WorldWideScience

Sample records for elite sugarcane progeny

  1. Rapid micropropagation of three elite Sugarcane (Saccharum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... culture. Sabaz Ali Khan1, 3*, Hamid Rashid2, M. Fayyaz Chaudhary1, Zubeda Chaudhry2 and Amber. Afroz2. 1Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan. ... Key words: Micropropagation, Sugarcane, Shoot tip, Hormone and Meristem culture. .... were dark green in color initially but changed to light ...

  2. Regeneration of sugarcane elite breeding lines and engineering of stem borer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Li-Xing; Deng, Haihua; Xu, Jin-Ling; Li, Qi; Wang, Lian-Hui; Jiang, Zide; Zhang, Hai Bao; Li, Qiwei; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2006-02-01

    Five elite sugarcane breeding lines were tested for efficiency in embryogenesis and plant regeneration. All of them produced regenerative embryogenic calli but with varied efficiencies. To engineer strongly insect-resistant sugarcanes, the GC content of a truncated cry1Ac gene, which encodes the active region of Cry1Ac insecticidal delta-endotoxin, was increased from the original 37.4 to 47.5% following the sugarcane codon usage pattern. The synthetic cry1Ac gene (s-cry1Ac) was placed under the control of maize ubiquitin promoter and introduced by microprojectile bombardment into the embryogenic calli of sugarcane lines YT79-177 and ROC16. Southern blotting analysis showed that multicopies of s-cry1Ac were integrated into the genomes of transgenic sugarcane lines. Immunoblotting analysis identified 18 transgenic lines expressing detectable levels of s-Cry1Ac, which were estimated in the range of 1.8-10.0 ng mg(-1) total soluble proteins. Four transgenic and two parental lines were assayed for sugarcane stem borer resistance in leaf tissue feeding trials and greenhouse plant assays. The results showed that, while the untransformed control lines were severely damaged in both leaves and stems, the transgenic sugarcane lines expressing high levels of s-Cry1Ac proteins were highly resistant to sugarcane stem borer attack, resulting in complete mortality of the inoculated insects within 1 week after inoculation. Copyright (c) 2006 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. elites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2016-05-01

    As usual, there are a lot of questions, much more than the answers. The questions are urgent and uneasy. Well, the greater the journal’s chances to become interesting, comprehensive and elite, in a good sense.

  4. Development and Integration of an SSR-Based Molecular Identity Database into Sugarcane Breeding Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Bao Pan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane breeding is very difficult and it takes 12 to 14 years to develop a new cultivar for commercial production. This is because sugarcane varieties are highly polyploid, inter-specific hybrids with 100 to 130 chromosomes that may vary across geographical areas. Other obstacles/constraints include the small size of flowers that may not synchronize but may self-pollinate, difficulty in distinguishing hybrids from self progenies, extreme (G × E interactive effect, and potential variety mis-identification during vegetative propagation and varietal exchange. To help cane breeders circumvent these constraints, a simple sequence repeats (SSR-based molecular identity database has been developed at the United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Sugarcane Research Unit in Houma, LA. Since 2005, approximately 2000 molecular identities have been constructed for clones of sugarcane and related Saccharum species that cover geographical areas including Argentina, Australia, Bangladesh, China, Colombia, India, Mexico, Pakistan, South Africa, Thailand, USA (Louisiana, Florida, Texas, and Hawaii, and Venezuela. The molecular identity database is updated annually and has been utilized to: (1 provide molecular descriptors to newly registered cultivars; (2 identify in a timely fashion any mislabeled or unidentifiable clones from cross parents and field evaluation plots; (3 develop de novo clones of energy cane with S. spontaneum cytoplasm; (4 provide clone-specific fingerprint information for assessing cross quality and paternity of polycross; (5 determine genetic relatedness of parental clones; (6 select F1 hybrids from (elite × wild or (wild × elite crosses; and (7 investigate the inheritance of SSR markers in sugarcane. The integration of the molecular identity database into the sugarcane breeding program may improve the overall efficacy of cultivar development and commercialization.

  5. Efficiency of biparental crossing in sugarcane analyzed by SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Messias dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane has hermaphrodite flowers, however, selfing and cross pollination may occur, resulting in selfed or hybrid progeny. The aim of this study was to analyze the paternity of progenies from biparental crosses, in order to identify true hybrids or progenies originating from pollen of unknown origin. Seventy-six progenies from four crosses were analyzed using three highly polymorphic microsatellite markers (SSR. Progenies showed moderate genetic similarity and were grouped into four distinct groups, according to the crosses. Transmission of alleles from parents to offspring was clearly observed, in which selfed individuals were not observed, and only true hybrids or progeny resulting from fertilization with pollen uncommon to both parents were. Results showed that there was contamination with pollen from unknown parents in sugarcane crosses, suggesting that errors in the pedigree may occur, and adjustment in the crossing procedure would decrease progenies from pollen of unknown origin.

  6. Segregation analysis of microsatellite (SSR) markers in sugarcane polyploids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers have been extensively used in sugarcane breeding research, little is known about its inheritance mechanism. To address this problem, a high throughput molecular genotyping experiment was conducted on 964 single pollen grains and a 288-self progeny S1 map...

  7. Rapid micropropagation of three elite Sugarcane (Saccharum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... For rapid multiplication the regenerated shoots were transferred on liquid Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2% sucrose, supplemented with. BAP in combinations with GA3. Optimum multiplication was observed at 1 mg/l BAP in combination with. 0.1 mg/l GA3 for variety HSF-240. Best response of ...

  8. Sugarcane ripener update

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical sugarcane ripeners glyphosate and trinexapac-ethyl play an important role in the Louisiana sugarcane industry. Their use allows for earlier starts to the sugarcane harvest season, increase recoverable sucrose (TRS) at the mill, and increases harvest efficiency. Response to ripeners oft...

  9. Sugarcane outgrowers in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendimu, Mengistu Assefa; Henningsen, Arne; Gibbon, Peter

    2016-01-01

    -users. Using data from the oldest and some more recently established sugarcane outgrower schemes in Ethiopia, this paper examines the effects of compulsory participation in sugarcane outgrower production on total household income and asset stocks. Because outgrowers and non-outgrowers may have some differences...

  10. Screening for Sugarcane Brown Rust in the First Clonal Stage of the Canal Point Sugarcane Breeding Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duli Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. brown rust (caused by Puccinia melanocephala Syd. & P. Syd. was first reported in the United States in 1978 and is still one of the great challenges for sugarcane production. A better understanding of sugarcane genotypic variation in response to brown rust will help optimize breeding and selection strategies for disease resistance. Brown rust ratings were scaled from non-infection (0 to severe infection (4 with intervals of 0.5 and routinely recorded for genotypes in the first clonal selection stage of the Canal Point sugarcane breeding program in Florida. Data were collected from 14,272 and 12,661 genotypes and replicated check cultivars in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Mean rust rating, % infection, and severity in each family and progeny of female parent were determined, and their coefficients of variation (CV within and among families (females were estimated. Considerable variation exists in rust ratings among families or females. The families and female parents with high susceptibility or resistance to brown rust were identified and ranked. The findings of this study can help scientists to evaluate sugarcane crosses and parents for brown rust disease, to use desirable parents for crossing, and to improve genetic resistance to brown rust in breeding programs.

  11. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly 222Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of 210Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  12. Postindustrial elite and non-elite insecurities

    OpenAIRE

    Higley, John

    2010-01-01

    Two growing conflicts, peculiar to postindustrial societies, challenge the ability of elites to keep postindustrial politics manageable. These are (1) a conflict between elites and those non-elites who remain reasonably well integrated in the productive and social orders of postindustrial societies but who feel themselves vulnerable to elite personnel decisions they regard as arbitrary and uninformed – ‘insiders’; (2) a conflict between insiders and the many persons in posti...

  13. Sugarcane-Biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sílvio

    2017-03-17

    Concepts such as biorefinery and green chemistry focus on the usage of biomass, as with the oil value chain. However, it can cause less negative impact on the environment. A biorefinery based on sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) as feedstock is an example, because it can integrate into the same physical space, of processes for obtaining biofuels (ethanol), chemicals (from sugars or ethanol), electricity, and heat.The use of sugarcane as feedstock for biorefineries is dictated by its potential to supply sugars, ethanol, natural polymers or macromolecules, organic matter, and other compounds and materials. By means of conversion processes (chemical, biochemical, and thermochemical), sugarcane biomass can be transformed into high-value bioproducts to replace petrochemicals, as a bioeconomy model.

  14. Sugarcane outgrowers in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa Wendimu, Mengistu; Henningsen, Arne; Gibbon, Peter

    smallholders. We apply matching methods to analyze the effects of a public sugarcane outgrower scheme in Ethiopia. Participation in the outgrower scheme significantly reduces the income and asset stocks of outgrowers who contributed irrigated land to the outgrower scheme, while the effect was insignificant...

  15. In planta production and characterization of a hyperthermostable GH10 xylanase in transgenic sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Yoon; Nong, Guang; Rice, John D; Gallo, Maria; Preston, James F; Altpeter, Fredy

    2017-03-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum sp. hybrids) is one of the most efficient and sustainable feedstocks for commercial production of fuel ethanol. Recent efforts focus on the integration of first and second generation bioethanol conversion technologies for sugarcane to increase biofuel yields. This integrated process will utilize both the cell wall bound sugars of the abundant lignocellulosic sugarcane residues in addition to the sucrose from stem internodes. Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass into its component sugars requires significant amounts of cell wall degrading enzymes. In planta production of xylanases has the potential to reduce costs associated with enzymatic hydrolysis but has been reported to compromise plant growth and development. To address this problem, we expressed a hyperthermostable GH10 xylanase, xyl10B in transgenic sugarcane which displays optimal catalytic activity at 105 °C and only residual catalytic activity at temperatures below 70 °C. Transgene integration and expression in sugarcane were confirmed by Southern blot, RT-PCR, ELISA and western blot following biolistic co-transfer of minimal expression cassettes of xyl10B and the selectable neomycin phosphotransferase II. Xylanase activity was detected in 17 transgenic lines with a fluorogenic xylanase activity assay. Up to 1.2% of the total soluble protein fraction of vegetative progenies with integration of chloroplast targeted expression represented the recombinant Xyl10B protein. Xyl10B activity was stable in vegetative progenies. Tissues retained 75% of the xylanase activity after drying of leaves at 35 °C and a 2 month storage period. Transgenic sugarcane plants producing Xyl10B did not differ from non-transgenic sugarcane in growth and development under greenhouse conditions. Sugarcane xylan and bagasse were used as substrate for enzymatic hydrolysis with the in planta produced Xyl10B. TLC and HPLC analysis of hydrolysis products confirmed the superior catalytic activity

  16. Unique cover crops for Louisiana sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana sugarcane production practices provide a tremendous opportunity for the use of cover crops following the final sugarcane harvest in the fall of one year and prior to replanting sugarcane during the summer of the next year. A Louisiana sugarcane field is typically replanted every four years...

  17. Registration of "CPSG-3481 sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘CPSG-3481’ (Reg. No. , PI 676023) sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) was a new cultivar developed through cooperative research conducted by the Shakarganj Sugar Research Institute in Pakistan and the USDA-ARS Sugarcane Field Station in USA, and released to growers for loam soils...

  18. Quantification of sugarcane yellow leaf virus in sugarcane following transmission through aphid vector, Melanaphis sacchari

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chinnaraja, C; Viswanathan, R

    2015-01-01

    .... Studies were conducted on the virus transmission by sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari in sugarcane by inoculating virus-free meristem derived from micro- propagated plants of sugarcane cv Co 86032...

  19. Quantification of sugarcane yellow leaf virus in sugarcane following transmission through aphid vector, Melanaphis sacchari

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnaraja, C.; Viswanathan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Yellow leaf caused by Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) is a serious constraint to sugarcane production in India and currently the disease epidemics occur on many of the susceptible varieties under field conditions. Studies were conducted on the virus transmission by sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari in sugarcane by inoculating virus-free meristem derived from micro- propagated plants of sugarcane cv Co 86032 with viruliferous aphids. Virus transmission was confirmed through RT-PCR assays...

  20. Sugarcane for Bioethanol: Soil and Environmental Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2008-01-01

    Cultivation of sugarcane for bioethanol is increasing and the area under sugarcane is expanding. Much of the sugar for bioethanol comes from large plantations where it is grown with relatively high inputs. Sugarcane puts a high demands on the soil because of the use of heavy machinery and because

  1. Kenaf and cowpea as sugarcane cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of cover crops during the fallow period prior to planting sugarcane has the potential to influence not only the following sugarcane crop, but the economics of the production system as a whole. Typically, a Louisiana sugarcane field is replanted every four years due to declining yields, and,...

  2. Managing damaging freeze events in Louisiana sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure of sugarcane to damaging frosts occurs in approximately 25% of the sugarcane producing countries of the world, but is most frequent on the mainland of the United States, especially in the state of Louisiana. The frequent winter freezes that occur in the sugarcane areas of Louisiana have fo...

  3. Categorizing sugarcane cultivar resistance to the sugarcane aphid and yellow sugarcane aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, W; Showler, A T; Reagan, T E; White, W H

    2010-08-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) in Louisiana is colonized by two aphid species, the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), and the yellow sugarcane aphid, Sipha flava (Forbes) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The main problem associated with M. sacchari is transmission of sugarcane yellow leaf virus, a casual agent of yellow leaf disease whose absence has been added to certification standards for micropropagated sugarcane in Louisiana. Greenhouse studies were conducted to categorize dominant commercial sugarcane cultivars for their ability to tolerate aphid injury and to express antixenotic or antibiotic effects on both aphid species. Antixenosis tests showed no preference among cultivars by either aphid species. Loss of chlorophyll content in tolerance tests also did not show differences among cultivars for both aphid species. However, antibiosis tests revealed that life history parameters such as the duration of the reproductive period and fecundity of both aphid species were negatively affected on 'HoCP 91-555' compared with 'L 97-128'. Estimation of demographic statistics indicated that both aphid species exhibited a significantly lower intrinsic rate of increase (1.8-2.8-fold) and longer doubling time (1.7-3.1-fold) on HoCP 91-555 relative to L 97-128. From these tests, cultivars in the current study can be ranked from most to the least susceptible as L 97-128 > 'LCP 85-384' > 'HoCP 96-540' > 'Ho 95-988' > HoCP 91-555 for M. sacchari and L 97-128 > LCP 85-384 > HoCP 91-555 for S. flava. Therefore, antibiosis is an important category of resistance in sugarcane to both aphid species, and HoCP 91-555 might provide useful germplasm for developing aphid resistant cultivars.

  4. (colouration) in progeny of Poecilia reticulate (guppy)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is high demand for ornamental fishes with improve colouration. Colouration is sex specific in Poecilia reticulate (Guppy) and the colour variation within the wild and exotic breeds is at variance. The effect of parental sex and breed on colouration of progeny in Poecilia reticulata (Guppy) was studied. Two breeds of P.

  5. The Turkish power elite

    OpenAIRE

    Arslan, Ali

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to analyse, the general power structure of Turkish society, and specifically the Turkish power elite. Also, the relationships within and between the elite groups, and the distribution of power will be examined. This paper will also try to understand and explain the distribution of power in Turkish society: How far is power (effective power) diffused in society or how far it is centralised and concentrated in the hands of elite groups?    In accordance with the pluralists views...

  6. The Turkish power elite

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Arslan

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to analyse, the general power structure of Turkish society, and specifically the Turkish power elite. Also, the relationships within and between the elite groups, and the distribution of power will be examined. This paper will also try to understand and explain the distribution of power in Turkish society: How far is power (effective power) diffused in society or how far it is centralised and concentrated in the hands of elite groups?    In accordance with the p...

  7. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of ß2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of ß-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of ß2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  8. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athletes...... their physical capacity. Elite athletes should undergo comprehensive assessment to confirm an asthma diagnosis and determine its degree of severity. Treatment should be as for any other asthmatic individual, including the use of β2-agonist, inhaled steroid as well as leukotriene-antagonist. It should, however......, be noted that daily use of β-agonists could expose elite athletes to the risk of developing tolerance towards these drugs. Use of β2-agonist should be replaced with daily inhaled corticosteroid treatment, the most important treatment of exercise-induced asthma. All physicians treating asthma should...

  9. Recent advances in Progeny testing program for Nili Ravi buffalo in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ghaffar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Progeny testing program was started in Nili-Ravi buffalo at Livestock Production and Research Institute (LPRI, Bahadurnagar, Okara in 1979-80. Initially buffalo bulls used at Livestock Experiment Station (LES Qadirabad and Rakh Gulaman during 1964-78 were evaluated. Five out of ten at Rakh Gulaman and 10 out of 22 at Qadirabad bulls were positive. As none of these bulls were available, therefore, sons and grandsons of these bulls were selected for production of future candidate bulls. All the buffaloes at LPRI were evaluat`ed on Most Probable Producing Ability. The elite herd thus formed was used for production for future candidate bulls. Since then a continuous program is in operation at Govt. Livestock Farms and expanded to 27 field sub-centers involving private farmers in four districts Okara, Sahiwal, Faisalabad and Pakpattan. Since the initiation of this program in 1980’s, about 174 bulls have been put under progeny testing program and 137 bulls were evaluated by Daughter-Dam Comparison, out of which sixty eight buffalo bulls contributed positively in milk production of daughters. It is worth mentioning here that milk production of registered buffalo was recorded on monthly intervals in the field along with other necessary reproduction data required to compute the different traits of economic importance.Progeny testing program was started in Nili-Ravi buffalo at Livestock Production and Research Institute (LPRI, Bahadurnagar, Okara in 1979-80. Initially buffalo bulls used at Livestock Experiment Station (LES Qadirabad and Rakh Gulaman during 1964-78 were evaluated. Five out of ten at Rakh Gulaman and 10 out of 22 at Qadirabad bulls were positive. As none of these bulls were available, therefore, sons and grandsons of these bulls were selected for production of future candidate bulls. All the buffaloes at LPRI were evaluat`ed on Most Probable Producing Ability. The elite herd thus formed was used for production for future candidate bulls

  10. Production of sugarcane and tropical grasses as a renewable energy source. First quarterly report, June 1--August 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, A.G.

    1977-01-01

    Research was initiated on the intensive production of sugarcane and other tropical grasses as solar-dried forages. Greenhouse experiments designed to screen candidate clones and to evaluate growth curves were the first to get underway. Chemical growth control tests were also initiated. Plant materials at this stage consist of commercial sugarcane hybrids, progeny from the AES-UPR cane breeding program, Saccharum clones from the species officinarum, spontaneum, sinense, and robustum, Erianthus clones, a commercial tropical forage grass, napier grass, and forms of S. spontaneum plus Arundo donax growing wild in Puerto Rico. Initial stages of cane breeding and progeny selection for the high tonnage attribute were begun during August. Foliar tissue analyses for N, P, K, S, and Si were started together-with assays for acid invertase and other components of expanding stem tissue. The first field experiment was initiated during July at the semi-arid Lajas Substation. Four clones (three sugarcane hybrids plus napier grass var. Merker) are being evaluated incident to row spacing and harvest frequency in field-plots.

  11. Physiological characteristics of elite and sub-elite badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Cheong Hwa; Tan, Albert; Ahmad, Azwari; Kwong, Kien Weng; Sompong, Ruji; Ghazali, Khairul Aswadi Mohd; Liew, Swee Lee; Chai, Wen Jin; Thompson, Martin William

    2009-12-01

    The aims of this study were to establish the physical and physiological attributes of elite and sub-elite Malaysian male badminton players and to determine whether these attributes discriminate elite players from sub-elite players. Measurements and tests of basic anthropometry, explosive power, anaerobic recovery capacity, badminton-specific movement agility, maximum strength, and aerobic capacity were conducted on two occasions, separated by at least one day. The elite (n = 12) and sub-elite (n = 12) players' characteristics were, respectively: mean age 24.6 years (s = 3.7) and 20.5 years (s = 0.7); mass 73.2 kg (s = 7.6) and 62.7 kg (s = 4.2); stature 1.76 m (s = 0.07) and 1.71 m (s = 0.05); body fat 12.5% (s = 4.8) and 9.5% (s = 3.4); estimated VO(2max) 56.9 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1) (s = 3.7) and 59.5 ml . kg(-1) . min(-1) (s = 5.2). The elite players had greater maximum absolute strength in one-repetition maximum bench press (P = 0.015) compared with the sub-elite players. There were significant differences in instantaneous lower body power estimated from vertical jump height between the elite and sub-elite groups (P badminton-specific movement agility tests. Our results show that elite Malaysian male badminton players are taller, heavier, and stronger than their sub-elite counterparts. The test battery, however, did not allow us to discriminate between the elite and sub-elite players, suggesting that at the elite level tactical knowledge, technical skills, and psychological readiness could be of greater importance.

  12. Providing supplemental milk to piglets preweaning improves the growth but not survival of gilt progeny compared with sow progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Y J; Collins, A M; Smits, R J; Thomson, P C; Holyoake, P K

    2012-12-01

    Gilt progeny have lighter weaning weights and greater postweaning medication and mortality rates compared with the progeny of older parity sows. Because weaning weight has been positively correlated with postweaning survival, this study aimed to determine whether the provision of supplemental milk preweaning could improve weaning weight and subsequent weights as well as postweaning survival of gilt progeny. The study was replicated in summer and winter as the effects of supplemental milk were expected to vary with season. The progeny of 80 gilts (parity 0) and 80 sows (parity 2 to 5) were allocated to both treatments: with or without supplemental milk in these 2 seasons with 5 sheds/season. Litter size was standardized (10 to 11 piglets) and each piglet was weighed at birth, d 21, weaning (4 wk), and 10 wk of age. Medications and mortalities were recorded both preweaning and postweaning. Pigs were housed within treatment groups postweaning, and ADFI and G:F were measured. Gilt progeny were 200 g lighter at birth in both replicates (P gilt and sow progeny by 800 g in summer (P gilts or sows (P > 0.05). Supplemental milk disappearance (the daily difference between the volume of milk provided and the residue left in the drinker) was greater in summer than winter (by 130 mL/piglet d(-1); P gilt progeny reached or exceeded that of nonsupplemented sow progeny. Gilt progeny had greater postweaning mortality (2.6%) and medication rates (6.2%) than sow progeny (1 and 2.2%, respectively; both P Gilt progeny also had less postweaning ADFI than sow progeny in winter (528 and 636 g, respectively; P 0.05). The hypothesis that supplemental milk provision did increase gilt progeny weaning weight was supported (especially in summer) but the supplementation had no effect on postweaning weights and survival. Efforts to improve gilt progeny postweaning growth and survival need to be aimed at improving health and immunity, not just weaning weight.

  13. Immersion Ethnography of Elites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Brooke

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines an innovative form of data-gathering that brings together two of the greatest methodological challenges social scientists face: conducting classical immersion ethnography and gaining access to elites. The difficulties of accessing elites for research purposes have been well......-documented (Conti and O’Neill 2007; Gilding 2010; Harrington 2003). There has been less scholarly discussion of the challenges posed by traditional ethnography, a method whose claim to scientific status is based on the length and depth of the investigator’s immersion in an organization or culture....

  14. Identifying Power Elites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grau Larsen, Anton; Ellersgaard, Christoph Houman

    2017-01-01

    Specifying network boundaries is fundamental in the study of social structures of elite networks. However, traditional methods do not offer clear criteria on either size or composition of the elite, and rely on numerous ad hoc decisions. A methodological framework that is inductive, reproducible...... and suitable for comparative research is proposed. First, a comprehensive dataset of the 5079 affiliation networks of all potentially powerful sectors in Denmark was assembled. Second, these heterogeneous affiliation networks were weighted to account for potential level of social integration. Third, a weighted...

  15. Conducting Elite Performance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Elliott; Tucker, Scott A; Imsdahl, Solveig; Charles, Justin A; Stellato, Mallory A; Wagner, Mercy D; Brown, Kimberly M

    2015-08-01

    Training to excellence in the conduct of surgical procedures has many similarities to the acquisition and mastery of technical skills in elite-level music and sports. By using coaching techniques and strategies gleaned from analysis of professional music ensembles and athletic training, surgical educators can set conditions that increase the success rate of training to elite performance. This article describes techniques and strategies used in both music and athletic coaching, and it discusses how they can be applied and integrated into surgical simulation and education. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Sugarcane rice residue biochars and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sugarcane production in U.S. involves either pre-harvest burning or after-harvest burning of the residue. Approximately 70-90% of the dry matter of harvested sugarcane trash is lost through open field burning. This practice has caused considerable concerns over air quality and soil sustainability. We propose an alternative conservation approach to convert the sugarcane residue to biochar and used as soil amendment to conserve carbon and potentially improve soil fertility. In this study, fundamental properties of biochars made from sugarcane residue along with rice residues were tested for agronomic and environmental benefits. Sugarcane and rice harvest residues and milling processing byproducts bagasse and rice husk were converted to biochars at different pyrolysis temperatures and characterized. In general, sugarcane leave biochar contained more P, K, Ca and Mg than sugarcane bagasse biochar. Rice straw biochar had more S, K Ca but less P than rice husk biochar. Both biochars had higher available fraction of total P than that of total K. Sugarcane leave biochar converted at 450oC was dominated with various lignin derived phenols as well as non-specific aromatic compounds whereas bagasse biochar was with both lignin derived phenol and poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Rice straw char was dominated with non-specific aromatic compounds. At 750oC, charred material was dominated with aromatic ethers while losing the aromatic C=C structures. These molecular and surface property differences likely contributed to the difference in water holding capacities observed with these biochars. On the other hand, rice straw biochars produced at different pyrolysis temperatures had no significant effect on rice germination. Soils treated with sugarcane leave/trash biochar significantly enhanced sugarcane growth especially the root length. Treating soil with either sugarcane leave or bagasse char also enhanced soil adsorption capacity of atrazine; a common herbicide used in sugarcane

  17. Biomass of cocoa and sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto; Sumanto; Hartati, R. S.; Prastowo, B.

    2017-05-01

    The role of the agricultural sector is very important as the upstream addressing downstream sectors and national energy needs. The agricultural sector itself is also highly dependent on the availability of energy. Evolving from it then it must be policies and strategies for agricultural development Indonesia to forward particularly agriculture as producers as well as users of biomass energy or bioenergy for national development including agriculture balance with agriculture and food production. Exports of biomass unbridled currently include preceded by ignorance, indifference and the lack of scientific data and potential tree industry in the country. This requires adequate scientific supporting data. This study is necessary because currently there are insufficient data on the potential of biomass, including tree biomasanya detailing the benefits of bioenergy, feed and food is very necessary as a basis for future policy. Measurement of the main estate plants biomass such as cocoa and sugarcane be done in 2015. Measurements were also conducted on its lignocellulose content. Tree biomass sugarcane potential measured consist of leaves, stems and roots, with the weight mostly located on the stem. Nevertheless, not all the potential of the stem is a good raw material for bioethanol. For cocoa turned out leaves more prospective because of its adequate hemicellulose content. For sugarcane, leaf buds contain a good indicator of digestion of feed making it more suitable for feed.

  18. ARTICLE - Inbreeding depression in castor bean (Ricinus communis L. progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Krieger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate inbreeding depression (DE in castor bean. From a population derived from the Guarani cultivar, 60 mother plants were sampled. Three types of progenies were obtained from each one: from self-pollination (AU, from crosses (CR and from open pollination (PL. Grain yield of the progenies was evaluated in two locations. There was a strong interaction of progenies x locations, which led to obtaining estimates within each location. Broad variation was observed in inbreeding depression, with mean values of 6.7% and 13.4%, comparing AU progenies with PL progenies. It was observed that the population has high potential for selecting promising inbred lines. The frequency of mother plants generating progenies with simultaneous high general combination capacity and low inbreeding depression was low. Recurrent selection will increase the occurrence of parent plants associating these two properties, which is necessary for obtaining superior synthetic varieties.

  19. A Very Economic Elite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellersgaard, Christoph Houman; Larsen, Anton Grau; Munk, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    degree. Elite universities also hold little importance for Danish top CEOs, partly due to the institutions’ historic decline; instead, reproduction is mediated through time spent in the economic field, placing the case of the Danish CEOs between that of their British and German counterparts. Specific...... trajectories of Danish executives, in particular sales people, are identified using Multiple Correspondence Analysis and cluster analysis....

  20. Ethanol production using hemicellulosic hydrolyzate and sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of vegetable biomass as substrate for ethanol production could reduce the existing usage of fossil fuels, thereby minimizing negative environmental impacts. Due to mechanical harvesting of sugarcane, the amount of pointer and straw has increased in sugarcane fields, becoming inputs of great energy potential.

  1. Vegetable seedling production with sugarcane bagasse ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    The eleven sugarcane mills in Louisiana processed 380,000 ac and 12.8 million tons of harvested sugarcane in 2014, producing 1.5 million tons of raw sugar (brown sugar), and an estimated 3 million tons of the fibrous plant residue called bagasse. Bagasse is the fibrous material remaining after remov...

  2. Correlations and correlated responses in sugarcane ( Saccharum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies were carried out for two years at two locations to determine the inter character relationships between various quantitative traits of sugarcane, using eight genetically diversified sugarcane clones. The experiments were laid out in randomized complete block design with three replications. Performance data were used ...

  3. Concentration on Callus Induction in Sugarcane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: Experiment was designed and conducted to determine the most appropriate concentration of 2, 4-Dichlorophenoxy Acetic Acid suitable for callus induction in sugarcane. Explants were obtained from apical meristems of two sugarcane cultivars (SP726180 and CO-. 001) and cultured in a modified MS medium ...

  4. Ethanol production using hemicellulosic hydrolyzate and sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Juliana

    2015-02-11

    Feb 11, 2015 ... The use of vegetable biomass as substrate for ethanol production could reduce the existing usage of fossil fuels, thereby minimizing negative environmental impacts. Due to mechanical harvesting of sugarcane, the amount of pointer and straw has increased in sugarcane fields, becoming inputs of great.

  5. Metabolic engineering of sugarcane to accumulate energy-dense triacylglycerols in vegetative biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zale, Janice; Jung, Je Hyeong; Kim, Jae Yoon; Pathak, Bhuvan; Karan, Ratna; Liu, Hui; Chen, Xiuhua; Wu, Hao; Candreva, Jason; Zhai, Zhiyang; Shanklin, John; Altpeter, Fredy

    2016-02-01

    Elevating the lipid content in vegetative tissues has emerged as a new strategy for increasing energy density and biofuel yield of crops. Storage lipids in contrast to structural and signaling lipids are mainly composed of glycerol esters of fatty acids, also known as triacylglycerol (TAG). TAGs are one of the most energy-rich and abundant forms of reduced carbon available in nature. Therefore, altering the carbon-partitioning balance in favour of TAG in vegetative tissues of sugarcane, one of the highest yielding biomass crops, is expected to drastically increase energy yields. Here we report metabolic engineering to elevate TAG accumulation in vegetative tissues of sugarcane. Constitutive co-expression of WRINKLED1 (WRI1), diacylglycerol acyltransferase1-2 (DGAT1-2) and oleosin1 (OLE1) and simultaneous cosuppression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and a subunit of the peroxisomal ABC transporter1 (PXA1) in transgenic sugarcane elevated TAG accumulation in leaves or stems by 95- or 43-fold to 1.9% or 0.9% of dry weight (DW), respectively, while expression or suppression of one to three of the target genes increased TAG levels by 1.5- to 9.5-fold. Accumulation of TAG in vegetative progeny plants was consistent with the results from primary transgenics and contributed to a total fatty acid content of up to 4.7% or 1.7% of DW in mature leaves or stems, respectively. Lipid droplets were visible within mesophyll cells of transgenic leaves by confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results provide the basis for optimizations of TAG accumulation in sugarcane and other high yielding biomass grasses and will open new prospects for biofuel applications. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. FOLIAR NUTRIENT CONTENTS AND FRUIT YIELD IN CUSTARD APPLE PROGENIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sérgio Lima e Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Foliar nutrient contents are evaluated in several fruit trees with many objectives. Leaf analysis constitutes a way of evaluating the nutritional requirements of crops. Due to the positive impact that fertilizers have on crop yields, researchers frequently try to evaluate the correlations between yield and foliar nutrient contents. This work's objective was to present fruit yields from the 4th to the 6th cropping seasons, evaluate foliar nutrient contents (on the 5th cropping season, and estimate the correlations between these two groups of traits for 20 half-sibling custard apple tree progenies. The progenies were evaluated in a random block design with five replicates and four plants per plot. One hundred leaves were collected from the middle third of the canopy (in height of each of four plants in each plot. The leaves were collected haphazardly, i.e., in a random manner, but without using a drawing mechanism. In the analysis of variance, the nutrient concentrations in the leaves from plants of each plot were represented by the average of four plants in the plot. Fruit yield in the various progenies did not depend on cropping season; progeny A4 was the most productive. No Spearman correlation was found between leaf nutrient concentrations and fruit yield. Increased nutrient concentrations in the leaves were progeny-dependent, i.e., with regard to Na (progenies FE5 and JG1, Ca (progeny A4, Mg (progeny SM7, N (progeny A3, P (progeny M, and K contents (progeny JG3. Spearman's correlation was negative between Na-Mg, Na-Ca, and Mg-P contents, and positive between Mg-Ca and N-K contents.

  7. Estimation of human dose to radon progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimo, Michikuni [Gifu Coll. of Medical Technology, Sekiichi, Gifu (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the paper is the estimation of the effective dose due to radon progeny for Japanese population. The estimation was performed by a modified UNSCEAR equation. The equation was needed the radon concentration annual occupancy time and the tidal volume on Japanese people and the dose conversion coefficient are needed. Furthermore, not only these figures but also unattached fraction and aerosol distribution data obtained in Japan and the factor related to the Japanese living style were used in the calculation. We used following figures as representative value in Japan; radon concentration: 13(6 - 25) Bq/m{sup 3} indoors and 6.7(3.5 - 13) Bq/m{sup 3} outdoors; the equilibrium factor: 0.45(0.35 - 0.57) indoors and 0.70(0.50 - 0.90) outdoors; the occupancy factor: 0.87 indoors, 0.09 outdoors and 0.04 in vehicle for male and 0.91 indoors, 0.06 outdoors and 0.03 in vehicle for female; the tidal volume: 7,000 (4,000 - 8,000) m{sup 3} for male, 6,200 (3,500 - 7,500) m{sup 3} for female. The effective doses due to radon progeny were estimated to be 0.45 mSv/y for male and 0.40 mSv/y for female, and the variance was -80 - +130%. These values were 1/2 - 1/3 as small as values shown by UNSCEAR 1993 Report and estimated by ICRP Publication 65. (author)

  8. Factors Affecting Sugarcane Production in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Nazir

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to identify the factors affecting sugarcane production in Pakistan. Data were collected from 387 sugarcane growers from Sindh, Punjab and NWFP province. Data were collected during the period 2007-08. The study reveals that the costs of inputs of sugarcane i.e. urea, DAP, FYM, land preparation, seed and its application, weeding and cost of irrigation were the important factors which influenced on the returns of sugarcane growers. The effectiveness was examined by using the Cobb-Douglas production function; MVP and allocative efficiency were calculated. The coefficient of multiple determinations R2 was 0.9249, which indicated that 92% variation in the cost of inputs was explained by all explanatory variables and the adjusted R2 was 92%. The F-value was 666.94 and was highly significant at 5% level of significance, indicating that the regression model was well fitted. The high prices of inputs, low price of output, delay in payments and lack of scientific knowledge were the major problems in sugarcane production. In order to enhance the productivity of sugarcane in the country, government should solve the identified problems to increase the income of sugarcane growers.

  9. Sugarcane starch: quantitative determination and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joelise de Alencar Figueira

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Starch is found in sugarcane as a storage polysaccharide. Starch concentrations vary widely depending on the country, variety, developmental stage, and growth conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the starch content in different varieties of sugarcane, between May and November 2007, and some characteristics of sugarcane starch such as structure and granules size; gelatinization temperature; starch solution filterability; and susceptibility to glucoamylase, pullulanase, and commercial bacterial and fungal α-amylase enzymes. Susceptibility to debranching amylolytic isoamylase enzyme from Flavobacterium sp. was also tested. Sugarcane starch had spherical shape with a diameter of 1-3 µm. Sugarcane starch formed complexes with iodine, which showed greater absorption in the range of 540 to 620 nm. Sugarcane starch showed higher susceptibility to glucoamylase compared to that of waxy maize, cassava, and potato starch. Sugarcane starch also showed susceptibility to debranching amylolytic pullulanases similar to that of waxy rice starch. It also showed susceptibility to α-amylase from Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Aspergillus oryzae similar to that of the other tested starches producing glucose, maltose, maltotriose, maltotetraose, maltopentose and limit α- dextrin.

  10. FAST PYROLYSIS TEST WITH WHOLE SUGARCANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. B. CORTEZ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a preliminary study proposing the usage of whole sugarcane in the thermoconversion process. . Tests were made on fast pyrolysis of biomass as whole sugarcane (bagasse, sugar and sugarcane straw crushed and dry. These experiments were performed in order to verify the suitability of this type of biomass for the fast pyrolysis process in a fluidized bed. The pre-treatment was assessed, during which, for the preparation of the whole sugarcane, an ordinary machine for chopping and grinding was employed. The pyrolysis process was conducted without major changes in the plant operating conditions to other biomass such as sugarcane trash. The efficiency of energy conversion of biomass to fine coal and bio-oil was 41%, resulting in a production of 3034 MJ per ton of the whole sugarcane processed, compared to 1900.6 MJ obtained in the production of ethanol via fermentation, where the conversion efficiency was around 26%. With the advances in this pyrolysis, efficiency may increase in the coming years, an interesting route for production of second generation fuels via catalytic synthesis using syngas from gasification of the mixture of bio-oil and fine charcoal. Keywords: Bioenergy, Whole sugarcane, Bio-oil, Fast pyrolysis.

  11. Skaber elite bredde?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Rasmus K.

    2012-01-01

    Dette arbejdspapir gennemgår eksisterende studier og forskning med henblik på at afdække om der kan findes dokumentation for det ofte fremsatte argument om, at elite skaber bredde. Gennemgangen viser, at der ikke kan siges eksistere nogen automatik mellem de to størrelser. Faktisk viser nogle af de...... gennemgåede undersøgelser det modsatte: for stort fokus på elite kan skabe mindre breddedeltagelse i idræt og sport. Samtidig kan det dog også argumenteres, at fokus på elitesport eller afholdelse af store internationale slutrunder i enkelte tilfælde kan øge interessen for specifikke sportsgrene og indirekte...

  12. The effect of sugarcane litter compost to soilphysical mechanical properties and ratoon sugarcane performance

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    It is expected that the use of sugarcane litter compost as organic fertilizer in the field will contribute in improving soil structure and increased sugarcane production. The objectives of this study were to identify the quality of sugarcane litter compost and to analyze the influence of the compost to soil chemical, physical and mechanical properties, soil fertility, and ratoon crop growth. The results showed that, based on C/N ratio, the quality of compost produced was appropriate with SNI ...

  13. Elite Polarization and Public Opinion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua; Mullinix, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Elite polarization has reshaped American politics and is an increasingly salient aspect of news coverage within the United States. As a consequence, a burgeoning body of research attempts to unravel the effects of elite polarization on the mass public. However, we know very little about how polar...... of the consequences of elite polarization—and how polarization is communicated—for public opinion and political behavior in democratic politics....

  14. Applications of a silicon photodiode detector for radon progeny measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Voytchev, M; Chambaudet, A; Georgiev, G; Iovtchev, M

    1999-01-01

    An application of our developed silicon photodiode detector for radon progeny measurements is presented in this paper. It was determined the deposition velocity for free (3.6+-0.7)x10 sup - sup 3 m s sup - sup 1 and attached (1.0+-0.5)x10 sup - sup 5 m s sup - sup 1 fraction of short living radon progeny.

  15. Modelling radon progeny concentration variations in thermal spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios; Vogiannis, Efstratios

    2007-02-01

    Radon and its short-lived progenies (218Po, 214Pb, 214Bi and 214Po) are well known radioactive indoor pollutants identified as the major radiation burden component of the thermal spa users. Monitoring of short-lived progeny concentration is of great importance for short-term dose estimations both for bathers and working personnel. A prediction model of the short-lived progeny concentration variations was developed and applied on published data of the thermal spas of Lesvos Island. The physical procedures involved were modeled in a set of differential equations describing radon progeny concentration variations on the basis of radon measurements. Published daughter data were fitted on model predictions adjusting non-measured parameters, e.g. attachment and deposition rate constants for attached and unattached progenies. Attachment rate constants were estimated between 50 and 200 h-1 while the deposition rate constants between 0.25 and 5 h-1 for attached progenies and 0.5 and 170 h-1 for the unattached ones. In addition, unattached 218Po, 214Pb and 214Bi progenies were found to be shifted forward in respect to radon approximately 0.001 h, 0.05 h and 0.40 h respectively, while attached 218Po, 214Pb and 214Bi progenies 0.05 h, 0.45 h and 0.65 h respectively.

  16. Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Brazilian Sugarcane Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, J.; Pitombo, L.; Cantarella, H.; Rosseto, R.; Andrade, C.; Martinelli, L.; Gava, G.; Vargas, V.; Sousa-Neto, E.; Zotelli, L.; Filoso, S.; Neto, A. E.

    2012-04-01

    Bioethanol from sugarcane is increasingly seen as a sustainable alternative energy source. Besides having high photosynthetic efficiency, sugarcane is a perennial tropical grass crop that can re-grow up to five or more years after being planted. Brazil is the largest producer of sugarcane in the world and management practices commonly used in the country lead to lower rates of inorganic N fertilizer application than sugarcane grown elsewhere, or in comparison to other feedstocks such as corn. Therefore, Brazilian sugarcane ethanol potentially promotes greenhouse gas savings. For that reason, several recent studies have attempted to assess emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG) during sugarcane production in the tropics. However, estimates have been mainly based on models due to a general lack of field data. In this study, we present data from in situ experiments on emission of three GHG (CO2, N2O, and CH4) in sugarcane fields in Brazil. Emissions are provided for sugarcane in different phases of the crop life cycle and under different management practices. Our results show that the use of nitrogen fertilizer in sugarcane crops resulted in an emission factor for N2O similar to those predicted by IPCC (1%), ranging from 0.59% in ratoon cane to 1.11% in plant cane. However, when vinasse was applied in addition to mineralN fertilizer, emissions of GHG increased in comparison to those from the use of mineral N fertilizer alone. Emissions increased significantly when experiments mimicked the accumulation of cane trash on the soil surface with 14 tons ha-1and 21 tons ha-1, which emission factor were 1.89% and 3.03%, respectively. This study is representative of Brazilian sugarcane systems under specific conditions for key factors affecting GHG emissions from soils. Nevertheless, the data provided will improve estimates of GHG from Brazilian sugarcane, and efforts to assess sugarcane ethanol sustainability and energy balance. Funding provided by the São Paulo Research

  17. Evaluating sugarcane families by the method of Dynamic Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (DTOPSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifang Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Enlarging the quantity of seedlings of elite families and discarding inferior sugarcane (Saccharum spp. families could improve sugarcane breeding and selection efficiency. The feasibility of using the method Dynamic Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (DTOPSIS method was explored to identify superior sugarcane families. Data on 5 traits: Brix, millable stalks per stool (MS, stalk diameter (SD, plant height (PH, and percent pith were collected from two family trials having 17 families and two check cultivars at two sites including plant-cane and first-ratoon crops. The rest of the seedlings were planted into field for routine selection in the regular program. The DTOPSIS method calculates a comprehensive index (Ci which expresses the closeness of a solution to the ideal solution and was used in this study to test the distance of each family to the ideal family. The Ci of the families was compared to the family selection rate in the regular program by determining the selection rate at Stage 1 to Stage 4 for each family in the regular program. The result indicated that the Ci values calculated from family trials were significantly (p<0.01 correlated to the selection rate at Stage 2 (r=0.8059, Stage3 (r=0.7967, and Stage 4 (r=0.8202, and indicating that promising clones were selected from families with higher Ci values in the family trial. Thus, it could be feasible to use DTOPSIS to determine elite sugarcane families and to eliminate inferior families and thereby, increasing the variety selection efficiency.

  18. N-glycosylation in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Ivan G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The N-linked glycosylation of secretory and membrane proteins is the most complex posttranslational modification known to occur in eukaryotic cells. It has been shown to play critical roles in modulating protein function. Although this important biological process has been extensively studied in mammals, much less is known about this biosynthetic pathway in plants. The enzymes involved in plant N-glycan biosynthesis and processing are still not well defined and the mechanism of their genetic regulation is almost completely unknown. In this paper we describe our first attempt to understand the N-linked glycosylation mechanism in a plant species by using the data generated by the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (SUCEST project. The SUCEST database was mined for sugarcane gene products potentially involved in the N-glycosylation pathway. This approach has led to the identification and functional assignment of 90 expressed sequence tag (EST clusters sharing significant sequence similarity with the enzymes involved in N-glycan biosynthesis and processing. The ESTs identified were also analyzed to establish their relative abundance.

