in the microscope field of view. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio near the bubble tip, μ-PIV and shadow images are recorded in separate trials then combined during post-processing with help of a custom-designed micro scale marker. Non-specific binding of Infasurf proteins to the channel wall is controlled by oxidation and chemical treatment of the glass surface. The colloidal stability and dynamic/static surface properties of the Infasurf-PIV particle solution are carefully adjusted based on Langmuir trough measurements. The Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) is computed to provide a Lagrangian perspective for comparison with our boundary element predictions.

  16. Elucidating the mechanism of Cr(VI) formation upon the interaction with metal oxides during coal oxy-fuel combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Jiao, Facun; Zhang, Lian; Yao, Hong; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-15

    The thermodynamics underpinning the interaction of Cr-bearing species with basic metal oxides, i.e. K2O, Fe2O3, MgO and CaO, during the air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal have been examined. The synchrotron-based X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used for Cr speciation. For the oxides tested, Cr(VI) formation is dominated by the reduction potential of the metals. The oxides of Ca(2+) with high reduction potential favored the oxidation of Cr(III), same for K(+). The other two basic metals, Fe2O3 and MgO with lower reduction potentials reacted with Cr(III) to form the corresponding chromites at the temperatures above 600°C. Coal combustion experiments in drop-tube furnace have confirmed the rapid capture of Cr vapors, either trivalent or hexavalent, by CaO into solid ash. The existence of HCl in flue gas favored the vaporization of Cr as CrO2Cl2, which was in turn captured by CaO into chromate. Both Fe2O3 and MgO exhibited less capability on scavenging the Cr(VI) vapor. Particularly, MgO alone exhibited a low capability for capturing the vaporized Cr(III) vapors. However, its co-existence with CaO in the furnace inhibited the Cr(VI) formation. This is beneficial for minimizing the toxicity of Cr in the coal combustion-derived fly ash. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    OpenAIRE

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2014-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and...

  18. DNA Encoding Training Using 3D Gesture Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Stelian; Handrea, Flavia-Laura; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara

    2017-01-01

    The work described in this paper summarizes the development process and presents the results of a human genetics training application, studying the 20 amino acids formed by the combination of the 3 nucleotides of DNA targeting mainly medical and bioinformatics students. Currently, the domain applications using recognized human gestures of the Leap Motion sensor are used in molecules controlling and learning from Mendeleev table or in visualizing the animated reactions of specific molecules with water. The novelty in the current application consists in using the Leap Motion sensor creating new gestures for the application control and creating a tag based algorithm corresponding to each amino acid, depending on the position in the 3D virtual space of the 4 nucleotides of DNA and their type. The team proposes a 3D application based on Unity editor and on Leap Motion sensor where the user has the liberty of forming different combinations of the 20 amino acids. The results confirm that this new type of study of medicine/biochemistry using the Leap Motion sensor for handling amino acids is suitable for students. The application is original and interactive and the users can create their own amino acid structures in a 3D-like environment which they could not do otherwise using traditional pen-and-paper.

  19. Interactions between nucleic acids and antibodies to Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, M.; Hartmann, B.; Malfoy, B.; Pilet, J.; Ramstein, J.; Sage, E.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we report some properties of the antibodies to Z-DNA. To determine more precisely the antigenic determinant, the interactions between the antibodies and several polynucleotides have been studied. We found that the antibodies bind very weakly to poly(dI-br 5 dC).(dI-br 5 dC). This polynucleotide can adopt the Z conformation in high salt concentration, as we have demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, from the study of the exchange rate of the protons involved in hydrogen bonds in this polynucleotide and from previous studies on poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) (Ramstein and Leng 1980; Pilet and Leng 1982), we propose a quantitative description of the dynamic structure of the Z form. 34 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  20. An atomistic geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration for DNA-radiation interaction simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, M. A.; Sikansi, D.; Cavalcante, F.; Incerti, S.; Champion, C.; Ivanchenko, V.; Francis, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, an atomistic geometrical model for the B-DNA configuration is explained. This model accounts for five organization levels of the DNA, up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. However, fragments of this fiber can be used to construct the whole genome. The algorithm developed in this work is capable to determine which is the closest atom with respect to an arbitrary point in space. It can be used in any application in which a DNA geometrical model is needed, for instance, in investigations related to the effects of ionizing radiations on the human genetic material. Successful consistency checks were carried out to test the proposed model. Catalogue identifier: AEPZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPZ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1245 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6574 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN. Computer: Any. Operating system: Multi-platform. RAM: 2 Gb Classification: 3. Nature of problem: The Monte Carlo method is used to simulate the interaction of ionizing radiation with the human genetic material in order to determine DNA damage yields per unit absorbed dose. To accomplish this task, an algorithm to determine if a given energy deposition lies within a given target is needed. This target can be an atom or any other structure of the genetic material. Solution method: This is a stand-alone subroutine describing an atomic-resolution geometrical model of the B-DNA configuration. It is able to determine the closest atom to an arbitrary point in space. This model accounts for five organization levels of the human genetic material, from the nucleotide pair up to the 30 nm chromatin fiber. This subroutine carries out a series of coordinate transformations

  1. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  2. RADX interacts with single-stranded DNA to promote replication fork stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubert, Lisa; Ho, Teresa; Hoffmann, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) regions form as an intermediate in many DNA-associated transactions. Multiple cellular proteins interact with ssDNA via the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. The heterotrimeric, multi-OB fold domain-containing Replication Protein A (RPA) complex...... ssDNA-binding activities is critical for avoiding these defects. Our findings establish RADX as an important component of cellular pathways that promote DNA replication integrity under basal and stressful conditions by means of multiple ssDNA-binding proteins....

  3. Elucidating the interplay between DNA-condensing and free polycations in gene transfection through a mechanistic study of linear and branched PEI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dai, Zhuojun; Gjetting, Torben; Mattebjerg, Maria Ahlm

    2011-01-01

    In the present study we compare LPEI and BPEI characteristics related to DNA condensation and their role as free polycation chains in gene transfection. Using radioactive 32P labeled DNA, we investigated the effect of free PEI chains on the cellular uptake of polyplexes. Our investigations show d...

  4. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the organization of the DNA in chromosomes plays an important role in radiation responses. In this paper, a model is proposed which suggests that these DNA unwinding alterations reflect differences in the attachment of DNA to the nuclear matrix. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure might exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and influencing the rate and nature of DNA double-strand break rejoining

  5. DNA interactions with a Methylene Blue redox indicator depend on the DNA length and are sequence specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjami, Elaheh; Clima, Lilia; Gothelf, Kurt V; Ferapontova, Elena E

    2010-06-01

    A DNA molecular beacon approach was used for the analysis of interactions between DNA and Methylene Blue (MB) as a redox indicator of a hybridization event. DNA hairpin structures of different length and guanine (G) content were immobilized onto gold electrodes in their folded states through the alkanethiol linker at the 5'-end. Binding of MB to the folded hairpin DNA was electrochemically studied and compared with binding to the duplex structure formed by hybridization of the hairpin DNA to a complementary DNA strand. Variation of the electrochemical signal from the DNA-MB complex was shown to depend primarily on the DNA length and sequence used: the G-C base pairs were the preferential sites of MB binding in the duplex. For short 20 nts long DNA sequences, the increased electrochemical response from MB bound to the duplex structure was consistent with the increased amount of bound and electrochemically readable MB molecules (i.e. MB molecules that are available for the electron transfer (ET) reaction with the electrode). With longer DNA sequences, the balance between the amounts of the electrochemically readable MB molecules bound to the hairpin DNA and to the hybrid was opposite: a part of the MB molecules bound to the long-sequence DNA duplex seem to be electrochemically mute due to long ET distance. The increasing electrochemical response from MB bound to the short-length DNA hybrid contrasts with the decreasing signal from MB bound to the long-length DNA hybrid and allows an "off"-"on" genosensor development.

  6. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a copper(II) Schiff-base complex: in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 plasmid cleavage and HSA binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Ahmad, Musheer; Afzal, Mohd; Zaki, Mehvash; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2014-11-01

    New copper(II) complex with Schiff base ligand 4-[(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-amino]-benzoic acid (H₂L) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies which revealed that the complex 1 exist in a distorted octahedral environment. In vitro CT-DNA binding studies were performed by employing different biophysical technique which indicated that the 1 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to ligand via electrostatic binding mode. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway and recognizes minor groove of DNA double helix. The HSA binding results showed that ligand and complex 1 has ability to quench the fluorescence emission intensity of Trp 214 residue available in the subdomain IIA of HSA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA Replication and Cell Cycle Progression Regulatedby Long Range Interaction between Protein Complexes bound to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsson, L

    2001-12-01

    A nonstationary interaction that controlsDNA replication and the cell cycle isderived from many-body physics in achemically open T cell. The model predictsa long range force F'(ξ) =- (κ/2) ξ(1 - ξ)(2 - ξ)between thepre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) boundby the origins in DNA, ξ = ϕ/N being the relativedisplacement of pre-RCs, ϕ the number of pre-RCs, N the number of replicons to be replicated,and κ the compressibilitymodulus in the lattice of pre-RCs whichbehaves dynamically like an elasticallybraced string. Initiation of DNAreplication is induced at the thresholdϕ = N by a switch ofsign of F''(ξ), fromattraction (-) and assembly in the G(1) phase (0force at ϕ = 2N, from repulsion inS phase back to attraction in G(2), when all primed replicons havebeen duplicated once. F'(0) = 0corresponds to a resting cell in theabsence of driving force at ϕ= 0. The model thus ensures that the DNAcontent in G(2) cells is exactlytwice that of G(1) cells. The switch of interaction at the R-point, at which N pre-RCs have been assembled, starts the release of Rb protein thus also explaining the shift in the Rb phosphorylation from mitogen-dependent cyclinD to mitogen-independent cyclin E.Shape,slope and scale of the response curvesderived agree well with experimental datafrom dividing T cells and polymerising MTs,the variable length of which is due to anonlinear dependence of the growthamplitude on the initial concentrations oftubulin dimers and guanosine-tri-phosphate(GTP). The model also explains the dynamic instabilityin growing MTs.

  8. A Novel Open Tubular Capillary Electrochromatographic Method for Differentiating the DNA Interaction Affinity of Environmental Contaminants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia D'Ulivo

    Full Text Available The interaction of chemicals with DNA may lead to genotoxicity, mutation or carcinogenicity. A simple open tubular capillary electrochromatographic method is proposed to rapidly assess the interaction affinity of three environmental contaminants (1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene to DNA by measuring their retention in the capillaries coated with DNA probes. DNA oligonucleotide probes were immobilized on the inner wall of a fused silica capillary that was first derivatized with 3-(aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES. The difference in retention times and factors was considered as the difference in interaction affinity of the contaminants to the DNA probes. The interaction of the contaminants with both double-stranded (dsDNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA coatings was compared. Retention factors of 1,4-phenylenediamine, pyridine and 2,4-diaminotoluene in the capillary coated with ssDNA probe were 0.29, 0.42, and 0.44, respectively. A similar trend was observed in the capillary coated with dsDNA, indicating that 2,4-diaminotoluene has the highest affinity among the three contaminants. The relative standard deviation (RSD for the retention factors was in the range of 0.05-0.69% (n = 3. The results demonstrated that the developed technique could be applied for preliminary screening purpose to provide DNA interaction affinity information of various environmental contaminants.

  9. DNA-psoralen interaction: a single molecule experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, M S; Viana, N B; Mesquita, O N

    2004-11-15

    By attaching one end of a single lambda-DNA molecule to a microscope coverslip and the other end to a polystyrene microsphere trapped by an optical tweezers, we can study the entropic elasticity of the lambda-DNA by measuring force versus extension as we stretch the molecule. This powerful method permits single molecule studies. We are particularly interested in the effects of the photosensitive drug psoralen on the elasticity of the DNA molecule. We have illuminated the sample with different light sources, studying how the different wavelengths affect the psoralen-DNA linkage. To do this, we measure the persistence length of individual DNA-psoralen complexes.

  10. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.L.; Chicago Univ., IL; Vaughan, A.T.M.

    1993-01-01

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions

  11. Comparison on the interaction of Al3+/nano-Al13 with calf thymus DNA /salmon sperm DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fei; Ma, Yue; Du, Changwen; Yang, Xiaodi; Shen, Renfang

    2015-11-01

    The conformation change, binding mode and binding site between Al3+/nano-Al13 and calf thymus DNA/salmon sperm DNA were investigated by UV-vis absorption, FTIR spectra, Raman spectroscopy and CD spectra, as well as melting curves measurement. The UV-vis spectra and circular dichroism spectra results suggested that the phosphate group structure was changed when Al3+ interacted with DNA, while the double-helix was distorted when nano-Al13 interacted with DNA. The FTIR and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the binding sites were Al3+ … PO2, Al3+ … N7/guanine PO2 … Al13 … N7-C8/guanine with calf thymus DNA, and Al3+ … N3-O2/cytosine, Al3+ … N7-C8/guanine, PO2 … Al13 … N7-C8/guanine, PO2 … Al13 … N1/adenine with salmon sperm DNA, respectively. The electrostatic binding was existed between Al3+ and DNA, and the electrostatic binding and complexing were found between nano-Al13 and DNA.

  12. Studies on the arctiin and its interaction with DNA by spectral methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yantao; Zhang Hanqi; Bi Shuyun; Zhou Xiaofu; Wang Liang; Yan Yongsheng

    2011-01-01

    The emission spectra of arctiin were determined under various experimental conditions. In addition, a fluorescence method was developed to obtain the binding constants and sites of the interaction between arctiin and DNA. A competitive binding experiment and melting temperature mensuration were carried out to investigate the binding mechanism of arctiin and DNA. The experimental results showed that the interaction between arctiin and DNA belongs to a groove binding mode. - Highlights: → Determined the emission spectra of arctiin by fluorescence spectrometry. → Obtain the binding constants and sites of interaction between arctiin and DNA. → Calculate the binding parameters according an improved calculation method.

  13. Biological significance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions. Applications to T4 endonuclease V-initiated DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, D.R.; Lloyd, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Facilitated diffusion along nontarget DNA is employed by numerous DNA-interactive proteins to locate specific targets. Until now, the biological significance of DNA scanning has remained elusive. T4 endonuclease V is a DNA repair enzyme which scans nontarget DNA and processively incises DNA at the site of pyrimidine dimers which are produced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light. In this study we tested the hypothesis that there exists a direct correlation between the degree of processivity of wild type and mutant endonuclease V molecules and the degree of enhanced UV resistance which is conferred to repair-deficient Eshcerichia coli. This was accomplished by first creating a series of endonuclease V mutants whose in vitro catalytic activities were shown to be very similar to that of the wild type enzyme. However, when the mechanisms by which these enzymes search nontarget DNA for its substrate were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the mutants displayed varying degrees of nontarget DNA scanning ranging from being nearly as processive as wild type to randomly incising dimers within the DNA population. The ability of these altered endonuclease V molecules to enhance UV survival in DNA repair-deficient E. coli then was assessed. The degree of enhanced UV survival was directly correlated with the level of facilitated diffusion. This is the first conclusive evidence directly relating a reduction of in vivo facilitated diffusion with a change in an observed phenotype. These results support the assertion that the mechanisms which DNA-interactive proteins employ in locating their target sites are of biological significance

  14. [Study of the interaction mechanism between brodifacoum and DNA by spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yun-qing; Min, Shun-geng

    2009-04-01

    The interaction between brodifacoum (3-[3-(4'-bromophenyl-4) 1,2,3,4-tetralin-10]-4-hydroxyl-coumarin) (BDF), an anticoagulant rodenticide, and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was studied by UV spectrum and fluorescence spectrum. The results were summarized as follows: There was a hypochromic effect of low concentration ct-DNA on the UV spectra. The fluorescence quenching studies showed a regular decrease in the fluorescence intensity after addition of ct-DNA by the static quenching mode with a quenching constant (Ksv) of 1.21 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) at 27 degrees C. The BDF possibly bonded to ct-DNA mainly via Van der Waals forces by the corresponding thermodynamics parameter. KI quenching experiment found that there was not obvious protection of ct-DNA to BDF. The fluorescence intensity of BDF/ct-DNA system changed with the variation in ionic strength Quenching of ct-DNA on the fluorescence of BDF/beta-CD inclusion complex was reduced in contrast with the free BDF, which showed that beta-CD could provide BDF with protection. So the comprehensive interaction mode of BDF with ct-DNA may be the groove binding by the above results. It was indicated that there had been static-electro interaction between BDF and ct-DNA at the same time. The conjunct action of Van der Waals forces and electrostatic attraction favorably provide BDF bonding interaction in the groove of ct-DNA.

  15. The importance of pKa in an analysis of the interaction of compounds with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mouli; Nandy, Promita; Chakraborty, Mousumi; Das, Piyal; Das, Saurabh

    2018-05-01

    pK a of a compound is crucial for determining the contributions of different forms of it towards overall binding with DNA. Hence it is important to use correct pK a values in DNA interaction studies. This study takes a look at the importance of pK a values to realize binding of compounds with DNA. Since pK a of a compound determined in the presence of DNA is quite different from that determined in its absence hence, presence of different forms of a compound during interaction with DNA is different from that realized if the determination of pK a is done in normal aqueous solution in absence of DNA. Hence, calculations determining contributions of different forms of a compound interacting with DNA are affected accordingly. Two simple analogues of anthracyclines, alizarin and purpurin, were used to investigate the influence DNA has on pK a values. Indeed, they were different in presence of DNA than when determined in normal aqueous solution. pK a1 for alizarin and purpurin determined in the absence and presence of calf thymus DNA were used in equations that determine contributions of two forms (neutral and anionic) towards overall binding with DNA. The study concludes that correct pK a values, determined correctly i.e. under appropriate conditions, must be used for DNA binding experiments to evaluate contributions of individual forms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular mechanism of DNA replication-coupled inactivation of the initiator protein in Escherichia coli: interaction of DnaA with the sliding clamp-loaded DNA and the sliding clamp-Hda complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Takata, Makoto; Kubota, Toshio; Matsuda, Yusaku; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2004-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, the ATP-DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication. After the DNA polymerase III holoenzyme is loaded on to DNA, DnaA-bound ATP is hydrolysed in a manner depending on Hda protein and the DNA-loaded form of the DNA polymerase III sliding clamp subunit, which yields ADP-DnaA, an inactivated form for initiation. This regulatory DnaA-inactivation represses extra initiation events. In this study, in vitro replication intermediates and structured DNA mimicking replicational intermediates were first used to identify structural prerequisites in the process of DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Unlike duplex DNA loaded with sliding clamps, primer RNA-DNA heteroduplexes loaded with clamps were not associated with DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, and duplex DNA provided in trans did not rescue this defect. At least 40-bp duplex DNA is competent for the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis when a single clamp was loaded. The DnaA-ATP hydrolysis was inhibited when ATP-DnaA was tightly bound to a DnaA box-bearing oligonucleotide. These results imply that the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis involves the direct interaction of ATP-DnaA with duplex DNA flanking the sliding clamp. Furthermore, Hda protein formed a stable complex with the sliding clamp. Based on these, we suggest a mechanical basis in the DnaA-inactivation that ATP-DnaA interacts with the Hda-clamp complex with the aid of DNA binding. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Limited

  17. A systems biology approach for elucidating the interaction of curcumin with Fanconi anemia FANC G protein and the key disease targets of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, David; Samanta, Dipayan; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S; Krishnaraj, R Navanietha

    2017-06-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a high risk of malignancies including acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinoma. There is a constant search out of new potential therapeutic molecule to combat this disorder. In most cases, patients with FA develop haematological malignancies with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Identifying drugs which can efficiently block the pathways of both these disorders can be an ideal and novel strategy to treat FA. The curcumin, a natural compound obtained from turmeric is an interesting therapeutic molecule as it has been reported in the literature to combat both FA as well as leukemia. However, its complete mechanism is not elucidated. Herein, a systems biology approach for elucidating the therapeutic potential of curcumin against FA and leukemia is investigated by analyzing the computational molecular interactions of curcumin ligand with FANC G of FA and seven other key disease targets of leukemia. The proteins namely DOT1L, farnesyl transferase (FDPS), histone decetylase (EP3000), Polo-like kinase (PLK-2), aurora-like kinase (AUKRB), tyrosine kinase (ABL1), and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) were chosen as disease targets for leukemia and modeled structure of FANC G protein as the disease target for FA. The docking investigations showed that curcumin had a very high binding affinity of -8.1 kcal/mol with FANC G protein. The key disease targets of leukemia namely tyrosine kinase (ABL1), aurora-like kinase (AUKRB), and polo-like kinase (PLK-2) showed that they had the comparable binding affinities of -9.7 k cal/mol, -8.7 k cal/mol, and -8.6 k cal/mol, respectively with curcumin. Further, the percentage similarity scores obtained from PAM50 using EMBOSS MATCHER was shown to provide a clue to understand the structural relationships to an extent and to predict the binding affinity. This investigation shows that curcumin effectively interacts with the disease targets of both

  18. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attia, Enas Mohammed Hassan

    2014-07-21

    has been also confirmed from the DFT calculations. Finally, interaction experiments of uranyl-quercetin complex with DNA have been performed to assess an alternative uranyl-trapping and photoreduction system. The data show that consecutive addition of quercetin and uranyl destabilizes DNA. However, a preformed uranyl quercetin complex has very little effect on DNA structure. On the other hand, quercetin and uranyl appear to bind to DNA as a preformed complex in the loop portion of hairpin DNA. Therefore, also HP DNA is expected to be a suitable but less effective trapping system for the uranyl quercetin complex and its potential photoproducts.

  19. Interactions of quercetin-uranium complexes with biomembranes and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attia, Enas Mohammed Hassan

    2014-01-01

    has been also confirmed from the DFT calculations. Finally, interaction experiments of uranyl-quercetin complex with DNA have been performed to assess an alternative uranyl-trapping and photoreduction system. The data show that consecutive addition of quercetin and uranyl destabilizes DNA. However, a preformed uranyl quercetin complex has very little effect on DNA structure. On the other hand, quercetin and uranyl appear to bind to DNA as a preformed complex in the loop portion of hairpin DNA. Therefore, also HP DNA is expected to be a suitable but less effective trapping system for the uranyl quercetin complex and its potential photoproducts.

  20. DNA-PK, ATM and ATR collaboratively regulate p53-RPA interaction to facilitate homologous recombination DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M A; Li, Z; Dangeti, M; Musich, P R; Patrick, S; Roginskaya, M; Cartwright, B; Zou, Y

    2013-05-09

    Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) are two distinct DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair pathways. Here, we report that DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), the core component of NHEJ, partnering with DNA-damage checkpoint kinases ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), regulates HR repair of DSBs. The regulation was accomplished through modulation of the p53 and replication protein A (RPA) interaction. We show that upon DNA damage, p53 and RPA were freed from a p53-RPA complex by simultaneous phosphorylations of RPA at the N-terminus of RPA32 subunit by DNA-PK and of p53 at Ser37 and Ser46 in a Chk1/Chk2-independent manner by ATR and ATM, respectively. Neither the phosphorylation of RPA nor of p53 alone could dissociate p53 and RPA. Furthermore, disruption of the release significantly compromised HR repair of DSBs. Our results reveal a mechanism for the crosstalk between HR repair and NHEJ through the co-regulation of p53-RPA interaction by DNA-PK, ATM and ATR.

  1. Physical interactions between bacteriophage and Escherichia coli proteins required for initiation of lambda DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberek, K; Osipiuk, J; Zylicz, M; Ang, D; Skorko, J; Georgopoulos, C

    1990-02-25

    The process of initiation of lambda DNA replication requires the assembly of the proper nucleoprotein complex at the origin of replication, ori lambda. The complex is composed of both phage and host-coded proteins. The lambda O initiator protein binds specifically to ori lambda. The lambda P initiator protein binds to both lambda O and the host-coded dnaB helicase, giving rise to an ori lambda DNA.lambda O.lambda P.dnaB structure. The dnaK and dnaJ heat shock proteins have been shown capable of dissociating this complex. The thus freed dnaB helicase unwinds the duplex DNA template at the replication fork. In this report, through cross-linking, size chromatography, and protein affinity chromatography, we document some of the protein-protein interactions occurring at ori lambda. Our results show that the dnaK protein specifically interacts with both lambda O and lambda P, and that the dnaJ protein specifically interacts with the dnaB helicase.

  2. The study of genomic DNA adsorption and subsequent interactions using total internal reflection ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabok, Alexei; Tsargorodskaya, Anna; Davis, Frank; Higson, Séamus P J

    2007-10-31

    The adsorption of genomic DNA and subsequent interactions between adsorbed and solvated DNA was studied using a novel sensitive optical method of total internal reflection ellipsometry (TIRE), which combines spectroscopic ellipsometry with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Single strands of DNA of two species of fish (herring and salmon) were electrostatically adsorbed on top of polyethylenimine films deposited upon gold coated glass slides. The ellipsometric spectra were recorded and data fitting utilized to extract optical parameters (thickness and refractive index) of adsorbed DNA layers. The further adsorption of single stranded DNA from an identical source, i.e. herring ss-DNA on herring ss-DNA or salmon ss-DNA on salmon ss-DNA, on the surface was observed to give rise to substantial film thickness increases at the surface of about 20-21 nm. Conversely adsorption of DNA from alternate species, i.e. salmon ss-DNA on herring ss-DNA or herring ss-DNA on salmon ss-DNA, yielded much smaller changes in thickness of 3-5 nm. AFM studies of the surface roughness of adsorbed layers were in line with the TIRE data.

  3. Demonstrating Interactions of Transcription Factors with DNA by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousaf, Nasim; Gould, David

    2017-01-01

    Confirming the binding of a transcription factor with a particular DNA sequence may be important in characterizing interactions with a synthetic promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay is a powerful approach to demonstrate the specific DNA sequence that is bound by a transcription factor and also to confirm the specific transcription factor involved in the interaction. In this chapter we describe a method we have successfully used to demonstrate interactions of endogenous transcription factors with sequences derived from endogenous and synthetic promoters.

  4. Elucidation of the sequence selective binding mode of the DNA minor groove binder adozelesin, by high-field 1H NMR and restrained molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, L.

    1999-01-01

    Adozelesin (formerly U73-975, The Upjohn Co.) is a covalent, minor-groove binding analogue of the antitumour antibiotic (+)CC-1065. Adozelesin consists of a cyclopropapyrroloindole alkylating sub-unit identical to (+)CC-1065, plus indole and benzofuran sub-units which replace the more complex pyrroloindole B and C sub-units, respectively, of (+)CC-1065. Adozelesin is a clinically important drug candidate, since it does not contain the ethylene bridge moieties on the B and C sub-units which are thought to be responsible for the unusual delayed hepatotoxicity exhibited by (+)CC-1065. Sequencing techniques identified two consensus sequences for adozelesin binding as p(dA) and 5'(T/A)(T/A)T-A*(C/G)G. This suggests that adozelesin spans a total of five base-pairs and shows a preference for A=T base-pair rich sequences, thus avoiding steric crowding around the exocyclic NH 2 of guanine and a wide minor groove. In this project, the covalent modification of two DNA sequences, i.e. 5'd(CGTAAGCGCTTA*CG) 2 and 5'-d(CGAAAAA*CGG)· 5'-d(CCGTTTTTCG), by adozelesin was examined by high-field NMR and restrained molecular mechanics and dynamics. Previous studies of minor groove binding drugs, using techniques as diverse as NMR, X-ray crystallography and molecular modelling, indicate that the incorporation of a guanine into the consensus sequence sterically hinders binding and, more importantly, produces a wider minor groove which is a 'slack' fit for the ligand. The aim of this investigation was to provide an insight into the sequence selective binding of adozelesin to 5'-AAAAA*CG and 5'-GCTTA*CG. The 1 H NMR data revealed that, in both cases, β-helical structure and Watson-Crick base-pairing was maintained on adduct formation. The 5'-GCTTA*CG adduct displayed significant distortion of the guanine base on the non-covalently modified strand. This distortion resulted from an amalgamation of two factors. Firstly, the presence of a strong hydrogen-bond between the amide linker of the

  5. Synthesis of furan-based DNA binders and their interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voege, Andrea; Hoffmann, Sascha; Gabel, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, many substances, based on naturally occurring DNA-binding molecules have been developed for the use in cancer therapy and as virostatica. Most of these substances are binding specifically to A-T rich sequences in the DNA minor groove. Neutral and positively charged DNA-binders are known. BNCT is most effective, which the boron is directly located in the cellular nucleus, so that the intercation with thermal neutrons can directly damage the DNA. To reach this aim, we have connected ammonioundecahydrododecaborate(1-) to DNA-binding structures such as 2,5-bis(4-formylphenyl)furan via a Schiff-Base reaction followed by a reduction of the imine to a secondary amine. In a following step the amine can be alkylated to insert positive charges to prevent repulsion between the compounds and the negatively charged sugar-phosphate-backbone of the DNA. (author)

  6. Interactions of photoactive DNAs with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase: Identification of peptides in the DNA binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, Y.J.K.; Evans, R.K.; Beach, C.M.; Coleman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (terminal transferase) was specifically modified in the DNA binding site by a photoactive DNA substrate (hetero-40-mer duplex containing eight 5-azido-dUMP residues at one 3' end). Under optimal photolabeling conditions, 27-40% of the DNA was covalently cross-linked to terminal transferase. The specificity of the DNA and protein interaction was demonstrated by protection of photolabeling at the DNA binding domain with natural DNA substrates. In order to recover high yields of modified peptides from limited amounts of starting material, protein modified with 32 P-labeled photoactive DNA and digested with trypsin was extracted 4 times with phenol followed by gel filtration chromatography. All peptides not cross-linked to DNA were extracted into the phenol phase while the photolyzed DNA and the covalently cross-linked peptides remained in the aqueous phase. The 32 P-containing peptide-DNA fraction was subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. Two sequences, Asp 221 -Lys 231 (peptide B8) and Cys 234 -Lys 249 (peptide B10), present in similar yield, were identified. Structure predictions placed the two peptides in an α-helical array of 39 angstrom which would accommodate a DNA helix span of 11 nucleotides. These peptides share sequence similarity with a region in DNA polymerase β that has been implicated in the binding of DNA template

  7. Investigation on the toxic interaction of typical plasticizers with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaojing [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Zong, Wansong, E-mail: gaocz@sdu.edu.cn [College of Population, Resources and Environment, Shandong Normal University, 88# East Wenhua Road, Jinan 250014 (China); Liu, Chunguang; Liu, Yang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Gao, Canzhu, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China); Liu, Rutao [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, China–America CRC for Environment & Health, Shandong University, 27# Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100, Shandong Province (China)

    2015-05-15

    The interactions of typical plasticizers dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. Experimental results indicated that the characteristic fluorescence intensity of phthalic acid rose with the increase of DNA concentration; while the characteristic fluorescence intensities of plasticizers decreased with the increase of DNA concentration. Experiments on native and denatured DNA determined that plasticizers interacted with DNA both in groove and electrostatic binding mode. The molecular modeling results further illustrated that there is groove binding between them; hydrogen bonding and Van der Waals interactions were the main forces. With the extension of branched-chains, the binding effects between plasticizers and DNA were weakened, which could be related to the increased steric hindrance. - Highlights: • This work established the binding mode of plasticizers with DNA on molecular level. • The mechanism was explored by fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. • There are two kinds of binding mode between DMP, DEP, DBP and DNA, electrostatic and groove. • With the branched chain extension, the binding effect of plasticizers and DNA has been weakened.

  8. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  9. Lichen secondary metabolites as DNA-interacting agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plšíková, J.; Štěpánková, Jana; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Bačkor, M.; Kozurková, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 2 (2014), s. 182-186 ISSN 0887-2333 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Lichens * DNA-binding * Topoisomerase I, II Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.903, year: 2014

  10. Interactive Roles of DNA Helicases and Translocases with the Single-Stranded DNA Binding Protein RPA in Nucleic Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awate, Sanket; Brosh, Robert M

    2017-06-08

    Helicases and translocases use the energy of nucleoside triphosphate binding and hydrolysis to unwind/resolve structured nucleic acids or move along a single-stranded or double-stranded polynucleotide chain, respectively. These molecular motors facilitate a variety of transactions including replication, DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. A key partner of eukaryotic DNA helicases/translocases is the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA). Biochemical, genetic, and cell biological assays have demonstrated that RPA interacts with these human molecular motors physically and functionally, and their association is enriched in cells undergoing replication stress. The roles of DNA helicases/translocases are orchestrated with RPA in pathways of nucleic acid metabolism. RPA stimulates helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding, enlists translocases to sites of action, and modulates their activities in DNA repair, fork remodeling, checkpoint activation, and telomere maintenance. The dynamic interplay between DNA helicases/translocases and RPA is just beginning to be understood at the molecular and cellular levels, and there is still much to be learned, which may inform potential therapeutic strategies.

  11. Structural Analysis of DNA Interactions with Magnesium Ion Studied by Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ponkumar; P. Duraisamy; N. Iyandurai

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: In the present study, FT Raman spectroscopy had been used to extend our knowledge about Magnesium ion - DNA interactions at various volume ratios (1:50, 1:20, 1:10 and 1:5). Approach: The analysis of FT Raman data supported the existence of structural specificities in the interaction and also the stability of DNA secondary structure. Results: Results from the Raman spectra clearly indicate that the interaction of Magnesium ion with DNA is mainly through the phosphate groups...

  12. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dusinska, Maria, E-mail: Maria.DUSINSKA@nilu.no [CEE-Health Effects Group, NILU - Norwegian Institute for Air Research, Kjeller (Norway); Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia); Smolkova, Bozena [Laboratory of Cancer Genetics, Cancer Research Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Collins, Andrew [Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo (Norway); Bonassi, Stefano [Unit of Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology, IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana, Rome (Italy); Volkovova, Katarina [Department of Experimental and Applied Genetics, Slovak Medical University, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-08-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  13. Are glutathione S transferases involved in DNA damage signalling? Interactions with DNA damage and repair revealed from molecular epidemiology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusinska, Maria; Staruchova, Marta; Horska, Alexandra; Smolkova, Bozena; Collins, Andrew; Bonassi, Stefano; Volkovova, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are members of a multigene family of isoenzymes that are important in the control of oxidative stress and in phase II metabolism. Acting non-enzymically, GSTs can modulate signalling pathways of cell proliferation, cell differentiation and apoptosis. Using a molecular epidemiology approach, we have investigated a potential involvement of GSTs in DNA damage processing, specifically the modulation of DNA repair in a group of 388 healthy adult volunteers; 239 with at least 5 years of occupational exposure to asbestos, stone wool or glass fibre, and 149 reference subjects. We measured DNA damage in lymphocytes using the comet assay (alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis): strand breaks (SBs) and alkali-labile sites, oxidised pyrimidines with endonuclease III, and oxidised purines with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase. We also measured GST activity in erythrocytes, and the capacity for base excision repair (BER) in a lymphocyte extract. Polymorphisms in genes encoding three GST isoenzymes were determined, namely deletion of GSTM1 and GSTT1 and single nucleotide polymorphism Ile105Val in GSTP1. Consumption of vegetables and wine correlated negatively with DNA damage and modulated BER. GST activity correlated with oxidised bases and with BER capacity, and differed depending on polymorphisms in GSTP1, GSTT1 and GSTM1. A significantly lower BER rate was associated with the homozygous GSTT1 deletion in all asbestos site subjects and in the corresponding reference group. Multifactorial analysis revealed effects of sex and exposure in GSTP1 Ile/Val heterozygotes but not in Ile/Ile homozygotes. These variants affected also SBs levels, mainly by interactions of GSTP1 genotype with exposure, with sex, and with smoking habit; and by an interaction between sex and smoking. Our results show that GST polymorphisms and GST activity can apparently influence DNA stability and repair of oxidised bases, suggesting a potential new role for these

  14. [Study on the aggregation behavior of cationic porphyrins and their interaction with ctDNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Min; Chen, Xin; Sun, Shu-Ting; Zhang, Li-Na; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Pei-Hua; Li, Yan; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2009-02-01

    Interest in the interaction between cationic porphyrins, particularly derivatives of meso-tetra(N-methylpyridinium-4-yl) porphyrin(TMPyP), and DNA abounds because they are versatile DNA-binding agents that could find application in photodynamic therapy, cancer detection, artificial nucleases, virus inhibition and so on. The interaction of two water-soluble cationic porphyrins, meso-tetrakis(4-N, N, N-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP) and 5-phenyl-10,15,20-tris[4-(N-methyl) pyridinium]porphyrin (TriMPyP), with calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was studied by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and resonance light scattering technique. TriMPyP forms aggregate in water due to the molecular asymmetry while TMAP exists as monomers. At lower concentrations of ctDNA (R > 1, R = c(TMAP)/c(DNA) base pair), the interaction of TMAP with DNA leads to significant hypochromicity and bathochromic shift of absorption spectra. And the fluorescence of TMAP was quenched while it showed enhanced resonance light scattering signals. But the extent of enhancement of resonance light scattering signals is very small, so the aggregate of TMAP is not very high. These observations indicate the self-stacking of TMAP along the DNA surface. At higher concentrations of ctDNA (R TMAP association with DNA is via outside binding which is accompanied with hyperchromic effect and fluorescence enhancement while the resonance light scattering signals is reduced. DNA addition decreases the fluorescence intensity of TriMPyP and it shifts the peak to the higher wavelengths (red shift). The interaction with DNA promotes the aggregation of TriMPyP and no simple outside binding is observed even at higher concentrations of ctDNA. The steric effect of molecular distortion constrains the intercalation or further binding to DNA. The effect of ionic strength on the interaction was investigated at two DNA concentrations, 1.2 and 24.0 micromol x L(-1), for TMAP. The Interactions of both porphyrins

  15. In Vitro Interactions between 17β-Estradiol and DNA Result in Formation of the Hormone-DNA Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbynek Heger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the role of 17β-estradiol (E2 in reproduction and during the menstrual cycle, it has been shown to modulate numerous physiological processes such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation and ion transport in many tissues. The pathways in which estrogens affect an organism have been partially described, although many questions still exist regarding estrogens’ interaction with biomacromolecules. Hence, the present study showed the interaction of four oligonucleotides (17, 20, 24 and/or 38-mer with E2. The strength of these interactions was evaluated using optical methods, showing that the interaction is influenced by three major factors, namely: oligonucleotide length, E2 concentration and interaction time. In addition, the denaturation phenomenon of DNA revealed that the binding of E2 leads to destabilization of hydrogen bonds between the nitrogenous bases of DNA strands resulting in a decrease of their melting temperatures (Tm. To obtain a more detailed insight into these interactions, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was employed. This study revealed that E2 with DNA forms non-covalent physical complexes, observed as the mass shifts for app. 270 Da (Mr of E2 to higher molecular masses. Taken together, our results indicate that E2 can affect biomacromolecules, as circulating oligonucleotides, which can trigger mutations, leading to various unwanted effects.

  16. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase and effect on polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L-P; Wang, S; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, Y-Y; Lai, Y-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, Q-Q

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase has been investigated by a number of biological, optical and electronic spectroscopic techniques. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to show gold nanoparticles' biological effect. Ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism spectra analysis were applied to character the structure of Pfu DNA polymerase after conjugation with gold nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the bond properties of the polymerase-gold nanoparticles complex. The authors demonstrate that gold nanoparticles do not affect the amplification efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using Pfu DNA polymerase, and Pfu DNA polymerase displays no significant changes of the secondary structure upon interaction with gold nanoparticles. The adsorption of Pfu DNA polymerase to gold nanoparticles is mainly through Au-NH(2) bond and electrostatic interaction. These findings may have important implications regarding the safety issue as gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  17. Studies on the Interaction between Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite Complex and Genomic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacali Necefoglu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite ([Zn (H206] (p-HO-C6H4COO22H20 complex which wassynthesized and characterized by instrumental methods and the DNA samples which hadbeen isolated from cattle were allowed to interact at 37 oC for different time periods. Theinteraction of genomic DNA with this complex has been followed by agarose gelelectrophoresis at 50 V for 2 h. When DNA samples were allowed to interact with this metalcomplex, it was found that band intensities changed with the concentrations of the complex.In the result of interaction between this complex and genomic DNA samples, it wasdetermined that the intensities of bands were changed at the different concentrations of thecomplex. The brightness of the bands was increased and mobility of the bands wasdecreased, indicating the occurrence of increased covalent binding of the metal complexwith DNA. In this study it was concluded that the damage effect of ascorbate was reducedby Zinc-Hydroxybenzoite.

  18. Theoretical study on the interaction of pregabalin and olanzapine with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZibaHooshiarSodagar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims is to study the interaction of two drugs including pregabalin and olanzapine with DNA. For this purpose, density functional theory calculations and docking were used. The structure of pregabalin and olanzapine using B3Lyp theory level and the basis set 6-311 G(d,p was optimized. Highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO calculated for each drugs. The obtained results showed that olanzapine is more reactive than pregabalin. Docking of drugs with DNA was performed and the results showed that binding affinity of olanzapine is higher than pregabalin. Also, the graphical results revealed that olanzapine interact with DNA via 5-terminal major groove of DNA, whereas pregabalin interact with DNA via 3- termind major groove.

  19. Electrostatic study of Alanine mutational effects on transcription: application to GATA-3:DNA interaction complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Assaad, Atlal; Dawy, Zaher; Nemer, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Protein-DNA interaction is of fundamental importance in molecular biology, playing roles in functions as diverse as DNA transcription, DNA structure formation, and DNA repair. Protein-DNA association is also important in medicine; understanding Protein-DNA binding kinetics can assist in identifying disease root causes which can contribute to drug development. In this perspective, this work focuses on the transcription process by the GATA Transcription Factor (TF). GATA TF binds to DNA promoter region represented by `G,A,T,A' nucleotides sequence, and initiates transcription of target genes. When proper regulation fails due to some mutations on the GATA TF protein sequence or on the DNA promoter sequence (weak promoter), deregulation of the target genes might lead to various disorders. In this study, we aim to understand the electrostatic mechanism behind GATA TF and DNA promoter interactions, in order to predict Protein-DNA binding in the presence of mutations, while elaborating on non-covalent binding kinetics. To generate a family of mutants for the GATA:DNA complex, we replaced every charged amino acid, one at a time, with a neutral amino acid like Alanine (Ala). We then applied Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations feeding into free energy calculations, for each mutation. These calculations delineate the contribution to binding from each Ala-replaced amino acid in the GATA:DNA interaction. After analyzing the obtained data in view of a two-step model, we are able to identify potential key amino acids in binding. Finally, we applied the model to GATA-3:DNA (crystal structure with PDB-ID: 3DFV) binding complex and validated it against experimental results from the literature.

  20. ATM Protein Physically and Functionally Interacts with Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen to Regulate DNA Synthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Armin M.; Choi, Serah; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a pleiotropic disease, with a characteristic hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation that is caused by biallelic mutations in A-T mutated (ATM), a gene encoding a protein kinase critical for the induction of cellular responses to DNA damage, particularly to DNA double strand breaks. A long known characteristic of A-T cells is their ability to synthesize DNA even in the presence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage, a phenomenon termed radioresistant DNA synthesis. We previously reported that ATM kinase inhibition, but not ATM protein disruption, blocks sister chromatid exchange following DNA damage. We now show that ATM kinase inhibition, but not ATM protein disruption, also inhibits DNA synthesis. Investigating a potential physical interaction of ATM with the DNA replication machinery, we found that ATM co-precipitates with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) from cellular extracts. Using bacterially purified ATM truncation mutants and in vitro translated PCNA, we showed that the interaction is direct and mediated by the C terminus of ATM. Indeed, a 20-amino acid region close to the kinase domain is sufficient for strong binding to PCNA. This binding is specific to ATM, because the homologous regions of other PIKK members, including the closely related kinase A-T and Rad3-related (ATR), did not bind PCNA. ATM was found to bind two regions in PCNA. To examine the functional significance of the interaction between ATM and PCNA, we tested the ability of ATM to stimulate DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase δ, which is implicated in both DNA replication and DNA repair processes. ATM was observed to stimulate DNA polymerase activity in a PCNA-dependent manner. PMID:22362778

  1. Interaction of zinc and cobalt with dipeptides and their DNA binding ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Concentrated CT DNA stock solutions were pre- pared in tris .... the SH, NH and NH2 hydrogen exchange with D2O the changes in ... which is an index of the interaction between the. DNA and ... Since ESI-MS is a powerful new approach for.