  19. An-Overview on invertase in sugarcane

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Mohammad Israil; Yadav, Ashok; Lal, Ramji

    2013-01-01

    Saccharum officinarum is one of the most cultivated hybrid varieties among the sugarcane varieties. In sugarcane plant sucrose is the major carbohydrate which can be stored and transported. Different physiological and biochemical studies on this crop report that invertase activity and sucrose concentration some how are key limiting step in the process of sucrose accumulation. Significant efforts have been made in relation to the sucrose cycle by altering the sucrose phosphate synthetase, sucr...

  20. RELATIVE PERFORMANCE OF SELFED AND OUTCROSSED PROGENY IN IMPATIENS CAPENSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Waller, Donald M

    1985-05-01

    This study compares survival and growth of progeny derived from chasmogamous (CH) and cleistogamous (CL) flowers in Impatiens capensis, a forest annual. When progeny were grown in the field, CH seeds had significantly higher survival rates over winter (64% versus 56%), and the survival advantage of outcrossed progeny was not attributable to seed weight differences. No differences in seedling growth were detected. Greenhouse comparisons revealed no difference in seed survival but a 30% growth advantage to CH seedlings. We found no changes in developmental homeostasis of three leaf shape characters between inbred and outbred progeny, nor was there any difference in variability within CH and CL families. The outcrossing advantage observed in these experiments could not have been caused by avoidance of sib competition. Theory predicts that self-pollinated progenies may be more variable than outcrossed progenies if rare, recessive alleles are important contributors to genetic variances. Electrophoretic markers indicate that progeny derived from CH flowers are predominantly outcrossed (at least 54-97%). © 1985 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  2. Analysis of Sugarcane Juice Quality Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeqing Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the quality indexes of sugarcane juice plays a vital role in the process of refining sugarcane, breeding, cultivation, and production management. The paper analyzes the dynamic laws of five quality indexes (i.e., brix, purity, polarization, sucrose content, and reducing sugar combined with graphs over time along the course of crushing season (December–March in Guangxi province of China. During this time, the sugarcane is in the mature stage and hypermature stage. At the beginning of December to early January, during which sugarcane is in the later stage of maturity, the nutrients are accumulating, causing brix, purity, polarization, and sucrose content increase. At the beginning of January to mid-February, due to low temperature and insufficient light, it is not conducive to accumulation of nutrients. However, there is the so-called “sugar back” phenomenon and reducing sugar rises gradually in March, leading to deterioration of the quality of sugarcane juice. The results show that timely harvest of sugarcane is beneficial for sugar making. The regression analysis results show that some of quality indexes have strong correlation between them and the regression models are extremely significant, indicating that the prediction results are ideal.

  3. Sugarcane vinasse: environmental implications of its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofoletti, Cintya Aparecida; Escher, Janaína Pedro; Correia, Jorge Evangelista; Marinho, Julia Fernanda Urbano; Fontanetti, Carmem Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The inadequate and indiscriminate disposal of sugarcane vinasse in soils and water bodies has received much attention since decades ago, due to environmental problems associated to this practice. Vinasse is the final by-product of the biomass distillation, mainly for the production of ethanol, from sugar crops (beet and sugarcane), starch crops (corn, wheat, rice, and cassava), or cellulosic material (harvesting crop residues, sugarcane bagasse, and wood). Because of the large quantities of vinasse produced, alternative treatments and uses have been developed, such as recycling of vinasse in fermentation, fertirrigation, concentration by evaporation, and yeast and energy production. This review was aimed at examining the available data on the subject as a contribution to update the information on sugarcane vinasse, from its characteristics and chemical composition to alternatives uses in Brazil: fertirrigation, concentration by evaporation, energy production; the effects on soil physical, chemical and biological properties; its influence on seed germination, its use as biostimulant and environmental contaminant. The low pH, electric conductivity, and chemical elements present in sugarcane vinasse may cause changes in the chemical and physical-chemical properties of soils, rivers, and lakes with frequent discharges over a long period of time, and also have adverse effects on agricultural soils and biota in general. Thus, new studies and green methods need to be developed aiming at sugarcane vinasse recycling and disposal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Women who belong to the Elite in Hungary - The features of elite Identity in Women’s Elite Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Ibolya Czibere

    2014-01-01

    The study represents the women’s situation who belong to the cultural, economic and political elite in Hungary, according to the differences between women and men elite groups on the one hand and on the other hand, according to elite type differences of women’s elite groups.

  5. Dosimetry of radium-223 and progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Radium-223 is a short-lived (11.4 d) alpha emitter with potential applications in radioimmunotherapy of cancer. Radium-223 can be complexed and linked to protein delivery molecules for specific tumor-cell targeting. It decays through a cascade of short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting daughters with emission of about 28 MeV of energy through complete decay. The first three alpha particles are essentially instantaneous. Photons associated with Ra-223 and progeny provide the means for tumor and normal-organ imaging and dosimetry. Two beta particles provide additional therapeutic value. Radium-223 may be produced economically and in sufficient amounts for widescale application. Many aspects of the chemistry of carrier-free isotope preparation, complexation, and linkage to the antibody have been developed and are being tested. The radiation dosimetry of a Ra-223-labeled antibody shows favorable tumor to normal tissue dose ratios for therapy. The 11.4-d half-life of Ra-223 allows sufficient time for immunoconjugate preparation, administration, and tumor localization by carrier antibodies before significant radiological decay takes place. If 0.01 percent of a 37 MBq (1 mCi) injection deposits in a one gram tumor mass, and if the activity is retained with a typical effective half-time (75 h), the absorbed dose will be 163 mGy MBq{sup {minus}1} (600 rad mCi{sup {minus}1}) administered. 49 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Elite Cohesion in Political Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayerhöffer, Eva

    The dissertation presents the first comprehensive analysis of the political communication elite– high-ranking journalists, editors, politicians and their communication advisors – that shapes the content and form of political messages, news, debate and decisions in modern democracies. Although...... there is no shortage of research on the changing nature of politics due to the increasing influence of the media, the relations between the key elites in the age of ‘mediated politics’ have yet to be analyzed thoroughly. Theoretically, the dissertation provides a new bridge between elite theory and political...... communication studies that allows us to view high-ranking journalists and editors as elites in their own right, entering into enduring relations with political elites. Based on the combination of these two otherwise separated disciplines, the dissertation develops an integrated and comprehensive model of elite...

  7. 2009 Service Elite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2009-01-01

    ... between the indispensable and the invisible is where CRM technology for customer support is expected to tread--and any company successfully able to implement such a project deserves recognition. We can't touch on every kind of service and support initiative, but on the pages that follow, we present profiles of our 2009 Service Elite, four companies that impressed us this past year with their CRM efforts--and, more important, they impressed their customers, sometimes without ever letting those customers see the effor...

  8. Extraction and characterization of wax from sugarcane bagasse and the enzymatic hydrolysis of dewaxed sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Gaoxiang; Peng, Fen; Xiong, Lian; Lin, Xiaoqing; Huang, Chao; Li, Hailong; Chen, Xuefang; Chen, Xinde

    2017-03-16

    Extraction of high-value products from agricultural wastes is an important component for sustainable bioeconomy development. In this study, wax extraction from sugarcane bagasse was performed and the beneficial effect of dewaxing pretreatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. About 1.2% (w/w) of crude sugarcane wax was obtained from the sugarcane bagasse using the mixture of petroleum ether and ethanol (mass ratio of 1:1) as the extraction agent. Results of Fourier-transform infrared characterization and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry qualitative analysis showed that the crude sugarcane wax consisted of fatty fractions (fatty acids, fatty aldehydes, hydrocarbons, and esters) and small amount of lignin derivatives. In addition, the effect of dewaxing pretreatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse was also investigated. The digestibilities of cellulose and xylan in dewaxed sugarcane bagasse were 18.7 and 10.3%, respectively, compared with those of 13.1 and 8.9% obtained from native sugarcane bagasse. The dewaxed sugarcane bagasse became more accessible to enzyme due to the disruption of the outermost layer of the waxy materials.

  9. Sugarcane stems as larval habitat for the stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans in sugarcane plantations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H.D. Cançado

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans, cause losses for livestock producers located near sugarcane mills in Brazil, especially in southern Mato Grosso do Sul. The sugarcane mills are often pointed by local farmers as the primary source of these outbreaks; some mills also joined the farmers in combating the flies. Brazilian beef cattle production has great economic importance in similar level to bio-fuel production as ethanol. In this context, the wide-ranging knowledge on the biology and ecology of the stable fly, including larval habitats and their reproduction sites is extremely important for further development of control programs. This paper aims to report the occurrence and development of S. calcitrans larvae inside sugarcane stems in three municipalities of Mato Grosso do Sul. The sugarcane stems give protection against bad weather conditions and insecticide application. In this way, for sustainable sugarcane growth specific research concerning this situation should be conducted.

  10. KIAI: FIGUR ELITE PESANTREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Takdir Ilahi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In a pesantren (Islamic boarding school, kiai is an strategic element. Javanese kiai mainly believe that a pesantren is a small palace where he becomes the ultimate source of power and authority. Even though he lives in a rural village, he becomes a member of elite group in social, politic and economic sides in the society. Kiai who leads big pesantren has successfully enlarged their power in term of nation so kiai could be accepted in national elite. The position of kiai is higher among all pesantren elements. The degree as an Islamic scholar is exactly a sacred degree in pesantren culture and tradition. Without his figure, it is impossible for a pesantren to develop and survive. Kiai holds an ultimate position on educate the behavior and morality of the santri (students to be qualified and compatible Muslims generation. Kiai is not only a leader but he is also the man behind the leadership itself in supporting the progress of Islamic education institution for Muslims generations.

  11. Accuracy of genomic selection in European maize elite breeding populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng; Gowda, Manje; Liu, Wenxin; Würschum, Tobias; Maurer, Hans P; Longin, Friedrich H; Ranc, Nicolas; Reif, Jochen C

    2012-03-01

    Genomic selection is a promising breeding strategy for rapid improvement of complex traits. The objective of our study was to investigate the prediction accuracy of genomic breeding values through cross validation. The study was based on experimental data of six segregating populations from a half-diallel mating design with 788 testcross progenies from an elite maize breeding program. The plants were intensively phenotyped in multi-location field trials and fingerprinted with 960 SNP markers. We used random regression best linear unbiased prediction in combination with fivefold cross validation. The prediction accuracy across populations was higher for grain moisture (0.90) than for grain yield (0.58). The accuracy of genomic selection realized for grain yield corresponds to the precision of phenotyping at unreplicated field trials in 3-4 locations. As for maize up to three generations are feasible per year, selection gain per unit time is high and, consequently, genomic selection holds great promise for maize breeding programs.

  12. Genetic Variation Among Open-Pollinated Progeny of Eastern Cottonwood

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. E. Farmer

    1970-01-01

    Improvement programs in eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides Bartr.) are most frequently designed to produce genetically superior clones for direct commercial use. This paper describes a progeny test to assess genetic variability on which selection might be based.

  13. IDENTIFIKASI GEN AROMA PADA PROGENI-PROGENI BACKCROSS ANTARA VARIETAS CIHERANG DENGAN PANDAN WANGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djarot Sasongko Hami Seno

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Marker-assisted PCR has been considered as the most potential method for fragrant selection. RM223 is the only suitable marker to identify mutated badh2 gene of Pandan Wangi. This research applies RM223-assisted PCR in the introgression of fragrant gene (mutated badh2 of Pandan Wangi variety, to engineer non-transgenic fragrant variety with good agronomic traits as those of Ciherang. Gene introduction was carried out through site-directed crossing; Pandan Wangi was crossed and backcrossed to Ciherang until heterozygot BC5F1, followed by selfing to obtain homozygot BC5F2. RM223-assisted selection was conducted in each cross and backcross generation. RM223 was able to identify native, mutated and heterozygot badh2 of Ciherang, Pandan Wangi, and their cross/backcross progenies, respectively. Therefore, the introgression of mutated badh2 within progenies were observed, as well as the statues of badh2 gene (native/mutated and alleles (homozygot/heterozygot. Further backcross and selfing to obtain BC5F2 is in progress

  14. Disease resistance in sugarcane – An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramesh Sundar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is one of the important commercial crops cultivated world-wide both under tropical and sub-tropical conditions. The crop gains economic importance by virtue of its industrial potential in terms of products like crystal white sugar, bagasse, pressmud, power etc. Among the various production constraints of the crop, diseases are seen as a major threat for sustaining the productivity of sugarcane. Conventional Breeding is a lengthy process and it involves almost more than 10 years for the release of a commercial variety. Many varieties with superior agronomical traits have succumbed to diseases like red rot and smut during the course of cultivation, which hitherto at the time of release were rated to be resistant. The breakdown of disease resistance is attributed to the possible emergence of new virulent pathotypes. This situation has warranted a pertinent need to have a thorough understanding on inheritance pattern and mechanism of disease resistance in sugarcane, which would aid for quick screening of disease resistant clones and successful management of the diseases, respectively. Overall, there is a paradigm shift in the understanding of plant disease resistance, thanks to the advent of robust molecular tools. An integration of the tools of “Omics” namely genomics, proteomics, metabolomics etc. has further strengthened in deciphering plant-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. With the accomplishments in elucidating sugarcane ESTs, which was ably supported by employing the next generation sequencing platforms to unlock the secrets of pathogenomics in sugarcane, it is now made possible to further improve our understanding on disease resistance in sugarcane. Giving the scenario, the future looks evenmore promising, wherein convincing results are in the offing to thoroughly unravel the enigmatic relationship between sugarcane and its important pathogens.

  15. Biosynthesis of secondary metabolites in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    França S.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A set of genes related to secondary metabolism was extracted from the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database and was used to investigate both the gene expression pattern of key enzymes regulating the main biosynthetic secondary metabolism pathways and the major classes of metabolites involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental and developmental cues. The SUCEST database was constructed with tissues in different physiological conditions which had been collected under varied situation of environmental stress. This database allows researchers to identify and characterize the expressed genes of a wide range of putative enzymes able to catalyze steps in the phenylpropanoid, isoprenoid and other pathways of the special metabolic mechanisms involved in the response of sugarcane to environmental changes. Our results show that sugarcane cDNAs encoded putative ultra-violet induced sesquiterpene cyclases (SC; chalcone synthase (CHS, the first enzyme in the pathway branch for flavonoid biosynthesis; isoflavone synthase (IFS, involved in plant defense and root nodulation; isoflavone reductase (IFR, a key enzyme in phenylpropanoid phytoalexin biosynthesis; and caffeic acid-O-methyltransferase, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of lignin cell wall precursors. High levels of CHS transcripts from plantlets infected with Herbaspirillum rubri or Gluconacetobacter diazotroficans suggests that agents of biotic stress can elicit flavonoid biosynthesis in sugarcane. From this data we have predicted the profile of isoprenoid and phenylpropanoid metabolism in sugarcane and pointed the branches of secondary metabolism activated during tissue-specific stages of development and the adaptive response of sugarcane to agents of biotic and abiotic stress, although our assignment of enzyme function should be confirmed by careful biochemical and genetic supporting evidence.

  16. Sugarcane genes associated with sucrose content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincentz Michel GA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background - Sucrose content is a highly desirable trait in sugarcane as the worldwide demand for cost-effective biofuels surges. Sugarcane cultivars differ in their capacity to accumulate sucrose and breeding programs routinely perform crosses to identify genotypes able to produce more sucrose. Sucrose content in the mature internodes reach around 20% of the culms dry weight. Genotypes in the populations reflect their genetic program and may display contrasting growth, development, and physiology, all of which affect carbohydrate metabolism. Few studies have profiled gene expression related to sugarcane's sugar content. The identification of signal transduction components and transcription factors that might regulate sugar accumulation is highly desirable if we are to improve this characteristic of sugarcane plants. Results - We have evaluated thirty genotypes that have different Brix (sugar levels and identified genes differentially expressed in internodes using cDNA microarrays. These genes were compared to existing gene expression data for sugarcane plants subjected to diverse stress and hormone treatments. The comparisons revealed a strong overlap between the drought and sucrose-content datasets and a limited overlap with ABA signaling. Genes associated with sucrose content were extensively validated by qRT-PCR, which highlighted several protein kinases and transcription factors that are likely to be regulators of sucrose accumulation. The data also indicate that aquaporins, as well as lignin biosynthesis and cell wall metabolism genes, are strongly related to sucrose accumulation. Moreover, sucrose-associated genes were shown to be directly responsive to short term sucrose stimuli, confirming their role in sugar-related pathways. Conclusion - Gene expression analysis of sugarcane populations contrasting for sucrose content indicated a possible overlap with drought and cell wall metabolism processes and suggested signaling and

  17. Sugarcane boiler ash as an amendment for soilless growing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2016, research was conducted to investigate the use of sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA) as an amendment to soilless planting media for the production of vegetable seedlings. Typically, the eleven Louisiana sugarcane mills use a portion of the sugarcane bagasse for fuel, producing over 60,000 tons of S...

  18. Identification of virus isolates inducing mosaic of sugarcane in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane mosaic disease caused by sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and sorghum mosaic Virus (SrMV) is an economically important viral disease of sugarcane worldwide. Field survey was conducted to assess the presence of the viruses involve in ...

  19. Reduction of Exudates (Browning) in Sugarcane Micro Propagation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ex plant preparation in the course of sugarcane micro propagation is known to release exudates which lead to the death of sugarcane in vitro. An industrial sugarcane variety (NCS008) was used for the study and was observed to die in less than 14 days in vitro. In a study to reduce the death of this variety, ascorbic acid and ...

  20. Importance and status of sugarcane smut ( Ustilago scitaminea ) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane smut (Ustilago scitaminea) is considered as the most prevalent and serious disease in sugarcane producing countries of the world. To determine incidence of sugarcane smut, a total of 144 fields were surveyed at Wonji-Shoa, Metahara and Finchaa on plantcane, first and last ratoon crops from August 2008 to ...

  1. Application of sugarcane bagasse ash as a partial cement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane bagasse ash is a byproduct of sugar factories found after burning sugarcane bagasse which itself is found after the extraction of all economical sugar from sugarcane. The disposal of this material is already causing environmental problems around the sugar factories. On the other hand, the boost in construction ...

  2. Effect of climate variability on sugarcane breeding in Nigeria | Ishaq ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of climate variability on sugarcane breeding in Nigeria. ... Flowering in sugarcane (Saccharum species) is poor and variable at many tropical locations due to sub-optimal photoperiod. The situation is often compounded by ... sugar production in Nigeria. Keywords: Climate Change, Variability and Sugarcane Breeding ...

  3. Post-processing, energy production use of sugarcane bagasse ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane bagasse ash (SBA) is a multi-process by-product produced from the milling of sugarcane. Bagasse is the fibrous material remaining after removing the sugar, water, and other impurities from the sugarcane delivered to the mill. Louisiana produces an estimated 2.7 mt of bagasse each year. In ...

  4. Genotypic value in hybrid progenies of Panicum maximum Jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Gomes dos Santos Braz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Genetic breeding of forage plants has increasingly contributed to the release of more productive plants. In this regard, evaluating the genotypic value is essential when aiming to rank genotypes based on the mean free of environmental factors. Therefore, this study aimed to predict the genotypic value of agronomic and nutritive value characters of three progenies of Panicum maximum. Hybrids were evaluated in a clonal test in an incomplete-randomized design with three treatments (progenies 1, 2, and 3 and two replications (clones. Six harvests were performed at 25cm from the ground level throughout one year. Progeny 2 provided better results for total and leaf dry mass yield, regrowth, and height, and lower incidence of leaf spot. Progenies 1 and 3 had a better response for qualitative characters such as higher crude protein and digestibility and lower lignin and fiber content. Hybrid progenies of P. maximum have forage characters of interest for breeding, and when using ‘Mombaça’ grass as parents, the progeny stands out for leaf production and resistance to leaf spot and for ‘Tanzania’ grass as parent has resulted in better forage quality.

  5. Tropa: debate de elites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Hamilton

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, o ator Paulo Hamilton, que interpreta o soldado Paulo no filme Tropa de elite, defende o trabalho de José Padilha das acusações de comprometimento com um discurso ideológico fascista. Sua estratégia consiste em desvincular o ponto de vista sob o qual o filme é narrado – aquele do Capitão Nascimento – daquele que a obra como um todo pretenderia comunicar. Mais ainda, argumenta ele, regimes totalitários procuram combater posturas de questionamento. A polêmica que Tropa fomentou seria um indício adicional contra a sua associação ao fascismo.

  6. Anthropometric, Physiological and Performance Characteristics of Elite and Sub-elite Fencers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsolakis, Charilaos; Vagenas, George

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the differences in selected anthropometric, strength-power parameters and functional characteristics of fencing performance between elite and sub-elite fencers...

  7. Tropa de elite: dangerous ambiguities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paulo Menezes

    2013-01-01

    ... framing and on the basis or certain values. In order to materialize this perspective, the film Tropa de Elite, of large national and international repercussion, is taken as object of a concrete analysis in order to examine the artifices and...

  8. Brazil's sugarcane boom could affect regional temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-04-01

    With the world seeking to cut its dependence on fossil fuels, the use of bioethanol and other biofuels is on the rise. In Brazil, the second largest producer and consumer of bioethanol, this has led to a boom in sugarcane production. Based on new laws and trade agreements, researchers expect Brazil's production of sugarcane-derived ethanol to increase tenfold over the next decade, with considerable land being converted for growing sugarcane. Much of this expansion is expected to come at a loss of some of the country's cerrado savannas. So while a major aim of the turn to biofuels is to reduce the transfer of carbon to the atmosphere and mitigate global climate change, the shifting agricultural activity could have direct consequences on Brazil's climate by changing the region's physical and biogeochemical properties.

  9. Anthropometric and physical performance characteristics of top-elite, elite and non-elite youth female team handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Samantha Louise; McWhannell, Nicola; Michalsik, Lars Bojsen; Twist, Craig

    2015-01-01

    In order to maximise the potential for success, developing nations need to produce superior systems to identify and develop talent, which requires comprehensive and up-to-date values on elite players. This study examined the anthropometric and physical characteristics of youth female team handball players (16.07 ± 1.30 years) in non-elite (n = 47), elite (n = 37) and top-elite players (n = 29). Anthropometric profiling included sum of eight skinfolds, body mass, stature, girths, breadths and somatotype. Performance tests included 20 m sprint, counter-movement jump, throwing velocity, repeated shuttle sprint and jump ability test, and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test Level 1. Youth top-elite players had greater body mass, lean mass, stature, limb girths and breadths than elite and non-elite players, while only stature and flexed arm were higher in elite compared to non-elite players (all P  0.05). Top-elite performed better in most performance tests compared to both elite and non-elite players (P standards (P > 0.05). Elite outperformed non-elite players only in throwing velocity. The findings reveal that non-elite players compare unfavourably to top-elite international European players in many anthropometric and performance characteristics, and differ in a few characteristics compared to elite European club team players. This study is useful for emerging team handball nations in improving talent identification processes.

  10. Generation of crystalline silica from sugarcane burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blond, Jennifer S; Horwell, Claire J; Williamson, Ben J; Oppenheimer, Clive

    2010-07-08

    Sugarcane leaves contain amorphous silica, which may crystallise to form crystalline silica polymorphs (cristobalite or quartz), during commercial sugarcane harvesting where sugarcane plants are burned. Respirable airborne particulate containing these phases may present an occupational health hazard. Following from an earlier pilot study (J. S. Le Blond, B. J. Williamson, C. J. Horwell, A. K. Monro, C. A. Kirk and C. Oppenheimer, Atmos. Environ., 2008, 42, 5558-5565) in which experimental burning of sugarcane leaves yielded crystalline silica, here we report on actual conditions during sugarcane burning on commercial estates, investigate the physico-chemical properties of the cultivated leaves and ash products, and quantify the presence of crystalline silica. Commercially grown raw sugarcane leaf was found to contain up to 1.8 wt% silica, mostly in the form of amorphous silica bodies (with trace impurities e.g., Al, Na, Mg), with only a small amount of quartz. Thermal images taken during several pre-harvest burns recorded temperatures up to 1056 degrees C, which is sufficient for metastable cristobalite formation. No crystalline silica was detected in airborne particulate from pre-harvest burning, collected using a cascade impactor. The sugarcane trash ash formed after pre-harvest burning contained between 10 and 25 wt% SiO(2), mostly in an amorphous form, but with up to 3.5 wt% quartz. Both quartz and cristobalite were identified in the sugarcane bagasse ash (5-15 wt% and 1-3 wt%, respectively) formed in the processing factory. Electron microprobe analysis showed trace impurities of Mg, Al and Fe in the silica particles in the ash. The absence of crystalline silica in the airborne emissions and lack of cristobalite in trash ash suggest that high temperatures during pre-harvest burning were not sustained long enough for cristobalite to form, which is supported by the presence of low temperature sylvite and calcite in the residual ash. The occurrence of quartz and

  11. Specific physiological and biomechanical performance in elite, sub-elite and in non-elite male team handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Herbert; Fuchs, Philip X; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2018-01-01

    Team handball is a dynamic sport game that is played professionally in numerous countries. However, knowledge about training and competition is based mostly on practical experience due to limited scientific studies. Consequently, the aims of our study were to compare specific physiological and biomechanical performance in elite, sub-elite and in non-elite male team handball players. Thirty-six elite, sub-elite and non-elite male team handball players performed a game based performance test, upper-body and lower-body strength tests, 30-m sprint test, counter movement jump test and an incremental treadmill running test. Significant differences (Phandball specific oxygen uptake and higher leg strength compared to sub-elite and non-elite players. Based on these results we recommend that training in team handball should focus on game based training methods to improve performance in specific agility, endurance and technique.

  12. Study of sugarcane pieces as yeast supports for ethanol production from sugarcane juice and molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lei; Zhang, Yuan-ping; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Ming-jun; Liang, Shi-zhong; Huang, Yu-nan

    2008-12-01

    Due to the environmental concerns and the increasing price of oil, bioethanol was already produced in large amount in Brazil and China from sugarcane juice and molasses. In order to make this process competitive, we have investigated the suitability of immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain AS2.1190 on sugarcane pieces for production of ethanol. Electron microscopy clearly showed that cell immobilization resulted in firm adsorption of the yeast cells within subsurface cavities, capillary flow through the vessels of the vascular bundle structure, and attachment of the yeast to the surface of the sugarcane pieces. Repeated batch fermentations using sugarcane supported-biocatalyst were successfully carried out for at least ten times without any significant loss in ethanol production from sugarcane juice and molasses. The number of cells attached to the support increased during the fermentation process, and fewer yeast cells leaked into fermentation broth. Ethanol concentrations (about 89.73-77.13 g/l in average value), and ethanol productivities (about 59.53-62.79 g/l d in average value) were high and stable, and residual sugar concentrations were low in all fermentations (0.34-3.60 g/l) with conversions ranging from 97.67-99.80%, showing efficiency (90.11-94.28%) and operational stability of the biocatalyst for ethanol fermentation. The results of this study concerning the use of sugarcane as yeast supports could be promising for industrial fermentations.

  13. Quantification of sugarcane yellow leaf virus in sugarcane following transmission through aphid vector, Melanaphis sacchari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnaraja, C; Viswanathan, R

    2015-12-01

    Yellow leaf caused by Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) is a serious constraint to sugarcane production in India and currently the disease epidemics occur on many of the susceptible varieties under field conditions. Studies were conducted on the virus transmission by sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari in sugarcane by inoculating virus-free meristem derived from micro- propagated plants of sugarcane cv Co 86032 with viruliferous aphids. Virus transmission was confirmed through RT-PCR assays and subsequently SCYLV population was established through RT-qPCR. A maximum of 22.3 × 10(3), 3.16 × 10(6) and 4.78 × 10(6) copies of SCYLV-RNA targets were recorded in the plants after 7, 180 and 300 days, respectively. This study showed that the aphid species M. sacchari acts as an effective vector of SCYLV. The relative standard curve method in RT-qPCR efficiently detected the increment in SCYLV copy numbers in sugarcane following transmission through M. sacchari.

  14. Microcollinearity between autopolyploid sugarcane and diploid sorghum genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokhsar Daniel S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. has become an increasingly important crop for its leading role in biofuel production. The high sugar content species S. officinarum is an octoploid without known diploid or tetraploid progenitors. Commercial sugarcane cultivars are hybrids between S. officinarum and wild species S. spontaneum with ploidy at ~12×. The complex autopolyploid sugarcane genome has not been characterized at the DNA sequence level. Results The microsynteny between sugarcane and sorghum was assessed by comparing 454 pyrosequences of 20 sugarcane bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs with sorghum sequences. These 20 BACs were selected by hybridization of 1961 single copy sorghum overgo probes to the sugarcane BAC library with one sugarcane BAC corresponding to each of the 20 sorghum chromosome arms. The genic regions of the sugarcane BACs shared an average of 95.2% sequence identity with sorghum, and the sorghum genome was used as a template to order sequence contigs covering 78.2% of the 20 BAC sequences. About 53.1% of the sugarcane BAC sequences are aligned with sorghum sequence. The unaligned regions contain non-coding and repetitive sequences. Within the aligned sequences, 209 genes were annotated in sugarcane and 202 in sorghum. Seventeen genes appeared to be sugarcane-specific and all validated by sugarcane ESTs, while 12 appeared sorghum-specific but only one validated by sorghum ESTs. Twelve of the 17 sugarcane-specific genes have no match in the non-redundant protein database in GenBank, perhaps encoding proteins for sugarcane-specific processes. The sorghum orthologous regions appeared to have expanded relative to sugarcane, mostly by the increase of retrotransposons. Conclusions The sugarcane and sorghum genomes are mostly collinear in the genic regions, and the sorghum genome can be used as a template for assembling much of the genic DNA of the autopolyploid sugarcane genome. The comparable gene density between

  15. Current international intercomparison measurement on radon and its progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Keizo [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1996-12-01

    The international intercomparison measurement on radon and its progeny was held between the EML of USDOE and several Japanese organisations, using the radon test chamber installed in EML. Japanese results of radon concentration by the active method using the ionization chamber or scintillation cell and the passive method using the solid track detector were about 5% small compared to that of EML. On the results of radon progeny, there were not any large systematic differences between EML and Japanese participants in spite of wide range of deviation except for the results at the condition of low aerosol density. (author)

  16. [Development of progeny after antenatal exposure to lithium oxybutyrate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smol'nikova, N M; Allakhverdiev, V D; Liubimov, B I

    1985-01-01

    Experiments on rats were made to study the effect of lithium hydroxybutyrate and to compare it with lithium carbonate effect on the development of the progeny after antenatal exposure to the drugs. It was established that the lithium salts under study did not produce any conclusive effect on the postnatal development of young rats. The activating component was discovered to be predominant in the action of lithium hydroxybutyrate, whereas the action of lithium carbonate was marked by the inhibitory component. As regards the effect on the development of the progeny, lithium hydroxybutyrate was less hazardous than lithium carbonate.

  17. Inoculation of sugarcane with diazotrophic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivaldo Schultz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane industry, a strategic crop in Brazil, requires technological improvements in production efficiency to increase the crop energy balance. Among the various currently studied alternatives, inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria proved to be a technology with great potential. In this context, the efficiency of a mixture of bacterial inoculant was evaluated with regard to the agronomic performance and N nutrition of sugarcane. The experiment was carried out on an experimental field of Embrapa Agrobiologia, in Seropédica, Rio de Janeiro, using a randomized block, 2 × 3 factorial design (two varieties and three treatments with four replications, totaling 24 plots. The varieties RB867515 and RB72454 were tested in treatments consisting of: inoculation with diazotrophic bacteria, N-fertilized control with 120 kg ha-1 N and absolute control (no inoculation and no N fertilizer. The inoculum was composed of five strains of five diazotrophic species. The yield, dry matter accumulation, total N in the shoot dry matter and the contribution of N by biological fixation were evaluated, using the natural 15N abundance in non-inoculated sugarcane as reference. The bacterial inoculant increased the stalk yield of variety RB72454 similarly to fertilization with 120 kg ha-1 N in the harvests of plant-cane and first ratoon crops, however the contribution of biological N fixation was unchanged by inoculation, indicating that the benefits of the inoculant in sugarcane may have resulted from plant growth promotion.

  18. Genome Editing in Sugarcane: Challenges ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarthi Mohan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing opens new and unique opportunities for researchers to enhance crop production. Until 2013, the zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs were the key tools used for genome editing applications. The advent of RNA-guided engineered nucleases - the type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated system from Streptococcus pyogenes holds great potential since it is simple, effective and more versatile than ZFNs and TALENs. CRISPR/Cas9 system has already been successfully employed in several crop plants. Use of these techniques is in its infant stage in sugarcane. Jung and Altpeter (2016 have reported TALEN mediated approach for the first time to reduce lignin content in sugarcane to make it amenable for biofuel production. This is so far the only report describing genome editing in sugarcane. Large genome size, polyploidy, low transformation efficiency, transgene silencing and lack of high throughput screening techniques are certainly great challenges for genome editing in sugarcane which would be discussed in detail in this review.

  19. Assessment of somaclonal variation in sugarcane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... A study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 to assess the variability arising from callus regeneration and its vegetative transmission in a subtropical variety of sugarcane, CoJ 64. Qualitative and quantitative characters were evaluated in the field at maturity in each of the 3 years at the same location. The.

  20. Evaluation of sugarcane ( Saccharum officinarum L.) somaclonal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tissue culture technique was used to obtain salt tolerant variants from embryogenic calli of sugarcane (Saccharum sp. Var. CP48-103) that were cultured on a selective medium containing different levels of NaCl (0, 33, 66, 99 and 132 mM). A total of four plants which regenerated from the tolerant calli were selected but the ...

  1. Assessment of somaclonal variation in sugarcane | Sobhakumari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 to assess the variability arising from callus regeneration and its vegetative transmission in a subtropical variety of sugarcane, CoJ 64. Qualitative and quantitative characters were evaluated in the field at maturity in each of the 3 years at the same location. The frequencies of variants ...

  2. Telomere Length in Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniesa, Carlos A; Verde, Zoraida; Diaz-Ureña, Germán; Santiago, Catalina; Gutiérrez, Fernando; Díaz, Enrique; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Lucia, Alejandro

    2017-08-01

    Growing evidence suggests that regular moderate-intensity physical activity is associated with an attenuation of leukocyte telomere length (LTL) shortening. However, more controversy exists regarding higher exercise loads such as those imposed by elite-sport participation. The authors investigated LTL differences between young elite athletes (n = 61, 54% men, age [mean ± SD] 27.2 ± 4.9 y) and healthy nonsmoker, physically inactive controls (n = 64, 52% men, 28.9 ± 6.3 y) using analysis of variance (ANOVA). Elite athletes had, on average, higher LTL than control subjects, 0.89 ± 0.26 vs 0.78 ± 0.31, P = .013 for the group effect, with no significant sex (P = .995) or age effect (P = .114). The results suggest that young elite athletes have longer telomeres than their inactive peers. Further research might assess the LTL of elite athletes of varying ages compared with both age-matched active and inactive individuals.

  3. Harvest managements and cultural practices in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Gustavo Quassi de Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The presence of trash from the mechanical harvest of green cane on sugarcane plantations promotes changes in the agricultural management, for example, in the mechanical cultural practices of ratoon cane in-between the rows and nitrogen (N fertilization. The goal of this study was to evaluate the performance of sugarcane in different harvest systems, associated to the mechanical cultural practices in interrows and N rates. The study was carried out on a sugarcane plantation in Sales Oliveira, São Paulo, Brazil, with the sugarcane variety SP81-3250, on soil classified as Acrudox, in a randomized block design with split-split plots and four replications. The main treatments consisted of harvest systems (harvesting green cane or burnt cane, the secondary treatment consisted of the mechanical cultural practices in the interrows and the tertiary treatments were N rates (0, 30, 60, 90, 120 and 160 kg ha-1, using ammonium nitrate (33 % N as N source. The harvest systems did not differ in sugarcane yield (tons of cane per hectare - TCH, but in burnt cane, the pol percent and total sugar recovery (TSR were higher. This could be explained by the higher quantity of plant impurities in the harvested raw material in the system without burning, which reduces the processing quality. Mechanical cultural practices in the interrows after harvest had no effect on cane yield and sugar quality, indicating that this operation can be omitted in areas with mechanical harvesting. The application of N fertilizer at rates of 88 and 144 kg ha-1 N, respectively, increased stalk height and TCH quadratically to the highest values for these variables. For the sugar yield per hectare (in pol %, N fertilization induced a linear increase.

  4. Performance of herbicides in sugarcane straw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosilaine Araldi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of mechanical harvesting of sugarcane generates a large deposition of straw on the soil surface, providing a coverage that several studies have found important for reducing the weed population. Although such coverage reduces weed infestations, additional management, including chemical control, is still needed. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the leaching of atrazine, pendimethalin, metribuzin, clomazone, diuron and hexazinone in sugarcane straw. The experiment was conducted at the School of Agronomic Engineering at UNESP (Sao Paulo State University - Botucatu/SP. The sugarcane straw was collected in the field, cut and placed in quantities of 10t ha-1 in the capsules used as experimental units. The experimental design was completely randomized, using six herbicide treatments and four replications. Within 24 hours after the herbicides were applied in capsules with straw, five different rainfalls (5, 10, 20, 50 and 100mm were simulated. The leached water was collected for chromatographic analysis. The herbicide percentages that crossed the straw layer were statistically correlated with the rainfall amount by the Mitscherlich model that compares the facility of herbicide removal from sugarcane straw. In summary, pendimethalin did not present quantified transposition of the product by sugarcane straw even with a rain simulation of 100 mm. Furthermore, two different profiles of facility to transpose the herbicides in straw were found: one for metribuzin and hexazinone that crossed quickly through the straw layer and another for atrazine, diuron and clomazone that required more rainfall to be leached from coverage to the soil according to the maximum removable amount of each herbicide.

  5. The New Elite Prefers Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Lidin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last fifty years, the quality of construction has been constantly declining in light of the ideology of fast updating of the whole sphere of consumption. As a result, the houses built in the 1950s remain elite, despite their respectable age. Bulgakov House (the object of the issue is built in the historical center of Moscow. The high quality of its design and construction and careful and attentive treatment of the historic environment make this house an example of true elitism.

  6. Segregation and expression of transgenes in the progenies of Bt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... rent progenies of Bt transgenic rice crosses to conventional rice varieties was analyzed by Western dot blotting. The samples derived from GUS positive plants of. Bt transgenic rice crossed to conventional rice varieties were found to produce a higher level of toxin protein, but with greater range of variation.

  7. Selection of carioca common bean progenies resistant to white mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Sérgio Batista Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A backcross breeding program between commercial common bean cultivars (VC3 and M20 and sources of resistance(Ex-Rico 23 and G122 was conducted with a view toward selecting carioca (beige with brown stripes progenies resistant to whitemold. Forty-eight progenies (27 F2:6 BC1 and 21 F1:5 BC2 were evaluated for yield, growth habit, grain type and pathogen responseby two methodologies for assessment (“straw test” and “oxalic acid”. The methods were effective in discriminating the progenies,showing differing results, for they may assess different resistance mechanisms. Thus, they should be used together. Simultaneousselection for yield, growth habit, grain type and white mold resistance proved to be viable. The most appropriate strategy was to uselower intensities of selection and prioritize traits such as resistance and grain type, which are essential for commercial acceptance.Two progenies proved their superiority for the breeding program for they combine the traits of resistance and favorable grain type.

  8. The study of triploid progenies crossed between different ploidy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study of triploid progenies crossed between different ploidy grapes. L Sun, G Zhang, A Yan, H Xu. Abstract. The cross between different ploidy grape was one of the effective ways to obtain new seedless cultivars, in this study, through testing the changes of the ovule weight and observing its anatomical structure, the ...

  9. Adversity before Conception Will Affect Adult Progeny in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shachar-Dadon, Alice; Schulkin, Jay; Leshem, Micah

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated whether adversity in a female, before she conceives, will influence the affective and social behavior of her progeny. Virgin female rats were either undisturbed (controls) or exposed to varied, unpredictable, stressors for 7 days (preconceptual stress [PCS]) and then either mated immediately after the end of the stress…

  10. Segregation and expression of transgenes in the progenies of Bt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PCR, Southern blotting and Western dot blotting analysis confirmed that cry1Ab gene was transferred to the genome of conventional rice varieties and it was highly expressed in the different progenies of Bt rice crossed to conventional rice varieties. Among these lines, the highest Bt toxin protein content reached 2.88% of ...

  11. Thoron and thoron progeny measurements in German clay houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierl, S; Meisenberg, O; Feistenauer, P; Tschiersch, J

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, elevated thoron concentrations were found in houses built of unfired clay. In this study experiments were carried out in 17 traditional and modern clay houses in Germany to obtain an overview of indoor thoron in such houses. Long-term measurements over an 8-week period were performed using a newly developed Unattended Battery-Operated Progeny Measurement Device (UBPM) for measuring thoron progeny. This instrument uses a high-voltage electric field to precipitate radon and thoron progeny on nuclear track detectors. Additional active and passive measurements of radon, thoron and their progeny were performed. The equilibrium equivalent thoron concentration was found to be between 2 and 10 Bq m(-3). Gas concentrations were found to be between 20 and 160 Bq m(-3) for radon and between 10 and 90 Bq m(-3) for thoron 20 cm from the wall. The thoron exposure contributes significantly to the inhalation dose of the dwellers (0.6-4 mSv a(-1)). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Oxidative stress response in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Soares Netto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress response in plants is still poorly understood in comparison with the correspondent phenomenon in bacteria, yeast and mammals. For instance, nitric oxide is assumed to play various roles in plants although no nitric oxide synthase gene has yet been isolated. This research reports the results of a search of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for homologous sequences involved in the oxidative stress response. I have not found any gene similar to nitric oxide synthase in the SUCEST database although an alternative pathway for nitric oxide synthesis was proposed. I have also found several genes involved in antioxidant defense, e.g. metal chelators, low molecular weight compounds, antioxidant enzymes and repair systems. Ascorbate (vitamin C is a key antioxidant in plants because it reaches high concentrations in cells and is a substrate for ascorbate peroxidase, an enzyme that I found in different isoforms in the SUCEST database. I also found many enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants, which may be potential targets for genetic manipulation. The engineering of plants for increased vitamin C and E production may lead to improvements in the nutritional value and stress tolerance of sugarcane. The components of the antioxidant defense system interact and their synthesis is probably closely regulated. Transcription factors involved in regulation of the oxidative stress response in bacteria, yeast and mammals differ considerably among themselves and when I used them to search the SUCEST database only genes with weak similarities were found, suggesting that these transcription regulators are not very conserved. The involvement of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in plant defense against pathogens is also discussed.A resposta ao estresse oxidativo não é bem conhecida em plantas como em bactérias, leveduras e humanos. Por exemplo, assume-se que óxido nítrico tem várias fun

  13. Climate Change and Sugarcane Production: Potential Impact and Mitigation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duli Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. is an important crop for sugar and bioenergy worldwide. The increasing greenhouse gas emission and global warming during climate change result in the increased frequency and intensity of extreme weather events. Climate change is expected to have important consequences for sugarcane production in the world, especially in the developing countries because of relatively low adaptive capacity, high vulnerability to natural hazards, and poor forecasting systems and mitigating strategies. Sugarcane production may have been negatively affected and will continue to be considerably affected by increases in the frequency and intensity of extreme environmental conditions due to climate change. The degree of climate change impact on sugarcane is associated with geographic location and adaptive capacity. In this paper, we briefly reviewed sugarcane response to climate change events, sugarcane production in several different countries, and challenges for sugarcane production in climate change in order for us to better understand effects of climate change on sugarcane production and to propose strategies for mitigating the negative impacts of climate change and improving sugarcane production sustainability and profitability.

  14. Sugarcane Land Classification with Satellite Imagery using Logistic Regression Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, F.; Herwindiati, D. E.; Mulyono, S.; Hendryli, J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper discusses the classification of sugarcane plantation area from Landsat-8 satellite imagery. The classification process uses binary logistic regression method with time series data of normalized difference vegetation index as input. The process is divided into two steps: training and classification. The purpose of training step is to identify the best parameter of the regression model using gradient descent algorithm. The best fit of the model can be utilized to classify sugarcane and non-sugarcane area. The experiment shows high accuracy and successfully maps the sugarcane plantation area which obtained best result of Cohen’s Kappa value 0.7833 (strong) with 89.167% accuracy.