  2. DNA interaction with platinum-based cytostatics revealed by DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerkova, Kristyna; Vaculovic, Tomas; Vaculovicova, Marketa; Kynicky, Jindrich; Brtnicky, Martin; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-12-15

    The main mechanism of action of platinum-based cytostatic drugs - cisplatin, oxaliplatin and carboplatin - is the formation of DNA cross-links, which restricts the transcription due to the disability of DNA to enter the active site of the polymerase. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was employed as a simplified model of the amplification process in the cell nucleus. PCR with fluorescently labelled dideoxynucleotides commonly employed for DNA sequencing was used to monitor the effect of platinum-based cytostatics on DNA in terms of decrease in labeling efficiency dependent on a presence of the DNA-drug cross-link. It was found that significantly different amounts of the drugs - cisplatin (0.21 μg/mL), oxaliplatin (5.23 μg/mL), and carboplatin (71.11 μg/mL) - were required to cause the same quenching effect (50%) on the fluorescent labelling of 50 μg/mL of DNA. Moreover, it was found that even though the amounts of the drugs was applied to the reaction mixture differing by several orders of magnitude, the amount of incorporated platinum, quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, was in all cases at the level of tenths of μg per 5 μg of DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction of water with oriented DNA in the A- and B-form conformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandes, R.; Rupprecht, A.; Kearns, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    High resolution 2 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to investigate the interaction of D 2 O with solid samples of uniaxially oriented Li-DNA (B-form DNA) and Na-DNA (A- and B-form DNA). At low levels of hydration, 0 approximately 4 D 2 O/nucleotide, the 2 H spectra shows a very weak (due to short T2) broad single resonance, suggestive of unrestricted rotational diffusion of the water. At approximately 5 or more D 2 O/nucleotide, the Li-DNA (B-form) spectra suddenly exhibit a large doublet splitting, characteristic of partially ordered water. With increasing hydration, the general trend is a decrease of this splitting. From our analysis we show that the DNA water structure reorganizes as the DNA is progressively hydrated. The D 2 O interaction with Na-DNA is rather different than with Li-DNA. Below 10 D 2 O/nucleotide Na-DNA is normally expected to be in the A-form, and a small, or negligible splitting is observed. In the range 9-19 D 2 O/nucleotide, the splitting increases with increasing hydration. Above approximately 20 D 2 O/nucleotide Na-DNA converts entirely to the B-form and the D 2 O splittings are then similar to those found in Li-DNA. We show that the complex Na-DNA results obtained in the range 0-20 D 2 O/nucleotide are caused by a mixture of A- and B-DNA in those samples

  4. Discovering approximate-associated sequence patterns for protein-DNA interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Tak Ming; Wong, Ka Chun; Lee, Kin Hong; Wong, Man Hon; Lau, Chi Kong; Tsui, Stephen Kwok Wing; Leung, Kwong Sak

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are fundamental protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. Extensive efforts have been made to better understand the protein

  5. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners

  6. Characterization of protein-DNA interactions in trypanosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Pariona Llanos

    2014-01-01

    O T. cruzi, é o agente causador da doença de Chagas. O estado redox NAD+/NADH intracelular é fundamental na manutenção do metabolismo celular. A GAPDH apresenta a função de proteção do telômero em mamíferos contra degradação, isto por causa de ligar se ao telômero. Aqui, mostramos que a GAPDH recombinante de T. cruzi (rTcGAPDH) interage com o DNA telomérico. A rTcGAPDH liga ao DNA de simples fita. Mostramos que a GAPDH liga ao DNA telomérico in vivo em células epimastigotas, onde a [NADH] é m...

  7. Functional interaction of the DNA-binding transcription factor Sp1 through its DNA-binding domain with the histone chaperone TAF-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toru; Muto, Shinsuke; Miyamoto, Saku; Aizawa, Kenichi; Horikoshi, Masami; Nagai, Ryozo

    2003-08-01

    Transcription involves molecular interactions between general and regulatory transcription factors with further regulation by protein-protein interactions (e.g. transcriptional cofactors). Here we describe functional interaction between DNA-binding transcription factor and histone chaperone. Affinity purification of factors interacting with the DNA-binding domain of the transcription factor Sp1 showed Sp1 to interact with the histone chaperone TAF-I, both alpha and beta isoforms. This interaction was specific as Sp1 did not interact with another histone chaperone CIA nor did other tested DNA-binding regulatory factors (MyoD, NFkappaB, p53) interact with TAF-I. Interaction of Sp1 and TAF-I occurs both in vitro and in vivo. Interaction with TAF-I results in inhibition of DNA-binding, and also likely as a result of such, inhibition of promoter activation by Sp1. Collectively, we describe interaction between DNA-binding transcription factor and histone chaperone which results in negative regulation of the former. This novel regulatory interaction advances our understanding of the mechanisms of eukaryotic transcription through DNA-binding regulatory transcription factors by protein-protein interactions, and also shows the DNA-binding domain to mediate important regulatory interactions.

  8. The DnaA N-terminal domain interacts with Hda to facilitate replicase clamp-mediated inactivation of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su'etsugu, Masayuki; Harada, Yuji; Keyamura, Kenji; Matsunaga, Chika; Kasho, Kazutoshi; Abe, Yoshito; Ueda, Tadashi; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2013-12-01

    DnaA activity for replication initiation of the Escherichia coli chromosome is negatively regulated by feedback from the DNA-loaded form of the replicase clamp. In this process, called RIDA (regulatory inactivation of DnaA), ATP-bound DnaA transiently assembles into a complex consisting of Hda and the DNA-clamp, which promotes inter-AAA+ domain association between Hda and DnaA and stimulates hydrolysis of DnaA-bound ATP, producing inactive ADP-DnaA. Using a truncated DnaA mutant, we previously demonstrated that the DnaA N-terminal domain is involved in RIDA. However, the precise role of the N-terminal domain in RIDA has remained largely unclear. Here, we used an in vitro reconstituted system to demonstrate that the Asn-44 residue in the N-terminal domain of DnaA is crucial for RIDA but not for replication initiation. Moreover, an assay termed PDAX (pull-down after cross-linking) revealed an unstable interaction between a DnaA-N44A mutant and Hda. In vivo, this mutant exhibited an increase in the cellular level of ATP-bound DnaA. These results establish a model in which interaction between DnaA Asn-44 and Hda stabilizes the association between the AAA+ domains of DnaA and Hda to facilitate DnaA-ATP hydrolysis during RIDA. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Loss of DNA-membrane interactions and cessation of DNA synthesis in myeloperoxidase-treated Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, H.; Orman, J.; Rakita, R.M.; Michel, B.R.; VanDevanter, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Neutrophils and monocytes employ a diverse array of antimicrobial effector systems to support their host defense functions. The mechanisms of action of most of these systems are incompletely understood. The present report indicates that microbicidal activity by a neutrophil-derived antimicrobial system, consisting of myeloperoxidase, enzymatically generated hydrogen peroxide, and chloride ion, is accompanied by prompt cessation of DNA synthesis in Escherichia coli, as determined by markedly reduced incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into trichloracetic acid-precipitable material. Simultaneously, the myeloperoxidase system mediates a decline in the ability of E. coli membranes to bind hemimethylated DNA sequences containing the E. coli chromosomal origin of replication (oriC). Binding of oriC to the E. coli membrane is an essential element of orderly chromosomal DNA replication. Comparable early changes in DNA synthesis and DNA-membrane interactions were not observed with alternative oxidant or antibiotic-mediated microbicidal systems. It is proposed that oxidants generated by the myeloperoxidase system modify the E. coli membrane in such a fashion that oriC binding is markedly impaired. As a consequence chromosomal DNA replication is impaired and organisms can no longer replicate

  10. Dynamics of bleomycin interaction with a strongly bound hairpin DNA substrate, and implications for cleavage of the bound DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Trevor C; Nanjunda, Rupesh; Tang, Chenhong; Liu, Yang; Segerman, Zachary J; Zaleski, Paul A; Wilson, W David; Hecht, Sidney M

    2012-10-31

    Recent studies involving DNAs bound strongly by bleomycins have documented that such DNAs are degraded by the antitumor antibiotic with characteristics different from those observed when studying the cleavage of randomly chosen DNAs in the presence of excess Fe·BLM. In the present study, surface plasmon resonance has been used to characterize the dynamics of BLM B(2) binding to a strongly bound hairpin DNA, to define the effects of Fe(3+), salt, and temperature on BLM-DNA interaction. One strong primary DNA binding site, and at least one much weaker site, were documented. In contrast, more than one strong cleavage site was found, an observation also made for two other hairpin DNAs. Evidence is presented for BLM equilibration between the stronger and weaker binding sites in a way that renders BLM unavailable to other, less strongly bound DNAs. Thus, enhanced binding to a given site does not necessarily result in increased DNA degradation at that site; i.e., for strongly bound DNAs, the facility of DNA cleavage must involve other parameters in addition to the intrinsic rate of C-4' H atom abstraction from DNA sugars.

  11. Thermodynamics of the Interaction between Alzheimer's Disease Related Tau Protein and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camero, Sergio; Benítez, María J.; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús; Jiménez, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation can be considered as one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other tauophaties. Besides its well-known role as a microtubule associated protein, Tau displays a key function as a protector of genomic integrity in stress situations. Phosphorylation has been proven to regulate multiple processes including nuclear translocation of Tau. In this contribution, we are addressing the physicochemical nature of DNA-Tau interaction including the plausible influence of phosphorylation. By means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we measured the equilibrium constant and the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes associated to the Tau-DNA complex formation. Our results show that unphosphorylated Tau binding to DNA is reversible. This fact is in agreement with the protective role attributed to nuclear Tau, which stops binding to DNA once the insult is over. According to our thermodynamic data, oscillations in the concentration of dephosphorylated Tau available to DNA must be the variable determining the extent of Tau binding and DNA protection. In addition, thermodynamics of the interaction suggest that hydrophobicity must represent an important contribution to the stability of the Tau-DNA complex. SPR results together with those from Tau expression in HEK cells show that phosphorylation induces changes in Tau protein which prevent it from binding to DNA. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding is analogous to the Tau-microtubules binding inhibition induced by phosphorylation. Our results suggest that hydrophobicity may control Tau location and DNA interaction and that impairment of this Tau-DNA interaction, due to Tau hyperphosphorylation, could contribute to Alzheimer's pathogenesis. PMID:25126942

  12. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of eugenol with salmon sperm DNA in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Shuyun, E-mail: sy_bi@sina.com [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China); Yan Lili; Wang Yu; Pang Bong; Wang Tianjiao [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Fluorescence spectra, absorption spectra, melting temperature, ionic strength effect, and viscosity experiments were described that characterize the interaction of eugenol with salmon sperm DNA in vitro. Eugenol was found to bind but weakly to DNA, with binding constants of 4.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3}, 3.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} and 2.47 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} at 18, 28 and 38 Degree-Sign C respectively. The Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures suggested that the quenching type of fluorescence of eugenol by DNA was a static quenching. Both the relative viscosity and the melting temperature of DNA were increased by the addition of eugenol. The changes of ionic strength had no affect on the binding. In addition, the binding constant of eugenol with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was larger than that of eugenol with double stranded DNA (dsDNA). These results revealed that the binding mode of eugenol to DNA was intercalative binding. The thermodynamic parameters {Delta}H, {Delta}G and {Delta}S were also obtained according to the Van't Hoff equations, which suggested that hydrogen bond or van der Waals force might play an important role in a binding of eugenol to DNA. Based on the theory of the Foerster energy transference, the binding distance between DNA and eugenol was determined as 4.40 nm, indicating that the static fluorescence quenching of eugenol by DNA was also a non-radiation energy transfer process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA quenched the fluorescence of eugenol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding constant, binding site and binding force were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding mode of eugenol to DNA was intercalative. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer occurred between eugenol and DNA.

  13. Electrochemical and calorimetric investigation of interaction of novel biscationic anticancer agents with DNA; Investigacao eletroquimica e calorimetrica da interacao de novos agentes antitumorais biscationicos com DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Lauris Lucia da; Donnici, Claudio Luis; Lopes, Julio Cesar Dias, E-mail: cdonnici@terra.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Goulart, Marilia Oliveira Fonseca; Abreu, Fabiane Caxico de; Paula, Francine Santos de [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Campus A.C. Simoes. Inst. de Quimica e Biotecnologia; Bravo, Carlos E. Salas; Santoro, Marcelo Matos [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia; Denadai, Angelo Marcio Leite [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, Timoteo, MG (Brazil). Campus VII; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Fisiologicas; Montanari, Carlos Alberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Biscationic amidines bind in the DNA minor groove and present biological activity against a range of infectious diseases. Two new biscationic compounds (bis-{alpha}-{omega}-S-thioureido, amino and sulfide analogues) were synthesized in good yields and fully characterized, and their interaction with DNA was also investigated. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) was used to measure the thermodynamic properties of binding interactions between DNA and these ligands. A double stranded calf thymus DNA immobilized on an electrode surface was used to study the possible DNA-interacting abilities of these compounds towards dsDNA in situ. A remarkable interaction of these compounds with DNA was demonstrated and their potential application as anticancer agents was furthered. (author)

  14. DNMT1-interacting RNAs block gene-specific DNA methylation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Di Ruscio, A.; Ebralidze, A.; Benoukraf, T.; Amabile, G.; Goff, L.A.; Terragni, J.; Figueroa, M.E.; Pontes, L.L.D.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell; Zhang, P.; Wu, M.C.; D´Alo, F.; Melnick, A.; Leone, G.; Ebralidze, K.K.; Pradhan, S.; Rinn, J.L.; Tenen, D.G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 503, č. 7476 (2013), s. 371-376 ISSN 0028-0836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21307 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DNA methylation * non-coding RNA * DNMT1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 42.351, year: 2013

  15. Interaction of the Sliding Clamp β-Subunit and Hda, a DnaA-Related Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the β subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation...

  16. DNA damage in human lymphocytes due to synergistic interaction between ionizing radiation and pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. K.; Lee, K. H.; Lee, B. H.; Chun, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    Biological risks may arise from the possibility of the synergistic interaction between harmful factors such as ionizing radiation and pesticide. The effect of pesticide on radiation-induced DNA damage in human in human blood lymphocytes was evaluated by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay. The lymphocytes, with or without pretreatment of the pesticide, were exposed to 2.0 Gy of gamma ray. Significantly increased tail moment, which was a marker of DNA strand breaks in SCGE assay, showed an excellent dose-response relationship. The present study confirms that the pesticide has the cytotoxic effect on lymphocytes and that it interacts synergistically with ionizing radiationon DNA damage, as well

  17. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction between pirimicarb and calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guowen; Hu, Xing; Pan, Junhui

    2011-02-01

    The interaction between pirimicarb and calf thymus DNA in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated with the use of Neutral Red (NR) dye as a spectral probe by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, as well as viscosity measurements and DNA melting techniques. The results revealed that an intercalation binding should be the interaction mode of pirimicarb to DNA. CD spectra indicated that pirimicarb induced conformational changes of DNA. The binding constants of pirimicarb with DNA were obtained by the fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (Δ Hθ) and entropy change (Δ Sθ) were calculated to be -52.13 ± 2.04 kJ mol -1 and -108.8 ± 6.72 J mol -1 K -1 according to the van't Hoff equation, which suggested that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces might play a major role in the binding of pirimicarb to DNA. Further, the alternative least squares (ALS) method was applied to resolve a complex two-way array of the absorption spectra data, which provided simultaneously the concentration information for the three reaction components, pirimicarb, NR and DNA-NR. This ALS analysis indicated that the intercalation of pirimicarb into the DNA by substituting for NR in the DNA-NR complex.

  18. Spectroscopic studies of the interaction between pirimicarb and calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guowen; Hu, Xing; Pan, Junhui

    2011-02-01

    The interaction between pirimicarb and calf thymus DNA in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated with the use of Neutral Red (NR) dye as a spectral probe by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, as well as viscosity measurements and DNA melting techniques. The results revealed that an intercalation binding should be the interaction mode of pirimicarb to DNA. CD spectra indicated that pirimicarb induced conformational changes of DNA. The binding constants of pirimicarb with DNA were obtained by the fluorescence quenching method. The thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔHθ) and entropy change (ΔSθ) were calculated to be -52.13±2.04 kJ mol(-1) and -108.8±6.72 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to the van't Hoff equation, which suggested that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces might play a major role in the binding of pirimicarb to DNA. Further, the alternative least squares (ALS) method was applied to resolve a complex two-way array of the absorption spectra data, which provided simultaneously the concentration information for the three reaction components, pirimicarb, NR and DNA-NR. This ALS analysis indicated that the intercalation of pirimicarb into the DNA by substituting for NR in the DNA-NR complex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A force-based, parallel assay for the quantification of protein-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Katja; Pippig, Diana A; Aschenbrenner, Daniela; Gaub, Hermann E

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA), parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction.

  20. A force-based, parallel assay for the quantification of protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Limmer

    Full Text Available Analysis of transcription factor binding to DNA sequences is of utmost importance to understand the intricate regulatory mechanisms that underlie gene expression. Several techniques exist that quantify DNA-protein affinity, but they are either very time-consuming or suffer from possible misinterpretation due to complicated algorithms or approximations like many high-throughput techniques. We present a more direct method to quantify DNA-protein interaction in a force-based assay. In contrast to single-molecule force spectroscopy, our technique, the Molecular Force Assay (MFA, parallelizes force measurements so that it can test one or multiple proteins against several DNA sequences in a single experiment. The interaction strength is quantified by comparison to the well-defined rupture stability of different DNA duplexes. As a proof-of-principle, we measured the interaction of the zinc finger construct Zif268/NRE against six different DNA constructs. We could show the specificity of our approach and quantify the strength of the protein-DNA interaction.

  1. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  2. Immunoglobulins acquire the ability to interact with DNA after chromatography on QAE-Sephadex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulaeva, N.I.; Lekakh, I.V.; Poverennyi, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    It was established that IgG isolated from the sera of healthy humans contains a substantial number of antibodies that react with native DNA. Their ability to interact with DNA is manifested only after chromatography on an anion exchange resin, as a result of which IgG is divided into two portions - acid and basic immunoglobulins. The peculiarities of the interaction of both fractions with DNA and the specificity of this reaction were investigated. It was shown that the investigated IgG can react with native and denatured DNA, dextran sulfate, poly(G), and poly(I). The question of the possibility of the interaction of the antibodies studied with the charged structures of the cell and that of the role of these antibodies in the normal and pathological states are discussed

  3. Time-resolved analysis of DNA-protein interactions in living cells by UV laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebbioso, Angela; Benedetti, Rosaria; Conte, Mariarosaria; Carafa, Vincenzo; De Bellis, Floriana; Shaik, Jani; Matarese, Filomena; Della Ventura, Bartolomeo; Gesuele, Felice; Velotta, Raffaele; Martens, Joost H A; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Altucci, Carlo; Altucci, Lucia

    2017-09-15

    Interactions between DNA and proteins are mainly studied through chemical procedures involving bi-functional reagents, mostly formaldehyde. Chromatin immunoprecipitation is used to identify the binding between transcription factors (TFs) and chromatin, and to evaluate the occurrence and impact of histone/DNA modifications. The current bottleneck in probing DNA-protein interactions using these approaches is caused by the fact that chemical crosslinkers do not discriminate direct and indirect bindings or short-lived chromatin occupancy. Here, we describe a novel application of UV laser-induced (L-) crosslinking and demonstrate that a combination of chemical and L-crosslinking is able to distinguish between direct and indirect DNA-protein interactions in a small number of living cells. The spatial and temporal dynamics of TF bindings to chromatin and their role in gene expression regulation may thus be assessed. The combination of chemical and L-crosslinking offers an exciting and unprecedented tool for biomedical applications.

  4. Quantitative analysis of TALE-DNA interactions suggests polarity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meckler, Joshua F; Bhakta, Mital S; Kim, Moon-Soo; Ovadia, Robert; Habrian, Chris H; Zykovich, Artem; Yu, Abigail; Lockwood, Sarah H; Morbitzer, Robert; Elsäesser, Janett; Lahaye, Thomas; Segal, David J; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2013-04-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) have revolutionized the field of genome engineering. We present here a systematic assessment of TALE DNA recognition, using quantitative electrophoretic mobility shift assays and reporter gene activation assays. Within TALE proteins, tandem 34-amino acid repeats recognize one base pair each and direct sequence-specific DNA binding through repeat variable di-residues (RVDs). We found that RVD choice can affect affinity by four orders of magnitude, with the relative RVD contribution in the order NG > HD ≈ NN > NI > NK. The NN repeat preferred the base G over A, whereas the NK repeat bound G with 10(3)-fold lower affinity. We compared AvrBs3, a naturally occurring TALE that recognizes its target using some atypical RVD-base combinations, with a designed TALE that precisely matches 'standard' RVDs with the target bases. This comparison revealed unexpected differences in sensitivity to substitutions of the invariant 5'-T. Another surprising observation was that base mismatches at the 5' end of the target site had more disruptive effects on affinity than those at the 3' end, particularly in designed TALEs. These results provide evidence that TALE-DNA recognition exhibits a hitherto un-described polarity effect, in which the N-terminal repeats contribute more to affinity than C-terminal ones.

  5. Analysis of the Interaction of Dp44mT with Human Serum Albumin and Calf Thymus DNA Using Molecular Docking and Spectroscopic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongjie Xu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Di-2-pyridylketone-4,4,-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Dp44mT exhibits significant antitumor activity. However, the mechanism of its pharmacological interaction with human serum albumin (HSA and DNA remains poorly understood. Here, we aimed to elucidate the interactions of Dp44mT with HSA and DNA using MTT assays, spectroscopic methods, and molecular docking analysis. Our results indicated that addition of HSA at a ratio of 1:1 did not alter the cytotoxicity of Dp44mT, but did affect the cytotoxicity of the Dp44mT-Cu complex. Data from fluorescence quenching and UV-VIS absorbance measurements demonstrated that Dp44mT could bind to HSA with a moderate affinity (Ka = approximately 104 M−1. CD spectra revealed that Dp44mT could slightly disrupt the secondary structure of HSA. Dp44mT could also interact with Ct-DNA, but had a moderate binding constant (KEB = approximately 104 M−1. Docking studies indicated that the IB site of HSA, but not the IIA and IIIA sites, could be favorable for Dp44mT and that binding of Dp44mT to HSA involved hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force, consistent with thermodynamic results from spectral investigations. Thus, the moderate binding affinity of Dp44mT with HSA and DNA partially contributed to its antitumor activity and may be preferable in drug design approaches.

  6. Correlation between the thermodynamic stability of DNA duplexes and the interaction and solvation energies of DNA building blocks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2008), s. 161-174 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/05/0009; GA ČR(CZ) GD203/05/H001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : DNA duplex * interaction energy * stability Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.784, year: 2008

  7. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy of Spermine-DNA Interactions - Nanostructure and Physical Supramolecular Chemistry of DNA Condensation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kral, Teresa; Langner, M.; Hof, Martin; Adjimatera, N.; Blagbrough, I. S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 98, Supplement (2004), s22-s23 ISSN 0009-2770 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : fluorescence * nanostructure * DNA condensation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.348, year: 2004

  8. DNA interaction studies of sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxyphenol) food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Tahmasian Ghobadi, Ameneh; Roshanfekr, Hamideh; Shariati, Zohreh

    2013-02-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with sesamol (3,4-methylenedioxyphenol) in Tris-HCl buffer at neutral pH 7.4 was monitored by absorption spectrophotometry, viscometry and spectrofluorometry. It is found that sesamol molecules could interact with DNA outside and/or groove binding modes, as are evidenced by: hyperchromism in UV absorption band, very slow decrease in specific viscosity of DNA, and small increase in the fluorescence of methylene blue (MB)-DNA solutions in the presence of increasing amounts of sesamol, which indicates that it is able to partially release the bound MB. Furthermore, the enthalpy and entropy of the reaction between sesamol and CT-DNA showed that the reaction is enthalpy-favored and entropy-disfavored (ΔH = -174.08 kJ mol(-1); ΔS = -532.92 J mol(-1) K(-1)). The binding constant was determined using absorption measurement and found to be 2.7 × 10(4) M(-1); its magnitude suggests that sesamol interacts to DNA with a high affinity.

  9. Destabilization of the PCNA trimer mediated by its interaction with the NEIL1 DNA glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Moharana, Kedar; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-12-19

    The base excision repair (BER) pathway repairs oxidized lesions in the DNA that result from reactive oxygen species generated in cells. If left unrepaired, these damaged DNA bases can disrupt cellular processes such as replication. NEIL1 is one of the 11 human DNA glycosylases that catalyze the first step of the BER pathway, i.e. recognition and excision of DNA lesions. NEIL1 interacts with essential replication proteins such as the ring-shaped homotrimeric proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA). We isolated a complex formed between NEIL1 and PCNA (±DNA) using size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This interaction was confirmed using native gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Stokes radii measured by SEC hinted that PCNA in complex with NEIL1 (±DNA) was no longer a trimer. Height measurements and images obtained by atomic force microscopy also demonstrated the dissociation of the PCNA homotrimer in the presence of NEIL1 and DNA, while small-angle X-ray scattering analysis confirmed the NEIL1 mediated PCNA trimer dissociation and formation of a 1:1:1 NEIL1-DNA-PCNA(monomer) complex. Furthermore, ab initio shape reconstruction provides insights into the solution structure of this previously unreported complex. Together, these data point to a potential mechanistic switch between replication and BER.

  10. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) interacts with p400 ATPase for an efficient DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rebecca J; Savoian, Matthew S; Weber, Lauren E; Park, Jeong Hyeon

    2016-11-04

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and TRRAP proteins belong to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase family and are involved in DNA damage repair and chromatin remodeling. ATM is a checkpoint kinase that is recruited to sites of DNA double-strand breaks where it phosphorylates a diverse range of proteins that are part of the chromatin and DNA repair machinery. As an integral subunit of the TRRAP-TIP60 complexes, p400 ATPase is a chromatin remodeler that is also targeted to DNA double-strand break sites. While it is understood that DNA binding transcriptional activators recruit p400 ATPase into a regulatory region of the promoter, how p400 recognises and moves to DNA double-strand break sites is far less clear. Here we investigate a possibility whether ATM serves as a shuttle to deliver p400 to break sites. Our data indicate that p400 co-immunoprecipitates with ATM independently of DNA damage state and that the N-terminal domain of p400 is vital for this interaction. Heterologous expression studies using Sf9 cells revealed that the ATM-p400 complex can be reconstituted without other mammalian bridging proteins. Overexpression of ATM-interacting p400 regions in U2OS cells induced dominant negative effects including the inhibition of both DNA damage repair and cell proliferation. Consistent with the dominant negative effect, the stable expression of an N-terminal p400 fragment showed a decrease in the association of p400 with ATM, but did not alter the association of p400 with TRRAP. Taken together, our findings suggest that a protein-protein interaction between ATM and p400 ATPase occurs independently of DNA damage and contributes to efficient DNA damage response and repair.

  11. Interaction of DNA/nuclear protein/polycation and the terplexes for gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Yuan; Pan Shirong; Feng Min; Wen Yuting; Deng Jingjing; Luo Xin; Wu Chuanbin [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Zhongshan II Road 74, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Peng Hui, E-mail: fengmin@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Zhongshan Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, 74 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou 510080 (China)

    2010-01-29

    Nuclear transport of exogenous DNA is a major barrier to nonviral gene delivery that needs to be addressed in the design of new vectors. In this study, we prepared pDNA/HMGB1/PEG-PEI terplexes to promote nuclear import. HMGB1 in the terplexes was used to assist the transportation of pDNA into the nucleus of cells, since it contained nuclear localization signal (NLS); PEG chains were introduced to stabilize pDNA/vector terplexes and reduce the cytotoxicity. HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors have been investigated specifically for their structure interaction by atomic force microscopy and circular dichroic spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the HMGB1 molecule could bind with the pDNA chains, but not condense pDNA well. The PEG-PEI further compacted pDNA/HMGB1 complexes into nanosized spherical terplexes. The pDNA delivered by HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vectors was significantly accumulated in the nucleus of cells, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The percentage of GFP-transfected cells and VEGF protein expression level induced by HMGB1/PEG-PEI were 2.6-4.9-fold and 1.4-2.8-fold higher, respectively, than that of a common cationic polymer PEI 25 kDa. Therefore, the HMGB1/PEG-PEI combined vector could be used as a versatile vector for promoting exogenous DNA nuclear localization, thereby enhancing its expression.

  12. DNA builds and strengthens the extracellular matrix in Myxococcus xanthus biofilms by interacting with exopolysaccharides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available One intriguing discovery in modern microbiology is the extensive presence of extracellular DNA (eDNA within biofilms of various bacterial species. Although several biological functions have been suggested for eDNA, including involvement in biofilm formation, the detailed mechanism of eDNA integration into biofilm architecture is still poorly understood. In the biofilms formed by Myxococcus xanthus, a Gram-negative soil bacterium with complex morphogenesis and social behaviors, DNA was found within both extracted and native extracellular matrices (ECM. Further examination revealed that these eDNA molecules formed well organized structures that were similar in appearance to the organization of exopolysaccharides (EPS in ECM. Biochemical and image analyses confirmed that eDNA bound to and colocalized with EPS within the ECM of starvation biofilms and fruiting bodies. In addition, ECM containing eDNA exhibited greater physical strength and biological stress resistance compared to DNase I treated ECM. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that DNA interacts with EPS and strengthens biofilm structures in M. xanthus.

  13. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H; Miller, Katherine H; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L

    2015-06-05

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome. PMID:25903123

  15. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Z.; Biver, T.; Corti, A.; Eltugral, N.; Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A.; Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M.

    2010-08-01

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdSnp) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Aunp) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Aunp are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdSnp do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO3. As regards the CdSnp/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdSnp external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 ± 0.5) × 105 M-1. On the contrary, concerning Aunp, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdSnp or Aunp. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdSnp to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration ( p resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Aunp neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdSnp can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Aunp.

  16. The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) complex with DNA and the determination of DNA using the complex as a fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Qianru; Yang, Zhousheng

    2010-09-01

    The interaction of taurine-salicylaldehyde Schiff base copper(II) (Cu(TSSB) 22+) complex with DNA was explored by using UV-vis, fluorescence spectrophotometry, and voltammetry. In pH 7.4 Tris-HCl buffer solution, the binding constant of the Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex interaction with DNA was 3.49 × 10 4 L mol -1. Moreover, due to the fluorescence enhancing of Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex in the presence of DNA, a method for determination of DNA with Cu(TSSB) 22+ complex as a fluorescence probe was developed. The fluorescence spectra indicated that the maximum excitation and emission wavelength were 389 nm and 512 nm, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the calibration graphs are linear over the range of 0.03-9.03 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA), 0.10-36 μg mL -1 for yeast DNA and 0.01-10.01 μg mL -1 for salmon DNA (SM-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limits are 7 ng mL -1 for CT-DNA, 3 ng mL -1 for yeast DNA and 3 ng mL -1 for SM-DNA. Using this method, DNA in synthetic samples was determined with satisfactory results.

  17. Interaction and dynamics of homologous pairing protein 2 (HOP2) and DNA studied by MD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto; Zhou, Donghua

    2015-03-01

    The homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2) plays an important role in meiosis and DNA repair. Together with protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. We recently determined the NMR structure of the N-terminal domain of Hop2 and proposed a model of Protein-DNA complex based on NMR chemical shift perturbations and mutagenesis studies (Moktan, J Biol Chem 2014 10.1074/jbc.M114.548180). However structure and dynamics of the complex have not been studied at the atomic level yet. Here, we used classical MD simulations to study the interactions between the N-terminal HOP2 and DNA. The simulated results indicate that helix3 (H3) interacts with DNA in major groove and wing1 (W1) interacts mostly in minor groove mainly via direct hydrogen bonds. Also it is found that binding leads to reduced fluctuations in both protein and DNA. Several water bridge interactions have been identified. The residue-wise contributions to the interaction energy were evaluated. Also the functional motion of the protein is analyzed using principal component analysis. The results confirmed the importance of H3 and W1 for the stability of the complex, which is consistent with our previous experimental studies.

  18. Spectroscopic studies on the interaction of mimosine with BSA and DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, C. J.; Mun, R.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.; Bariyanga, J.

    2018-06-01

    Mimosine has shown antitumor activity towards cancer cells. It has also been found to inhibit deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) but the interaction is not fully understood. Here we report the results of investigation of its interactions with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and DNA in aqueous solution (pH 7.4) using FTIR and UV spectroscopic methods. Mimosine was found to disrupt the conformation of BSA by reducing its α-helix component and promoting a partial unfolding of the protein. In addition, the results indicated that mimosine may bind to DNA by electrostatic attractions via phosphate groups and grooves. The overall binding constant of DNA -mimosine complex was 5 × 10 3 M-1.

  19. Synthesis and DNA interaction of a Sm(III) complex of a Schiff base ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction between the Sm(III) complex of an ionic Schiff base [HL]-, derived from vanillin and L-tryptophan, and herring sperm DNA at physiological pH (7.40) has been studied by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence and viscosity methods. The binding ratios nSm(III) : nK[HL] = 1:1 and nSm(III)L: nDNA =5:1 were confirmed ...

  20. Energetic studies on DNA-peptide interaction in relation to the enthalpy-entropy compensation paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Robin C K; Huang, Jonathan T B; Chien, Shih-Chuan; Huang, Roy; Jeng, Kee-Ching G; Chen, Yen-Chung; Liao, Mokai; Wu, Jia-Rong; Hung, Wei-Kang; Hung, Chia-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ling; Waring, Michael J; Sheh, Leung

    2013-01-07

    This study aims to interpret the energetic basis of complex DNA-peptide interactions according to a novel allosteric interaction network approach. In common with other designed peptides, five new conjugates incorporating the XPRK or XHypRK motif (Hyp = hydroxyproline) attached to a N-methylpyrrole (Py) tract with a basic tail have been found to display cooperative binding to DNA involving multiple monodentate as well as interstrand bidentate interactions. Using quantitative DNase I footprinting it appears that allosteric communication via cooperative binding to multiple sites on complementary DNA strands corresponds to two different types of DNA-peptide interaction network. Temperature variation experiments using a dodecapeptide RY-12 show that lower temperature (25 °C) favor a circuit type of allosteric interaction network, whereas higher temperatures (31 and 37 °C) afford only a partial-circuit type of network. Circular dichroism studies show that our five peptides induce significant local conformational changes in DNA via the minor groove, with apparently dimeric binding stoichiometry. Isothermal titration calorimetry reveals that these peptides, together with another seven for comparison, are strongly exothermic upon binding to a model 13-mer DNA duplex, characterized by ΔH ranging from -14.7 to -74.4 kcal mol(-1), and also high TΔS ranging from -6.5 to -65.9 kcal mol(-1). Multiple monodentate and bidentate interactions, as well as ionic forces that mediate positive cooperativity in sequence recognition, are consistent with a dramatic decrease in entropy and a 'tightening' effect of DNA conformation. Distinctive enthalpy-entropy compensation (EEC) relationships are demonstrated for the interaction of all twelve designed peptides with DNA, affording a straight line of slope close to unity when ΔH is plotted versus TΔS, with a y-axis intercept (average ΔG) corresponding to -8.5 kcal mol(-1), while the observed ΔG ranges from -8.2 to -9.1 kcal mol(-1) for

  1. Label-free detection of biomolecular interactionDNA — Antimicrobial peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fojan, Peter; Jensen, Kasper Risgaard; Gurevich, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    the molecule. In particular, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have been already demonstrated suitable for food-safety control, label-free screening for various disease markers in bodily fluids, as well as for real-time continuous monitoring of drug levels in intensive care environment. We envisage...... of plasmon based biosensors to the study of the interaction of Antimicrobial peptide IL4 and DNA. Our results indicate high affinity binding between IL4 and DNA thereby preventing DNA replication and eventually killing the affected cell. We speculate that this is common for a large class of Antimicrobial...

  2. Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C12mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yunfei; Shang, Yazhuo; Liu, Zhenhai; Shao, Shuang; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between ionic liquid surfactant [C(12)mim]Br and DNA in dilute brine were investigated in terms of various experimental methods and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. It was shown that the aggregation of [C(12)mim]Br on DNA chains is motivated not only by electrostatic attractions between DNA phosphate groups and [C(12)mim]Br headgroups but also by hydrophobic interactions among [C(12)mim]Br alkyl chains. Isothermal titration calorimetry analysis indicated that the [C(12)mim]Br aggregation in the presence and absence of DNA are both thermodynamically favored driven by enthalpy and entropy. DNA undergoes size transition and conformational change induced by [C(12)mim]Br, and the charges of DNA are neutralized by the added [C(12)mim]Br. Various microstructures were observed such as DNA with loose coil conformation in nature state, necklace-like structures, and compact spherical aggregates. MD simulation showed that the polyelectrolyte collapses upon the addition of oppositely charged surfactants and the aggregation of surfactants around the polyelectrolyte was reaffirmed. The simulation predicted the gradual neutralization of the negatively charged polyelectrolyte by the surfactant, consistent with the experimental results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial interactions chapter: binding and entry of DNA in bacterial transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacks, S.A.

    1977-01-01

    Genetic transformation of bacteria by DNA released from cells of a related strain is discussed. The mechanism by which the giant information-bearing molecules of DNA are transported into the bacterial cell was investigated. It was concluded that the overall process of DNA uptake consists of two main steps, binding of donor DNA to the outside of the cell and entry of the bound DNA into the cell. Each step is discussed in detail. Inasmuch as these phenomena occur at the cell surface, they are related to structures and functions of the cell wall and membrane. In addition, the development of competence, that is the formation of cell surface structures allowing DNA uptake, is examined from both a physiological and evolutionary point of view. Genetic transfer mediated by free DNA is an obvious and important form of cellular interaction. The development of competence involves another, quite distinct system of interaction between bacterial cells. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bacillus subtilis, and Hemophilus influenzae were used as the test organisms. 259 references.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the DNA interaction with metallic nanoparticles and TiO2 surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmurodov, Kh.T.; Krasavin, E.A.; Dushanov, E.B.; Hassan, H.K.; Galal, A.; ElHabashy, H.A.; Sweilam, N.H.; Yasuoka, K.

    2013-01-01

    The understanding of the mechanism of DNA interactions and binding with metallic nanoparticles (NPs) and surfaces represents a great interest in today's medicine applications due to diagnostic and treatment of oncology diseases. Recent experimental and simulation studies involve the DNA interaction with highly localized proton beams or metallic NPs (such as Ag, Au, etc.), aimed at targeted cancer therapy through the injection of metal micro- or nanoparticles into the tumor tissue with consequent local microwave or laser heating. The effects of mutational structure changes in DNA and protein structures could result in destroying of native chemical (hydrogen) bonds or, on the contrary, creating of new bonds that do not normally exist there. The cause of such changes might be the alteration of one or several nucleotides (in DNA) or the substitution of specific amino acid residues (in proteins) that can lead to the essential structural destabilization or unfolding. At the atomic or molecular level, the replacement of one nucleotide by another (in DNA double helices) or replacement of one amino acid residue by another (in proteins) cause essential modifications of the molecular force fields of the environment that break locally important hydrogen bonds underlying the structural stability of the biological molecules. In this work, the molecular dynamics(MD) simulations were performed for four DNA models and the flexibilities of the purine and pyrimidine nucleotides during the interaction process with the metallic NPs and TiO 2 surface were clarified

  5. physico-chemical studies on DNA-drugs interaction and their analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandil, S.A

    2003-01-01

    The present thesis is devoted to study the interaction of some antibacterial agents i.e. fluoroquinolones . these agents include ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin , ofloxacin , pefloxacin and levofloxacin with DNA. voltammetric and spectrophotometric methods were used to carry out this study. Also the interaction of the suggested drugs with DNA at the surface of carbon electrode by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse techniques is examined. The work comprises three chapters: (1) includes an introduction of voltammetry , differential pulse, drug-DNA interaction and fluoroquinoline- DNA interaction and literature survey on fluoroquinolones.Chapter (II) includes preparation of the solutions and instruments which were used for the measurements using the different techniques.Chapter(III) comprises three parts; (1) deals with the interaction of fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, pefloxacin and levofloxacin) with DNA in solution have been investigated by means of voltammetry and spectroscopy . the results show that the values of binding constant of fluoroquinolne drugs with DNA obtained through the changes of the anodic peak current, and their values are, 30900,31000,32300,32000 and 32500 M -1 respectively. or changes of absorption and values are, 36000,30200.38300,36500 and 34400 M -1 receptively.(II) includes voltammetric behavior of fluoroquinolones on DNA-modified carbon paste electrode. (III)includes analytical application for proposed method for the determination of levofloxacin as a typical example for fluoroquinolones. Concentration in the range 5.0x10 -7 ∼ 5.0x10 -6 mol/L , with a detection limit of 1.0x10 -7 mol/L. direct and simple determination of levofloxacin in urine was established with no manipulation of urine sample other than dilution 1:10

  6. Impedance analysis of DNA and DNA-drug interactions on thin mercury film electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hasoň, Stanislav; Dvořák, Jakub; Jelen, František; Vetterl, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 2 (2002), s. 167-179 ISSN 1040-8347 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4004901; GA AV ČR IAA4004002; GA AV ČR IBS5004107 Grant - others:GA FRVŠ(XC) G40583; GA FRVŠ(XC) F40564 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : electrochemical impedance spectroscopy * intercalators * DNA at electrode surface Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.074, year: 2002

  7. Structure and decoy-mediated inhibition of the SOX18/Prox1-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus, Miriam; Prokoph, Nina; Girbig, Mathias; Wang, Xuecong; Huang, Yong-Heng; Srivastava, Yogesh; Hou, Linlin; Narasimhan, Kamesh; Kolatkar, Prasanna R; Francois, Mathias; Jauch, Ralf

    2016-05-05

    The transcription factor (TF) SOX18 drives lymphatic vessel development in both embryogenesis and tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. Genetic disruption of Sox18 in a mouse model protects from tumour metastasis and established the SOX18 protein as a molecular target. Here, we report the crystal structure of the SOX18 DNA binding high-mobility group (HMG) box bound to a DNA element regulating Prox1 transcription. The crystals diffracted to 1.75Å presenting the highest resolution structure of a SOX/DNA complex presently available revealing water structure, structural adjustments at the DNA contact interface and non-canonical conformations of the DNA backbone. To explore alternatives to challenging small molecule approaches for targeting the DNA-binding activity of SOX18, we designed a set of five decoys based on modified Prox1-DNA. Four decoys potently inhibited DNA binding of SOX18 in vitro and did not interact with non-SOX TFs. Serum stability, nuclease resistance and thermal denaturation assays demonstrated that a decoy circularized with a hexaethylene glycol linker and terminal phosphorothioate modifications is most stable. This SOX decoy also interfered with the expression of a luciferase reporter under control of a SOX18-dependent VCAM1 promoter in COS7 cells. Collectively, we propose SOX decoys as potential strategy for inhibiting SOX18 activity to disrupt tumour-induced neo-lymphangiogenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Sequence-influenced interactions of oligoacridines with DNA detected by retarded gel electrophorectic migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, P.E.; Zhen, W.; Henriksen, U.; Buchardt, O.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have found that di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexa-9-acridinylamines are so efficiently associated with DNA during electrophoresis in polyacrylamide or agarose gels that they retard its migration. The retardation is roughly proportional to the reagent to base pair ratio, and the magnitude of the retardation indicates that a combined charge neutralization/helix extension mechanism is mainly responsible for the effect. Furthermore, DNA sequence dependent differences are observed. Thus, the pUC 19 restriction fragments (HaeIII or AluI), which in the native state comigrate upon gel electrophoretic analysis, could be separated in the presence of a diacridine, and specific DNA fragments responded differently to different diacridines. These results suggest that the effect also is due to a contribution from the DNA conformation and that the DNA conformation dynamics are influenced differently upon binding of different diacridines. They foresee three applications of this observation: (1) in analytical gel electrophoretic separation of otherwise comigrating DNA molecules, (2) in studies of polyintercalator-DNA interaction, and (3) in measurements of polyintercalator-induced DNA unwinding

  9. Electrochemical study of varenicline adsorptive behaviour and its interaction with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radulović Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behaviour of novel nicotinic α4β2 subtype receptor partial agonist varenicline (VAR which is used for smoking cessation, was investigated in Britton-Robinson buffers (pH 2.0-12.0 by cyclic, differential pulse and square wave voltammetry at a hanging mercury drop elctrode. The influence of pH, scan rate, concentration, accumulation potential and time on peak current and potential suggested that in alkaline media the redox process was adsorption controlled. Also, the experimental value of surface coverage, G = 1.03´10-10 mol cm-2, was used to determine the conditions when VAR was fully adsorbed at the electrode surface. Having in mind potential high toxicity of VAR due to the presence of quinoxaline structure, its interaction with DNA was postulated, and studied when both compounds were in the adsorbed state at modified HMDE. Using adsorptive transfer technique, the changes in potential and decrease in normalized peak currents were observed. The estimated value of the ratio of surface-binding constants indicated that the reduced form of VAR interacted with dsDNA more strongly than the oxidized form. Subtle DNA damage under conditions of direct DNA-VAR interaction at room temperature was observed. The proposed type of interaction was an intercalation. This study used simple electroanalytical methodology and showed the potential of DNA/HMDE biosensor for investigation of genotoxic effects.