  15. Elite athletes and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, S; McLaughlin, K; Morgaine, K; Drummond, B

    2011-09-01

    Elite athletes follow demanding training regimes to achieve optimal performance. Training incorporates strategies which coincide with risk factors for dental caries and erosion. The important role of a disease-free oral cavity for peak performance is often overlooked and oral health may be compromised. This initial exploratory study aimed to identify risk factors for dental caries and erosion in elite triathletes. Questionnaires regarding training, diet and oral health were distributed to a sample of elite triathletes in New Zealand. A further sample of 10 athletes was randomly selected from the Dunedin triathlon club to participate in a clinical oral examination. Sports drinks were consumed by 83.9% of the triathletes while training; for 48.4% consumption of both sports drinks and water was described as 'little sips often, from a bottle'. Eating during training sessions was reported by 93.5% of participants; of those 62.1% ate only during cycling training. Only 3.2% perceived training as high risk to oral health. All clinical examination cases were assessed as high risk for developing caries. The diet of elite triathletes is consistent with a high risk profile for caries and erosion. Future research should be aimed at oral health promotion programs for the athletes, coaches and oral-health providers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Somatotype of elite Italian gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massidda, Myosotis; Toselli, Stefania; Brasili, Patricia; Calò, Carla M

    2013-09-01

    The somatotyping method is especially helpful in sports in which the body could directly influence the biomechanics of movements and the performance's results. The purpose of this study was to determine the somatotype of elite Italian gymnasts and to compare it in terms of competition levels. The sample comprised 64 elite gymnasts (42 females (F), somatotype 1.4-4.4-3.2; and 22 males (M), somatotype 1.6-6.3-2.1) belonging to the Italian National Artistic Gymnastic Team (2007) at different competition levels: Allieve, Junior, and Senior. Mean whole somatotypes, by competition levels, were not significantly different in both sexes (Female gymnasts: Allieve, 1.3-4.6-3.3; Junior, 1.3-4.2-3.6; Senior, 1.7-4.2-2.7; Male gymnasts: Junior, 1.5-6.3-2.5; Senior, 1.7-6.3-1.6). Male Junior gymnasts exhibited greater ectomorphy than Senior athletes (F1,20 = 7.75, p somatotype of Italian elite gymnasts and their strong homogeneity, evident also from the low values of somatotype attitudinal mean (SAM). The results emphasize the need for a specific somatotype to reach an elite level in sport and the need to integrate the somatotype analysis between the scientific instruments for selecting talent also in artistic gymnastics.

  17. Elite Distance Runners and Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Audrey R; Phillipps, Breanna; Darroch, Francine E; McGettigan-Dumas, Roisin

    2016-11-01

    Elite female distance runners lack guidelines regarding breastfeeding while training at a high intensity. The purpose of this research was to understand how elite female distance runners manage breastfeeding. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 14 women who had had at least one pregnancy within the past 5 years and had achieved a minimum of the USA Track and Field 2012 Olympic Trials "B" entry standard for running for the marathon or equivalent performance for 1,500 m or longer. Using thematic analysis, we identified the following themes: breastfeeding as a barrier to training and competition, limited access to relevant breastfeeding information, and concerns for the baby's health. Our findings show that despite the considerable barriers with which these women contend, they breastfed at higher rates and for longer duration than members of the general public. Based on our findings, we argue that elite female distance runners' experiences of breastfeeding would be enhanced if more research were conducted on breastfeeding practices while training and competing at an elite level.

  18. Performance Analysis in Elite Sports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, Bertus Gatze

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of this dissertation concerns the development of techniques for analyzing and comparing performances of elite sportsmen. When performances are delivered under varying circumstances, or are influenced by other factors than the athletes' abilities, a fair comparison, for instance

  19. Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Colin P.

    A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

  20. Effect of Combat Stress in the Psychophysiological Response of Elite and Non-Elite Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero-Aguilera, José Francisco; Robles-Pérez, José Juan; Clemente-Suárez, Vicente Javier

    2017-06-01

    We aimed to analyse the effect of combat stress in the psychophysiological responses of elite and non-elite soldiers. We analysed heart rate, cortical arousal, skin temperature, blood lactate concentration and lower body muscular strength before and after a tactical combat simulation in 40 warfighters divided in two groups: elite (n: 20; 28.5 ± 6.38 years) and non-elite (n:20; 31.94 ± 6.24 years) group. Elite presented a significantly higher lactate concentration after combat than non elite soldiers (3.8 ± 1.5 vs 6.6 ± 1.3 mmol/L). Non-elite soldiers had a higher heart rate pre and post the simulation than elite (82.9 ± 12.3 vs 64.4 ± 11. pre non elite and elite respectively; 93.0 ± 12.8 vs 88 ± 13.8 bpm post non elite and elite respectively). Elite soldiers presented higher lower muscular strength than elite in all test and before and after the combat simulation. Cortical arousal was not modified significantly in both groups. We conclude elite soldiers presented in combat a higher anaerobic metabolism activation and muscular strength than non-elite soldiers, but cardiovascular, cortical, and muscular strength manifestation presented the same response in both elite and non-elite soldiers.

  1. Atrial fibrillation in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlanello, F; Bertoldi, A; Dallago, M; Galassi, A; Fernando, F; Biffi, A; Mazzone, P; Pappone, C; Chierchia, S

    1998-08-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a rare event in people younger than 25 years of age, but is probably more frequent in competitive athletes. We analyzed the presence of AF, paroxysmal or chronic, in a population of young elite athletes, including previous Olympic and World champions, who were studied for arrhythmias that endangered their athletic careers. From 1974 to June 1977, 1,772 athletes identified with arrhythmias (1,464 males and 308 females; mean age 21 years) underwent individualized work-ups. Among these, 146 (122 males and 24 females; mean age 24 years) were young elite athletes. They were studied from 1985 to 1997, with a mean follow-up of 62 months. Of the 146 young elite athletes, 13 (9%) had AF (paroxysmal in 11 and chronic in 2); all were male. The paroxysmal AF occurred during effort (n = 7), after effort (n = 1), or at rest (n = 3) and was reinduced by transesophageal pacing or endocavitary electrophysiologic testing under the same clinical circumstances. AF was the cause of symptoms in 13 (40%) of 22 young elite athletes with long-lasting palpitations. Five young elite athletes had a substrate for AF: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome (WPW) in 3, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) in 1, healed myocarditis in 1, and was considered idiopathic in 8. All elite athletes are alive with a mean follow-up of 62 months and 7 continue in their sports: 3 after radiofrequency catheter ablation (of WPW in 2 and AF with maze-type nonfluoroscopic approach in 1) and 4 after a period of de-training. AF, occurring in young elite athletes and affecting only males, is one of the most frequent causes of prolonged palpitations and is reproduced easily by transesophageal atrial pacing or electrophysiologic testing. AF may be a cause of disqualification from sports eligibility, but may disappear if the athletic activity is stopped for an adequate period of time, if trigger mechanisms are corrected (i.e., WPW), or if the substrate is modified.

  2. TECHNOLOGICAL SCENARIOS TO THE DEMAND FOR SUGARCANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Franco Paes Leme Barbosa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available From the first decade of the 2000s, it is clear that there is an increase in discussions involving sustainability, including the bioenergy issue, to which Brazil has drawn the attention due to advances in the ethanol industry. Advances in engine technology reflected new opportunities for this industry and, according to the Ten-Year Energy Plan for 2019 developed by the Ministry of Mines and Energy, there is an expected increase in demand for ethanol of 90% by 2019 (Brazil, 2010. However, new technologies for the conversion and use of sugarcane and the complex context of this industry add uncertainties to this sector. Aiming to discuss and include the uncertainties on the agenda of this industry, this study proposes to elaborate and discuss prospective scenarios to the demand for sugarcane. Four scenarios with different perspectives of technological advance and market development were elaborated and discussed in the conclusion.

  3. Extraction and Characterization of Sugarcane Peel Wax

    OpenAIRE

    Inarkar, Mangesh B.; Lele, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    Sugarcane peel is an agrowaste product and contains considerable amount of wax. This has a good technoeconomic potential. In view of this, the present study aims at extraction and characterization of wax from sugarcane peel. The yield of crude wax was 0.95% on dry weight basis. During Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) prominent peaks obtained at 2921.73 and 2851.64 (–CH), 1463.44 (–CH2), 1376.96 (–CH3), 1108.4 and 1170.16 (–C–O) 3395.60 (–OH), 1710.25 (–CHO), and 1736.63 (–COOH)...

  4. Incidente of microbial contaminants in sugarcane micropropagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelenys Alvarado-Capó

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of microbial contaminants in Establishment, Multiplication and Rooting stages of the sugarcane micropropagation was determined by visual observation of the culture vessels. The type of microorganism was confirmed in observations to the optic microscope. The percentage of contamination for microbial group was determined in 731 apexes in the Establishment stage, in each multiplication subculture (up to the seventh in a total of 5 225 in vitro plants and 6 650 in the Rooting stage. In three stages the presence of microbial contaminants was verified (filamentous fungi, bacteria and yeasts with prevalence of the bacteria (13.7-31.6%. In the Multiplication stage the percentages of bacterial contamination were increased with the number of subcultures. The results indicated the high incidence of microbial contaminants in sugarcane micropropagation and the necessity of paying attention to the control of the bacterial contamination. Key words: bacteria, filamentous fungi, in vitro plants, yeast

  5. Enhanced polyhydroxybutyrate production in transgenic sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasovits, Lars A; Zhao, Lihan; McQualter, Richard B; Snell, Kristi D; Somleva, Maria N; Patterson, Nii A; Nielsen, Lars K; Brumbley, Stevens M

    2012-06-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a bacterial polyester that has properties similar to some petrochemically produced plastics. Plant-based production has the potential to make this biorenewable plastic highly competitive with petrochemical-based plastics. We previously reported that transgenic sugarcane produced PHB at levels as high as 1.8% leaf dry weight without penalty to biomass accumulation, suggesting scope for improving PHB production in this species. In this study, we used different plant and viral promoters, in combination with multigene or single-gene constructs to increase PHB levels. Promoters tested included the maize and rice polyubiquitin promoters, the maize chlorophyll A/B-binding protein promoter and a Cavendish banana streak badnavirus promoter. At the seedling stage, the highest levels of polymer were produced in sugarcane plants when the Cavendish banana streak badnavirus promoter was used. However, in all cases, this promoter underwent silencing as the plants matured. The rice Ubi promoter enabled the production of PHB at levels similar to the maize Ubi promoter. The maize chlorophyll A/B-binding protein promoter enabled the production of PHB to levels as high as 4.8% of the leaf dry weight, which is approximately 2.5 times higher than previously reported levels in sugarcane. This is the first time that this promoter has been tested in sugarcane. The highest PHB-producing lines showed phenotypic differences to the wild-type parent, including reduced biomass and slight chlorosis. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Behavior of radon progeny in low frequency electromagnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, K; Yamamoto, T

    1999-01-01

    Whether the electro-magnetic (EM) fields are carcinogenic or not still remains to be discussed from scientific point of view. Recently a possibility was pointed out that increased deposition of radon progeny in the EM-fields should enhance exposure dose to internal body. We investigated the behavior of charged sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn progeny and aerosols containing them by measuring the pattern and the magnitude of the deposition rate of decay products on both CR-39 track detectors and imaging plates under various conditions. We concluded that the attachment to wire cables should be increased mainly by electric component of low frequency EM-fields and possibly by electric field induced by strong changing magnetic ones.

  7. Prediction of genetic gains from selection in Arabica coffee progenies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Baião de Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gains from selection for yield were estimated in Arabica coffee progenies carrying rust-resistance genes. Theexperiment in augmented block design was installed in Três Pontas, state of Minas Gerais. Three blocks were established with sixplants per plot, spaced 3.50 x 0.90 m, in 96 regular (F2 progenies and two control treatments. The plant response to rust wasevaluated on a grade scale in 2008. Yield (bags per hectare was estimated in the growing seasons 2005 to 2008. Significantdifferences between treatments for yield were observed in all harvests, except 2005. The presence of genetic variability amongprogenies allowed significant gain from selection for yield. Under the experimental conditions of this study, selection for yield can beperformed in the first high-yield year, without major losses compared to genetic gain from selection for yield when based on the meanof four harvests.

  8. Selection of arabica coffee progenies tolerant to heat stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexsandro Lara Teixeira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to high temperatures, practically all coffee farms in the state of Rondonia are of the C. canephora species. Thus, importing arabica coffee from other states becomes necessary for composition of blends, as well as for the specialty or gourmet coffee market. The purpose of this study was to select arabica coffee genotypes that exhibit satisfactory agronomic performance under high temperature conditions. The experiment was conducted in OuroPreto do Oeste, RO, Brazil, with mean annual temperature of 25.8°C and mean annual rainfall of 2300mm year-1. The experiment was composed of 114 arabica coffee genotypes, with 103 progenies and eleven control cultivars, provided by EPAMIG. A randomized block experimental design was used with three replications, spacing of 3.0x1.0 meters and five plants per plot. All the crop seasons showed significant difference for the green coffee yield trait. In joint analysis, significant differences were detected among progenies and control cultivars. In the average of the four harvests, green coffee yield was 32.38 bags ha-1. The cultivars 'CatuaíVermelho IAC 15', 'Obatã IAC 1669-20' and 'Catucaí Amarelo 2SLCAK' stood out, achieving yields greater than 40 bags ha-1. The gain obtained from selection was 14.33 bags ha-1, which is equivalent to an increase of 44.04% in production of green coffee. The progeny H514-7-10-6-2-3-9 stood out with an average yield of 51.20 bags ha-1. In regard to maturation cycle, 56% of the progenies were classified as early maturity and 44% as medium maturity. Late maturity genotypes were not observed

  9. Preliminary observations of sugarcane trash degradation for repurposing as mulch

    Science.gov (United States)

    A potential use for sugarcane trash is to convert it to mulch. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether a compost enhancer or nitrogen would accelerate degradation of leaf trash. Trash was obtained from a sugarcane grower, and was treated with water only, a commercial compost starter composed o...

  10. Persistence and metabolism of fipronil in sugarcane leaves and juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Kousik; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-02-01

    Fipronil gives effective control of early shoot borer and termites in sugarcane. The persistence and metabolism of fipronil in sugarcane leaves and juice were studied following application of fipronil (Regent 0.3 G) at 75 and 300 g a.i. ha(-1). Samples of sugarcane leaves were collected at various time intervals. Samples of sugarcane juice were collected at harvest. Residues of fipronil and its metabolites were quantified by gas liquid chromatograph. The limit of quantification of fipronil and its metabolites was 0.01 mg kg(-1) for sugarcane leaves and juice. Total residues of fipronil and its metabolites in sugarcane leaves after 7 days of its application at 75 and 300 g a.i. ha(-1) were 0.26 and 0.66 mg kg(-1), respectively. Residues could not be detected after 60 and 90 following fipronil application at either concentration. In sugarcane leaves, fipronil was found to be the main constituent, followed by its metabolites amide, desulfinyl, sulfone and sulfide. Samples of sugarcane juice did not reveal the presence of fipronil or its metabolites following its application at both the dosages at harvest.

  11. Sugarcane straw removal effects on plant growth and stalk yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is growing interest in sugarcane straw removal from the field to use as raw material for bioenergy production. In contrast, sugarcane straw removal may have negative implications for many soil ecosystem services and subsequent plant growth. A two-year experiment was conducted at Bom Retiro and...

  12. The political organization of sugarcane production in Western Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guzman - Flores, E.

    1995-01-01

    The strike of CNC sugarcane producers and the immediate response by the refinery administration are a good example of the ongoing political negotiations between the main actors involved in the organization of sugarcane production in the Valley of Autlán-El Grullo. I introduced in Chapter I

  13. Rumen dry matter degradability of fresh and ensiled sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the chemical composition and in situ ruminal degradability of fresh (FSC) and ensiled (ESC) sugarcane. In situ dry matter degradability (DMD) was determined using the nylon bag technique with four cows equipped ruminal fistulas. Cows were fed with fresh or ensiled sugarcane and ...

  14. Late season sugarcane performance as affected by soil water deficit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was carried out in Ferké 2 Sugar mill located in northern Ivory Coast, in order to study sugarcane growth and yield response to deficit irrigation imposed over the yield formation stage. The crop used was a first ratoon Co 957, a non flowering late season sugarcane variety. The experiment was completely ...

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity analysis in contrasting sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane is an important crop in the country economically, politically and sociologically. It is the second largest agro-industry next to textiles. The selection and combination of parents for crossing rely on an understanding of their genetic structures and molecular diversity. In the present study, 28 sugarcane genotypes were ...

  16. Comparative study on early detection of sugarcane smut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane smut caused by Sporisorium scitamineum has the potential to result in substantial tonnage loss and significant reduction in sucrose recovery. As early and precise diagnosis is an integral component in the successful management of sugarcane smut, the present study was undertaken to accurately determine the ...

  17. Efficacy of modified polycross method in development of sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that the modified polycross method is as efficient as the Hawaiian polycross technique and more economical in the development of high yielding commercial sugarcane varieties in low technological developed sugarcane breeding programme. Key Words: Crop cycles, Heritability, Rank Summation Index ...

  18. Impact of biotechnology on sugarcane agriculture and industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are nine key issues that can influence the productivity and sustainability of the sugarcane industry. These include land, soil fertility, water, variety, planting density, crop protection, cultural practices, harvesting and processing, and information technology. To all sugarcane farmers, it r...

  19. Growing Sugarcane for Bioenergy – Effects on the Soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, A.E.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing area of sugarcane is being growing for the production of bioenergy. Sugarcane puts a high demands on the soil due to the use of heavy machinery and because large amounts of nutrients are removed with the harvest. Biocides and inorganic fertilizers introduces risks of groundwater

  20. Agrobiodiversity endangered by sugarcane farming in Mumias and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Sugarcane can be considered as the single most important cash crop extensively grown in the Lake. Victoria basin of Kenya and Uganda. In Kenya sugarcane is commercially grown in Western and Nyanza provinces, primarily by small scale farmers followed by large-scale farmers and company/factory nucleus estates ...

  1. Somaclonal Variation studies in sugarcane somaclones by using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sami

    2012-06-14

    Jun 14, 2012 ... 3Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. 4National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faisalabad, Pakistan. Accepted 16 May, 2012. Three sugarcane accessions susceptible to sugarcane mosaic virus; HSF-240, S-2000-US-359, ...

  2. Production of Citric Acid from Solid State Fermentation of Sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspergillus niger is the leading microorganism of choice for citric acid production. Sugarcane waste was used as substrate under solid state fermentation to comparatively evaluate the citric acid production capacity of Aspergillus niger isolates and the indigenous microflora in the sugarcane waste. Known optimal cultural ...

  3. Progeny Clustering: A Method to Identify Biological Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chenyue W.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Slater, John H.; Qutub, Amina A.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the optimal number of clusters is a major challenge in applying cluster analysis to any type of dataset, especially to biomedical datasets, which are high-dimensional and complex. Here, we introduce an improved method, Progeny Clustering, which is stability-based and exceptionally efficient in computing, to find the ideal number of clusters. The algorithm employs a novel Progeny Sampling method to reconstruct cluster identity, a co-occurrence probability matrix to assess the clustering stability, and a set of reference datasets to overcome inherent biases in the algorithm and data space. Our method was shown successful and robust when applied to two synthetic datasets (datasets of two-dimensions and ten-dimensions containing eight dimensions of pure noise), two standard biological datasets (the Iris dataset and Rat CNS dataset) and two biological datasets (a cell phenotype dataset and an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reverse phase protein array (RPPA) dataset). Progeny Clustering outperformed some popular clustering evaluation methods in the ten-dimensional synthetic dataset as well as in the cell phenotype dataset, and it was the only method that successfully discovered clinically meaningful patient groupings in the AML RPPA dataset. PMID:26267476

  4. Phytochemical profile of morphologically selected yerba-mate progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Teresa Valduga

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Yerba-mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil is a native South American species. Plant progenies are populations that differ in terms of their productivity, morphology and phytochemical profile. This study aimed to determine the concentration of primary and secondary metabolites, such as antioxidants, in leaves, of yerba-mate progenies selected based on morphological characteristics. We evaluated the centesimal composition of secondary metabolites in the leaves of five yerba-mate plants. Methylxanthines and phenolic compounds were determined by UPLC-PDA, and antioxidant activity by measuring DPPH scavenging. Significant differences were found in centesimal composition and the contents of caffeine, theobromine, rutin and chlorogenic acid, as well as antioxidant activities, in selected progenies. The IC50 values were correlated with the chlorogenic acid levels (r2 = 0.5242 and soluble content (r2 = 0.7686. The morphological characteristics observed in yerba-mate leaves can be used as a tool for plant selection, to obtain matrices with different phytochemical profiles as a genetic material source.

  5. THE ELITES AND THE MASSES IN 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Cristiana NILĂ-STRATONE

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The dichotomy elite / non-elite has determined the segmentation of the romanian population in groups centered on competence, talent and excellence - at the qualitatively (positive pole - on the one hand and vanity, fight for power, incompetence - at the opposite pole of the quality - on the other hand. The discrepancy between the two categories has led to the necessity of studying the causes that sustain each cluster. The separation of popular elite mass is an unquestionable cause of a form of aversion from the masses against the elite. Based on this harmful and so-called democratic attitude, the elite has became a suspect notion, with a pronounced negative connotation, marked by doubts. Considering the socio-political events occurring at global level, but especially in Europe in years 2015-2016, feels definitely a need for a ruling class with high moral character, coming from among the meritocratic elite.

  6. Effects of sugarcane waste-products on Cd and Zn fractionation and their uptake by sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkajit, Pensiri; DeSutter, Thomas; Tongcumpou, Chantra

    2014-01-01

    The effects of three sugarcane waste-products from an ethanol production plant on the fractionation of Cd and Zn in high Cd and Zn contaminated soil and metal accumulation in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) were studied, using the BCR sequential extraction and aqua regia extraction procedures. A pot experiment was performed for 4 months with four treatments: no-amendments (control), boiler ash (3% w/w), filter cake (3% w/w) and a combination of boiler ash and vinasse (1.5% + 1.5%, w/w). The results showed that all treatments reduced the most bioavailable concentrations of Cd and Zn (BCR1 + 2) in soils (4.0-9.6% and 5.5-6.3%, respectively) and metal uptake (μg) in the aboveground part of the sugarcane (up to 62% and 54% for Cd and Zn, respectively) as compared to the control. No visual symptoms of metal toxicity and no positive effect on the biomass production of sugarcane were observed. Both Cd and Zn were accumulated mainly in the underground parts of the sugarcane (root > shoot ≥ underground sett > leaf; and root > underground sett > shoot > leaf, respectively) and the translocation factors were below 1, indicating low metal uptake. The results suggested that even though sugarcane waste-products insignificantly promote sugarcane growth, they can be used in agriculture due to the low metal accumulation in sugarcane and the reduction in metal bioavailability in the soil.

  7. [Heart screening of elite athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lars Juel; Rasmusen, Hanne; Madsen, Jan Kyst; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2010-11-29

    Sudden cardiac death in competing athletes is usually caused by unsuspected heart disease, and pre-participation screening may reduce the incidence of this tragic event. Although the cost-effectiveness of screening programs is unclear, international sports associations are currently implementing mandatory screening of elite athletes. During the first year of screening in the top Danish soccer league, all athletes were found to be eligible for continued participation in the game, suggesting that concern about false positive screening results may be exaggerated.

  8. Elite Education Abroad and Social Reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Poutvaara, Panu; Foged, Mette

    Previous research has shown that family background still plays a role in educational choices, especially when it comes to elite education. We examine how family background affects the likelihood of graduating in an elite or non-elite university abroad. We use two unique surveys of Danish emigrants......, especially men highlighted academic level and prestige. For one third of women, partner was an important consideration....

  9. Elite Rationalities and Curricular Form: "Meritorious" Class Reproduction in the Elite Thinking Curriculum in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Leonel; Apple, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    While much of the critical scholarship around elite schooling has focused on the students who attend elite institutions, their social class locations, privileged habituses and cultural capital, this paper foregrounds curricular form itself as a central mechanism in the (re)production of elites. Using Basil Bernstein's conceptual framework of…

  10. Kinanthropometric and performance characteristics of elite and non-elite female softball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Singh, M; Rathi, B

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the kinanthropometric and performance characteristics of elite and non-elite female softball players. A total forty elite and non-elite level female softball players were selected from the different colleges affiliated to the Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar, for the present study. The height of subjects was measured by using the standard anthropometric rod. Weight was measured with portable weighing machine. Widths and diameters of body parts were measured by using digital caliper. Girths and lengths were taken with steel tape. Skinfold thickness measurements were taken using the Slimguide skinfold caliper. All subjects were also assessed for performance tests i.e. vertical jump, 50m sprint, medicine ball throw, 10×4m shuttle run and reaction time. Independent samples t-test reveals that elite female softball players were significantly taller (Pelite players. The elite female softball players also had significantly greater biacromial (Pelite female softball players. The non-elite female softball players were found to have significantly greater thigh circumference (Pelite female softball players. The non-elite players were also found to have significantly higher percentage body fat (Pelite players. In performance tests, the elite players were found to have significantly better reaction time (Pelite female softball players. The elite female softball players had significantly greater kinanthropometric characteristics, body composition and performance characteristics than the non-elite female softball players.

  11. Sugarcane Flood Tolerance: Current Limits and Future Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert

    2010-01-08

    Sugarcane flood tolerance is discussed in this presentation. Related issues are looked at from four perspectives – various limits, physiological and morphological changes, future gains speculations and possible ecological and hydrological applications. Sugarcane flood tolerance and yield changes are presented on several field experiments during the crop various growth phases – (1) after planting with furrow open and with furrow closed, (2) during summer growth and (3) prior to harvest. It is documented that flood or shallow water-table depth do not affect photosynthesis, stomatal conductance and transpiration. It is also documented that roots of all 40 sugarcane genotypes tested in Florida had aerenchyma, while stalks form aerenchyma after being flooded. However, only some genotypes form aerenchyma in stalks without exposure to flood; this provides extra flood tolerance. While it is still a theory, it seems that sugarcane root growth is decreased when roots must grow into water. However, sugarcane roots appear to meet the needs of the plant when flooded for up to 2 weeks. It is concluded that most commercial sugarcane cultivars in Florida can tolerate floods for 1 to 2 weeks and that sugarcane has physiological and morphological traits that allow it to respond well to short-duration floods, while continuous shallow water tables are more harmful to sugarcane than periodic flooding. Given these facts, new strategy of storing water on sugarcane fields is proposed - field A could be flooded for 1-2 weeks, then drained to the field B which would be flooded for 1-2 weeks, then drained to the field C, etc. Research should focus on extending this flood period duration, so new strategies for ecological and hydrological application could be pursued further.

  12. MRI of overuse injury in elite athletes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, E.S.; Lee, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Healy, J.C. [Department of Radiology, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.healy@imperial.ac.uk

    2007-11-15

    Overuse injuries are a common finding in elite athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal method for the diagnosis of overuse injury in athletes of all levels. We present a review of common and important overuse injuries occurring in elite athletes. A systematic approach based on the functional anatomic units - tendons, bones and joints - may assist in diagnosis of these injuries.

  13. Exploring Biographical Learning in Elite Soccer Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Qualified and skilled sport coaches are vital to the development of sport in general and of elite sport in particular. Research suggests that the development of coaching expertise in elite sport is a complex matter involving mediated, unmediated and internal learning situations. However, it is less clear to what extent and in which ways these…

  14. Elite Cricket Coach Education: A Bourdieusian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Robert C.; Cushion, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    The social structures within coach education have been largely unexplored, undiscussed, and treated as unproblematic in contributing to coach learning, both in research and practice. The study used semi-structured, in-depth interviews with 11 elite cricket coaches to gather their perceptions of an elite coach education programme. In particular,…

  15. Educating Elites in Democratic Societies: A Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agassi, Joseph; Swartz, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    This dialogue centers on the following questions: (1) How can schools help a society select or identify new elites who are hopefully as good as and perhaps even better than those individuals who belong to the existing elite system?, and (2) How can we create learning situations that provide the most general learner with a broad basic education?…

  16. Nitrogen fluxes at the root-soil interface show a mismatch of nitrogen fertilizer supply and sugarcane root uptake capacity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brackin, Richard; Näsholm, Torgny; Robinson, Nicole; Guillou, Stéphane; Vinall, Kerry; Lakshmanan, Prakash; Schmidt, Susanne; Inselsbacher, Erich

    2015-01-01

    ... these with N uptake capacities of sugarcane roots. We show that in fertilized sugarcane soils, fluxes of inorganic N exceed the uptake capacities of sugarcane roots by several orders of magnitude...

  17. Sugarcane Elongin C is involved in infection by sugarcane mosaic disease pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yushan; Deng, Yuqing; Cheng, Guangyuan; Peng, Lei; Zheng, Yanru; Yang, Yongqing, E-mail: yyq287346@163.com; Xu, Jingsheng, E-mail: xujingsheng@126.com

    2015-10-23

    Sugarcane (Saccharum sp. hybrid) provides the main source of sugar for humans. Sugarcane mosaic disease (SMD) is a major threat to sugarcane production. Currently, control of SMD is mainly dependent on breeding resistant cultivars through hybridization, which is time-consuming. Understanding the mechanism of viral infection may facilitate novel strategies to breed cultivars resistant to SMD and to control the disease. In this study, a wide interaction was detected between the viral VPg protein and host proteins. Several genes were screened from sugarcane cDNA library that could interact with Sugarcane streak mosaic virus VPg, including SceIF4E1 and ScELC. ScELC was predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein, but subcellular localization analysis showed it was distributed both in cytoplasmic and nuclear, and interactions were also detected between ScELC and VPg of SCMV or SrMV that reveal ScELC was widely used in the SMD pathogen infection process. ScELC and VPgs interacted in the nucleus, and may function to enhance the viral transcription rate. ScELC also interacted with SceIF4E2 both in the cytoplasm and nucleus, but not with SceIF4E1 and SceIF4E3. These results suggest that ScELC may be essential for the function of SceIF4E2, an isomer of eIF4E. - Highlights: • We cloned ScELC, SceIF4E1, SceIF4E2 and SceIF4E3 from sugarcane accession Badila. • We examined interactions among VPg, ScELC, SceIF4E1, SceIF4E2 and SceIF4E3. • We proofed that ScELC interacted with VPgs of SCMV, SrMV and SCSMV. • We proofed that ScELC interacted with SceIF4E2 but not SceIF4E1 or SceIF4E3.

  18. Transgenic sugarcane overexpressing CaneCPI-1 negatively affects the growth and development of the sugarcane weevil Sphenophorus levis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Vanessa Karine; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Chakravarthi, Mohan; Ribeiro, Carolina; Chabregas, Sabrina Moutinho; Falco, Maria Cristina; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic sugarcane expressing CaneCPI-1 exhibits resistance to Sphenophorus levis larvae. Transgenic plants have widely been used to improve resistance against insect attack. Sugarcane is an economically important crop; however, great losses are caused by insect attack. Sphenophorus levis is a sugarcane weevil that digs tunnels in the stem base, leading to the destruction of the crop. This insect is controlled inefficiently by chemical insecticides. Transgenic plants expressing peptidase inhibitors represent an important strategy for impairing insect growth and development. Knowledge of the major peptidase group present in the insect gut is critical when choosing the most effective inhibitor. S. levis larvae use cysteine peptidases as their major digestive enzymes, primarily cathepsin L-like activity. In this study, we developed transgenic sugarcane plants that overexpress sugarcane cysteine peptidase inhibitor 1 (CaneCPI-1) and assessed their potential through feeding bioassays with S. levis larvae. Cystatin overexpression in the transgenic plants was evaluated using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, RT-qPCR, and immunoblot assays. A 50% reduction of the average weight was observed in larvae that fed on transgenic plants in comparison to larvae that fed on non-transgenic plants. In addition, transgenic sugarcane exhibited less damage caused by larval attack than the controls. Our results suggest that the overexpression of CaneCPI-1 in sugarcane is a promising strategy for improving resistance against this insect.

  19. GENETIC VARIABILITY IN YOUNG PROGENIES OF AÇAIZEIRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Tomé de Farias Neto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed at studying the genetic variability in young progenies of açaizeiro population. The experiment wasinstalled in the physical base of Tomé-Açu of the Embrapa Eastern Amazônia, involving the study of 25 progenies of half sibdelineated in látice 5 x 5. The experiment consisted of two repetitions and five plants per plot. Plant height (AP and diameter (DFC,number of live leaves (NFV and tillers (NP were obtained twelve months after planting. The analyses of variance showed that,except plant height and number of leaves characteristics, it had significant differences 5 % of probability for diameter plant andnumber of tillers. Values estimated in the superior extremity of the interval of variation for the characteristic appraised point outpromising individuals to be selected for producing fruits, regarding diameter of the plant, due to the fact that these characters arecorrelated positively. The biggest estimates of genetic parameters had been gotten in relation to the characteristic number of tillers,followed by plant diameter.

  20. Sudetic larch in Germany - Results of provenance and progeny research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisgerber, H. [Forest Centre for Management Planning, Research and Ecology, Hann Muenden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    There are only a few older sources of Sudetic larch in Germany. They distinguish themselves by outstanding growth and low susceptibility to canker. This impression was confirmed by results of provenance research. The Sudetic larch tested in comparison with numerous other provenances proved to be fast-growing, site-tolerant, to a large extent insusceptible to canker, with straight but also slightly to moderately curved stems. The Sudetic provenances behave remarkably uniformly as regards these characteristics. In addition to provenance research investigations have been going on for a long time in Germany into individual differences within the Sudetic larch populations. A report is given on the results of progeny tests from free and controlled pollination, using the example of a seed orchard consisting of 54 clones. We point also to possibilities for improving stem quality by selection steps. The results of provenance and progeny research on Sudetic larch are in the meantime being put to use to a large extent in practical forestry. The forest administrations of various federal lands recommend the use of reproductive material of Sudetic origin and from seed orchards. 20 refs, 3 figs

  1. Room model with three modal distributions of attached 220Rn progeny and dose conversion factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikezić, D; Stevanović, N

    2007-01-01

    Jacobi parametric room model was extended to the three modal distribution of aerosols, and applied to (220)Rn progeny. The computer program was developed to calculate ratios of progeny activity concentrations in different modes to (220)Rn concentration. The ratios are relatively small and they are given as functions on ventilation rate. Dose conversion factor (DCF) for (220)Rn progeny was calculated as 4.5 mSv WLM(-1), which is smaller by over three times than that for (222)Rn progeny.

  2. Lifecycle assessment of fuel ethanol from sugarcane in Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ometto, A. R.; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Roma, W. N. L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the lifecycle assessment (LCA) of fuel ethanol, as 100% of the vehicle fuel, from sugarcane in Brazil. The functional unit is 10,000 km run in an urban area by a car with a 1,600-cm(3) engine running on fuel hydrated ethanol, and the resulting reference flow is 1,000 kg......, and study cases at sugarcane farms and fuel ethanol industries in the northeast of SA o pound Paulo State, Brazil. The methodological structure for this LCA study is in agreement with the International Standardization Organization, and the method used is the Environmental Design of Industrial Products...... fuel. The recommendations for the ethanol lifecycle are: harvesting the sugarcane without burning; more environmentally benign agricultural practices; renewable fuel rather than diesel; not washing sugarcane and implementing water recycling systems during the industrial processing; and improving...

  3. CO2 emissions from soil incubated with sugarcane straw and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CO2 emissions from soil incubated with sugarcane straw and nitrogen fertilizer. RF de Almeida, CH Silveira, JER Mikhael, FO Franco, BT Ribeiro, A de Siqueira Ferreira, E de Sa Mendonca, B Wendling ...

  4. Development of somaclones in sugarcane genotype BF-162 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pris

    2012-02-21

    2007). Saponins Production in Shoot and Callus Cultures of Gypsophila Paniculata. J. Appl. Sci. Res. 3(10): 1045-1049. Hussnain Z, Afghan S (2006). Impact of major cane diseases on sugarcane yield and sugar recovery.

  5. Diversity of plant growth-promoting bacteria associated with sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, J E L; Lyra, M C C P; Ollero, F J; Freitas, A D S; Oliveira, L M S; Araújo, A S F; Figueiredo, M V B

    2017-05-10

    The sugarcane (Saccharum spp) presents economic importance, mainly for tropical regions, being an important Brazilian commodity. However, this crop is strongly dependent on fertilizers, mainly nitrogen (N). This study assessed the plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) associated with sugarcane that could be used as a potential inoculant to the crop. We evaluated the genetic diversity of PGPB in the plant tissue of sugarcane varieties (RB 867515, RB 1011, and RB 92579). The primer BOX-A1R was used to differentiate the similar isolated and further sequencing 16S rRNA ribosomal gene. The 16S rRNA gene showed the presence of seven different genera distributed into four groups, the genus Bacillus, followed by Paenibacillus (20%), Burkholderia (14%), Herbaspirillum (6%), Pseudomonas (6%), Methylobacterium (6%), and Brevibacillus (3%). The molecular characterization of endophytic isolates from sugarcane revealed a diversity of bacteria colonizing this plant, with a possible biotechnological potential to be used as inoculant and biofertilizers.

  6. Development of somaclones in sugarcane genotype BF-162 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of somaclones in sugarcane genotype BF-162 and assessment of variability by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers in selected red rot resistant somaclones.

  7. Feasibility of cultivation of sugarcane in agroforestry systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Luís Fernando Guedes

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazil is the world's main sugarcane producer and the production system has changed abiding to legal and technical recommendation. In Piracicaba many smallholders grow sugarcane in steep areas. Under such situation, mechanization at harvest makes cultivation impossible. This work assess the viability of agroforestry systems on joining crop production and conservation of natural resources. Soils at 12-20% slope class were identified, tree species which could be cultivated along with sugarcane were selected, and the design of the systems to be adopted was evaluated. Identified area occupies 11,556 ha and the most representative soil types are Typic Kandiuldult and Lithic Hapludoll. The exotic species coconut, eucalyptus, pejibaye and rubber, and eight native species have potential to be grown in contourhedgerows with sugarcane. Initial planting of exotic, domesticated trees is recommended, and gradual introduction of native, non-domesticated species, can be set according to their ecological requirements.

  8. Competitiveness of Brazilian Sugarcane Ethanol Compared to US Corn Ethanol

    OpenAIRE

    Crago, Christine Lasco; Khanna, Madhu; Barton, Jason; Giuliani, Eduardo; Amaral, Weber

    2010-01-01

    Corn ethanol produced in the US and sugarcane ethanol produced in Brazil are the world’s leading sources of biofuel. Current US biofuel policies create both incentives and constraints for the import of ethanol from Brazil, and together with the competitiveness and greenhouse gas intensity of sugarcane ethanol compared to corn ethanol will determine the extent of these imports. This study analyzes the supply-side determinants of this competitiveness and compares the greenhouse gas intensity of...

  9. IMAGE PROCESSING METHOD TO MEASURE SUGARCANE LEAF AREA

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay B Patil; Dr Shrikant K Bodhe

    2011-01-01

    In order to increase the average sugarcane yield per acres with minimum cost farmers are adapting precision farming technique. This paper includes the area measurement of sugarcane leaf based on image processing method which is useful for plants growth monitoring, to analyze fertilizer deficiency and environmental stress,to measure diseases severity. In image processing method leaf area is calculated through pixel number statistic. Unit pixel in the same digital images represent the same size...

  10. RB975242 and RB975201 - Late maturation sugarcane varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monalisa Sampaio Carneiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane varieties RB975201 and RB975242 were developed and released for harvest at the end of the season (late maturation in the CentralSouth region of Brazil. In specific environments, these varieties were compared with commercial standards in sugar yield per area. They are resistant to major sugarcane diseases and present the Bru1 gene of resistance to brown rust.

  11. Comparison of genes fragments coding for ribosomal protein in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María I. Oloriz

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial sequences of sugarcane genes, obtained by means of a subtractive library were identified by BLAST alignment against all sequences available in the databases. During the homology search, five genes were identified as chloroplast or citosol ribosomal proteins. The biggest homology obtained among the identified sequences as ribosomal proteins of sugarcane was with the corn genome. Key words: consensus domain, Saccharum spp., subtractive library

  12. All eggs are not equal: the maternal environment affects progeny reproduction and developmental fate in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon C Harvey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maternal effects on progeny traits are common and these can profoundly alter progeny life history. Maternal effects can be adaptive, representing attempts to appropriately match offspring phenotype to the expected environment and are often mediated via trade-offs between progeny number and quality. Here we have investigated the effect of maternal food availability on progeny life history in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The maternal environment affects both reproductive traits and progeny development. Comparisons of the progeny of worms from high and low maternal food environments indicates that low maternal food availability reduces progeny reproduction in good environments, increases progeny reproduction in poor environments and decreases the likelihood that progeny will develop as dauer larvae. These analyses also indicate that the effects on progeny are not a simple consequence of changes in maternal body size, but are associated with an increase in the size of eggs produced by worms at low maternal food availabilities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that the maternal environment affects both progeny reproduction and development in C. elegans and therefore that all progeny are not equal. The observed effects are consistent with changes to egg provisioning, which are beneficial in harsh environments, and of changes to progeny development, which are beneficial in harsh environments and detrimental in benign environments. These changes in progeny life history suggest that mothers in poor quality environments may be producing larger eggs that are better suited to poor conditions.

  13. Competitiveness of Brazilian sugarcane ethanol compared to US corn ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crago, Christine L. [Energy Biosciences Institute, 1115 IGB Bldg., 1206 W Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL (United States); Khanna, Madhu [Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, 301A Mumford Hall, 1301 W Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL (United States); Barton, Jason [Faculty of Land and Food Systems, University of British Columbia, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Giuliani, Eduardo [Venture Partners do Brasil, Rua Iguatemi 354 82, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Amaral, Weber [Av. Padua Dias 11 - CP 9, Forest Sciences Departament - ESALQ, University of Sao Paulo, 13148-900, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    Corn ethanol produced in the US and sugarcane ethanol produced in Brazil are the world's leading sources of biofuel. Current US biofuel policies create both incentives and constraints for the import of ethanol from Brazil and together with the cost competitiveness and greenhouse gas intensity of sugarcane ethanol compared to corn ethanol will determine the extent of these imports. This study analyzes the supply-side determinants of cost competitiveness and compares the greenhouse gas intensity of corn ethanol and sugarcane ethanol delivered to US ports. We find that while the cost of sugarcane ethanol production in Brazil is lower than that of corn ethanol in the US, the inclusion of transportation costs for the former and co-product credits for the latter changes their relative competitiveness. We also find that the relative cost of ethanol in the US and Brazil is highly sensitive to the prevailing exchange rate and prices of feedstocks. At an exchange rate of US1=R2.15 the cost of corn ethanol is 15% lower than the delivered cost of sugarcane ethanol at a US port. Sugarcane ethanol has lower GHG emissions than corn ethanol but a price of over $113 per ton of CO{sub 2} is needed to affect competitiveness. (author)

  14. Nitrogenous fertilization of sugarcane in a soil with hydromorphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Pineda Ruiz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The element that sugarcane responds to more frequently is nitrogen. A deficiency of this element may decrease the agricultural yields, when applied below the rates the crop needs; and an over-abundance of this element causes smaller sucrose content in sugarcane juice. It is necessary to apply nitrogen fertilizers appropriately at the right time and in the right place. In a long-term (18-year experiment on a Vertisol, where doses ranging from 0 until 250 kg of N.ha-1 were applied, the nitrogen fertilization revealed a positive effect on the agricultural yields of the 14 studied crops, during the first 3 cycles. And all the evaluated stumps responded constantly to the nitrogen fertilization. The rate of consumption was of 1.13 kg of N per ton of sugarcane produced, lower than the one accepted by the Cuban sugarcane growers (1.5 kg of N/t of sugarcane. The organic matter content benefitted where the element was applied, although its content increased in the soil over a long period of time. The objective of this research was to evaluate of the response of sugarcane when nitrogen fertilizers were applied to hydromorphic soils.

  15. Previously identified patellar tendinopathy risk factors differ between elite and sub-elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, I; Steele, J R; Munro, B J; Brown, N A T

    2015-06-01

    Patellar tendinopathy is the most common knee injury incurred in volleyball, with its prevalence in elite athletes more than three times that of their sub-elite counterparts. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patellar tendinopathy risk factors differed between elite and sub-elite male volleyball players. Nine elite and nine sub-elite male volleyball players performed a lateral stop-jump block movement. Maximum vertical jump, training history, muscle extensibility and strength, three-dimensional landing kinematics (250 Hz), along with lower limb neuromuscular activation patterns (1500 Hz), and patellar tendon loading were collected during each trial. Multivariate analyses of variance (P volleyball players. Interventions designed to reduce landing frequency and improve quadriceps extensibility are recommended to reduce patellar tendinopathy prevalence in volleyball players. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Elite y naturaleza. ¿Naturaleza de elite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Luz Jaramillo Giraldo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available El artículo da cuenta de las actitudes y representaciones de una colectividad particular con respecto a la naturaleza, su origen y consecuencias sobre el paisaje, la tierra, la estructura agraria, en la primera mitad del siglo XX –partiendo del XIX–. Ideas y representaciones de la elite que se encarga de “dirigir” el destino del país y que repercuten en todos los estratos, creando no sólo políticas y técnicas; también actitudes profundas y sus efectos visibles en los paisajes reales y en las mediaciones complejas de las representaciones fantásticas que los conforman.

  17. Elite Education Abroad and Social Reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Poutvaara, Panu; Foged, Mette

    2012-01-01

    We study how social origin affects the likelihood of obtaining university education, with focus on foreign elite and non-elite education. Having highly educated parents increases the likelihood of obtaining university education both at home and abroad. Our survey data on Danes who have emigrated...... a bigger role for women, especially among women going for elite education. When we asked respondents why they studied abroad, especially men highlighted academic level and prestige. For one third of women, partner was an important consideration. Together, the United Kingdom and the United States attract 60...