  10. Interaction of a copper (II) complex containing an artificial sweetener (aspartame) with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kashanian, Soheila; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2014-01-01

    A copper (II) complex containing aspartame (APM) as ligand, Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O, was synthesized and characterized. In vitro binding interaction of this complex with native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was studied at physiological pH. The interaction was studied using different methods: spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, competition experiment, circular dichroism (CD) and viscosimetric techniques. Hyperchromicity was observed in UV absorption band of Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O was observed and the binding constants (Kf) and corresponding numbers of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be+89.3 kJ mol(-1) and+379.3 J mol(-1) K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Experimental results from spectroscopic methods were comparable and further supported by viscosity measurements. We suggest that Cu(APM)2Cl2⋅2H2O interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 8×10+4 M(-1). Binding of this copper complex to DNA was found to be stronger compared to aspartame which was studied recently. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Perturbations in DNA structure upon interaction with porphyrins revealed by chemical probes, DNA footprinting and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, K G; Neidle, S

    1995-06-01

    The interactions of several porphyrins with a 74 base-pair DNA sequence have been examined by footprinting and chemical protection methods. Tetra-(4-N-methyl-(pyridyl)) porphyrin (TMPy), two of its metal complexes and tetra-(4-trimethylanilinium) porphyrin (TMAP) bind to closely similar AT-rich sequences. The three TMPy ligands produce modest changes in DNA structure and base accessibility on binding, in contrast to the large-scale conformational changes observed with TMAP. Molecular modelling studies have been performed on TMPy and TMAP bound in the AT-rich minor groove of an oligonucleotide. These have shown that significant structural change is needed to accommodate the bulky trimethyl substituent groups of TMAP, in contrast to the facile minor groove fit of TMPy.

  12. Interdependence of pyrene interactions and tetramolecular G4-DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluca, Osman; Withers, Jamie M; Loo, Trevor S; Edwards, Patrick J B; González, Carlos; Filichev, Vyacheslav V

    2015-03-28

    Controlling the arrangement of organic chromophores in supramolecular architectures is of primary importance for the development of novel functional molecules. Insertion of a twisted intercalating nucleic acid (TINA) moiety, containing phenylethynylpyren-1-yl derivatives, into a G-rich DNA sequence alters G-quadruplex folding, resulting in supramolecular structures with defined pyrene arrangements. Based on CD, NMR and ESI-mass-spectra, as well as TINA excited dimer (excimer) fluorescence emission we propose that insertion of the TINA monomer in the middle of a dTG4T sequence (i.e. dTGGXGGT, where X is TINA) converts a parallel tetramolecular G-quadruplex into an assembly composed of two identical antiparallel G-quadruplex subunits stacked via TINA-TINA interface. Kinetic analysis showed that TINA-TINA association controls complex formation in the presence of Na(+) but barely competes with guanine-mediated association in K(+) or in the sequence with the longer G-run (dTGGGXGGGT). These results demonstrate new perspectives in the design of molecular entities that can kinetically control G-quadruplex formation and show how tetramolecular G-quadruplexes can be used as a tuneable scaffold to control the arrangement of organic chromophores.

  13. The Cold Shock Domain of YB-1 Segregates RNA from DNA by Non-Bonded Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Kljashtorny

    Full Text Available The human YB-1 protein plays multiple cellular roles, of which many are dictated by its binding to RNA and DNA through its Cold Shock Domain (CSD. Using molecular dynamics simulation approaches validated by experimental assays, the YB1 CSD was found to interact with nucleic acids in a sequence-dependent manner and with a higher affinity for RNA than DNA. The binding properties of the YB1 CSD were close to those observed for the related bacterial Cold Shock Proteins (CSP, albeit some differences in sequence specificity. The results provide insights in the molecular mechanisms whereby YB-1 interacts with nucleic acids.

  14. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤ 4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥ 8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients.

  15. Modes of Escherichia coli Dps Interaction with DNA as Revealed by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav V Melekhov

    Full Text Available Multifunctional protein Dps plays an important role in iron assimilation and a crucial role in bacterial genome packaging. Its monomers form dodecameric spherical particles accumulating ~400 molecules of oxidized iron ions within the protein cavity and applying a flexible N-terminal ends of each subunit for interaction with DNA. Deposition of iron is a well-studied process by which cells remove toxic Fe2+ ions from the genetic material and store them in an easily accessible form. However, the mode of interaction with linear DNA remained mysterious and binary complexes with Dps have not been characterized so far. It is widely believed that Dps binds DNA without any sequence or structural preferences but several lines of evidence have demonstrated its ability to differentiate gene expression, which assumes certain specificity. Here we show that Dps has a different affinity for the two DNA fragments taken from the dps gene regulatory region. We found by atomic force microscopy that Dps predominantly occupies thermodynamically unstable ends of linear double-stranded DNA fragments and has high affinity to the central part of the branched DNA molecule self-assembled from three single-stranded oligonucleotides. It was proposed that Dps prefers binding to those regions in DNA that provide more contact pads for the triad of its DNA-binding bundle associated with one vertex of the protein globule. To our knowledge, this is the first study revealed the nucleoid protein with an affinity to branched DNA typical for genomic regions with direct and inverted repeats. As a ubiquitous feature of bacterial and eukaryotic genomes, such structural elements should be of particular care, but the protein system evolutionarily adapted for this function is not yet known, and we suggest Dps as a putative component of this system.

  16. Energetic and binding properties of DNA upon interaction with dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathaie, S Z; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A; Saboury, A A

    1999-02-15

    The interaction of dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), a cationic surfactant, with calf thymus DNA has been studied by various methods, including potentiometric technique using DTAB-selective plastic membrane electrode at 27 and 37 degreesC, isothermal titration microcalorimetry and UV spectrophotometry at 27 degreesC using 0.05 M Tris buffer and 0.01 M NaCl at pH 7.4. The free energy is calculated from binding isotherms on the basis of Wyman binding potential theory and the enthalpy of binding according to van't Hoff relation. The enthalpy of unfolding has been determined by subtraction of the enthalpy of binding from the microcalorimetric enthalpy. The results show that, after the interaction of first DTAB molecule to DNA (base molarity) through the electrostatic interaction, the second DTAB molecule also binds to DNA through electrostatic interaction. At this stage, the predom-inant DNA conformational change occurs. Afterwards up to 20 DTAB molecules, below the critical micelle concentration of DTAB, bind through hydrophobic interactions.

  17. Interaction of the Sliding Clamp β-Subunit and Hda, a DnaA-Related Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the β subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation to replication. However, the biochemical mechanism for this crucial step in DNA synthesis has not been resolved. Using purified Hda and β proteins in a plate binding assay and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid pulldown analysis, we show for the first time that Hda directly interacts with β in vitro. A new β-binding motif, a hexapeptide with the consensus sequence QL[SP]LPL, related to the previously identified β-binding pentapeptide motif (QL[SD]LF) was found in the amino terminus of the Hda protein. Mutants of Hda with amino acid changes in the hexapeptide motif are severely defective in their ability to bind β. A 10-amino-acid peptide containing the E. coli Hda β-binding motif was shown to compete with Hda for binding to β in an Hda-β interaction assay. These results establish that the interaction of Hda with β is mediated through the hexapeptide sequence. We propose that this interaction may be crucial to the events that lead to the inactivation of DnaA and the prevention of excess initiation of rounds of replication. PMID:15150238

  18. Interaction of the sliding clamp beta-subunit and Hda, a DnaA-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Mareike; Dalrymple, Brian; Wijffels, Gene; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2004-06-01

    In Escherichia coli, interactions between the replication initiation protein DnaA, the beta subunit of DNA polymerase III (the sliding clamp protein), and Hda, the recently identified DnaA-related protein, are required to convert the active ATP-bound form of DnaA to an inactive ADP-bound form through the accelerated hydrolysis of ATP. This rapid hydrolysis of ATP is proposed to be the main mechanism that blocks multiple initiations during cell cycle and acts as a molecular switch from initiation to replication. However, the biochemical mechanism for this crucial step in DNA synthesis has not been resolved. Using purified Hda and beta proteins in a plate binding assay and Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid pulldown analysis, we show for the first time that Hda directly interacts with beta in vitro. A new beta-binding motif, a hexapeptide with the consensus sequence QL[SP]LPL, related to the previously identified beta-binding pentapeptide motif (QL[SD]LF) was found in the amino terminus of the Hda protein. Mutants of Hda with amino acid changes in the hexapeptide motif are severely defective in their ability to bind beta. A 10-amino-acid peptide containing the E. coli Hda beta-binding motif was shown to compete with Hda for binding to beta in an Hda-beta interaction assay. These results establish that the interaction of Hda with beta is mediated through the hexapeptide sequence. We propose that this interaction may be crucial to the events that lead to the inactivation of DnaA and the prevention of excess initiation of rounds of replication.

  19. Mapping DNA damage-dependent genetic interactions in yeast via party mating and barcode fusion genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Mejía, J Javier; Celaj, Albi; Mellor, Joseph C; Coté, Atina; Balint, Attila; Ho, Brandon; Bansal, Pritpal; Shaeri, Fatemeh; Gebbia, Marinella; Weile, Jochen; Verby, Marta; Karkhanina, Anna; Zhang, YiFan; Wong, Cassandra; Rich, Justin; Prendergast, D'Arcy; Gupta, Gaurav; Öztürk, Sedide; Durocher, Daniel; Brown, Grant W; Roth, Frederick P

    2018-05-28

    Condition-dependent genetic interactions can reveal functional relationships between genes that are not evident under standard culture conditions. State-of-the-art yeast genetic interaction mapping, which relies on robotic manipulation of arrays of double-mutant strains, does not scale readily to multi-condition studies. Here, we describe barcode fusion genetics to map genetic interactions (BFG-GI), by which double-mutant strains generated via en masse "party" mating can also be monitored en masse for growth to detect genetic interactions. By using site-specific recombination to fuse two DNA barcodes, each representing a specific gene deletion, BFG-GI enables multiplexed quantitative tracking of double mutants via next-generation sequencing. We applied BFG-GI to a matrix of DNA repair genes under nine different conditions, including methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), bleomycin, zeocin, and three other DNA-damaging environments. BFG-GI recapitulated known genetic interactions and yielded new condition-dependent genetic interactions. We validated and further explored a subnetwork of condition-dependent genetic interactions involving MAG1 , SLX4, and genes encoding the Shu complex, and inferred that loss of the Shu complex leads to an increase in the activation of the checkpoint protein kinase Rad53. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  20. In vitro study on the interaction of 4,4-dimethylcurcumin with calf thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing-Mi, E-mail: liubingmi@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Bai, Chong-Liang [Centre for Molecular Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yang; Dong, Bo-Yang; Zhang, Yi-Tong [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Liu, Bin, E-mail: liubinzehao@163.com [Department of Pharmacy, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2015-10-15

    The interaction of 4,4-dimethylcurcumin (DMCU), a synthesized analog of curcumin, with calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was investigated using fluorescence, absorption, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and molecular docking techniques. DMCU was found to bind to ct-DNA with moderate binding affinity through groove binding as evidenced by a decrease in the absorption intensity in combination with no obvious change in the relative specific viscosity of ct-DNA and the CD spectrum. Thermodynamic analysis of the fluorescence data obtained at different temperatures suggested that the binding process was spontaneous and was primarily driven by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Furthermore, competitive binding experiments with ethidium bromide and 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole as probes showed that DMCU could preferentially bind in the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. The results obtained from the molecular docking studies were consistent with these experimental results. This study explored the potential applicability of the spectroscopic properties of DMCU for studying its interactions with relevant biological or biomimicking targets. - Highlights: • 4,4-dimethylcurcumin (DMCU) has strong fluorescence characteristics. • DMCU could bind to DNA through groove binding. • Docking studies revealed that DMCU bound to the A–T region in the minor groove.

  1. FT-Raman and QM/MM study of the interaction between histamine and DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Chica, A.J.; Soriano, A.; Tunon, I.; Sanchez-Jimenez, F.M.; Silla, E.; Ramirez, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction between histamine and highly polymerized calf-thymus DNA has been investigated using FT-Raman spectroscopy and the hybrid QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) methodology. Raman spectra of solutions containing histamine and calf-thymus DNA, at different molar ratios, were recorded. Solutions were prepared at physiological settings of pH and ionic strength, using both natural and heavy water as the solvent. The analysis of the spectral changes on the DNA Raman spectra when adding different concentrations of histamine allowed us to identify the reactive sites of DNA and histamine, which were used to built two minor groove and one intercalated binding models. They were further used as starting points of the QM/MM theoretical study. However, minimal energy points were only reached for the two minor groove models. For each optimized structure, we calculated analytical force constants of histamine molecule in order to perform the vibrational dynamics. Normal mode descriptions allowed us to compare calculated wavenumbers for DNA-interacting histamine to those measured in the Raman spectra of DNA-histamine solutions

  2. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alizadeh, E.; Sanche, L.

    2014-01-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N 2 , O 2 , H 2 O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N 2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O 2 and H 2 O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O 2 and H 2 O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitization of these agents in chemo-radiation cancer therapy. (authors)

  3. DNA-binding protects p53 from interactions with cofactors involved in transcription-independent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrughi, Matteo; De Gioia, Luca; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Nussinov, Ruth; Urani, Chiara; Bruschi, Maurizio; Papaleo, Elena

    2016-11-02

    Binding-induced conformational changes of a protein at regions distant from the binding site may play crucial roles in protein function and regulation. The p53 tumour suppressor is an example of such an allosterically regulated protein. Little is known, however, about how DNA binding can affect distal sites for transcription factors. Furthermore, the molecular details of how a local perturbation is transmitted through a protein structure are generally elusive and occur on timescales hard to explore by simulations. Thus, we employed state-of-the-art enhanced sampling atomistic simulations to unveil DNA-induced effects on p53 structure and dynamics that modulate the recruitment of cofactors and the impact of phosphorylation at Ser215. We show that DNA interaction promotes a conformational change in a region 3 nm away from the DNA binding site. Specifically, binding to DNA increases the population of an occluded minor state at this distal site by more than 4-fold, whereas phosphorylation traps the protein in its major state. In the minor conformation, the interface of p53 that binds biological partners related to p53 transcription-independent functions is not accessible. Significantly, our study reveals a mechanism of DNA-mediated protection of p53 from interactions with partners involved in the p53 transcription-independent signalling. This also suggests that conformational dynamics is tightly related to p53 signalling. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Low-energy-electron interactions with DNA: approaching cellular conditions with atmospheric experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Elahe; Sanche, Léon

    2014-04-01

    A novel technique has been developed to investigate low energy electron (LEE)-DNA interactions in the presence of small biomolecules (e.g., N2, O2, H2O) found near DNA in the cell nucleus, in order to simulate cellular conditions. In this technique, LEEs are emitted from a metallic surface exposed by soft X-rays and interact with DNA thin films at standard ambient temperature and pressure (SATP). Whereas atmospheric N2 had little effect on the yields of LEE-induced single and double strand breaks, both O2 and H2O considerably modified and increased such damage. The highest yields were obtained when DNA is embedded in a combined O2 and H2O atmosphere. In this case, the amount of additional double strand breaks was supper-additive. The effect of modifying the chemical and physical stability of DNA by platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents (Pt-drugs) including cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin was also investigated with this technique. The results obtained provide information on the role played by subexcitation-energy electrons and dissociative electron attachment in the radiosensitization of DNA by Pt-drugs, which is an important step to unravel the mechanisms of radiosensitisation of these agents in chemoradiation cancer therapy.

  5. Structure of uracil-DNA glycosylase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: insights into interactions with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushal, Prem Singh; Talawar, Ramappa K.; Varshney, Umesh; Vijayan, M.

    2010-01-01

    The molecule of uracil-DNA glycosylase from M. tuberculosis exhibits domain motion on binding to DNA or a proteinaceous inhibitor. The highly conserved DNA-binding region interacts with a citrate ion in the structure. Uracil N-glycosylase (Ung) is the most thoroughly studied of the group of uracil DNA-glycosylase (UDG) enzymes that catalyse the first step in the uracil excision-repair pathway. The overall structure of the enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is essentially the same as that of the enzyme from other sources. However, differences exist in the N- and C-terminal stretches and some catalytic loops. Comparison with appropriate structures indicate that the two-domain enzyme closes slightly when binding to DNA, while it opens slightly when binding to the proteinaceous inhibitor Ugi. The structural changes in the catalytic loops on complexation reflect the special features of their structure in the mycobacterial protein. A comparative analysis of available sequences of the enzyme from different sources indicates high conservation of amino-acid residues in the catalytic loops. The uracil-binding pocket in the structure is occupied by a citrate ion. The interactions of the citrate ion with the protein mimic those of uracil, in addition to providing insights into other possible interactions that inhibitors could be involved in

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed structural differences among WRKY domain-DNA interaction in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Bharati; Grover, Abhinav; Sharma, Pradeep

    2018-02-12

    The WRKY transcription factors are a class of DNA-binding proteins involved in diverse plant processes play critical roles in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. Genome-wide divergence analysis of WRKY gene family in Hordeum vulgare provided a framework for molecular evolution and functional roles. So far, the crystal structure of WRKY from barley has not been resolved; moreover, knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of WRKY domain is pre-requisites for exploring the protein-DNA recognition mechanisms. Homology modelling based approach was used to generate structures for WRKY DNA binding domain (DBD) and its variants using AtWRKY1 as a template. Finally, the stability and conformational changes of the generated model in unbound and bound form was examined through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 100 ns time period. In this study, we investigated the comparative binding pattern of WRKY domain and its variants with W-box cis-regulatory element using molecular docking and dynamics (MD) simulations assays. The atomic insight into WRKY domain exhibited significant variation in the intermolecular hydrogen bonding pattern, leading to the structural anomalies in the variant type and differences in the DNA-binding specificities. Based on the MD analysis, residual contribution and interaction contour, wild-type WRKY (HvWRKY46) were found to interact with DNA through highly conserved heptapeptide in the pre- and post-MD simulated complexes, whereas heptapeptide interaction with DNA was missing in variants (I and II) in post-MD complexes. Consequently, through principal component analysis, wild-type WRKY was also found to be more stable by obscuring a reduced conformational space than the variant I (HvWRKY34). Lastly, high binding free energy for wild-type and variant II allowed us to conclude that wild-type WRKY-DNA complex was more stable relative to variants I. The results of our study revealed complete dynamic and structural information

  7. Spectrophotometric analysis of flavonoid-DNA binding interactions at physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Naveed Kausar; Siddiqa, Asima; Yaqub, Azra; Sabahat, Sana; Qureshi, Rumana; Haque, Sayed ul

    2009-12-01

    Mode of interactions of three flavonoids [morin (M), quercetin (Q), and rutin (R)] with chicken blood ds.DNA (ck.DNA) has been investigated spectrophotometrically at different temperatures including body temperature (310 K) and at two physiological pH values, i.e. 7.4 (human blood pH) and 4.7 (stomach pH). The binding constants, Kf, evaluated using Benesi-Hildebrand equation showed that the flavonoids bind effectively through intercalation at both pH values and body temperature. Quercetin, somehow, showed greater binding capabilities with DNA. The free energies of flavonoid-DNA complexes indicated the spontaneity of their binding. The order of binding constants of three flavonoids at both pH values were found to be Kf(Q) > Kf(R) > Kf(M) and at 310 K.

  8. Substrate sequence selectivity of APOBEC3A implicates intra-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvas, Tania V; Hou, Shurong; Myint, Wazo; Nalivaika, Ellen; Somasundaran, Mohan; Kelch, Brian A; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Schiffer, Celia A

    2018-05-14

    The APOBEC3 (A3) family of human cytidine deaminases is renowned for providing a first line of defense against many exogenous and endogenous retroviruses. However, the ability of these proteins to deaminate deoxycytidines in ssDNA makes A3s a double-edged sword. When overexpressed, A3s can mutate endogenous genomic DNA resulting in a variety of cancers. Although the sequence context for mutating DNA varies among A3s, the mechanism for substrate sequence specificity is not well understood. To characterize substrate specificity of A3A, a systematic approach was used to quantify the affinity for substrate as a function of sequence context, length, secondary structure, and solution pH. We identified the A3A ssDNA binding motif as (T/C)TC(A/G), which correlated with enzymatic activity. We also validated that A3A binds RNA in a sequence specific manner. A3A bound tighter to substrate binding motif within a hairpin loop compared to linear oligonucleotide, suggesting A3A affinity is modulated by substrate structure. Based on these findings and previously published A3A-ssDNA co-crystal structures, we propose a new model with intra-DNA interactions for the molecular mechanism underlying A3A sequence preference. Overall, the sequence and structural preferences identified for A3A leads to a new paradigm for identifying A3A's involvement in mutation of endogenous or exogenous DNA.

  9. Architecture and ssDNA interaction of the Timeless-Tipin-RPA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witosch, Justine; Wolf, Eva; Mizuno, Naoko

    2014-11-10

    The Timeless-Tipin (Tim-Tipin) complex, also referred to as the fork protection complex, is involved in coordination of DNA replication. Tim-Tipin is suggested to be recruited to replication forks via Replication Protein A (RPA) but details of the interaction are unknown. Here, using cryo-EM and biochemical methods, we characterized complex formation of Tim-Tipin, RPA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Tim-Tipin and RPA form a 258 kDa complex with a 1:1:1 stoichiometry. The cryo-EM 3D reconstruction revealed a globular architecture of the Tim-Tipin-RPA complex with a ring-like and a U-shaped domain covered by a RPA lid. Interestingly, RPA in the complex adopts a horse shoe-like shape resembling its conformation in the presence of long ssDNA (>30 nucleotides). Furthermore, the recruitment of the Tim-Tipin-RPA complex to ssDNA is modulated by the RPA conformation and requires RPA to be in the more compact 30 nt ssDNA binding mode. The dynamic formation and disruption of the Tim-Tipin-RPA-ssDNA complex implicates the RPA-based recruitment of Tim-Tipin to the replication fork. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. GEMC1 is a TopBP1-interacting protein required for chromosomal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Errico, Alessia; Garner, Elizabeth; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Many of the factors required for chromosomal DNA replication have been identified in unicellular eukaryotes. However, DNA replication is poorly understood in multicellular organisms. Here, we report the identification of GEMC1 (geminin coiled-coil containing protein 1), a novel vertebrate protein required for chromosomal DNA replication. GEMC1 is highly conserved in vertebrates and is preferentially expressed in proliferating cells. Using Xenopus laevis egg extract we show that Xenopus GEMC1 (xGEMC1) binds to the checkpoint and replication factor TopBP1, which promotes binding of xGEMC1 to chromatin during pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation. We demonstrate that xGEMC1 interacts directly with replication factors such as Cdc45 and the kinase Cdk2-CyclinE, through which it is heavily phosphorylated. Phosphorylated xGEMC1 stimulates initiation of DNA replication, whereas depletion of xGEMC1 prevents the onset of DNA replication owing to the impairment of Cdc45 loading onto chromatin. Similarly, inhibition of GEMC1 expression with morpholino and siRNA oligos prevents DNA replication in embryonic and somatic vertebrate cells. These data suggest that GEMC1 promotes initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in multicellular organisms by mediating TopBP1- and Cdk2-dependent recruitment of Cdc45 onto replication origins.

  11. GEMC1 is a TopBP1 interacting protein required for chromosomal DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Cosentino, Claudia; Errico, Alessia; Garner, Elizabeth; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Many factors required for chromosomal DNA replication have been identified in unicellular eukaryotes. However, DNA replication in complex multicellular organisms is poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of GEMC1, a novel vertebrate protein required for chromosomal DNA replication. GEMC1 is highly conserved in vertebrates and is preferentially expressed in proliferating cells. Using Xenopus egg extract we show that Xenopus GEMC1 (xGEMC1) binds to checkpoint and replication factor TopBP1, which promotes xGEMC1 binding to chromatin during pre-replication complex (pre-RC) formation. We demonstrate that xGEMC1 directly interacts with replication factors such as Cdc45 and Cdk2-CyclinE by which it is heavily phosphorylated. Phosphorylated xGEMC1 stimulates initiation of DNA replication whereas depletion of xGEMC1 prevents DNA replication onset due to impairment of Cdc45 loading onto chromatin. Likewise, inhibition of GEMC1 expression by morpholino and siRNA oligos prevents DNA replication in embryonic and somatic vertebrate cells. These data suggest that GEMC1 promotes initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in higher eukaryotes by mediating TopBP1 and Cdk2 dependent recruitment of Cdc45 onto replication origins. PMID:20383140

  12. DNA methylation requires a DNMT1 ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM) and histone ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Weihua; Wolf, Patricia; Liu, Nan; Link, Stephanie; Smets, Martha; La Mastra, Federica; Forné, Ignasi; Pichler, Garwin; Hörl, David; Fellinger, Karin; Spada, Fabio; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Imhof, Axel; Harz, Hartmann; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2015-08-01

    DNMT1 is recruited by PCNA and UHRF1 to maintain DNA methylation after replication. UHRF1 recognizes hemimethylated DNA substrates via the SRA domain, but also repressive H3K9me3 histone marks with its TTD. With systematic mutagenesis and functional assays, we could show that chromatin binding further involved UHRF1 PHD binding to unmodified H3R2. These complementation assays clearly demonstrated that the ubiquitin ligase activity of the UHRF1 RING domain is required for maintenance DNA methylation. Mass spectrometry of UHRF1-deficient cells revealed H3K18 as a novel ubiquitination target of UHRF1 in mammalian cells. With bioinformatics and mutational analyses, we identified a ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM) in the N-terminal regulatory domain of DNMT1 that binds to ubiquitinated H3 tails and is essential for DNA methylation in vivo. H3 ubiquitination and subsequent DNA methylation required UHRF1 PHD binding to H3R2. These results show the manifold regulatory mechanisms controlling DNMT1 activity that require the reading and writing of epigenetic marks by UHRF1 and illustrate the multifaceted interplay between DNA and histone modifications. The identification and functional characterization of the DNMT1 UIM suggests a novel regulatory principle and we speculate that histone H2AK119 ubiquitination might also lead to UIM-dependent recruitment of DNMT1 and DNA methylation beyond classic maintenance.

  13. Isolate extended state in the DNA molecular transistor with surface interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Le, E-mail: wang_le917@gs.zzu.edu.cn; Qin, Zhi-Jie

    2016-02-01

    The field effect characteristic of a DNA molecular device is investigated in a tight binding model with binary disorder and side site correlation. Using the transfer-matrix method and Landauer–Büttiker theory, we find that the system has isolated extended state that is irrespective of the DNA sequence and can be modulated by the gate voltage. When the gate voltage reaches some proper value, the isolated extended state appears at the Fermi level of the system and the long range charge transport is greatly enhanced. We attribute this phenomenon to the combination of the external field, the surface interaction, and the intrinsic disorder of DNA. The result is a generic feature of the nanowire with binary disorder and surface interaction.

  14. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Maribel [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Centro de Quimica; Betancourt, Adelmo [Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia (Venezuela). Facultad Experimental de Ciencia y Tecnologia. Dept. de Quimica; Hernandez, Clara [Universidad de Carabobo Sede Aragua, Maracay (Venezuela). Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud. Dept. de Ciencias Basicas; Marchan, Edgar [Universidad de Oriente, Cumana (Venezuela). Inst. de Investigaciones en Biomedicina y Ciencias Aplicadas. Nucleo de Sucre

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl{sub 2}(phen)] and [PdCl{sub 2}(phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 {mu}mol L{sup -1} in 48 h. (author)

  15. Palladium polypyridyl complexes: synthesis, characterization, DNA interaction and biological activity on Leishmania (L.) mexicana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, Maribel; Betancourt, Adelmo; Hernandez, Clara; Marchan, Edgar

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the search for new potential chemotherapeutic agents based on transition metal complexes with planar ligands. In this study, palladium polypyridyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, NMR, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA was also investigated by spectroscopic methods. All metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) bands of the palladium polypyridyl complexes exhibited hypochromism and red shift in the presence of DNA. The binding constant and viscosity data suggested that the complexes [PdCl 2 (phen)] and [PdCl 2 (phendiamine)] interact with DNA by electrostatic forces. Additionally, these complexes induced an important leishmanistatic effect on L. (L.) mexicana promastigotes at the final concentration of 10 μmol L -1 in 48 h. (author)

  16. INTERACTION OF IRON(II MIXED-LIGAND COMPLEXES WITH DNA: BASE-PAIR SPECIFICITY AND THERMAL DENATURATION STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudasir Mudasir

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A research about base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of [Fe(phen3]2+, [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ and [Fe(phen(dip2]2+ complexes and the effect of calf-thymus DNA (ct-DNA binding of these metal complexes on thermal denaturation of ct-DNA has been carried out. This research is intended to evaluate the preferential binding of the complexes to the sequence of DNA (A-T or G-C sequence and to investigate the binding strength and mode upon their interaction with DNA. Base-pair specificity of the DNA binding of the complexes was determined by comparing the equilibrium binding constant (Kb of each complex to polysynthetic DNA that contain only A-T or G-C sequence. The Kb value of the interaction was determined by spectrophotometric titration and thermal denaturation temperature (Tm was determined by monitoring the absorbance of the mixture solution of each complex and ct-DNA at λ =260 nm as temperature was elevated in the range of 25 - 100 oC. Results of the study show that in general all iron(II complexes studied exhibit a base-pair specificity in their DNA binding to prefer the relatively facile A-T sequence as compared to the G-C one. The thermal denaturation experiments have demonstrated that Fe(phen3]2+ and [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ interact weakly with double helical DNA via electrostatic interaction as indicated by insignificant changes in melting temperature, whereas [Fe(phen2(dip]2+  most probably binds to DNA in mixed modes of interaction, i.e.: intercalation and electrostatic interaction. This conclusion is based on the fact that the binding of [Fe(phen2(dip]2+ to ct-DNA moderately increase the Tm value of ct- DNA   Keywords: DNA Binding, mixed-ligand complexes

  17. WHERE MULTIFUNCTIONAL DNA REPAIR PROTEINS MEET: MAPPING THE INTERACTION DOMAINS BETWEEN XPG AND WRN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaraj, K.; Cooper, P.K.; Trego, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    The rapid recognition and repair of DNA damage is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity and cellular survival. Multiple complex and interconnected DNA damage responses exist within cells to preserve the human genome, and these repair pathways are carried out by a specifi c interplay of protein-protein interactions. Thus a failure in the coordination of these processes, perhaps brought about by a breakdown in any one multifunctional repair protein, can lead to genomic instability, developmental and immunological abnormalities, cancer and premature aging. This study demonstrates a novel interaction between two such repair proteins, Xeroderma pigmentosum group G protein (XPG) and Werner syndrome helicase (WRN), that are both highly pleiotropic and associated with inherited genetic disorders when mutated. XPG is a structure-specifi c endonuclease required for the repair of UV-damaged DNA by nucleotide excision repair (NER), and mutations in XPG result in the diseases Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and Cockayne syndrome (CS). A loss of XPG incision activity results in XP, whereas a loss of non-enzymatic function(s) of XPG causes CS. WRN is a multifunctional protein involved in double-strand break repair (DSBR), and consists of 3’–5’ DNA-dependent helicase, 3’–5’ exonuclease, and single-strand DNA annealing activities. Nonfunctional WRN protein leads to Werner syndrome, a premature aging disorder with increased cancer incidence. Far Western analysis was used to map the interacting domains between XPG and WRN by denaturing gel electrophoresis, which separated purifi ed full length and recombinant XPG and WRN deletion constructs, based primarily upon the length of each polypeptide. Specifi c interacting domains were visualized when probed with the secondary protein of interest which was then detected by traditional Western analysis using the antibody of the secondary protein. The interaction between XPG and WRN was mapped to the C-terminal region of

  18. Architecture of the bacteriophage T4 activator MotA/promoter DNA interaction during sigma appropriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Meng-Lun; James, Tamara D; Knipling, Leslie; Waddell, M Brett; White, Stephen; Hinton, Deborah M

    2013-09-20

    Gene expression can be regulated through factors that direct RNA polymerase to the correct promoter sequence at the correct time. Bacteriophage T4 controls its development in this way using phage proteins that interact with host RNA polymerase. Using a process called σ appropriation, the T4 co-activator AsiA structurally remodels the σ(70) subunit of host RNA polymerase, while a T4 activator, MotA, engages the C terminus of σ(70) and binds to a DNA promoter element, the MotA box. Structures for the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of MotA are available, but no structure exists for MotA with or without DNA. We report the first molecular map of the MotA/DNA interaction within the σ-appropriated complex, which we obtained by using the cleaving reagent, iron bromoacetamidobenzyl-EDTA (FeBABE). We conjugated surface-exposed, single cysteines in MotA with FeBABE and performed cleavage reactions in the context of stable transcription complexes. The DNA cleavage sites were analyzed using ICM Molsoft software and three-dimensional physical models of MotA(NTD), MotA(CTD), and the DNA to investigate shape complementarity between the protein and the DNA and to position MotA on the DNA. We found that the unusual "double wing" motif present within MotA(CTD) resides in the major groove of the MotA box. In addition, we have used surface plasmon resonance to show that MotA alone is in a very dynamic equilibrium with the MotA element. Our results demonstrate the utility of fine resolution FeBABE mapping to determine the architecture of protein-DNA complexes that have been recalcitrant to traditional structure analyses.

  19. Interaction of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen With DNA at the Single Molecule Level

    KAUST Repository

    Raducanu, Vlad-Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a key factor involved in Eukaryotic DNA replication and repair, as well as other cellular pathways. Its importance comes mainly from two aspects: the large numbers of interacting partners and the mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA. The large numbers of interacting partners makes PCNA a necessary factor to consider when studying DNA replication, either in vitro or in vivo. The mechanism of facilitated diffusion along the DNA, i.e. sliding along the duplex, reduces the six degrees of freedom of the molecule, three degrees of freedom of translation and three degrees of freedom of rotation, to only two, translation along the duplex and rotational tracking of the helix. Through this mechanism PCNA can recruit its partner proteins and localize them to the right spot on the DNA, maybe in the right spatial orientation, more effectively and in coordination with other proteins. Passive loading of the closed PCNA ring on the DNA without free ends is a topologically forbidden process. Replication factor C (RFC) uses energy of ATP hydrolysis to mechanically open the PCNA ring and load it on the dsDNA. The first half of the introduction gives overview of PCNA and RFC and the loading mechanism of PCNA on dsDNA. The second half is dedicated to a diffusion model and to an algorithm for analyzing PCNA sliding. PCNA and RFC were successfully purified, simulations and a mean squared displacement analysis algorithm were run and showed good stability and experimental PCNA sliding data was analyzed and led to parameters similar to the ones in literature.

  20. Influence of anticancer drugs on interactions of tumor suppressor protein p53 with DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivoňková, Hana; Němcová, Kateřina; Brázdová, Marie; Kašpárková, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Fojta, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 272, Suppl. 1 (2005), s. 562 ISSN 1474-3833. [FEBS Congress /30./ and IUBMB Conference /9./. 02.07.2005-07.07.2005, Budapest] R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NC7574 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : tumour suppressor protein p53 * anticancer drugs * interaction with DNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  1. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study DNA/Drug Interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research Article. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study. DNA/Drug Interaction Based on Sequence Selective. Inhibition of Restriction Endonucleases. Syed A Hassan1*, Lata Chauhan2, Ritu Barthwal2 and Aparna Dixit3. 1 Faculty of Computing and Information Technology, King Abdul Aziz University, Rabigh-21911 ...

  2. A discriminatory function for prediction of protein-DNA interactions based on alpha shape modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weiqiang; Yan, Hong

    2010-10-15

    Protein-DNA interaction has significant importance in many biological processes. However, the underlying principle of the molecular recognition process is still largely unknown. As more high-resolution 3D structures of protein-DNA complex are becoming available, the surface characteristics of the complex become an important research topic. In our work, we apply an alpha shape model to represent the surface structure of the protein-DNA complex and developed an interface-atom curvature-dependent conditional probability discriminatory function for the prediction of protein-DNA interaction. The interface-atom curvature-dependent formalism captures atomic interaction details better than the atomic distance-based method. The proposed method provides good performance in discriminating the native structures from the docking decoy sets, and outperforms the distance-dependent formalism in terms of the z-score. Computer experiment results show that the curvature-dependent formalism with the optimal parameters can achieve a native z-score of -8.17 in discriminating the native structure from the highest surface-complementarity scored decoy set and a native z-score of -7.38 in discriminating the native structure from the lowest RMSD decoy set. The interface-atom curvature-dependent formalism can also be used to predict apo version of DNA-binding proteins. These results suggest that the interface-atom curvature-dependent formalism has a good prediction capability for protein-DNA interactions. The code and data sets are available for download on http://www.hy8.com/bioinformatics.htm kenandzhou@hotmail.com.

  3. Interaction of spermine with DNA, vitamin C and bovine serum albumin in the unirradiated and gamma irradiated states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, S.N.; Lal, C.; Bhardwaj, R.; Chaturvedi, S.; Chaudhury, N.K.

    2006-01-01

    Structural deformability of spermine with radiation dose (maximum 10 Gy) has been proved. Complex formation of spermine with DNA, vitamin C and BSA took place. Calibration and radiation-induced absorption changes in spermine by ninhydrin reagent has been followed quantitatively. Interaction of vitamin C with DNA and their radiation-induced changes have been reported. Interaction of spermine with DNA in the unirradiated and gamma irradiated states in 10 -3 M phosphate buffer and water have been compared. Addition of spermine and vitamin C to DNA makes DNA structure more condensed. Bovine serum albumin also binds with spermine and protects it from radiation-induced degradation. (author)

  4. Sequence Dependent Interactions Between DNA and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxbury, Daniel

    It is known that single-stranded DNA adopts a helical wrap around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), forming a water-dispersible hybrid molecule. The ability to sort mixtures of SWCNTs based on chirality (electronic species) has recently been demonstrated using special short DNA sequences that recognize certain matching SWCNTs of specific chirality. This thesis investigates the intricacies of DNA-SWCNT sequence-specific interactions through both experimental and molecular simulation studies. The DNA-SWCNT binding strengths were experimentally quantified by studying the kinetics of DNA replacement by a surfactant on the surface of particular SWCNTs. Recognition ability was found to correlate strongly with measured binding strength, e.g. DNA sequence (TAT)4 was found to bind 20 times stronger to the (6,5)-SWCNT than sequence (TAT)4T. Next, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, equilibrium structures formed by (a) single-strands and (b) multiple-strands of 12-mer oligonucleotides adsorbed on various SWCNTs were explored. A number of structural motifs were discovered in which the DNA strand wraps around the SWCNT and 'stitches' to itself via hydrogen bonding. Great variability among equilibrium structures was observed and shown to be directly influenced by DNA sequence and SWCNT type. For example, the (6,5)-SWCNT DNA recognition sequence, (TAT)4, was found to wrap in a tight single-stranded right-handed helical conformation. In contrast, DNA sequence T12 forms a beta-barrel left-handed structure on the same SWCNT. These are the first theoretical indications that DNA-based SWCNT selectivity can arise on a molecular level. In a biomedical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, pathways for DNA-SWCNT internalization into healthy human endothelial cells were explored. Through absorbance spectroscopy, TEM imaging, and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that intracellular concentrations of SWCNTs far exceeded those of the incubation

  5. Non-covalent interactions of cadmium sulphide and gold nanoparticles with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atay, Z. [Bogazici University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Biver, T., E-mail: tarita@dcci.unipi.i [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Corti, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Eltugral, N. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy); Lorenzini, E.; Masini, M.; Paolicchi, A. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Patologia Sperimentale BMIE (Italy); Pucci, A.; Ruggeri, G.; Secco, F.; Venturini, M. [Universita di Pisa, Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale (Italy)

    2010-08-15

    Mercaptoethanol-capped CdS nanoparticles (CdS{sub np}) and monohydroxy-(1-mercaptoundec-11-yl)tetraethylene-glycol-capped Au nanoparticles (Au{sub np}) were synthesised, characterised and their interactions with DNA were investigated. Au{sub np} are stable in different aqueous solvents, whereas CdS{sub np} do precipitate in 0.1 M NaCl and form two different cluster types in 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}. As regards the CdS{sub np}/DNA interaction, absorbance and fluorescence titrations, ethidium bromide displacement assays and gel electrophoresis experiments indicate that a non-covalent interaction between DNA and the CdS{sub np} external surface does take place. The binding constant was evaluated to be equal to (2.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}. On the contrary, concerning Au{sub np}, no direct interaction with DNA could be observed. Possible interaction with serum albumin was also checked, but no effects could be observed for either CdS{sub np} or Au{sub np}. Finally, short-time exposure of cultured cells to nanoparticles revealed the ability of CdS{sub np} to enter the cells and allocate both in cytosol and nucleus, thus promoting cell proliferation at low concentration (p < 0.005), while longer-time exposure resulted in a significant inhibition of cell growth, accompanied by apoptotic cell death. Au{sub np} neither enter the cells, nor do affect cell proliferation. In conclusion, our data indicate that CdS{sub np} can strongly interact with living cells and nucleic acid while no effects or interactions were observed for Au{sub np}.

  6. Interactions of DNA with graphene and sensing applications of graphene field-effect transistor devices: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Nathaniel S.; Norton, Michael L., E-mail: norton@marshall.edu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The interaction of DNA, including DNA nanostructures, and graphene is reviewed. • Comparison of DNA graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) with other detection methods. • Discussion of challenges present in the detection mechanism of GFETs. • Use of DNA aptamer GFET sensors for the detection of small molecules and proteins. - Abstract: Graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) have emerged as powerful detection platforms enabled by the advent of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) production of the unique atomically thin 2D material on a large scale. DNA aptamers, short target-specific oligonucleotides, are excellent sensor moieties for GFETs due to their strong affinity to graphene, relatively short chain-length, selectivity, and a high degree of analyte variability. However, the interaction between DNA and graphene is not fully understood, leading to questions about the structure of surface-bound DNA, including the morphology of DNA nanostructures and the nature of the electronic response seen from analyte binding. This review critically evaluates recent insights into the nature of the DNA graphene interaction and its affect on sensor viability for DNA, small molecules, and proteins with respect to previously established sensing methods. We first discuss the sorption of DNA to graphene to introduce the interactions and forces acting in DNA based GFET devices and how these forces can potentially affect the performance of increasingly popular DNA aptamers and even future DNA nanostructures as sensor substrates. Next, we discuss the novel use of GFETs to detect DNA and the underlying electronic phenomena that are typically used as benchmarks for characterizing the analyte response of these devices. Finally, we address the use of DNA aptamers to increase the selectivity of GFET sensors for small molecules and proteins and compare them with other, state of the art, detection methods.

  7. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation Assay for the Identification of Arabidopsis Protein-DNA Interactions In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komar, Dorota N; Mouriz, Alfonso; Jarillo, José A; Piñeiro, Manuel

    2016-01-14

    Intricate gene regulatory networks orchestrate biological processes and developmental transitions in plants. Selective transcriptional activation and silencing of genes mediate the response of plants to environmental signals and developmental cues. Therefore, insights into the mechanisms that control plant gene expression are essential to gain a deep understanding of how biological processes are regulated in plants. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technique described here is a procedure to identify the DNA-binding sites of proteins in genes or genomic regions of the model species Arabidopsis thaliana. The interactions with DNA of proteins of interest such as transcription factors, chromatin proteins or posttranslationally modified versions of histones can be efficiently analyzed with the ChIP protocol. This method is based on the fixation of protein-DNA interactions in vivo, random fragmentation of chromatin, immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes with specific antibodies, and quantification of the DNA associated with the protein of interest by PCR techniques. The use of this methodology in Arabidopsis has contributed significantly to unveil transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that control a variety of plant biological processes. This approach allowed the identification of the binding sites of the Arabidopsis chromatin protein EBS to regulatory regions of the master gene of flowering FT. The impact of this protein in the accumulation of particular histone marks in the genomic region of FT was also revealed through ChIP analysis.