  18. Transgenic Sugarcane with a cry1Ac Gene Exhibited Better Phenotypic Traits and Enhanced Resistance against Sugarcane Borer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Gao

    Full Text Available We developed sugarcane plants with improved resistance to the sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis (F. An expression vector pGcry1Ac0229, harboring the cry1Ac gene and the selectable marker gene, bar, was constructed. This construct was introduced into the sugarcane cultivar FN15 by particle bombardment. Transformed plantlets were identified after selection with Phosphinothricin (PPT and Basta. Plantlets were then screened by PCR based on the presence of cry1Ac and 14 cry1Ac positive plantlets were identified. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR revealed that the copy number of cry1Ac gene in the transgenic lines varied from 1 to 148. ELISA analysis showed that Cry1Ac protein levels in 7 transgenic lines ranged from 0.85 μg/FWg to 70.92 μg/FWg in leaves and 0.04 μg/FWg to 7.22 μg/FWg in stems, and negatively correlated to the rate of insect damage that ranged from 36.67% to 13.33%, respectively. Agronomic traits of six transgenic sugarcane lines with medium copy numbers were similar to the non-transgenic parental line. However, phenotype was poor in lines with high or low copy numbers. Compared to the non-transgenic control plants, all transgenic lines with medium copy numbers had relatively equal or lower sucrose yield and significantly improved sugarcane borer resistance, which lowered susceptibility to damage by insects. This suggests that the transgenic sugarcane lines harboring medium copy numbers of the cry1Ac gene may have significantly higher resistance to sugarcane borer but the sugarcane yield in these lines is similar to the non-transgenic control thus making them superior to the control lines.

  19. ACID HYDROLYSIS OF HEMICELLULOSE FROM SUGARCANE BAGASSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. PESSOA JR.

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of the hemicellulosic fraction of sugarcane bagasse by sulphuric acid was performed in laboratory (25 mL and semi-pilot (25 L reactors under different conditions of temperature, time and acid concentration. On the laboratory scale, the three highest recovery yields were obtained at: 140ºC for 10 min with 100 mgacid/gdm (yield=73.4%; 140ºC for 20 min with 100 mgacid/gdm (yield=73.9% and 150ºC for 20 min with 70 mgacid/gdm (yield=71.8%. These conditions were also used for hydrolysis in a semi-pilot reactor, and the highest xylose recovery yield (83.3% was obtained at 140ºC for 20 min with 100 mgacid/gdm

  20. Radon progeny deposition in track-detection diffusion chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Pressyanov, D; Simeonov, G

    1999-01-01

    The sensitivity dependence for cylindrical diffusion chambers that are used for radon track-detection measurements on the deposition fraction of radon progeny atoms has been theoretically studied (sensitivity is the ratio: area track density/integrated sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn activity concentration). Experimentally, the sensitivity values of both the metal- and plastic-made chambers were determined. Results indicate that the experimental sensitivity for metal chambers is in accordance with the theoretical model while a deviation of 15% is observed for plastic chambers. The uncertainty in the sensitivity values that is related to possible variations of the diffusion coefficient for sup 2 sup 1 sup 8 Po atoms was estimated to be less than 10%. (author)

  1. First detection of radon progeny recoil tracks by MIMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffard, Q.; Santos, D.; Guillaudin, O.; Bosson, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, J.; Descombes, T.; Fourel, C.; Muraz, J.-F.; Lebreton, L.; Maire, D.; Colas, P.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Giomataris, I.; Busto, J.; Fouchez, D.; Brunner, J.; Tao, C.

    2017-06-01

    The MIMAC experiment is a μ-TPC project for directional dark matter search. Directional detection strategy is based on the measurement of the WIMP flux anisotropy due to the solar system motion with respect to the dark matter halo. The main purpose of MIMAC project is the measurement of nuclear recoil energy and 3D direction from the WIMP elastic scattering on target nuclei. Since June 2012 a bi-chamber prototype is operating at the Modane underground laboratory. In this paper, we report the first ionization energy and 3D track observations of NRs produced by the radon progeny. This measurement shows the capability of the MIMAC detector and opens the possibility to explore the low energy recoil directionality signature.

  2. Soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period: influence on soil chemical and physical properties and on sugarcane productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roniram Pereira da Silva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The planting of diversified crops during the sugarcane fallow period can improve the chemical and physical properties and increase the production potential of the soil for the next sugarcane cycle. The primary purpose of this study was to assess the influence of various soil uses during the sugarcane fallow period on soil chemical and physical properties and productivity after the first sugarcane harvest. The experiment was conducted in two areas located in Jaboticabal, São Paulo State, Brazil (21º 14' 05'' S, 48º 17' 09'' W with two different soil types, namely: an eutroferric Red Latosol (RLe with high-clay texture (clay content = 680 g kg-1 and an acric Red Latosol (RLa with clayey texture (clay content = 440 g kg-1. A randomized block design with five replications and four treatments (crop sequences was used. The crop sequences during the sugarcane fallow period were soybean/millet/soybean, soybean/sunn hemp/soybean, soybean/fallow/soybean, and soybean. Soil use was found not to affect chemical properties and sugarcane productivity of RLe or RLa. The soybean/millet/soybean sequence improved aggregation in the acric Latosol.

  3. Comparison of baseline free testosterone and cortisol concentrations between elite and non-elite female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Christian J; Crewther, Blair T; Smith, Alan A

    2012-01-01

    To compare the baseline free testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations of elite and non-elite female athletes. Eighteen females from different sports (track and field, netball, cycling, swimming, bob skeleton) were monitored over a 12-week period. Baseline measures of salivary free T and C concentrations were taken weekly prior to any training. The elites (n = 9) and non-elites (n = 9) were classified as international and national level competitors, respectively, with both groups matched by sport. The pooled free T concentrations of the elites (87 pg/ml) were significantly higher than the non-elites (41 pg/ml) and consistently so across all weekly time points (P free C concentrations were also greater in the elite group (2.90 ng/ml) than the non-elites (2.32 ng/ml) (P free T and C concentrations could indicate a greater capacity for physical performance at higher work rates, which is commensurate with the demands of elite sport. Speculatively, the T differences observed could influence female behavior and thereby help to regulate sporting potential. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzer, Lev; Ruzer, Lev S.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-02-25

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry ?-- nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction.

  5. Life cycle assessment of sugarcane ethanol production in India in comparison to Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Faaij, André P C; Seabra, Joaquim E A; Lundquist, Lars; Schenker, Urs; Briois, Jean François; Patel, Martin K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: India's biofuel programme relies on ethanol production from sugarcane molasses. However, there is limited insight on environmental impacts across the Indian ethanol production chain. This study closes this gap by assessing the environmental impacts of ethanol production from sugarcane

  6. Fermented sugarcane and pineapple beverage produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and non‐Saccharomyces yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribeiro, Luciana Silva; Duarte, Whasley Ferreira; Dias, Disney Ribeiro; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2015-01-01

    ...) to produce a fermented sugarcane and pineapple drink was evaluated. Co‐ and pure cultures using different proportions of sugarcane juice and pineapple pulp (80:20, 70:30 and 60:40) were prepared...

  7. Genetic parameters and estimated genetic gains in young rubber tree progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Khusala Verardi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the genetic parameters and to estimate genetic gains in young rubber tree progenies. The experiments were carried out during three years, in a randomized block design, with six replicates and ten plants per plot, in three representative Hevea crop regions of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Twenty-two progenies were evaluated, from three to five years old, for rubber yield and annual girth growth. Genetic gain was estimated with the multi-effect index (MEI. Selection by progenies means provided greater estimated genetic gain than selection based on individuals, since heritability values of progeny means were greater than the ones of individual heritability, for both evaluated variables, in all the assessment years. The selection of the three best progenies for rubber yield provided a selection gain of 1.28 g per plant. The genetic gains estimated with MEI using data from early assessments (from 3 to 5-year-old were generally high for annual girth growth and rubber yield. The high genetic gains for annual girth growth in the first year of assessment indicate that progenies can be selected at the beginning of the breeding program. Population effective size was consistent with the three progenies selected, showing that they were not related and that the population genetic variability is ensured. Early selection with the genetic gains estimated by MEI can be made on rubber tree progenies.

  8. Cellulose content of tuber cell walls of progeny from a cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two transgenic potato lines, csr2-1 and csr4-8, containing two different antisense genes, csr2 and csr4, respectively, were crossed to investigate the possibility of achieving reduction in cellulose content in the tuber cell walls of the progeny. The progeny containing both transgenes (double csr2/csr4 transformant) exhibited ...

  9. Relation of Zn, Fe, Cu and Mn between progenies of mate-tree and soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiane Cava Guimarães

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The mate tea tree (Ilex Paraguariensis St. Hil. has considerable growth in acid a low fertility soils. The knowledge of soil and plant relation will contribute to genetic improvement programs, as highly capable progenies in nutrient acquisition may be selected. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interference of provenance and, or progenies, in relations established among the extractable contents of Zn, Fe, Cu and Mn, via Mehlich-1 (1:10; and EDTA (1%, with the corresponding contents in the mate tea tree leaves. In the experiment two provenances, Ivaí-PR and Barão de Cotegipe-RS, with five progenies each considered as treatments. The samples were distributed in four randomized blocks, totalizing 120 plant leaf samples, related to 120 soil samples of a Red Distrophic Latosol. The results were analyzed and fitted in regression equations. In Ivaí provenance Zn and Mn from the soil correlated with their contents in the leaves for progeny 04, for both extracts. For provenances 08 and 10, soil Mn via EDTA correlated with leaf Mn contents, while via Mehlich-1 only for progeny 10. In the provenance of Barão de Cotegipe, the correlations between soil and leaves for Zn, Fe and Cu occurred for the EDTA extract in the progenies 61, 65 and 69 respectively. For Mn and Cu, via Melich-1 the correlations occurred for progenies 53 and 69 respectively, and still for Cu, via EDTA, for progeny 53.

  10. Sugarcane Water Sustainability Assessment Through the Indicators Extracted from Spatial Models: Case Study of Sugarcane Expansion Hotspots in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, R. P.; Simoes, M.; Dubreuil, V.

    2012-12-01

    The CanaSat project data from INPE (2010) has evidenced the trend of sugarcane expansion into savanna areas in the Midwest region of Brazil that has a great potential for the sugarcane development, in terms of topography and suitable soils, according to Sugarcane Agroecological Zoning (EMBRAPA, 2009). However, in this region the climatic water availability has limitations, once the climate is marked by drought season with a strong water deficiency due to reduction of rainfall (SILVA et al. 2008). There may be serious risks to the sugarcane culture conducted in dryland crop system without any support from additional irrigation. Silva et al. (2008) state that, for the expansion of sugarcane cultivation in the Cerrado region will be necessary supplemental irrigation with 80 to 120 mm of water applied after cutting or planting. In the Brazilian Midwest the sugarcane agroindustry expansion is technically viable, but for the sustainable development of this activity it is necessary an adequate planning based on knowledge about water demand and availability. The aim of this study was to conduct an assessment of the potential water sustainability for the sugarcane cultivation in four microregions in Goiás State, Brazil, through the use of indicators proposed in Indicators System of Sugarcane Water Sustainability Assessment (Ferraz, 2012), that was thought to subsidize the public policies proposals and sectoral planning in strategic level by means of indicators that enable to perform diagnostic and prognostic analysis. These indicators are direct and relevant indexes obtained from data extracted through geoprocessing techniques from integration of many spatial models. The used indicators were: (i) Three indexes expressing the land favorability for sugarcane development conducted in dryland or irrigation system through the establishment of the ratio between the sugarcane suitable area for each different system and the total area of territorial unit of analysis (micro

  11. Sugarcane Water Stress Tolerance Mechanisms and Its Implications on Developing Biotechnology Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Thais H. S. Ferreira; Tsunada, Max S.; Denis Bassi; Pedro Araújo; Lucia Mattiello; Guidelli, Giovanna V.; Righetto, Germanna L.; Gonçalves, Vanessa R.; Prakash Lakshmanan; Marcelo Menossi

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane is a unique crop with the ability to accumulate high levels of sugar and is a commercially viable source of biomass for bioelectricity and second-generation bioethanol. Water deficit is the single largest abiotic stress affecting sugarcane productivity and the development of water use efficient and drought tolerant cultivars is an imperative for all major sugarcane producing countries. This review summarizes the physiological and molecular studies on water deficit stress in sugarcan...

  12. Elite Forces - The Army of the Future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Floca, Mihai

    1997-01-01

    ...) information warfare; (f) foreign internal defense; (g) counter- proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; (h) civil affairs; (i) war by proxy. This paper will demonstrate that activities 'c-i' need elite forces or/and Special Operation Forces.

  13. Is Competitive Elite Sport Really Morally Corrupt?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingthorsson Rögnvaldur D.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been argued that competitive elite sport both a reduces the humanity of athletes by turning them into beings whose sole value is determined in relation to others, and b is motivated by a celebration of the genetically superior and humiliation of the weak. This paper argues that while a is a morally reproachable attitude to competition, it is not what competitive elite sport revolves around, and that b simply is not the essence of competitive elite sport. Competitive elite sport is an exploration of the physical and mental demands of sport. Finally, the paper explores a number of consequences of the different views of sport with respect to the problem of intersexual women.

  14. Business and corporate elites in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratković-Njegovan Biljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the issue of new business and corporate elites in Serbian society as one of the neglected aspects of two-decades-long social and economic transition away from the eyes of the general public. These elites haven't reached their status through typical channels of social mobility, such as education and achievements in professional work. In the struggle for capital allocation most of the business elites took advantage of the accelerated privatization of public property which took place in a climate of illegal business. The political establishment was in favor of the new business tycoons since they themselves also took advantage of the moment to convert their political power into the economic one. By devaluing public enterprises, selling them for a pittance and deceiving small shareholders massively, new corporate owners eroded the social capital. The society was impoverished and instead of developing it followed the path of antimodernization and peripheralization of the economy. That was a clear case of obstructing the democratic development of society by its elites. The majority of the new economic elite have originated from those social layers of the socialist era who had already possessed significant resources, economic, organizational and cultural capital, as well as political power. It can be argued that it was a transition without transformation, i.e. a process of 'remaking' the old establishment into a new elite. However, since the mid-nineties, the business and corporate elites have been penetrated by a new generation of business people, generally not related to the previous establishment. They accept the rules of doing business in a responsible manner. On the other hand, the state has found enough strength to start sanctioning transitional financial frauds and fraudsters from the closed circles of the current financial (pseudo elite.

  15. Whither Elite Cohesion in Mexico: A Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    Mexico, 1984; and at the local level, in Gustavo del a - tiio V., Crisis y transformucion de ura socied4d tradicional, (K-ntro de Investigaciones ...circumstances. Personalism may be the most important cultural or psychological factor that explains the tenacity cf the traditional dowreh sy-tem-- but it...within the elite or broader forces of social change-- the centralizing tendencies within the elite and the key institutions have become excessive, and some

  16. Water sustainability assessment in Brazilian sugarcane expansion area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpare, F. V.; Ruiz-Correa, S. T.; Hernandes, T. A.; Scanlon, B. R.; Picoli, M. C. A.; Bonomi, A.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the increasing demand for ethanol, sugarcane is expanding into Cerrado (Savannahs), where edaphoclimatic characteristics differ significantly from traditional areas in South-eastern Brazil. It is expected that the sugarcane will be irrigated in those areas to increase yields and ensure stable production. The main objective is to assess the sugarcane land occupation and its dynamics relating its occurrence with the potential and actual yields, the irrigation needs, the production costs, and the water footprint in Paranaíba watershed (222,593 km2 drainage area). The Agroecological Zone Model - FAO was used in order to provide essential data for yield and water requirement assessment. For sugarcane stalk yield estimation, several improvements have been made allowing this tool to assess different irrigation scenarios. In this study, full irrigation which aims to replace 100% of the water deficit until senescence period was considered. The sugarcane occupation and expansion was assessed through EVI approach from 2009/2010 to 2012/2013 crop seasons. It was possible to identify that most part of sugarcane occupation is concentrated in the central area, which presents less potential for yield gain through irrigation and significant water availability issues. With regard to the expansion, an increase of 54% of cane occupation (from 616,899 to 946,589 ha) was detected during the assessed period showing that the main dynamic occurred in central part towards west side and at less extent, to southeaster side. The irrigation management were responsible for increase, on average, 108% of yields while decreasing 42% of water footprints. Simulated yields combine with CanaSoft model estimated a 30% decline in production cost. Although several aspects such as land price and infrastructure must to be considered, in conclusion, the expansion dynamic agrees to the areas with greater yield gain potential through irrigation, lower sugarcane production costs and water footprint

  17. Computational identification and analysis of novel sugarcane microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiebaut Flávia

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNA-regulation of gene expression plays a key role in the development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Deep sequencing analyses accelerate the process of small RNA discovery in many plants and expand our understanding of miRNA-regulated processes. We therefore undertook small RNA sequencing of sugarcane miRNAs in order to understand their complexity and to explore their role in sugarcane biology. Results A bioinformatics search was carried out to discover novel miRNAs that can be regulated in sugarcane plants submitted to drought and salt stresses, and under pathogen infection. By means of the presence of miRNA precursors in the related sorghum genome, we identified 623 candidates of new mature miRNAs in sugarcane. Of these, 44 were classified as high confidence miRNAs. The biological function of the new miRNAs candidates was assessed by analyzing their putative targets. The set of bona fide sugarcane miRNA includes those likely targeting serine/threonine kinases, Myb and zinc finger proteins. Additionally, a MADS-box transcription factor and an RPP2B protein, which act in development and disease resistant processes, could be regulated by cleavage (21-nt-species and DNA methylation (24-nt-species, respectively. Conclusions A large scale investigation of sRNA in sugarcane using a computational approach has identified a substantial number of new miRNAs and provides detailed genotype-tissue-culture miRNA expression profiles. Comparative analysis between monocots was valuable to clarify aspects about conservation of miRNA and their targets in a plant whose genome has not yet been sequenced. Our findings contribute to knowledge of miRNA roles in regulatory pathways in the complex, polyploidy sugarcane genome.

  18. Cognitive Functions in Elite and Sub-Elite Youth Soccer Players Aged 13 to 17 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijgen, Barbara C H; Leemhuis, Sander; Kok, Niels M; Verburgh, Lot; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Soccer players are required to anticipate and react continuously in a changing, relatively unpredictable situation in the field. Cognitive functions might be important to be successful in soccer. The current study investigated the relationship between cognitive functions and performance level in elite and sub-elite youth soccer players aged 13-17 years. A total of 47 elite youth soccer players (mean age 15.5 years, SD = 0.9) and 41 sub-elite youth soccer players (mean age 15.2 years, SD = 1.2) performed tasks for "higher-level" cognitive functions measuring working memory (i.e., Visual Memory Span), inhibitory control (i.e., Stop-Signal Task), cognitive flexibility (i.e., Trail Making Test), and metacognition (i.e., Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System Design Fluency Test). "Lower-level" cognitive processes, i.e., reaction time and visuo-perceptual abilities, were also measured with the previous tasks. ANOVA's showed that elite players outscored sub-elite players at the "higher-level" cognitive tasks only, especially on metacognition (p elite youth soccer players on inhibitory control (p = .001), and cognitive flexibility (p = .042), but not on metacognition (p = .27). No differences were found concerning working memory nor the "lower-level" cognitive processes (p > .05). In conclusion, elite youth soccer players have better inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, and especially metacognition than their sub-elite counterparts. However, when training hours are taken into account, differences between elite and sub-elite youth soccer players remain apparent on inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility in contrast to metacognition. This highlights the need for longitudinal studies to further investigate the importance of "higher-level" cognitive functions for talent identification, talent development and performance in soccer.

  19. Louisiana sugarcane entomology: A look at the back and a peek at the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlling insect pests is an important consideration for sugarcane farmers seeking to minimize losses and maximize profits. Research in managing insects has been conducted for almost as long as sugarcane has been grown in Louisiana. This presentation reviews Louisiana sugarcane entomology from the...

  20. Genetic variability in coat protein gene of sugarcane mosaic virus in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is one of the three causative viruses of mosaic in sugarcane, a sugar crop widely grown under tropical and subtropical conditions worldwide. Although molecular characterization of SCMV strains was reported from many countries, strain occurring in Pakistan, a major sugarcane producer ...

  1. Evaluation of the juice brix of wild sugarcanes (Saccharum spontaneum indigenous to Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Sakaigaichi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern sugarcane cultivars are derived from the interspecific crossing between Saccharum officinarum and wild sugarcane, Saccharum spontaneum. The introgression of valuable characteristics from wild sugarcane is recognized as extremely important, but this process typically requires long-term effort over multiple generations of backcrosses owing to the low sugar content of the initial interspecific hybrids. In this study, we aimed to identify Japanese wild sugarcanes with high juice brix in order to promote effective interspecific crossing of sugarcane. Sixty-four accessions from the Nansei Islands and 70 accessions from the Honshu were evaluated for juice brix. Wild sugarcanes with high juice brix were demonstrated to exist among wild sugarcanes indigenous to the Honshu. A significant difference was observed between the median juice brix values of wild sugarcanes of the Nansei Islands and those of the Honshu. The relationship between juice brix and stem traits was then examined in 20 wild sugarcanes, 10 each from the Nansei Islands and the Honshu. The reproducibility of juice brix value in both experiments was confirmed. In contrast to juice brix, stem traits, such as length, diameter, and volume, were typically smaller in wild sugarcanes from the Honshu. Moreover, a negative correlation was observed between the index of stem volume and juice brix. In this study, we identified outstanding wild sugarcanes with high juice brix. Using germplasms from the identified wild sugarcanes in interspecific crossing could contribute to the increases in both yield and sugar content.

  2. Impact of sugarcane field residue and mill bagasse on seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research indicates that sugarcane field residue and sugarcane mill bagasse may be allelopathic. Allelopathy is the chemical interaction between plants, which may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. Previous research in Louisiana indicated that sugarcane field residue may inhibi...

  3. Using agent-based simulation to explore sugarcane supply chain transport complexities at a mill scale

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Price, CS

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane supply chain (from sugarcane grower to mill) have particular challenges. One of these is that the growers have to deliver their cane to the mill before its quality degrades. The sugarcane supply chain typically consists of many growers...

  4. Determinants of the effectiveness of fast break actions in elite and sub-elite Italian men’s basketball games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Conte

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the determinants of successful and unsuccessful fast-break (FB actions in elite and sub-elite basketball games. Fifteen 1st-division (elite and fifteen 3rd-division (sub-elite Italian men’s championship games were analysed across two seasons (2012/2013 and 2013/2014. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed, and the fast-break outcome (successful vs. unsuccessful was adopted as the dependent variable separately in both elite and sub-elite games. FB execution (initiation, advance and completion phases, typology (primary and secondary break and the number of players involved (equal number or superiority were used as independent variables. The results showed that the rate of success of FB actions was 63.5% and 59.7% in elite and sub-elite games, respectively. Moreover, successful FBs were more likely to be completed in the lane in relation to unsuccessful ones in both elite and sub-elite games (p<0.05. Finally, descriptive statistics showed that both elite and sub-elite teams executed FBs similarly. This study highlighted that completion zone was the only predictor of a successful fast break in basketball, while the typology and number of players involved did not predict fast break effectiveness. Moreover, elite and sub-elite teams executed fast break actions similarly. These findings might be useful for basketball coaches to optimize the training of FB actions.

  5. Soil Quality Indexing Strategies for Evaluating Sugarcane Expansion in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherubin, Maurício R.; Karlen, Douglas L.; Cerri, Carlos E. P.; Franco, André L. C.; Tormena, Cássio A.; Davies, Christian A.; Cerri, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing demand for biofuel has intensified land-use change (LUC) for sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) expansion in Brazil. Assessments of soil quality (SQ) response to this LUC are essential for quantifying and monitoring sustainability of sugarcane production over time. Since there is not a universal methodology for assessing SQ, we conducted a field-study at three sites within the largest sugarcane-producing region of Brazil to develop a SQ index (SQI). The most common LUC scenario (i.e., native vegetation to pasture to sugarcane) was evaluated using six SQI strategies with varying complexities. Thirty eight soil indicators were included in the total dataset. Two minimum datasets were selected: one using principal component analysis (7 indicators) and the other based on expert opinion (5 indicators). Non-linear scoring curves were used to interpret the indicator values. Weighted and non-weighted additive methods were used to combine individual indicator scores into an overall SQI. Long-term conversion from native vegetation to extensive pasture significantly decreased overall SQ. In contrast, conversion from pasture to sugarcane had no significant impact on overall SQ at the regional scale, but site-specific responses were found. In general, sugarcane production improved chemical attributes (i.e., higher macronutrient levels and lower soil acidity); however it has negative effects on physical and biological attributes (i.e., higher soil compaction and structural degradation as well as lower soil organic carbon (SOC), abundance and diversity of macrofauna and microbial activity). Overall, we found that simple, user-friendly strategies were as effective as more complex ones for identifying SQ changes. Therefore, as a protocol for SQ assessments in Brazilian sugarcane areas, we recommend using a small number of indicators (e.g., pH, P, K, Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure -VESS scores and SOC concentration) and proportional weighting to reflect chemical

  6. Soil Quality Indexing Strategies for Evaluating Sugarcane Expansion in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício R Cherubin

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for biofuel has intensified land-use change (LUC for sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum expansion in Brazil. Assessments of soil quality (SQ response to this LUC are essential for quantifying and monitoring sustainability of sugarcane production over time. Since there is not a universal methodology for assessing SQ, we conducted a field-study at three sites within the largest sugarcane-producing region of Brazil to develop a SQ index (SQI. The most common LUC scenario (i.e., native vegetation to pasture to sugarcane was evaluated using six SQI strategies with varying complexities. Thirty eight soil indicators were included in the total dataset. Two minimum datasets were selected: one using principal component analysis (7 indicators and the other based on expert opinion (5 indicators. Non-linear scoring curves were used to interpret the indicator values. Weighted and non-weighted additive methods were used to combine individual indicator scores into an overall SQI. Long-term conversion from native vegetation to extensive pasture significantly decreased overall SQ. In contrast, conversion from pasture to sugarcane had no significant impact on overall SQ at the regional scale, but site-specific responses were found. In general, sugarcane production improved chemical attributes (i.e., higher macronutrient levels and lower soil acidity; however it has negative effects on physical and biological attributes (i.e., higher soil compaction and structural degradation as well as lower soil organic carbon (SOC, abundance and diversity of macrofauna and microbial activity. Overall, we found that simple, user-friendly strategies were as effective as more complex ones for identifying SQ changes. Therefore, as a protocol for SQ assessments in Brazilian sugarcane areas, we recommend using a small number of indicators (e.g., pH, P, K, Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure -VESS scores and SOC concentration and proportional weighting to reflect

  7. Triazines mobility in sugarcane cultivated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portocarrero, Rocio; Aparicio, Virginia; de Gerónimo, Eduardo; Costa, José Luis

    2017-04-01

    Atrazine and ametryn are pre and post-emergence herbicides, widely used in sugarcane crops in Argentina. Both herbicides are characterized by their moderate to high mobility in soil. The mobility increases with higher soil pH and lower organic matter content (OM). Tucuman province has the main sugarcane cultivated area in the country (>65%), which lies over a shallow aquifer and drains to the Salí river. Most of the cultivated soils from the southeast of the province have a pH> 7.3 and OMmobility. The aim of this study was to estimate the leaching potential of atrazine and ametryn in soils from the southeast of Tucuman under sugarcane production. Miscible displacement experiments were carried out using undisturbed topsoil cores from four production fields, by triplicate. Each column was 15 cm length and 8 cm diameter. The dose of atrazine and ametryn that was applied in the columns corresponds to the equivalent dose used in the field of 2 kg ha-1a.i and 1.2 kg ha-1a.i respectively. Br- was used as a tracer molecule and it was applied previous to the herbicides pulse at a concentration of 150 BrK kg ha-1. Displacement was made with CaCl2 (0.01M) at a flow of 0.4 ml min-1, constant temperature (21°C) and unsaturated conditions (-0,5 m). The leached water samples were analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography (Waters® ACQUITY® UPLC) coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS/MSQuattro Premier XE Waters).The breakthrough curves (BTCs) for each compound were estimated by the convection-dispersion equation (using CXTFIT 2.0 program) in order to estimate the transport parameters. Results showed that the hydraulic transport was in equilibrium conditions, meaning that all the soil water is involved in solute convective transport. This could be explained by a soil porosity composed mainly by micro and mesopores, due to natural conditions or by tillage and harvest practices. Water velocity and dispersion range were 0.73-1.6 cm h-1 and 0.24-2.3 cm2 h-1 respectively

  8. Identification and characterization of yeasts in sugarcane silages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, C L S; Bravo Martins, C E C; Schwan, R F

    2010-11-01

    To enumerate the micro-organisms and to identify the yeast species present during the ensilage of different sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) cultivars. Samples of sugarcane silage were collected at 10, 20, 30 and 40 days from the start of fermentation. Population levels of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), mesophilic facultative anaerobic (MFA) bacteria, filamentous fungi and yeasts were determined. Nine species of yeasts were classified according to traditional methods and confirmed using molecular techniques. LAB dominated the ensiling process of sugarcane, although yeasts were present at relatively high population levels throughout the whole fermentation period. The detected species of yeasts varied according to sugarcane cultivar and time of fermentation. Torulaspora delbrueckii was the predominant yeast, followed by Pichia anomala and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Knowledge of the population of micro-organisms in general, and of yeasts in particular, present during the fermentation of sugarcane is of fundamental importance in the development of more effective ensiling processes. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Scenarios of suitable areas of sugarcane crops in Brazil regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga-Vicente, A.

    2011-12-01

    The use of ethanol produced from sugarcane presents advantages to face climate changes as adaptation measure (reduce dependency of fossil fuel) and mitigation measure (reduce GHG emissions and captures CO2). Whereas the increasing demand of ethanol production and the importance of the planning in order to meet a future demand, this work aimed to evaluate suitable areas for sugarcane crops in two Brazilian regions in present and in possible climate change conditions. Scenarios were generated considering climatic risk to sugarcane crops (present and based in IPCC projections for changes in temperature and precipitation values); land available and able to cultivation (baseline is actual conditions and the projections consider public policies; urban and protected areas were eliminated; regions that already have sugarcane crops were eliminated) and food security (areas that are used to food production crops were eliminated). Scenarios show areas with potential for expansion of sugarcane crops in the present conditions and the possible changes that could occur in a climate change scenario. The results can be used to drive public policies in ethanol sector.

  10. Simulated hydroclimatic impacts of projected Brazilian sugarcane expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, M.; Lobell, D. B.; Field, C. B.; Mahalov, A.

    2013-03-01

    Sugarcane area is currently expanding in Brazil, largely in response to domestic and international demand for sugar-based ethanol. To investigate the potential hydroclimatic impacts of future expansion, a regional climate model is used to simulate 5 years of a scenario in which cerrado and cropland areas (~1.1E6 km2) within south-central Brazil are converted to sugarcane. Results indicate a cooling of up to ~1.0°C during the peak of the growing season, mainly as a result of increased albedo of sugarcane relative to the previous landscape. After harvest, warming of similar magnitude occurs from a significant decline in evapotranspiration and a repartitioning toward greater sensible heating. Overall, annual temperature changes from large-scale conversion are expected to be small because of offsetting reductions in net radiation absorption and evapotranspiration. The decline in net water flux from land to the atmosphere implies a reduction in regional precipitation, which is consistent with progressively decreasing simulated average rainfall for the study period, upon conversion to sugarcane. However, rainfall changes were not robust across three ensemble members. The results suggest that sugarcane expansion will not drastically alter the regional energy or water balance, but could result in important local and seasonal effects.

  11. Sugarcane spirit market share simulation: an application of conjoint analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João de Deus Souza Carneiro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the influence of packaging and labeling attributes of sugarcane spirit on consumers' behavior by applying the results of conjoint analysis in sugarcane spirit market share simulation. Firstly, a conjoint analysis was performed aiming to estimate the part-worths of each consumer for some sugarcane spirit packaging and labeling attributes. These part-worths were used in the market share simulation using the maximum utility model. It was observed that some packaging and labeling attributes affected consumer's purchase intention and that most consumers showed a similar preference pattern regarding these attributes. These consumers showed preference for the Seleta brand, which was bottled in 700 mL clear glass bottles with a metal screw cap that bore a label illustration unrelated to sugarcane spirit production process and had the information "aged 36 months in oak barrels". This study also showed that conjoint analysis and the use of its results in the market share simulation proved important tools to better understand consumer behavior towards intention to purchase sugarcane spirit.

  12. Sugarcane Bagasse: A Potential Medium for Fungal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arushdeep Sidana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, sugarcane industries produce tons of sugarcane bagasse as residual/waste material. This residual material is rich in complex lignocellulosic substances and may be used as a low cost carbon and energy source for the growth of fungal species. The present work was aimed at designing a sugarcane waste-based medium as a substitute for expensive commercial media for growing fungal cultures. Eight species of fungi, namely, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Fusarium sp., and four unidentified species F1, F2, F3, and F5, were grown on the sugarcane bagasse medium which produced remarkable results and competed with standard media like potato dextrose agar, Sabouraud dextrose agar, and cornmeal agar. The designed medium was able to provide nourishment to the fungi as well as prevent the growth of any bacterial or fungal contaminant. The production of spores was more in the sugarcane medium as compared with standard media. Hence, this study led to the discovery of a new and efficient medium for fungal cultures as well as decrease in the waste disposal expenses and efforts.

  13. Cardiac Damage Biomarkers Following a Triathlon in Elite and Non-elite Triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Ho; Kim, Kwi-Baek; Han, Jin; Ji, Jin-Goo; Kwak, Yi-Sub

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate cardiac damage biomarkers after a triathlon race in elite and non-elite athlete groups. Fifteen healthy men participated in the study. Based on performance, they were divided into elite athlete group (EG: n=7) and non-elite athlete group (NEG: n=8). Participants' blood samples were obtained during four periods: before, immediately, 2 hours and 7 days after finishing the race. creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase-myoglobin (CK-MB), myoglobin, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly increased in both groups immediately after, and 2 hours after finishing the race (pelite than in non-elite. However, all cardiac damage markers return to normal range within 1 week.

  14. Early growth performance of full-sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies at three different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Aimin, Atirah Abdullah; Abdullah, Mohd Zaki; Muhammad, Norwati; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Field trials of 14 full sib Acacia auriculiformis x Acacia mangium F1 hybrid progenies were evaluated for growth performance at three sites (Bintulu, Mentakab and Segamat). Results indicated that there were significant differences (p> 0.05) for diameter breast height (Dbh) and total height (Ht) among the progenies and different sites. Superior progenies have been identified for future tree selection and improvement.

  15. motivation and physical performance in elite and non-elite trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BT Crewther

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding of the hormonal contribution to athletic performance, we examined the temporal associations between individual changes in testosterone (T and/or cortisol (C concentrations, training motivation and physical performance in elite and non-elite trained men. Two male cohorts classified as elites (n = 12 and non-elites (n = 12 completed five testing sessions over a six-week period. The athletes were tested for salivary T, C, T/C ratio, self-perceived training motivation, countermovement jump (CMJ height and isometric mid-thigh pull peak force (IMTP PF, after which an actual training workout was performed. The elite men reported higher motivation to train and they produced greater CMJ height overall, whereas the non-elites had higher pooled T levels (p < 0.05. No significant group differences in C concentrations, T/C ratio or IMTP PF were found. The individual changes in T levels were positively associated with training motivation in the elite men only (p = 0.033, but the hormonal and motivation measures did not predict CMJ height or IMTP PF in either group. The monitoring of elite and non-elite men across a short training block revealed differences in T levels, motivation and lower-body power, which may reflect training and competitive factors in each group. Despite having lower T levels, the elite athletes showed better linkage between pre-training T fluctuations and subsequent motivation to train. The nature of the performance tests (i.e. single repetition trials could partly explain the lack of an association with the hormonal and motivational measures.

  16. Maternal Diet and Insulin-Like Signaling Control Intergenerational Plasticity of Progeny Size and Starvation Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Hibshman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal effects of environmental conditions produce intergenerational phenotypic plasticity. Adaptive value of these effects depends on appropriate anticipation of environmental conditions in the next generation, and mismatch between conditions may contribute to disease. However, regulation of intergenerational plasticity is poorly understood. Dietary restriction (DR delays aging but maternal effects have not been investigated. We demonstrate maternal effects of DR in the roundworm C. elegans. Worms cultured in DR produce fewer but larger progeny. Nutrient availability is assessed in late larvae and young adults, rather than affecting a set point in young larvae, and maternal age independently affects progeny size. Reduced signaling through the insulin-like receptor daf-2/InsR in the maternal soma causes constitutively large progeny, and its effector daf-16/FoxO is required for this effect. nhr-49/Hnf4, pha-4/FoxA, and skn-1/Nrf also regulate progeny-size plasticity. Genetic analysis suggests that insulin-like signaling controls progeny size in part through regulation of nhr-49/Hnf4, and that pha-4/FoxA and skn-1/Nrf function in parallel to insulin-like signaling and nhr-49/Hnf4. Furthermore, progeny of DR worms are buffered from adverse consequences of early-larval starvation, growing faster and producing more offspring than progeny of worms fed ad libitum. These results suggest a fitness advantage when mothers and their progeny experience nutrient stress, compared to an environmental mismatch where only progeny are stressed. This work reveals maternal provisioning as an organismal response to DR, demonstrates potentially adaptive intergenerational phenotypic plasticity, and identifies conserved pathways mediating these effects.

  17. Inference of genetic diversity in popcorn S3 progenies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G F; do Amaral, A T; Ribeiro, R M; Ramos, H C C; Boechat, M S B; Santos, J S; Mafra, G S; Kamphorst, S H; de Lima, V J; Vivas, M; de Souza Filho, G A

    2016-05-09

    Molecular markers are a useful tool for identification of complementary heterotic groups in breeding programs aimed at the production of superior hybrids, particularly for crops such as popcorn in which heterotic groups are not well-defined. The objective of the present study was to analyze the genetic diversity of 47 genotypes of tropical popcorn to identify possible heterotic groups for the development of superior hybrids. Four genotypes of high genetic value were studied: hybrid IAC 125, strain P2, and varieties UENF 14 and BRS Angela. In addition, 43 endogamous S3 progenies obtained from variety UENF 14 were used. Twenty-five polymorphic SSR-EST markers were analyzed. A genetic distance matrix was obtained and the following molecular diversity parameters were estimated: number of alleles, number of effective alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), observed and expected heterozygosities, Shannon diversity index, and coefficient of inbreeding. We found a moderate PIC and high diversity index, indicating that the studied population presents both good discriminatory ability and high informativeness for the utilized markers. The dendrogram built based on the dissimilarity matrix indicated six distinct groups. Our findings demonstrate the genetic diversity among the evaluated genotypes and provide evidence for heterotic groups in popcorn. Furthermore, the functional genetic diversity indicates that there are informative genetic markers for popcorn.

  18. Sugarcane Serine Peptidase Inhibitors, Serine Peptidases, and Clp Protease System Subunits Associated with Sugarcane Borer (Diatraea saccharalis) Herbivory and Wounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Ane H; Mingossi, Fabiana B; Dias, Renata O; Franco, Flávia P; Vicentini, Renato; Mello, Marcia O; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2016-09-01

    Sugarcane's (Saccharum spp.) response to Diatraea saccharalis (F.) (Lepidoptera: (Crambidae) herbivory was investigated using a macroarray spotted with 248 sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) encoding serine peptidase inhibitors, serine peptidases. and Clp protease system subunits. Our results showed that after nine hours of herbivory, 13 sugarcane genes were upregulated and nine were downregulated. Among the upregulated genes, nine were similar to serine peptidase inhibitors and four were similar to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these sequences belong to a phylogenetic group of sugarcane BBIs that are potentially involved in plant defense against insect predation. The remaining four upregulated genes included serine peptidases and one homolog to the Arabidopsis AAA+ chaperone subunit ClpD, which is a member of the Clp protease system. Among the downregulated genes, five were homologous to serine peptidases and four were homologous to Arabidopsis Clp subunits (three homologous to Clp AAA+ chaperones and one to a ClpP-related ClpR subunit). Although the roles of serine peptidase inhibitors in plant defenses against herbivory have been extensively investigated, the roles of plant serine peptidases and the Clp protease system represent a new and underexplored field of study. The up- and downregulated D. saccharalis genes presented in this study may be candidate genes for the further investigation of the sugarcane response to herbivory.

  19. Functional characterization of sugarcane mustang domesticated transposases and comparative diversity in sugarcane, rice, maize and sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kajihara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transposable elements (TEs account for a large portion of plant genomes, particularly in grasses, in which they correspond to 50%-80% of the genomic content. TEs have recently been shown to be a source of new genes and new regulatory networks. The most striking contribution of TEs is referred as “molecular domestication”, by which the element coding sequence loses its movement capacity and acquires cellular function. Recently, domesticated transposases known as mustang and derived from the Mutator element have been described in sugarcane. In order to improve our understanding of the function of these proteins, we identified mustang genes from Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays and performed a phenetic analysis to assess the diversity and evolutionary history of this gene family. This analysis identified orthologous groups and showed that mustang genes are highly conserved in grass genomes. We also explored the transcriptional activity of sugarcane mustang genes in heterologous and homologous systems. These genes were found to be ubiquitously transcribed, with shoot apical meristem having the highest expression levels, and were downregulated by phytohormones. Together, these findings suggest the possible involvement of mustang proteins in the maintenance of hormonal homeostasis.

  20. Injuries in elite male kitesurfers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliseo Andreu-Cabrera

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new extreme sport, kitesurf hasn’t received the kind of scientific scrutiny found with other more traditional sports. Currently, the pattern and rate of kiteboarding injuries are largely unclear. The objective was to identify common injury patterns as well as potential areas in which prevention measures might be instituted. A descriptive epidemiological study was designed and a retrospective questionnaire was performed on 38 elite kitesurfers taking part in the World Cup Fuerteventura 2008. The ankle is the part of the body most affected by injury p<0.01, whilst the Course Race category accounted for 68.4% of injuries, compared with 31.6% in the Freestyle category. Said injuries occurred more frequently when training (76.3%; p<0.01 than during competitions and acute injuries were the most common. These results show the need to establish new prevention methodologies, above all for the legs and specifically for the ankle area and in the Course Race category, as well as the use of foot protections

  1. Sugarcane maturity estimation through edaphic-climatic parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarpari Maximiliano Salles

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. grows under different weather conditions directly affecting crop maturation. Raw material quality predicting models are important tools in sugarcane crop management; the goal of these models is to provide productivity estimates during harvesting, increasing the efficiency of strategical and administrative decisions. The objective of this work was developing a model to predict Total Recoverable Sugars (TRS during harvesting, using data related to production factors such as soil water storage and negative degree-days. The database of a sugar mill for the crop seasons 1999/2000, 2000/2001 and 2001/2002 was analyzed, and statistical models were tested to estimate raw material. The maturity model for a one-year old sugarcane proved to be significant, with a coefficient of determination (R² of 0.7049*. No differences were detected between measured and estimated data in the simulation (P < 0.05.

  2. Isozyme Analysis on Different Varieties of Sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson M.

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Isozymic and protein diversity among five sugarcane varieties viz., Co 6304, Co 85019, Co 8371, Co 89003 and Co 91010 were studied to understand the varietal interrelationship and to identify the biochemical marker for the disease resistance and stress tolerance. The standard technique of vertical gel electrophoresis PAGE was employed for size separation of isozymes. The gel was stained with different staining solutions for different isozyme systems viz. peroxidase, esterase, acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and proteins. Rf values of the banding profiles, similarity index and variation between the varieties were analysed. Among the four enzyme systems, peroxidase profile reveals the difference between the disease resistant / susceptible and abiotic stress tolerant / non tolerant varieties. The two isoperoxidase bands with Rf values 0.62 and 0.66 showed their presence in disease resistant and abiotic tolerant varieties. The presence of two marker bands (0.62, 0.66 of resistant and stress tolerant varieties suggest that the variety Co 6304 may also be resistant to smut, wilt and moderately resistant to red rot and tolerant to drought.

  3. Vision and Visual History in Elite/Near-Elite-Level Cricketers and Rugby-League Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Brendan T; Flavell, Jonathan C; Bennett, Simon J; Cruickshank, Alice G; Mankowska, Alex; Harris, Julie M; Buckley, John G

    2017-11-10

    The importance of optimal and/or superior vision for participation in high-level sports remains the subject of considerable clinical research interest. Here, we examine the vision and visual history of elite/near-elite cricketers and rugby-league players. Stereoacuity (TNO), colour vision, and distance (with/without pinhole) and near visual acuity (VA) were measured in two cricket squads (elite/international-level, female, n = 16; near-elite, male, n = 23) and one professional rugby-league squad (male, n = 20). Refractive error was determined, and details of any correction worn and visual history were recorded. Overall, 63% had their last eye examination within 2 years. However, some had not had an eye examination for 5 years or had never had one (near-elite cricketers 30%; rugby-league players 15%; elite cricketers 6%). Comparing our results for all participants to published data for young, optimally corrected, non-sporting adults, distance VA was ~ 1 line of letters worse than expected. Adopting α = 0.01, the deficit in distance VA was significant, but only for elite cricketers (p elite cricketers, p = 0.02; rugby-league players, p = 0.03). Near VA did not differ between subgroups or relative to published norms for young adults (p > 0.02 for all comparisons). On average, near stereoacuity was better than in young adults, but only in elite cricketers (p elite cricketers; p = 0.47, rugby-league players). On-field visual issues were present in 27% of participants and mostly (in 75% of cases) comprised uncorrected ametropia. Some cricketers (near-elite 17.4%; elite 38%) wore refractive correction during play, but no rugby-league player did. Some individuals with prescribed correction choose not to wear it when playing. Aside from near stereoacuity in elite cricketers, the basic visual abilities we measured were not better than equivalent, published data for optimally corrected adults; 20-25% exhibited sub-optimal vision, suggesting that the

  4. Elite High Schools Breed Higher Risk of Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166144.html Elite High Schools Breed Higher Risk of Addiction: Study ... from drug addiction, new research suggests. Teens at elite U.S. high schools seem to face a higher ...