  8. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  9. A quantitative 14-3-3 interaction screen connects the nuclear exosome targeting complex to the DNA damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blasius, Melanie; Wagner, Sebastian A; Choudhary, Chuna Ram

    2014-01-01

    RNA metabolism is altered following DNA damage, but the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Through a 14-3-3 interaction screen for DNA damage-induced protein interactions in human cells, we identified protein complexes connected to RNA biology. These include the nuclear exosome...

  10. A Hard Constraint Algorithm to Model Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Bybee, M D

    2006-08-01

    We present a new method for particle interactions in polymer models of DNA. The DNA is represented by a bead-rod polymer model and is fully-coupled to the fluid. The main objective in this work is to implement short-range forces to properly model polymer-polymer and polymer-surface interactions, specifically, rod-rod and rod-surface uncrossing. Our new method is based on a rigid constraint algorithm whereby rods elastically bounce off one another to prevent crossing, similar to our previous algorithm used to model polymer-surface interactions. We compare this model to a classical (smooth) potential which acts as a repulsive force between rods, and rods and surfaces.

  11. An Ultraviolet Resonance Raman Spectroscopic Study of Cisplatin and Transplatin Interactions with Genomic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jiafeng; Aioub, Mena; El-Sayed, Mostafa A; Barry, Bridgette A

    2017-09-28

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy is a label-free method to define biomacromolecular interactions with anticancer compounds. Using UVRR, we describe the binding interactions of two Pt(II) compounds, cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II)) and its isomer, transplatin, with nucleotides and genomic DNA. Cisplatin binds to DNA and other cellular components and triggers apoptosis, whereas transplatin is clinically ineffective. Here, a 244 nm UVRR study shows that purine UVRR bands are altered in frequency and intensity when mononucleotides are treated with cisplatin. This result is consistent with previous suggestions that purine N7 provides the cisplatin-binding site. The addition of cisplatin to DNA also causes changes in the UVRR spectrum, consistent with binding of platinum to purine N7 and disruption of hydrogen-bonding interactions between base pairs. Equally important is that transplatin treatment of DNA generates similar UVRR spectral changes, when compared to cisplatin-treated samples. Kinetic analysis, performed by monitoring decreases of the 1492 cm -1 band, reveals biphasic kinetics and is consistent with a two-step binding mechanism for both platinum compounds. For cisplatin-DNA, the rate constants (6.8 × 10 -5 and 6.5 × 10 -6 s -1 ) are assigned to the formation of monofunctional adducts and to bifunctional, intrastrand cross-linking, respectively. In transplatin-DNA, there is a 3.4-fold decrease in the rate constant of the slow phase, compared with the cisplatin samples. This change is attributed to generation of interstrand, rather than intrastrand, adducts. This longer reaction time may result in increased competition in the cellular environment and account, at least in part, for the lower pharmacological efficacy of transplatin.

  12. Non-Watson–Crick interactions between PNA and DNA inhibit the ATPase activity of bacteriophage T4 Dda helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Alan J.; Corey, David R.; Raney, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) is a DNA mimic in which the nucleobases are linked by an N-(2-aminoethyl) glycine backbone. Here we report that PNA can interact with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in a non-sequence-specific fashion. We observed that a 15mer PNA inhibited the ssDNA-stimulated ATPase activity of a bacteriophage T4 helicase, Dda. Surprisingly, when a fluorescein-labeled 15mer PNA was used in binding studies no interaction was observed between PNA and Dda. However, fluorescence polarization did reveal non-sequence-specific interactions between PNA and ssDNA. Thus, the inhibition of ATPase activity of Dda appears to result from depletion of the available ssDNA due to non-Watson–Crick binding of PNA to ssDNA. Inhibition of the ssDNA-stimulated ATPase activity was observed for several PNAs of varying length and sequence. To study the basis for this phenomenon, we examined self-aggregation by PNAs. The 15mer PNA readily self-aggregates to the point of precipitation. Since PNAs are hydrophobic, they aggregate more than DNA or RNA, making the study of this phenomenon essential for understanding the properties of PNA. Non-sequence-specific interactions between PNA and ssDNA were observed at moderate concentrations of PNA, suggesting that such interactions should be considered for antisense and antigene applications. PMID:11842106

  13. Topoisomerase I tyrosine phosphorylation site and the DNA-interactive site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roll, D.; Durban, E.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorylation of topoisomerase I (topo I) at serine by NII kinase is accompanied by stimulation of enzymatic activity. In contrast, phosphorylation at tyrosine by tyrosine kinase seems to inhibit enzymatic activity. This inhibition may be caused by interference of the phosphorylated tyrosine residue with the interaction of topo I with DNA. To test this, topo I was labeled with crude membrane fraction enriched for EGF-receptor kinase in presence of γ-P32-ATP and electrophoresed on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Stained topo I bands were excised, dried, digested with trypsin and analyzed on a C18 reverse-phase HPLC column. One major peak of radioactivity eluted at fraction 23 with 20% acetonitrile. To obtain the DNA-interactive site, topo I was incubated with pBR322 DNA labeled by nick-translation followed by DNase I treatment, and electrophoresis on SDS-polyacrylamide gels. Tryptic peptides were generated and analyzed by reverse-phase HPLC. A major peak of radioactivity eluted at fraction 16-18 with 15.5-17% acetonitrile. Studies are in progress to resolve whether (a) the two peptides are different, i.e. the tyrosine-P site and DNA-tyrosine interactive site are localized at different regions of the topo I or (b) the peptide sequences are identical but the covalent attachment of deoxynucleotides altered the peptide's elution from the HPLC column

  14. Survey of protein–DNA interactions in Aspergillus oryzae on a genomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Lv, Yangyong; Wang, Bin; Yin, Chao; Lin, Ying; Pan, Li

    2015-01-01

    The genome-scale delineation of in vivo protein–DNA interactions is key to understanding genome function. Only ∼5% of transcription factors (TFs) in the Aspergillus genus have been identified using traditional methods. Although the Aspergillus oryzae genome contains >600 TFs, knowledge of the in vivo genome-wide TF-binding sites (TFBSs) in aspergilli remains limited because of the lack of high-quality antibodies. We investigated the landscape of in vivo protein–DNA interactions across the A. oryzae genome through coupling the DNase I digestion of intact nuclei with massively parallel sequencing and the analysis of cleavage patterns in protein–DNA interactions at single-nucleotide resolution. The resulting map identified overrepresented de novo TF-binding motifs from genomic footprints, and provided the detailed chromatin remodeling patterns and the distribution of digital footprints near transcription start sites. The TFBSs of 19 known Aspergillus TFs were also identified based on DNase I digestion data surrounding potential binding sites in conjunction with TF binding specificity information. We observed that the cleavage patterns of TFBSs were dependent on the orientation of TF motifs and independent of strand orientation, consistent with the DNA shape features of binding motifs with flanking sequences. PMID:25883143

  15. Systems Biology Model of Interactions between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A

    2016-01-01

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses, and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low-dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low- and high-LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to crosstalk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  16. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Peter [University of Oxford; Anderson, Jennifer [University of Oxford

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  17. Systems Biology Model of Interactions between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFβ and ATM Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucinotta, Francis A [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses, and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low-dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGFβ pathways initiated by low- and high-LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGFβ signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to crosstalk between the TGFβ and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental

  18. cDNA-AFLP analysis reveals differential gene expression in compatible interaction of wheat challenged with Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Lili

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici is a fungal pathogen causing stripe rust, one of the most important wheat diseases worldwide. The fungus is strictly biotrophic and thus, completely dependent on living host cells for its reproduction, which makes it difficult to study genes of the pathogen. In spite of its economic importance, little is known about the molecular basis of compatible interaction between the pathogen and wheat host. In this study, we identified wheat and P. striiformis genes associated with the infection process by conducting a large-scale transcriptomic analysis using cDNA-AFLP. Results Of the total 54,912 transcript derived fragments (TDFs obtained using cDNA-AFLP with 64 primer pairs, 2,306 (4.2% displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation, of which 966 showed up-regulated and 1,340 down-regulated. 186 TDFs produced reliable sequences after sequencing of 208 TDFs selected, of which 74 (40% had known functions through BLAST searching the GenBank database. Majority of the latter group had predicted gene products involved in energy (13%, signal transduction (5.4%, disease/defence (5.9% and metabolism (5% of the sequenced TDFs. BLAST searching of the wheat stem rust fungus genome database identified 18 TDFs possibly from the stripe rust pathogen, of which 9 were validated of the pathogen origin using PCR-based assays followed by sequencing confirmation. Of the 186 reliable TDFs, 29 homologous to genes known to play a role in disease/defense, signal transduction or uncharacterized genes were further selected for validation of cDNA-AFLP expression patterns using qRT-PCR analyses. Results confirmed the altered expression patterns of 28 (96.5% genes revealed by the cDNA-AFLP technique. Conclusion The results show that cDNA-AFLP is a reliable technique for studying expression patterns of genes involved in the wheat-stripe rust interactions. Genes involved in compatible interactions between wheat and the

  19. Probing DNA interactions with proteins using a single-molecule toolbox: inside the cell, in a test tube and in a computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman, Adam J M; Miller, Helen; Zhou, Zhaokun; Leake, Mark C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-interacting proteins have roles in multiple processes, many operating as molecular machines which undergo dynamic meta-stable transitions to bring about their biological function. To fully understand this molecular heterogeneity, DNA and the proteins that bind to it must ideally be interrogated at a single molecule level in their native in vivo environments, in a time-resolved manner, fast enough to sample the molecular transitions across the free-energy landscape. Progress has been made over the past decade in utilizing cutting-edge tools of the physical sciences to address challenging biological questions concerning the function and modes of action of several different proteins which bind to DNA. These physiologically relevant assays are technically challenging but can be complemented by powerful and often more tractable in vitro experiments which confer advantages of the chemical environment with enhanced detection signal-to-noise of molecular signatures and transition events. In the present paper, we discuss a range of techniques we have developed to monitor DNA-protein interactions in vivo, in vitro and in silico. These include bespoke single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques to elucidate the architecture and dynamics of the bacterial replisome and the structural maintenance of bacterial chromosomes, as well as new computational tools to extract single-molecule molecular signatures from live cells to monitor stoichiometry, spatial localization and mobility in living cells. We also discuss recent developments from our laboratory made in vitro, complementing these in vivo studies, which combine optical and magnetic tweezers to manipulate and image single molecules of DNA, with and without bound protein, in a new super-resolution fluorescence microscope.

  20. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA-barcoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M

    2014-11-27

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing, high-throughput protein analyses are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule protein detection using optical methods is limited by the number of spectrally non-overlapping chromophores. Here we introduce a single-molecular-interaction sequencing (SMI-seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling leveraging single-molecule advantages. DNA barcodes are attached to proteins collectively via ribosome display or individually via enzymatic conjugation. Barcoded proteins are assayed en masse in aqueous solution and subsequently immobilized in a polyacrylamide thin film to construct a random single-molecule array, where barcoding DNAs are amplified into in situ polymerase colonies (polonies) and analysed by DNA sequencing. This method allows precise quantification of various proteins with a theoretical maximum array density of over one million polonies per square millimetre. Furthermore, protein interactions can be measured on the basis of the statistics of colocalized polonies arising from barcoding DNAs of interacting proteins. Two demanding applications, G-protein coupled receptor and antibody-binding profiling, are demonstrated. SMI-seq enables 'library versus library' screening in a one-pot assay, simultaneously interrogating molecular binding affinity and specificity.

  1. Interaction of organophosphorus pesticides with DNA nucleotides on a Boron-doped diamond electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbellini, Gustavo S.; Uliana, Carolina V.; Yamanaka, Hideko, E-mail: gustgarb@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica

    2013-12-01

    Diamond electrode was used to evaluate the interaction of the nucleotides guanosine monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with the pesticides chlorpyrifos, methamidophos and monocrotophos. Changes were observed in the currents and peak potentials of the nucleotide voltammograms in the presence of the pesticides, with dependence on the pesticide concentration (from 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) and the interaction time (from 1 min to 4 h). This is probably due to binding of the pesticides to the nitrogenous bases present in the nucleotides, which could lead to problems in the DNA replication and biological functions of nucleotides. The pesticides showed stronger interaction with AMP than with GMP. Studies of the interaction of 50 Micro-Sign g mL{sup -1} DNA with the pesticides (from 30 min to 4 h and from 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} mol L{sup -1}) did not reveal any peaks relating to double helix opening or DNA unwinding. (author)

  2. HyCCAPP as a tool to characterize promoter DNA-protein interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillen-Ahlers, Hector; Rao, Prahlad K; Levenstein, Mark E; Kennedy-Darling, Julia; Perumalla, Danu S; Jadhav, Avinash Y L; Glenn, Jeremy P; Ludwig-Kubinski, Amy; Drigalenko, Eugene; Montoya, Maria J; Göring, Harald H; Anderson, Corianna D; Scalf, Mark; Gildersleeve, Heidi I S; Cole, Regina; Greene, Alexandra M; Oduro, Akua K; Lazarova, Katarina; Cesnik, Anthony J; Barfknecht, Jared; Cirillo, Lisa A; Gasch, Audrey P; Shortreed, Michael R; Smith, Lloyd M; Olivier, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Currently available methods for interrogating DNA-protein interactions at individual genomic loci have significant limitations, and make it difficult to work with unmodified cells or examine single-copy regions without specific antibodies. In this study, we describe a physiological application of the Hybridization Capture of Chromatin-Associated Proteins for Proteomics (HyCCAPP) methodology we have developed. Both novel and known locus-specific DNA-protein interactions were identified at the ENO2 and GAL1 promoter regions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and revealed subgroups of proteins present in significantly different levels at the loci in cells grown on glucose versus galactose as the carbon source. Results were validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Overall, our analysis demonstrates that HyCCAPP is an effective and flexible technology that does not require specific antibodies nor prior knowledge of locally occurring DNA-protein interactions and can now be used to identify changes in protein interactions at target regions in the genome in response to physiological challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of point substitutions within the minimal DNA-binding domain of xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein on interaction with DNA intermediates of nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltseva, E A; Krasikova, Y S; Naegeli, H; Lavrik, O I; Rechkunova, N I

    2014-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum factor A (XPA) is one of the key proteins in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) process. The effects of point substitutions in the DNA-binding domain of XPA (positively charged lysine residues replaced by negatively charged glutamate residues: XPA K204E, K179E, K141E, and tandem mutant K141E/K179E) on the interaction of the protein with DNA structures modeling intermediates of the damage recognition and pre-incision stages in NER were analyzed. All these mutations decreased the affinity of the protein to DNA, the effect depending on the substitution and the DNA structure. The mutant as well as wild-type proteins bind with highest efficiency partly open damaged DNA duplex, and the affinity of the mutants to this DNA is reduced in the order: K204E > K179E > K141E = K141/179E. For all the mutants, decrease in DNA binding efficiency was more pronounced in the case of full duplex and single-stranded DNA than with bubble-DNA structure, the difference between protein affinities to different DNA structures increasing as DNA binding activity of the mutant decreased. No effect of the studied XPA mutations on the location of the protein on the partially open DNA duplex was observed using photoinduced crosslinking with 5-I-dUMP in different positions of the damaged DNA strand. These results combined with earlier published data suggest no direct correlation between DNA binding and activity in NER for these XPA mutants.

  4. Biflorin induces cytotoxicity by DNA interaction in genetically different human melanoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Ana Carolina Lima; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; da Silva Souza, Luciana Gregório; de Lemos, Telma Leda Gomes; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; de Vasconcellos, Marne Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is a public health problem and the second leading cause of death worldwide. The incidence of cutaneous melanoma has been notably increasing, resulting in high aggressiveness and poor survival rates. Taking into account the antitumor activity of biflorin, a substance isolated from Capraria biflora L. roots that is cytotoxic in vitro and in vivo, this study aimed to demonstrate the action of biflorin against three established human melanoma cell lines that recapitulate the molecular landscape of the disease in terms of genetic alterations and mutations, such as the TP53, NRAS and BRAF genes. The results presented here indicate that biflorin reduces the viability of melanoma cell lines by DNA interactions. Biflorin causes single and double DNA strand breaks, consequently inhibiting cell cycle progression, replication and DNA repair and promoting apoptosis. Our data suggest that biflorin could be considered as a future therapeutic option for managing melanoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Supramolecular interaction of 6-shogaol, a therapeutic agent of Zingiber officinale with human serum albumin as elucidated by spectroscopic, calorimetric and molecular docking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroz, S R; Mohamad, S B; Lee, G S; Malek, S N A; Tayyab, S

    2015-06-01

    6-Shogaol, one of the main bioactive constituents of Zingiber officinale has been shown to possess various therapeutic properties. Interaction of a therapeutic compound with plasma proteins greatly affects its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. The present investigation was undertaken to characterize the interaction between 6-shogaol and the main in vivo transporter, human serum albumin (HSA). Various binding characteristics of 6-shogaol-HSA interaction were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy. Thermal stability of 6-shogaol-HSA system was determined by circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques. Identification of the 6-shogaol binding site on HSA was made by competitive drug displacement and molecular docking experiments. Fluorescence quench titration results revealed the association constant, Ka of 6-shogaol-HSA interaction as 6.29 ± 0.33 × 10(4) M(-1) at 25 ºC. Values of the enthalpy change (-11.76 kJ mol(-1)) and the entropy change (52.52 J mol(-1) K(-1)), obtained for the binding reaction suggested involvement of hydrophobic and van der Waals forces along with hydrogen bonds in the complex formation. Higher thermal stability of HSA was noticed in the presence of 6-shogaol, as revealed by DSC and thermal denaturation profiles. Competitive ligand displacement experiments along with molecular docking results suggested the binding preference of 6-shogaol for Sudlow's site I of HSA. All these results suggest that 6-shogaol binds to Sudlow's site I of HSA through moderate binding affinity and involves hydrophobic and van der Waals forces along with hydrogen bonds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Elucidation of electronic structure by the analysis of hyperfine interactions: The MnH A 7Π-X 7Sigma + (0,0) band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Field, Robert W.; Merer, Anthony J.

    1991-08-01

    We present a complete analysis of the hyperfine structure of the MnH A 7Π-X 7Σ+ (0,0) band near 5680 Å, studied with sub-Doppler resolution by intermodulated fluorescence spectroscopy. Magnetic hyperfine interactions involving both the 55Mn (I=5/2) and 1H (I=1/2) nuclear spins are observed as well as 55Mn electric quadrupole effects. The manganese Fermi contact interaction in the X 7Σ+ state is the dominant contributor to the observed hyperfine splittings; the ΔF=0, ΔN=0, ΔJ=±1 matrix elements of this interaction mix the electron spin components of the ground state quite strongly at low N, destroying the ``goodness'' of J as a quantum number and inducing rotationally forbidden, ΔJ=±2 and ±3 transitions. The hyperfine splittings of over 50 rotational transitions covering all 7 spin components of both states were analyzed and fitted by least squares, allowing the accurate determination of 14 different hyperfine parameters. Using single electronic configurations to describe the A 7Π and X 7Σ+ states and Herman-Skillman atomic radial wave functions to represent the molecular orbitals, we calculated a priori values for the 55Mn and 1H hyperfine parameters which agree closely with experiment. We show that the five high-spin coupled Mn 3d electrons do not contribute to the manganese hyperfine structure but are responsible for the observed proton magnetic dipolar couplings. Furthermore, the results suggest that the Mn 3d electrons are not significantly involved in bonding and demonstrate that the molecular hyperfine interactions may be quantitatively understood using simple physical interpretations.

  7. RPA and XPA interaction with DNA structures mimicking intermediates of the late stages in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasikova, Yuliya S; Rechkunova, Nadejda I; Maltseva, Ekaterina A; Lavrik, Olga I

    2018-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) and the xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein are indispensable for both pathways of nucleotide excision repair (NER). Here we analyze the interaction of RPA and XPA with DNA containing a flap and different size gaps that imitate intermediates of the late NER stages. Using gel mobility shift assays, we found that RPA affinity for DNA decreased when DNA contained both extended gap and similar sized flap in comparison with gapped-DNA structure. Moreover, crosslinking experiments with the flap-gap DNA revealed that RPA interacts mainly with the ssDNA platform within the long gap and contacts flap in DNA with a short gap. XPA exhibits higher affinity for bubble-DNA structures than to flap-gap-containing DNA. Protein titration analysis showed that formation of the RPA-XPA-DNA ternary complex depends on the protein concentration ratio and these proteins can function as independent players or in tandem. Using fluorescently-labelled RPA, direct interaction of this protein with XPA was detected and characterized quantitatively. The data obtained allow us to suggest that XPA can be involved in the post-incision NER stages via its interaction with RPA.

  8. RPA and XPA interaction with DNA structures mimicking intermediates of the late stages in nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya S Krasikova

    Full Text Available Replication protein A (RPA and the xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA protein are indispensable for both pathways of nucleotide excision repair (NER. Here we analyze the interaction of RPA and XPA with DNA containing a flap and different size gaps that imitate intermediates of the late NER stages. Using gel mobility shift assays, we found that RPA affinity for DNA decreased when DNA contained both extended gap and similar sized flap in comparison with gapped-DNA structure. Moreover, crosslinking experiments with the flap-gap DNA revealed that RPA interacts mainly with the ssDNA platform within the long gap and contacts flap in DNA with a short gap. XPA exhibits higher affinity for bubble-DNA structures than to flap-gap-containing DNA. Protein titration analysis showed that formation of the RPA-XPA-DNA ternary complex depends on the protein concentration ratio and these proteins can function as independent players or in tandem. Using fluorescently-labelled RPA, direct interaction of this protein with XPA was detected and characterized quantitatively. The data obtained allow us to suggest that XPA can be involved in the post-incision NER stages via its interaction with RPA.

  9. DNA-interactive properties of crotamine, a cell-penetrating polypeptide and a potential drug carrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available Crotamine, a 42-residue polypeptide derived from the venom of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus, has been shown to be a cell-penetrating protein that targets chromosomes, carries plasmid DNA into cells, and shows specificity for actively proliferating cells. Given this potential role as a nucleic acid-delivery vector, we have studied in detail the binding of crotamine to single- and double-stranded DNAs of different lengths and base compositions over a range of ionic conditions. Agarose gel electrophoresis and ultraviolet spectrophotometry analysis indicate that complexes of crotamine with long-chain DNAs readily aggregate and precipitate at low ionic strength. This aggregation, which may be important for cellular uptake of DNA, becomes less likely with shorter chain length. 25-mer oligonucleotides do not show any evidence of such aggregation, permitting the determination of affinities and size via fluorescence quenching experiments. The polypeptide binds non-cooperatively to DNA, covering about 5 nucleotide residues when it binds to single (ss or (ds double stranded molecules. The affinities of the protein for ss- vs. ds-DNA are comparable, and inversely proportional to salt levels. Analysis of the dependence of affinity on [NaCl] indicates that there are a maximum of ∼3 ionic interactions between the protein and DNA, with some of the binding affinity attributable to non-ionic interactions. Inspection of the three-dimensional structure of the protein suggests that residues 31 to 35, Arg-Trp-Arg-Trp-Lys, could serve as a potential DNA-binding site. A hexapeptide containing this sequence displayed a lower DNA binding affinity and salt dependence as compared to the full-length protein, likely indicative of a more suitable 3D structure and the presence of accessory binding sites in the native crotamine. Taken together, the data presented here describing crotamine-DNA interactions may lend support to the design of more

  10. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  11. An AP endonuclease 1-DNA polymerase beta complex: theoretical prediction of interacting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexej Abyzov

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abasic (AP sites in DNA arise through both endogenous and exogenous mechanisms. Since AP sites can prevent replication and transcription, the cell contains systems for their identification and repair. AP endonuclease (APEX1 cleaves the phosphodiester backbone 5' to the AP site. The cleavage, a key step in the base excision repair pathway, is followed by nucleotide insertion and removal of the downstream deoxyribose moiety, performed most often by DNA polymerase beta (pol-beta. While yeast two-hybrid studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays provide evidence for interaction of APEX1 and pol-beta, the specifics remain obscure. We describe a theoretical study designed to predict detailed interacting surfaces between APEX1 and pol-beta based on published co-crystal structures of each enzyme bound to DNA. Several potentially interacting complexes were identified by sliding the protein molecules along DNA: two with pol-beta located downstream of APEX1 (3' to the damaged site and three with pol-beta located upstream of APEX1 (5' to the damaged site. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations, ensuring geometrical complementarity of interfaces, enabled us to predict interacting residues and calculate binding energies, which in two cases were sufficient (approximately -10.0 kcal/mol to form a stable complex and in one case a weakly interacting complex. Analysis of interface behavior during MD simulation and visual inspection of interfaces allowed us to conclude that complexes with pol-beta at the 3'-side of APEX1 are those most likely to occur in vivo. Additional multiple sequence analyses of APEX1 and pol-beta in related organisms identified a set of correlated mutations of specific residues at the predicted interfaces. Based on these results, we propose that pol-beta in the open or closed conformation interacts and makes a stable interface with APEX1 bound to a cleaved abasic site on the 3' side. The method described here can be used for analysis in

  12. Multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its interaction with DnaA boxes in the initiation of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Meera J; Bhatia, Lavesh; Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2017-09-01

    DnaA protein is the initiator of genomic DNA replication in prokaryotes. It binds to specific DNA sequences in the origin of DNA replication and unwinds small AT-rich sequences downstream for the assembly of the replisome. The mechanism of activation of DnaA that enables it to bind and organize the origin DNA and leads to replication initiation remains unclear. In this study, we have developed double-labeled fluorescent DnaA probes to analyze conformational states of DnaA protein upon binding DNA, nucleotide, and Soj sporulation protein using Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). Our studies demonstrate that DnaA protein undergoes large conformational changes upon binding to substrates and there are multiple distinct conformational states that enable it to initiate DNA replication. DnaA protein adopted a relaxed conformation by expanding ~15Å upon binding ATP and DNA to form the ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. Hydrolysis of bound ATP to ADP led to a contraction of DnaA within the complex. The relaxed conformation of DnaA is likely required for the formation of the multi-protein ATP·DnaA·DNA complex. In the initiation of sporulation, Soj binding to DnaA prevented relaxation of its conformation. Soj·ADP appeared to block the activation of DnaA, suggesting a mechanism for Soj·ADP in switching initiation of DNA replication to sporulation. Our studies demonstrate that multiple conformational states of DnaA protein regulate its binding to DNA in the initiation of DNA replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Interaction of a non-histone chromatin protein (high-mobility group protein 2) with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, G.H.; Shooter, K.V.; Johns, E.W.

    1975-01-01

    The interaction with DNA of the calf thymus chromatin non-histone protein termed the high-mobility group protein 2 has been studied by sedimentation analysis in the ultracentrifuge and by measuring the binding of the 125 I-labelled protein to DNA. The results have been compared with those obtained previously by us [Eur. J. Biochem. (1974) 47, 263-270] for the interaction of high-mobility group protein 1 with DNA. Although the binding parameters are similar for these two proteins, high-mobility group protein 2 differs from high-mobility group protein 1 in that the former appears to change the shape of the DNA to a more compact form. The molecular weight of high-mobility group protein 2 has been determined by equilibrium sedimentation and a mean value of 26,000 was obtained. A low level of nuclease activity detected in one preparation of high-mobility group protein 2 has been investigated. (orig.) [de

  14. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh; Azam, Ameer

    2010-01-01

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. 119 Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K b = 8.42 x 10 4 M -1 . The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  15. DNA interaction studies of new nano metal based anticancer agent: validation by spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Chandra Sharma, Girish; Arjmand, Farukh [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Azam, Ameer [Center of Excellence in Materials Science (Nanomaterials), Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002, UP (India)

    2010-05-14

    A new nano dimensional heterobimetallic Cu-Sn containing complex as a potential drug candidate was designed, synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectral methods. The electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance parameters of the complex revealed that the Cu(II) ion exhibits a square pyramidal geometry with the two pyrazole nitrogen atoms, the amine nitrogen atom and the carboxylate oxygen of the phenyl glycine chloride ligand located at the equatorial sites and the coordinated chloride ion occupying an apical position. {sup 119}Sn NMR spectral data showed a hexa-coordinated environment around the Sn(IV) metal ion. TEM, AFM and XRD measurements illustrate that the complex could induce the condensation of CT-DNA to a particulate nanostructure. The interaction of the Cu-Sn complex with CT-DNA was investigated by UV-vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, as well as cyclic voltammetric measurements. The results indicated that the complex interacts with DNA through an electrostatic mode of binding with an intrinsic binding constant K{sub b} = 8.42 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. The Cu-Sn complex exhibits effective cleavage of pBR322 plasmid DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism, monitored at different concentrations both in the absence and in the presence of reducing agents.

  16. In vitro fluorescence studies of transcription factor IIB-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górecki, Andrzej; Figiel, Małgorzata; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    General transcription factor TFIIB is one of the basal constituents of the preinitiation complex of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, acting as a bridge between the preinitiation complex and the polymerase, and binding promoter DNA in an asymmetric manner, thereby defining the direction of the transcription. Methods of fluorescence spectroscopy together with circular dichroism spectroscopy were used to observe conformational changes in the structure of recombinant human TFIIB after binding to specific DNA sequence. To facilitate the exploration of the structural changes, several site-directed mutations have been introduced altering the fluorescence properties of the protein. Our observations showed that binding of specific DNA sequences changed the protein structure and dynamics, and TFIIB may exist in two conformational states, which can be described by a different microenvironment of W52. Fluorescence studies using both intrinsic and exogenous fluorophores showed that these changes significantly depended on the recognition sequence and concerned various regions of the protein, including those interacting with other transcription factors and RNA polymerase II. DNA binding can cause rearrangements in regions of proteins interacting with the polymerase in a manner dependent on the recognized sequences, and therefore, influence the gene expression.

  17. Cytogenetic evaluation and DNA interaction studies of the food colorants amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpountoukas, Panagiotis; Pantazaki, Anastasia; Kostareli, Efterpi; Christodoulou, Pantelitsa; Kareli, Dimitra; Poliliou, Stamatia; Mourelatos, Costas; Lambropoulou, Vasso; Lialiaris, Theodore

    2010-10-01

    Food coloring agents, amaranth, erythrosine and tartrazine have been tested at 0.02-8mM in human peripheral blood cells in vitro, in order to investigate their genotoxic, cytotoxic and cytostatic potential. Amaranth at the highest concentration (8mM) demonstrates high genotoxicity, cytostaticity and cytotoxicity. The frequency of SCEs/cell was increased 1.7 times over the control level. Additionally, erythrosine at 8, 4 and 2mM shows a high cytotoxicity and cytostaticity. Finally, tartrazine seems to be toxic at 8 and 4mM. No signs of genotoxicity were observed. Reversely, tartrazine showed cytotoxicity at 1 and 2mM. Furthermore, spectroscopic titration studies for the interaction of these food additives with DNA showed that these dyes bind to calf thymus DNA and distinct isosbestic points are observed clearly suggesting binding of the dyes to DNA. Additionally DNA electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that these colorants are obviously capable for strong binding to linear dsDNA causing its degradation. PCR amplification of all DNA fragments (which previously were pre-treated with three different concentrations of the colorants, extracted from agarose gel after separation and then purified), seems to be attenuated with a manner dye concentration-dependent reflecting in a delayed electrophoretic mobility due to the possible binding of some molecules of the dyes. Evaluation of the data and curves were obtained after quantitative and qualitative analysis of the lanes of the gel by an analyzer computer program. Our results indicate that these food colorants had a toxic potential to human lymphocytes in vitro and it seems that they bind directly to DNA. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Study of DNA interactions with bifenthrin by spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pan; Zhang, Guowen; Ma, Yadi; Zhang, Yepeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2013-08-01

    The interaction between bifenthrin (BF) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by UV-vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, coupled with viscosity measurements and molecular docking techniques. It was found that BF molecular could intercalate into the base pairs of ctDNA as evidenced by significant increases in absorption intensity, fluorescence polarization and relative viscosity of ctDNA, decrease in iodide quenching effect, and induced CD spectral changes. The association constant of BF with ctDNA was evaluated to be in the order of 104 L mol-1. Thermodynamic analysis of the binding data obtained at different temperatures suggested that the binding process was primarily driven by hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces, as the values of the enthalpy change (ΔH) and the entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be -31.13 ± 1.89 kJ mol-1 and -22.79 ± 1.21 J mol-1 K-1, respectively. The results of FT-IR spectra and molecular docking showed that a specific binding mainly existed between BF and adenine and guanine bases.

  19. Tailored protein encapsulation into a DNA host using geometrically organized supramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Andreas; Lill, Pascal; Stegemann, Pierre; Bravo-Rodriguez, Kenny; Schöneweiß, Elisa-C.; Merdanovic, Melisa; Gudnason, Daniel; Aznauryan, Mikayel; Gamrad, Lisa; Barcikowski, Stephan; Sanchez-Garcia, Elsa; Birkedal, Victoria; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Ehrmann, Michael; Saccà, Barbara

    2017-02-01

    The self-organizational properties of DNA have been used to realize synthetic hosts for protein encapsulation. However, current strategies of DNA-protein conjugation still limit true emulation of natural host-guest systems, whose formation relies on non-covalent bonds between geometrically matching interfaces. Here we report one of the largest DNA-protein complexes of semisynthetic origin held in place exclusively by spatially defined supramolecular interactions. Our approach is based on the decoration of the inner surface of a DNA origami hollow structure with multiple ligands converging to their corresponding binding sites on the protein surface with programmable symmetry and range-of-action. Our results demonstrate specific host-guest recognition in a 1:1 stoichiometry and selectivity for the guest whose size guarantees sufficient molecular diffusion preserving short intermolecular distances. DNA nanocontainers can be thus rationally designed to trap single guest molecules in their native form, mimicking natural strategies of molecular recognition and anticipating a new method of protein caging.

  20. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection

  1. The interaction of DNA gyrase with the bacterial toxin CcdB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampranis, S C; Howells, A J; Maxwell, A

    1999-01-01

    CcdB is a bacterial toxin that targets DNA gyrase. Analysis of the interaction of CcdB with gyrase reveals two distinct complexes. An initial complex (alpha) is formed by direct interaction between GyrA and CcdB; this complex can be detected by affinity column and gel-shift analysis, and has...... of this initial complex with ATP in the presence of GyrB and DNA slowly converts it to a second complex (beta), which has a lower rate of ATP hydrolysis and is unable to catalyse supercoiling. The efficiency of formation of this inactive complex is dependent on the concentrations of ATP and CcdB. We suggest...

  2. Interactive measurement and characterization of DNA molecules by analysis of AFM images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marek, J.; Demjénová, E.; Tomori, Z.; Janáček, Jiří; Zolotová, I.; Valle, F.; Favre, M.; Dietler, G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2005), s. 87-93 ISSN 1552-4922 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 5048; VEGA(SK) 2185; CZ-SK(CZ) KONTAKT 139; Swiss National Science Foundation(CH) 2100-063746.00/1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : DNA * atomic force microscopy * interactive image analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.115, year: 2005

  3. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Suvankar Das; Cristiane J. da Silva; Marina de M. Silva; Maria Dayanne de A. Dantas; Ângelo de Fátima; Ana Lúcia T. Góis Ruiz; Cleiton M. da Silva; João Ernesto de Carvalho; Josué C.C. Santos; Isis M. Figueiredo; Edeildo F. da Silva-Júnior; Thiago M. de Aquino; João X. de Araújo-Júnior; Goutam Brahmachari; Luzia Valentina Modolo

    2018-01-01

    Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−). The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine...

  4. Interaction of bacteriophage T4 and T7 single-stranded DNA-binding proteins with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokri, Leila; Williams, Mark C; Rouzina, Ioulia

    2009-01-01

    Bacteriophages T4 and T7 are well-studied model replication systems, which have allowed researchers to determine the roles of many proteins central to DNA replication, recombination and repair. Here we summarize and discuss the results from two recently developed single-molecule methods to determine the salt-dependent DNA-binding kinetics and thermodynamics of the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins (SSBs) from these systems. We use these methods to characterize both the equilibrium double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and ssDNA binding of the SSBs T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) and T7 gene 2.5 protein (gp2.5). Despite the overall two-orders-of-magnitude weaker binding of gp2.5 to both forms of DNA, we find that both proteins exhibit four-orders-of-magnitude preferential binding to ssDNA relative to dsDNA. This strong preferential ssDNA binding as well as the weak dsDNA binding is essential for the ability of both proteins to search dsDNA in one dimension to find available ssDNA-binding sites at the replication fork

  5. Additional mitochondrial DNA influences the interactions between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in a bovine embryo model of nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srirattana, Kanokwan; St John, Justin C

    2018-05-08

    We generated cattle embryos using mitochondrial supplementation and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), named miNT, to determine how additional mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) modulates the nuclear genome. To eliminate any confounding effects from somatic cell mtDNA in intraspecies SCNT, donor cell mtDNA was depleted prior to embryo production. Additional oocyte mtDNA did not affect embryo development rates but increased mtDNA copy number in blastocyst stage embryos. Moreover, miNT-derived blastocysts had different gene expression profiles when compared with SCNT-derived blastocysts. Additional mtDNA increased expression levels of genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, cell cycle and DNA repair. Supplementing the embryo culture media with a histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A (TSA), had no beneficial effects on the development of miNT-derived embryos, unlike SCNT-derived embryos. When compared with SCNT-derived blastocysts cultured in the presence of TSA, additional mtDNA alone had beneficial effects as the activity of glycolysis may increase and embryonic cell death may decrease. However, these beneficial effects were not found with additional mtDNA and TSA together, suggesting that additional mtDNA alone enhances reprogramming. In conclusion, additional mtDNA increased mtDNA copy number and expression levels of genes involved in energy production and embryo development in blastocyst stage embryos emphasising the importance of nuclear-mitochondrial interactions.

  6. Microarrays in ecological research: A case study of a cDNA microarray for plant-herbivore interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gase Klaus

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray technology allows researchers to simultaneously monitor changes in the expression ratios (ERs of hundreds of genes and has thereby revolutionized most of biology. Although this technique has the potential of elucidating early stages in an organism's phenotypic response to complex ecological interactions, to date, it has not been fully incorporated into ecological research. This is partially due to a lack of simple procedures of handling and analyzing the expression ratio (ER data produced from microarrays. Results We describe an analysis of the sources of variation in ERs from 73 hybridized cDNA microarrays, each with 234 herbivory-elicited genes from the model ecological expression system, Nicotiana attenuata, using procedures that are commonly used in ecologic research. Each gene is represented by two independently labeled PCR products and each product was arrayed in quadruplicate. We present a robust method of normalizing and analyzing ERs based on arbitrary thresholds and statistical criteria, and characterize a "norm of reaction" of ERs for 6 genes (4 of known function, 2 of unknown with different ERs as determined across all analyzed arrays to provide a biologically-informed alternative to the use of arbitrary expression ratios in determining significance of expression. These gene-specific ERs and their variance (gene CV were used to calculate array-based variances (array CV, which, in turn, were used to study the effects of array age, probe cDNA quantity and quality, and quality of spotted PCR products as estimates of technical variation. Cluster analysis and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA were used to reveal associations among the transcriptional "imprints" of arrays hybridized with cDNA probes derived from mRNA from N. attenuata plants variously elicited and attacked by different herbivore species and from three congeners: N. quadrivalis, N. longiflora and N. clevelandii. Additionally, the PCA

  7. Genotoxicity studies on DNA-interactive telomerase inhibitors with application as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Dean J; Cemeli, Eduardo; Carder, Joanna; Fearnley, Jamie; Estdale, Sian; Perry, Philip J; Jenkins, Terence C; Anderson, Diana

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase-targeted strategies have aroused recent interest in anti-cancer chemotherapy, because DNA-binding drugs can interact with high-order tetraplex rather than double-stranded (duplex) DNA targets in tumour cells. However, the protracted cell-drug exposure times necessary for clinical application require that telomerase inhibitory efficacy must be accompanied by both low inherent cytotoxicity and the absence of mutagenicity/genotoxicity. For the first time, the genotoxicity of a number of structurally diverse DNA-interactive telomerase inhibitors is examined in the Ames test using six Salmonella typhimurium bacterial strains (TA1535, TA1537, TA1538, TA98, TA100, and TA102). DNA damage induced by each agent was also assessed using the Comet assay with human lymphocytes. The two assay procedures revealed markedly different genotoxicity profiles that are likely to reflect differences in metabolism and/or DNA repair between bacterial and mammalian cells. The mutational spectrum for a biologically active fluorenone derivative, shown to be mutagenic in the TA100 strain, was characterised using a novel and rapid assay method based upon PCR amplification of a fragment of the hisG46 allele, followed by RFLP analysis. Preliminary analysis indicates that the majority (84%) of mutations induced by this compound are C --> A transversions at position 2 of the missense proline codon of the hisG46 allele. However, despite its genotoxic bacterial profile, this fluorenone agent gave a negative response in the Comet assay, and demonstrates how unwanted systemic effects (e.g., cytotoxicity and genotoxicity) can be prevented or ameliorated through suitable molecular fine-tuning of a candidate drug in targeted human tumour cells. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis class II apurinic/apyrimidinic-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III exhibits DNA regulated modes of interaction with the sliding DNA β-clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Taran; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-10-01

    The class-II AP-endonuclease (XthA) acts on abasic sites of damaged DNA in bacterial base excision repair. We identified that the sliding DNA β-clamp forms in vivo and in vitro complexes with XthA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A novel 239 QLRFPKK245 motif in the DNA-binding domain of XthA was found to be important for the interactions. Likewise, the peptide binding-groove (PBG) and the C-terminal of β-clamp located on different domains interact with XthA. The β-clamp-XthA complex can be disrupted by clamp binding peptides and also by a specific bacterial clamp inhibitor that binds at the PBG. We also identified that β-clamp stimulates the activities of XthA primarily by increasing its affinity for the substrate and its processivity. Additionally, loading of the β-clamp onto DNA is required for activity stimulation. A reduction in XthA activity stimulation was observed in the presence of β-clamp binding peptides supporting that direct interactions between the proteins are necessary to cause stimulation. Finally, we found that in the absence of DNA, the PBG located on the second domain of the β-clamp is important for interactions with XthA, while the C-terminal domain predominantly mediates functional interactions in the substrate's presence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The intervening domain from MeCP2 enhances the DNA affinity of the methyl binding domain and provides an independent DNA interaction site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Lanuza, Pilar M; Morales-Chueca, Ignacio; Jorge-Torres, Olga C; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Esteller, Manel; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-01-31

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) preferentially interacts with methylated DNA and it is involved in epigenetic regulation and chromatin remodelling. Mutations in MeCP2 are linked to Rett syndrome, the leading cause of intellectual retardation in girls and causing mental, motor and growth impairment. Unstructured regions in MeCP2 provide the plasticity for establishing interactions with multiple binding partners. We present a biophysical characterization of the methyl binding domain (MBD) from MeCP2 reporting the contribution of flanking domains to its structural stability and dsDNA interaction. The flanking disordered intervening domain (ID) increased the structural stability of MBD, modified its dsDNA binding profile from an entropically-driven moderate-affinity binding to an overwhelmingly enthalpically-driven high-affinity binding. Additionally, ID provided an additional site for simultaneously and autonomously binding an independent dsDNA molecule, which is a key feature linked to the chromatin remodelling and looping activity of MeCP2, as well as its ability to interact with nucleosomes replacing histone H1. The dsDNA interaction is characterized by an unusually large heat capacity linked to a cluster of water molecules trapped within the binding interface. The dynamics of disordered regions together with extrinsic factors are key determinants of MeCP2 global structural properties and functional capabilities.

  10. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches to elucidate the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV), a second-generation HIV protease inhibitor, is widely used across the world as an important component of HIV therapy. The interaction of DRV with bovine serum albumin (BSA), a major carrier protein, has been studied under simulated physiological conditions (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular modeling. Fluorescence data revealed that the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by DRV in terms of a static quenching procedure due to the formation of the DRV-BSA complex. The results indicated the presence of single weak affinity binding site ( 103 M- 1, 310 K) on protein. The thermodynamic parameters, namely enthalpy change (ΔH0), entropy change (ΔS0) and Gibbs free energy change (ΔG0) were calculated, which signified that the binding reaction was spontaneous, the main binding forces were hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Importantly, competitive binding experiments with three site probes, phenylbutazone (in sub-domain IIA, site I), ibuprofen (in sub-domain IIIA, site II) and artemether (in the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB, site II'), suggested that DRV was preferentially bound to the hydrophobic cavity in site II' of BSA, and this finding was validated by the docking results. Additionally, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and Resonance Rayleigh Scattering (RRS) spectroscopy gave qualitative information on the conformational changes of BSA upon adding DRV, while quantitative data were obtained with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR).

  11. Elucidating the weak protein-protein interaction mechanisms behind the liquid-liquid phase separation of a mAb solution by different types of additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guoliang; Wang, Shujing; Tian, Zhou; Zhang, Ning; Sheng, Han; Dai, Weiguo; Qian, Feng

    2017-11-01

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has long been observed during the physical stability investigation of therapeutic protein formulations. The buffer conditions and the presence of various excipients are thought to play important roles in the formulation development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In this study, the effects of several small-molecule excipients (histidine, alanine, glycine, sodium phosphate, sodium chloride, sorbitol and sucrose) with diverse physical-chemical properties on LLPS of a model IgG1 (JM2) solutions were investigated by multiple techniques, including UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry/fluorimetry, size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering. The LLPS of JM2 was confirmed to be a thermodynamic equilibrium process with no structural changes or irreversible aggregation of proteins. Phase diagrams of various JM2 formulations were constructed, suggesting that the phase behavior of JM2 was dependent on the solution pH, ionic strength and the presence of other excipients such as glycine, alanine, sorbitol and sucrose. Furthermore, we demonstrated that for this mAb, the interaction parameter (k D ) determined at low protein concentration appeared to be a good predictor for the occurrence of LLPS at high concentration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovering approximate-associated sequence patterns for protein-DNA interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chan, Tak Ming

    2010-12-30

    Motivation: The bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are fundamental protein-DNA interactions in transcriptional regulation. Extensive efforts have been made to better understand the protein-DNA interactions. Recent mining on exact TF-TFBS-associated sequence patterns (rules) has shown great potentials and achieved very promising results. However, exact rules cannot handle variations in real data, resulting in limited informative rules. In this article, we generalize the exact rules to approximate ones for both TFs and TFBSs, which are essential for biological variations. Results: A progressive approach is proposed to address the approximation to alleviate the computational requirements. Firstly, similar TFBSs are grouped from the available TF-TFBS data (TRANSFAC database). Secondly, approximate and highly conserved binding cores are discovered from TF sequences corresponding to each TFBS group. A customized algorithm is developed for the specific objective. We discover the approximate TF-TFBS rules by associating the grouped TFBS consensuses and TF cores. The rules discovered are evaluated by matching (verifying with) the actual protein-DNA binding pairs from Protein Data Bank (PDB) 3D structures. The approximate results exhibit many more verified rules and up to 300% better verification ratios than the exact ones. The customized algorithm achieves over 73% better verification ratios than traditional methods. Approximate rules (64-79%) are shown statistically significant. Detailed variation analysis and conservation verification on NCBI records demonstrate that the approximate rules reveal both the flexible and specific protein-DNA interactions accurately. The approximate TF-TFBS rules discovered show great generalized capability of exploring more informative binding rules. © The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  14. A new insight into the interaction of ZnO with calf thymus DNA through surface defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sumita; Chatterjee, Sabyasachi; Pramanik, Srikrishna; Devi, Parukuttyamma Sujatha; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2018-01-01

    Experimental evidences on the binding interaction of ZnO and Calf Thymus (CT) DNA using several biophysical techniques are the centre of interest of the present study. The interaction of ZnO with CT DNA has been investigated in detail by absorption spectral study, fluorescence titration, Raman analysis, zeta potential measurement, viscometric experiment along with thermal melting study and microscopic analysis. Steady-state fluorescence study revealed the quenching (48%) of the surface defect related peak intensity of ZnO on interaction with DNA. The optimized concentration of ZnO and DNA to obtain this level of quenching has been found to be 0.049mM and 1.027μM, respectively. Additional fluorescence study with 8-hydroxy-5-quinoline (HQ) as a fluorescence probe for Zn 2+ ruled out the dissolution effect of ZnO under the experimental conditions. DNA conjugation on the surface of ZnO was also supported by Raman study. The quantitative variation in conductivity as well as electrophoretic mobility indicated significant interaction of ZnO with the DNA molecule. Circular dichroism (CD) and viscometry titrations provided clear evidence in support of the conformational retention of the DNA on interaction with ZnO. The binding interaction was found to be predominantly entropy driven in nature. The bio-physical studies presented in this paper exploring ZnO-CT DNA interaction could add a new horizon to understand the interaction between metal oxide and DNA. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling approaches to elucidate the binding interaction between bovine serum albumin and darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-01-05

    Darunavir (DRV), a second-generation HIV protease inhibitor, is widely used across the world as an important component of HIV therapy. The interaction of DRV with bovine serum albumin (BSA), a major carrier protein, has been studied under simulated physiological conditions (pH7.4) by multi-spectroscopic techniques in combination with molecular modeling. Fluorescence data revealed that the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by DRV in terms of a static quenching procedure due to the formation of the DRV-BSA complex. The results indicated the presence of single weak affinity binding site (~10 3 M -1 , 310K) on protein. The thermodynamic parameters, namely enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ), entropy change (ΔS 0 ) and Gibbs free energy change (ΔG 0 ) were calculated, which signified that the binding reaction was spontaneous, the main binding forces were hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Importantly, competitive binding experiments with three site probes, phenylbutazone (in sub-domain IIA, site I), ibuprofen (in sub-domain IIIA, site II) and artemether (in the interface between sub-domain IIA and IIB, site II'), suggested that DRV was preferentially bound to the hydrophobic cavity in site II' of BSA, and this finding was validated by the docking results. Additionally, synchronous fluorescence, three-dimensional fluorescence and Resonance Rayleigh Scattering (RRS) spectroscopy gave qualitative information on the conformational changes of BSA upon adding DRV, while quantitative data were obtained with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA effects upon the reaction between acetonitrile pentacyanoferrate (II) and ruthenium pentammine pyrazine: Kinetic and thermodynamic evidence of the interaction of DNA with anionic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueso, E.; Prado-Gotor, R.; Lopez, M.; Gomez-Herrera, C.; Sanchez, F.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetics of the reaction between ruthenium pentaammine pyrazine and acetonitrile pentacyanoferrate (II) to obtain the binuclear anionic complex [Fe(CN) 5 pzRu(NH 3 ) 5 ] - , and the reverse (dissociation) process, have been studied in solutions containing DNA. The results corresponding to this reaction and those corresponding to the reverse (dissociation) process show a clear influence of DNA on their kinetics. The results can be interpreted using a modified Pseudophase Model. From the results obtained for the dissociation reaction one can conclude that the binuclear anionic complex [Fe(CN) 5 pzRu(NH 3 ) 5 ] - interacts with DNA

  17. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) localizes to mitochondria and interacts with mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Barbara; Samson, Leona D

    2013-03-01

    Due to a harsh environment mitochondrial genomes accumulate high levels of DNA damage, in particular oxidation, hydrolytic deamination, and alkylation adducts. While repair of alkylated bases in nuclear DNA has been explored in detail, much less is known about the repair of DNA alkylation damage in mitochondria. Alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG) recognizes and removes numerous alkylated bases, but to date AAG has only been detected in the nucleus, even though mammalian mitochondria are known to repair DNA lesions that are specific substrates of AAG. Here we use immunofluorescence to show that AAG localizes to mitochondria, and we find that native AAG is present in purified human mitochondrial extracts, as well as that exposure to alkylating agent promotes AAG accumulation in the mitochondria. We identify mitochondrial single-stranded binding protein (mtSSB) as a novel interacting partner of AAG; interaction between mtSSB and AAG is direct and increases upon methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment. The consequence of this interaction is specific inhibition of AAG glycosylase activity in the context of a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but not a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) substrate. By inhibiting AAG-initiated processing of damaged bases, mtSSB potentially prevents formation of DNA breaks in ssDNA, ensuring that base removal primarily occurs in dsDNA. In summary, our findings suggest the existence of AAG-initiated BER in mitochondria and further support a role for mtSSB in DNA repair. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Investigation of hyperfine interactions in DNA nitrogenous bases using perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Andreia dos Santos; Carbonari, Artur Wilson; Lapolli, Andre Luis; Saxena, Rajendra Narain; Saitovitch, Henrique

    2013-01-01

    Perturbed γγ angular correlations (PAC) spectroscopy has been used to study the DNA nitrogenous bases (adenine, cytosine, guanine, thymine), using 111 In→ 111 Cd and 111m Cd→ 111 Cd probe nuclei. One of the advantages of applying PAC technique to biological molecules is that the experiments can be carried out on molecules in aqueous solution [1], approaching the function of molecules under conditions that are close to in vivo conditions. The measurements were carried out for DNA nitrogenous bases molecules at 295 K and 77 K in order to investigate dynamic and static hyperfine interactions, respectively. The interpretation of the results was based on the measurements of dynamic interaction characterized by the decay constant from which valuable information on the macroscopic behavior of the molecules was obtained [2; 3]. On the other hand, PAC measurements at low temperature showed interaction frequency (ν Q ), asymmetry parameter (η) and the distribution of the quadrupole frequency (δ). These parameters provide a local microscopic description of the chemical environment in the neighborhood of the probe nuclei. Results showed differences in the hyperfine interactions of probe nuclei bound to the studied biomolecules. Such differences were observed by variations in the hyperfine parameters, which depended on the type of biomolecule and the results also showed that the probe nuclei bounded at the molecules in some cases and at others did not. (author)

  19. [Mechanistic modelling allows to assess pathways of DNA lesion interactions underlying chromosome aberration formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eĭdel'man, Iu A; Slanina, S V; Sal'nikov, I V; Andreev, S G

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of radiation-induced chromosomal aberration (CA) mechanisms is required in many fields of radiation genetics, radiation biology, biodosimetry, etc. However, these mechanisms are yet to be quantitatively characterised. One of the reasons is that the relationships between primary lesions of DNA/chromatin/chromosomes and dose-response curves for CA are unknown because the pathways of lesion interactions in an interphase nucleus are currently inaccessible for direct experimental observation. This article aims for the comparative analysis of two principally different scenarios of formation of simple and complex interchromosomal exchange aberrations: by lesion interactions at chromosome territories' surface vs. in the whole space of the nucleus. The analysis was based on quantitative mechanistic modelling of different levels of structures and processes involved in CA formation: chromosome structure in an interphase nucleus, induction, repair and interactions of DNA lesions. It was shown that the restricted diffusion of chromosomal loci, predicted by computational modelling of chromosome organization, results in lesion interactions in the whole space of the nucleus being impossible. At the same time, predicted features of subchromosomal dynamics agrees well with in vivo observations and does not contradict the mechanism of CA formation at the surface of chromosome territories. On the other hand, the "surface mechanism" of CA formation, despite having certain qualities, proved to be insufficient to explain high frequency of complex exchange aberrations observed by mFISH technique. The alternative mechanism, CA formation on nuclear centres is expected to be sufficient to explain frequent complex exchanges.

  20. Engineering DNA Backbone Interactions Results in TALE Scaffolds with Enhanced 5-Methylcytosine Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Preeti; Witte, Anna; Summerer, Daniel

    2017-11-08

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are DNA major-groove binding proteins widely used for genome targeting. TALEs contain an N-terminal region (NTR) and a central repeat domain (CRD). Repeats of the CRD selectively recognize each one DNA nucleobase, offering programmability. Moreover, repeats with selectivity for 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and its oxidized derivatives can be designed for analytical applications. However, both TALE domains also nonspecifically interact with DNA phosphates via basic amino acids. To enhance the 5mC selectivity of TALEs, we aimed to decrease the nonselective binding energy of TALEs. We substituted basic amino acids with alanine in the NTR and identified TALE mutants with increased selectivity. We then analysed conserved, DNA phosphate-binding KQ diresidues in CRD repeats and identified further improved mutants. Combination of mutations in the NTR and CRD was highly synergetic and resulted in TALE scaffolds with up to 4.3-fold increased selectivity in genomic 5mC analysis via affinity enrichment. Moreover, transcriptional activation in HEK293T cells by a TALE-VP64 construct based on this scaffold design exhibited a 3.5-fold increased 5mC selectivity. This provides perspectives for improved 5mC analysis and for the 5mC-conditional control of TALE-based editing constructs in vivo.

  1. Neutron Reflectometry Investigations of the Interaction of DNA-PAMAM Dendrimers with Model Biological Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainalem, M.L.; Rennie, A.R.; Campbell, Richard; Edler, Karen; Nylander, Tommy

    2009-01-01

    The systemic delivery of DNA for gene therapy requires control of DNA compaction by an agent, such a lipid, surfactant or a polymer (e.g. cationic dendrimers) as well as understanding of how this complex interacts with a biological membrane. Poly (amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers have been reported to be a promising synthetic gene-transfection agent. We have studied the structure of the complexes formed between DNA and PAMAM dendrimers with SANS, dynamic light scattering and cryo-TEM. Here we noted that the structure of the complex formed strongly depends on the generation of the dendrimer. The results of the adsorption of generation 2 (G2) and 4 (G4) PAMAM dendrimers to surface deposited bilayers, consisting of palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidyl choline on silicon surface, have been studied using neutron reflectometry (NR). The NR data shows that the dendrimers are able to penetrate the bilayer. However, the complex is less able to penetrate the bilayer, but rather stays on the top of the bilayer. The dendrimers appear slightly flattened on the surface in comparison with their size in bulk as determined by light scattering. We will also report on the interfacial behavior of the DNA-PAMAM complexes at other types of studies of interfaces, important for biomedical applications, where NR has allowed us to determine the layer structure and composition. (author)

  2. RPA physically interacts with the human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 to regulate excision of oxidative DNA base damage in primer-template structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar

    2010-06-04

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1, activated during the S-phase, has been shown to excise oxidized base lesions in single-strand DNA substrates. Furthermore, our previous work demonstrating functional interaction of NEIL1 with PCNA and flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) suggested its involvement in replication-associated repair. Here we show interaction of NEIL1 with replication protein A (RPA), the heterotrimeric single-strand DNA binding protein that is essential for replication and other DNA transactions. The NEIL1 immunocomplex isolated from human cells contains RPA, and its abundance in the complex increases after exposure to oxidative stress. NEIL1 directly interacts with the large subunit of RPA (K(d) approximately 20 nM) via the common interacting interface (residues 312-349) in NEIL1's disordered C-terminal region. RPA inhibits the base excision activity of both wild-type NEIL1 (389 residues) and its C-terminal deletion CDelta78 mutant (lacking the interaction domain) for repairing 5-hydroxyuracil (5-OHU) in a primer-template structure mimicking the DNA replication fork. This inhibition is reduced when the damage is located near the primer-template junction. Contrarily, RPA moderately stimulates wild-type NEIL1 but not the CDelta78 mutant when 5-OHU is located within the duplex region. While NEIL1 is inhibited by both RPA and Escherichia coli single-strand DNA binding protein, only inhibition by RPA is relieved by PCNA. These results showing modulation of NEIL1's activity on single-stranded DNA substrate by RPA and PCNA support NEIL1's involvement in repairing the replicating genome. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. Results: The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Design, synthesis and DNA interactions of a chimera between a platinum complex and an IHF mimicking peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Harita; Damian, Mariana S; Alshiekh, Alak; Elmroth, Sofi K C; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2015-12-28

    Conjugation of metal complexes with peptide scaffolds possessing high DNA binding affinity has shown to modulate their biological activities and to enhance their interaction with DNA. In this work, a platinum complex/peptide chimera was synthesized based on a model of the Integration Host Factor (IHF), an architectural protein possessing sequence specific DNA binding and bending abilities through its interaction with a minor groove. The model peptide consists of a cyclic unit resembling the minor grove binding subdomain of IHF, a positively charged lysine dendrimer for electrostatic interactions with the DNA phosphate backbone and a flexible glycine linker tethering the two units. A norvaline derived artificial amino acid was designed to contain a dimethylethylenediamine as a bidentate platinum chelating unit, and introduced into the IHF mimicking peptides. The interaction of the chimeric peptides with various DNA sequences was studied by utilizing the following experiments: thermal melting studies, agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA unwinding experiments, and native and denaturing gel electrophoresis to visualize non-covalent and covalent peptide-DNA adducts, respectively. By incorporation of the platinum metal center within the model peptide mimicking IHF we have attempted to improve its specificity and DNA targeting ability, particularly towards those sequences containing adjacent guanine residues.

  5. Study of neutral red interaction with DNA by resolution of rank deficient multi-way fluorescence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghaddam, Fatemeh Ghasemi; Kompany Zare, Mohsen; Gholami, Somayeh

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of neutral red (NR) as an efficient anticancer drug with DNA was studied under physiological pH condition. Three-way data array were recorded by measuring excitation-emission fluorescence during the titration of neutral red with DNA at constant pH. The acid-base equilibrium constant...

  6. Identification of coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human K562 cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-09-27

    Motivation: The protein-DNA interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, also known as DNA motifs) are critical activities in gene transcription. The identification of the DNA motifs is a vital task for downstream analysis. Unfortunately, the long-range coupling information between different DNA motifs is still lacking. To fill the void, as the first-of-its-kind study, we have identified the coupling DNA motif pairs on long-range chromatin interactions in human. Results: The coupling DNA motif pairs exhibit substantially higher DNase accessibility than the background sequences. Half of the DNA motifs involved are matched to the existing motif databases, although nearly all of them are enriched with at least one gene ontology term. Their motif instances are also found statistically enriched on the promoter and enhancer regions. Especially, we introduce a novel measurement called motif pairing multiplicity which is defined as the number of motifs that are paired with a given motif on chromatin interactions. Interestingly, we observe that motif pairing multiplicity is linked to several characteristics such as regulatory region type, motif sequence degeneracy, DNase accessibility and pairing genomic distance. Taken into account together, we believe the coupling DNA motif pairs identified in this study can shed lights on the gene transcription mechanism under long-range chromatin interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Coulomb and CH-π interactions in (6-4) photolyase-DNA complex dominate DNA binding and repair abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terai, Yuma; Sato, Ryuma; Yumiba, Takahiro; Harada, Ryuhei; Shimizu, Kohei; Toga, Tatsuya; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Todo, Takeshi; Iwai, Shigenori; Shigeta, Yasuteru; Yamamoto, Junpei

    2018-05-14

    (6-4) Photolyases ((6-4)PLs) are flavoenzymes that repair the carcinogenic UV-induced DNA damage, pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts ((6-4)PPs), in a light-dependent manner. Although the reaction mechanism of DNA photorepair by (6-4)PLs has been intensively investigated, the molecular mechanism of the lesion recognition remains obscure. We show that a well-conserved arginine residue in Xenopus laevis (6-4)PL (Xl64) participates in DNA binding, through Coulomb and CH-π interactions. Fragment molecular orbital calculations estimated attractive interaction energies of -80-100 kcal mol-1 for the Coulomb interaction and -6 kcal mol-1 for the CH-π interaction, and the loss of either of them significantly reduced the affinity for (6-4)PP-containing oligonucleotides, as well as the quantum yield of DNA photorepair. From experimental and theoretical observations, we formulated a DNA binding model of (6-4)PLs. Based on the binding model, we mutated this Arg in Xl64 to His, which is well conserved among the animal cryptochromes (CRYs), and found that the CRY-type mutant exhibited reduced affinity for the (6-4)PP-containing oligonucleotides, implying the possible molecular origin of the functional diversity of the photolyase/cryptochrome superfamily.

  8. Theoretical investigation of nuclear quadrupole interactions in DNA at first-principles level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahato, Dip N. [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States); Dubey, Archana [University of Central Florida, Department of Physics (United States); Pink, R. H. [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States); Scheicher, R. H. [Uppsala University, Condensed Matter Theory Group, Department of Physics and Materials Science (Sweden); Badu, S. R. [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States); Nagamine, K. [University of California at Riverside, Department of Physics (United States); Torikai, E. [Yamanashi University, Department of Electrical Engineering (Japan); Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee [University of Central Florida, Department of Physics (United States); Huang, M. B. [State University of New York at Albany, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (United States); Das, T. P., E-mail: tpd56@albany.edu [State University of New York at Albany, Department of Physics (United States)

    2008-01-15

    We have studied the nuclear quadrupole interactions (NQI) of the {sup 14}N, {sup 17}O and {sup 2}H nuclei in the nucleobases cytosine, adenine, guanine and thymine in the free state as well as when they are bonded to the sugar ring in DNA, simulated through a CH{sub 3} group attached to the nucleobases. The nucleobase uracil, which replaces thymine in RNA, has also been studied. Our results show that there are substantial indirect effects of the bonding with the sugar group in the nucleic acids on the NQI parameters e{sup 2}qQ/h and {eta}. It is hoped that measurements of these NQI parameters in DNA will be available in the future to compare with our predictions. Our results provide the conclusion that for any property dependent on the electronic structures of the nucleic acids, the effects of the bonding between the nucleobases and the nucleic acid backbones have to be included.

  9. Electrochemical monitoring of the interaction between mitomycin C and DNA at chitosan--carbon nanotube composite modified electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    CANAVAR, Pembe Ece; EKŞİN, Ece; ERDEM, Arzum

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) and chitosan composite (chitosan*CNT) based sensors were developed as DNA biosensors, and then they were applied for electrochemical investigation of the interaction between the anticancer drug mitomycin C (MC) and DNA. The oxidation signals of MC and guanine were monitored before and after the interaction process by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The DPV results were in good agreement with those of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)....

  10. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals Dynamic Interactions of the Minichromosome Maintenance Complex (MCM) in the Cellular Response to Etoposide Induced DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drissi, Romain; Dubois, Marie-Line; Douziech, Mélanie; Boisvert, François-Michel

    2015-07-01

    The minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM) proteins are required for processive DNA replication and are a target of S-phase checkpoints. The eukaryotic MCM complex consists of six proteins (MCM2-7) that form a heterohexameric ring with DNA helicase activity, which is loaded on chromatin to form the pre-replication complex. Upon entry in S phase, the helicase is activated and opens the DNA duplex to recruit DNA polymerases at the replication fork. The MCM complex thus plays a crucial role during DNA replication, but recent work suggests that MCM proteins could also be involved in DNA repair. Here, we employed a combination of stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics with immunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged fusion proteins to identify proteins interacting with the MCM complex, and quantify changes in interactions in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, the MCM complex showed very dynamic changes in interaction with proteins such as Importin7, the histone chaperone ASF1, and the Chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 3 (CHD3) following DNA damage. These changes in interactions were accompanied by an increase in phosphorylation and ubiquitination on specific sites on the MCM proteins and an increase in the co-localization of the MCM complex with γ-H2AX, confirming the recruitment of these proteins to sites of DNA damage. In summary, our data indicate that the MCM proteins is involved in chromatin remodeling in response to DNA damage. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. In and out of the minor groove: interaction of an AT-rich DNA with the drug CD27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J. [Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dardonville, Christophe [Instituto de Química Médica, IQM–CSIC, Juan de la Cierva 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Koning, Harry P. de; Natto, Manal [University of Glasgow, 120 University Place, Glasgow G12 8TA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Subirana, Juan A.; Campos, J. Lourdes, E-mail: lourdes.campos@upc.edu [Universitat Politécnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    New features of an antiprotozoal DNA minor-groove binding drug, which acts as a cross-linking agent, are presented. It also fills the minor groove of DNA completely and prevents the access of proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with suitable DNA targets. The DNA of several pathogens is very rich in AT base pairs. Typical examples include the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the causative agents of trichomoniasis and trypanosomiases. This fact has prompted studies of drugs which interact with the minor groove of DNA, some of which are used in medical practice. Previous studies have been performed almost exclusively with the AATT sequence. New features should be uncovered through the study of different DNA sequences. In this paper, the crystal structure of the complex of the DNA duplex d(AAAATTTT){sub 2} with the dicationic drug 4, 4′-bis(imidazolinylamino)diphenylamine (CD27) is presented. The drug binds to the minor groove of DNA as expected, but it shows two new features that have not previously been described: (i) the drugs protrude from the DNA and interact with neighbouring molecules, so that they may act as cross-linking agents, and (ii) the drugs completely cover the whole minor groove of DNA and displace bound water. Thus, they may prevent the access to DNA of proteins such as AT-hook proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with all-AT DNA. These findings allow a better understanding of this family of compounds and will help in the development of new, more effective drugs. New data on the biological interaction of CD27 with the causative agent of trichomoniasis, Trichomonas vaginalis, are also reported.

  12. In and out of the minor groove: interaction of an AT-rich DNA with the drug CD27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta-Reyes, Francisco J.; Dardonville, Christophe; Koning, Harry P. de; Natto, Manal; Subirana, Juan A.; Campos, J. Lourdes

    2014-01-01

    New features of an antiprotozoal DNA minor-groove binding drug, which acts as a cross-linking agent, are presented. It also fills the minor groove of DNA completely and prevents the access of proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with suitable DNA targets. The DNA of several pathogens is very rich in AT base pairs. Typical examples include the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and the causative agents of trichomoniasis and trypanosomiases. This fact has prompted studies of drugs which interact with the minor groove of DNA, some of which are used in medical practice. Previous studies have been performed almost exclusively with the AATT sequence. New features should be uncovered through the study of different DNA sequences. In this paper, the crystal structure of the complex of the DNA duplex d(AAAATTTT) 2 with the dicationic drug 4, 4′-bis(imidazolinylamino)diphenylamine (CD27) is presented. The drug binds to the minor groove of DNA as expected, but it shows two new features that have not previously been described: (i) the drugs protrude from the DNA and interact with neighbouring molecules, so that they may act as cross-linking agents, and (ii) the drugs completely cover the whole minor groove of DNA and displace bound water. Thus, they may prevent the access to DNA of proteins such as AT-hook proteins. These features are also expected for other minor-groove binding drugs when associated with all-AT DNA. These findings allow a better understanding of this family of compounds and will help in the development of new, more effective drugs. New data on the biological interaction of CD27 with the causative agent of trichomoniasis, Trichomonas vaginalis, are also reported

  13. Evidence that yeast SGS1, DNA2, SRS2, and FOB1 interact to maintain rDNA stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Weitao; Budd, Martin; Campbell, Judith L.

    2003-01-01

    We and others have proposed that faulty processing of arrested replication forks leads to increases in recombination and chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Now we use the ribosomal DNA locus, which is a good model for all stages of DNA replication, to test this hypothesis. We showed previously that DNA replication pausing at the ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier (RFB) is accompanied by the occurrence of double-strand breaks near the RFB. Both pausing and breakage are elevated in the hypomorphic dna2-2 helicase mutant. Deletion of FOB1 suppresses the elevated pausing and DSB formation. Our current work shows that mutation inactivating Sgs1, the yeast RecQ helicase ortholog, also causes accumulation of stalled replication forks and DSBs at the rDNA RFB. Either deletion of FOB1, which suppresses fork blocking and certain types of rDNA recombination, or an increase in SIR2 gene dosage, which suppresses rDNA recombination, reduces the number of forks persisting at the RFB. Although dna2-2 sgs1Δ double mutants are conditionally lethal, they do not show enhanced rDNA defects compared to sgs1Δ alone. However, surprisingly, the dna2-2 sgs1Δ lethality is suppressed by deletion of FOB1. On the other hand, the dna2-2 sgs1Δ lethality is only partially suppressed by deletion of rad51Δ. We propose that the replication-associated defects that we document in the rDNA are characteristic of similar events occurring either stochastically throughout the genome or at other regions where replication forks move slowly or stall, such as telomeres, centromeres, or replication slow zones

  14. Evidence that yeast SGS1, DNA2, SRS2, and FOB1 interact to maintain rDNA stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Weitao; Budd, Martin; Campbell, Judith L

    2003-11-27

    We and others have proposed that faulty processing of arrested replication forks leads to increases in recombination and chromosome instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Now we use the ribosomal DNA locus, which is a good model for all stages of DNA replication, to test this hypothesis. We showed previously that DNA replication pausing at the ribosomal DNA replication fork barrier (RFB) is accompanied by the occurrence of double-strand breaks near the RFB. Both pausing and breakage are elevated in the hypomorphic dna2-2 helicase mutant. Deletion of FOB1 suppresses the elevated pausing and DSB formation. Our current work shows that mutation inactivating Sgs1, the yeast RecQ helicase ortholog, also causes accumulation of stalled replication forks and DSBs at the rDNA RFB. Either deletion of FOB1, which suppresses fork blocking and certain types of rDNA recombination, or an increase in SIR2 gene dosage, which suppresses rDNA recombination, reduces the number of forks persisting at the RFB. Although dna2-2 sgs1{delta} double mutants are conditionally lethal, they do not show enhanced rDNA defects compared to sgs1{delta} alone. However, surprisingly, the dna2-2 sgs1{delta} lethality is suppressed by deletion of FOB1. On the other hand, the dna2-2 sgs1{delta} lethality is only partially suppressed by deletion of rad51{delta}. We propose that the replication-associated defects that we document in the rDNA are characteristic of similar events occurring either stochastically throughout the genome or at other regions where replication forks move slowly or stall, such as telomeres, centromeres, or replication slow zones.

  15. Cationic liposome/DNA complexes: from structure to interactions with cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Giulio; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2012-10-01

    Gene-based therapeutic approaches are based upon the concept that, if a disease is caused by a mutation in a gene, then adding back the wild-type gene should restore regular function and attenuate the disease phenotype. To deliver the gene of interest, both viral and nonviral vectors are used. Viruses are efficient, but their application is impeded by detrimental side-effects. Among nonviral vectors, cationic liposomes are the most promising candidates for gene delivery. They form stable complexes with polyanionic DNA (lipoplexes). Despite several advantages over viral vectors, the transfection efficiency (TE) of lipoplexes is too low compared with those of engineered viral vectors. This is due to lack of knowledge about the interactions between complexes and cellular components. Rational design of efficient lipoplexes therefore requires deeper comprehension of the interactions between the vector and the DNA as well as the cellular pathways and mechanisms involved. The importance of the lipoplex structure in biological function is revealed in the application of synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering in combination with functional TE measurements. According to current understanding, the structure of lipoplexes can change upon interaction with cellular membranes and such changes affect the delivery efficiency. Recently, a correlation between the mechanism of gene release from complexes, the structure, and the physical and chemical parameters of the complexes has been established. Studies aimed at correlating structure and activity of lipoplexes are reviewed herein. This is a fundamental step towards rational design of highly efficient lipid gene vectors.

  16. Physical interaction between components of DNA mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand, P.; Tishkoff, D.X.; Filosi, N.; Dasgupta, R.; Kolodner, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) and DNA mismatch repair are required for some common processes although the biochemical basis for this requirement is unknown. Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD14 was identified in a two-hybrid screen using MSH2 as 'bait,' and pairwise interactions between MSH2 and RAD1, RAD2, RAD3, RAD10, RAD14, and RAD25 subsequently were demonstrated by two-hybrid analysis. MSH2 coimmunoprecipitated specifically with epitope-tagged versions of RAD2, RAD10, RAD14, and RAD25. MSH2 and RAD10 were found to interact in msh3 msh6 and mlh1 pms1 double mutants, suggesting a direct interaction with MSH2. Mutations in MSH2 increased the UV sensitivity of NER-deficient yeast strains, and msh2 mutations were epistatic to the mutator phenotype observed in NER-deficient strains. These data suggest that MSH2 and possibly other components of DNA mismatch repair exist in a complex with NER proteins, providing a biochemical and genetical basis for these proteins to function in common processes

  17. In vivo protein-DNA interactions at the β-globin gene locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohru Ikuta; Yuet Wai Kan

    1991-01-01

    The authors have investigated in vivo protein-DNA interactions in the β-globin gene locus by dimethyl sulfate (DMS) footprinting in K562 cells, which express var-epsilon- and γ-globin but not β-globin. In the locus control region, hypersensitive site 2 (HS-2) exhibited footprints in several putative protein binding motifs. HS-3 was not footprinted. The β promoter was also not footprinted, while extensive footprints were observed in the promoter of the active γ-globin gene. No footprints were seen in the A γ and β3' enhancers. With several motifs, additional protein interactions and alterations in binding patterns occurred with hemin induction. In HeLa cells, some footprints were observed in some of the motifs in HS-2, compatible with the finding that HS-2 has some enhancer function in HeLa cells, albeit much weaker than its activity in K562 cells. No footprint was seen in B lymphocytes. In vivo footprinting is a useful method for studying relevant protein-DNA interactions in erythroid cells

  18. Magnesium-DNA interactions and the possible relation of magnesium to carcinogenesis. Irradiation and free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassopoulou, J; Theophanides, T

    2002-04-01

    Magnesium deficiency causes renal complications. The appearance of several diseases is related to its depletion in the human body. In radiotherapy, as well as in chemotherapy, especially in treatment of cancers with cis-platinum, hypomagnesaemia is observed. The site effects of chemotherapy that are due to hypomagnesaemia are decreased using Mg supplements. The role of magnesium in DNA stabilization is concentration dependent. At high concentrations there is an accumulation of Mg binding, which induces conformational changes leading to Z-DNA, while at low concentration there is deficiency and destabilization of DNA. The biological and clinical consequences of abnormal concentrations are DNA cleavage leading to diseases and cancer. Carcinogenesis and cell growth are also magnesium-ion concentration dependent. Several reports point out that the interaction of magnesium in the presence of other metal ions showed that there is synergism with Li and Mn, but there is magnesium antagonism in DNA binding with the essential metal ions in the order: Zn>Mg>Ca. In the case of toxic metals such as Cd, Ga and Ni there is also antagonism for DNA binding. It was found from radiolysis of deaerated aqueous solutions of the nucleoside 5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) in the presence as well as in the absence of magnesium ions that, although the addition of hydroxyl radicals (*OH) has been increased by 2-fold, the opening of the imidazole ring of the guanine base was prevented. This effect was due to the binding of Mg2+ ions to N7 site of the molecule by stabilizing the five-member ring imitating cis-platinum. It was also observed using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and Fast Atom Bombardment mass spectrometry that *OH radicals subtract H atoms from the C1', C4' and C5' sites of the nucleotide. Irradiation of 5'-GMP in the presence of oxygen (2.5 x 10(-4) M) shows that magnesium is released from the complex. There is spectroscopic evidence that

  19. Novel essential residues of Hda for interaction with DnaA in the regulatory inactivation of DnaA: unique roles for Hda AAA Box VI and VII motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenta; Katayama, Tsutomu

    2010-04-01

    Escherichia coli ATP-DnaA initiates chromosomal replication. For preventing extra-initiations, a complex of ADP-Hda and the DNA-loaded replicase clamp promotes DnaA-ATP hydrolysis, yielding inactive ADP-DnaA. However, the Hda-DnaA interaction mode remains unclear except that the Hda Box VII Arg finger (Arg-153) and DnaA sensor II Arg-334 within each AAA(+) domain are crucial for the DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Here, we demonstrate that direct and functional interaction of ADP-Hda with DnaA requires the Hda residues Ser-152, Phe-118 and Asn-122 as well as Hda Arg-153 and DnaA Arg-334. Structural analyses suggest intermolecular interactions between Hda Ser-152 and DnaA Arg-334 and between Hda Phe-118 and the DnaA Walker B motif region, in addition to an intramolecular interaction between Hda Asn-122 and Arg-153. These interactions likely sustain a specific association of ADP-Hda and DnaA, promoting DnaA-ATP hydrolysis. Consistently, ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA interact with the ADP-Hda-DNA-clamp complex with similar affinities. Hda Phe-118 and Asn-122 are contained in the Box VI region, and their hydrophobic and electrostatic features are basically conserved in the corresponding residues of other AAA(+) proteins, suggesting a conserved role for Box VI. These findings indicate novel interaction mechanisms for Hda-DnaA as well as a potentially fundamental mechanism in AAA(+) protein interactions.

  20. Anticancer drug-DNA interactions measured using a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism based on luminescent quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jipei; Guo, Weiwei; Yang, Xiurong; Wang, Erkang

    2009-01-01

    A sensing system based on the photoinduced electron transfer of quantum dots (QDs) was designed to measure the interaction of anticancer drug and DNA, taking mitoxantrone (MTX) as a model drug. MTX adsorbed on the surface of QDs can quench the photoluminescence (PL) of QDs through the photoinduced electron-transfer process; and then the addition of DNA will bring the restoration of QDs PL intensity, as DNA can bind with MTX and remove it from QDs. Sensitive detection of MTX with the detection limit of 10 nmol L(-1) and a linear detection range from 10 nmol L(-1) to 4.5 micromol L(-1) was achieved. The dependence of PL intensity on DNA amount was successfully utilized to investigate the interactions between MTX and DNA. Both the binding constants and the sizes of binding site of MTX-DNA interactions were calculated based on the equations deduced for the PL recovery process. The binding constant obtained in our experiment was generally consistent with previous reports. The sensitive and speedy detection of MTX as well as the avoidance of modification or immobilization process made this system suitable and promising in the drug-DNA interaction studies.

  1. GANP regulates the choice of DNA repair pathway by DNA-PKcs interaction in AID-dependent IgV region diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Mohammed Mansour Abbas; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Almofty, Sarah Ameen; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Shimoda, Mayuko; Sakaguchi, Nobuo

    2014-06-15

    RNA export factor germinal center-associated nuclear protein (GANP) interacts with activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) and shepherds it from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and toward the IgV region loci in B cells. In this study, we demonstrate a role for GANP in the repair of AID-initiated DNA damage in chicken DT40 B cells to generate IgV region diversity by gene conversion and somatic hypermutation. GANP plays a positive role in IgV region diversification of DT40 B cells in a nonhomologous end joining-proficient state. DNA-PKcs physically interacts with GANP, and this interaction is dissociated by dsDNA breaks induced by a topoisomerase II inhibitor, etoposide, or AID overexpression. GANP affects the choice of DNA repair mechanism in B cells toward homologous recombination rather than nonhomologous end joining repair. Thus, GANP presumably plays a critical role in protection of the rearranged IgV loci by favoring homologous recombination of the DNA breaks under accelerated AID recruitment. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Interaction between insulin and calf thymus DNA, and quantification of insulin and calf thymus DNA by a resonance Rayleigh scattering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, L.; Liu, Z.; Hu, X.; Liu, S.; Li, W.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of insulin with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) leads to a complex that displays remarkably enhanced resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS). The complex and its formation were investigated by atomic force microscopy and by absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. We show that the Tyr B16, Tyr B26 and Phe B24 amino acids near the active center (Phe B25) were influenced by the interaction, whereas Tyr A14, Tyr A19 and Phe B1 (which are located far away from the active center) were less influenced. The interaction provide a way in the quantitation of both ctDNA and insulin with high sensitivity. When ctDNA is used as a probe to quantify insulin, the detection limit (3σ) is 6.0 ng mL -1 . If, inversely, insulin is used as a probe to quantify ctDNA, the detection limit (3σ) is 7.2 ng mL -1 . The analysis of synthetic DNA samples and an insulin infection sample provided satisfactory results. (author)

  3. A selective chemosensor for fluoride ion and its interaction with Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Al Masum, Abdulla; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Islam, Md Maidul; Alam, Md Akhtarul; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2017-05-05

    The amido-Schiff base 1 (N 1 , N 3 -bis (2-nitrobenzylidene)benzene-1,3-dicabohydrazide) containing a CONH group and CHN linkage has been synthesized by the condensation between isophthalic acid dihydrazide and o-nitrobenzaldehyde. This molecule can act as a fluoride ion sensor with high selectivity and sensitivity. Presence of nitro group in the phenyl ring may be responsible for the detection of fluoride ion visually with a dramatic color change from colorless to deep red in aqueous dimethyl sulphoxide solution. This Schiff base can be used as test kit for sensing of fluoride ion in the solid state. Compound 1 can detect fluoride also in commercially available toothpaste. As the compound has adequate solubility in DMSO-water mixture (7:93, v/v) and having some hydrogen bond donor and acceptor centers, we have investigated its nature of binding with Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA) using theoretical molecular modelling and other experimental methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, circular dichroic and thermal melting studies. Thermodynamic parameters have been obtained using the well known Van't Hoff's equation. From both theoretical and experimental findings it has been observed that it can interact effectively with CT-DNA with binding energy -7.55kcal/mol to -7.50kcal/mol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DNA interaction, antioxidant activity, and bioactivity studies of two ruthenium(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing-Jie; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Wang, Ji; Huang, Hong-Liang; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Two new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes [Ru(dmb)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (1) and [Ru(bpy)2(dcdppz)](ClO4)2 (2) were prepared and characterized. The crystal structure of the complex 2 was solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The complex crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P21/n with a = 12.9622(14) Å, b = 17.1619(19) Å, c = 22.7210(3) Å, β = 100.930(2)°, R = 0.0536, Rω = 0.1111. The DNA-binding constants for complexes 1 and 2 were determined to be 1.92 × 105 (s = 1.72) and 2.24 × 105 (s = 1.86) M-1, respectively. The DNA-binding behaviors showed that complexes 1 and 2 interact with DNA by intercalative mode. The antioxidant activities of the ligand and the complexes were performed. Ligand, dcdppz, has no cytotoxicity against the selected cell lines. Complex 1 shows higher cytotoxicity than complex 2, but lower than cisplatin toward selected cell lines. The apoptosis and cell cycle arrest were investigated, and the apoptotic mechanism of BEL-7402 cells was studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and western blot analysis. Complex 1 induces apoptosis in BEL-7402 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway and by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins.

  5. Flexible double-headed cytosine-linked 2'-deoxycytidine nucleotides. Synthesis, polymerase incorporation to DNA and interaction with DNA methyltransferases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kielkowski, Pavel; Cahová, Hana; Pohl, Radek; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 6 (2016), s. 1268-1276 ISSN 0968-0896 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : nucleosides * nucleotides * pyrimidines * DNA methyltransferases * DNA polymerases Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.930, year: 2016

  6. Ionizing radiation interactions with DNA: nanodosimetry; Ionisierende Strahlungswechselwirkung mit der DNS. Nanodosimetrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bug, Marion; Nettelbeck, Heidi [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Biologische Wirksamkeit ionisierender Strahlung' ; Hilgers, Gerhard [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Nanodosimetrie' ; Rabus, Hans [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Fachbereich ' Grundlagen der Dosimetrie'

    2011-06-15

    The metrology of ionizing radiation is based on measuring values that are averaged over macroscopic volume elements, for instance the energy dose is defined as ratio of the energy deposited on the absorber and the absorber mass. For biological or medical radiation effects the stochastic nature of radiation interaction is of main importance, esp. the interaction of ionizing radiation with the DNA as the genetic information carrier. For radiotherapy and risk evaluation purposes a comprehensive system of radiation weighing factors and other characteristics, like radiation quality or relative biological efficacy was developed. The nanodosimetry is aimed to develop a metrological basis relying on physical characteristics of the microscopic structure of ionizing radiation tracks. The article includes the development of experimental nanodosimetric methods, the respective calibration techniques, Monte-Carlo simulation of the particle track microstructure and the correlation nanodosimetry and biological efficiency.

  7. Alpha Particles and X Rays Interact in Inducing DNA Damage in U2OS Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollazzo, Alice; Brzozowska, Beata; Cheng, Lei; Lundholm, Lovisa; Haghdoost, Siamak; Scherthan, Harry; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2017-10-01

    Survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki are monitored for health effects within the Life Span Study (LSS). The LSS results represent the most important source of data about cancer effects from ionizing radiation exposure, which forms the foundation for the radiation protection system. One uncertainty connected to deriving universal risk factors from these results is related to the problem of mixed radiation qualities. The A-bomb explosions generated a mixed beam of the sparsely ionizing gamma radiation and densely ionizing neutrons. However, until now the possible interaction of the two radiation types of inducing biological effects has not been taken into consideration. The existence of such interaction would suggest that the application of risk factors derived from the LSS to predict cancer effects after pure gamma-ray irradiation (such as in the Fukushima prefecture) leads to an overestimation of risk. To analyze the possible interaction of radiation types, a mixed-beam exposure facility was constructed where cells can be exposed to sparsely ionizing X rays and densely ionizing alpha particles. U2OS cells were used, which are stably transfected with a plasmid coding for the DNA repair gene 53BP1 coupled to a gene coding for the green fluorescent protein (GFP). The induction and repair of DNA damage, which are known to be related to cancer induction, were analyzed. The results suggest that alpha particles and X rays interact, leading to cellular and possibly cancer effects, which cannot be accurately predicted based on assuming simple additivity of the individual mixed-beam components.