  5. Absenteeism due to occupational diseases among sugarcane workers

    OpenAIRE

    Aline Duarte Ferreira Ceccato; Luiz Carlos Soares de Carvalho Junior; Rafaela Campos Cuissi; Mariane Monteschi; Nayara Galvão Oliveira; Carlos Roberto Padovani; Ercy Mara Cipulo Ramos; Dionei Ramos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the frequency of work-related sick leave in sugarcane workers. A total of 1,230 medical excuses for 400 sugarcane workers were analyzed according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10). The following items were analyzed: diagnosis, sex, and length and season of sick leave. In all the seasons, musculoskeletal diseases showed the highest sick leave rate, following by respiratory diseases (p < 0.05). Sick leave due to musculos...

  6. Elite Circulation and the Convertibility of Knowledge: Comparing Different Types and Forms of Knowledge and Degrees of Elite Circulation in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangset, Marte

    2017-01-01

    According to classical elite theory, increased circulation is related to increased integration which is thought to increase elites' power. Based on a comparative analysis of some European countries' elite education systems, recruitment to elite positions and degrees of circulation--with a specific focus on administrative elites--this article…

  7. Movement pattern comparisons in elite (AFL) and sub-elite (WAFL) Australian football games using GPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Cameron; Dawson, Brian; Heasman, Jarryd; Stewart, Glenn; Cormack, Stuart

    2010-11-01

    This study examined differences in movement patterns between AFL (elite) and WAFL (sub-elite) players using Global Positioning System (GPS) devices. Maximum speed data and totals of high intensity efforts (>15 km h⁻¹), sprint efforts (>20 km h⁻¹) and distance covered were collected on 41 players during the 2008 season. Data were expressed per min of game time played, separated into first and second halves, and also into positions, for both elite and sub-elite players. Overall, elite players had higher movement demands, including 9% more distance covered/min (128±12 m min⁻¹ vs. 117±15 m min⁻¹; p<0.01, ES=0.84), and 21% more high intensity efforts/min (2.9±0.6 vs. 2.4±0.6; p<0.01, ES=0.83). Movement demands significantly declined (p<0.05-0.01) from first to second half, in both competition levels. For both leagues, Small Forwards/Small Backs and Midfield players covered significantly greater (p<0.05-0.01) total distances and completed more high intensity efforts than other positions. Ruckmen recorded significantly lower (p<0.05-0.01) movement demands than Small Forwards/Small Backs, Midfielders and Centre Half-Forwards/Centre Half-Backs over most variables. In conclusion, elite players recorded higher overall movement demands than sub-elite players. This information may be useful for coaches and conditioning staff in designing appropriate training drills for specific role requirements of individual players and assist in the progression of players from sub-elite to elite levels of competition. Copyright © 2010 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fitness profile of elite junior South African badminton players | van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to establish the fitness profile of the elite junior badminton players in South Africa through the measurement and description of their body composition, aerobic power, muscular characteristics, speed, flexibility and agility. Eight elite male and seven elite female badminton players between the ...

  9. Jumping Together: Apprenticeship Learning among Elite Trampoline Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Ole; Ravn, Susanne; Christensen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Elite athletes often take part in group trainings and use teammates as learning resources. Despite this, research on the training and learning of elite athletes tends to characterise this training and learning as primarily individual. Purpose: This study, explores interrelated learning processes among elite athletes by exploring the…

  10. Comparative characteristics of elite New Zealand and South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. A comparative study of elite New Zealand and South African u/16 rugby players with special reference to game-specific skills, physical abilities and anthropometric data. Design and settings. A battery of tests was used to obtain information concerning a group of elite New Zealand players (N=24) and two elite ...

  11. Elite Schools, Postcolonial Chineseness and Hegemonic Masculinities in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Daniel P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The educational reproduction of elite masculinity in postcolonial societies has not been properly studied. This is partly because the postcolonial masculinities of non-western elites are accomplished through the cultivation of naturalized practices signifying the body politic of the nation-state. In Singapore, same-sex elite schools of colonial…

  12. Sugarcane White Leaf Disease Incidences and Population Dynamic of Leafhopper Insect Vectors in Sugarcane Plantations in Northeast Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanabunta, Chiranan; Hanboonsong, Yupa

    2015-04-01

    The work consisted of two experiments, i.e. Experiment 1 was conducted under controlled environments where sugarcane plants were used as hosts. This investigation aimed to monitor the occurrence of the Sugarcane White Leaf disease and the abundance of Leafhopper insect vectors and also the work aimed to provide useful information in understanding some aspects on epidemiology of the Sugarcane White Leaf disease. A Completely Randomized Design with three replications was used to justify growth and development of Leafhopper insects as affected by different temperatures: 20 (T1), 25 (T2), 30 (T3) and 35 degrees C (T4). Experiment 2 was carried out to determine the numbers of Leafhopper insects with the use of light traps in the sugarcane Field 1 (ratoon plants), Field 2 (newly planted), Field 3 (newly planted) and Field 4 (ratoon plants). The results of Experiment 1 showed that growth and development of Leafhopper insects were highly affected by temperatures i.e. the higher the environmental temperature the faster the growth and development of the insects to reach its full adulthood. At 20 degrees C, Leafhopper insects took 12 days to lay eggs whereas at 25 degrees C the insects took only 6 days. Male reached its adulthood approximately 9 days earlier than female when cultured at 25 degrees C and became approximately one week at 30 degrees C or higher. The results of Experiment 2 showed that the majority of Leafhopper insects were found within the months of June and July for both newly planted and ratoon crops. A small amount was found in May and August with an exceptional case of Field 4 where the highest number of Leafhopper insects was found in April followed by June and July. For Sugarcane White Leaf disease, the disease was found in all months of the year except February for Fields 2 and 3. Newly planted sugarcane plants attained much smaller percentages of disease than those of the ratoon plants.

  13. Production of wide hybrids and backcross progenies between Diplotaxis erucoides and crop brassicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, P; Prakash, S; Shivanna, K R

    1995-03-01

    Intergeneric hybrids were produced between D. erucoides (♀), a wild species, and four cultivated species of Brassica, B. campestris, B. juncea, B. napus and B. oleracea, through embryo rescue. The hybrid nature of these plants was confirmed through morphological and cytological studies. Backcross pollinations with the pollen of the respective cultivars yielded BC progenies in the hybrids D. erucoides x B. juncea and D. erucoides x B. napus but not in D. erucoides x B. campestris and D. erucoides x B. oleracea. The hybrid D. erucoides x B. campestris was also used as a bridge species and crossed with B. juncea to raise the hybrid and backcross progenies. F2 progenies were more amenable than f1 hybrids for raising backcross progenies. Although D. erucoides is considered to be a close relative of B. campestris and B. oleracea, incompatibility barriers of this species with different cultivars do not reflect this relationship.

  14. [Genetic polymorphism of clones and their seed progeny in the scotch pine clone plantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshikov, I I; Demkovich, A E

    2010-01-01

    Genetic variation at 12 allozyme loci (10 of them being polymorphic ones) has been studied in the archive-clone plantation of 23 Pinus sylvestris plus-trees and their seed progeny in the south-east of Ukraine. More than a half of clones had 4-8 heterozygous loci, whereas their seed progeny was marked by a lower variation than maternal trees. Seed progeny was obtained at a high outcrossing rate (t(m) = 95%). The clone progeny was characterized by a high percentage of abnormal allele segregation in megagametophytes. There was also a high frequency of significant deviation in distribution of seed embryo genotypes from the theoretically expected one according to the Hardy-Weinberg law.

  15. Molecular marker analysis of F1 progenies and their parents for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular marker analysis of F1 progenies and their parents for carotenoids inheritance in African cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). DN Njoku, VE Gracen, SK Offei, IK Asante, EY Danquah, CN Egesi, E Okogbenin ...

  16. Assessment of radon equilibrium factor from distribution parameters of simultaneous radon and radon progeny measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Marro, Leonora

    2011-11-01

    In Canada, a radon and radon progeny survey was carried out in the 1970s in 19 cities. To the authors' knowledge, this is the only large survey of simultaneous radon and radon progeny measurements up to the present time. However, the survey was carried out for the purpose of establishing geographic variation of radon and radon progeny; therefore, radon equilibrium factors, F, were not assessed at that time. From the summary results of this large simultaneous radon and radon progeny survey, the characteristics of radon equilibrium factor were assessed. The average F factor assessed from this survey in 12,576 houses is 0.54. The current assessment may indicate that the typical F value of 0.4 recommended by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) could lead to a downward bias in the estimation of radon doses to the lung.

  17. Physical demands in elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, L B; Aagaard, Per

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of the present study was to examine differences in the physical demands imposed on male vs. female adult elite team handball players during match--play. METHODS: Male and female elite team handball players were monitored over a six and five season time span, respectively. Each player...... was evaluated during match--play by use of video recording and subsequent computerized locomotive and technical match analysis. Furthermore, physiological measurements during match--play, physical testing and anthropometric measurements were performed. RESULTS: Female players (FP, n=82) covered a longer mean.......4±6.1 cm, 69.5±6.5 kg, pdemands in elite team handball were observed, with MP performing more high--intense, strength--related playing actions and high--intensity running than FP. Conversely, FP covered a greater total distance...

  18. When do ruling elites support productive sectors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Anne Mette

    that the ruling elite initially supported the fishing industry because of industry pressure. They have failed to enforce fisheries management because there are big political costs associated with such enforcement. The dairy sector in the southwestern milk region was initially supported because the ruling elite...... wanted to build a coalition of support in this region. Coming from the region himself, the president had a keen interest in dairy cattle. The sector was subsequently regulated because the biggest processor put pressure on the ruling elite to do so. Even when the ruling coalition is fragmented, promoting...... production is possible if there is strong industry pressure and when the initiatives to promote the sector are also seen to help build or maintain the ruling coalition....

  19. Global Elite as Transnational Capitalist Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Kantor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the burgeoning field of multidisciplinary globalization studies, this article evaluates how IR grand theories can conceptualize the phenomenon of global elite. It compares and synthesizes (neoliberalism, constructivism, feminism and neo-Marxism. Liberal approaches use the analytical tool of transnational actors or transnational networks. In constructivist’s perspective, part of global elite falls into the category of epistemic community. Feminists offer the term Davos Men. Neo-Marxist conceptualization revolves around the notion of transnational capitalist class. The paper concludes that neo-Marxist IR theory best accounts for the global elite and therefore, the debates on the transnational capitalist class are thoroughly and critically reviewed.

  20. Campylobacter epidemiology from breeders to their progeny in Eastern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingresa-Capaccioni, S; Jiménez-Trigos, E; Marco-Jiménez, F; Catalá, P; Vega, S; Marin, C

    2016-03-01

    While horizontal transmission is a route clearly linked to the spread of Campylobacter at the farm level, few studies support the transmission of Campylobacter spp. from breeder flocks to their offspring. Thus, the present study was carried out to investigate the possibility of vertical transmission. Breeders were monitored from the time of housing day-old chicks, then throughout the laying period (0 to 60 wk) and throughout their progeny (broiler fattening, 1 to 42 d) until slaughter. All samples were analyzed according with official method ISO 10272:2006. Results revealed that on breeder farms, Campylobacter isolation started from wk 16 and reached its peak at wk 26, with 57.0% and 93.2% of positive birds, respectively. After this point, the rate of positive birds decreased slightly to 86.0% at 60 wk. However, in broiler production all day-old chicks were found negative for Campylobacter spp, and the bacteria was first isolated at d 14 of age (5.0%), with a significant increase in detection during the fattening period with 62% of Campylobacter positive animals at the end of the production cycle. Moreover, non-positive sample was determined from environmental sources. These results could be explained because Campylobacter may be in a low concentration or in a non-culturable form, as there were several studies that successfully detected Campylobacter DNA, but failed to culture. This form can survive in the environment and infect successive flocks; consequently, further studies are needed to develop more modern, practical, cost-effective and suitable techniques for routine diagnosis. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  1. Bone health in elite Kenyan runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nicholas; Santos-Concejero, Jordan; Tucker, Ross; Lamberts, Robert P; Micklesfield, Lisa K

    2018-02-01

    Impact loading in athletes participating in various sports has been positively associated with increased bone mineral density (BMD), but this has not been investigated in elite Kenyan runners. Body composition and site-specific BMD measures quantified with dual x-ray absorptiometry were measured in 15 elite male Kenyan runners and 23 apparently healthy South African males of different ethnicities. Training load and biomechanical variables associated with impact loading, such as joint stiffness, were determined in the elite Kenyan runners. Greater proximal femur (PF) BMD (g · cm -2 ) was higher (P = 0.001, ES = 1.24) in the elite Kenyan runners compared with the controls. Six of the 15 (40%) Kenyan runners exhibited lumbar spine (LS) Z-Scores below -2.0 SD, whereas this was not found in the apparently healthy controls. PFBMD was associated with training load (r = 0.560, P = 0.003) and ankle (r = 0.710, P = 0.004) and knee (r = 0.546, P = 0.043) joint stiffness. Elite Kenyan runners exhibit greater PFBMD than healthy controls, which is associated with higher training load and higher joint stiffness. Our results reaffirm the benefits of impact loading on BMD at a weight-bearing site, while a high prevalence of low LSBMD in the elite Kenyan runners is hypothesised to be the result of a mismatch between energy intake and high training load. Future research investigating energy availability in Kenyan runners and the possible association with musculoskeletal injury should be investigated.

  2. The hESC line Envy expresses high levels of GFP in all differentiated progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Magdaline; Dottori, Mirella; Ng, Elizabeth; Hawes, Susan M; Sourris, Koula; Jamshidi, Pegah; Pera, Martin F; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G

    2005-04-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been advanced as a potential source of cells for use in cell replacement therapies. The ability to identify hESCs and their differentiated progeny readily in transplantation experiments will facilitate the analysis of hESC potential and function in vivo. We have generated a hESC line designated 'Envy', in which robust levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) are expressed in stem cells and all differentiated progeny.

  3. Control of respirable particles and radon progeny with portable air cleaners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offermann, F.J.; Sextro, R.G.; Fisk, W.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles and radon progeny. Following injection of cigarette smoke and radon in a room-size chamber, decay rates for particles and radon progeny concentrations were measured with and without air cleaner operation. Particle concentrations were obtained for total number concentration and for number concentration by particle size. In tests with no air cleaner the natural decay rate for cigarette smoke was observed to be 0.2 hr/sup -1/. Air cleaning rates for particles were found to be negligible for several small panel-filters, a residential ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans. The electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters tested had significant particle removal rates, and a HEPA-type filter was the most efficient air cleaner. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in removing radon progeny. At low particle concentrations plateout of the unattached radon progeny is an important removal mechanism. Based on data from these tests, the plateout rate for unattached progeny was found to be 15 hr/sup -1/. The unattached fraction and the overall removal rate due to deposition of attached and unattached nuclides have been estimated for each radon decay product as a function of particle concentration. While air cleaning can be effective in reducing total radon progeny, concentrations of unattached radon progeny can increase with increasing air cleaning. 39 references, 26 figures, 9 tables.

  4. Effects of exposing Drosophila melanogaster parents to ethanol on expression of vestigial in their progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesel, J T; Niemann, M M

    1985-03-01

    When parental Drosophila melanogaster were chronically exposed at 28 degrees C or 24 degrees C to ethanol during their larval and pupal stages of development, their progeny, produced when parents were 5-16-day-old adults, showed modified expression of vestigial alleles in heterozygous and homozygous combinations. Parental alcohol effects were dependent on parental rearing temperature. We conclude that parental environment (alcohol, temperature) causes heritable but transitory changes in progeny phenotype that are elicited by exposure of germ cells to alcohol.

  5. High Correlated Paternity Leads to Negative Effects on Progeny Performance in Two Mediterranean Shrub Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Nora

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic habitat deterioration can promote changes in plant mating systems that subsequently may affect progeny performance, thereby conditioning plant recruitment for the next generation. However, very few studies yet tested mating system parameters other than outcrossing rates; and the direct effects of the genetic diversity of the pollen received by maternal plants (i.e. correlated paternity has often been overlooked. In this study, we investigated the relation between correlated paternity and progeny performance in two common Mediterranean shrubs, Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus. To do so, we collected open-pollinated progeny from selected maternal plants, calculated mating system parameters using microsatellite genotyping and conducted sowing experiments under greenhouse and field conditions. Our results showed that some progeny fitness components were negatively affected by the high correlated paternity of maternal plants. In Myrtus communis, high correlated paternity had a negative effect on the proportion and timing of seedling emergence in the natural field conditions and in the greenhouse sowing experiment, respectively. In Pistacia lentiscus, seedling emergence time under field conditions was also negatively influenced by high correlated paternity and a progeny survival analysis in the field experiment showed greater mortality of seedlings from maternal plants with high correlated paternity. Overall, we found effects of correlated paternity on the progeny performance of Myrtus communis, a self-compatible species. Further, we also detected effects of correlated paternity on the progeny emergence time and survival in Pistacia lentiscus, an obligate outcrossed species. This study represents one of the few existing empirical examples which highlight the influence that correlated paternity may exert on progeny performance in multiple stages during early seedling growth.

  6. High Correlated Paternity Leads to Negative Effects on Progeny Performance in Two Mediterranean Shrub Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nora, Sofia; Aparicio, Abelardo; Albaladejo, Rafael G

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic habitat deterioration can promote changes in plant mating systems that subsequently may affect progeny performance, thereby conditioning plant recruitment for the next generation. However, very few studies yet tested mating system parameters other than outcrossing rates; and the direct effects of the genetic diversity of the pollen received by maternal plants (i.e. correlated paternity) has often been overlooked. In this study, we investigated the relation between correlated paternity and progeny performance in two common Mediterranean shrubs, Myrtus communis and Pistacia lentiscus. To do so, we collected open-pollinated progeny from selected maternal plants, calculated mating system parameters using microsatellite genotyping and conducted sowing experiments under greenhouse and field conditions. Our results showed that some progeny fitness components were negatively affected by the high correlated paternity of maternal plants. In Myrtus communis, high correlated paternity had a negative effect on the proportion and timing of seedling emergence in the natural field conditions and in the greenhouse sowing experiment, respectively. In Pistacia lentiscus, seedling emergence time under field conditions was also negatively influenced by high correlated paternity and a progeny survival analysis in the field experiment showed greater mortality of seedlings from maternal plants with high correlated paternity. Overall, we found effects of correlated paternity on the progeny performance of Myrtus communis, a self-compatible species. Further, we also detected effects of correlated paternity on the progeny emergence time and survival in Pistacia lentiscus, an obligate outcrossed species. This study represents one of the few existing empirical examples which highlight the influence that correlated paternity may exert on progeny performance in multiple stages during early seedling growth.

  7. The Cistercians as a Scandinavian Elite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Brian Patrick

    2007-01-01

    En redegørelse for hvordan cisterciensermunke gav udtryk for deres identitet i de danske middelalderkilder og hvordan denne identitet udviklede sig i løbet af middelalderen, således at munkene kom til at deltage i den danske elite.......En redegørelse for hvordan cisterciensermunke gav udtryk for deres identitet i de danske middelalderkilder og hvordan denne identitet udviklede sig i løbet af middelalderen, således at munkene kom til at deltage i den danske elite....

  8. Changing the Corporate Elite? Not So Easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregoric, Aleksandra; Oxelheim, Lars; Randøy, Trond

    new women to their boards. To address this issue we – in this study – introduce the cognitive and affective processes related to directors’ identification with the traditional corporate elite as an explanation for the slow organizational response to pressure for gender diversity on boards. We bridge...... the social identity and critical mass theory to further show how these responses may vary with the current composition of the board. Viewing the board as a locus for the maintenance of the positive distinctiveness of the established corporate elite, we conjecture that new female appointments will not only...

  9. Determinants of the effectiveness of fast break actions in elite and sub-elite Italian men's basketball games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, D; Favero, T G; Niederhausen, M; Capranica, L; Tessitore, A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the determinants of successful and unsuccessful fast-break (FB) actions in elite and sub-elite basketball games. Fifteen 1 st -division (elite) and fifteen 3 rd -division (sub-elite) Italian men's championship games were analysed across two seasons (2012/2013 and 2013/2014). A binary logistic regression analysis was performed, and the fast-break outcome (successful vs. unsuccessful) was adopted as the dependent variable separately in both elite and sub-elite games. FB execution (initiation, advance and completion phases), typology (primary and secondary break) and the number of players involved (equal number or superiority) were used as independent variables. The results showed that the rate of success of FB actions was 63.5% and 59.7% in elite and sub-elite games, respectively. Moreover, successful FBs were more likely to be completed in the lane in relation to unsuccessful ones in both elite and sub-elite games (psuccessful fast break in basketball, while the typology and number of players involved did not predict fast break effectiveness. Moreover, elite and sub-elite teams executed fast break actions similarly. These findings might be useful for basketball coaches to optimize the training of FB actions.

  10. Prediction of direct and indirect genetic gains and genotypic correlations in rubber tree progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Khusala Verardi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the genetic parameters, genotypic and phenotypic correlations, and direct and indirect genetic gains among and within rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis progenies. The experiment was set up at the Municipality of Jaú, SP, Brazil. A randomized complete block design was used, with 22 treatments (progenies, 6 replicates, and 10 plants per plot at a spacing of 3x3 m. Three‑year‑old progenies were assessed for girth, rubber yield, and bark thickness by direct and indirect gains and genotypic correlations. The number of latex vessel rings showed the best correlations, correlating positively and significantly with girth and bark thickness. Selection gains among progenies were greater than within progeny for all the variables analyzed. Total gains obtained were high, especially for girth increase and rubber yield, which were 93.38 and 105.95%, respectively. Young progeny selection can maximize the expected genetic gains, reducing the rubber tree selection cycle.

  11. [Evaluation of Reproductive Health of Chickens and Their Progeny at a Chronic Effect of 131I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudarkov, V A

    2015-01-01

    A reproductive health of hens exposed to 131I in a 30-day period with daily quantities ranging from 0.11 to 4.6 MBq/kg and 6 progenies of their offspring was evaluated. We determined that 131I did not change significantly the reproductive potential of hens if administered at a dose of 0.11 MBq, while it raised at 1.1 MBq, progressively decreased after a short-time increase at 2.1 MBq and was inhabited up to its irreversible extinction at 4.6 MBq. Irrespective of the isotope quantity administered, a decline occurred in the birth rate of the progeny where hens dominated in the sex composition. The reproductive potential (i.e., laying capacity) of the offspring of three chicken progenies that had been administered 131I at 0.11 MBq/kg, progenies 3 and 5 that had been administered 1.1 MBq/kg and progeny 1 affected with 2.1 MBq/kg increased, while for chicken progenies 1, 2, 4 and 6 that had been given 131I at 1.1. MBq/kg the reproductive capacity was within the normal range or decreased.

  12. Meiotic behavior in apomictic Brachiaria ruziziensis × B. brizantha (Poaceae progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veridiana Aparecida Fuzinatto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids combining desirable traits from divergent parents are the main objective of some Brachiaria (Syn. Urochloa P. Beauv. breeding programs. There is great interest in the development of apomictic hybrid cultivars that combine desirable genes such as resistance to spittlebugs, high nutritive value, and tolerance to acid soils. Microsporogenesis of six apomictic progenies resulting from a tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36 cross between B. ruziziensis × B. brizantha was evaluated under light microscopy. Genetic recombination, ensured by multivalent chromosome association and crossing-over at prophase occurred in low frequency among progenies, and in one, recombination was almost nonexistent. The percentage of meiocytes with meiotic abnormalities among progenies ranged from 16.6 % to 85.6 %. Besides an observed irregular chromosome segregation typical of polyploid hybrids in these five progenies, putative meiotic mutations characterized as desynapsis and divergent spindle organization occurred in three progenies. These anomalies caused frequent fractionation of the genome into several microspores of different sizes. In Brachiaria, new cultivars must be apomictic to fix the genotype. However, Brachiaria is a pseudogamous apomict, and viable gametes are necessary to produce viable seeds. Considering meiotic behavior, only two progenies are promising for advancement in the breeding program.

  13. Cytogenetic changes in the liver of progeny of irradiated male rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropacova, K.; Slovinska, L.; Misurova, E. [P.J. Safarik Univ., Kosice (Slovakia)

    2002-06-01

    The transgenerational transmission of radiation damage of rat genom was studied on the basis of cytogenetic changes in somatic cells (hepatocytes). It was found, that the irradiation of rat males with dose of 3 Gy of gamma radiation caused latent cytogenetic damage to the liver, which was expressed during the course of an induced proliferation of hepatocytes (by partial hepatectomy) by lower proliferative activity and a high frequency of chromosomal aberrations. In the progeny of irradiated males (in the F{sub 1} generation), the radiation damage to DNA was manifested by similar changes, i.e. by lower proliferation activity and increase in ''spontaneous'' chromosomal aberration occurrence in liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy. Irradiating the progeny of irradiated males (the total radiation load of the progeny being 3 Gy+3 Gy) caused slighter changes in compared with irradiating the progeny of non-irradiated control males (the total radiation load of the progeny being 0 Gy+3 Gy), which suggests some kind of adaptive response, which was also found in other experimental systems and parameters. An analogous course of RNA and DNA quantitative changes in the liver of the F{sub 0} and F{sub 1} generations of rats confirms the partial transmission of radiation damage of genom to the progeny. (author)

  14. Effect of pollination mode on progeny of Panicum coloratum var. makarikariense: Implications for conservation and breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena V. Armando

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Panicum coloratum var. makarikariense, a perennial grass native to Africa, is adapted to a wide range of soil and climatic conditions with potential to be used as forage in tropical and semi-arid regions around the world. Our objective was to understand how the pollination mode affects viable seed production and further survival of the progeny. We evaluated self- and open-pollinated progenies from different accessions by measuring the seed production of the parents and their germination performance, germination rate and seedling survival. Parents and progeny were also fingerprinted with Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR. Progeny produced through open-pollination resulted in significantly more filled seeds and superior seedling survival than self-pollination. These results indicate that accessions studied here rely heavily on cross-pollination, whereas the contribution of self-pollinated offspring to the population is likely to be low. SSR profiles showed that, on average, 85% of the progeny (arising from cross-pollination possessed paternal specific markers and 100% of them were genetically different from the maternal genotype. All plants examined had 4x = 36 chromosomes. Overall, our findings indicate that var. makarikariense is able to generate highly polymorphic progeny through segregation and recombination. This study provides reference information for the formulation of appropriate strategies for pasture germplasm management, conservation and development of breeding programs. 

  15. The sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue: prospecting signal transduction in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glaucia Mendes Souza

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available EST sequencing has enabled the discovery of many new genes in a vast array of organisms, and the utility of this approach to the scientific community is greatly increased by the establishment of fully annotated databases. The present study aimed to identify sugarcane ESTs sequenced in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br that corresponded to signal transduction components. We also produced a sugarcane signal transduction (SUCAST catalogue (http://sucest.lad.ic.unicamp.br/private/mining-reports/QG/QG-mining.htm that covered the main categories and pathways. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs encoding enzymes for hormone (gibberellins, ethylene, auxins, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathways were found and tissue specificity was inferred from their relative frequency of occurrence in the different libraries. Whenever possible, transducers of hormones and plant peptide signaling were catalogued to the respective pathway. Over 100 receptors were found in sugarcane, which contains a large family of Ser/Thr kinase receptors and also photoreceptors, histidine kinase receptors and their response regulators. G-protein and small GTPases were analyzed and compared to known members of these families found in mammalian and plant systems. Major kinase and phosphatase pathways were mapped, with special attention being given to the MAP kinase and the inositol pathway, both of which are well known in plants.O sequenciamento de ESTs (etiquetas de sequencias transcritas tem possibilitado a descoberta de muitos novos genes em uma ampla variedade de organismos. Um aumento do aproveitamento desta informação pela comunidade científica tem sido possível graças ao desenvolvimento de base de dados contendo seqüências completamente anotadas. O trabalho aqui relatado teve como objetivo a identificação de ESTs de cana de açúcar seqüenciadas através do projeto SUCEST (http://sucest.lad.ic. unicamp.br que

  16. Sugarcane production under smallholder farming systems: Farmers preferred traits, constraints and genetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esayas Tena

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Smallholder sugarcane production sector is under researched and underdeveloped with limited industrial link and support. The objectives of this study were to assess the current state of sugarcane production, farmers’ perceived production constraints and preferred traits, and to collect germplasm grown by smallholder farmers in southern Ethiopia for strategic breeding and conservation. The study was conducted across 16 administrative zones, 28 districts and 56 peasant associations involving 560 smallholder sugarcane growers in southern Ethiopia using a participatory rural appraisal (PRA approach. Sugarcane genetic resources were collected through structured sampling. Findings from this study indicated that monocropping was identified as the predominant sugarcane farming system. Respondent farmers prioritized drought tolerance (21%, increased cane yield (20%, early maturity (18%, marketability (17%, and high biomass (14% as the top preferred traits of sugarcane. Ninety diverse sugarcane landraces were collected from homesteads of smallholder farmers. Findings from this study would serve as baseline information towards sugarcane research and development emphasising the constraints and preferences of smallholder sugarcane growers in Ethiopia or similar agro-ecologies. This is the first study to report farmers preferred traits and constraints, and genetic resources of sugarcane under smallholder farming systems in Ethiopia.

  17. Performance of growing rabbits fed graded levels of sugarcane peel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty five growing rabbits of mixed breeds and average weight of 894g were used in a seven week feeding trial. Five experimental diets were formulated in which sugarcane peels (SCP) was included at 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40% levels to replace maize offal. The rabbits were balanced for weight and allotted to the treatments ...

  18. Evaluating Brazilian sugarcane expansion effects on soil structure using VESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing global demand for biofuel has accelerated land-use change (LUC) in Brazil, primarily by replacing degraded pasture with sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum). The intensive echanization associated with this LUC has increased concerns regarding soil structural quality (SSQ). Through decades of...

  19. Establishment of in vitro callus in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    2016-07-20

    Jul 20, 2016 ... are used to produce ethanol (blended for motor fuel) and livestock feed. Bagasse (fibrous portion) is burned to provide heat and electricity for sugar mills, and green tops can be used as livestock feed (Mackintosh, 2000). It accounts for around 70% of the world's sugar (Khan et al., 2004). Sugarcane ...

  20. Determinants of Financial Sustainability of Small Holder Sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the impact of farming systems on determinants of smallholder sugarcane farmers (SSFs) financial sustainability (FS) between Block Farming (BF) and Traditional Farming (TF) systems. FS was analyzed by assessing profitability of the farming system. Semi structured questionnaires were administered ...

  1. Life cycle impact assssment of biobased plastics from sugarcane ethanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsiropoulos, Ioannis; Faaij, André; Lundquist, Lars; Schenker, Urs; Biois, J.F.; Patel, M.K.

    The increasing production of bio-based plastics calls for thorough environmental assessments. Using life cycle assessment, this study compares European supply of fully bio-based high-density polyethylene and partially bio-based polyethylene terephthalate from Brazilian and Indian sugarcane ethanol

  2. Mendel’s legacy lives through management of sugarcane pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entomology and classical Mendelian genetics have had a long association and Mendel’s legacy continues to live through sugarcane pests. In this paper, we discuss examples of that legacy as applied to conventional and molecular approaches to breeding for insect resistance. We also discuss the applicat...

  3. Ensuring and exploiting the genetic diversity of sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern sugarcane cultivars are complex interspecific hybrids primarily involving Saccharum officinarum and S. spontaneum. In the late 1800s, early breeders in Java, Indonesia recognized the value of interspecific hybridization and began to hybridize the two species, resulting in vigorous and diseas...

  4. Transcriptome analysis of Aspergillus niger grown on sugarcane bagasse

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Considering that the costs of cellulases and hemicellulases contribute substantially to the price of bioethanol, new studies aimed at understanding and improving cellulase efficiency and productivity are of paramount importance. Aspergillus niger has been shown to produce a wide spectrum of polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes. To understand how to improve enzymatic cocktails that can hydrolyze pretreated sugarcane bagasse, we used a genomics approach to investigate which genes and pathways are transcriptionally modulated during growth of A. niger on steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse (SEB). Results Herein we report the main cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes with increased expression during growth on SEB. We also sought to determine whether the mRNA accumulation of several SEB-induced genes encoding putative transporters is induced by xylose and dependent on glucose. We identified 18 (58% of A. niger predicted cellulases) and 21 (58% of A. niger predicted hemicellulases) cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes, respectively, that were highly expressed during growth on SEB. Conclusions Degradation of sugarcane bagasse requires production of many different enzymes which are regulated by the type and complexity of the available substrate. Our presently reported work opens new possibilities for understanding sugarcane biomass saccharification by A. niger hydrolases and for the construction of more efficient enzymatic cocktails for second-generation bioethanol. PMID:22008461

  5. Establishment of in vitro callus in sugarcane ( Saccharum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane is an important perennial, polyploidy crop. Based on the growing demand, it has now attracted great attention as cash crop. Tissue culture technique, an alternative method for solving production problem and increasing production, was used in this study. The work was carried out at the Nuclear Institute of ...

  6. Converting developing and mature sugarcane carbohydrates into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolz, Carlos; De Leon, Roberto [Biochemical Engineering Center, Research Institute, Universidad del Valle de Guatemala (Guatemala)

    2010-10-15

    Experiments were performed employing cane particles obtained from sugarcane at different growth stages until maturation measuring the amount of ethanol produced and the carbohydrate consumption in order to estimate the sugarcane growth stage where both parameters were optimized. Two non-flowering commercial cane varieties NA56 and PR752002 were cultivated and samples taken at different time intervals. Two Saccharomyces cerevisae strains were also compared in the trials. Sucrose was poorly consumed in young cane, which was an unexpected result. Fructose on the other hand was the hexose that remained in the medium at the end of the fermentations specially when using mature sugarcane. There was an increasing trend in ethanol production as a function of days after planting (DAP) as expected; however, a plateau was reached after 225 DAP and the maximum value obtained was between 300 and 325 DAP. When these figures were compared with the corresponding DAP used for sugar production, only 25 days less were needed in the field for maximum ethanol production. On the other hand, it was clear from the data that cane harvesting for ethanol production should not be done after the recommended DAP for commercial sugar production. If this is done, the excess fructose present will not be completely utilized by yeast. Finally, it was observed that the yeast with more affinity for sugarcane fibers showed better ethanol yields in all samples tested. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. RB962962, a sugarcane cultivar for late harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz José Oliveira Tavares de Melo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Northeast of Brazil, sugarcane cultivar RB962962 is harvested at the end of the cycle, between December and February, with a high sugar yield per area. Recommended for sandy soils of medium texture and fertility, it is resistant to the major diseases and fast-growing in plant and ratoon crops.

  8. Effect of various amino acids on shoot regeneration of sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... specific climatic requirements for flowering and seed setting coupled with longer life cycle are major ... fertile seeds (Sugarcane encyclopedia, 1994), and due to difficulties in selfing and crossing, the crop is one of ..... bioassays with tobacco tissue cultures. Physiol Plant 15: 473-479. Quatrano RS (1987).

  9. Advances in marker-assisted breeding of sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the challenges posed by sugarcane, geneticists and breeders have actively sought to use DNA marker technology to enhance breeding efforts. Markers have been used to explore taxonomy, estimate genetic diversity, and to develop unique molecular fingerprints. Numerous studies have been undertak...

  10. Registration of ‘CP 08-1110’ Sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘CP 08-1110’ (Reg. No.CV-171; PI 678579) sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) was developed through cooperative research conducted by the USDA-ARS, the University of Florida, and the Florida Sugar Cane League, Inc. and released to growers for mineral (sand) soils in Florida in October 2014...

  11. Transcriptome analysis of Aspergillus niger grown on sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Gustavo H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Considering that the costs of cellulases and hemicellulases contribute substantially to the price of bioethanol, new studies aimed at understanding and improving cellulase efficiency and productivity are of paramount importance. Aspergillus niger has been shown to produce a wide spectrum of polysaccharide hydrolytic enzymes. To understand how to improve enzymatic cocktails that can hydrolyze pretreated sugarcane bagasse, we used a genomics approach to investigate which genes and pathways are transcriptionally modulated during growth of A. niger on steam-exploded sugarcane bagasse (SEB. Results Herein we report the main cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes with increased expression during growth on SEB. We also sought to determine whether the mRNA accumulation of several SEB-induced genes encoding putative transporters is induced by xylose and dependent on glucose. We identified 18 (58% of A. niger predicted cellulases and 21 (58% of A. niger predicted hemicellulases cellulase- and hemicellulase-encoding genes, respectively, that were highly expressed during growth on SEB. Conclusions Degradation of sugarcane bagasse requires production of many different enzymes which are regulated by the type and complexity of the available substrate. Our presently reported work opens new possibilities for understanding sugarcane biomass saccharification by A. niger hydrolases and for the construction of more efficient enzymatic cocktails for second-generation bioethanol.

  12. Ensilage Of Sugarcane Tops Using Urea And Broiler Litter Additives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane tops (SCT) constitute a source of readily available and cheap agroindustrial by-product for ruminant feeding in Mauritius. Its nutritional constraints are its low digestibility, and low crude protein (CP) content. Wilted SCT (50% DM) was ensiled in the laboratory using a SemiMicro technique with PVC silos.

  13. Registration of ‘CP 04-1844’ Sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘CP 04-1844’ sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) was developed through cooperative research conducted by the USDA-ARS, the University of Florida, and the Florida Sugar Cane League, Inc., and was released to growers in Florida on 20 Sept. 2011. CP 04-1844 was selected from the cross X01-03...

  14. Preliminary Evaluation of Some Qualitative Traits of Sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thirty five local sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) accessions were collected in an expedition in North-Western Nigeria, covering Sokoto, Kebbi, Zamfara, Katsina, Kaduna, Kano and Jigawa States in September 2011. The germplasm accessions were maintained at Usmanu Danfodiyo University Sokoto. Data on leaf colour, leaf ...

  15. Reproducible in vitro regeneration system for purifying sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genome purification of a selected clone of sugarcane is the key to developing homogenous lines. Generally, regenerated plants after transformation are heterogeneous at genome level, and several successive rounds of selection on antibiotic-containing medium and regeneration cycles are required to purify the genome to ...

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity among sugarcane cultivars using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity based on the characterization of genetic makeup, using molecular markers is of utmost importance for breeders in crop improvement programme. A total of 26 microsatellite primers were used to determine the genetic diversity among 40 sugarcane genotypes including their parents. The polymerase chain ...

  17. Estimate of ratooning ability in sugarcane (saccharum officinarum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ratooning ability (RA) is an important criterion in determining varietal suitability for commercial sugarcane cultivation because of the necessity to spread the costs of planting operations over subsequent ratoon crops. Two estimates of RA were computed with the objective to identify a more suitable approach for estimating ...

  18. Nutrient contents of Soyabeans: A Guide for sugarcane growers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was conducted on sandy clay loams of the lithosol group under the Zimbabwe soil classification system at The Zimbabwe Sugar Association Experiment Station (Z.S.A.E.S) in the South Eastern Lowveld, the leading sugarcane producing region in Zimbabwe. The objectives of this research were to: 1) analyse ...

  19. Sugarcane aphid spatial distribution in grain sorghum fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum is an important summer grain crop in the United States. In 2014, the U.S. produced 432 million bushels of sorghum valued at $1.67 billion on more than 6 million acres. The sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), was discovered in damaging numbers in grain sorghum, Sorghum bicolor ...

  20. Sugarcane in vitro culture technology: Opportunities for Kenya's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is one of the most important crops in Kenya and has wide range of economic importance. The sugar industry contributes up to 15% to the country's agricultural gross domestic product and an estimated 25% of the population depends on the industry for their livelihood. However, the ...

  1. Productivity of sugarcane plants of ratooning with fertilizing treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUHADIONO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Latief AS, Syarief R, Pramudya B, Muhadiono. 2010. Productivity of sugarcane plants of ratooning with various fertilizing treatments. Nusantara Bioscience 2: 43-47. This research aims to determine the sugarcane plants of ratooning productivity with low external input of fertilization treatment towards farmers can increase profits. The method used is the Completely Randomized Block Design (CRBD with four treatments and three repetitions (4x3. Sugarcane varieties R 579 planted in each patch experiment 5x5 m2. Dosage of fertilizer: P0 = 3.6 kg/year plot experiment was 100% dosage usage of chemical fertilizers used by farmers. Further dosages were P1 (75% = 2.7 kg/plot, P2 (50% = 1.8 kg/plot and P3 (0.25% = 0.9 kg/plot, each supplemented with fertilizer 5 mL of liquid organic/patch a year. Sugarcane crops with a variety of treatment showed no significant difference. The highest productivity was achieved at dosages of P2 (50% chemical fertilizers plus organic fertilizer is 21.67 kg per square meter. Chemical fertilizers can be saved 7 quintals per hectare a year or Rp 997,500 per year. Additional costs of liquid organic fertilizer Rp. 100,000 per hectare year and labor Rp 100,000 per hectare, so the additional advantage of saving farmers fertilizer Rp. 797,500 per year.

  2. pesticide residues in water from tpc sugarcane plantations and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. We report herein, the analysis of water samples collected from TPC Sugarcane Plantation and its environs in Kilimanjaro region, which is the earliest intensive user of pesticides in Tanzania. A total of 50 water samples collected from 18 sampling sites between 2000 and 2001 were analyzed for pesticide ...

  3. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaker, Patricia D C; Palhares, Alessandra C; Taniguti, Lucas M; Peters, Leila P; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P; Vieira, Maria L C; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression.

  4. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguti, Lucas M.; Peters, Leila P.; Creste, Silvana; Aitken, Karen S.; Van Sluys, Marie-Anne; Kitajima, João P.; Vieira, Maria L. C.; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq) shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression. PMID:27583836

  5. Reproducible in vitro regeneration system for purifying sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tansgenic Lab

    2012-05-24

    May 24, 2012 ... 1970s, genetic manipulation of sugarcane had been attempted for the .... After 5 days of incubation on callus induction media, calli were sub- cultured onto IP, IPC1 ... Graph showing comparison of % age frequency of callus induction on three different media, and the first three basal segments. A, Explant ...

  6. Protocol optimization for in vitro mass propagation of two sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-03-19

    Mar 19, 2014 ... The present study was initiated to optimize in vitro protocol for mass propagation of two commercial sugarcane clones (Co 449 and Co 678) grown in Ethiopia through shoot tip culture. Experiments on shoot multiplication and rooting were laid out in a completely randomized design with factorial treatment ...

  7. Yield potential of non-irrigated sugarcane germplasm accessions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... strict upland condition. Data obtained from a replicated field trial involving 30 exotic and 18 local sugarcane germplasm collections at the University of Ilorin Sugar Research Institute (USRI), were used to assess their yielding potential under non- irrigated condition. The objective was to determine their suitability as parents ...

  8. Sugarcane straw and the populations of pests and nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Luci Dinardo-Miranda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The green cane harvesting represented a significant change in sugarcane ecosystem due to the presence of straw left on the soil and to the absence of fire. These two factors may affect the populations of pests and their natural enemies. Among the pests benefit from the green cane harvesting stand out the spittlebug, Mahanarva fimbriolata, the curculionid Sphenophorus levis and sugarcane borer, Diatraea saccharalis. In areas of green cane harvesting, the population of these species grew faster than in areas of burnt cane. On the other hand, there are virtually no records of attacks by lesser cornstalk borers in areas of green cane harvesting. Populations of plant parasitic nematodes and the beetles Migdolus fryanus, very important pests of sugarcane, were apparently not affected by the green cane harvesting. Despite the absence of more consistent information, it appears that populations of ants and the giant borer Telchin licus can increase in green cane areas, due primarily to the difficulty of pest control. The partial or total removal of straw from the field represents an additional change to the ecosystem that could alter the status of pests and nematodes. It is likely that spittlebug, the curculionid S. levis and sugarcane borer populations decrease if a portion of the straw is removed from the field. However, the pest populations in areas where the straw is collected will not return to their original conditions at the time of burnt cane harvesting because the absence of fire will be maintained.

  9. Moringa extracts used in sugarcane juice treatment and effects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sugarcane juice treatment using Moringa oleifera leaf and seeds extracts on ethanolic fermentation. The experiment was arranged in a split plot statistical design, with four replications. Main treatments were three sedimentation agents (synthetic polyelectrolyte, ...