  8. A feature-based approach to modeling protein-DNA interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilon Sharon

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding to its DNA target site is a fundamental regulatory interaction. The most common model used to represent TF binding specificities is a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM, which assumes independence between binding positions. However, in many cases, this simplifying assumption does not hold. Here, we present feature motif models (FMMs, a novel probabilistic method for modeling TF-DNA interactions, based on log-linear models. Our approach uses sequence features to represent TF binding specificities, where each feature may span multiple positions. We develop the mathematical formulation of our model and devise an algorithm for learning its structural features from binding site data. We also developed a discriminative motif finder, which discovers de novo FMMs that are enriched in target sets of sequences compared to background sets. We evaluate our approach on synthetic data and on the widely used TF chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP dataset of Harbison et al. We then apply our algorithm to high-throughput TF ChIP data from mouse and human, reveal sequence features that are present in the binding specificities of mouse and human TFs, and show that FMMs explain TF binding significantly better than PSSMs. Our FMM learning and motif finder software are available at http://genie.weizmann.ac.il/.

  9. Ni(II) complexes of arginine Schiff-bases and its interaction with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sallam, S.A., E-mail: shehabsallam@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt); Abbas, A.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Isamilia (Egypt)

    2013-04-15

    Ni(II) complexes with Schiff-bases obtained by condensation of arginine with salicylaldehyde; 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde have been synthesized using the template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and {sup 1}H NMR spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG and DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate donors and the complexes have diamagnetic square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Highlights: ► Arginine Schiff-bases and their nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized. ► Magnetic and spectral data show diamagnetic square planar and octahedral complexes. ► The complexes thermally decompose in three stages. Interaction with FM-DNA shows hyperchromism with blue shift.

  10. Ni(II) complexes of arginine Schiff-bases and its interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallam, S.A.; Abbas, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Ni(II) complexes with Schiff-bases obtained by condensation of arginine with salicylaldehyde; 2,3-; 2,4-; 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and o-hydroxynaphthaldehyde have been synthesized using the template method in ethanol or ammonia media. They were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, magnetic moment, UV, IR and 1 H NMR spectra as well as thermal analysis (TG, DTG and DTA). The Schiff-bases are dibasic tridentate donors and the complexes have diamagnetic square planar and octahedral structures. The complexes decompose in three steps where kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of the decomposition steps were computed. The interactions of the formed complexes with FM-DNA were monitored by UV and fluorescence spectroscopy. -- Highlights: ► Arginine Schiff-bases and their nickel(II) complexes have been synthesized. ► Magnetic and spectral data show diamagnetic square planar and octahedral complexes. ► The complexes thermally decompose in three stages. Interaction with FM-DNA shows hyperchromism with blue shift

  11. Highly functionalized piperidines: Free radical scavenging, anticancer activity, DNA interaction and correlation with biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvankar Das

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five piperidines were studied as potential radical scavengers and antitumor agents. Quantitative interaction of compounds with ctDNA using spectroscopic techniques was also evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the evaluated piperidines possesses different abilities to scavenge the radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and the anion radical superoxide (·O2−. The piperidine 19 was the most potent radical DPPH scavenger, while the most effective to ·O2− scavenger was piperidine 10. In general, U251, MCF7, NCI/ADR-RES, NCI-H460 and HT29 cells were least sensitive to the tested compounds and all compounds were considerably more toxic to the studied cancer cell lines than to the normal cell line HaCaT. The binding mode of the compounds and ctDNA was preferably via intercalation. In addition, these results were confirmed based on theoretical studies. Finally, a linear and exponential correlation between interaction constant (Kb and GI50 for several human cancer cell was observed.

  12. A Penalty Method to Model Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Bybee, M D

    2006-01-01

    We present a hybrid fluid-particle algorithm to simulate flow and transport of DNA-laden fluids in microdevices. Relevant length scales in microfluidic systems range from characteristic channel sizes of millimeters to micron scale geometric variation (e.g., post arrays) to 10 nanometers for the length of a single rod in a bead-rod polymer representation of a biological material such as DNA. The method is based on a previous fluid-particle algorithm in which long molecules are represented as a chain of connected rods, but in which the physically unrealistic behavior of rod crossing occurred. We have extended this algorithm to include screened Coulombic forces between particles by implementing a Debye-Hueckel potential acting between rods. In the method an unsteady incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with a second-order finite difference method in the interior of the Cartesian grid domain; an embedded boundary volume-of-fluid formulation is used near boundaries. The bead-rod polymer model is fully coupled to the solvent through body forces representing hydrodynamic drag and stochastic thermal fluctuations. While intrapolymer interactions are modeled by a soft potential, polymer-structure interactions are treated as perfectly elastic collisions. We demonstrate this method on flow and transport of a polymer through a post array microchannel in 2D where the polymer incorporates more realistic physical parameters of DNA, and compare to previous simulations where rods are allowed to cross. We also show that the method is capable of simulating 3D flow in a packed bed micro-column

  13. A Penalty Method to Model Particle Interactions in DNA-laden Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H; Bybee, M D

    2006-10-06

    We present a hybrid fluid-particle algorithm to simulate flow and transport of DNA-laden fluids in microdevices. Relevant length scales in microfluidic systems range from characteristic channel sizes of millimeters to micron scale geometric variation (e.g., post arrays) to 10 nanometers for the length of a single rod in a bead-rod polymer representation of a biological material such as DNA. The method is based on a previous fluid-particle algorithm in which long molecules are represented as a chain of connected rods, but in which the physically unrealistic behavior of rod crossing occurred. We have extended this algorithm to include screened Coulombic forces between particles by implementing a Debye-Hueckel potential acting between rods. In the method an unsteady incompressible Newtonian fluid is discretized with a second-order finite difference method in the interior of the Cartesian grid domain; an embedded boundary volume-of-fluid formulation is used near boundaries. The bead-rod polymer model is fully coupled to the solvent through body forces representing hydrodynamic drag and stochastic thermal fluctuations. While intrapolymer interactions are modeled by a soft potential, polymer-structure interactions are treated as perfectly elastic collisions. We demonstrate this method on flow and transport of a polymer through a post array microchannel in 2D where the polymer incorporates more realistic physical parameters of DNA, and compare to previous simulations where rods are allowed to cross. We also show that the method is capable of simulating 3D flow in a packed bed micro-column.

  14. Interaction between the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) and DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, G; Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Koehler, J E

    1993-01-01

    maintained its DNA-binding capacity and was able at high concentrations to form condensed aggregates with DNA (one molecule of Hc1 per base pair) independently of the form or size of the DNA but with a slight preference for supercoiled DNA. Hc1 alone is thus able to package DNA into condensed spherical...

  15. Programmable display of DNA-protein chimeras for controlling cell-hydrogel interactions via reversible intermolecular hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-08

    Extensive studies have been recently carried out to achieve dynamic control of cell-material interactions primarily through physicochemical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to apply reversible intermolecular hybridization to program cell-hydrogel interactions in physiological conditions based on DNA-antibody chimeras and complementary oligonucleotides. The results showed that DNA oligonucleotides could be captured to and released from the immobilizing DNA-functionalized hydrogels with high specificity via DNA hybridization. Accordingly, DNA-antibody chimeras were captured to the hydrogels, successfully inducing specific cell attachment. The cell attachment to the hydrogels reached the plateau at approximately half an hour after the functionalized hydrogels and the cells were incubated together. The attached cells were rapidly released from the bound hydrogels when triggering complementary oligonucleotides were introduced to the system. However, the capability of the triggering complementary oligonucleotides in releasing cells was affected by the length of intermolecular hybridization. The length needed to be at least more than 20 base pairs in the current experimental setting. Notably, because the procedure of intermolecular hybridization did not involve any harsh condition, the released cells maintained the same viability as that of the cultured cells. The functionalized hydrogels also exhibited the potential to catch and release cells repeatedly. Therefore, this study demonstrates that it is promising to regulate cell-material interactions dynamically through the DNA-programmed display of DNA-protein chimeras.

  16. Disruption of PCNA-lamins A/C interactions by prelamin A induces DNA replication fork stalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Andrew M; Murray, Thomas V; Warren, Derek T; Liu, Yiwen; Shanahan, Catherine M

    2016-09-02

    The accumulation of prelamin A is linked to disruption of cellular homeostasis, tissue degeneration and aging. Its expression is implicated in compromised genome stability and increased levels of DNA damage, but to date there is no complete explanation for how prelamin A exerts its toxic effects. As the nuclear lamina is important for DNA replication we wanted to investigate the relationship between prelamin A expression and DNA replication fork stability. In this study we report that the expression of prelamin A in U2OS cells induced both mono-ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and subsequent induction of Pol η, two hallmarks of DNA replication fork stalling. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that cells expressing prelamin A presented with high levels of colocalisation between PCNA and γH2AX, indicating collapse of stalled DNA replication forks into DNA double-strand breaks. Subsequent protein-protein interaction assays showed prelamin A interacted with PCNA and that its presence mitigated interactions between PCNA and the mature nuclear lamina. Thus, we propose that the cytotoxicity of prelamin A arises in part, from it actively competing against mature lamin A to bind PCNA and that this destabilises DNA replication to induce fork stalling which in turn contributes to genomic instability.

  17. The Isolation of DNA by Polycharged Magnetic Particles: An Analysis of the Interaction by Zeta Potential and Particle Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Xhaxhiu, Kledi; Kopel, Pavel; Hynek, David; Zitka, Ondrej; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-04-20

    Magnetic isolation of biological targets is in major demand in the biotechnology industry today. This study considers the interaction of four surface-modified magnetic micro- and nanoparticles with selected DNA fragments. Different surface modifications of nanomaghemite precursors were investigated: MAN37 (silica-coated), MAN127 (polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated), MAN158 (phosphate-coated), and MAN164 (tripolyphosphate-coated). All particles were positive polycharged agglomerated monodispersed systems. Mean particle sizes were 0.48, 2.97, 2.93, and 3.67 μm for MAN37, MAN127, MAN164, and MAN158, respectively. DNA fragments exhibited negative zeta potential of -0.22 mV under binding conditions (high ionic strength, low pH, and dehydration). A decrease in zeta potential of particles upon exposure to DNA was observed with exception of MAN158 particles. The measured particle size of MAN164 particles increased by nearly twofold upon exposure to DNA. Quantitative PCR isolation of DNA with a high retrieval rate was observed by magnetic particles MAN127 and MAN164. Interaction between polycharged magnetic particles and DNA is mediated by various binding mechanisms such as hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Future development of DNA isolation technology requires an understanding of the physical and biochemical conditions of this process.

  18. A study on interaction of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes for an effective ejection of the molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.; Wang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The ejection of DNA molecules from carbon nanotubes is reported from interaction energy perspectives by molecular dynamics simulations. The critical ejection energy, which is to be applied to a DNA molecule for a successful ejection from a carbon nanotube, is investigated based on a study on the friction and binding energy between the DNA molecule and the tube. An effective ejection is realized by subjecting a kinetic energy on the DNA molecule that is larger than the solved critical ejection energy. In addition, the relationship between ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes is investigated. -- Highlights: ► Report the ejection of DNA molecules from CNTs from interaction energy perspectives. ► Develop a methodology for the critical energy of an effective ejection of a DNA molecule from a CNT. ► Present the relationship between critical ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and CNTs. ► Provide a general guidance on the ejection of encapsulated molecules from CNTs.

  19. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  20. Experimental study of oxidative DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Steffen; Deng, Xin-Sheng; Tuo, Jingsheng

    1998-01-01

    Animal experiments allow the study of oxidative DNA damage in target organs and the elucidation of dose-response relationships of carcinogenic and other harmful chemicals and conditions as well as the study of interactions of several factors. So far the effects of more than 50 different chemical ...

  1. Interaction with Single-stranded DNA-binding Protein Stimulates Escherichia coli Ribonuclease HI Enzymatic Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Christine; Marceau, Aimee H.; Miller, Katherine H.; Marqusee, Susan; Keck, James L. (UW-MED); (UCB)

    2015-04-22

    Single-stranded (ss) DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) bind and protect ssDNA intermediates formed during replication, recombination, and repair reactions. SSBs also directly interact with many different genome maintenance proteins to stimulate their enzymatic activities and/or mediate their proper cellular localization. We have identified an interaction formed between Escherichia coli SSB and ribonuclease HI (RNase HI), an enzyme that hydrolyzes RNA in RNA/DNA hybrids. The RNase HI·SSB complex forms by RNase HI binding the intrinsically disordered C terminus of SSB (SSB-Ct), a mode of interaction that is shared among all SSB interaction partners examined to date. Residues that comprise the SSB-Ct binding site are conserved among bacterial RNase HI enzymes, suggesting that RNase HI·SSB complexes are present in many bacterial species and that retaining the interaction is important for its cellular function. A steady-state kinetic analysis shows that interaction with SSB stimulates RNase HI activity by lowering the reaction Km. SSB or RNase HI protein variants that disrupt complex formation nullify this effect. Collectively our findings identify a direct RNase HI/SSB interaction that could play a role in targeting RNase HI activity to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates within the genome.

  2. Dielectric behavior of irradiated and nonirradiadiated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-crotonic acid interaction in 5% dextrose solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erginun, M.

    1980-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ex. thymus, dissolved in 5% dextrose, was exposed to gamma radiation at doses between 0-5000 Rads. Crotonic acid dissolved in 5% dextrose was added to this irradiated DNA at t=0 and t=24 hrs after irradiation, in concentrations between 0-1.000 mg/ml. The dielectric behavior of the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction was investigated at T=20 0 C by pH, permittivity (dielectric constant) and conductivity measurements. The pH, permittivity and conductivity measurements exhibit that the effective and critical conditions for the DNA-irradiation-crotonic acid interaction are; low doses of irradiation (350 Rad.), low concentrations of crotonic acid (0.05-0.100 mg/ml) and the addition of crotonic acid 24 hours after the irradiation. These results support and are in good agreement with those results observed with mammalian cells and laboratory animals when the chemical carcinogens are given in conjunction with radiation

  3. [Molecular dynamics of immune complex of photoadduct-containing DNA with Fab-Anti-DNA antibody fragment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akberova, N I; Zhmurov, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies to DNA play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. The elucidation of structural mechanisms of both the antigen recognition and the interaction of anti-DNA antibodies with DNA will help to understand the role of DNA-containing immune complexes in various pathologies and can provide a basis for new treatment modalities. Moreover, the DNA-antibody complex is an analog of specific intracellular DNA-protein interactions. In this work, we used in silico molecular dynamic simulations of bimolecular complexes of the dsDNA segment containing the Fab fragment of an anti-DNA antibody to obtain the detailed thermodynamic and structural characteristics of dynamic intermolecular interactions. Using computationally modified crystal structure of the Fab-DNA complex (PDB ID: 3VW3), we studied the equilibrium molecular dynamics of the 64M-5 antibody Fab fragment associated with the dsDNA fragment containing the thymine dimer, the product of DNA photodamage. Amino acid residues that constitute paratopes and the complementary nucleotide epitopes for the Fab-DNA construct were identified. Stacking and electrostatic interactions were found to play the main role in mediating the most specific antibody-dsDNA contacts, while hydrogen bonds were less significant. These findings may shed light on the formation and properties of pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus associated with skin photosensitivity and DNA photodamage.

  4. Analysis of damaged DNA / proteins interactions: Methodological optimizations and applications to DNA lesions induced by platinum anticancer drugs; Analyse des interactions ADN lese / proteines: Optimisations methodologiques et applications aux dommages de l'ADN engendres par les derives du platine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bounaix Morand du Puch, Ch

    2010-10-15

    DNA lesions contribute to the alteration of DNA structure, thereby inhibiting essential cellular processes. Such alterations may be beneficial for chemotherapies, for example in the case of platinum anticancer agents. They generate bulky adducts that, if not repaired, ultimately cause apoptosis. A better understanding of the biological response to such molecules can be obtained through the study of proteins that directly interact with the damages. These proteins constitute the DNA lesions interactome. This thesis presents the development of tools aiming at increasing the list of platinum adduct-associated proteins. Firstly, we designed a ligand fishing system made of damaged plasmids immobilized onto magnetic beads. Three platinum drugs were selected for our study: cisplatin, oxali-platin and satra-platin. Following exposure of the trap to nuclear extracts from HeLa cancer cells and identification of retained proteins by proteomics, we obtained already known candidates (HMGB1, hUBF, FACT complex) but also 29 new members of the platinated-DNA interactome. Among them, we noted the presence of PNUTS, TOX4 and WDR82, which associate to form the recently-discovered PTW/PP complex. Their capture was then confirmed with a second model, namely breast cancer cell line MDA MB 231, and the biological consequences of such an interaction now need to be elucidated. Secondly, we adapted a SPRi bio-chip to the study of platinum-damaged DNA/proteins interactions. Affinity of HMGB1 and newly characterized TOX4 for adducts generated by our three platinum drugs could be validated thanks to the bio-chip. Finally, we used our tools, as well as analytical chemistry and biochemistry methods, to evaluate the role of DDB2 (a factor involved in the recognition of UV-induced lesions) in the repair of cisplatin adducts. Our experiments using MDA MB 231 cells differentially expressing DDB2 showed that this protein is not responsible for the repair of platinum damages. Instead, it appears to act

  5. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  6. Multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking studies on the interaction of darunavir, a HIV protease inhibitor with calf thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Zhou, Kai-Li; Lou, Yan-Yue; Pan, Dong-Qi

    2018-03-15

    Molecular interaction of darunavir (DRV), a HIV protease inhibitor with calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct-DNA) was studied in physiological buffer (pH7.4) by multi-spectroscopic approaches hand in hand with viscosity measurements and molecular docking technique. The UV absorption and fluorescence results together revealed the formation of a DRV-ct-DNA complex having binding affinities of the order of 10 3 M -1 , which was more in keeping with the groove binding. The results that DRV bound to ct-DNA via groove binding mode was further evidenced by KI quenching studies, viscosity measurements, competitive binding investigations with EB and Rhodamine B and CD spectral analysis. The effect of ionic strength indicated the negligible involvement of electrostatic interaction between DRV and ct-DNA. The thermodynamic parameters regarding the binding interaction of DRV with ct-DNA in terms of enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ) and entropy change (ΔS 0 ) were -63.19kJ mol -1 and -141.92J mol -1 K -1 , indicating that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played a predominant role in the binding process. Furthermore, molecular simulation studies suggested that DRV molecule was prone to bind in the A-T rich region of the minor groove of DNA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies on the interaction of anti-platelet drug ticlopidine with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Shumaila; Rahman, Yusra; Sarwar, Tarique; Husain, Mohammed Amir; Ali, Abad; Shamsuzzaman; Tabish, Mohammad

    2017-11-01

    Ticlopidine is an anti-platelet drug which belongs to the thienopyridine structural family and exerts its effect by functioning as an ADP receptor inhibitor. Ticlopidine inhibits the expression of TarO gene in S. aureus and may provide protection against MRSA. Groove binding agents are known to disrupt the transcription factor DNA complex and consequently inhibit gene expression. Understanding the mechanism of interaction of ticlopidine with DNA can prove useful in the development of a rational drug designing system. At present, there is no such study on the interaction of anti-platelet drugs with nucleic acids. A series of biophysical experiments were performed to ascertain the binding mode between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments confirmed the formation of a complex between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. Moreover, the values of binding constant were found to be in the range of 103 M- 1, which is indicative of groove binding between ticlopidine and calf thymus DNA. These results were further confirmed by studying the effect of denaturation on double stranded DNA, iodide quenching, viscometric studies, thermal melting profile as well as CD spectral analysis. The thermodynamic profile of the interaction was also determined using isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The reaction was found to be endothermic and the parameters obtained were found to be consistent with those of known groove binders. In silico molecular docking studies further corroborated well with the experimental results.

  8. Interaction of an Fe derivative of TMAP (Fe(TMAP)OAc) with DNA in comparison with free-base TMAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Bathaie, S Zahra; Saboury, Ali-Akbar; Sharghi, Hashem; Tangestaninejad, Shahram

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the interaction of meso-tetrakis (N-para-methylanilium) porphyrin (TMAP) in its free base and Fe(II) form (Fe(TMAP)OAc) as a new derivative, with high molecular weight DNA at different ionic strengths, using various spectroscopic methods and microcalorimetry. The data obtained by spectrophotometery, circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence quenching and resonance light scattering (RLS) have demonstrated that TMAP association with DNA is via outside binding with self-stacking manner, which is accompanied with the "end-on" type complex formation in low ionic strength. However, in the case of Fe(TMAP)OAc, predominant mode of interaction is groove binding and after increasing in DNA concentration, unstable stacking-type aggregates are formed. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetric measurements have indicated the exothermic process of porphyrins binding to DNA, but the exothermisity in metal derivative of porphyrin is less than the free base. It confirmed the formation of a more organized aggregate of TMAP on DNA surface. Interactions of both porphyrins with DNA show high sensitivity to ionic strength. By addition of salt, the downfield CD signal of TMAP aggregates is shifted to a higher wavelength, which indicates some changes in the aggregates position. In the case of Fe(TMAP)OAc, addition of salt leads to changes in the mode of binding from groove binding to outside binding with self-stacking, which is accompanied with major changes in CD spectra, possibly indicating the formation of "face-on" type complex.

  9. SIRT6 stabilizes DNA-dependent protein kinase at chromatin for DNA double-strand break repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCord, Ronald A; Michishita, Eriko; Hong, Tao

    2009-01-01

    -PKcs) to chromatin in response to DNA damage and stabilizes DNA-PKcs at chromatin adjacent to an induced site-specific DSB. Abrogation of these SIRT6 activities leads to impaired resolution of DSBs. Together, these findings elucidate a mechanism whereby regulation of dynamic interaction of a DNA repair factor......-dependent protein kinase) and promotes DNA DSB repair. In response to DSBs, SIRT6 associates dynamically with chromatin and is necessary for an acute decrease in global cellular acetylation levels on histone H3 Lysine 9. Moreover, SIRT6 is required for mobilization of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA......, and SIRT6 knockout cells exhibit genomic instability and DNA damage hypersensitivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these defects are not fully understood. Here, we show that SIRT6 forms a macromolecular complex with the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor DNA-PK (DNA...

  10. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base

  11. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  12. The Inner Membrane Protein PilG Interacts with DNA and the Secretin PilQ in Transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    Full Text Available Expression of type IV pili (Tfp, filamentous appendages emanating from the bacterial surface, is indispensable for efficient neisserial transformation. Tfp pass through the secretin pore consisting of the membrane protein PilQ. PilG is a polytopic membrane protein, conserved in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, that is required for the biogenesis of neisserial Tfp. PilG null mutants are devoid of pili and non-competent for transformation. Here, recombinant full-length, truncated and mutated variants of meningococcal PilG were overexpressed, purified and characterized. We report that meningococcal PilG directly binds DNA in vitro, detected by both an electromobility shift analysis and a solid phase overlay assay. PilG DNA binding activity was independent of the presence of the consensus DNA uptake sequence. PilG-mediated DNA binding affinity was mapped to the N-terminus and was inactivated by mutation of residues 43 to 45. Notably, reduced meningococcal transformation of DNA in vivo was observed when PilG residues 43 to 45 were substituted by alanine in situ, defining a biologically significant DNA binding domain. N-terminal PilG also interacted with the N-terminal region of PilQ, which previously was shown to bind DNA. Collectively, these data suggest that PilG and PilQ in concert bind DNA during Tfp-mediated transformation.

  13. Specificity of interactions among the DNA-packaging machine components of T4-related bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Rao, Venigalla B

    2011-02-04

    Tailed bacteriophages use powerful molecular motors to package the viral genome into a preformed capsid. Packaging at a rate of up to ∼2000 bp/s and generating a power density twice that of an automobile engine, the phage T4 motor is the fastest and most powerful reported to date. Central to DNA packaging are dynamic interactions among the packaging components, capsid (gp23), portal (gp20), motor (gp17, large "terminase"), and regulator (gp16, small terminase), leading to precise orchestration of the packaging process, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we analyzed the interactions between small and large terminases of T4-related phages. Our results show that the gp17 packaging ATPase is maximally stimulated by homologous, but not heterologous, gp16. Multiple interaction sites are identified in both gp16 and gp17. The specificity determinants in gp16 are clustered in the diverged N- and C-terminal domains (regions I-III). Swapping of diverged region(s), such as replacing C-terminal RB49 region III with that of T4, switched ATPase stimulation specificity. Two specificity regions, amino acids 37-52 and 290-315, are identified in or near the gp17-ATPase "transmission" subdomain II. gp16 binding at these sites might cause a conformational change positioning the ATPase-coupling residues into the catalytic pocket, triggering ATP hydrolysis. These results lead to a model in which multiple weak interactions between motor and regulator allow dynamic assembly and disassembly of various packaging complexes, depending on the functional state of the packaging machine. This might be a general mechanism for regulation of the phage packaging machine and other complex molecular machines.

  14. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha; Hamdan, Samir; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Two modes of interaction of the single-stranded DNA-binding protein of bacteriophage T7 with the DNA polymerase-thioredoxin complex

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, Sharmistha

    2010-04-06

    The DNA polymerase encoded by bacteriophage T7 has low processivity. Escherichia coli thioredoxin binds to a segment of 76 residues in the thumb subdomain of the polymerase and increases the processivity. The binding of thioredoxin leads to the formation of two basic loops, loops A and B, located within the thioredoxin-binding domain (TBD). Both loops interact with the acidic C terminus of the T7 helicase. A relatively weak electrostatic mode involves the C-terminal tail of the helicase and the TBD, whereas a high affinity interaction that does not involve the C-terminal tail occurs when the polymerase is in a polymerization mode. T7 gene 2.5 single-stranded DNA-binding protein (gp2.5) also has an acidic C-terminal tail. gp2.5 also has two modes of interaction with the polymerase, but both involve the C-terminal tail of gp2.5. An electrostatic interaction requires the basic residues in loops A and B, and gp2.5 binds to both loops with similar affinity as measured by surface plasmon resonance. When the polymerase is in a polymerization mode, the C terminus of gene 2.5 protein interacts with the polymerase in regions outside the TBD.gp2.5 increases the processivity of the polymerase-helicase complex during leading strand synthesis. When loop B of the TBD is altered, abortive DNA products are observed during leading strand synthesis. Loop B appears to play an important role in communication with the helicase and gp2.5, whereas loop A plays a stabilizing role in these interactions. © 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Detailed kinetic analysis of the interaction between the FOXO4–DNA-binding domain and DNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, P.; Zusková, Iva; Bumba, Ladislav; Večeř, J.; Obšilová, Veronika; Obšil, T.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 184, DEC 31 (2013), s. 68-78 ISSN 0301-4622 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/11/0717 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : binding kinetics * DNA-binding domain * FOXO4 forkhead transcription factor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; CE - Biochemistry (MBU-M) Impact factor: 2.319, year: 2013

  17. Three-dimensional structure of N-terminal domain of DnaB helicase and helicase-primase interactions in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Kashav

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Replication initiation is a crucial step in genome duplication and homohexameric DnaB helicase plays a central role in the replication initiation process by unwinding the duplex DNA and interacting with several other proteins during the process of replication. N-terminal domain of DnaB is critical for helicase activity and for DnaG primase interactions. We present here the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (NTD of H. pylori DnaB (HpDnaB helicase at 2.2 A resolution and compare the structural differences among helicases and correlate with the functional differences. The structural details of NTD suggest that the linker region between NTD and C-terminal helicase domain plays a vital role in accurate assembly of NTD dimers. The sequence analysis of the linker regions from several helicases reveals that they should form four helix bundles. We also report the characterization of H. pylori DnaG primase and study the helicase-primase interactions, where HpDnaG primase stimulates DNA unwinding activity of HpDnaB suggesting presence of helicase-primase cohort at the replication fork. The protein-protein interaction study of C-terminal domain of primase and different deletion constructs of helicase suggests that linker is essential for proper conformation of NTD to interact strongly with HpDnaG. The surface charge distribution on the primase binding surface of NTDs of various helicases suggests that DnaB-DnaG interaction and stability of the complex is most probably charge dependent. Structure of the linker and helicase-primase interactions indicate that HpDnaB differs greatly from E.coli DnaB despite both belong to gram negative bacteria.

  18. Transcription factors as readers and effectors of DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Heng; Wang, Guohua; Qian, Jiang

    2016-08-01

    Recent technological advances have made it possible to decode DNA methylomes at single-base-pair resolution under various physiological conditions. Many aberrant or differentially methylated sites have been discovered, but the mechanisms by which changes in DNA methylation lead to observed phenotypes, such as cancer, remain elusive. The classical view of methylation-mediated protein-DNA interactions is that only proteins with a methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) can interact with methylated DNA. However, evidence is emerging to suggest that transcription factors lacking a MBD can also interact with methylated DNA. The identification of these proteins and the elucidation of their characteristics and the biological consequences of methylation-dependent transcription factor-DNA interactions are important stepping stones towards a mechanistic understanding of methylation-mediated biological processes, which have crucial implications for human development and disease.

  19. Carcinogen-DNA interaction study by base sequence footprinting. Final report, July 1, 1983-June 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bases, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies on acetylaminofluorene (AAF) modified DNA demonstrated three kinds of structural changes in DNA of defined base sequence. For example, adduct formation by N-Aco-AAF was found at each guanine. We studied the interaction of IgG specific for AAF guanosine in an in vitro system using AAF modified phi X-174 rf DNA. We had expected to find protection against DNAase I digestion. Instead, when the DNA was immunobound to an inert matrix via the IgG, DNAase I digestion was enhanced 20 fold without changing the base sequence pattern of digestion. DNAase I hypersensitive sites are a necessary but not a sufficient condition for transcription. Moreover, some hypersensitive sites are stably propagated, independent of the continued presence of the inducer. Stability of these hypersensitive sites in the absence of their inducer suggests that they can be propagated. It appeared likely that distortion of DNA by a carcinogen adduct such as AAF, and the interaction of this modified DNA with a specific protein such as IgG or cellular proteins might inappropriately enhance the transcription of specific genes. That hypothesis will be tested; surprisingly, little is known about the early action of carcinogens on expression of specific genes. 34 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  1. Interactive effects of ultraviolet-B radiation and pesticide exposure on DNA photo-adduct accumulation and expression of DNA damage and repair genes in Xenopus laevis embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shuangying; Tang, Song; Mayer, Gregory D.; Cobb, George P.; Maul, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Interactive effects of UVB radiation-pesticide co-exposures were examined in frogs. • Responses included induction of DNA photo-adducts and DNA damage and repair genes. • Elevated DNA adduct levels occurred for co-exposures compared to UVB alone. • One mechanism is that pesticides may alter nuclear excision repair gene expression. - Abstract: Pesticide use and ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation have both been suggested to adversely affect amphibians; however, little is known about their interactive effects. One potential adverse interaction could involve pesticide-induced dysregulation of DNA repair pathways, resulting in greater numbers of DNA photo-adducts from UVB exposure. In the present study, we investigated the interactive effects of UVB radiation and two common pesticides (endosulfan and α-cypermethrin) on induction of DNA photo-adducts and expression of DNA damage and repair related genes in African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. We examined 13 genes that are, collectively, involved in stress defense, cell cycle arrest, nucleotide excision repair (NER), base excision repair, mismatch repair, DNA repair regulation, and apoptosis. We exposed X. laevis embryos to 0, 25, and 50 μg/L endosulfan or 0, 2.5, and 5.0 μg/L α-cypermethrin for 96 h, with environmentally relevant exposures of UVB radiation during the last 7 h of the 96 h exposure. We measured the amount of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and mRNA abundance of the 13 genes among treatments including control, pesticide only, UVB only, and UVB and pesticide co-exposures. Each of the co-exposure scenarios resulted in elevated CPD levels compared to UVB exposure alone, suggesting an inhibitory effect of endosulfan and α-cypermethrin on CPD repair. This is attributed to results indicating that α-cypermethrin and endosulfan reduced mRNA abundance of XPA and HR23B, respectively, to levels that may affect the initial recognition of DNA lesions. In contrast, both pesticides

  2. Investigations on the interactions of diclofenac sodium with HSA and ctDNA using molecular modeling and multispectroscopic methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yanrui; Hao, Erjun; Hui, Guangquan; Guo, Wei; Cui, Fengling

    2013-06-01

    A tentative study on interaction of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was conducted by using multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques under simulative physiological conditions. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that the quenching mechanisms were static quenching. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy clearly demonstrated the occurrence of conformational changes of HSA with addition of DF-Na. In addition, competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that DF-Na can bind to ctDNA relatively strong via groove binding. Based on the values of thermodynamic parameters and the results of molecular modeling, it was confirmed that hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond were the mainly binding forces in DF-Na-HSA and DF-Na-DNA systems. The binding distance between DF-Na and HSA was also determined using the theory of the Förster energy transference.

  3. IDN2 Interacts with RPA and Facilitates DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Homologous Recombination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Ba, Zhaoqing; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Wei, Wei; Li, Lanxia; Kong, Fansi; Li, Yan; Chai, Jijie; Pontes, Olga; Qi, Yijun

    2017-03-01

    Repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. We previously showed that DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) facilitate homologous recombination-mediated DSB repair in Arabidopsis thaliana Here, we show that INVOLVED IN DE NOVO2 (IDN2), a double-stranded RNA binding protein involved in small RNA-directed DNA methylation, is required for DSB repair in Arabidopsis. We find that IDN2 interacts with the heterotrimeric replication protein A (RPA) complex. Depletion of IDN2 or the diRNA binding ARGONAUTE2 leads to increased accumulation of RPA at DSB sites and mislocalization of the recombination factor RAD51. These findings support a model in which IDN2 interacts with RPA and facilitates the release of RPA from single-stranded DNA tails and subsequent recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites to promote DSB repair. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Interaction studies of resistomycin from Streptomyces aurantiacus AAA5 with calf thymus DNA and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayabharathi, R.; Sathyadevi, P.; Krishnamoorthy, P.; Senthilraja, D.; Brunthadevi, P.; Sathyabama, S.; Priyadarisini, V. Brindha

    2012-04-01

    Resistomycin, a secondary metabolite produced by Streptomyces aurantiacus AAA5. The binding interaction of resistomycin with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, circular dichroism (CD) and synchronous fluorescence techniques under physiological conditions in vitro. Absorption spectral studies along with the fluorescence competition with ethidium bromide measurements and circular dichroism clearly suggest that the resistomycin bind with CT DNA relatively strong via groove binding. BSA interaction results revealed that the drug was found to quench the fluorescence intensity of the protein through a static quenching mechanism. The number of binding sites 'n' and apparent binding constant 'K' calculated according to the Scatchard equation exhibit a good binding property to bovine serum albumin protein. In addition, the results observed from synchronous fluorescence measurements clearly demonstrate the occurrence of conformational changes of BSA upon addition of the test compound.

  5. The unstructured linker arms of Mlh1-Pms1 are important for interactions with DNA during mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plys, Aaron J.; Rogacheva, Maria V.; Greene, Eric C.; Alani, Eric

    2012-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) models have proposed that MSH proteins identify DNA polymerase errors while interacting with the DNA replication fork. MLH proteins (primarily Mlh1-Pms1 in baker’s yeast) then survey the genome for lesion-bound MSH proteins. The resulting MSH-MLH complex formed at a DNA lesion initiates downstream steps in repair. MLH proteins act as dimers and contain long (20 – 30 nanometers) unstructured arms that connect two terminal globular domains. These arms can vary between 100 to 300 amino acids in length, are highly divergent between organisms, and are resistant to amino acid substitutions. To test the roles of the linker arms in MMR, we engineered a protease cleavage site into the Mlh1 linker arm domain of baker’s yeast Mlh1-Pms1. Cleavage of the Mlh1 linker arm in vitro resulted in a defect in Mlh1-Pms1 DNA binding activity, and in vivo proteolytic cleavage resulted in a complete defect in MMR. We then generated a series of truncation mutants bearing Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms of varying lengths. This work revealed that MMR is greatly compromised when portions of the Mlh1 linker are removed, whereas repair is less sensitive to truncation of the Pms1 linker arm. Purified complexes containing truncations in Mlh1 and Pms1 linker arms were analyzed and found to have differential defects in DNA binding that also correlated with the ability to form a ternary complex with Msh2-Msh6 and mismatch DNA. These observations are consistent with the unstructured linker domains of MLH proteins providing distinct interactions with DNA during MMR. PMID:22659005

  6. The interaction of linear and ring forms of DNA molecules with nanodiamonds synthesized by detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purtov, K V; Burakova, L P; Puzyr, A P; Bondar, V S

    2008-01-01

    Nanodiamonds synthesized by detonation have been found not to immobilize the ring form of pUC19 plasmid DNA. Linear pUC19 molecules with blunt ends, prepared by restriction of the initial ring form of pUC19 DNA, and linear 0.25-10 kb DNA fragments are adsorbed on nanodiamonds. The amount of adsorbed linear DNA molecules depends on the size of the molecules and the size of the nanodiamond clusters

  7. TAF(II)170 interacts with the concave surface of TATA-binding protein to inhibit its DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L A; van der Knaap, J A; van den Boom, V; van den Heuvel, F A; Timmers, H T

    2001-11-01

    The human RNA polymerase II transcription factor B-TFIID consists of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and the TBP-associated factor (TAF) TAF(II)170 and can rapidly redistribute over promoter DNA. Here we report the identification of human TBP-binding regions in human TAF(II)170. We have defined the TBP interaction domain of TAF(II)170 within three amino-terminal regions: residues 2 to 137, 290 to 381, and 380 to 460. Each region contains a pair of Huntington-elongation-A subunit-Tor repeats and exhibits species-specific interactions with TBP family members. Remarkably, the altered-specificity TBP mutant (TBP(AS)) containing a triple mutation in the concave surface is defective for binding the TAF(II)170 amino-terminal region of residues 1 to 504. Furthermore, within this region the TAF(II)170 residues 290 to 381 can inhibit the interaction between Drosophila TAF(II)230 (residues 2 to 81) and TBP through competition for the concave surface of TBP. Biochemical analyses of TBP binding to the TATA box indicated that TAF(II)170 region 290-381 inhibits TBP-DNA complex formation. Importantly, the TBP(AS) mutant is less sensitive to TAF(II)170 inhibition. Collectively, our results support a mechanism in which TAF(II)170 induces high-mobility DNA binding by TBP through reversible interactions with its concave DNA binding surface.

  8. DNA-mediated bacterial aggregation is dictated by acid-base interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Theerthankar; Krom, Bastiaan P.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Sharma, Prashant K.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular DNA (eDNA) plays a significant role in bacterial biofilm formation and aggregation. Here, for the first time, we present a physico-chemical analysis of the DNA-mediated aggregation for three bacterial strains (Streptococcus mutans LT11, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and Staphylococcus

  9. Close encounters for the first time: Helicase interactions with DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Irfan; Sommers, Joshua A; Brosh, Robert M

    2015-09-01

    DNA helicases are molecular motors that harness the energy of nucleoside triphosphate hydrolysis to unwinding structured DNA molecules that must be resolved during cellular replication, DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. In vivo, DNA helicases are expected to encounter a wide spectrum of covalent DNA modifications to the sugar phosphate backbone or the nitrogenous bases; these modifications can be induced by endogenous biochemical processes or exposure to environmental agents. The frequency of lesion abundance can vary depending on the lesion type. Certain adducts such as oxidative base modifications can be quite numerous, and their effects can be helix-distorting or subtle perturbations to DNA structure. Helicase encounters with specific DNA lesions and more novel forms of DNA damage will be discussed. We will also review the battery of assays that have been used to characterize helicase-catalyzed unwinding of damaged DNA substrates. Characterization of the effects of specific DNA adducts on unwinding by various DNA repair and replication helicases has proven to be insightful for understanding mechanistic and biological aspects of helicase function in cellular DNA metabolism. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Role of minor groove width and hydration pattern on amsacrine interaction with DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Jangir

    Full Text Available Amsacrine is an anilinoacridine derivative anticancer drug, used to treat a wide variety of malignancies. In cells, amsacrine poisons topoisomerase 2 by stabilizing DNA-drug-enzyme ternary complex. Presence of amsacrine increases the steady-state concentration of these ternary complexes which in turn hampers DNA replication and results in subsequent cell death. Due to reversible binding and rapid slip-out of amsacrine from DNA duplex, structural data is not available on amsacrine-DNA complexes. In the present work, we designed five oligonucleotide duplexes, differing in their minor groove widths and hydration pattern, and examined their binding with amsacrine using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Complexes of amsacrine with calf thymus DNA were also evaluated for a comparison. Our results demonstrate for the first time that amsacrine is not a simple intercalator; rather mixed type of DNA binding (intercalation and minor groove takes place between amsacrine and DNA. Further, this binding is highly sensitive towards the geometries and hydration patterns of different minor grooves present in the DNA. This study shows that ligand binding to DNA could be very sensitive to DNA base composition and DNA groove structures. Results demonstrated here could have implication for understanding cytotoxic mechanism of aminoacridine based anticancer drugs and provide directions to modify these drugs for better efficacy and few side-effects.

  11. E2F1 interactions with hHR23A inhibit its degradation and promote DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Randeep K; Dagnino, Lina

    2016-05-03

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major mechanism for removal of DNA lesions induced by exposure to UV radiation in the epidermis. Recognition of damaged DNA sites is the initial step in their repair, and requires multiprotein complexes that contain XPC and hHR23 proteins, or their orthologues. A variety of transcription factors are also involved in NER, including E2F1. In epidermal keratinocytes, UV exposure induces E2F1 phosphorylation, which allows it to recruit various NER factors to sites of DNA damage. However, the relationship between E2F1 and hHR23 proteins vis-à-vis NER has remained unexplored. We now show that E2F1 and hHR23 proteins can interact, and this interaction stabilizes E2F1, inhibiting its proteasomal degradation. Reciprocally, E2F1 regulates hHR23A subcellular localization, recruiting it to sites of DNA photodamage. As a result, E2F1 and hHR23A enhance DNA repair following exposure to UV radiation, contributing to genomic stability in the epidermis.

  12. DMPD: Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14751759 Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of CpG DNA withTo...;16(1):17-22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signal transduction pathways mediated by the interaction of... CpG DNA withToll-like receptor 9. PubmedID 14751759 Title Signal transduction pathways media

  13. Anticancer drug mithramycin interacts with core histones: An additional mode of action of the DNA groove binder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mithramycin (MTR is a clinically approved DNA-binding antitumor antibiotic currently in Phase 2 clinical trials at National Institutes of Health for treatment of osteosarcoma. In view of the resurgence in the studies of this generic antibiotic as a human medicine, we have examined the binding properties of MTR with the integral component of chromatin – histone proteins – as a part of our broad objective to classify DNA-binding molecules in terms of their ability to bind chromosomal DNA alone (single binding mode or both histones and chromosomal DNA (dual binding mode. The present report shows that besides DNA, MTR also binds to core histones present in chromatin and thus possesses the property of dual binding in the chromatin context. In contrast to the MTR–DNA interaction, association of MTR with histones does not require obligatory presence of bivalent metal ion like Mg2+. As a consequence of its ability to interact with core histones, MTR inhibits histone H3 acetylation at lysine 18, an important signature of active chromatin, in vitro and ex vivo. Reanalysis of microarray data of Ewing sarcoma cell lines shows that upon MTR treatment there is a significant down regulation of genes, possibly implicating a repression of H3K18Ac-enriched genes apart from DNA-binding transcription factors. Association of MTR with core histones and its ability to alter post-translational modification of histone H3 clearly indicates an additional mode of action of this anticancer drug that could be implicated in novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  15. Conformational dynamism for DNA interaction in the Salmonella RcsB response regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casino, Patricia; Miguel-Romero, Laura; Huesa, Juanjo; García, Pablo; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Marina, Alberto

    2018-01-09

    The RcsCDB phosphorelay system controls an extremely large regulon in Enterobacteriaceae that involves processes such as biofilm formation, flagella production, synthesis of extracellular capsules and cell division. Therefore, fine-tuning of this system is essential for virulence in pathogenic microorganisms of this group. The final master effector of the RcsCDB system is the response regulator (RR) RcsB, which activates or represses multiple genes by binding to different promoter regions. This regulatory activity of RcsB can be done alone or in combination with additional transcriptional factors in phosphorylated or dephosphorylated states. The capacity of RcsB to interact with multiple promoters and partners, either dephosphorylated or phosphorylated, suggests an extremely conformational dynamism for this RR. To shed light on the activation mechanism of RcsB and its implication on promoter recognition, we solved the crystal structure of full-length RcsB from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the presence and absence of a phosphomimetic molecule BeF3-. These two novel structures have guided an extensive site-directed mutagenesis study at the structural and functional level that confirms RcsB conformational plasticity and dynamism. Our data allowed us to propose a β5-T switch mechanism where phosphorylation is coupled to alternative DNA binding ways and which highlights the conformational dynamism of RcsB to be so pleiotropic. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Different modes of interaction by TIAR and HuR with target RNA and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Henry S; Wilce, Matthew C J; Yoga, Yano M K; Pendini, Nicole R; Gunzburg, Menachem J; Cowieson, Nathan P; Wilson, Gerald M; Williams, Bryan R G; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A

    2011-02-01

    TIAR and HuR are mRNA-binding proteins that play important roles in the regulation of translation. They both possess three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and bind to AU-rich elements (AREs), with seemingly overlapping specificity. Here we show using SPR that TIAR and HuR bind to both U-rich and AU-rich RNA in the nanomolar range, with higher overall affinity for U-rich RNA. However, the higher affinity for U-rich sequences is mainly due to faster association with U-rich RNA, which we propose is a reflection of the higher probability of association. Differences between TIAR and HuR are observed in their modes of binding to RNA. TIAR is able to bind deoxy-oligonucleotides with nanomolar affinity, whereas HuR affinity is reduced to a micromolar level. Studies with U-rich DNA reveal that TIAR binding depends less on the 2'-hydroxyl group of RNA than HuR binding. Finally we show that SAXS data, recorded for the first two domains of TIAR in complex with RNA, are more consistent with a flexible, elongated shape and not the compact shape that the first two domains of Hu proteins adopt upon binding to RNA. We thus propose that these triple-RRM proteins, which compete for the same binding sites in cells, interact with their targets in fundamentally different ways.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA mapping of social-biological interactions in Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Maia Carvalho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the Brazilian Amazonian population has historically involved three main ethnic groups, Amerindian, African and European. This has resulted in genetic investigations having been carried out using classical polymorphisms and molecular markers. To better understand the genetic variability and the micro-evolutionary processes acting in human groups in the Brazilian Amazon region we used mitochondrial DNA to investigate 159 maternally unrelated individuals from five Amazonian African-descendant communities. The mitochondrial lineage distribution indicated a contribution of 50.2% from Africans (L0, L1, L2, and L3, 46.6% from Amerindians (haplogroups A, B, C and D and a small European contribution of 1.3%. These results indicated high genetic diversity in the Amerindian and African lineage groups, suggesting that the Brazilian Amazonian African-descendant populations reflect a possible population amalgamation of Amerindian women from different Amazonian indigenous tribes and African women from different geographic regions of Africa who had been brought to Brazil as slaves. The present study partially mapped the historical biological and social interactions that had occurred during the formation and expansion of Amazonian African-descendant communities.