  10. Protocol optimization for in vitro mass propagation of two sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was initiated to optimize in vitro protocol for mass propagation of two commercial sugarcane clones (Co 449 and Co 678) grown in Ethiopia through shoot tip culture. Experiments on shoot multiplication and rooting were laid out in a completely randomized design with factorial treatment arrangements.

  11. RNAseq Transcriptional Profiling following Whip Development in Sugarcane Smut Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia D C Schaker

    Full Text Available Sugarcane smut disease is caused by the biotrophic fungus Sporisorium scitamineum. The disease is characterized by the development of a whip-like structure from the primary meristems, where billions of teliospores are produced. Sugarcane smut also causes tillering and low sucrose and high fiber contents, reducing cane productivity. We investigated the biological events contributing to disease symptoms in a smut intermediate-resistant sugarcane genotype by examining the transcriptional profiles (RNAseq shortly after inoculating the plants and immediately after whip emission. The overall picture of disease progression suggests that premature transcriptional reprogramming of the shoot meristem functions continues until the emergence of the whip. The guidance of this altered pattern is potentially primarily related to auxin mobilization in addition to the involvement of other hormonal imbalances. The consequences associated with whip emission are the modulation of typical meristematic functions toward reproductive organ differentiation, requiring strong changes in carbon partitioning and energy production. These changes include the overexpression of genes coding for invertases and trehalose-6P synthase, as well as other enzymes from key metabolic pathways, such as from lignin biosynthesis. This is the first report describing changes in the transcriptional profiles following whip development, providing a hypothetical model and candidate genes to further study sugarcane smut disease progression.

  12. Identification, phylogeny, and transcript of chitinase family genes in sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yachun; Xu, Liping; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Zhuqing; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Yun; Que, Youxiong

    2015-06-02

    Chitinases are pathogensis-related proteins, which play an important role in plant defense mechanisms. The role of the sugarcane chitinase family genes remains unclear due to the highly heterozygous and aneuploidy chromosome genetic background of sugarcane. Ten differentially expressed chitinase genes (belonging to class I~VII) were obtained from RNA-seq analysis of both incompatible and compatible sugarcane genotypes during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge. Their structural properties and expression patterns were analyzed. Seven chitinases (ScChiI1, ScChiI2, ScChiI3, ScChiIII1, ScChiIII2, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVI1) showed more positive with early response and maintained increased transcripts in the incompatible interaction than those in the compatible one. Three (ScChiII1, ScChiV1 and ScChiVII1) seemed to have no significant difference in expression patterns between incompatible and compatible interactions. The ten chitinases were expressed differentially in response to hormone treatment as well as having distinct tissue specificity. ScChiI1, ScChiIV1 and ScChiVII1 were induced by various abiotic stresses (NaCl, CuCl2, PEG and 4 °C) and their involvement in plant immunity was demonstrated by over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The results suggest that sugarcane chitinase family exhibit differential responses to biotic and abiotic stress, providing new insights into their function.

  13. Efficacy of selected herbicide formulations on sugarcane field weeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terbuthylazine 500 SC and 90 WG were applied as pre-emergence herbicides while dicamba 480 SL and dicamba 70 SG as post emergence herbicides. The result shows that application of the above formulations did not significantly affect the emergence of sugarcane. The efficacy of pre-emergence application decreases ...

  14. Importance and Status of Sugarcane Smut (Ustilago scitaminea) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the varieties across sites and among crop types within and across sites. Among the sites, the highest ... [36]. Introduction. Sugarcane is an important commercial crop in Ethiopia covering about 30,000 ha of ..... of the disease at the plantation over the years could be the result of the replacement of susceptible varieties by ...

  15. Biomass Yield and Carbohydrate Composition in Sugarcane and Energy Cane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane and energy cane are important crops for sugar and bio-ethanol production. A better understanding their carbohydrate composition and concentrations in addition to biomass yields can improve knowledge in biomass processing and utilization. There were two objectives for this study. The first ...

  16. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN IMAGERY TYPE AND COLLECTIVE EFFICACY IN ELITE AND NON ELITE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Shearer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between imagery function and individual perceptions of collective efficacy as a function of skill level. Elite (n = 70 and non elite (n = 71 athletes from a number of interactive team sports completed the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (SIQ and the Collective Efficacy Inventory (CEI. Multiple hierarchical regression analysis was then used to examine which SIQ sub-scales predicted individual perceptions of collective efficacy. For the elite sample, Motivational General-Mastery (MG-M imagery accounted for approximately 17% of the variance in collective efficacy scores. No significant predictions were observed in the non elite sample. The findings suggest MG-M imagery as a potential technique to improve levels of collective efficacy although competitive level may moderate the effectiveness of such interventions

  17. Climate change and sugarcane expansion increase Hantavirus infection risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prist, Paula Ribeiro; Uriarte, María; Fernandes, Katia; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2017-07-01

    Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS) is a disease caused by Hantavirus, which is highly virulent for humans. High temperatures and conversion of native vegetation to agriculture, particularly sugarcane cultivation can alter abundance of rodent generalist species that serve as the principal reservoir host for HCPS, but our understanding of the compound effects of land use and climate on HCPS incidence remains limited, particularly in tropical regions. Here we rely on a Bayesian model to fill this research gap and to predict the effects of sugarcane expansion and expected changes in temperature on Hantavirus infection risk in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The sugarcane expansion scenario was based on historical data between 2000 and 2010 combined with an agro-environment zoning guideline for the sugar and ethanol industry. Future evolution of temperature anomalies was derived using 32 general circulation models from scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (Representative greenhouse gases Concentration Pathways adopted by IPCC). Currently, the state of São Paulo has an average Hantavirus risk of 1.3%, with 6% of the 645 municipalities of the state being classified as high risk (HCPS risk ≥ 5%). Our results indicate that sugarcane expansion alone will increase average HCPS risk to 1.5%, placing 20% more people at HCPS risk. Temperature anomalies alone increase HCPS risk even more (1.6% for RCP4.5 and 1.7%, for RCP8.5), and place 31% and 34% more people at risk. Combined sugarcane and temperature increases led to the same predictions as scenarios that only included temperature. Our results demonstrate that climate change effects are likely to be more severe than those from sugarcane expansion. Forecasting disease is critical for the timely and efficient planning of operational control programs that can address the expected effects of sugarcane expansion and climate change on HCPS infection risk. The predicted spatial location of HCPS infection risks obtained here can be

  18. Climate change and sugarcane expansion increase Hantavirus infection risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Ribeiro Prist

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus Cardiopulmonary Syndrome (HCPS is a disease caused by Hantavirus, which is highly virulent for humans. High temperatures and conversion of native vegetation to agriculture, particularly sugarcane cultivation can alter abundance of rodent generalist species that serve as the principal reservoir host for HCPS, but our understanding of the compound effects of land use and climate on HCPS incidence remains limited, particularly in tropical regions. Here we rely on a Bayesian model to fill this research gap and to predict the effects of sugarcane expansion and expected changes in temperature on Hantavirus infection risk in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The sugarcane expansion scenario was based on historical data between 2000 and 2010 combined with an agro-environment zoning guideline for the sugar and ethanol industry. Future evolution of temperature anomalies was derived using 32 general circulation models from scenarios RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (Representative greenhouse gases Concentration Pathways adopted by IPCC. Currently, the state of São Paulo has an average Hantavirus risk of 1.3%, with 6% of the 645 municipalities of the state being classified as high risk (HCPS risk ≥ 5%. Our results indicate that sugarcane expansion alone will increase average HCPS risk to 1.5%, placing 20% more people at HCPS risk. Temperature anomalies alone increase HCPS risk even more (1.6% for RCP4.5 and 1.7%, for RCP8.5, and place 31% and 34% more people at risk. Combined sugarcane and temperature increases led to the same predictions as scenarios that only included temperature. Our results demonstrate that climate change effects are likely to be more severe than those from sugarcane expansion. Forecasting disease is critical for the timely and efficient planning of operational control programs that can address the expected effects of sugarcane expansion and climate change on HCPS infection risk. The predicted spatial location of HCPS infection risks

  19. Subsurface drip irrigation in different planting spacing of sugarcane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, R. C. M.; Barbosa, E. A. A.; Arruda, F. B.; Silva, T. J. A.; Sakai, E.; Landell, M. G. A.

    2012-04-01

    The use of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in sugarcane cultivation is an interesting cultural practice to improve production and allow cultivation in marginal lands due to water deficits conditions. The SDI provides better water use efficiency, due to the water and nutrients application in root zone plants. However, it is important to investigate the long-term effect of irrigation in the yield and technological quality in different ecological condition cultivation. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of SDI in sugarcane cultivated in different planting spacings on technological quality, yield and theoretical recoverable sugar during four cycles of sugarcane cultivation. The experiment was carried out at Colorado Mill, Guaíra, São Paulo State in Brazil, in a clay soil. The experiment was installed in randomized blocks, with six replications. The treatments were three different planting spacings (S1 - 1.5 m between rows; S2 - 1.8 m between rows and S3 - planting in double line of 0.5 m x 1.3 m between planting rows) which were subdivided in irrigated and non-irrigated plots. In S1 and S2 treatments were installed one drip line in each plant row and in treatment S3 one drip line was installed between the rows with smaller spacing (0.5 m). The RB855536 genotype was used and the planting date occurred in May, 25th 2005. The analyzed parameters were: percentage of soluble solids (brix), percent apparent sucrose juice (Pol), total recoverable sugar (ATR), yield and theoretically recoverable sugar (RTR). Four years of yield (plant cane and first, second and third ratoon) were analyzed. Data were submitted to variance analysis and the averages compared by Duncan test at 5% probability. Two months before the first harvest a yield estimate was realized. According to the observed results the irrigated plants provided increase of about 20 % compared to non irrigated plants. However there was a great tipping of plants specially in irrigated plots. The

  20. Yo-Yo IR2 testing of elite and sub-elite soccer players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Jørgen; Bendiksen, Mads; Randers, Morten Bredsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We examined performance, heart rate response and construct validity of the Yo-Yo IR2 test by testing 111 elite and 92 sub-elite soccer players from Norway and Denmark. VO(2)max, Yo-Yo IR1 and repeated sprint tests (RSA) (n = 51) and match-analyses (n = 39) were also performed. Yo-Yo IR2...

  1. Somatic characteristics and motor fitness of elite and sub-elite Polish male badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Paweł; Kęska, Anna; Tkaczyk, Joanna; Nowicki, Dariusz; Sienkiewicz-Dianzenza, Edyta

    2017-06-21

    An appropriate level of somatic and fitness traits is believed to contribute to success in an international badminton competitions however, these have not been sufficiently explored in elite Polish badminton players. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess somatic build and physical fitness of elite and sub-elite Polish badminton players and to identify key traits that determine achieving sporting success in badminton. The study participants comprised 20 men from the Polish Badminton National Teams A (elite; n = 9) and B (sub-elite; n = 11). In all participants body height, arm span, body mass, body fat, fat free mass and body mass index (BMI) were assessed. Fitness tests included two badminton-specific on-court movement tests and cycloergometer test to assess maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Studied players did not differ in body height and arm span however, elite players were heavier by about 10 kg and had significantly higher values of BMI and body fat. Irrespectively of sport level, elite and sub-elite badminton players achieved comparable results in both on-court tests as well as with respect to VO2max (55.9 and 57.2 mL/min/kg, respectively). Cluster analysis allowed to indirectly describe the profile of somatic traits and physical fitness that facilitates achieving success in badminton. Relatively small body size of badminton players can be considered advantageous in sport competitions. It also seems that aerobic capacity contributes to achieving sport success in badminton to a much lower degree than the badminton-specific on- court skills.

  2. Simulated soil C changes over sugarcane expansion in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Dener; Williams, Stephen; Cerri, Carlos; Paustian, Keith

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, the increase in Brazilian ethanol production has been based on expansion of sugarcane cropped area, mainly by the land use change (LUC) pasture-sugarcane. However, second generation (2G) cellulosic-derived ethanol supplies are likely to increase dramatically in the next years in Brazil. Both these management changes potentially affect soil C (SOC) changes and may have a significant impact on the greenhouse gases balance of Brazilian ethanol. To evaluate these impacts, we used the Daycent model to predict the influence of the LUC native vegetation (NV) - pasture (PA) - sugarcane (SG), as well as to evaluate the effect of different management practices (straw removal, no-tillage and application of organic amendments) on long-term SOC changes in sugarcane areas in Brazil. The DayCent model estimated that the conversion of NV-PA caused SOC losses of 0.34±0.03 Mg ha-1 yr-1, whilst the conversion PA-SG resulted in SOC gains of 0.16±0.04 Mg ha-1 yr-1. Moreover, simulations showed SOC losses of 0.19±0.04 Mg ha-1yr-1 in SG areas in Brazil with straw removal. However, our analysis suggested that adoption of some best management practices can mitigate these losses, highlighting the application of organic amendments (+0.14±0.03 Mg C ha-1 yr-1). Based on the commitments made by Brazilian government in the UNFCCC, we estimated the ethanol production needed to meet the domestic demand by 2030. If the increase in ethanol production was based on the expansion of sugarcane area on degraded pasture land, the model predicted a SOC accretion of 144 Tg from 2020-2050, whilst increased ethanol production based on straw removal as a cellulosic feedstock was predicted to decrease SOC by 50 Tg over the same 30 year period in Brazil.

  3. A comparison of the activity demands of elite and sub-elite Australian men's basketball competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Aaron; Dascombe, Ben; Reaburn, Peter

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the differences in the activity demands of sub-elite and elite Australian men's basketball competition. Ten elite (age 28.3 ± 4.9 years, mass 97.0 ± 13.9 kg, height 197.4 ± 8.3 cm) and 12 sub-elite (age 26.1 ± 5.3 years, mass 85.9 ± 13.2 kg, height 191.4 ± 7.6 cm) Australian basketball players participated in the study. Player activity was analysed using video-based time-motion analysis across multiple in-season matches. Customized analytical software was used to calculate player activity into frequencies, mean and total durations (s), and mean and total distances (m) for standing/walking, jogging, running, sprinting, low shuffling, high shuffling, and dribbling movements. Only movement frequency was calculated for jumping and upper body activity. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed that elite players performed significantly more total movement changes (P basketball competition requires a greater intermittent workload and more sustained activity demands, whereas sub-elite competition may involve greater bursts of activity and longer recovery periods. These differences are likely to reflect variations in player skill and fitness, as well as playing structure between playing standards.

  4. Changes in blood values in elite cyclist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkeberg, J S; Belhage, B; Damsgaard, R

    2009-01-01

    samples were obtained from 28 elite, male cyclists. Blood was analyzed for hematocrit (Hct), hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) and % reticulocytes. Seventy-six percent of all samples were collected out-of-competition (OOC). From December 2006 to September 2007, the average Hct and [Hb] decreased by 4...

  5. Fractures in German elite male soccer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffner, Erik; Latz, David; Grassmann, Jan P; Schek, Alberto; Scholz, Armin; Windolf, Joachim; Jungbluth, Pascal; Schneppendahl, Johannes

    2017-10-27

    Aim of this retrospective cohort study was to identify fracture epidemiology and off times after different types of fractures in German male elite soccer players from the first division Bundesliga based on information from the public media. Exposure and fracture data over 7.5 consecutive seasons (2009/10 -1.Half 2016/17) were collected from two media based register (transfermarkt.de® and kicker.de®). 357 fractures from 290 different players were recorded with an incidences of 0.19/1000 h of exposure (95% 0.14 - 0.24). Most fractures in German elite soccer players involved the lower extremities (35.3%), the head/face (30.3%) and the upper extremities (24.9%). The median off time after a fracture in German elite male professional soccer in 7.5 Season was 51.1 days (range 0-144). The number of fractures per 100 players per season decreased between 2009 and 2016. There was no significant difference in overall fracture incidence when comparing players at different position (p=0.11). Goalkeepers have a significantly (pelite soccer. The incidence of fractures in elite German soccer players decreased between 2009 and 2016. The most fractures occur in the lower extremities and there is no difference in overall fracture risk for players at different playing positions. The information from our study might be of a great importance to medical practitioners, soccer coaches and soccer manager.

  6. What Is an Elite Boarding School?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaztambide-Fernandez, Ruben

    2009-01-01

    This article brings attention to the rarefied world of elite boarding schools. Despite their reputation for excellence, these unique educational institutions remain largely outside the gaze of educational researchers and the scope of public debates about education. One reason for this absence is a lack of knowledge about what exactly defines an…

  7. Biomechanical, anthropometrical and physical profile of elite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Literature indicates that deficiencies of certain parameters such as biomechanics, anthropometry, physical and motor abilities, may influence a netball players susceptibility to injury, as well as the players physical performance during a game. The primary aim of this study was to determine the physical profile of elite netball ...

  8. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer,

  9. Nutrition Education for Elite Female Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Nancy; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of the dietary habits of 115 elite female runners revealed that some did not eat wisely, pointing out nutrition education needs for these subjects in the areas of sweets, vitamin and mineral supplementation, intake of red meat, body weight and body image, eating disorders, calorie intake, and amenorrhea and stress fractures. (Author/CB)

  10. Physiological profiles of elite judo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Emerson; Del Vecchio, Fabrício B; Matsushigue, Karin A; Artioli, Guilherme G

    2011-02-01

    To be successful in international competitions, judo athletes must achieve an excellent level of physical fitness and physical condition during training. This article reviews the physiological profiles of elite judo athletes from different sex, age and weight categories. Body fat is generally low for these athletes, except for the heavyweight competitors. In general, elite judo athletes presented higher upper body anaerobic power and capacity than non-elite athletes. Lower body dynamic strength seems to provide a distinction between elite and recreational judo players, but not high-level judo players competing for a spot on national teams. Even maximal isometric strength is not a discriminant variable among judo players. However, more studies focusing on isometric strength endurance are warranted. Although aerobic power and capacity are considered relevant to judo performance, the available data do not present differences among judo athletes from different competitive levels. Typical maximal oxygen uptake values are around 50-55 mL/kg/min for male and 40-45 mL/kg/min for female judo athletes. As for other variables, heavyweight competitors presented lower aerobic power values. The typical differences commonly observed between males and females in the general population are also seen in judo athletes when analysing anaerobic power and capacity, aerobic power, and maximal strength and power. However, further research is needed concerning the differences among the seven weight categories in which judo athletes compete.

  11. Sugarcane mild mosaic virus: towards the full characterization of this sugarcane Ampelovirus re-discovered using metagenomics-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane mild mosaic virus (SCMMV) is a closterovirus-like virus that was discovered by Lockhart et al. (1992). SCMMV is provisionally assigned to the genus Ampelovirus, family Closteroviridae (Martelli et al 2002). Since the initial serological and microscopical studies, no new information about S...

  12. The aptitude of the soils for the production of sugarcane. Part 2: Comparison of two methods at ‘Ciudad Caracas’ sugarcane mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson C. Arzola Pina

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to compare two methods for determining the aptitude of soils for growing Sugarcane in Cuba. The information was provided by three sugarcane farms owned by Ciudad Caracas sugarcane mill in the municipality of Santa Isabel de Las Lajas in Cienfuegos. The information of the soils from each farm was taken from the 1:25 000 scale cadastral maps designed by Ministerio de la Agricultura (MINAG. Rainfall data was collected from the nearby stations rain gauges. And the sugarcane yield was reported by each farm. The aptitude of the soils was determined by two methods (AGRO 24 de 1993 y Arzola de 1999 using the information available. Results showed that both methods are appropriate for selecting soils with higher productive potential, and are a useful tool for making right decisions for optimizing the land use at each sugarcane farm.

  13. Improvement in genetic characteristics and oil yield of selected soybean progenies from octuple crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamawaki Osvaldo Toshiyuki

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate 44 soybean octuple crosses in the F4:3[8] and F5:3[8] generations in order to select progenies superior for seed oil yield (OY and other important agronomic characteristics. Octuple crosses were hybridized in a chain mating system. In one group, crosses were carried out for three generations with the adapted x exotic parents until octuple crosses with 75% adapted genes and 25% exotic genes were obtained. In a second group, hybridization of adapted x adapted parents originated crosses with 100% adapted genes. During the growing season 1994/95, the progenies F4:3[8] were evaluated by using the augmented block design. The progenies F5:3[8] were evaluated during the growing season 1995/96 in three experiments using augmented block design without repetition. The octuple crosses gave origin to superior progenies for all the characters studied. In the C22 cross, OY values were 707 kg/ha. The estimates of heritability in relation to the crosses average resulted in the following mean, minimum and maximum values, respectively: number of days to maturity (52.35%, 3.71%, 84.23%; agronomic value (26.69%, 1.62%, 61.28% and grain yield (29.28%, 1.52%, 61.06%. The observed genetic gains for grain yield in the early, intermediate and late F5:3[8] progenies were superior to the expected genetic gains and the observed genetic gains for OY were more expressive in the early and late F5:[8] progenies. The genetic variability remaining in the selected progenies of some crosses suggests that further genetic gains for grain yield and OY might be possible with advanced selection cycles.

  14. Genetic potential of common bean progenies selected for crude fiber content obtained through different breeding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, V A P; Melo, P G S; Pereira, H S; Bassinello, P Z; Melo, L C

    2015-05-29

    Gastrointestinal health is of great importance due to the increasing consumption of functional foods, especially those concern-ing diets rich in fiber content. The common bean has been valorized as a nutritious food due to its appreciable fiber content and the fact that it is consumed in many countries. The current study aimed to evaluate and compare the genetic potential of common bean progenies of the carioca group, developed through different breeding methods, for crude fiber content. The progenies originated through hybridization of two advanced strains, CNFC 7812 and CNFC 7829, up to the F7 generation using three breeding methods: bulk-population, bulk within F2 families, and single seed descent. Fifteen F8 progenies were evaluated in each method, as well as two check cultivars and both parents, us-ing a 7 x 7 simple lattice design, with experimental plots comprised of two 4-m long rows. Field trials were conducted in eleven environments encompassing four Brazilian states and three different sowing times during 2009 and 2010. Estimates of genetic parameters indicate differences among the breeding methods, which seem to be related to the different processes for sampling the advanced progenies inherent to each method, given that the trait in question is not subject to natural selection. Variability amongst progenies occurred within the three breeding methods and there was also a significant effect of environment on the progeny for all methods. Progenies developed by bulk-population attained the highest estimates of genetic parameters, had less interaction with the environment, and greater variability.

  15. Inhalation dose due to radon, thoron, and progenies in dwellings of a hill station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, R

    2017-02-01

    The general public spends a major portion of their time in an indoor environment and hence receives a considerable amount of radiation. Knowledge about indoor radiation is important in order to arrive at the actual effective dose received by residents. The indoor radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations observed in the present study were found to vary with seasons of a given year. The highest and lowest indoor average radon, thoron, and progeny levels were observed during winter and summer seasons, respectively. The concentrations of indoor radon, thoron, and progenies were found to vary with the type of houses. The highest (222)Rn, (220)Rn, and progeny concentrations were observed in mud houses and the lowest values were recorded in wooden houses. The indoor (222)Rn concentration correlated well with concentration of its grandparent (238)U in underlying soil with a correlation coefficient of 0.87. The correlation between indoor (220)Rn and (232)Th in the underlying soil was found to be 0.64. The estimated effective doses received by the general public in the present study due to indoor radon and thoron were 1.49 ± 0.49 and 1.30 ± 0.53 mSv/year, respectively. The annual effective doses due to radon and thoron progenies were estimated as 0.76 ± 0.27 and 0.47 ± 0.23 mSv/year, respectively. The contributions from (222)Rn, (220)Rn, and corresponding progenies to the annual effective doses received were 37, 32, 19, and 12%, respectively. The general public living in the study area receives an inhalation dose of 4.02 mSv/year due to indoor radon, thoron, and progenies, which were found to be less than the action limit of ICRP 2009.

  16. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hongzhou; Hu, Mei; Li, Pengfei; Geng, Guangdong; Zhang, Qingqin; Zhang, Suqin

    2015-01-01

    The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs) of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues’ normally pairing. PMID:25950431

  17. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhou An

    Full Text Available The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing.

  18. Eating disorder pathology in elite adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giel, Katrin Elisabeth; Hermann-Werner, Anne; Mayer, Jochen; Diehl, Katharina; Schneider, Sven; Thiel, Ansgar; Zipfel, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to investigate eating disorder pathology in German elite adolescent athletes. Evidence suggests that eating disorder pathology is more common in adult elite sports, especially in female athletes and in sports emphasizing leanness. There is a scarcity of studies in elite adolescent athletes who are in a vulnerable developmental stage and are affected by general as well as sport-specific risk factors. Our data was derived from the German Young Olympic Athletes' Lifestyle and Health Management Study (GOAL) which conducted a survey in 1138 elite adolescent athletes. In this sample, we assessed body weight, weight control behavior, body acceptance and screened overall for core symptoms of eating disorders, depression and anxiety. We performed a tree analysis to identify high risk groups for eating disorder pathology. High risk groups comprised (a) athletes competing in weight dependent sports, and among athletes competing in disciplines other than weight dependent sports (b) athletes who are high on negative affectivity, (c) female athletes and (d) male athletes competing in endurance, technical or power sports. Athletes competing in weight dependent disciplines reported wide spread use of compensatory behaviors to influence body weight. Athletes reporting eating disorder pathology showed higher levels of depression and anxiety than athletes without eating disorder pathology. Increased psychosocial burden in athletes with eating disorder pathology suggests that eating disorder symptoms should not be accepted as an unproblematic and functional part of elite sports. The prevention and management of eating disorder pathology is especially important in weight dependent sports. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:553-562). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Final height in elite male artistic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Neoklis A; Theodoropoulou, Anastasia; Roupas, Nikolaos D; Armeni, Anastasia K; Koukkou, Eftychia; Leglise, Michel; Markou, Kostas B

    2012-01-01

    Elite male artistic gymnasts (AG) are exposed to high levels of physical and psychological stress during adolescence and experience a significant late maturation in both linear growth and pubertal development. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of intensive physical training on the adult final height in elite male AG. This study is unique in character, as all variables were measured on the field of competition. The study was prospective and longitudinal; however, the current analysis of data is cross-sectional. Data from 86 elite male AG were obtained during the gymnastics competitions of European and World Championships. Clinical evaluation included height and weight measurements, as well as assessment of pubic hair and genital development according to Tanner's stages of pubertal development. The laboratory investigation included determination of skeletal maturation. All athletes completed a questionnaire that included questions on personal (onset and intensity of training, number of competitions per year) and family data (paternal and maternal heights). Male AG were below the 50th percentile for both final height and weight. Elite male AG had final height standard deviation score (SDS) lower than their genetic predisposition. Final height SDS was correlated positively with target height SDS (r = 0.430, p < 0.001) and weight SDS (r = 0.477, p < 0.001) and negatively to the intensity of training (r = -0.252, p = 0.022). The main factors influencing final height, by multiple regression analysis were weight SDS (p < 0.001) and target height SDS (p = 0.003). In elite maleAG, final height falls short of genetic predisposition, still well within normal limits. Considering medical and psychological risks in general, and based on the results of this research project, the International Federation of Gymnastics has increased the age limit for participants in international gymnastics competitions by 1 year.

  20. Sugarcane Water Stress Tolerance Mechanisms and Its Implications on Developing Biotechnology Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais H. S. Ferreira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is a unique crop with the ability to accumulate high levels of sugar and is a commercially viable source of biomass for bioelectricity and second-generation bioethanol. Water deficit is the single largest abiotic stress affecting sugarcane productivity and the development of water use efficient and drought tolerant cultivars is an imperative for all major sugarcane producing countries. This review summarizes the physiological and molecular studies on water deficit stress in sugarcane, with the aim to help formulate more effective research strategies for advancing our knowledge on genes and mechanisms underpinning plant response to water stress. We also overview transgenic studies in sugarcane, with an emphasis on the potential strategies to develop superior sugarcane varieties that improve crop productivity in drought-prone environments.

  1. Phosphorus fertilization and lime application and its effect on sugarcane growth, yield and borer attack in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Walter Rasche Alvarez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Both soil phosphorus (P and soil acidity are the key factors in soil fertility management and of - ten limits crop production in subtropical agriculture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the response of lime and different P rates on sugarcane variety and their interactive effect on the sugar cane borer attack. A three factorial experiment containing, two sugarcane varieties i. e., (SP81-3250 and RB-956911; with and without application of agricultural lime (3.5 t ha-1 and four P rates i. e., (0, 20, 40 and 60 kg P2O5 ha-1 was ca - rried out at the research field area of Federal University of Santa Maria, RS, Brazil during 2011-12. It assessed a sugarcane stalk length, b stem diameter; c number of internodes, d number of stalk ha-1, e stalk yield, f °Brix and g Intensity of infestation Index. Results indicated that, the stalk yields of RB-956911 and SP81-3250 was 106.6 and 139.8 Mg ha-1, respectively. The °Brix was between 18.60 % and 18.00 %, respectively. The Intensity of infestation Index was 2.76 % for the RB-956911 and 3.65 % for the SP81-3250. The lime application showed significant results only on the borer attack. Phosphorus application increased the sugarcane yield from 105.9 Mg ha-1 to 136.5 Mg ha-1 with 60 kg of P2O5 ha-1. The application of phosphorus increased sugarcane productivity but it does not contribute which increase the borer attack.

  2. Moringa extracts used in sugarcane juice treatment and effects on ethanolic fermentation

    OpenAIRE

    Rita, De Cassia Vieira Macri [UNESP; Gustavo, Henrique Gravatim Costa [UNESP; Nayara, Abrao Montijo [UNESP; Aline, Ferreira Silva [UNESP; Mutton,Márcia Justino Rossini

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of sugarcane juice treatment using Moringa oleifera leaf and seeds extracts on ethanolic fermentation. The experiment was arranged in a split plot statistical design, with four replications. Main treatments were three sedimentation agents (synthetic polyelectrolyte, moringa leaf and seed extracts) and control while the secondary treatments were two sugarcane varieties (RB867515 and CTC4). Extracted sugarcane juice was clarified by simple...

  3. Adsorption of heavy metal ion from aqueous single metal solution by chemically modified sugarcane bagasse.

    OpenAIRE

    Karnitz Júnior, Osvaldo; Gurgel, Leandro Vinicius Alves; Melo, Júlio César Perin de; Botaro, Vagner Roberto; Melo, Tânia Márcia Sacramento; Gil, Rossimiriam Pereira de Freitas; Gil, Laurent Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the preparation of new chelating materials derived from sugarcane bagasse for adsorption of heavy metal ions in aqueous solution. The first part of this report deals with the chemical modification of sugarcane bagasse with succinic anhydride. The carboxylic acid functions introduced into the material were used to anchor polyamines, which resulted in two yet unpublished modified sugarcane bagasse materials. The obtained materials were characterized by elemental analysis and...

  4. Measurement of the deposited activity of the short-lived radon progeny in the human respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezzu, G.; Butterweck-Dempewolf, G.; Schuler, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland). Div. for Radiation Protection and Waste Management

    1998-12-31

    Volunteers were exposed in the radon chamber at Paul Scherrer Institut to an atmosphere enriched with highly unattached radon progeny. The deposited radon progeny activity in the respiratory tract of the volunteers was determined using a low level in-vivo counter. The detector arrangement and its calibration for the measurement of deposited radon progeny activity is described and the results for a mouth and a nose breathing volunteer are presented. For the nose breathing volunteer 55% of the deposited radon progeny activity was located in the head and the remaining 45% in the chest whereas for the mouth breathing volunteer 25% was located in the head and the remaining 75% in the chest. A mean clearance half-life for the deposited radon progeny from the respiratory tract of (2{+-}1) h was obtained from the analyses of the temporal behaviour of the deposited radon progeny activity in the head. (orig.)

  5. Mixed models for selection of Jatropha progenies with high adaptability and yield stability in Brazilian regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, P E; Bhering, L L; Costa, R D; Rocha, R B; Laviola, B G

    2016-08-19

    The aim of this study was to estimate genetic parameters via mixed models and simultaneously to select Jatropha progenies grown in three regions of Brazil that meet high adaptability and stability. From a previous phenotypic selection, three progeny tests were installed in 2008 in the municipalities of Planaltina-DF (Midwest), Nova Porteirinha-MG (Southeast), and Pelotas-RS (South). We evaluated 18 families of half-sib in a randomized block design with three replications. Genetic parameters were estimated using restricted maximum likelihood/best linear unbiased prediction. Selection was based on the harmonic mean of the relative performance of genetic values method in three strategies considering: 1) performance in each environment (with interaction effect); 2) performance in each environment (with interaction effect); and 3) simultaneous selection for grain yield, stability and adaptability. Accuracy obtained (91%) reveals excellent experimental quality and consequently safety and credibility in the selection of superior progenies for grain yield. The gain with the selection of the best five progenies was more than 20%, regardless of the selection strategy. Thus, based on the three selection strategies used in this study, the progenies 4, 11, and 3 (selected in all environments and the mean environment and by adaptability and phenotypic stability methods) are the most suitable for growing in the three regions evaluated.

  6. Glucosinolates in Self-crossed Progenies of Monosomic Cabbage Alien Addition Lines in Chinese Cabbage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Aixia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brassica species have been reported to possess cancer preventive activity due to glucosinolates (GLS and their derived properties. Many studies on GLS have focused on Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa. However, information on GLS in progeny between Chinese cabbage (B. rapa ssp. pekinensis and cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata remains limited. In this study, eight GLS were detected in the self-crossed progenies of monosomic cabbage alien addition lines in Chinese cabbage (Chinese cabbage – cabbage MAALs and parental Chinese cabbage, and nine GLS were detected in the parental cabbage. The variation of GLS content ranges was greater in the progeny than in the parental Chinese cabbage. The nine GLS identified were subjected to PCA to evaluate the differences among progeny and parents. Eight progeny samples had a comprehensive principal component score closer to or greater than that of cabbage, and four of them exhibited glucoraphanin (GRA and total GLS contents greater than that of Chinese cabbage with the relative content of total indolic GLS was greater than 50%. These results offered new opportunity to improve GLS-containing of Chinese cabbage using genes from cabbage.

  7. Sugarcane proteomics: An update on current status, challenges, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabas, Leonard; Ramadass, Ashwin; Amalraj, Ramesh Sundar; Palaniyandi, Malathi; Rasappa, Viswanathan

    2015-05-01

    Sugarcane is one of the most important commercial crops cultivated worldwide for the production of crystal sugar, ethanol, and other related by-products. Unlike other comparable monocots like sorghum, maize, and rice, sugarcane genome by virtue of its polyploidy nature remains yet to be fully deciphered. Proteomics-an established complementary tool to genomics is at its infancy in sugarcane as compared to the other monocots. However, with the surge in genomics research accomplished by next-generation sequencing platforms, sugarcane proteomics has gained momentum. This review summarizes the available literature from 1970 to 2014, which ensures a comprehensive coverage on sugarcane proteomics-a topic first of its kind to be reviewed. We herewith compiled substantial contributions in different areas of sugarcane proteomics, which include abiotic and biotic stresses, cell wall, organelle, and structural proteomics. The past decade has witnessed a paradigm shift in the pace with which sugarcane proteomics is progressing, as evident by the number of research publications. In addition to extensively reviewing the progress made thus far, we intend to highlight the scope in sugarcane proteomics, with an aspiration to instigate focused research on sugarcane to harness its full potential for the human welfare. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Early changes in arbuscular mycorrhiza development in sugarcane under two harvest management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Lucas Carvalho Basilio; Stürmer, Sidney Luiz; Lambais, Marcio Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is grown on over 8 million ha in Brazil and is used to produce ethanol and sugar. Some sugarcane fields are burned to facilitate harvesting, which can affect the soil microbial community. However, whether sugarcane pre-harvest burning affects the community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and symbioses development is not known. In this study, we investigated the early impacts of harvest management on AMF spore communities and root colonization in three sugarcane varieties, under two harvest management systems (no-burning and pre-harvest burning). Soil and root samples were collected in the field after the first harvest of sugarcane varieties SP813250, SP801842, and RB72454, and AMF species were identified based on spore morphology. Diversity indices were determined based on spore populations and root colonization determined as an indicator of symbioses development. Based on the diversity indices, spore number and species occurrence in soil, no significant differences were observed among the AMF communities, regardless of harvest management type, sugarcane variety or interactions between harvest management type and sugarcane variety. However, mycorrhiza development was stimulated in sugarcane under the no-burning management system. Our data suggest that the sugarcane harvest management system may cause early changes in arbuscular mycorrhiza development.

  9. Early changes in arbuscular mycorrhiza development in sugarcane under two harvest management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Carvalho Basilio de Azevedo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. is grown on over 8 million ha in Brazil and is used to produce ethanol and sugar. Some sugarcane fields are burned to facilitate harvesting, which can affect the soil microbial community. However, whether sugarcane pre-harvest burning affects the community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF and symbioses development is not known. In this study, we investigated the early impacts of harvest management on AMF spore communities and root colonization in three sugarcane varieties, under two harvest management systems (no-burning and pre-harvest burning. Soil and root samples were collected in the field after the first harvest of sugarcane varieties SP813250, SP801842, and RB72454, and AMF species were identified based on spore morphology. Diversity indices were determined based on spore populations and root colonization determined as an indicator of symbioses development. Based on the diversity indices, spore number and species occurrence in soil, no significant differences were observed among the AMF communities, regardless of harvest management type, sugarcane variety or interactions between harvest management type and sugarcane variety. However, mycorrhiza development was stimulated in sugarcane under the no-burning management system. Our data suggest that the sugarcane harvest management system may cause early changes in arbuscular mycorrhiza development.

  10. Residual biomass potential of commercial and pre-commercial sugarcane cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guimarães de Andrade Landell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum spp. is an efficient and sustainable alternative for energy generation compared to non-renewable sources. Currently, during the mechanized harvest process, the straw left in the field can be used in part for the second generation ethanol and increasing the electric energy production. Thus, this study aimed to provide information on the potential for residual biomass cultivars of sugarcane cropping system. This study provides the following information: yield of straw, depending on the calculated leaf area index and the number of tillers per linear meter; primary energy production of several sugarcane genotypes; contribution of dry tops and leaves; biomass yield; and evaluation of fiber, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Preliminary results obtained by researchers of the State of São Paulo, Brazil, and reCviews related studies are presented. The results suggest that the production of sugarcane straw content varies according to the cultivars; the greater mass of sugarcane straw is in the top leaves and that the potential for the crude energy production of sugarcane per area unit can be increased using fiber-rich species or species that produce more straw. The straw indexes was shown to be a good indicator and allow the estimation of straw volumes generated in a sugarcane crop. The cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin composition in sugarcane is distinct among varieties. Therefore, it is possible to develop distinct biomass materials for energy production and for the development of sugarcane mills using biochemical processes and thermal routes.

  11. Homogeneous Modification of Sugarcane Bagasse by Graft Copolymerization in Ionic Liquid for Oil Absorption Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jie Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane bagasse, lignocellulosic residue from the sugar industry, is an abundant and renewable bioresource on the earth. The application of ionic liquids in sugarcane bagasse biorefinery is gaining increasing interest. The homogeneous modification of sugarcane bagasse by free radical initiated graft copolymerization of acrylate monomers using 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride as solvent was performed. A variety of sugarcane bagasse graft copolymers with different weight percent gain were prepared via adjusting the monomer dosage. FT-IR studies confirmed the success in attaching the poly(acrylate side chains onto sugarcane bagasse. Oil absorbency studies suggested that the sugarcane bagasse graft copolymers were potential biobased materials for effective treatment of ester-based oils. SEM studies showed that the sugarcane bagasse graft copolymers displayed a dense morphology structure. Thermogravimetric analysis demonstrated that the thermal stability of sugarcane bagasse decreased after the homogeneous modification by the graft copolymerization. The present study provides an alternative strategy to convert sugarcane bagasse into a value-added functional biobased material.

  12. Engineering Behavior and Characteristics of Wood Ash and Sugarcane Bagasse Ash

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco Grau; Hyunwook Choo; Jong Wan Hu; Jongwon Jung

    2015-01-01

    .... Plenty of biomasses are produced nationwide. Biomasses are mostly combusted and usually discarded or disposed of without treatment as biomass ashes, which include wood and sugarcane bagasse ashes...

  13. Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Stocks of Different Hawaiian Sugarcane Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Tirado-Corbalá

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane has been widely used as a biofuel crop due to its high biological productivity, ease of conversion to ethanol, and its relatively high potential for greenhouse gas reduction and lower environmental impacts relative to other derived biofuels from traditional agronomic crops. In this investigation, we studied four sugarcane cultivars (H-65-7052, H-78-3567, H-86-3792 and H-87-4319 grown on a Hawaiian commercial sugarcane plantation to determine their ability to store and accumulate soil carbon (C and nitrogen (N across a 24-month growth cycle on contrasting soil types. The main study objective establish baseline parameters for biofuel production life cycle analyses; sub-objectives included (1 determining which of four main sugarcane cultivars sequestered the most soil C and (2 assessing how soil C sequestration varies among two common Hawaiian soil series (Pulehu-sandy clay loam and Molokai-clay. Soil samples were collected at 20 cm increments to depths of up to 120 cm using hand augers at the three main growth stages (tillering, grand growth, and maturity from two experimental plots at to observe total carbon (TC, total nitrogen (TN, dissolved organic carbon (DOC and nitrates (NO−3 using laboratory flash combustion for TC and TN and solution filtering and analysis for DOC and NO−3. Aboveground plant biomass was collected and subsampled to determine lignin and C and N content. This study determined that there was an increase of TC with the advancement of growing stages in the studied four sugarcane cultivars at both soil types (increase in TC of 15–35 kg·m2. Nitrogen accumulation was more variable, and NO−3 (<5 ppm were insignificant. The C and N accumulation varies in the whole profile based on the ability of the sugarcane cultivar’s roots to explore and grow in the different soil types. For the purpose of storing C in the soil, cultivar H-65-7052 (TC accumulation of ~30 kg·m−2 and H-86-3792 (25 kg·m−2 rather H-78

  14. NDVI to Detect Sugarcane Aphid Injury to Grain Sorghum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, N C; Backoulou, G F; Brewer, M J; Giles, K L

    2015-06-01

    Multispectral remote sensing has potential to provide quick and inexpensive information on sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), pest status in sorghum fields. We describe a study conducted to determine if injury caused by sugarcane aphid to sorghum plants in fields of grain sorghum could be detected using multispectral remote sensing from a fixed wing aircraft. A study was conducted in commercial grain sorghum fields in the Texas Gulf Coast region in June 2014. Twenty-six commercial grain sorghum fields were selected and rated for the level of injury to sorghum plants in the field caused by sugarcane aphid. Plant growth stage ranged from 5.0 (watery ripe) to 7.0 (hard dough) among fields; and plant injury rating from sugarcane aphid ranged from 1.0 (little or no injury) to 4.0 (>40% of plants displaying injury) among fields. The normalized differenced vegetation index (NDVI) is calculated from light reflectance in the red and near-infrared wavelength bands in multispectral imagery and is a common index of plant stress. High NDVI indicates low levels of stress and low NDVI indicates high stress. NDVI ranged from -0.07 to 0.26 among fields. The correlation between NDVI and plant injury rating was negative and significant, as was the correlation between NDVI and plant growth stage. The negative correlation of NDVI with injury rating indicated that plant stress increased with increasing plant injury. Reduced NDVI with increasing plant growth probably resulted from reduced photosynthetic activity in more mature plants. The correlation between plant injury rating and plant growth stage was positive and significant indicating that plant injury from sugarcane aphid increased as plants matured. The partial correlation of NDVI with plant injury rating was negative and significant indicating that NDVI decreased with increasing plant injury after adjusting for its association with plant growth stage. We demonstrated that remotely sensed imagery acquired from grain

  15. Do Elite Athletes Live Longer? A Systematic Review of Mortality and Longevity in Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemez, Srdjan; Baker, Joseph

    Understanding of an athlete's lifespan is limited with a much more sophisticated knowledge of their competitive careers and little knowledge of post-career outcomes. In this review, we consider the relationship between participation at elite levels of sport and mortality risk relative to other athletes and age- and sex-matched controls from the general population. Our objective was to identify, collate, and disseminate a comprehensive list of risk factors associated with longevity and trends and causes of mortality among elite athletes. English language articles were searched using the Web of Science database. Keywords athletes, death, elite, "high performance" life expect*, longevity, mortality, players, professional, and sport were used to locate research articles. Seventeen additional articles were retrieved from reference lists found in these papers and a general web search. The inclusion criteria were the following: (1) publication year 1980 or later; (2) the study examined elite-level athletes; and (3) outcome data measured mortality/longevity trends and/or causes. Fifty-four peer-reviewed publications and three articles from online sources met the criteria for inclusion. Baseball, football, soccer, basketball, and cycling had the most reported data on elite athletes' lifespan longevities. A variety of mechanisms have attempted to explain mortality risk (e.g., handedness, playing position, achievement, etc.). Considerable support was found for superior longevity outcomes for elite athletes, particularly those in endurance and mixed sports. Future research into the mechanisms that may affect mortality risk is important for a better understanding of life expectancies in both eminent and non-eminent populations. Participation in elite sport is generally favorable to lifespan longevity. A majority of studies included in this review reported superior lifespan longevity outcomes for elite athletes compared to age- and sex-matched controls from the general

  16. Behavior of {sup 222}Rn and its progeny in high-rise buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, J.K.C.; Tso, M.Y.W.; Ho, C.W. [Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Radioisotope Unit

    1998-09-01

    Unlike detached or semi-detached houses, the main source of indoor radon in high-rise buildings is the building material. Radon released from the building material will be removed by ventilation, either forced or natural, so that its concentration, its progeny`s concentration, and the equilibrium between the two will be different for different types of buildings and environmental factors. A number of surveys were carried out in buildings throughout the territory to look at the seasonal variation of indoor {sup 222}Rn levels; the dependence of indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration on the living environment; the indoor gamma dose rate and its relation to indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration; and the dependence of {sup 222}Rn progeny concentration and equilibrium factor on the environment in high-rise buildings.

  17. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Mitch

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition.

  18. Asthma in elite athletes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Elers, Jimmi; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    is essential when treating elite athletes. This article is aimed at physicians who diagnose and treat athletes with respiratory symptoms. It focuses on the pathogenesis of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes and how the diagnosis can be made. Furthermore, treatment of elite......Elite athletes have a high prevalence of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Although respiratory symptoms can be suggestive of asthma, the diagnosis of asthma in elite athletes cannot be based solely on the presence or absence of symptoms; diagnosis should be based on objective...... measurements, such as the eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test or exercise test. When considering that not all respiratory symptoms are due to asthma, other diagnoses should be considered. Certain regulations apply to elite athletes who require asthma medication for asthma. Knowledge of these regulations...

  19. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomax M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitch Lomax Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK Abstract: The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. Keywords: exercise, aquatic athletes, bronchoconstriction

  20. Spittlebug impacts on sugarcane quality and ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cristina Ravaneli

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the impacts of spittlebug (Mahanarva fimbriolata attack on sugarcane quality and ethanol production. Technological and microbiological parameters of juice and fermentation process were evaluated in ten fermentation cycles and two harvest seasons. Treatments consisted of different spittlebug stalk damage levels: control, with 100% of apparently healthy stalks; medium, with 15% of damaged or dry stalks (DDS; high, with 30% of DDS; and very high, with 60% of DDS. Spittlebug attack caused significant losses in cane quality, reducing total soluble solids, sucrose content, total reducing sugars, and pH, and increasing total phenolic compounds, and total and volatile juice acidity. The fermentation process was also significantly affected, resulting in lower ethanol content in wine. There was an increase in acetaldehyde concentration in the distillate. The spittlebug attack caused negative impacts on sugarcane quality and fermentation process, and these impacts are stronger in late season harvests.

  1. Power is sweet: sugarcane in the global ethanol assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Gail

    2010-01-01

    New alliances between Brazil and the US for ethanol production, transport, and trade are revitalising and expanding the centuries -old sugarcane plantation system in the Americas. In this paper I adopt the concept of global assemblages, building on the work of Aihwa Ong, Stephen Collier, and Saskia Sassen, to draw the contours of an "ethanol assemblage," which includes states, corporations, growers, technologies, urban consumers, and rural communities and landscapes. Though important to conceptualise agrofuels as a global phenomenon, it is also necessary to recognise the distinct regional patterns that cohere around various aspects of this polymorphous industry. Therefore, I focus on alliances around sugarcane ethanol, paying particular attention to the role of Miami as a global city serving as a gateway to information, investment, and commodities for the public/private and national/transnational entities that are engaged in the hemispheric project of ethanol promotion, production and distribution.

  2. Process Alternatives for Second Generation Ethanol Production from Sugarcane Bagasse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Furlan, Felipe; Giordano, Roberto C.; Costa, Caliane B. B.

    2015-01-01

    In ethanol production from sugarcane juice, sugarcane bagasse is used as fuel for the boiler, to meet the steam and electric energy demand of the process. However, a surplus of bagasse is common, which can be used either to increase electric energy or ethanol production. While the first option uses...... already established processes, there are still many uncertainties about the techno-economic feasibility of the second option. In this study, some key parameters of the second generation ethanol production process were analyzed and their influence in the process feasibility assessed. The simulated process...... on the economic feasibility of the process. For the economic scenario considered in this study, using bagasse to increase ethanol production yielded higher ethanol production costs compared to using bagasse for electric energy production, showing that further improvements in the process are still necessary....

  3. Genetic divergence and parent selection of sugarcane clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Rosa Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the genetic divergence of 140 sugarcane clones of the series RB97,in phase T3 of the Sugarcane Genetic Improvement Program of the Universidade Federal do Paraná, at three locations bymultivariate analysis, using the linear mixed model and grouping analysis by the Tocher procedure, based on Mahalanobis´generalized distance. The evaluated traits were number of stalks per plot, mass of ten stalks, Brix and Brix per plot in kg. Thenumber of groups varied according to the evaluated environment. Based on the results, combinations of one of the mostdivergent clones RB975008, RB975112, RB975019 RB975153 and RB975067 with any one of the most productive clonesRB975269, RB977533, RB975102, RB975317 and RB975038 are recommended.

  4. SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF THE SUGARCANE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Oranges Cezarino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the concern about the environmental degradation and the conditions of life of our planet has increased. An alarm literally sounded relating the environmental problems and the uncertainties of the future. An energy revolution is necessary in face of the climate changes. Nature offers numerous possibilities of energy production and Brazil is in a great position in this scenario. It is the greatest producer, consumer and exporter of ethanol. Analyzing the Brazilian sugarcane industry, it is easy to recognize its historical and economic importance. More than ever, this industry has shown environmental solutions with changes in the energy matrix using ethanol as renewable fuel. It is essential to have the industry development in balance with social and environmental values. Thus, the first step to expand this sector would be to identify the social and environmental impacts of the sugarcane industry. Public policies are also acting on the sector and have a prominent role in the scenario.

  5. Biocontrol of Sugarcane Smut Disease by Interference of Fungal Sexual Mating and Hyphal Growth Using a Bacterial Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Shiyin Liu; Nuoqiao Lin; Yumei Chen; Zhibin Liang; Lisheng Liao; Mingfa Lv; Yufan Chen; Yingxin Tang; Fei He; Shaohua Chen; Jianuan Zhou; Lianhui Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane smut is a fungal disease caused by Sporisorium scitamineum, which can cause severe economic losses in sugarcane industry. The infection depends on the mating of bipolar sporida to form a dikaryon and develops into hyphae to penetrate the meristematic tissue of sugarcane. In this study, we set to isolate bacterial strains capable of blocking the fungal mating and evaluate their potential in control of sugarcane smut disease. A bacterial isolate ST4 from rhizosphere displayed potent i...

  6. [Surveillance experience in the sugarcane sector: challenges in disrupting the perilous "marathon" of the sugarcane plantations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Rodolfo Andrade de Gouveia; dos Santos, Simone Alves; da Silva, Alessandro José Nunes; de Almeida, Ildeberto Muniz

    2014-12-01

    The sugar-alcohol sector is growing year by year, especially in the state of Sao Paulo where approximately 42.9% of the sugar-ethanol plants are concentrated. The production chain is a subject for concern to public agencies and to civil society by exposing migrant workers to risks arising from the work process. In Sao Paulo, from 2006-2009, Occupational Health Surveillance (VISAT) set up two initiatives to address problems related to the housing and working conditions of sugarcane workers. The objective of this article presented in the form of an essay is to analyze the experiences in their context. The methodology used combines document analysis with the perception of the authors who participated in the actions. The experience led to improvements in these conditions and fostered public debate on the conditions of such physically demanding work. The interventions resulted in a definition of sanitary norms and initiatives at the legislative and judicial level, but even the most successful measures failed to attain the organizational targets, especially a production remuneration structure that challenges the traditional action of surveillance and the impacts were weakened due to the fragility of worker representation for the sector.

  7. Reliability evaluation and analysis of sugarcane 7000 series harvesters in sugarcane harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Najafi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The performance of agricultural machines depends on the reliability of the equipment used, the maintenance efficiency, the operation process, the technical expertise of workers, etc. As the size and complexity of agricultural equipment continue to increase, the implications of equipment failure become even more critical. Machine failure probability is (1-R and R is machine reliability (Vafaei et al., 2010. Moreover, system reliability is the probability that an item will perform a required function without failure under stated conditions for a stated period of time (Billinton and Allan, 1992. Therefore, we must be able to create an appropriate compromise between maintenance methods and acceptable reliability levels. Precision failure data gathering in a farm is a worthwhile work, because these can represent a good estimate of machine reliability combining the effects of machine loading, surrounding effects and incorrect repair and maintenance. Each machine based on its work conditions, parts combinationand manufacturing process follows a failures distribution function depending on the environment where the machine work and the machine’s specifications (Meeker and Escobar, 1998. General failures distributions for contiguous data are normal, log-normal, exponential and Weibull (Shirmohamadi, 2002. Each machine can represent proportionate behavior with these functions in short or long time. Materials and methods: The study area was the Hakim Farabi agro-industry Company located 35 kilometers south of Ahvaz in Iran. Arable lands of this company are located in 31 to 31°10 N latitude and 45 to 48°36 E longitudes. The region has dry and warm climate. A total of 24 Austoft 7000 sugarcane chopper harvester are being used in the company. Cane harvesters were divided into 3 group consisting of old, middle aged and new. From each group, one machine was chosen. Data from maintenance reports of harvesters which have been recorded within 400

  8. Micropropagation of an elite Darjeeling tea clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, T; Sen, S K

    1992-03-01

    Shoot cultures of Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntz var. T-78, an elite Darjeeling tea clone, were established from cotyledonary nodes and shoot tips of germinated seedlings as well as from nodal explants of field grown plants. Shoot multiplication rate ranged from 4x in nodal explants to 35x in cotyledonary nodes after 18 weeks of culture. Rooting was achieved in 80-90% micro-shoots by either placing them on an inductive medium for 10 d and then transferring shoots to hormone-free medium, or by treating micro-shoots with a chronic dose of IBA (500 mg/l) for 30-40 min. Rooted plants were established in soil under glasshouse condition at 60% frequency after hardening phase of 4-6 weeks. The regenerated plants show a constant chromosome number of 2n=30 and are morphologically true to type. This procedure can be applied for conservation and utilisation of an elite clone of Darjeeling tea.

  9. Echocardiography to measure fitness of elite runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaz Arrese, Alejandro; Serrano Ostáriz, Enrique; González Carretero, Mariano; Lacambra Blasco, Isaac

    2005-05-01

    We evaluated the echocardiograms of 134 male and 54 female elite runners who competed over different distances to observe cardiac enlargement and differences among athletes engaged in different types of training, and to relate the echographic dimension with running performance. In male runners, left ventricular (LV) internal diameter at end diastole (LVIDd), LV mass, and left atrial diameter were increased by the length of distance ( P hypertrophy and that it is necessary to establish a new upper limit of abnormal cavity dilatation as indexed LVIDd. The normal systolic function and the relationship between LVIDd and performance indicate that LV enlargement in elite runners is a physiologic adaptation and that echocardiographic assessment can be used to determine the fitness of runners.

  10. Host Plant Specialization in the Sugarcane Aphid Melanaphis sacchari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibouche, Samuel; Mississipi, Stelly; Fartek, Benjamin; Delatte, Hélène; Reynaud, Bernard; Costet, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Most aphids are highly specialized on one or two related plant species and generalist species often include sympatric populations adapted to different host plants. Our aim was to test the hypothesis of the existence of host specialized lineages of the aphid Melanaphis sacchari in Reunion Island. To this end, we investigated the genetic diversity of the aphid and its association with host plants by analyzing the effect of wild sorghum Sorghum bicolor subsp. verticilliflorum or sugarcane as host plants on the genetic structuring of populations and by performing laboratory host transfer experiments to detect trade-offs in host use. Genotyping of 31 samples with 10 microsatellite loci enabled identification of 13 multilocus genotypes (MLG). Three of these, Ms11, Ms16 and Ms15, were the most frequent ones. The genetic structure of the populations was linked to the host plants. Ms11 and Ms16 were significantly more frequently observed on sugarcane, while Ms15 was almost exclusively collected in colonies on wild sorghum. Laboratory transfer experiments demonstrated the existence of fitness trade-offs. An Ms11 isofemale lineage performed better on sugarcane than on sorghum, whereas an Ms15 lineage developed very poorly on sugarcane, and two Ms16 lineages showed no significant difference in performances between both hosts. Both field and laboratory results support the existence of host plant specialization in M. sacchari in Reunion Island, despite low genetic differentiation. This study illustrates the ability of asexual aphid lineages to rapidly undergo adaptive changes including shifting from one host plant to another.

  11. Monitoring of mechanical sugarcane harvesting through control charts

    OpenAIRE

    Voltarelli,Murilo A.; Silva,Rouverson P. da; Zerbato,Cristiano; Paixão,Carla S. S.; Tavares,Tiago de O.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Statistical process control in mechanized farming is a new way to assess operation quality. In this sense, we aimed to compare three statistical process control tools applied to losses in sugarcane mechanical harvesting to determine the best control chart template for this quality indicator. Losses were daily monitored in farms located within Triângulo Mineiro region, in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. They were carried over a period of 70 days in the 2014 harvest. At the end of the eval...

  12. Host Plant Specialization in the Sugarcane Aphid Melanaphis sacchari.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Nibouche

    Full Text Available Most aphids are highly specialized on one or two related plant species and generalist species often include sympatric populations adapted to different host plants. Our aim was to test the hypothesis of the existence of host specialized lineages of the aphid Melanaphis sacchari in Reunion Island. To this end, we investigated the genetic diversity of the aphid and its association with host plants by analyzing the effect of wild sorghum Sorghum bicolor subsp. verticilliflorum or sugarcane as host plants on the genetic structuring of populations and by performing laboratory host transfer experiments to detect trade-offs in host use. Genotyping of 31 samples with 10 microsatellite loci enabled identification of 13 multilocus genotypes (MLG. Three of these, Ms11, Ms16 and Ms15, were the most frequent ones. The genetic structure of the populations was linked to the host plants. Ms11 and Ms16 were significantly more frequently observed on sugarcane, while Ms15 was almost exclusively collected in colonies on wild sorghum. Laboratory transfer experiments demonstrated the existence of fitness trade-offs. An Ms11 isofemale lineage performed better on sugarcane than on sorghum, whereas an Ms15 lineage developed very poorly on sugarcane, and two Ms16 lineages showed no significant difference in performances between both hosts. Both field and laboratory results support the existence of host plant specialization in M. sacchari in Reunion Island, despite low genetic differentiation. This study illustrates the ability of asexual aphid lineages to rapidly undergo adaptive changes including shifting from one host plant to another.

  13. Comparison of Aerobic and Anaerobic Biodegradation of Sugarcane Vinasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, V T; Araújo, T A; Amaral, M C S

    2015-07-01

    Vinasse is the main liquid waste from ethanol production, and it has a considerable pollution potential. Biological treatment is a promising alternative to reduce its organic load. The aim of this study was to analyze the biodegradation of sugarcane juice vinasse in aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The content of carbohydrates, proteins and volatile fatty acids was evaluated. Vinasse samples showed a high biodegradability (>96.5 %) and low percentage of inert chemical oxygen demand (COD) (vinasse.

  14. Effect of strenuous maternal exercise before and during pregnancy on rat progeny renal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira A.O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of strenuous exercise before and during pregnancy on the renal function and morphological alterations of the progeny were determined in a study on female Wistar rats. This research was done based on a previous study carried out in our laboratory, which showed morphological alterations in rats submitted to this kind of exercise. As the form is related to the function, the physiological relevance of submitting a pregnant female to a high-intensity exercise training regimen could be explained by the fact that morphological alterations can influence kidney function. The animals were assigned to one of two groups: control animals that did not exercise during pregnancy and trained animals that swam for 120 min 5 days a week for 8 weeks before pregnancy and daily for 60 min over a period of 8 weeks starting on the second day of pregnancy. Seven rats of each group were analyzed for morphological alterations and for renal function. The progeny of the rats used for morphological evaluation were born by cesarean section and the progeny of the animals used to evaluate renal function were born normally. The progeny were two months old when renal function was evaluated. Fertility and morbidity were the same for both groups. Strenuous maternal exercise had no significant influence on glomerular filtration rate (GFR but renal plasma flow was lower in the progeny of the trained group (mean ± SD, 16.65 ± 3.77 ml min-1 kg-1 compared to the progeny of the control group (33.42 ± 2.56 ml min-1 kg-1. Antidiuretic and antinatriuretic effects on the progeny of the trained group were observed, since urine flow as percentage of GFR and the fraction of urinary sodium excretion were lower in this group (1.38 ± 0.10 and 0.60 ± 0.04%, respectively compared to the progeny of the control group (2.36 ± 0.11 and 1.55 ± 0.20%, respectively. Moreover, in this exercise program, fetuses from trained animals were small-sized (2.45 ± 0.19 vs 4.66 ± 2.45 g for

  15. A family business: stem cell progeny join the niche to regulate homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Fuchs, Elaine

    2012-01-23

    Stem cell niches, the discrete microenvironments in which the stem cells reside, play a dominant part in regulating stem cell activity and behaviours. Recent studies suggest that committed stem cell progeny become indispensable components of the niche in a wide range of stem cell systems. These unexpected niche inhabitants provide versatile feedback signals to their stem cell parents. Together with other heterologous cell types that constitute the niche, they contribute to the dynamics of the microenvironment. As progeny are often located in close proximity to stem cell niches, similar feedback regulations may be the underlying principles shared by different stem cell systems.

  16. Body Image Amongst Elite Rugby Union Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Claire; Hindle, Chloe; McLay-Cooke, Rebecca; Slater, Joanne; Brown, Rachel; Smith, Brett; Baker, Dane; Healey, Philip; Black, Katherine

    2017-11-16

    There is limited information on the risk of eating disorders and body image of elite male athletes. However, research suggests there are some athletes who have poor body image and they may be at increased risk of developing eating disorders. Therefore, the current study investigated risk of eating disorders, body image, and the relationship with age, in elite rugby union players during their pre-season training period.This cross-sectional study was undertaken at the start of the pre-season amongst elite rugby union players in New Zealand. Twenty-six professional rugby union players completed a 49-item questionnaire on body image and disordered eating. A 'body image score' was calculated from questionnaire subscales including 'drive for thinness', 'bulimia' and 'body dissatisfaction', with total scores above twenty indicative of poor body image.Body image scores varied from 8-39 out of a possible 0-100. Disordered eating behaviours were reported, including binge eating at least once a week (15%, n=4/26), pathogenic weight control use (4%, n=1/26) and avoidance of certain foods (77%, n=20/26). There was a statistically significant inverse association between the bulimia subscale and age (P = 0.034).At the start of the pre-season training period, many elite rugby union players experience disturbances in body image. The prevalence of disordered eating behaviours is of concern, and needs to be minimised due to the negative impact on health and performance. A focus on assessment and education of younger male rugby players may be required in order to reduce disordered eating patterns.

  17. How do elite athletes lead themselves?

    OpenAIRE

    Heiss, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The present research transfers the concept of self-leadership, originally rooted in organizational psychology, to the domain of elite sports. For this two studies were conducted: The first study analyzes whether self-leadership maintains construct-specific variance when compared with the similar concept of volition. Results showed that self-leadership and volition are distinguishable, albeit weak to moderately correlated concepts (r = .33). Moreover using the Rubicon model of action phases to...

  18. A Comparison of the Developmental Experiences of Elite and Sub-Elite Swimmers: Similar Developmental Histories Can Lead to Differences in Performance Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael B.; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Edmonds, William A.; Castillo, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    The current study fills a void in the literature that investigates the factors required for elite athlete development. Previous studies have (a) illustrated psychological and physiological differences between elites and non-elites; "or" (b) described the psychological and physiological developmental experiences of elite performers. The…

  19. Working strategy for bacterial contamination control on sugarcane micropropagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelenys Alvarado-Capó

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The most important losses in labs are caused by microbial contamination. Though several methods have been assayed and put into practice to eliminate or to diminish bacterial contamination of in vitro culture in cells and plant tissues, none has been completely effective. In the present research the aim was to find effective methods to prevent and to control the bacterial contamination of in vitro culture of sugarcane. The culture media for the in vitro plant multiplication was modified by adding nutritive substances in order to evaluate its effect on bacterial contamination percent and its phytotoxicity on in vitro plants. It was also evaluated the effect of modification of the initial pH of the in vitro plant culture medium and bacterial contaminants. It was proved that it is possible, without damaging the in vitro plant, to increase the growing of bacterial contaminants by adding coconut water (100.0 ml.l-1 or yeast extract (250.0 mg.l-1 to the culture medium of multiplication of the sugarcane. The use of the initial pH 6.5 favors the early appearance of bacterial contaminants detecting them since the first 24 hours without a negative effect to the in vitro plant. Evaluating these results a working strategy was set for the prevention and control of bacterial contamination in sugarcane micropropagation by applying early detection methods. Key words: bacteria, coconut water, Saccharum spp. hybrid, yeast extract

  20. Differential gene expression in drought-tolerant sugarcane roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantini, J S; Dedemo, G C; Jovino Gimenez, D F; Fonseca, L F S; Tezza, R I D; Mutton, M A; Ferro, J A; Ferro, M I T

    2015-06-29

    Drought is one of the most frequent abiotic stresses limiting the productivity and geographical distribution of sugarcane culture. The use of drought-tolerant genotypes is one approach for overcoming the effects of water stress. We conducted a comparative study to identify gene expression profiles under water stress in tolerant sugarcane roots. Two different cultivars, 1 drought tolerant (RB867515) and 1 drought susceptible (SP86-155), were evaluated at 4 sampling time points (1, 3, 5, and 10 days) using the cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique. A total of 173 fragments were found to be differentially expressed in response to water stress in the tolerant cultivar. Seventy of these were cloned, sequenced, and categorized. Similarity analysis using BLAST revealed that 64% of the fragments differentially expressed code proteins classified as no hits (23%), hypothetical (21%), or involved in stress response (20%), with others were involved in communication pathways and signal transduction, bioenergetics, secondary metabolism, and growth and development. Four genes were analyzed and validated using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine their expression and showed consistency with the cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses. Our results contribute insight into the molecular responses to water stress in sugarcane and possibility to the development of cultivars with improved tolerance to drought.

  1. Brazilian organic sugarcane spirits: Physicochemical and chromatographic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cimino Duarte

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT There has been a growing demand for products from organic agriculture for the food market. Brazil leads the production of sugarcane spirits and produces about 1.6 billion liters/year. New technologies have been sought throughout the supply chain to improve production, and organic raw material has been used in the production of sugar cane for the production of beverages. This study aimed to define the physicochemical and chromatographic profiles of eleven organic sugarcane spirits samples from various Brazilian states. The secondary components and contaminants were identified and quantified through physicochemical analyses, HPLC and gas chromatography (GC. A significant percentage of the organic sugarcane spirits samples contained concentrations of components that were above the limits required by the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Provisioning (MAPA, specifically the esters (18.20%, copper and dry extract (9.10%. This contamination is caused by bad conditions employed during the production process, which are not in compliance with the good manufacturing practices determined and legislated by Brazilian law.

  2. Sugarcane biopolymer patch in femoral artery angioplasty on dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, José Lamartine de Andrade; Lins, Esdras Marques; Marques, Silvio Romero de Barros; Coelho, Antônio Roberto de Barros; Rossiter, Renata de Oliveira; Melo, Roberto José Vieira de

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of the sugarcane biopolymer membrane in femoral artery patch angioplasty on dogs. Eight dogs were submitted to bilateral femoral artery patch angioplasty with a sugarcane biopolymer membrane patch on one side and e-PTFE patch on the contralateral side. This research was performed at Experimental Surgical Research Laboratory of the Centro de Ciências da Saúde at Universidade Federal de Pernambuco. The dogs were submitted to a new surgery at 180 days after the patch angioplasty in order to harvest the femoral artery. All the animals were evaluated by: clinical examination, measure of femoral artery diameter, arteriogram and Doppler fluxometry. Yet the material harvested was sent to histological study. Each animal served as its own control. In all vessels of both groups there were no cases of infection, aneurysm formation, rupture or pseudoaneurysm formation and thrombosis. In both groups it was observed a chronic inflammatory reaction with lymphocytes, neutrophils and fibrosis in the outer surface of the patches. It was observed fibrosis in the inner surfaces of all the patches. In e-PTFE patches occurred invasion by fibroblasts. The sugarcane biopolymer membrane can be used as a patch in femoral artery angioplasty on dogs.

  3. Survey of transposable elements in sugarcane expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Magdalena

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST project has produced a large number of cDNA sequences from several plant tissues submitted or not to different conditions of stress. In this paper we report the result of a search for transposable elements (TEs revealing a surprising amount of expressed TEs homologues. Of the 260,781 sequences grouped in 81,223 fragment assembly program (Phrap clusters, a total of 276 clones showed homology to previously reported TEs using a stringent cut-off value of e-50 or better. Homologous clones to Copia/Ty1 and Gypsy/Ty3 groups of long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons were found but no non-LTR retroelements were identified. All major transposon families were represented in sugarcane including Activator (Ac, Mutator (MuDR, Suppressor-mutator (En/Spm and Mariner. In order to compare the TE diversity in grasses genomes, we carried out a search for TEs described in sugarcane related species O.sativa, Z. mays and S. bicolor. We also present preliminary results showing the potential use of TEs insertion pattern polymorphism as molecular markers for cultivar identification.

  4. Expression Analysis of Sugarcane Aquaporin Genes under Water Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manassés Daniel da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a pioneer study specifically addressing the aquaporin transcripts in sugarcane transcriptomes. Representatives of the four aquaporin subfamilies (PIP, TIP, SIP, and NIP, already described for higher plants, were identified. Forty-two distinct aquaporin isoforms were expressed in four HT-SuperSAGE libraries from sugarcane roots of drought-tolerant and -sensitive genotypes, respectively. At least 10 different potential aquaporin isoform targets and their respective unitags were considered to be promising for future studies and especially for the development of molecular markers for plant breeding. From those 10 isoforms, four (SoPIP2-4, SoPIP2-6, OsPIP2-4, and SsPIP1-1 showed distinct responses towards drought, with divergent expressions between the bulks from tolerant and sensitive genotypes, when they were compared under normal and stress conditions. Two targets (SsPIP1-1 and SoPIP1-3/PIP1-4 were selected for validation via RT-qPCR and their expression patterns as detected by HT-SuperSAGE were confirmed. The employed validation strategy revealed that different genotypes share the same tolerant or sensitive phenotype, respectively, but may use different routes for stress acclimation, indicating the aquaporin transcription in sugarcane to be potentially genotype-specific.

  5. Urea in sugarcane-based diets for dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Magno Ferreira Santiago

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of adding four levels (0, 4, 8 and 12 g/kg, as fed of a mixture (9:1 of urea and ammonium sulfate (UAs to sugarcane on feed intake and digestibility, productive performance and metabolism of nitrogen compounds of dairy cows. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows (12.6±0.5 kg/d of milk, 225±90 days in milk were distributed in three 4 × 4 Latin squares, receiving diets with the same amount of nitrogen (125 g crude protein/kg of dry matter. Concentrate feed was supplied at a ratio of 1 kg for each 3 kg of milk produced. The sugarcane presented 21.9 ºBrix. The level of UAs did not affect intake, total digestibility of diet components, milk production or milk components. Increasing UAs level linearly increased concentration of plasma urea nitrogen (PUN, urinary excretion of nitrogen and contribution of non-urea nitrogen in the urinary excretion and linearly reduced milk production/urinary excretion of nitrogen ratio. In spite of the linear increase of PUN with increased urea, the maximum value observed (14.31 mg/dL was below the threshold value of 20 mg/dL, above which reproductive function may be compromised. In diets with sugarcane for dairy cows with production below 15 kg/day, the UAs level may be raised from 0 to 12 g/kg natural matter without impairing performance.

  6. Estimation of herbicide bioconcentration in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Luiz Cerdeira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important crop for sugar and biofuel production in Brazil. Growers depend greatly on herbicides to produce it. This experiment used herbicide physical-chemical and sugarcane plant physiological properties to simulate herbicide uptake and estimate the bioconcentration factor (BCF. The (BCF was calculated for the steady state chemical equilibrium between the plant herbicide concentration and soil solution. Plant-water partition coefficient (sugarcane bagasse-water partition coefficient, herbicide dilution rate, metabolism and dissipation in the soil-plant system, as well as total plant biomass factors were used. In addition, we added Tebuthiuron at rate of 5.0kg a.i. ha-1 to physically test the model. In conclusion, the model showed the following ranking of herbicide uptake: sulfentrazone > picloram >tebuthiuron > hexazinone > metribuzin > simazine > ametryn > diuron > clomazone > acetochlor. Furthermore, the highest BCF herbicides showed higher Groundwater Ubiquity Score (GUS index indicating high leaching potential. We did not find tebuthiuron in plants after three months of herbicide application

  7. Land Suitability Assessment for Sugarcane in "Herois de Caxito" (Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baert, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of the soils surrounding the sugarcane plantation at "Herois de Caxito" (7068 ha is assessed. The main goal is to identify land suitability for the enlargement of the present plantation, using FAO land evaluation models (modified to suit Herois de Caxito conditions and GIS. Calculations of the radiationthermal production potential (RPP, land production potential (LPP, irrigation suitability index, and evaluation of the irrigation water quality are done. The water-limited production potential (WPP is found equal to the RPP, because water needs were fully met under irrigation. Maps showing the spatial distribution of the LPP and the suitability for irrigation are generated. The matching of irrigation and fertility indices has shown that, about 40% of the soils with good fertility for sugarcane production present low suitability for irrigation, the main limitations being the very fine texture and the drainage. The available surface water at Herois de Caxito (Dande river is of very good quality for irrigation of sugarcane.

  8. A review of topramezone in sugarcane and potential carryover of post emergence soybean herbicides on plant cane

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are approximately 430,000 acres in commercial sugarcane production in Lousiana and methods to control weeds consist primarily of herbicides and tillage. Topramezone, the active ingredient in Armezon® received registration in sugarcane in fall of 2017. Data on sugarcane cultivar tolerance to to...

  9. Frequency and distribution of the brown rust resistance gene Bru1 and implications for the Louisiana sugarcane breeding programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia melanocephala, is an important disease of sugarcane posing an increasing threat to sugarcane industries worldwide. A major gene, Bru1, has been shown to contribute a significant proportion of brown rust resistance in multiple sugarcane industries. The recent...

  10. Anthropometric characteristics of elite male junior rowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgois, J; Claessens, A L; Vrijens, J; Philippaerts, R; Van Renterghem, B; Thomis, M; Janssens, M; Loos, R; Lefevre, J

    2000-06-01

    During the 1997 Federation Internationale des Sociétés d'Aviron World Junior Rowing Championships, anthropometric data on 383 male junior rowers were assessed. With 430 participating athletes, the sample represented 89% of the population. In addition to age, 27 dimensions were measured: body mass, six heights or lengths, four breadths, 10 girths, and six skinfolds. The elite male junior rowers were tall (187.4 (5.8) cm; mean (SD)) and heavy (82.2 (7.4) kg), with larger length, breadth, and girth dimensions than a nationally representative sample of Belgian boys of the same chronological age. A rowing specific anthropometric profile chart with norms was constructed. The stature of the junior rowers is similar to that of adult heavyweight elite rowers, except that the junior rowers are lighter. Compared with non-finalists, finalists are heavier (but still lighter than the adult heavyweight elite rower) and taller, with greater length, breadth (except for the bicristal diameter), and girth dimensions.

  11. Development of Elite Programmes at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove

    2008-01-01

    Europe and  the United States on higher educations  tailored  to challenge  the most  talented and motivated students. Further details are provided on  the current situation  in Denmark, where the government has decided  to support  the development of highly specialised elite programmes at  the  master......  from a survey conducted among  the elite students are  reported. Many of  the objectives  of  the  programmes  such  as  involving  the  students  in  research  and  having  them  to contribute  actively  are  met.  Students  have  been  able  to  submit  journal  papers  and  patent applications.......  More  importantly,  up  to  84%  of  the  elite  students  are  potentially  interested  in pursuing a career in academia....

  12. DIFFERENCES IN THE REACTIVE FORCE OF ELITE AND SUB-ELITE SPRINTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Čoh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at establishing the differences between the kinematic and dynamic parameters of reactive force which is one of the most important biomotor ability of sprinters. Reactive force was assessed during a drop jump from 45 cm. The basic kinematic and dynamic parameters were registered using the Smart 600E bipedal force platform which had been synchronised with a 3D infra-red kinematic system. The sample of subjects consisted of 12 elite sprinters. Based on the analysis of variance (Anova the main generators of reactive force which differentiate between elite and sub-elite sprinters were established. The statistically significant differences between the sprinters were found in the following: jump height, eccentric phase time, take-off velocity, eccentric velocity and force impulse in the eccentric phase.

  13. Movement Demands of Elite U20 International Rugby Union Players

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cunningham, Daniel; Shearer, David A; Drawer, Scott; Eager, Robin; Taylor, Neil; Cook, Christian; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-01-01

    ...) rugby union players during competitive tournament match play. Forty elite professional players from an U20 international performance squad were monitored using 10 Hz global positioning systems (GPS...

  14. Hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in elite, sub-elite and amateur Australian footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Ned; Hopper, Diana; Finucane, Mark; Grisbrook, Tiffany L

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that obtaining an adduction-to-abduction strength ratio of 90-100%, and an adduction strength equal to that of the uninjured side, are suitable clinical milestones for return to sport following groin injury. Little is known about hip adduction and abduction strength profiles in Australian footballers. This study aimed to compare isometric hip adduction and abduction strength profiles between preferred and non-preferred kicking legs in elite, sub-elite and amateur Australian footballers. Cross sectional study 36 elite, 19 sub-elite and 18 amateur Australian footballers, with a mean age of 24, 19 and 23 years respectively, were included. Maximal hip isometric adduction and abduction strength were measured using a hand held dynamometer with external belt fixation. There were no significant differences in isometric hip adduction (p=0.262) or abduction (p=0.934) strength, or the adduction-to-abduction ratio (p=0.163), between preferred and non-preferred kicking legs, regardless of playing level. Elite players had significantly greater isometric hip adduction and abduction strength than both sub-elite (mean difference; adduction=46.01N, pamateur players (mean difference; adduction=78.72N, p<0.001, abduction=59.11N, p<0.001). There was no significant difference in the adduction-to-abduction ratio between the playing levels (p=0.165). No significant differences were found between preferred and non-preferred kicking legs across the playing levels for isometric hip adduction, abduction or the adduction-to-abduction ratio. This may have implications for developing groin injury prediction and return to sport criteria in Australian footballers. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anthropometric and anaerobic fitness profile of elite and non-elite female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedano, S; Vaeyens, R; Philippaerts, R M; Redondo, J C; Cuadrado, G

    2009-12-01

    The main aim of the current study was to compare the anthropometrical and fitness profile of female soccer players by level and by playing positions. The second purpose was to explore correlations between kicking speed on the one hand and anthropometric features and explosive strength on the other. Female soccer players (N.=190) were tested divided in two groups: elite group (N.=100) and non-elite group (N.=90). Body mass, height, leg length, body composition, counter movement jump, drop jump and kicking speed with both legs were measured. After controlling for experience with multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA), body mass, body fat and muscle mass differed significantly by level. MANCOVA also revealed that all the anthropometrical variables differed by playing position. However, MANCOVA did not show significant differences by level of play, neither for explosive strength nor for kicking speed but revealed significant differences among playing positions. There were significant positive correlations between body mass, height, leg length, muscle mass, counter movement jump height, drop jump height and experience on the one hand and kicking speed with dominant and non-dominant leg on the other for the elite and non-elite players. Elite players differ from their non-elite counterparts in terms of anthropometrical features, while explosive strength and kicking speed are not sensitive enough to distinguish between levels. On the other hand, the findings indicate few positional variations, and only goalkeepers, tend to have a specific anthropometric and fitness profile. Anthropometric variables, explosive strength and experience have an influence on kicking speed.

  16. Identification of stable fly attractant compounds in vinasse, a byproduct of sugarcane-ethanol distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans (Diptera: Muscidae), is a worldwide pest of livestock. Recent outbreaks of stable flies in sugarcane fields in Brazil have become a serious problem for livestock producers. Larvae and pupae found inside sugarcane stems after harvesting may indicate that stable fli...

  17. Sugarcane Cultivar Response to High Summer Water Tables in the Everglades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane (interspecific hybrids of Saccharum spp.) in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) in Florida is frequently subjected to periods of higher than desired (wetter) water levels. This study was conducted to evaluate yields of nine sugarcane cultivars subjected to the wet conditions of two hig...

  18. Where is sugarcane cropping expanding in the brazilian cerrado, and why? A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arruda, de M.R.; Giller, K.E.; Slingerland, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane growing area in Brazil sharply expanded between 2000 and 2010 due to the increasing world demand for sugar and ethanol. Since this expansion of sugarcane is said to occur in areas covered by degraded pastures, it is likely not threatening the environment or food production. In order to

  19. The sugarcane-biofuel expansion and dairy farmers' responses in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monteiro Novo, A.L.; Jansen, K.; Slingerland, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of sugarcane for biofuels is a highly contentious issue. The growth of sugarcane area has occurred simultaneously with a reduction of dairy production in São Paulo state, the primary production region for sugar and ethanol in Brazil. This paper analyses different dairy farm rationales

  20. Effect of orange rust on sugarcane breeding program at canal Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange rust of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids), caused by Puccinia kuehnii (W. Krüger) E.J. Butler, appeared in the Western Hemisphere ten years ago. Orange rust substantially reduces yields in susceptible sugarcane genotypes. Majority of the commercial cultivars were susceptible at the time of o...

  1. Effect of growing media and fertilization on sugarcane flowering under artificial photoperiod

    Science.gov (United States)

    The USDA-ARS Sugarcane Variety Development Program in Houma, LA aims to maximize the number of panicles available for crossing through artificial manipulation of the environment. In a three-year study, the effect of growing media, fertilizer treatment, and their interaction on sugarcane flowering (%...

  2. Regional based estimates of water use for commercial sugar-cane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-08-22

    Aug 22, 2005 ... The water use of rain-fed sugar-cane has come under the spotlight in South Africa, largely as a result of changes in legislation and a focus on streamflow reduction activities. In this study a robust relationship between sugar-cane yield and evapotranspi- ration derived by Thompson in 1976 is applied in ...

  3. The effect of in-vitro environmental conditions on some sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and then, transferred in light. Maximum shoot regeneration and number of shoots per culture could be recorded under 16 h photoperiod of 4000 lux light intensity at a growth room temperature of 25 ± 2°C in both varieties of sugarcane. Key words: Callus culture, shoot regeneration, in-vitro growth condition, sugarcane.

  4. Regional based estimates of water use for commercial sugar-cane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water use of rain-fed sugar-cane has come under the spotlight in South Africa, largely as a result of changes in legislation and a focus on streamflow reduction activities. In this study a robust relationship between sugar-cane yield and evapotranspiration derived by Thompson in 1976 is applied in conjunction with ...

  5. Building organic matter of long-term sugarcane soils in a temperate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mineral soils with a history of sugarcane monoculture cropping contain less soil organic matter (-35%), and plant macro- and micronutrients, including N (-20%), K (-26%), S (-7%), Ca (-8%), B (-33%), Zn (-88%), Mn (-29%), and Cu (-26%), than adjacent non-cultivated soils. Harvesting sugarcane ‘green...

  6. Colonization ability of Herbaspirillum spp. B501gfp1 in sugarcane, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GRACE

    2006-05-16

    May 16, 2006 ... Inoculating sugarcane with a mixture of diazotrophic endophytic bacteria has shown that they can provide substantial amount of biologically fixed nitrogen to the plant. The genera of diazotrophic endophytes previously isolated from sugarcane have been reported associating with other non- leguminous ...

  7. A mixed model QTL analysis for sugarcane multiple-harvest-location trial data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pastina, M.M.; Malosetti, M.; Gazaffi, R.; Mollinari, M.; Margarido, G.R.A.; Oliveira, K.M.; Pinto, L.R.; Souza, A.P.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Garcia, A.A.F.

    2012-01-01

    Sugarcane-breeding programs take at least 12 years to develop new commercial cultivars. Molecular markers offer a possibility to study the genetic architecture of quantitative traits in sugarcane, and they may be used in marker-assisted selection to speed up artificial selection. Although the

  8. A satellite based crop water stress index for irrigation scheduling in sugarcane fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veysi, Shadman; Naseri, Abd Ali; Hamzeh, Saeid; Bartholomeus, Harm

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the capability of crop water stress index (CWSI) based on satellite thermal infrared data for estimating water stress and irrigation scheduling in sugarcane fields was evaluated. For this purpose, eight Landsat 8 satellite images were acquired during the sugarcane growing season

  9. Population genetics of the sugarcane aphid, Melanaphis sacchari (Zehntner), in the continental US

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sugarcane aphid (SCA), Melanaphis sacchari, was reported as a damaging pest of sorghum in the United States (U.S.) for the first time in 2013. However, this aphid is not new to the U.S. Since 1920s up until 2013 SCA have occurred on sugarcane in Florida and later in Louisiana, causing minimal ...

  10. Exploring the role of sugarcane in small-scale farmers' livelihoods in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participatory, mixed-methods research was conducted to study the role of sugarcane in small-scale sugarcane farmers' livelihoods in the Noodsberg area, KwaZulu-Natal. Thirty-five farmers were visited at their homes and data was collected through semi-structured interviews, participatory sketch mapping, matrix scoring ...

  11. Plant resistance in sorghums to the sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated ten sorghum lines that were near or in commercial release with the intent of identifying phenotypic expression of host-plant resistance to the sugarcane aphid. Two of the ten entries OL2042 and SP7715 expressed a high degree of resistance to the sugarcane aphid with damage ratings <3.0...

  12. Regional-based estimates of water use for commercial sugar-cane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The water use of rain-fed sugar-cane has come under the spotlight in South Africa, largely as a result of changes in legislation and a focus on streamflow reduction activities. In this study a robust relationship between sugar-cane yield and evapotranspiration derived by Thompson in 1976 is applied in conjunction with ...

  13. Influence of potential evapotranspiration on the water balance of sugarcane fields in Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    The year-long warm temperatures and other climatic characteristics of the Pacific Ocean Islands have made Hawaii an optimum place for growing sugarcane; however, irrigation is essential to satisfy the large water demand of sugarcane. Under the Hawaiian tropical weather, actual evapotranspiration (A...

  14. Investigation of suitable spray drying conditions for sugarcane juice powder production with an energy consumption study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krittiya Khuenpet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane juice was spray-dried under various conditions to determine the most suitable drying conditions for the manufacture of sugarcane juice powder. Initially, fresh, 30°Brix and 50°Brix sugarcane juice samples were dried in a laboratory-scale spray dryer at an air-drying temperature between 130 °C and 170 °C using maltodextrin, Arabic gum and dietary fiber as drying aids. It appeared that sugarcane juice should be concentrated under vacuum to 30°Brix and added with at least 15% maltodextrin before drying at 170 °C in order to obtain dried powder product with a low drying cost. After conducting the experiments in the laboratory, sugarcane juice powders were produced in a factory using an industrial-scale spray dryer under five drying conditions. It was found that the energy cost of industrial-scale production of sugarcane juice powder ranged between 0.77 USD and 2.06 USD per kg of powder. According to the results of the industrial-scale experiments, the sugarcane juice powder should be produced using vacuum evaporation of the sugarcane juice to 30°Brix prior to adding maltodextrin at 30% by weight and then spray drying at 190 °C.

  15. Digestion of feed fractions and intake of heifers fed hydrolyzed sugarcane stored for different periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis Luis Missio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate, in Nellore heifers, intake and digestibility of hydrolyzed sugarcane stored for different periods. The experimental design used was a 4 × 4 Latin square, four diets, four Nellore heifers with ruminal cannulas (initial body weight 285.4±23.08 kg and average initial age 14 months and four periods of 21 days. The diets were composed by fresh sugarcane (time zero or hydrolyzed sugarcane with addition of 0.5% of hydrated lime, stored for 24, 48 or 72 hours, as the unique forage. Intake and digestibility of feed fractions, nitrogen balance, microbial synthesis efficiency, total number of ruminal protozoans and ammoniacal nitrogen did not significantly change by storing sugarcane with addition of 0.5% of hydrated lime. Sugarcane pH varied quadratically for storage time, with maximum pH of 7.02 after 24 hours from lime addition. Ruminal liquid pH values were higher for heifers fed fresh sugarcane, in comparison with those fed hydrolyzed sugarcane. Sugarcane treated with 0.5% of hydrated lime stored for up to 72 hours does not change ruminal digestion to alter the amount of feed consumed by pubescent Nellore heifers. Thus, lime is a viable technology, once it allows long-duration storage and bee control on treated forage, which contributes to animal feeding logistics.

  16. Colonization ability of Herbaspirillum spp. B501gfp1 in sugarcane, a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inoculating sugarcane with a mixture of diazotrophic endophytic bacteria has shown that they can provide substantial amount of biologically fixed nitrogen to the plant. The genera of diazotrophic endophytes previously isolated from sugarcane have been reported associating with other nonleguminous plants showing a ...