  18. Nucleosome–nucleosome interactions via histone tails and linker DNA regulate nuclear rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimamoto, Yuta; Tamura, Sachiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Cells, as well as the nuclei inside them, experience significant mechanical stress in diverse biological processes, including contraction, migration, and adhesion. The structural stability of nuclei must therefore be maintained in order to protect genome integrity. Despite extensive knowledge on nuclear architecture and components, however, the underlying physical and molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. We address this by subjecting isolated human cell nuclei to microneedle-based quantitative micromanipulation with a series of biochemical perturbations of the chromatin. We find that the mechanical rigidity of nuclei depends on the continuity of the nucleosomal fiber and interactions between nucleosomes. Disrupting these chromatin features by varying cation concentration, acetylating histone tails, or digesting linker DNA results in loss of nuclear rigidity. In contrast, the levels of key chromatin assembly factors, including cohesin, condensin II, and CTCF, and a major nuclear envelope protein, lamin, are unaffected. Together with in situ evidence using living cells and a simple mechanical model, our findings reveal a chromatin-based regulation of the nuclear mechanical response and provide insight into the significance of local and global chromatin structures, such as those associated with interdigitated or melted nucleosomal fibers. PMID:28428255

  19. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. PMID:21615552

  20. Role of the Coulomb interaction in the low-frequency density of states of DNA double helices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, A.E.; Krumhansl, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    The complete vibrational frequency spectrum of several DNA double-helical oligomers is calculated using established pair potentials. Various cutoff values are used for the range of the Coulomb interactions. At very low frequency the integrated density of states shows a noninteger exponent with values ranging from 0.75 to 1.55, depending on the cutoff value for the Coulomb interactions. We conclude that the cumulative densities of states in those molecules depend more on competing interactions than on various proposed universal laws

  1. Novel DNA lesions generated by the interaction between therapeutic thiopurines and UVA light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Jeffs, Graham; Ren, Xiaolin; O'Donovan, Peter; Montaner, Beatriz; Perrett, Conal M; Karran, Peter; Xu, Yao-Zhong

    2007-03-01

    The therapeutic effect of the thiopurines, 6-thioguanine (6-TG), 6-mercaptopurine, and its prodrug azathioprine, depends on the incorporation of 6-TG into cellular DNA. Unlike normal DNA bases, 6-TG absorbs UVA radiation, and UVA-mediated photochemical damage of DNA 6-TG has potentially harmful side effects. When free 6-TG is UVA irradiated in solution in the presence of molecular oxygen, reactive oxygen species are generated and 6-TG is oxidized to guanine-6-sulfonate (G(SO3)) and guanine-6-thioguanine in reactions involving singlet oxygen. This conversion is prevented by antioxidants, including the dietary vitamin ascorbate. DNA G(SO3) is also the major photoproduct of 6-TG in DNA and it can be selectively introduced into DNA or oligonucleotides in vitro by mild chemical oxidation. Thermal stability measurements indicate that G(SO3) does not form stable base pairs with any of the normal DNA bases in duplex oligonucleotides and is a powerful block for elongation by Klenow DNA polymerase in primer extension experiments. In cultured human cells, DNA damage produced by 6-TG and UVA treatment is associated with replication inhibition and provokes a p53-dependent DNA damage response.

  2. Interaction Mode between Inclusion Complex of Vitamin K3 with γ- Cyclodextrin and Herring-Sperm DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yan; Cai, Li; Xue, Kang; Wang, Chunling; Xiong, Xiaoli

    2016-05-03

    Methods including spectroscopy, electronic chemistry and thermodynamics were used to study the inclusion effect between γ-cyclodextrin (CD) and vitamin K3(K3), as well as the interaction mode between herring-sperm DNA (hsDNA) and γ-CD-K3 inclusion complex. The results from ultraviolet spectroscopic method indicated that VK3 and γ-CD formed 1:1 inclusion complex, with the inclusion constant Kf = 1.02 × 10(4) L/mol, which is based on Benesi-Hildebrand's viewpoint. The outcomes from the probe method and Scatchard methods suggested that the interaction mode between γ-CD-K3 and DNA was a mixture mode, which included intercalation and electrostatic binding effects. The binding constants were K (θ)25°C = 2.16 × 10(4) L/mol, and K(θ)37°C = 1.06 × 10(4) L/mol. The thermodynamic functions of the interaction between γ-CD-K3 and DNA were ΔrHm(θ) = -2.74 × 10(4) J/mol, ΔrSm(θ) = 174.74 J·mol(-1)K(-1), therefore, both ΔrHm(θ) (enthalpy) and ΔrSm(θ) (entropy) worked as driven forces in this action.

  3. DNA base dimers are stabilized by hydrogen-bonding interactions including non-Watson-Crick pairing near graphite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Akshaya; Jagota, Anand; Mittal, Jeetain

    2012-10-11

    Single- and double-stranded DNA are increasingly being paired with surfaces and nanoparticles for numerous applications, such as sensing, imaging, and drug delivery. Unlike the majority of DNA structures in bulk that are stabilized by canonical Watson-Crick pairing between Ade-Thy and Gua-Cyt, those adsorbed on surfaces are often stabilized by noncanonical base pairing, quartet formation, and base-surface stacking. Not much is known about these kinds of interactions. To build an understanding of the role of non-Watson-Crick pairing on DNA behavior near surfaces, one requires basic information on DNA base pair stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions. All-atom molecular simulations of DNA bases in two cases--in bulk water and strongly adsorbed on a graphite surface--are conducted to study the relative strengths of stacking and hydrogen bond interactions for each of the 10 possible combinations of base pairs. The key information obtained from these simulations is the free energy as a function of distance between two bases in a pair. We find that stacking interactions exert the dominant influence on the stability of DNA base pairs in bulk water as expected. The strength of stability for these stacking interactions is found to decrease in the order Gua-Gua > Ade-Gua > Ade-Ade > Gua-Thy > Gua-Cyt > Ade-Thy > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Cyt-Thy > Cyt-Cyt. On the other hand, mutual interactions of surface-adsorbed base pairs are stabilized mostly by hydrogen-bonding interactions in the order Gua-Cyt > Ade-Gua > Ade-Thy > Ade-Ade > Cyt-Thy > Gua-Gua > Cyt-Cyt > Ade-Cyt > Thy-Thy > Gua-Thy. Interestingly, several non-Watson-Crick base pairings, which are commonly ignored, have similar stabilization free energies due to interbase hydrogen bonding as Watson-Crick pairs. This clearly highlights the importance of non-Watson-Crick base pairing in the development of secondary structures of oligonucleotides near surfaces.

  4. The self-assembly of particles with isotropic interactions: Using DNA coated colloids to create designer nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Dion, S.; Konigslow, K. von

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory equations are presented that are suitable for use as a coarse-grained model for DNA coated colloids, polymer-grafted nanoparticles and other systems with approximately isotropic interactions. The equations are generalized for arbitrary numbers of chemically distinct colloids. The advantages and limitations of such a coarse-grained approach for DNA coated colloids are discussed, as are similarities with block copolymer self-assembly. In particular, preliminary results for three species self-assembly are presented that parallel results from a two dimensional ABC triblock copolymer phase. The possibility of incorporating crystallization, dynamics, inverse statistical mechanics and multiscale modelling techniques are discussed

  5. Structural and electrostatic regularities in interactions of homeodomains with operator DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirgadze, Yu.N.; Ivanov, V.V.; Polozov, R.V.; Zheltukhin, E.I.; Sivozhelezov, V.S.

    2008-01-01

    Interfaces of five DNA-homeodomain complexes, selected by similarity of structures and patterns of contacting residues, were compared. The long-range stage of the recognition process was characterized by electrostatic potentials about 5 Angstroem away from molecular surfaces of both protein and DNA. For proteins, clear positive potential is displayed only at the side contacting DNA, while grooves of DNA display a strong negative potential. Thus, one functional role of electrostatics is guiding the protein into the DNA major groove. At the close-range stage, neutralization of the phosphate charges by positively charged residues is necessary for decreasing the strong electrostatic potential of DNA, allowing nucleotide bases to participate in formation of protein-DNA atomic contacts in the interface. The protein's recognizing α-helix was shown to form both invariant and variable contacts with DNA by means of the certain specific side groups, with water molecules participating in some of the contacts. The invariant contacts included the highly specific Asn-Ade hydrogen bonds, nonpolar contacts of hydrophobic amino acids serving as barriers for fixing the protein on DNA, and interface water molecule cluster providing local mobility necessary for the dissociation of the protein-DNA complex. One of the water molecules is invariant and located at the center of the interface. Invariant contacts of the proteins are mostly formed with the TAAT motive of promoter DNA's forward strand. They distinguish the homeodomain family from other DNA-binding proteins. Variable contacts are formed with the reverse strand and are responsible for the binding specificity within the homeodomain family

  6. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-01

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging.

  7. Neocarzinostatin as a probe for DNA protection activity--molecular interaction with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Der-Hang; Li, Huang-Hsien; Kuo, Hsiu-Maan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Liu, Chia-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Neocarzinostatin (NCS), a potent mutagen and carcinogen, consists of an enediyne prodrug and a protein carrier. It has a unique double role in that it intercalates into DNA and imposes radical-mediated damage after thiol activation. Here we employed NCS as a probe to examine the DNA-protection capability of caffeine, one of common dietary phytochemicals with potential cancer-chemopreventive activity. NCS at the nanomolar concentration range could induce significant single- and double-strand lesions in DNA, but up to 75 ± 5% of such lesions were found to be efficiently inhibited by caffeine. The percentage of inhibition was caffeine-concentration dependent, but was not sensitive to the DNA-lesion types. The well-characterized activation reactions of NCS allowed us to explore the effect of caffeine on the enediyne-generated radicals. Postactivation analyses by chromatographic and mass spectroscopic methods identified a caffeine-quenched enediyne-radical adduct, but the yield was too small to fully account for the large inhibition effect on DNA lesions. The affinity between NCS chromophore and DNA was characterized by a fluorescence-based kinetic method. The drug-DNA intercalation was hampered by caffeine, and the caffeine-induced increases in DNA-drug dissociation constant was caffeine-concentration dependent, suggesting importance of binding affinity in the protection mechanism. Caffeine has been shown to be both an effective free radical scavenger and an intercalation inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that caffeine ingeniously protected DNA against the enediyne-induced damages mainly by inhibiting DNA intercalation beforehand. The direct scavenging of the DNA-bound NCS free radicals by caffeine played only a minor role. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A treatise on benzimidazole based Schiff base metal(II) complexes accentuating their biological efficacy: Spectroscopic evaluation of DNA interactions, DNA cleavage and antimicrobial screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaravel, Ganesan; Raman, Natarajan, E-mail: ramchem1964@gmail.com

    2017-01-01

    Two novel imidazole derived Schiff bases, (Z)-1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-N-benzylidenemethanamine (L{sup 1}) and 1-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)-N-(4-nitrobenzylidene) methanamine, and a series of their transition metal complexes of the types [M(L{sup 1}){sub 2}]Cl{sub 2} and [M(L{sup 2}){sub 2}]Cl{sub 2} where, M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II) and Zn(II) have been designed and synthesized. These compounds were characterized by various spectral and physicochemical data. UV–Vis, magnetic susceptibility and molar conductivity data indicate that all the complexes adopt square planar geometry. The EPR spectral data of the Cu(II) complexes have provided supportive evidence to the conclusion derived on the basis of electronic absorption and magnetic moment values. Moreover, the interaction of complexes with DNA via intercalation has been explored by absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, viscosity and circular dichroism. Agarose gel electrophoresis technique reveals that the complexes are good metallonucleases. All the compounds have relatively high antibacterial and antifungal potencies. Among the metal complexes, Cu(II) complexes exhibit higher efficacy against all the pathogens. - Highlights: • Synthesis of new and efficient benzimidazole based DNA targeting complexes • Synthesis of efficient metallointercalators • Excellent DNA exploiting ability of Cu(II) complexes • Efficient antimicrobial agents against various pathogens.

  9. Modulation of the genotoxicity of bleomycin by amines through noncovalent DNA interactions and alteration of physiological conditions in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, George R.; Gessner, Gabrielle S.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Ronan, Matthew V.; Sylvia, Katelyn E.; Willett, Christine J.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of amines on the induction of mitotic gene conversion by bleomycin (BLM) were studied at the trp5 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7. BLM induces double-strand breaks in DNA and is a potent recombinagen in this assay. The polyamine spermidine causes concentration-dependent protection against the genotoxicity of BLM, reducing the convertant frequency by over 90% under the most protective conditions. Spermine, diethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, putrescine, and ethylamine were also antigenotoxic in combined treatments with BLM. There was a general correspondence between the protective effect and the number of amino groups, suggesting that more strongly cationic amines tend to be stronger antirecombinagens. Electrostatic association of the amines with DNA probably hinders BLM access to the 4' position of deoxyribose where it generates a free radical. Other amines interact with BLM differently from these unbranched aliphatic amines. The aminothiol cysteamine inhibits the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but increases it under euoxic conditions. In contrast, pargyline potentiates the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but not under euoxic conditions. The antirecombinagenic effect of cysteamine apparently involves DNA binding and depletion of oxygen needed for BLM activity, whereas its potentiation of BLM entails its serving as an electron source for the activation of BLM. Pargyline may enhance BLM indirectly by preventing the depletion of oxygen by monoamine and polyamine oxidase. The planar 9-aminoacridine weakly induces gene conversion in strain D7, but it is strongly synergistic with BLM. Enhancement of BLM activity by this compound and by the related nitroacridine Entozon is apparently mediated by intercalation of the acridine ring system into DNA. Thus, the influence of amines on the genotoxicity of BLM in yeast encompasses antigenotoxic, potentiating, and synergistic interactions. The underlying mechanisms involve

  10. Modulation of the genotoxicity of bleomycin by amines through noncovalent DNA interactions and alteration of physiological conditions in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, George R. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)], E-mail: ghoffmann@holycross.edu; Gessner, Gabrielle S.; Hughes, Jennifer F.; Ronan, Matthew V.; Sylvia, Katelyn E.; Willett, Christine J. [Department of Biology, College of the Holy Cross, One College Street, Worcester, MA 01610-2395 (United States)

    2007-10-01

    The effects of amines on the induction of mitotic gene conversion by bleomycin (BLM) were studied at the trp5 locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain D7. BLM induces double-strand breaks in DNA and is a potent recombinagen in this assay. The polyamine spermidine causes concentration-dependent protection against the genotoxicity of BLM, reducing the convertant frequency by over 90% under the most protective conditions. Spermine, diethylenetriamine, ethylenediamine, putrescine, and ethylamine were also antigenotoxic in combined treatments with BLM. There was a general correspondence between the protective effect and the number of amino groups, suggesting that more strongly cationic amines tend to be stronger antirecombinagens. Electrostatic association of the amines with DNA probably hinders BLM access to the 4' position of deoxyribose where it generates a free radical. Other amines interact with BLM differently from these unbranched aliphatic amines. The aminothiol cysteamine inhibits the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but increases it under euoxic conditions. In contrast, pargyline potentiates the genotoxicity of BLM under hypoxic conditions but not under euoxic conditions. The antirecombinagenic effect of cysteamine apparently involves DNA binding and depletion of oxygen needed for BLM activity, whereas its potentiation of BLM entails its serving as an electron source for the activation of BLM. Pargyline may enhance BLM indirectly by preventing the depletion of oxygen by monoamine and polyamine oxidase. The planar 9-aminoacridine weakly induces gene conversion in strain D7, but it is strongly synergistic with BLM. Enhancement of BLM activity by this compound and by the related nitroacridine Entozon is apparently mediated by intercalation of the acridine ring system into DNA. Thus, the influence of amines on the genotoxicity of BLM in yeast encompasses antigenotoxic, potentiating, and synergistic interactions. The underlying mechanisms involve

  11. The Mini-Chromosome Maintenance (Mcm) Complexes Interact with DNA Polymerase α-Primase and Stimulate Its Ability to Synthesize RNA Primers

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhiying; De Falco, Mariarosaria; Kamada, Katsuhiko; Pisani, Francesca M.; Masai, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    The Mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm) proteins are essential as central components for the DNA unwinding machinery during eukaryotic DNA replication. DNA primase activity is required at the DNA replication fork to synthesize short RNA primers for DNA chain elongation on the lagging strand. Although direct physical and functional interactions between helicase and primase have been known in many prokaryotic and viral systems, potential interactions between helicase and primase have not been explored in eukaryotes. Using purified Mcm and DNA primase complexes, a direct physical interaction is detected in pull-down assays between the Mcm2∼7 complex and the hetero-dimeric DNA primase composed of the p48 and p58 subunits. The Mcm4/6/7 complex co-sediments with the primase and the DNA polymerase α-primase complex in glycerol gradient centrifugation and forms a Mcm4/6/7-primase-DNA ternary complex in gel-shift assays. Both the Mcm4/6/7 and Mcm2∼7 complexes stimulate RNA primer synthesis by DNA primase in vitro. However, primase inhibits the Mcm4/6/7 helicase activity and this inhibition is abolished by the addition of competitor DNA. In contrast, the ATP hydrolysis activity of Mcm4/6/7 complex is not affected by primase. Mcm and primase proteins mutually stimulate their DNA-binding activities. Our findings indicate that a direct physical interaction between primase and Mcm proteins may facilitate priming reaction by the former protein, suggesting that efficient DNA synthesis through helicase-primase interactions may be conserved in eukaryotic chromosomes. PMID:23977294

  12. The mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm complexes interact with DNA polymerase α-primase and stimulate its ability to synthesize RNA primers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiying You

    Full Text Available The Mini-chromosome maintenance (Mcm proteins are essential as central components for the DNA unwinding machinery during eukaryotic DNA replication. DNA primase activity is required at the DNA replication fork to synthesize short RNA primers for DNA chain elongation on the lagging strand. Although direct physical and functional interactions between helicase and primase have been known in many prokaryotic and viral systems, potential interactions between helicase and primase have not been explored in eukaryotes. Using purified Mcm and DNA primase complexes, a direct physical interaction is detected in pull-down assays between the Mcm2~7 complex and the hetero-dimeric DNA primase composed of the p48 and p58 subunits. The Mcm4/6/7 complex co-sediments with the primase and the DNA polymerase α-primase complex in glycerol gradient centrifugation and forms a Mcm4/6/7-primase-DNA ternary complex in gel-shift assays. Both the Mcm4/6/7 and Mcm2~7 complexes stimulate RNA primer synthesis by DNA primase in vitro. However, primase inhibits the Mcm4/6/7 helicase activity and this inhibition is abolished by the addition of competitor DNA. In contrast, the ATP hydrolysis activity of Mcm4/6/7 complex is not affected by primase. Mcm and primase proteins mutually stimulate their DNA-binding activities. Our findings indicate that a direct physical interaction between primase and Mcm proteins may facilitate priming reaction by the former protein, suggesting that efficient DNA synthesis through helicase-primase interactions may be conserved in eukaryotic chromosomes.

  13. Effect of Temperature on the Intrinsic Flexibility of DNA and Its Interaction with Architectural Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, R.P.C.; Sitter, G.; Moolenaar, G.F.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Goosen, N.; Dame, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    The helical structure of double-stranded DNA is destabilized by increasing temperature. Above a critical temperature (the melting temperature), the two strands in duplex DNA become fully separated. Below this temperature, the structural effects are localized. Using tethered particle motion in a

  14. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    Full Text Available A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  15. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for monitoring the aptamer selection progress. Structural investigations and sequence truncation experiments of the selected aptamer for Protein A led to the conclusion, that a stem-loop structure at its 5'-end including the 5'-primer binding site is essential for aptamer-target binding. Extensive interaction analyses between aptamer and Protein A were performed by methods like surface plasmon resonance, MicroScale Thermophoresis and bead-based binding assays using fluorescence measurements. The binding of the aptamer to its target was thus investigated in assays with immobilization of one of the binding partners each, and with both binding partners in solution. Affinity constants were determined in the low micromolar to submicromolar range, increasing to the nanomolar range under the assumption of avidity. Protein A provides more than one binding site for the aptamer, which may overlap with the known binding sites for immunoglobulins. The aptamer binds specifically to both native and recombinant Protein A, but not to other immunoglobulin-binding proteins like Protein G and L. Cross specificity to other proteins was not found. The application of the aptamer is directed to Protein A detection or affinity purification. Moreover, whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus, presenting Protein A on the cell surface, could also be bound by the aptamer.

  16. Dynamics of Dnmt1 interaction with the replication machinery and its role in postreplicative maintenance of DNA methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermelleh, Lothar; Haemmer, Andrea; Spada, Fabio; Rösing, Nicole; Meilinger, Daniela; Rothbauer, Ulrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    Postreplicative maintenance of genomic methylation patterns was proposed to depend largely on the binding of DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) to PCNA, a core component of the replication machinery. We investigated how the slow and discontinuous DNA methylation could be mechanistically linked with fast and processive DNA replication. Using photobleaching and quantitative live cell imaging we show that Dnmt1 binding to PCNA is highly dynamic. Activity measurements of a PCNA-binding-deficient mutant with an enzyme-trapping assay in living cells showed that this interaction accounts for a 2-fold increase in methylation efficiency. Expression of this mutant in mouse dnmt1−/− embryonic stem (ES) cells restored CpG island methylation. Thus association of Dnmt1 with the replication machinery enhances methylation efficiency, but is not strictly required for maintaining global methylation. The transient nature of this interaction accommodates the different kinetics of DNA replication and methylation while contributing to faithful propagation of epigenetic information. PMID:17576694

  17. Real-Time Study of the Interaction between G-Rich DNA Oligonucleotides and Lead Ion on DNA Tetrahedron-Functionalized Sensing Platform by Dual Polarization Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Lu, Shasha; Zhao, Jiahui; Huang, Jianshe; Yang, Xiurong

    2017-11-29

    G-quadruplex plays roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes of organisms. Due to the unique properties of G-quadruplex (e.g., forming G4/hemin complexes with catalytic activity and electron acceptability, binding with metal ions, proteins, fluorescent ligands, and so on), it has been widely applied in biosensing. But the formation process of G-quadruplex is not yet fully understood. Here, a DNA tetrahedron platform with higher reproducibility, regenerative ability, and time-saving building process was coupled with dual polarization interferometry technique for the real-time and label-free investigation of the specific interaction process of guanine-rich singled-stranded DNA (G-rich ssDNA) and Pb 2+ . The oriented immobilization of probes greatly decreased the spatial hindrance effect and improved the accessibility of the probes to the Pb 2+ ions. Through real-time monitoring of the whole formation process of the G-quadruplex, we speculated that the probes on the tetrahedron platform initially stood on the sensing surface with a random coil conformation, then the G-rich ssDNA preliminarily formed unstable G-quartets by H-bonding and cation binding, subsequently forming a completely folded and stable quadruplex structure through relatively slow strand rearrangements. On the basis of these studies, we also developed a novel sensing platform for the specific and sensitive determination of Pb 2+ and its chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. This study not only provides a proof-of-concept for conformational dynamics of G-quadruplex-related drugs and pathogenes, but also enriches the biosensor tools by combining nanomaterial with interfaces technique.

  18. Cations form sequence selective motifs within DNA grooves via a combination of cation-pi and ion-dipole/hydrogen bond interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mikaela; Dunlap, Tori; Dourlain, Elizabeth; Grant, Bryce; McFail-Isom, Lori

    2013-01-01

    The fine conformational subtleties of DNA structure modulate many fundamental cellular processes including gene activation/repression, cellular division, and DNA repair. Most of these cellular processes rely on the conformational heterogeneity of specific DNA sequences. Factors including those structural characteristics inherent in the particular base sequence as well as those induced through interaction with solvent components combine to produce fine DNA structural variation including helical flexibility and conformation. Cation-pi interactions between solvent cations or their first hydration shell waters and the faces of DNA bases form sequence selectively and contribute to DNA structural heterogeneity. In this paper, we detect and characterize the binding patterns found in cation-pi interactions between solvent cations and DNA bases in a set of high resolution x-ray crystal structures. Specifically, we found that monovalent cations (Tl⁺) and the polarized first hydration shell waters of divalent cations (Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺) form cation-pi interactions with DNA bases stabilizing unstacked conformations. When these cation-pi interactions are combined with electrostatic interactions a pattern of specific binding motifs is formed within the grooves.

  19. Interaction of the retinoblastoma protein with Orc1 and its recruitment to human origins of DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Mendoza-Maldonado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The retinoblastoma protein (Rb is a crucial regulator of cell cycle progression by binding with E2F transcription factor and repressing the expression of a variety of genes required for the G1-S phase transition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Rb and E2F1 directly participate in the control of initiation of DNA replication in human HeLa, U2OS and T98G cells by specifically binding to origins of DNA replication in a cell cycle regulated manner. We show that, both in vitro and inside the cells, the largest subunit of the origin recognition complex (Orc1 specifically binds hypo-phosphorylated Rb and that this interaction is competitive with the binding of Rb to E2F1. The displacement of Rb-bound Orc1 by E2F1 at origins of DNA replication marks the progression of the G1 phase of the cell cycle toward the G1-S border. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The participation of Rb and E2F1 in the formation of the multiprotein complex that binds origins of DNA replication in mammalian cells appears to represent an effective mechanism to couple the expression of genes required for cell cycle progression to the activation of DNA replication.

  20. Baculovirus proteins IE-1, LEF-3, and P143 interact with DNA in vivo: a formaldehyde cross-linking study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Emma; Sahri, Daniela; Knippers, Rolf; Carstens, Eric B.

    2004-01-01

    IE-1, LEF-3, and P143 are three of six proteins encoded by Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) essential for baculovirus DNA replication in transient replication assays. IE-1 is the major baculovirus immediate early transcription regulator. LEF-3 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) and P143 is a DNA helicase protein. To investigate their interactions in vivo, we treated AcMNPV-infected Spodoptera frugiperda cells with formaldehyde and separated soluble proteins from chromatin by cell fractionation and cesium chloride equilibrium centrifugation. Up to 70% of the total LEF-3 appeared in the fraction of soluble, probably nucleoplasmic proteins, while almost all P143 and IE-1 were associated with viral chromatin in the nucleus. This suggests that LEF-3 is produced in quantities that are higher than needed for the coverage of single stranded regions that arise during viral DNA replication and is consistent with the hypothesis that LEF-3 has other functions such as the localization of P143 to the nucleus. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation procedure, we present the first direct evidence of LEF-3, P143, and IE-1 proteins binding to closely linked sites on viral chromatin in vivo, suggesting that they may form replication complexes on viral DNA in infected cells

  1. Analysis of DNA binding by human factor xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) provides insight into its interactions with nucleotide excision repair substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Norie; Voehler, Markus W; Roh, Michelle S; Topolska-Woś, Agnieszka M; Chazin, Walter J

    2017-10-13

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A (XPA) is an essential scaffolding protein in the multiprotein nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The interaction of XPA with DNA is a core function of this protein; a number of mutations in the DNA-binding domain (DBD) are associated with XP disease. Although structures of the central globular domain of human XPA and data on binding of DNA substrates have been reported, the structural basis for XPA's DNA-binding activity remains unknown. X-ray crystal structures of the central globular domain of yeast XPA (Rad14) with lesion-containing DNA duplexes have provided valuable insights, but the DNA substrates used for this study do not correspond to the substrates of XPA as it functions within the NER machinery. To better understand the DNA-binding activity of human XPA in NER, we used NMR to investigate the interaction of its DBD with a range of DNA substrates. We found that XPA binds different single-stranded/double-stranded junction DNA substrates with a common surface. Comparisons of our NMR-based mapping of binding residues with the previously reported Rad14-DNA crystal structures revealed similarities and differences in substrate binding between XPA and Rad14. This includes direct evidence for DNA contacts to the residues extending C-terminally from the globular core, which are lacking in the Rad14 construct. Moreover, mutation of the XPA residue corresponding to Phe-262 in Rad14, previously reported as being critical for DNA binding, had only a moderate effect on the DNA-binding activity of XPA. The DNA-binding properties of several disease-associated mutations in the DBD were investigated. These results suggest that for XPA mutants exhibiting altered DNA-binding properties, a correlation exists between the extent of reduction in DNA-binding affinity and the severity of symptoms in XP patients. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Patricia A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  3. Copper(II Complexes Based on Aminohydroxamic Acids: Synthesis, Structures, In Vitro Cytotoxicities and DNA/BSA Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Four complexes, [Cu2(glyha(bpy2(H2O]·2ClO4·H2O (1, [Cu2(glyha(phen2]·2ClO4 (2, [Cu2(alaha(bpy2Cl]·Cl·4H2O (3, and [{Cu2(alaha(phen2}{Cu2(alaha(phen2(NO3}]·3NO3 (4 (glyha2− = dianion glycinehydroxamic acid, alaha2− = dianion alaninehydroxamic acid, bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline have been successfully synthesized and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction. The interactions of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were studied through UV spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism. The results revealed that complexes 1–4 could interact with CT-DNA through intercalation. Interactions of all complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA were confirmed by the docking study to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA in a static quenching process. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxic effect of the complexes was also examined on four tumor cell lines, including human lung carcinoma cell line (A549, human colon carcinoma cell line (HCT-116, human promyelocytic leukemia cell (HL-60 and cervical cancer cell line (HeLa. All complexes exhibited different antitumor activities.

  4. Generalized theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a generalized theoretical framework on the binding of transcription factor proteins (TFs) with specific sites on DNA that takes into account the interplay of various factors regarding overall electrostatic potential at the DNA-protein interface, occurrence of kinetic traps along the DNA sequence, presence of other roadblock protein molecules along DNA and crowded environment, conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of TFs, and the conformational state of the DNA. Starting from a Smolochowski type theoretical framework on site-specific binding of TFs we logically build our model by adding the effects of these factors one by one. Our generalized two-step model suggests that the electrostatic attractive forces present inbetween the positively charged DBDs of TFs and the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA, along with the counteracting shielding effects of solvent ions, is the core factor that creates a fluidic type environment at the DNA-protein interface. This in turn facilitates various one-dimensional diffusion (1Dd) processes such as sliding, hopping and intersegmental transfers. These facilitating processes as well as flipping dynamics of conformational states of DBDs of TFs between stationary and mobile states can enhance the 1Dd coefficient on a par with three-dimensional diffusion (3Dd). The random coil conformation of DNA also plays critical roles in enhancing the site-specific association rate. The extent of enhancement over the 3Dd controlled rate seems to be directly proportional to the maximum possible 1Dd length. We show that the overall site-specific binding rate scales with the length of DNA in an asymptotic way. For relaxed DNA, the specific binding rate will be independent of the length of DNA as length increases towards infinity. For condensed DNA as in in vivo conditions, the specific binding rate depends on the length of DNA in a turnover way with a maximum. This maximum rate seems to scale with the

  5. Lamin A/C-dependent interaction with 53BP1 promotes cellular responses to DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Markiewicz, Ewa; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Lamins A/C have been implicated in DNA damage response pathways. We show that the DNA repair protein 53BP1 is a lamin A/C binding protein. In undamaged human dermal fibroblasts (HDF), 53BP1 is a nucleoskeleton protein. 53BP1 binds to lamins A/C via its Tudor domain, and this is abrogated by DNA...... damage. Lamins A/C regulate 53BP1 levels and consequently lamin A/C-null HDF display a 53BP1 null-like phenotype. Our data favour a model in which lamins A/C maintain a nucleoplasmic pool of 53BP1 in order to facilitate its rapid recruitment to sites of DNA damage and could explain why an absence...

  6. Antimalarial, antimicrobial, cytotoxic, DNA interaction and SOD like activities of tetrahedral copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Jugal V.; Gajera, Sanjay B.; Patel, Mohan N.

    2015-02-01

    The mononuclear copper(II) complexes with P, O-donor ligand and different fluoroquinolones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electronic spectra, TGA, EPR, FT-IR and LC-MS spectroscopy. An antimicrobial efficiency of the complexes has been tested against five different microorganisms in terms of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and displays very good antimicrobial activity. The binding strength and binding mode of the complexes with Herring Sperm DNA (HS DNA) have been investigated by absorption titration and viscosity measurement studies. The studies suggest the classical intercalative mode of DNA binding. Gel electrophoresis assay determines the ability of the complexes to cleave the supercoiled form of pUC19 DNA. Synthesized complexes have been tested for their SOD mimic activity using nonenzymatic NBT/NADH/PMS system and found to have good antioxidant activity. All the complexes show good cytotoxic and in vitro antimalarial activities.

  7. Extracellular DNA and lipoteichoic acids interact with exopolysaccharides in the extracellular matrix of Streptococcus mutans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Pedraza, Midian C.; Novais, Tatiana F.; Faustoferri, Roberta C.; Quivey, Robert G.; Terekhov, Anton; Hamaker, Bruce R.; Klein, Marlise I.

    2018-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans -derived exopolysaccharides are virulence determinants in the matrix of biofilms that cause caries. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) are found in cariogenic biofilms, but their functions are unclear. Therefore, strains of S. mutans carrying single deletions that would modulate matrix components were used: eDNA – ΔlytS and ΔlytT; LTA – ΔdltA and ΔdltD; and insoluble exopolysaccharide – ΔgtfB. Single-species (parental strain S. mutans UA159 or individual mutant strains) and mixed-species (UA159 or mutant strain, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii) biofilms were evaluated. Distinct amounts of matrix components were detected, depending on the inactivated gene. eDNA was found to be cooperative with exopolysaccharide in early phases, while LTA played a larger role in the later phases of biofilm development. The architecture of mutant strains biofilms was distinct (vs UA159), demonstrating that eDNA and LTA influence exopolysaccharide distribution and microcolony organization. Thus, eDNA and LTA may shape exopolysaccharide structure, affecting strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilms. PMID:28946780

  8. Extracellular DNA and lipoteichoic acids interact with exopolysaccharides in the extracellular matrix of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Pedraza, Midian C; Novais, Tatiana F; Faustoferri, Roberta C; Quivey, Robert G; Terekhov, Anton; Hamaker, Bruce R; Klein, Marlise I

    2017-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans-derived exopolysaccharides are virulence determinants in the matrix of biofilms that cause caries. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) are found in cariogenic biofilms, but their functions are unclear. Therefore, strains of S. mutans carrying single deletions that would modulate matrix components were used: eDNA - ∆lytS and ∆lytT; LTA - ∆dltA and ∆dltD; and insoluble exopolysaccharide - ΔgtfB. Single-species (parental strain S. mutans UA159 or individual mutant strains) and mixed-species (UA159 or mutant strain, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus gordonii) biofilms were evaluated. Distinct amounts of matrix components were detected, depending on the inactivated gene. eDNA was found to be cooperative with exopolysaccharide in early phases, while LTA played a larger role in the later phases of biofilm development. The architecture of mutant strains biofilms was distinct (vs UA159), demonstrating that eDNA and LTA influence exopolysaccharide distribution and microcolony organization. Thus, eDNA and LTA may shape exopolysaccharide structure, affecting strategies for controlling pathogenic biofilms.

  9. Studies of interaction between histone F2b and DNA from normal and exposed to X-radiation calf lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartkowiak, J.; Gaczynski, M.

    1978-01-01

    Affinity chromatography has been used to compare the specificity of interaction between DNA and histone F2b. Histone-sepharose gels were prepared by binding the F2b protein to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B (Pharmacia, Sweden). DNA was applied to columns formed from the gels, and a linear gradient of concentration of NaCl used for elution. Absorption at 260 nm, and derivative melting points were measured for those samples of effluent containing DNA. The results indicated that the fractionation of DNA was not conditioned only by the composition of the DNA bases. There were significant differences in the interaction with DNA of gels prepared from histone F2b molecules from X-irradiated and normal lymph nodes. It is concluded that histone F2b remaining in lymph nodes after irradiation had properties which differed from protein in normal tissue. (U.K.)

  10. A novel microfluidic mixer based on dual-hydrodynamic focusing for interrogating the kinetics of DNA-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Xu, Fei; Liu, Chao; Xu, Youzhi; Feng, Xiaojun; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2013-08-21

    Kinetic measurement of biomacromolecular interaction plays a significant role in revealing the underlying mechanisms of cellular activities. Due to the small diffusion coefficient of biomacromolecules, it is difficult to resolve the rapid kinetic process with traditional analytical methods such as stopped-flow or laminar mixers. Here, we demonstrated a unique continuous-flow laminar mixer based on microfluidic dual-hydrodynamic focusing to characterize the kinetics of DNA-protein interactions. The time window of this mixer for kinetics observation could cover from sub-milliseconds to seconds, which made it possible to capture the folding process with a wide dynamic range. Moreover, the sample consumption was remarkably reduced to <0.55 μL min⁻¹, over 1000-fold saving in comparison to those reported previously. We further interrogated the interaction kinetics of G-quadruplex and the single-stranded DNA binding protein, indicating that this novel micromixer would be a useful approach for analyzing the interaction kinetics of biomacromolecules.

  11. Blind trials of computer-assisted structure elucidation software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moser Arvin

    2012-02-01

    heteroatoms and poor quality spectral data. Conclusion When applied to a complex set of blind trials, ACD/Structure Elucidator was shown to be a very useful tool in advancing the computer's contribution to elucidating a candidate structure from a set of spectral data (NMR and MS for an unknown. The synergistic interaction between humans and computers can be highly beneficial in terms of less biased approaches to elucidation as well as dramatic improvements in speed and throughput. In those cases where multiple candidate structures exist, ACD/Structure Elucidator is equipped to validate the correct structure and eliminate inconsistent candidates. Full elucidation can generally be performed in less than two hours; this includes the average spectral data processing time and data input.

  12. Analysis of capsid portal protein and terminase functional domains: interaction sites required for DNA packaging in bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H; Rao, V B; Black, L W

    1999-06-04

    Bacteriophage DNA packaging results from an ATP-driven translocation of concatemeric DNA into the prohead by the phage terminase complexed with the portal vertex dodecamer of the prohead. Functional domains of the bacteriophage T4 terminase and portal gene 20 product (gp20) were determined by mutant analysis and sequence localization within the structural genes. Interaction regions of the portal vertex and large terminase subunit (gp17) were determined by genetic (terminase-portal intergenic suppressor mutations), biochemical (column retention of gp17 and inhibition of in vitro DNA packaging by gp20 peptides), and immunological (co-immunoprecipitation of polymerized gp20 peptide and gp17) studies. The specificity of the interaction was tested by means of a phage T4 HOC (highly antigenicoutercapsid protein) display system in which wild-type, cs20, and scrambled portal peptide sequences were displayed on the HOC protein of phage T4. Binding affinities of these recombinant phages as determined by the retention of these phages by a His-tag immobilized gp17 column, and by co-immunoprecipitation with purified terminase supported the specific nature of the portal protein and terminase interaction sites. In further support of specificity, a gp20 peptide corresponding to a portion of the identified site inhibited packaging whereas the scrambled sequence peptide did not block DNA packaging in vitro. The portal interaction site is localized to 28 residues in the central portion of the linear sequence of gp20 (524 residues). As judged by two pairs of intergenic portal-terminase suppressor mutations, two separate regions of the terminase large subunit gp17 (central and COOH-terminal) interact through hydrophobic contacts at the portal site. Although the terminase apparently interacts with this gp20 portal peptide, polyclonal antibody against the portal peptide appears unable to access it in the native structure, suggesting intimate association of gp20 and gp17 possibly

  13. DMS-Seq for In Vivo Genome-wide Mapping of Protein-DNA Interactions and Nucleosome Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeyama, Taichi; Ito, Takashi

    2017-10-03

    Protein-DNA interactions provide the basis for chromatin structure and gene regulation. Comprehensive identification of protein-occupied sites is thus vital to an in-depth understanding of genome function. Dimethyl sulfate (DMS) is a chemical probe that has long been used to detect footprints of DNA-bound proteins in vitro and in vivo. Here, we describe a genomic footprinting method, dimethyl sulfate sequencing (DMS-seq), which exploits the cell-permeable nature of DMS to obviate the need for nuclear isolation. This feature makes DMS-seq simple in practice and removes the potential risk of protein re-localization during nuclear isolation. DMS-seq successfully detects transcription factors bound to cis-regulatory elements and non-canonical chromatin particles in nucleosome-free regions. Furthermore, an unexpected preference of DMS confers on DMS-seq a unique potential to directly detect nucleosome centers without using genetic manipulation. We expect that DMS-seq will serve as a characteristic method for genome-wide interrogation of in vivo protein-DNA interactions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Separation and Characterization of DNA Molecules and Intermolecular Interactions in Pressure-Driven Micro Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Sarah; Wang, Tza-Huei

    Pressure-driven flow in micron-sized diameter capillaries can be used to separate DNA molecules by size in a technique called Free Solution Hydrodynamic Separation. By coupling this technique with Cylindrical Illumination Confocal Spectroscopy, we have developed a highly sensitive and quantitative platform capable of separating DNA molecules by length over a large dynamic range (25 bp to 48 kbp) in a single run using only picoliters or femtograms of a DNA sample. The optical detection volume completely spans the capillary cross section, enabling highly efficient single molecule detection for enhanced sensitivity and quantification accuracy via single molecule counting. Because each DNA molecule generates its own fluorescent burst, these burst profiles can be further analyzed to individually characterize each DNA molecule's shape as it passes through the detection region. We exploit these burst profiles to visualize fluctuations in conformation under shear flow in microcapillaries, and utilizing combined mobility shift analysis, explore the complex relationship between molecular properties including length and conformation, hydrodynamic mobility, solution conditions including ion species and concentrations, and separation conditions including flow rate and capillary diameter.

  15. Anthraquinone-chalcone hybrids: synthesis, preliminary antiproliferative evaluation and DNA-interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Violeta; Debeljak, Nevena; Stanojković, Tatjana; Kolundžija, Branka; Sladić, Dušan; Vujčić, Miroslava; Janović, Barbara; Tanić, Nikola; Perović, Milka; Tešić, Vesna; Antić, Jadranka; Joksović, Milan D

    2015-01-07

    Novel anthraquinone based chalcone compounds were synthesized starting from 1-acetylanthraquinone in a Claisen-Schmidt reaction and evaluated for their anticancer potential against three human cancer cell lines. Compounds 4a, 4b and 4j showed promising activity in inhibition of HeLa cells with IC50 values ranging from 2.36 to 2.73 μM and low cytotoxicity against healthy MRC-5 cell lines. The effects that compounds produces on the cell cycle were investigated by flow cytometry. It was found that 4a, 4b and 4j cause the accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases in a dose-dependent manner and induce caspase-dependent apoptosis. All of three compounds exhibit calf thymus DNA-binding activity. The determined binding constants by absorption titrations (2.65 × 10(3) M(-1), 1.36 × 10(3) M(-1)and 2.51 × 10(3) M(-1) of 4a/CT-DNA, 4b/CT-DNA and 4j/CT-DNA, respectively) together with fluorescence displacement analysis designate 4a, 4b and 4j as strong minor groove binders, but no cleavage of plasmid DNA was observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear Lipid Microdomain as Place of Interaction between Sphingomyelin and DNA during Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuela Cataldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear sphingomyelin is a key molecule for cell proliferation. This molecule is organized with cholesterol and proteins to form specific lipid microdomains bound to the inner nuclear membrane where RNA is synthesized. Here, we have reported the ability of the sphingomyelin present in the nuclear microdomain to bind DNA and regulate its synthesis, and to highlight its role in cell proliferation induced by partial hepatectomy. During G1/S transition of the cell cycle, sphingomyelin and DNA content is very high and it is strongly reduced after exogenous sphingomyelinase treatment. During the S-phase of the cell cycle, the stimulation of sphingomyelinase and inhibition of sphingomyelin–synthase are accompanied by the DNA synthesis start. To assess the specificity of the results, experiments were repeated with trifluoperazine, a drug known to affect the synthesis of lipids and DNA and to stimulate sphingomyelinase activity. The activity of sphingomyelinase is stimulated in the first hour after hepatectomy and sphingomyelin–DNA synthesis is strongly attenuated. It may be hypothesized that the nuclear microdomain represents a specific area of the inner nuclear membrane that acts as an active site of chromatin anchorage thanks to the stabilizing action of sphingomyelin. Thus, sphingomyelin metabolism in nuclear lipid microdomains is suggested to regulate cell proliferation.

  17. Mechanisms of interaction of radiation with matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geacintov, N.E.; Pope, M.

    1992-01-01

    This project is concerned with studies of biological activity-structure relationships in which the mechanisms of interaction of ionizing radiation and benzopyrene (PB) compounds with DNA are being investigated and compared. Emphasis is focused on effects of DNA conformation on its mechanisms of interaction with ionizing radiation, on the influence of structure and stereochemistry of BP metabolites on mechanisms of DNA damage, and on influence of DNA conformation on interactions between BP metabolites and DNA molecules, and the structures of the complexes and adducts which are formed. One basic theme of this project is the use of photoexcited states of BP and nucleic acids as probes of these interactions. In part I of this report, recent progress on elucidating the structures of selected BP-oligonucleotide model adducts by high resolution NMR and gel electrophoresis techniques is summarized. It is shown that the stereochemical properties of benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide-DNA adducts play a crucial role in determining their interactions with certain exonucleases. These results provide useful models for deriving a better understanding of differences biological activities of BP compounds and the relationships between mutagenicities and the structure properties of BP-DNA adducts. In Part II of this report, a new time-resolved method based on picosecond laser pulse techniques for elucidating the electronic levels involved in electron photoemission and electron transfer in BP and nucleic acid solids is described

  18. Interaction of acridine-calix[4]arene with DNA at the electrified liquid liquid interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivlehan, Francine; Lefoix, Myriam; Moynihan, Humphrey A.; Thompson, Damien; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I.; Herzog, Gregoire; Arrigan, Damien W.M.

    2010-01-01

    The behaviour of an acridine-functionalised calix[4]arene at the interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (ITIES) is reported. Molecular modelling showed that the acridine-calix[4]arene has regions of significant net positive charge spread throughout the protonated acridine moieties, consistent with it being able to function as an anion ionophore. The presence of this compound in the organic phase facilitated the transfer of aqueous phase electrolyte ions. Upon addition of double stranded DNA to the aqueous phase, the transfer of electrolyte anions was diminished, due to DNA binding to the acridine moiety at the ITIES. The behaviour provides a basis for DNA hybridization detection using electrochemistry at the ITIES.

  19. Interaction of dinuclear cadmium(II) 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde complexes with calf-thymus DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristovic, Maja Sumar [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Faculty of Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studenski Trg 12-16, Belgrade (Serbia); Zianna, Ariadni; Psomas, George; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G. [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Coutouli-Argyropoulou, Evdoxia [Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Lalia-Kantouri, Maria, E-mail: lalia@chem.auth.gr [Department of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2016-04-01

    Five dinuclear Cd(II) complexes with the anion of 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde (5-Cl-saloH) were synthesized in the absence or presence of the α-diimines: 2,2′-bipyridine (bipy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen), 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (neoc) or 2,2′-dipyridylamine (dpamH) and characterized as [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(CH{sub 3}OH)]{sub 2} (1), [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(bipy)]{sub 2} (2), [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(phen)]{sub 2} (3), [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(neoc)(ONO{sub 2})]{sub 2} (4) and [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(dpamΗ)(ONO{sub 2})]{sub 2} (5). The complexes were characterized by spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV‐vis, {sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C–NMR), elemental analysis and molar conductivity measurements. The structures of four complexes (1–3 and 5) were determined by X-ray crystallography, providing all three possible coordination modes of the ligand 5-Cl-salicylaldehyde, i.e. bidentate or tridentate chelating and/or bridging mode. The complexes bind to calf-thymus (CT) DNA mainly by intercalation, as concluded by the viscosity measurements and present relatively high DNA-binding constants. The complexes exhibit significant ability to displace ethidium bromide (EB) from the EB-DNA complex, thus indirectly proving the intercalation as the most possible binding mode to CT DNA. - Graphical abstract: Cadmium complexes of the formulae [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(CH{sub 3}OH)]{sub 2} and [Cd(5-Cl-salo){sub 2}(α-diimine)]{sub 2} or [Cd(5-Cl-salo)(α-diimine)(ONO{sub 2})]{sub 2} have been synthesized and characterized. The complexes bind tightly to CT DNA probably by intercalation competing with ethidium bromide for the intercalation site of DNA. - Highlights: • Synthesis of a series of dinuclear Cd complexes • The complexes characterized by diverse techniques. • The crystal structures of four complexes have been determined. • Intercalation is the most possible binding mode of the complexes to DNA. • The complexes compete with ethidium bromide for the DNA-intercalating sites.

  20. Thermodynamic study of rhodamine 123-calf thymus DNA interaction: determination of calorimetric enthalpy by optical melting study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masum, Abdulla Al; Chakraborty, Maharudra; Pandya, Prateek; Halder, Umesh Chandra; Islam, Md Maidul; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2014-11-20

    In this paper, the interaction of rhodamine123 (R123) with calf thymus DNA has been studied using molecular modeling and other biophysical methods like UV-vis spectroscopy, fluoremetry, optical melting, isothermal titration calorimetry, and circular dichroic studies. Results showed that the binding energy is about -6 to -8 kcal/mol, and the binding process is favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. A new method to determine different thermodynamic properties like calorimetric enthalpy and heat capacity change has been introduced in this paper. The obtained data has been crossed-checked by other methods. After dissecting the free-energy contribution, it was observed that the binding was favored by both negative hydrophobic free energy and negative molecular free energy which compensated for the positive free energies due to the conformational change loss of rotational and transitional freedom of the DNA helix.

  1. Electrochemical study of the interaction between dsDNA and copper(I) using carbon paste and hanging mercury drop electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Z; Girousi, S

    2008-06-30

    The interaction of copper(I) with double-stranded (ds) calf thymus DNA was studied in solution and at the electrode surface by means of transfer voltammetry using a carbon paste electrode (CPE) as working electrode in 0.2 M acetate buffer solution (pH 5.0). As a result of the interaction of Cu(I) between the base pairs of the dsDNA, the characteristic peaks of dsDNA, due to the oxidation of guanine and adenine, increased and after a certain concentration of Cu(I) a new peak at +1.37 V appeared, probably due to the formation of a purine-Cu(I) complex (dsDNA-Cu(I) complex). Accordingly, the interaction of copper(I) with calf thymus dsDNA was studied in solution as well as at the electrode surface using hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) by means of alternating current voltammetry (AC voltammetry) in 0.3 M NaCl and 50 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 8.5) as supporting electrolyte. Its interaction with DNA is shown to be time dependent. Significant changes in the characteristic peaks of dsDNA were observed after addition of higher concentration of Cu(I) to a solution containing dsDNA, as a result of the interaction between Cu(I) and dsDNA. All the experimental results indicate that Cu(I) can bind to DNA by electrostatic binding and form an association complex.

  2. Small molecule inhibitors uncover synthetic genetic interactions of human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 with DNA damage response genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Ward

    Full Text Available Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1 is a structure selective endonuclease required for proficient DNA replication and the repair of DNA damage. Cellularly active inhibitors of this enzyme have previously been shown to induce a DNA damage response and, ultimately, cell death. High-throughput screens of human cancer cell-lines identify colorectal and gastric cell-lines with microsatellite instability (MSI as enriched for cellular sensitivity to N-hydroxyurea series inhibitors of FEN1, but not the PARP inhibitor olaparib or other inhibitors of the DNA damage response. This sensitivity is due to a synthetic lethal interaction between FEN1 and MRE11A, which is often mutated in MSI cancers through instabilities at a poly(T microsatellite repeat. Disruption of ATM is similarly synthetic lethal with FEN1 inhibition, suggesting that disruption of FEN1 function leads to the accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks. These are likely a result of the accumulation of aberrant replication forks, that accumulate as a consequence of a failure in Okazaki fragment maturation, as inhibition of FEN1 is toxic in cells disrupted for the Fanconi anemia pathway and post-replication repair. Furthermore, RAD51 foci accumulate as a consequence of FEN1 inhibition and the toxicity of FEN1 inhibitors increases in cells disrupted for the homologous recombination pathway, suggesting a role for homologous recombination in the resolution of damage induced by FEN1 inhibition. Finally, FEN1 appears to be required for the repair of damage induced by olaparib and cisplatin within the Fanconi anemia pathway, and may play a role in the repair of damage associated with its own disruption.

  3. Attenuation of radiation-induced DNA damage due to paracrine interactions between normal human epithelial and stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, V.A.; Nakazawa, Yu.; Rogounovitch, T.I.; Suzuki, K.; Mitsutake, N.; Matsuse, M.; Yamashita, S.

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Developmentally, every tissue accommodates different types of cells, such as epitheliocytes and stromal cells in parenchymal organs. To better understand the complexity of radiation response, it is necessary to evaluate possible cross-talk between different tissue components. This work was set out to investigate reciprocal influence of normal human epithelial cells and fibroblasts on the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage. Methods: Model cultures of primary human thyrocytes (PT), normal diploid fibroblasts (BJ), PT/BJ cell co-culture and conditioned medium transfer were used to examine DNA damage in terms of γ-H2AX foci number per cell or by Comet assay after exposure to different doses of γ-rays. Results: In co-cultures, the kinetics of γ-H2AX foci number change was dose-dependent and similar to that in individual PT and BJ cultures. The number of γ-H2AX foci in co-cultures was significantly lower (∼25%) in both types of cells comparing to individual cultures. Reciprocal conditioned medium transfer to individual counterpart cells prior to irradiation resulted in approximately 35% reduction in the number γ-H2AX foci at 1 Gy and lower doses in both PT and BJ demonstrating the role of paracrine soluble factors. Comet assay corroborated the results of γ-H2AX foci counting in conditioned medium transfer experiments. In contrast to medium conditioned on PT cells, conditioned medium collected from several human thyroid cancer cell lines failed to establish DNA-protected state in BJ fibroblasts. In its turn, medium conditioned on BJ cells did not change the extent of radiation-induced DNA damage in cancer cell lines tested. Conclusion: The results imply the existence of a network of soluble factor-mediated paracrine interactions between normal epithelial and stromal cells that could be a part of natural mechanism by which cells protect DNA from genotoxic stress.

  4. Synthetic models related to DNA-intercalating molecules. Interactions between 8-alkoxypsoralen and adenine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decout, J.L.; Lhomme, J.

    1983-01-01

    To investigate the interactions and the photoreactions between furocoumarins and adenine, compounds in which a psoralen molecule is linked by different polymethylene bridges have been synthesised. Ring-ring intramolecular interactions are observed by UV spectroscopy. Thermodynamic parameters of these hydrophobic interactions are determined by the study of the variation of the hypochromic effect with temperature. (author)

  5. Elucidation of Molecular Pathogenic Mechanisms of Norrie Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Luhmann, Ulrich F.O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Norrie disease (ND) is a rare X-linked recessive congenital blindness, sometimes associated with deafness and mental retardation. In this thesis the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of this syndrome should be elucidated using the Ndph knockout mouse model. Gene expression studies but also histology and protein biochemistry were used to characterize the affected organs, eye and brain. Gene expression analyses of eyes at p21 using cDNA subtrac...

  6. The Development of Protein Microarrays and Their Applications in DNA-Protein and Protein-Protein Interaction Analyses of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; He, Kun; Covington, Mike; Dinesh-Kumar, S. P.; Snyder, Michael; Harmer, Stacey L.; Zhu, Yu-Xian; Deng, Xing Wang

    2009-01-01

    We used our collection of Arabidopsis transcription factor (TF) ORFeome clones to construct protein microarrays containing as many as 802 TF proteins. These protein microarrays were used for both protein-DNA and protein-protein interaction analyses. For protein-DNA interaction studies, we examined AP2/ERF family TFs and their cognate cis-elements. By careful comparison of the DNA-binding specificity of 13 TFs on the protein microarray with previous non-microarray data, we showed that protein microarrays provide an efficient and high throughput tool for genome-wide analysis of TF-DNA interactions. This microarray protein-DNA interaction analysis allowed us to derive a comprehensive view of DNA-binding profiles of AP2/ERF family proteins in Arabidopsis. It also revealed four TFs that bound the EE (evening element) and had the expected phased gene expression under clock-regulation, thus providing a basis for further functional analysis of their roles in clock regulation of gene expression. We also developed procedures for detecting protein interactions using this TF protein microarray and discovered four novel partners that interact with HY5, which can be validated by yeast two-hybrid assays. Thus, plant TF protein microarrays offer an attractive high-throughput alternative to traditional techniques for TF functional characterization on a global scale. PMID:19802365

  7. Four-tiered π interaction at the dimeric interface of HIV-1 integrase critical for DNA integration and viral infectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q.; Hombrouck, Anneleen; Dayam, Raveendra; Debyser, Zeger; Neamati, Nouri

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme for viral infection. Here, we report an extensive π electron orbital interaction between four amino acids, W132, M178, F181 and F185, located at the dimeric interface of IN that is critical for the strand transfer activity alone. Catalysis of nine different mutant IN proteins at these positions were evaluated. Whereas the 3'-processing activity is predominantly strong, the strand transfer activity of each enzyme was completely dependent on an intact π electron orbital interaction at the dimeric interface. Four representative IN mutants were constructed in the context of the infectious NL4.3 HIV-1 viral clone. Whereas viruses with an intact π electron orbital interaction at the IN dimeric interface replicated comparable to wild type, viruses containing an abolished π interaction were non-infectious. Q-PCR analysis of viral DNA forms during viral replication revealed pleiotropic effects of most mutations. We hypothesize that the π interaction is a critical contact point for the assembly of functional IN multimeric complexes, and that IN multimerization is required for a functional pre-integration complex. The rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting the disruption of this π-π interaction should lead to powerful anti-retroviral drugs

  8. Scanning Probe Optical Tweezers: a new tool to study DNA-protein interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisstede, J.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    The main goal of the work described in this thesis is to construct a microscope in which OT and scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are combined, to be able to localize proteins while simultaneously controlling the tension within the DNA molecule. This apparatus enables the study of the effect of

  9. Effect of hydrophobic interactions on properties and stability of DNA-polyelectrolyte complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Filippov, Sergey K.; Koňák, Čestmír; Kopečková, P.; Starovoytova, Larisa; Špírková, Milena; Štěpánek, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 7 (2010), s. 4999-5006 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/2078 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 512087 - GIANT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : DNA * polyplex * cholesterol Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.269, year: 2010

  10. ChIP-exo interrogation of Crp, DNA, and RNAP holoenzyme interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Latif, Haythem; Federowicz, Stephen; Ebrahim, Ali

    2018-01-01

    Numerous in vitro studies have yielded a refined picture of the structural and molecular associations between Cyclic-AMP receptor protein (Crp), the DNA motif, and RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme. In this study, high-resolution ChIP-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) was applied to study Crp binding in vivo...

  11. A Qualitative and Quantitative Assay to Study DNA/Drug Interaction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To explore the use of restriction inhibition assay (RIA) to study the binding specificity of some anticancer drugs. Methods: A 448 bp DNA fragment derived from pBCKS+ plasmid (harboring the polylinker region with multiple restriction endonuclease sites) was used as a template for sequence selective inhibition of ...

  12. Spectroscopic studies on the interactions of 5-ethyl-6-phenyl-3,8-bis((3-aminoalkyl)propanamido)phenanthridin-5-ium derivatives with G-quadruplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçın, Ergin; Duyar, Halil; Ihmels, Heiko; Seferoğlu, Zeynel

    2018-05-01

    An improved microwave-induced synthesis of five ethidium derivatives (Ethidium derivatives, 2a-d) is presented. As the derivatives 2a-d have been proposed previously to be telomerase inhibitors, the binding interactions of these ethidium derivatives with G-quadruplex DNA were evaluated by means of photometric and fluorimetric titration, thermal DNA denaturation, CD and 1H NMR spectroscopy. In particular, the compound bearing 3,8-bis(pyrrolidin-1-yl)propanamido substituent 2a exhibits high selectivity for G-quadruplex DNA relative to duplex DNA.

  13. Raman spectroscopy of DNA-metal complexes. I. Interactions and conformational effects of the divalent cations: Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Pd, and Cd

    OpenAIRE

    Duguid, J.; Bloomfield, V.A.; Benevides, J.; Thomas Jr, G.J.

    1993-01-01

    Interactions of divalent metal cations (Mg2+, Ca2+, Ba2+, Sr2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Pd2+, and Cd2+) with DNA have been investigated by laser Raman spectroscopy. Both genomic calf-thymus DNA (> 23 kilobase pairs) and mononucleosomal fragments (160 base pairs) were employed as targets of metal interaction in solutions containing 5 weight-% DNA and metal:phosphate molar ratios of 0.6:1. Raman difference spectra reveal that transition metal cations (Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Pd2+, and Cd2+) ind...

  14. Spectroscopic and molecular modeling study on the interaction of ctDNA with 3′-deoxy-3′-azido doxorubicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, Shaoguang; Cui, Yanrui; Liu, Qingfeng; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng; Chi, Yanwei; Peng, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The method of synthesizing 3′-deoxy-3′-azido doxorubicin (ADOX) directly from doxorubicin has been developed. This study presents the interaction between ADOX and calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ctDNA) by using spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling techniques. Iodide quenching, fluorescence polarization, viscosity and molecular modeling studies of ADOX–ctDNA interactions indicated that ADOX was an intercalator of ctDNA and preferentially bound to C–G rich regions of ctDNA. Simultaneously, spectroscopic results indicated that the quenching mechanism of ADOX–ctDNA was a static quenching. According to thermodynamic parameters, electrostatic force played roles in the interaction of ADOX with ctDNA. -- Highlights: ●An approach to 3′-deoxy-3′-azido doxorubicin (ADOX) from doxorubicin was developed. ●The quenching mechanism of ADOX with ctDNA was a static quenching type. ●The binding mode between ADOX and ctDNA was intercalative binding. ●The results of molecular docking corroborated results of spectra investigations

  15. The disordered C-terminal domain of human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 contributes to its stability via intramolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Muralidhar L; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hegde, Pavana M; Holthauzen, Luis Marcelo F; Li, Jing; Oezguen, Numan; Hilser, Vincent J; Tainer, John A; Mitra, Sankar

    2013-07-10

    NEIL1 [Nei (endonuclease VIII)-like protein 1], one of the five mammalian DNA glycosylases that excise oxidized DNA base lesions in the human genome to initiate base excision repair, contains an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain (CTD; ~100 residues), not conserved in its Escherichia coli prototype Nei. Although dispensable for NEIL1's lesion excision and AP lyase activities, this segment is required for efficient in vivo enzymatic activity and may provide an interaction interface for many of NEIL1's interactions with other base excision repair proteins. Here, we show that the CTD interacts with the folded domain in native NEIL1 containing 389 residues. The CTD is poised for local folding in an ordered structure that is induced in the purified fragment by osmolytes. Furthermore, deletion of the disordered tail lacking both Tyr and Trp residues causes a red shift in NEIL1's intrinsic Trp-specific fluorescence, indicating a more solvent-exposed environment for the Trp residues in the truncated protein, which also exhibits reduced stability compared to the native enzyme. These observations are consistent with stabilization of the native NEIL1 structure via intramolecular, mostly electrostatic, interactions that were disrupted by mutating a positively charged (Lys-rich) cluster of residues (amino acids 355-360) near the C-terminus. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis confirms the flexibility and dynamic nature of NEIL1's CTD, a feature that may be critical to providing specificity for NEIL1's multiple, functional interactions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Exploring the Interactions of the Dietary Plant Flavonoids Fisetin and Naringenin with G-Quadruplex and Duplex DNA, Showing Contrasting Binding Behavior: Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Snehasish; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K; Bhowmik, Sudipta

    2016-09-01

    Guanine-rich sequences have the propensity to fold into a four-stranded DNA structure known as a G-quadruplex (G4). G4 forming sequences are abundant in the promoter region of several oncogenes and become a key target for anticancer drug binding. Here we have studied the interactions of two structurally similar dietary plant flavonoids fisetin and naringenin with G4 as well as double stranded (duplex) DNA by using different spectroscopic and modeling techniques. Our study demonstrates the differential binding ability of the two flavonoids with G4 and duplex DNA. Fisetin more strongly interacts with parallel G4 structure than duplex DNA, whereas naringenin shows stronger binding affinity to duplex rather than G4 DNA. Molecular docking results also corroborate our spectroscopic results, and it was found that both of the ligands are stacked externally in the G4 DNA structure. C-ring planarity of the flavonoid structure appears to be a crucial factor for preferential G4 DNA recognition of flavonoids. The goal of this study is to explore the critical effects of small differences in the structure of closely similar chemical classes of such small molecules (flavonoids) which lead to the contrasting binding properties with the two different forms of DNA. The resulting insights may be expected to facilitate the designing of the highly selective G4 DNA binders based on flavonoid scaffolds.

  17. [Verification of a decrease in the rigidity of the phage lambda DNA polymeric chain in low ionic strength aqueous solutions by testing the polymer-polymer interlink interactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutiunian, A V; Ivanova, M A; Kurliand, D I; Kapshin, Iu S; Landa, S B; Poshekhonov, S T; Drobchenko, E A; Shevelev, I V

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the rigidity of the polymetric chain of phage lambda double-strand DNA have been studied by laser correlation spectroscopy. It was shown that, as the ionic strength increases, the effect of the screening of the hydrodynamic interaction of the links of the polymeric chain specific for polymeric coils arises in a DNA solution. It is assumed that the screening occurs when the threshold of the overlapping of DNA coils is achieved. The overlapping of coils is the result of a previously observed significant rise of DNA coil size from abnormally small DNA coils in low ionic strength buffers (about 10(-2) M Na+ or less) to maximum possible large coils in the 5SSC and 5SSC-like buffers. Further analysis of the far interlink interactions in linear lambda phage DNA coils in similar buffers at pH 7 and 4 confirms the earlier proposal about the role of H+ ions in the appearance of abnormally small DNA coils. The abnormal decrease in the DNA coil size in low ionic strength buffers is not a specific feature of lambda phage DNA only.

  18. The Interaction between Checkpoint Kinase 1 (Chk1) and the Minichromosome Maintenance (MCM) Complex Is Required for DNA Damage-induced Chk1 Phosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiangzi; Aslanian, Aaron; Fu, Kang; Tsuji, Toshiya; Zhang, Youwei

    2014-01-01

    Chk1 is an essential mediator of the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint. However, how exactly Chk1 transduces the checkpoint signaling is not fully understood. Here we report the identification of the heterohexamic minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex that interacts with Chk1 by mass spectrometry. The interaction between Chk1 and the MCM complex was reduced by DNA damage treatment. We show that the MCM complex, at least partially, contributes to the chromatin association of Chk1, allowing for immediate phosphorylation of Chk1 by ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) in the presence of DNA damage. Further, phosphorylation of Chk1 at ATR sites reduces the interaction between Chk1 and the MCM complex, facilitating chromatin release of phosphorylated Chk1, a critical step in the initiation and amplification of cell cycle checkpoint. Together, these data provide novel insights into the activation of Chk1 in response to DNA damage. PMID:25049228

  19. A Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA Gene Repeats and a Locus Encoding an RNA Polymerase I Subunit Affects Ribosomal DNA Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyani, Inswasti; Cridge, Andrew G.; Engelke, David R.; Ganley, Austen R. D.

    2014-01-01

    The spatial organization of eukaryotic genomes is linked to their functions. However, how individual features of the global spatial structure contribute to nuclear function remains largely unknown. We previously identified a high-frequency interchromosomal interaction within the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome that occurs between the intergenic spacer of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) repeats and the intergenic sequence between the locus encoding the second largest RNA polymerase I subunit and a lysine tRNA gene [i.e., RPA135-tK(CUU)P]. Here, we used quantitative chromosome conformation capture in combination with replacement mapping to identify a 75-bp sequence within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region that is involved in the interaction. We demonstrate that the RPA135-IGS1 interaction is dependent on the rDNA copy number and the Msn2 protein. Surprisingly, we found that the interaction does not govern RPA135 transcription. Instead, replacement of a 605-bp region within the RPA135-tK(CUU)P intergenic region results in a reduction in the RPA135-IGS1 interaction level and fluctuations in rDNA copy number. We conclude that the chromosomal interaction that occurs between the RPA135-tK(CUU)P and rDNA IGS1 loci stabilizes rDNA repeat number and contributes to the maintenance of nucleolar stability. Our results provide evidence that the DNA loci involved in chromosomal interactions are composite elements, sections of which function in stabilizing the interaction or mediating a functional outcome. PMID:25421713

  20. Cutting edge: Antimalarial drugs inhibit IFN-β production through blockade of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jie; Woodward, Joshua J; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Minie, Mark; Elkon, Keith B

    2015-05-01

    Type I IFN is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, and rare monogenic IFNopathies, including Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Recently, a new DNA-activated pathway involving the enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) was described and potentially linked to Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. To identify drugs that could potentially inhibit cGAS activity, we performed in silico screening of drug libraries. By computational analysis, we identified several antimalarial drugs (AMDs) that were predicted to interact with the cGAS/dsDNA complex. Our studies validated that several AMDs were effective inhibitors of IFN-β production and that they functioned by inhibiting dsDNA stimulation of cGAS. Because AMDs have been widely used in human diseases and have an excellent safety profile, our findings suggest new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of severe debilitating diseases associated with type I IFNs due to cGAS activation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  1. Shedding lights on the flexible-armed porphyrins: Human telomeric G4 DNA interaction and cell photocytotoxicity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-Fang; Liu, Min-Chao; Wang, Xia-Hong; Huang, Yu-Min; Cheng, Zhen-Feng; Yan, Si-Qi; Li, Yan-Yu; Chen, Ya-Qing; Zhong, Yan-Mei

    2017-08-01

    DNA polymorphism exerts a fascination on a large scientific community. Without crystallographic structural data, clarification of the binding modes between G-quadruplex (G4) and ligand (complex) is a challenging job. In the present work, three porphyrin compounds with different flexible carbon chains (arms) were designed, synthesized and characterized. Their binding, folding and stabilizing abilities to human telomeric G4 DNA structures were comparatively researched. Positive charges at the end of the flexible carbon chains seem to be favorable for the DNA-porphyrin interactions, which were evidenced by the spectral results and further confirmed by the molecular docking calculations. Biological function analysis demonstrated that these porphyrins show no substantial inhibition to Hela, A549 and BEL 7402 cancer cell lines under dark while exhibit broad inhibition under visible light. This significantly enhanced photocytotoxicity relative to the dark control is an essential property of photochemotherapeutic agents. The feature of the flexible arms emerges as critical influencing factors in the cell photocytotoxicity. Moreover, an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway was suggested for the cell apoptosis induced by these flexible-armed porphyrins. It is found that the porphyrins with positive charges located at the end of the flexible arms represent an exciting opportunity for photochemotherapeutic anti-cancer drug design. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The piroxicam complex of copper(II), trans-[Cu(Pir)2(THF)2], and its interaction with DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Salimi, Mona; Weil, Matthias; Jannesari, Zahra; Darabi, Farivash; Abdi, Khatereh; Khalaji, Aliakbar Dehno; Sardari, Soroush; Ahangari, Reza

    2012-08-01

    The mononuclear Cu(II) complex, trans-[Cu(Pir)2(THF)2], where Pir is 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-2-pyridyl-2H-1,2-benzothiazine-3-carboxamide-1,1-dioxide (piroxicam), has been prepared and characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopic methods (UV-Vis, IR, and 1H NMR) and single crystal X-ray structure analysis. The molecular structure of the centrosymmetric complex is made up of two monoanionic bidentate Pir ligands coordinated to the Cu(II) atom through the pyridyl N atom and the carbonyl O atom of the amide group in equatorial positions. The elongated rhombic octahedral (ERO) coordination of the CuNONOO2″ chromophore is completed by the O atoms of two THF molecules in axial positions. A strong intramolecular hydrogen bond between the amide N-H function and the enolate O atom confirms the ZZZ conformation of piroxicam. In addition, CD spectroscopy and gel electrophoresis assays have been used to investigate the interaction of the complex with DNA. The results revealed that the binding of the complex with DNA led to DNA backbone distortion.

  3. Modeling techniques and fluorescence imaging investigation of the interactions of an anthraquinone derivative with HSA and ctDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zheng; Cui, Yanrui; Cui, Fengling; Zhang, Guisheng

    2016-01-15

    A new anthraquinone derivative (AORha) was synthesized. Its interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Cell viability assay and cell imaging experiment were performed using cervical cancer cells (HepG2 cells). The fluorescence results revealed that the quenching mechanism was static quenching. At different temperatures (290, 300, 310 K), the binding constants (K) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined, respectively. The positive ΔH and ΔS values showed that the binding of AORha with HSA was hydrophobic force, which was identical with the molecular docking result. Studying the fluorescence spectra, UV spectra and molecular modeling also verified that the binding mode of AORha and ctDNA might be intercalative. When HepG2 cells were treated with AORha, the fluorescence became brighter and turned green, which could be used for bioimaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. SYNTHESIS AND DNA INTERACTION OF A Sm(III) COMPLEX OF A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    volume of brownish red solution was reduced in vacuo using rotary evaporator to about 5 mL. Then absolute ethanol was ... The titration was done manually by use of a micro-injector and incremental addition injection of 10 μL .... The plots of 1/(A0 - A) versus 1/cDNA were linear at 25 and 37 °C and the binding constants ...

  5. Concealed by darkness: interactions between predatory bats and nocturnally migrating songbirds illuminated by DNA sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, Carlos; Popa-Lisseanu, Ana G.; Pastor-Beviá, David; García-Mudarra, Juan L.; Juste, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Recently, several species of aerial-hawking bats have been found to prey on migrating songbirds, but details on this behaviour and its relevance for bird migration are still unclear. We sequenced avian DNA in feather-containing scats of the bird-feeding bat Nyctalus lasiopterus from Spain collected during bird migration seasons. We found very high prey diversity, with 31 bird species from eight families of Passeriformes, almost all of which were nocturnally flying sub-Saharan migrants. Moreov...

  6. Theory of site-specific interactions of the combinatorial transcription factors with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murugan, R

    2010-01-01

    We derive a functional relationship between the mean first passage time associated with the concurrent binding of multiple transcription factors (TFs) at their respective combinatorial cis-regulatory module sites (CRMs) and the number n of TFs involved in the regulation of the initiation of transcription of a gene of interest. Our results suggest that the overall search time τ s that is required by the n TFs to locate their CRMs which are all located on the same DNA chain scales with n as τ s ∼n α where α ∼ (2/5). When the jump size k that is associated with the dynamics of all the n TFs along DNA is higher than that of the critical jump size k c that scales with the size of DNA N as k c ∼ N 2/3 , we observe a similar power law scaling relationship and also the exponent α. When k c , α shows a strong dependence on both n and k. Apparently there is a critical number of combinatorial TFs n c ∼ 20 that is required to efficiently regulate the initiation of transcription of a given gene below which (2/5) 1. These results seem to be independent of the initial distances between the TFs and their corresponding CRMs and also suggest that the maximum number of TFs involved in a given combinatorial regulation of the initiation of transcription of a gene of interest seems to be restricted by the degree of condensation of the genomic DNA. The optimum number m opt of roadblock protein molecules per genome at which the search time associated with these n TFs to locate their binding sites is a minimum seems to scale as m opt ∼Ln α/2 where L is the sliding length of TFs whose maximum value seems to be such that L ≤ 10 4 bps for the E. coli bacterial genome.

  7. In vitro Selection and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer Targeting Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Stoltenburg, Regina; Schubert, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2015-01-01

    A new DNA aptamer targeting Protein A is presented. The aptamer was selected by use of the FluMag-SELEX procedure. The SELEX technology (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment) is widely applied as an in vitro selection and amplification method to generate target-specific aptamers and exists in various modified variants. FluMag-SELEX is one of them and is characterized by the use of magnetic beads for target immobilization and fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides for moni...

  8. Interaction of RECQ4 and MCM10 is important for efficient DNA replication origin firing in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliszczak, Maciej; Sedlackova, Hana; Pitchai, Ganesha P

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly coordinated process that is initiated at multiple replication origins in eukaryotes. These origins are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which subsequently recruits the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase in a Cdt1/Cdc6-dependent manner. In budding yeast, two...... essential replication factors, Sld2 and Mcm10, are then important for the activation of replication origins. In humans, the putative Sld2 homolog, RECQ4, interacts with MCM10. Here, we have identified two mutants of human RECQ4 that are deficient in binding to MCM10. We show that these RECQ4 variants...... are able to complement the lethality of an avian cell RECQ4 deletion mutant, indicating that the essential function of RECQ4 in vertebrates is unlikely to require binding to MCM10. Nevertheless, we show that the RECQ4-MCM10 interaction is important for efficient replication origin firing....

  9. Noncovalent Interactions in Specific Recognition Motifs of Protein-DNA Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stasyuk, Olga A.; Jakubec, Dávid; Vondrášek, Jiří; Hobza, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2017), s. 877-885 ISSN 1549-9618 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * side chain interactions * interaction energies Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 5.245, year: 2016

  10. DNA hosted and aligned in aqueous interstitia of a lamellar liquid crystal – a membrane–biomacromolecule interaction model system

    KAUST Repository

    Carlsson, Nils; Jonsson, Fabian; Wilhelmsson, L. Marcus; Nordé n, Bengt; Å kerman, Bjö rn

    2013-01-01

    We report that DNA molecules can be intercalated and macroscopically oriented in the aqueous interstitia of a lyotropic lamellar liquid crystal. Using UV-vis linear dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy we show that double-stranded oligonucleotides (25 base pairs) in the water-octanoate-decanol system remain base-paired in the B conformation and are confined in two dimensions, with the helix axis preferentially parallel to the lipid bilayer surfaces but free to rotate within this plane. The degree of helix confinement and the corresponding 2-D orientation can be improved by decreasing the thickness of the water interstitia via the fraction of water in the ternary mixture. Not surprisingly, the corresponding single-stranded oligonucleotides are not aligned, with their persistence length being short in comparison to the lamellar interstitium thickness. We propose this as a model system for studying interactions of DNA-ligand complexes near a lipid bilayer membrane which we demonstrate by using dye probes that are either covalently attached to one end of the oligonucleotide or reversibly bound by intercalation between the base pairs. Three cationic dyes, all strongly bound by intercalation to DNA when free in solution, are found to not bind to DNA but to prefer the membrane surface. The covalently attached Cy5 also binds to the bilayer while Cy3 tends to end-stack to the oligonucleotide duplex. The orientation of Cy5 parallel to the membrane indicates that electrostatic surface binding predominates over insertion into the hydrophobic interior of the membrane. Anionic and zwitterionic dyes (FAM and ROX) are found to remain randomly oriented in the water between the lipid bilayer surfaces. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. A novel type of DNA-binding protein interacts with a conserved sequence in an early nodulin ENOD12 promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, H; Hansen, A C; Vijn, I

    1996-01-01

    The pea genes PsENOD12A and PsENOD12B are expressed in the root hairs shortly after infection with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae or after application of purified Nod factors. A 199 bp promoter fragment of the PsENOD12B gene contains sufficient information for Nod...... factor-induced tissue-specific expression. We have isolated a Vicia sativa cDNA encoding a 1641 amino acid protein, ENBP1, that interacts with the 199 bp ENOD12 promoter. Two different DNA-binding domains were identified in ENBP1. A domain containing six AT-hooks interacts specifically with an AT...... of the ENBP1 transcript in cells expressing ENOD12 strongly suggest that ENBP1 is a transcription factor involved in the regulation of ENOD12. Finally, the C-terminal region of ENBP1 shows strong homology to a protein from rat that is specifically expressed in testis tissue. Udgivelsesdato: 1996-Dec...

  12. Arranging eukaryotic nuclear DNA polymerases for replication: Specific interactions with accessory proteins arrange Pols α, δ, and ϵ in the replisome for leading-strand and lagging-strand DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A; Burgers, Peter M J

    2017-08-01

    Biochemical and cryo-electron microscopy studies have just been published revealing interactions among proteins of the yeast replisome that are important for highly coordinated synthesis of the two DNA strands of the nuclear genome. These studies reveal key interactions important for arranging DNA polymerases α, δ, and ϵ for leading and lagging strand replication. The CMG (Mcm2-7, Cdc45, GINS) helicase is central to this interaction network. These are but the latest examples of elegant studies performed in the recent past that lead to a much better understanding of how the eukaryotic replication fork achieves efficient DNA replication that is accurate enough to prevent diseases yet allows evolution. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. The PCNA interaction protein box sequence in Rad54 is an integral part of its ATPase domain and is required for efficient DNA repair and recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Sebesta, Marek; Sisakova, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is an ATP-driven translocase involved in the genome maintenance pathway of homologous recombination (HR). Although its activity has been implicated in several steps of HR, its exact role(s) at each step are still not fully understood. We have identified a new interaction between Rad54...... and the replicative DNA clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). This interaction was only mildly weakened by the mutation of two key hydrophobic residues in the highly-conserved PCNA interaction motif (PIP-box) of Rad54 (Rad54-AA). Intriguingly, the rad54-AA mutant cells displayed sensitivity to DNA damage...

  14. DNA interactions of monofuntional organometallic ruthenium(II) antitumor complexes in cell-free media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Olga; Chen, H.; Vrána, Oldřich; Rodger, A.; Sadler, P. J.; Brabec, Viktor

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 39 (2003), s. 11544-11554 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/02/1552; GA ČR GA305/01/0418; GA AV ČR IAA5004101; GA MŠk OC D20.002; GA MŠk OC D20.005 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : double-helical DNA * interstrand cross-links * biophysical analysis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.922, year: 2003

  15. DNA interactions of dinuclear RuII arene antitumor complexes in cell-free media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Olga; Nazarov, A.A.; Hartinger, Ch.G.; Keppler, B.K.; Brabec, Viktor

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 3 (2009), s. 364-374 ISSN 0006-2952 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08017; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08003; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : dinuclear ruthenium complex * DNA * cross-links Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.254, year: 2009

  16. A common mutation in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene affects genomic DNA methylation through an interaction with folate status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friso, Simonetta; Choi, Sang-Woon; Girelli, Domenico; Mason, Joel B.; Dolnikowski, Gregory G.; Bagley, Pamela J.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Jacques, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Corrocher, Roberto; Selhub, Jacob

    2002-01-01

    DNA methylation, an essential epigenetic feature of DNA that modulates gene expression and genomic integrity, is catalyzed by methyltransferases that use the universal methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the synthesis of 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (5-methylTHF), the methyl donor for synthesis of methionine from homocysteine and precursor of S-adenosyl-l-methionine. In the present study we sought to determine the effect of folate status on genomic DNA methylation with an emphasis on the interaction with the common C677T mutation in the MTHFR gene. A liquid chromatography/MS method for the analysis of nucleotide bases was used to assess genomic DNA methylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 105 subjects homozygous for this mutation (T/T) and 187 homozygous for the wild-type (C/C) MTHFR genotype. The results show that genomic DNA methylation directly correlates with folate status and inversely with plasma homocysteine (tHcy) levels (P < 0.01). T/T genotypes had a diminished level of DNA methylation compared with those with the C/C wild-type (32.23 vs.62.24 ng 5-methylcytosine/μg DNA, P < 0.0001). When analyzed according to folate status, however, only the T/T subjects with low levels of folate accounted for the diminished DNA methylation (P < 0.0001). Moreover, in T/T subjects DNA methylation status correlated with the methylated proportion of red blood cell folate and was inversely related to the formylated proportion of red blood cell folates (P < 0.03) that is known to be solely represented in those individuals. These results indicate that the MTHFR C677T polymorphism influences DNA methylation status through an interaction with folate status. PMID:11929966

  17. BAG3 sensitizes cancer cells exposed to DNA damaging agents via direct interaction with GRP78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, De-Hui; Zhang, Qiang; Meng, Xin; Zong, Zhi-Hong; Li, Chao; Liu, Bao-Qin; Guan, Yifu; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2013-12-01

    Bcl-2 associated athanogene 3 (BAG3) has a modular structure that contains a BAG domain, a WW domain, a proline-rich (PxxP) domain to mediate potential interactions with chaperons and other proteins that participate in more than one signal transduction. In search for novel interacting partners, the current study identified that 78kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) was a novel partner interacting with BAG3. Interaction between GRP78 and BAG3 was confirmed by coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown. We also identified that the ATPase domain of GRP78 and BAG domain of BAG3 mediated their interaction. Counterintuitive for a prosurvival protein, BAG3 was found to promote the cytotoxicity of breast cancer MCF7, thyroid cancer FRO and glioma U87 cells subjected to genotoxic stress. In addition, the current study demonstrated that BAG3 interfered with the formation of the antiapoptotic GRP78-procaspase-7 complex, which resulted in an increased genotoxic stress-induced cytotoxicity in cancer cells. Furthermore, overexpression of GRP78 significantly blocked the enhancing effects of BAG3 on activation of caspase-7 and induction of apoptosis by genotoxic stress. Overall, these results suggested that through direct interaction BAG3 could prevent the antiapoptotic effect of GRP78 upon genotoxic stress. © 2013.

  18. Reversible Modulation of DNA-Based Hydrogel Shapes by Internal Stress Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuwei; Kahn, Jason S; Guo, Weiwei; Huang, Fujian; Fadeev, Michael; Harries, Daniel; Willner, Itamar

    2016-12-14

    We present the assembly of asymmetric two-layer hybrid DNA-based hydrogels revealing stimuli-triggered reversibly modulated shape transitions. Asymmetric, linear hydrogels that include layer-selective switchable stimuli-responsive elements that control the hydrogel stiffness are designed. Trigger-induced stress in one of the layers results in the bending of the linear hybrid structure, thereby minimizing the elastic free energy of the systems. The removal of the stress by a counter-trigger restores the original linear bilayer hydrogel. The stiffness of the DNA hydrogel layers is controlled by thermal, pH (i-motif), K + ion/crown ether (G-quadruplexes), chemical (pH-doped polyaniline), or biocatalytic (glucose oxidase/urease) triggers. A theoretical model relating the experimental bending radius of curvatures of the hydrogels with the Young's moduli and geometrical parameters of the hydrogels is provided. Promising applications of shape-regulated stimuli-responsive asymmetric hydrogels include their use as valves, actuators, sensors, and drug delivery devices.

  19. Possible mechanism of psoralen phototoxicity not involving direct interaction with DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Yurkow, E.J.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Psoralens in combination with ultraviolet light (UVA; 320-400 nm) are used in the photochemical treatment of a variety of skin diseases including vitiligo, a skin depigmentational disorder, and psoriasis, a disease of accelerated epidermal cell proliferation. Although it is generally assumed that the major site of action of the psoralens is DNA, the authors have obtained evidence that another site may be the primary target for these compounds. They have identified specific, saturable, high-affinity binding sites for 8-methoxypsoralen on HeLa cells and have detected specific binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to four other human cell lines and five mouse cell lines. In HeLa cells, specific binding is reversible and independent of the ability of the compound to interc