  17. Sugarcane field residue and bagasse allelopathic impact on vegetable seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chemical interaction between plants, which is referred to as allelopathy, may result in the inhibition of plant growth and development. The objective of this research was to determine the allelopathic impact of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) var. ‘HoCP 96-540’ field residue and sugarcane baga...

  18. Effect of potassium fertilizer application on the yield and quality of current sugarcane varieties in Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    For many sugarcane producers in Louisiana the only fertilizer that is routinely applied to their crop is nitrogen that is side-dressed in the spring. This is due, primarily to the high cost of potassium and phosphorus fertilizers. Recent cooperative research conducted between the USDA/ARS Sugarcane ...

  19. Establishing sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) genetic resources for in vitro storage and cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is used to produce sugar, a variety of alcoholic beverages, bagasse and industrial ethanol utilized in making fuel. In production fields, sugarcane is propagated vegetatively and currently, the crop’s genetic resources are also preserved as field plantings. The National Pl...

  20. Crop rotation biomass and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi effects on sugarcane yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosano, Edmilson Jose; Rossi, Fabricio; Guirado, Nivaldo; Teramoto, Juliana Rolim Salome [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Polo Regional Centro Sul; Azcon, Rozario [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Granada (Spain). Estacao Experimental de Zaidin; Cantarela, Heitor [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IAC), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. Agronomico. Centro de Solos e Recursos Ambientais; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Odontologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social], Email: ambrosano@apta.sp.gov.br; Schammass, Eliana Aparecida [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IZ), Nova Odessa, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Zootecnia; Muraoka, Takashi; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Ungaro, Maria Regina Goncalves [Agencia Paulista de Tecnologia dos Agronegocios (APTA/IAC), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. Agronomico. Centro de Plantas Graniferas

    2010-07-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is an important crop for sugar production and agro-energy purposes in Brazil. In the sugarcane production system after a 4- to 8-year cycle crop rotation may be used before replanting sugarcane to improve soil conditions and give an extra income. This study had the objective of characterizing the biomass and the natural colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of leguminous green manure and sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) in rotation with sugarcane. Their effect on stalk and sugar yield of sugarcane cv. IAC 87-3396 grown subsequently was also studied. Cane yield was harvested in three subsequent cuttings. Peanut cv. IAC-Caiapo, sunflower cv. IAC-Uruguai and velvet bean (Mucuna aterrimum Piper and Tracy) were the rotational crops that resulted in the greater percentage of AMF. Sunflower was the specie that most extracted nutrients from the soil, followed by peanut cv. IAC-Tatu and mung bean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek). The colonization with AMF had a positive correlation with sugarcane plant height, at the first cut (p = 0.01 and R = 0.52) but not with the stalk or cane yields. Sunflower was the rotational crop that brought about the greatest yield increase of the subsequent sugarcane crop: 46% increase in stalk yield and 50% in sugar yield compared with the control. Except for both peanut varieties, all rotational crops caused an increase in net income of the cropping system in the average of three sugarcane harvests. (author)

  1. The Sugarcane-Biofuel Expansion and Dairy Farmers' Responses in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novo, Andre; Jansen, Kees; Slingerland, Maja

    2012-01-01

    The expansion of sugarcane for biofuels is a highly contentious issue. The growth of sugarcane area has occurred simultaneously with a reduction of dairy production in Sao Paulo state, the primary production region for sugar and ethanol in Brazil. This paper analyses different dairy farm rationales to continue dairy production in the context of a…

  2. Managing pressure: patterns of appraisals and coping strategies of non-elite and elite athletes during competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmeiro, Luis; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Eccles, David William

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare moment-to-moment appraisals and coping strategies of 4 non-elite and 2 elite male trap shooters during competitions and in particular during periods of competition perceived as critical to performance. Appraisals and coping patterns of trap shooters were captured via verbal reports of thinking provided between sets of shots during major competitions. Verbal reports were coded according to an appraisal and coping typology. Coded data as well as shooting performance data were subjected to a sequential analysis of probabilities of pairs of events. Fewer reports of negative appraisals (NEGAs) and more frequent reports of problem-focused coping (PFC) were observed among both elite athletes compared to non-elite athletes. After making a NEGA, non-elite shooters often progressed to the next target without attempting to cope, whereas elite shooters used both PFC and emotion-focused coping (EFC) before proceeding to the next target. After missing a target, the non-elite athletes used more EFC than expected. These results indicate that elite athletes are more likely to cope with NEGAs than non-elite athletes using a wider variety of coping strategies. Athletes might benefit from increased awareness of the potentially detrimental impact of NEGAs on performance and by integrating coping strategies within preparatory routines.

  3. Growth and Crown Vigor of 25 Year-Old Shortleaf Pine Progenies on a Littleleaf Disease Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; John L. Ruehle; Roger P. Belanger; Donald H. Marx; W. Craig Bryan

    1994-01-01

    On a littleleaf disease site in South Carolina, most of the control-pollinated progeny of shrotleaf pines that appeared to be reesistant to the disease outperformed a check seedlot through age 25. Rankings of progeny based on volume changed little between ages 17 and 25.

  4. Soil bacterial community shifts associated with sugarcane straw removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Laisa; Gumiere, Thiago; Andreote, Fernando; Cerri, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    In Brazil, the adoption of the mechanical unburned sugarcane harvest potentially increase the quantity of residue left in the field after harvesting. Economically, this material has a high potential for second generation ethanol (2G) production. However, crop residues have an essential role in diverse properties and processes in the soil. The greater part of the uncertainties about straw removal for 2G ethanol production is based on its effects in soil microbial community. In this sense, it is important to identify the main impacts of sugarcane straw removal on soil microbial community. Therefore, we conducted a field study, during one year, in Valparaíso (São Paulo state - Brazil) to evaluate the effects of straw decomposition on soil bacterial community. Specifically, we wanted: i) to compare the rates of straw removal and ii) to evaluate the effects of straw decomposition on soil bacterial groups over one year. The experiment was in a randomized block design with treatments arranged in strip plot. The treatments are different rates of sugarcane straw removal, namely: no removal, 50, 75 and 100% of straw removal. Soil sampling was carried out at 0, 4, 8 and 12 months after the sugarcane harvest (August 2015). Total DNA was extracted from soil using the PowersoilTM DNA Isolation kit. And the abundance of bacterial in each soil sample was estimated via quantification of 16S rRNA gene. The composition of the bacterial communities was estimated via terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, and the T-RF sizes were performed on a 3500 Genetic Analyzer. Finally, the results were examined with GeneMapper 4.1 software. There was bacterial community shifts through the time and among the rates of sugarcane straw removal. Bacterial community was firstly determined by the time scale, which explained 29.16% of total variation. Rates of straw removal explained 11.55% of shifts on bacterial community. Distribution through the time is an important

  5. QTL analysis of the genetic architecture determining resistance to fire blight in an apple progeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenge, F.; Drouet, D.; Weg, van de W.E.; Brisset, M.N.; Paulin, J.P.; Durel, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    Fire blight, caused by the bacterial pathogen Erwinia amylovora, is one of the most destructive diseases of apple (Malus x domestica). In order to analyse the genetic determinism of resistance to fire blight in apple, a quantitative trait analysis (QTL) approach was used. A F1 progeny of 164

  6. Response of locally adapted pearl millet populations to s1 progeny ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Response of locally adapted pearl millet populations to s1 progeny recurrent selection for ... African Crop Science Journal ... This led to grain yield of 1,047 from 611 kg ha-1 in Lam population and 943 from 693 kg ha-1 in Omoda population.

  7. New strategy for evaluating grain cooking quality of progenies in dry bean breeding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Line Carvalho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The methodology available for evaluating the cooking quality of dry beans is impractical for assessing a large number of progenies. The aims of this study were to propose a new strategy for evaluating cooking quality of grains and to estimate genetic and phenotypic parameters using a selection index. A total of 256 progenies of the 13thcycle of a recurrent selection program were evaluated at three locations for yield, grain type, and cooked grains. Samples of grains from each progeny were placing in a cooker and the percentage of cooked grains was assessed. The new strategy for evaluating cooking quality was efficient because it allowed a nine-fold increase in the number of progenies evaluated per unit time in comparison to available methods. The absence of association between grain yield and percentage of cooked grains or grain type indicated that it is possible to select high yielding lines with excellent grain aspect and good cooking properties using a selection index.

  8. Past as Prologue: Educational Psychology's Legacy and Progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patricia A.

    2018-01-01

    On the occasion of the 125th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, the legacies and progenies of the discipline of educational psychology are explored. To capture those legacies, transformational and influential contributions by educational psychologists to schools and society are described as key themes. Those themes entail: the…

  9. Oleoresin characteristics of progeny of loblolly pines that escaped attack by southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    B.L. Strom; R.A. Goyer; L.L. Ingram; G.D.L. Boyd; L.H. Lott

    2002-01-01

    Oleoresin characteristics of first-generation (F1) progeny of loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) that escaped mortality from the southern pine beetle, Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), despite heavy mortality of neighbors, were evaluated and compared to trees from a general (i.e., trees...

  10. Immunological surveillance in a pseudorabies quarantined herd using gilts and their progeny as sentinels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P P; Sacks, J M; Yang, P C; Pirtle, E C; Erickson, G A; Beran, G W

    1989-01-01

    Specific pathogen free gilts and their progeny were evaluated to use as sentinels in a pseudorabies virus (PRV) infected herd by immunologically monitoring for PRV seroconversions. Time intervals targeted were pre- and post-PRV vaccinations, herd exposure, and farrowing to finishing. Post-PRV vaccinations, gilts showed low PRV lymphocyte stimulation and humoral responses. Following herd exposure, control gilts PRV seroconverted and PRV vaccinated gilts increased (2 to 4 times) in virus neutralization (VN) titers. Sixty-seven percent (4/6) of the progeny from a control gilt were PRV seropositive at finishing. Progeny from PRV vaccinated gilts were depleted of passive immunity by week 7, and were seronegative until week 9. At finishing 47% (14/30) of them were PRV seropositive indicating exposure to PRV. The VN test was not sensitive enough to detect weak positive serums, noted as positives by latex agglutination (LA) test, ELISA, and Western blots. The gilts and progeny detected PRV, respectively, in the herd housing quarters and in the farrow to finish facilities. A strategy for future sentinel experimental surveillances using primarily the LA test is proposed.

  11. Inherent Variation Among Slash Pine Progenies at the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    John C. Barber

    1964-01-01

    Reported here in detail is information obtained from two open-pollinated progeny tests of slash pine at the Ida Cason Callaway Foundation, Pine Mountain, Georgia. Because of the small amount of similar data available to tree improvement workers, it was decided to include as much information as possible, even though some of it is too limited for statistical analyses...

  12. Right of Progeny and Cairo Declaration of Human Rights in Islam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haleema Ashfaq

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The first main objective of Maqasid I Shari`ah is the completion of human’s necessity; in which protection of progeny (nasl is the foremostpurpose. The preservation of lineage is greatly emphasized by the Islamic Shariah and the Cairo declaration of human rights in Islam also supported the protection of lineage in Islam. All the articles of CDHRI covered the five basic human rights mentioned in Maqasid I Shariah. The research is focused on delineating the concept of protection of lineage as one of the main objective of Shariah and it is supported by evidences from Cairo Declaration of Human Rights in Islam along with Quranic verses and traditions of the Holy Prophet (S.A.W. The aspects covered in the paper range from discussion of right of progeny as well as equal rights of progeny for male and female; rights of children with the hierarchy of their rights from the stage of fetus, having proper nursing, caring, education and a healthy beginning of life. The comparative analysis based on arguments of Shariah and the CDHRI proves that it is the basic objective of Shariah to protect all fundamental rights and right of progeny has the foremost significance in it.

  13. Parental partners effects on progenies characteristics on hybridization within the Larix genus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, J.; Frydl, J. [Forestry and Game Management Research Inst., Jiloviste (Czech Republic)

    1995-12-31

    Larch progenies of maternal clone No. 52-4-11 (Larix decidua Mill.) combined with the series of paternal clones of the same species and further of the Larix leptolepis Gord. and L. gmelini (Rupr.) Ledeb. species were evaluated on three research plots with larch (Larix sp.). Growth in height and thickness as well as stem forming were monitored at the age of 11 and 22 years. There was found out a significant share of variance falling on the action of mother, hence the existence of extra-nuclear heredity can be anticipated, particularly in interspecific hybrids. Comparing with the control in interspecific hybrids mostly luxuriant growth is displayed. On one of the studied plots there was found out the assumed growth depression in the quantitative characters of progenies originated from self-pollination. Some results of the research can be used as an auxiliary criterion in the selection of progenies and trees within the progenies for the establishment of seed orchards to produce hybrid seed of F2 generation. 24 refs, 6 figs, 6 tabs

  14. Prediction of lung cells oncogenic transformation for induced radon progeny alpha particles using sugarscape cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baradaran, Samaneh; Maleknasr, Niaz; Setayeshi, Saeed; Akbari, Mohammad Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Alpha particle irradiation from radon progeny is one of the major natural sources of effective dose in the public population. Oncogenic transformation is a biological effectiveness of radon progeny alpha particle hits. The biological effects which has caused by exposure to radon, were the main result of a complex series of physical, chemical, biological and physiological interactions. The cellular and molecular mechanisms for radon-induced carcinogenesis have not been clear yet. Various biological models, including cultured cells and animals, have been found useful for studying the carcinogenesis effects of radon progeny alpha particles. In this paper, sugars cape cellular automata have been presented for computational study of complex biological effect of radon progeny alpha particles in lung bronchial airways. The model has included mechanism of DNA damage, which has been induced alpha particles hits, and then formation of transformation in the lung cells. Biomarkers were an objective measure or evaluation of normal or abnormal biological processes. In the model, the metabolism rate of infected cell has been induced alpha particles traversals, as a biomarker, has been followed to reach oncogenic transformation. The model results have successfully validated in comparison with "in vitro oncogenic transformation data" for C3H 10T1/2 cells. This model has provided an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes, at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis, involving human cells. It has become well known that simulation could be used to investigate complex biomedical systems, in situations where traditional methodologies were difficult or too costly to employ.

  15. Assessing the Potential Oleoresin Yields of Slash Pine Progenies at Juvenile Ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.E. Squillace; Charles R. Gansel

    1968-01-01

    The potential oleoresin yields of slash pine progenies can be assessed at juvenile ages, 7 to 8 years earlier than with previous methods. Seeds are sown in peat pots, outplanted shortly after germination at a spacing of 14 by 3 feet, and given intensive cultural treatment. At 26 years from seed, when the trees average about 9 feet tall, their potential yields are...

  16. Dietary manipulation of the sow milk does not influence the lipid absorption capacity of the progeny

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Charlotte; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Pierzynowski, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A control diet without supplemental fat and four diets containing 8% of coconut oil, rapeseed oil, fish oil or sunflower oil were fed to lactating sows in order to investigate the lipid absorption capacity of their progeny in terms of pancreatic enzyme activity, hormonal regulation, and bile salt...

  17. Replication of mycoplasmavirus MVL51 III identification of a progeny viral DNA-protein intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, J.; Maniloff, J.

    1976-01-01

    Intracellular replication of the non-lytic single stranded circular DNA mycoplasmavirus MVL51 has been shown to involve three DNA intermediates: RFI, RFII and SSI. Growth in Eagle's basal medium, rather than richer tryptose medium, has allowed the identification of an intermediate between nascent progeny chromosomes (SSI) and mature virus. This intermediate is a protein associated form of SSI.

  18. Growth, reproductive performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality in F1 and F2 progenies of somatic cell-cloned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Noritaka; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Akiyuki; Miura, Narumi; Sunaga, Seiji; Oishi, Hitoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Oishi, Takatsugu; Iwamoto, Masaki; Hanada, Hirofumi; Kubo, Masanori; Onishi, Akira

    2014-04-24

    The objective of this study was to examine the health and meat production of cloned sows and their progenies in order to demonstrate the application of somatic cell cloning to the pig industry. This study compared the growth, reproductive performance, carcass characteristics and meat quality of Landrace cloned sows, F1 progenies and F2 progenies. We measured their body weight, growth rate and feed conversion and performed a pathological analysis of their anatomy to detect abnormalities. Three of the five cloned pigs were used for a growth test. Cloned pigs grew normally and had characteristics similar to those of the control purebred Landrace pigs. Two cloned gilts were bred with a Landrace boar and used for a progeny test. F1 progenies had characteristics similar to those of the controls. Two of the F1 progeny gilts were bred with a Duroc or Large White boar and used for the progeny test. F2 progenies grew normally. There were no biological differences in growth, carcass characteristics and amino acid composition among cloned sows, F1 progenies, F2 progenies and conventional pigs. The cloned sows and F1 progenies showed normal reproductive performance. No specific abnormalities were observed by pathological analysis, with the exception of periarteritis in the F1 progenies. All pigs had a normal karyotype. These results demonstrate that cloned female pigs and their progenies have similar growth, reproductive performance and carcass quality characteristics and that somatic cell cloning could be a useful technique for conserving superior pig breeds in conventional meat production.

  19. Short-term effects of sugarcane waste products from ethanol production plant as soil amendments on sugarcane growth and metal stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkajit, Pensiri; DeSutter, Thomas; Tongcumpou, Chantra

    2013-05-01

    Numerous waste products have been widely studied and used as soil amendments and metal immobilizing agents. Waste utilization from ethanol production processes as soil amendments is one of the most promising and sustainable options to help utilize materials effectively, reduce waste disposal, and add value to byproducts. As a consequence, this present work carried out a four-month pot experiment of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) cultivation in Cd and Zn contaminated soil to determine the effect of three sugarcane waste products (boiler ash, filter cake and vinasse) as soil amendment on sugarcane growth, metal translocation and accumulation in sugarcane, and fractionation of Cd and Zn in soil by the BCR sequential extraction. Four treatments were tested: (1) non-amended soil; (2) 3% w/w boiler ash; (3) 3% w/w filter cake; and (4) a combination of 1.5% boiler ash and 1.5% vinasse (w/w). Our findings showed the improved biomass production of sugarcanes; 6 and 3-fold higher for the above ground parts (from 8.5 to 57.6 g per plant) and root (from 2.1 to 6.59 g per plant), respectively, as compared to non-amended soil. Although there was no significant difference in Cd and Zn uptake in sugarcane (mg kg(-1)) between the non-amended soil and the treated soils (0.44 to 0.52 mg Cd kg(-1) and 39.9 to 48.1 mg Zn kg(-1), respectively), the reduction of the most bioavailable Cd concentration (BCR1 + 2) in the treated soils (35.4-54.5%) and the transformation of metal into an insoluble fraction (BCR3) highlighted the beneficial effects of sugarcane waste-products in promoting the sugarcane growth and Cd stabilization in soil.

  20. Een ongekende elite : De opkomst van een gekleurde elite in koloniaal Suriname 1800-1863

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neslo, Ellen Brigitte Aurelia

    2016-01-01

    During the slavery period in the nineteenth century in Paramaribo there was a colored elite. Their social economic status was better than generally assumed. To a great extent this was due to the many craftsmen such as carpenters, tailors and midwives. Most of them learned these skills during their

  1. Elite perceptions of poverty and Nigeria's poverty reduction research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The way the elite perceive poverty and the poor in any society constitutes a very important dimension of poverty research. This is because normally there are several areas of interrelationship and interdependence between the poor and the elite, and these form part of the basis for social life in all societies. Perceptions of the ...

  2. Strength and energetics of elite rugby union players | Lombard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comprehensive assessments of the various physical and physiological demands of a rugby union match, can contribute towards scientific based conditioning to enhance performance. The study compared physical and physiological differences between elite and non-elite South African Rugby Union players. A comparison ...

  3. Autonomy, Eating Disorders and Elite Gymnastics: Ethical and Conceptual Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodworth, Andrew; McNamee, Mike; Tan, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Participation in elite sport, and in particular those sports with special demands in terms of weight and shape, is associated with a higher risk for eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa [Sundgot-Borgen, J., & Torstveit, M. K. (2010). Aspects of disordered eating continuum in elite high intensity sports. "Scandinavian Journal of…

  4. Elite coaches' perceptions of the characteristics of decision-making ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed at discovering what elite coaches perceive to be the critical characteristics of decision-making that distinguish expert players from novices in basketball. A qualitative method of inquiry (the long interview) was followed. The data were gathered during interviews with five elite coaches. A framework to ...

  5. Prestige With Limitations: Realities of the Chinese-American Elite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Dean

    The 'myth' that Asian Americans have succeeded in white society is refuted in this study of Chinese-American elites. Chinese-American elites represent a double minority, an ethnic minority and an economic minority. The status contradictions inherent in such a situation are examined. The high level of educational attainment of Chinese-Americans has…

  6. Physiological capacity and physical testing in male elite team handball

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michalsik, Lars Bojsen; Madsen, K; Aagaard, Per

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to examine the physical demands placed on male elite team handball (TH) players in relation to playing position. Methods: Male elite TH field players were evaluated during match-play over a six season time span using physiological measurements and by subsequent...

  7. Political elites and foreign policy : democratization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wibisono, Aria Teguh Mahendra

    2009-01-01

    In the investigation, the domestic sources of foreign policy analytical framework were used to analyze the dynamics of elites in foreign policy making. After analyses of the results of mostly personal interviews and historical materials, it was determined that political elites do matter in foreign

  8. Elite and Status Attainment Models of Inequality of Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myles, John F.; Srensen, Aage B.

    1975-01-01

    With changes in method, analysis of the process of attainment of various occupations and sub-sets of occupations such as elites can bring about the desired comparability between elite and status attainment studies of equality of opportunity. (Author/AM)

  9. The Transnational Track: State Sponsorship and Singapore's Oxbridge Elite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rebecca; Nylander, Erik

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the process of transnational institutional matching between elite institutions in Singapore and Great Britain, and the role of state-sponsored scholarships in enabling this process as political and administrative elites are selected and groomed. Using data gathered from in-depth interviews conducted with Singaporean…

  10. The Elite and Political Process in Nigeria | Banjo | Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria's crisis-ridden political history shows how it survived multiple military dictatorships, and had only three short-lived civilian-led political dispensations until the Fourth Republic. The article considers the concept of African elite and progresses to unravel the Nigerian elite and its role in the scuttling of the First and ...

  11. Researching Elite Education: Affectively Inferred Belongings, Desires and Exclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Claire; Aggleton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This paper reflects on key moments occurring during the course of a three-year study of elite girls' education, with a focus on the power relations that emerged between researchers and elites within the context in which the study was conducted. Central to our analysis is a focus on the affective dimensions of interaction between the researcher and…

  12. The Question of Elitism: Some Movement to the Left?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Paul

    1987-01-01

    Calls for a synthesis of beneficial elitism and beneficial populism to ensure excellence for all. Suggests that Robert Penn Warren's views on how to collapse dualisms between these two philosophies provides the key to their synthesis. Concludes by comparing differences between elitism and populism and examining questions raised by Ralph Smith's…

  13. Revisiting the issue of elite capture in participatory initiatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Jens Friis; Saito-Jensen, Moeko

    2013-01-01

    Based on case studies of two communities implementing participatory forestry in Tanzania and India, we revisit the issue of elite capture of participatory initiatives. Our cases illustrate how initial elite capture of the participatory initiatives is circumvented over time through various forms...

  14. Anthropometric Injury Risk Factors in Elite-standard Youth Soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, G. L. J.; van der Sluis, A.; Brink, M. S.; Visscher, C.; Frencken, W. G. P.; Elferink-Gemser, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether an increased risk of injury occurrence can be determined through frequent anthropometric measurements in elite-standard youth soccer players. Over the course of one season, we followed 101 male elite-standard youth soccer players between 11 and 19

  15. CAFFEINE INTAKE ENHANCES ENDURANCE PERFORMANCE IN SUB-ELITE BUT NOT IN ELITE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Smolka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our contribution is to evaluate the influence of caffeine (CAF ingestion on maximal power output (MPO during endurance performance. Two groups of men – 10 sub-elite cyclists and 8 elite cyclists completed a randomized, crossover, double-blind study. Over the course of three days participants completed three identical experimental tests (60min cycling time trial on 70 % VO2max followed by test to exhaustion. Three experimental meals - a combination of 500ml water, a gel supplement and a specific dose of CAF: a placebo (PLA, no caffeine, CAF2 (2 mg / kg body weight (BW and CAF7 (7 mg / kg BW were administered 45min prior to the start of the experimental tests. Subjective RPE values were determined using the Borg 20-category scale. The results show significant differences between MPOPLA and MPOCAF7 and between MPOCAF2 and MPOCAF7 with p = 0.018 and p = 0.019, respectively, in the sub-elite cyclists group only. The mean MPO during experimental test in sub-elite cyclists, but not in elite cyclists, was significantly enhanced following caffeine ingestion (p = 0.05. These findings indicate that caffeine intake at recommended levels is not associated with improved performance in a professional level cyclist. The results of the comparison of the experimental situations using the Borg scale are not persuasive. We found a significant difference (0.008356 between the PLA and CAF2 experimental measurements (p < 0.05. The level of substantive significance was assessed using Cohen’s coefficient effect and only a small “size of effect” (0.19 was found. It is therefore not possible to determine whether the Borg scale might be used to define the effects of caffeine ingestion on endurance performance, due to the multifactorial effects of caffeine.

  16. Interviewing Ghanaian Educational Elites: Strategies for Access, Commitment, and Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope Pius Nudzor

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A review of the research methodology literature suggests that owing to the difficulty of gaining access to and obtaining commitments from elites, social scientists less frequently use them as research respondents, opting instead to investigate those over whom power is exercised. This article provides insights into some intricacies of elite interviewing. It recounts the experience of a novice researcher in his quest to gain access to and interview elite individuals within the Ghanaian educational system for his PhD thesis. In the process, the article sheds light on strategies and techniques (related to interviewee identification, scheduling, and researcher preparation for the interview, as well as rapport establishment with potential interviewees that are helpful as toolkits in ensuring that elite interview processes are not unduly derailed. The article argues that the strategies discussed are useful for circumventing formalised and “public relations” responses, which elites tend to communicate with the press and public.

  17. Elite athletes experiences with risk related to cardiac screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jonas Schmidt; Thing, Lone Friis

    perspective on risk (Foucault 1988). For most elite athletes participation in cardiac screening is done out of a wish to obtain an acquittal from risks. Symptomatic of the risk society cardiac screening can from an athlete perspective at the same time be seen as an attempt to gain control over......Elite Athletes experiences with risks related to Cardiac Screening Jonas Schmidt Christensen1, Lone Friis Thing1 1University of Copenhagen - Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports (NEXS), Cardiac screening of elite athletes are recommended by both the American Heart Association & the European...... is dominated by studies with a clinical medical focus and studies of athlete’s perspectives on cardiac screening are consequently an absence. By using an interpretive sociological perspective (Denzin 2001) and qualitative research done with elite athletes of both gender this paper seeks to explore how elite...

  18. Attributes of top elite team-handball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuça, Luís M; Fragoso, Isabel; Teles, Júlia

    2014-01-01

    Researchers in the field of excellence in sport performance are becoming increasingly focused on the study of sport-specific characteristics and requirements. In accordance with this, the purposes of this study were (a) to examine the morphologic-, fitness-, handball-specific skills and psychological and "biosocial" differences between top elite and nontop elite team-handball players and (b) to investigate the extent to which they may be used to identify top elite team-handball players. One hundred sixty-seven adult male team-handball players were studied and divided in 2 groups: top elite (n = 41) and nontop elite (n = 126). Twenty-eight morphologic-, 9 fitness-, 1 handball-specific skills and 2 psychological-based and 2 "biosocial"-based attributes were used. Top elite and nontop elite groups were compared for each variable of interest using Student's t-test, and 5 logistic regression analyses were performed with the athlete's performance group (top elite or nontop elite) as the dependent variable and the variables of each category as predictors. The results showed that (a) body mass, waist girth, radiale-dactylion length, midstylion-dactylion length, and absolute muscle mass (morphologic model); (b) 30-m sprint time, countermovement jump height and average power, abdominal strength and the class of performance in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Endurance Test (fitness model); (c) offensive power (specific-skills model); (d) ego-based motivational orientation (psychological model); (e) socioeconomic status and the energy spent (for week) in handball activity (biosocial model); significantly (p handball player. Moreover, the fitness model exhibited higher percentages of correct classification (i.e., 91.5%) than all the other models did. This study provided (a) the rational to reduce the battery of tests for evaluation purposes, and (b) the initial step to work on building a multidisciplinary model to predict the probability of a handball athlete to be a top elite player.

  19. Moving Elite Athletes Forward: Examining the Status of Secondary School Elite Athlete Programmes and Available Post-School Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Seth

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study focused specifically on examining the status of and the promotion of two elite athlete programmes (EAPs), the students/elite athlete selection process and available post-school options. The research was guided by Michel Foucault's work in understanding the relationship between power and knowledge. Participants,…

  20. Identification of sugarcane genes involved in the purine synthesis pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario A. Jancso

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide synthesis is of central importance to all cells. In most organisms, the purine nucleotides are synthesized de novo from non-nucleotide precursors such as amino acids, ammonia and carbon dioxide. An understanding of the enzymes involved in sugarcane purine synthesis opens the possibility of using these enzymes as targets for chemicals which may be effective in combating phytopathogen. Such an approach has already been applied to several parasites and types of cancer. The strategy described in this paper was applied to identify sugarcane clusters for each step of the de novo purine synthesis pathway. Representative sequences of this pathway were chosen from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database and used to search the translated sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database using the available basic local alignment search tool (BLAST facility. Retrieved clusters were further tested for the statistical significance of the alignment by an implementation (PRSS3 of the Monte Carlo shuffling algorithm calibrated using known protein sequences of divergent taxa along the phylogenetic tree. The sequences were compared to each other and to the sugarcane clusters selected using BLAST analysis, with the resulting table of p-values indicating the degree of divergence of each enzyme within different taxa and in relation to the sugarcane clusters. The results obtained by this strategy allowed us to identify the sugarcane proteins participating in the purine synthesis pathway.A via de síntese de purino nucleotídeos é considerada uma via de central importância para todas as células. Na maioria dos organismos, os purino nucleotídeos são sintetizados ''de novo'' a partir de precursores não-nucleotídicos como amino ácidos, amônia e dióxido de carbono. O conhecimento das enzimas envolvidas na via de síntese de purinas da cana-de-açúcar vai abrir a possibilidade do uso dessas enzimas como alvos no desenho

  1. EFFICIENCY OF PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING RHIZOBACTERIA (PGPR IN SUGARCANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Morgado González

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are an alternative for promoting sugarcane (Saccharum spp. development. Growth promotion was evaluated in sugarcane vitroplants inoculated separately with twenty-four strains of seven different bacterial species. Total indole synthesis and phosphate solubilization activity were determined in each strain. The experimental unit was one 5 L pot filled with a sterile mixture of farm soil-agrolite and one plant. The experimental design was completely random. Inoculation consisted of 1.0 mL of bacterial suspension (1 × 107 CFU. Plant height, stem diameter, number of shoots, leaf area and dry matter of shoot and root were determined every two weeks. The Ochrobactrum anthropi strains N208 and IMP311 and Pseudomonas luteola IMPCA244 had the highest production of total indoles (116.69, 115.70 and 117.34 µg mL-1, respectively. The Stenotrophomonas maltophilia strains CA158 and 79 exhibited the highest values of phosphate solubilization (222.43 and 216.38 µg mL-1, respectively. In general, plant height increased 27.75%, stem diameter 30.75%, number of tillers 38.5%, leaf area 49%, aerial dry matter 59.75% and root dry matter 59.5%. P. luteola, P. f luorescens, O. anthropi and S. maltophilia exhibited the highest values of the leaf area index, net assimilation, and relative and absolute growth rates. P. luteola IMPCA244, O. anthropi IMP311, Aeromonas salmonicida N264, Burkholderia cepacia N172, P. f luorescens N50 and S. maltophilia 79 promoted the highest values in different response variables throughout the study. Before using these strains as sugarcane biofertilizer, additional studies are required.

  2. Patterns of expression of cell wall related genes in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima D.U.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Our search for genes related to cell wall metabolism in the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database (http://sucest.lbi.dcc.unicamp.br resulted in 3,283 reads (1% of the total reads which were grouped into 459 clusters (potential genes with an average of 7.1 reads per cluster. To more clearly display our correlation coefficients, we constructed surface maps which we used to investigate the relationship between cell wall genes and the sugarcane tissues libraries from which they came. The only significant correlations that we found between cell wall genes and/or their expression within particular libraries were neutral or synergetic. Genes related to cellulose biosynthesis were from the CesA family, and were found to be the most abundant cell wall related genes in the SUCEST database. We found that the highest number of CesA reads came from the root and stem libraries. The genes with the greatest number of reads were those involved in cell wall hydrolases (e.g. beta-1,3-glucanases, xyloglucan endo-beta-transglycosylase, beta-glucosidase and endo-beta-mannanase. Correlation analyses by surface mapping revealed that the expression of genes related to biosynthesis seems to be associated with the hydrolysis of hemicelluloses, pectin hydrolases being mainly associated with xyloglucan hydrolases. The patterns of cell wall related gene expression in sugarcane based on the number of reads per cluster reflected quite well the expected physiological characteristics of the tissues. This is the first work to provide a general view on plant cell wall metabolism through the expression of related genes in almost all the tissues of a plant at the same time. For example, developing flowers behaved similarly to both meristematic tissues and leaf-root transition zone tissues. Besides providing a basis for future research on the mechanisms of plant development which involve the cell wall, our findings will provide valuable tools for plant engineering in the

  3. Saccharification of Sugarcane Bagasse by Enzymatic Treatment for bioethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed, F. M.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The escalating demands for traditional fossil fuels with unsecured deliverance and issues of climate change compel the researchers to develop alternative fuels like bioethanol. This study examines the prospect of biofuel production from high carbohydrate containing lignocellulosic material, e.g. sugarcane bagasse through biological means. Methodology and Results: Cellulolytic enzymes were collected from the culture filtrate of thermotolerant Trichodermaviride grown on variously pre-treated sugarcane bagasse. CMCase and FPase enzyme activities were determined as a measure of suitable substrate pre-treatment and optimum condition for cellulolytic enzyme production. The highest CMCase and FPase activity was found to be 1.217 U/ml and 0.109 U/ml respectively under the production conditions of 200 rpm, pH 4.0 and 50 °C using steamed NaOH treated bagasse as substrate. SEM was carried out to compare and confirm the activity of cellulolytic enzymes on sugarcane bagasse. Saccharification of pre-treated bagasse was carried out with crude enzymes together using a two-factor experimental design. Under optimized conditions the pre-treated bagasse was saccharified up to 42.7 % in 24 h. The hydrolysate was concentrated by heating to suitable concentration and then used for fermentation by an indigenous isolate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. With 50 and 80 % brix containing liquor the concentration of alcohol was 0.579 % and 1.15 % respectively. Conclusion, significance and impact of study: This is the first report in Bangladesh for the production of cellulosicethanol using local isolates. Though the rate of alcohol production was very low, a great impetus in this field can maximize the production thereby meet the demand for fuel in future.

  4. Enzyme loading dependence of cellulose hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Martín

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated sugarcane bagasse, either delignified or non-delignified, was studied as a function of enzyme loading. Hydrolysis experiments were carried out using five enzyme loadings (2.5 to 20 FPU/g cellulose and the concentration of solids was 2% for both materials. Alkaline delignification improved cellulose hydrolysis by increasing surface area. For both materials, glucose concentrations increased with enzyme loading. On the other hand, enzyme loadings higher than 15 FPU/g did not result in any increase in the initial rate, since the excess of enzyme adsorbed onto the substrate restricted the diffusion process through the structure.

  5. DNA damage protection against free radicals of two antioxidant neolignan glucosides from sugarcane molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikin, Yonathan; Takahashi, Makoto; Mizu, Masami; Takara, Kensaku; Oku, Hirosuke; Wada, Koji

    2016-03-15

    Sugarcane molasses is a potential by-product of the sugarcane manufacturing industry that is rich in antioxidant materials. The present study aimed to obtain antioxidative compounds from sugarcane molasses and to evaluate their ability to protect DNA from oxidative damage. Two neolignan glucosides were isolated from sugarcane molasses using bioassay and UV spectra monitoring-guided fractionation. The compounds were elucidated as (7R,8S)-dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol-4-O-β-d-glucoside (1) and (7S,8R)-simulanol-9'-O-β-d-glucoside (2). Neolignan glucoside 2 protected against DNA damage caused by free radicals more effectively than did neolignan glucoside 1 (13.62 and 9.08 µmol L(-1) for peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals, respectively, compared to 48.07 and 14.42 µmol L(-1) ). Additionally, neolignan glucoside 2 exhibited superior DNA protection against free radicals compared with various known antioxidative compounds, including p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vanillic acid and epigallocatechin gallate. The isolated neolignan glucosides from sugarcane molasses are able to protect DNA from oxidative damage caused by free radicals. This is the first identification of these two compounds in sugarcane molasses. The sugarcane molasses can therefore be used as potential nutraceutical preventative agents, and the findings may foster the utilization of this by-product as a bioresource-based product. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. Copyright © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Career drop outs of young elite athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Fišer

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The main problem of the study was to examine the characteristics of sports career drop outs of young elite sportswomen and their adaptation to the post-sport life. The sample included 20 ex-young elite sportswomen, who had brought their successful sport careers to an end before the age of 19. We used a modified interview about sports career termination (Cecić Erpič, 1998 for the investigation of the characteristics of their sports careers. To examine the caracteristics of sport careers we used frequency analysis and cluster analysis. The results showed that the participants mostly stated more than one reason for the termination of their career. The most common reasons for career termination were: lack of motivation, bad relations with trainers or co-competitors and dedication to school or education. After the end of a sports career most of the young sportswomen stayed actively in touch with sport, either as trainers, judges, or they remained engaged in sports for recreation.

  7. MENAKAR MORALITAS ELIT POLITIK MELALUI KONTRAK POLITIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiwan * **

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Before the General Election to choose the legislative members, that is held on April 5, 2005 and President General Election, that is held on June 5 and September 20, 2004, there was a political phenomenon, which then popularlY said "a politicai contract. " The political contract was initiated by some elements of 'the civil society', which were the important components of the political power of pro-reform community. Looking at the cultural side, the existence of the political contract in the development of Indonesian politics implied that there was a change in cognitive, affective and evaluation orientation of some of Indonesian people in their attitudes and political habits to be more rational. The emergence of the more-rational political orientation was also pushed by the previous political experience of ''being betrayed by the political elite ', just like in 1999 General Election at the reform era. The chance also rose after the changes in the system of General Election that introduced the district and proportional system, and the direct president election that rose up the important of people's vote and aspiration. The changes had pushed the political elites to approach the people, fit themselves with the people's rhythm and dynamism, including the aspiration for political transparency and political accountability by willing to sign the political contract.

  8. Egalitarian Democracy between Elitism and Populism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cerovac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In his influential book Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy Jacques Ranciere builds a substantial critique of liberal regimes present in most Western countries. He finds them defective because: (1 they allow wealth and economic power of groups and individuals to influence public decision-making, making those with economic power an elite group; (2 they allow knowledge and expertise of groups and individuals to influence public decision-making, making those with epistemic power an elite group; (3 they allow and encourage social and economic conditions that make people inappropriate for decision-making on important issues, making those with certain characteristics thus acquired an inferior group. We focus on the Ranciere’s second objection by relying on Estlund’s epistemic proceduralis approach and claim that one does not have to embrace postmodernist idea of reducing reason to relations of power in order to present a substantial critique of our contemporary society. Furthermore, we argue that one does not have to base egalitarian democracy on postmodernist ideas that reject the truth-tracking potential of democratic procedures – egalitarian democracy is perfectly compatible with the idea of truth in politics. Key words: , , , , ,

  9. Elite Sport, Doping and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The issue of doping in sport was once of interest only to aficionados of elite sports.  Nowadays, it is a matter of intense public scrutiny thatspans the worlds of health, medicine, sports, politics, technology, andbeyond.  In keeping with this territorial expansion, the...... aim of this book is toillustrate how the issue of doping has evolved beyond the world of elite sport into an arena of public health.  In so doing, the book drawsupon multi-disciplinary perspectives from applied and professionalethics, biomedical science, history, philosophy, policy studies, andsociology.  The essays, written by a...... enhancement; and the formation and critique of policies thatreflect the diversity of social issues in doping.  The book should be of interest to scholars in health sciences, sports studies, and to sports administrators and policy makers....

  10. Improving leaping ability in elite rhythmic gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, M R; Tremain, L; Christiansen, J; Beitzel, J

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the leaping ability of athletes in rhythmic gymnastics, a high leap demanding sport, using a controlled course of jump training. Six elite athletes underwent a course of leap training including pool training and Pilates' Method of Body Conditioning using spring controlled resistance to muscular exertion. Baseline data was obtained on a force plate that measured reaction time, leap height, and explosive power on each athlete before initiating training. After 1 month of training, leap height improved 16.2%, ground reaction time improved 50%, and explosive power improved 220%. With continued maintenance training, no decrease in effect was noted; however, no significant improvement occurred after the first month of training. At 1 yr with discontinuation of the leaping protocol but continued training within the sport, the initial gains were likewise maintained. No injuries occurred during participation in the leaping protocol. Elite rhythmic gymnasts can safely improve their leaping ability significantly through an intense course of jump training. Continued training with the leaping protocol does not appear to further enhance the benefit; however, the gains appear to be maintained at 4 months and 1 yr post training with or without additional training with the leaping protocol.

  11. A global view of transcriptome dynamics during Sporisorium scitamineum challenge in sugarcane by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youxiong Que

    Full Text Available Sugarcane smut caused by Sporisorium scitamineum is a critical fungal disease in the sugarcane industry. However, molecular mechanistic studies of pathological response of sugarcane to S. scitamineum are scarce and preliminary. Here, transcriptome analysis of sugarcane disease induced by S. scitamineum at 24, 48 and 120 h was conducted, using an S. scitamineum-resistant and -susceptible genotype (Yacheng05-179 and "ROC"22. The reliability of Illumina data was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. In total, transcriptome sequencing of eight samples revealed gene annotations of 65,852 unigenes. Correlation analysis of differentially expressed genes indicated that after S. scitamineum infection, most differentially expressed genes and related metabolic pathways in both sugarcane genotypes were common, covering most biological activities. However, expression of resistance-associated genes in Yacheng05-179 (24-48 h occurred earlier than those in "ROC"22 (48-120 h, and more transcript expressions were observed in the former, suggesting resistance specificity and early timing of these genes in non-affinity sugarcane and S. scitamineum interactions. Obtained unigenes were related to cellular components, molecular functions and biological processes. From these data, functional annotations associated with resistance were obtained, including signal transduction mechanisms, energy production and conversion, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and defense mechanisms. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed that differentially expressed genes are involved in plant hormone signal transduction, flavonoid biosynthesis, plant-pathogen interaction, cell wall fortification pathway and other resistance-associated metabolic pathways. Disease inoculation experiments and the validation of in vitro antibacterial activity of the chitinase gene ScChi show that this sugarcane chitinase gene identified through RNA-Seq analysis is relevant to plant-pathogen interactions

  12. Long-term T-DNA insert stability and transgene expression consistency in field propagated sugarcane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffall, Kerry Hosmer; He, Chengkun; Smith-Jones, Michele; Mayo, Kristin; Mai, Pearl; Dong, Shujie; Ke, John; Dunder, Erik; Yarnall, Michele; Whinna, Rachel; DeMaio, Joe; Gu, Weining; Sheldon, Judith; Allen, Martin; Costello, Tricia; Setliff, Kristin; Jain, Rakesh; Snyder, Ada; Lovelady, Clark; Rawls, Eric; Palmer, Eric; Zhang, Yan; Bate, Nicholas; Shi, Liang; Jepson, Ian

    2017-03-01

    This study addresses T-DNA insert stability and transgene expression consistency in multiple cycles of field propagated sugarcane. T-DNA inserts are stable; no transgene rearrangements were observed. AmCYAN1 and PMI protein accumulation levels were maintained. There was no evidence that production of either protein declined across generations and no transgene silencing was observed in three commercial sugarcane varieties through commercially relevant ratooning, propagation-by-setts, and micro-propagation generation processes over 4 years of field testing. Long term transgene expression consistency and T-DNA insert stability can be achieved in sugarcane, suggesting that it is highly probable that transgenic sugarcane can be successfully commercialized. This study addresses T-DNA insert stability and transgene expression consistency in multiple cycles of field propagated sugarcane. These data are critical supporting information needed for successful commercialization of GM sugarcane. Here seventeen transgenic events, containing the AmCYAN1 gene driven by a CMP promoter and the E. coli PMI gene driven by either a CMP or Ubi promoter, were used to monitor T-DNA insert stability and consistency of transgene encoded protein accumulation through commercially relevant ratooning, propagation-by-setts, and micro-propagation generation processes. The experiments were conducted in three commercial sugarcane varieties over 4 years of field testing. DNA gel blot analysis showed that the T-DNA inserts are stable; no transgene rearrangements were observed. Quantitative ELISA showed no evidence of decreasing AmCYAN1 and PMI protein levels across generations and no transgene silencing was observed. These results indicate that long term transgene expression consistency and T-DNA insert stability can be achieved in sugarcane, suggesting that it is highly probable that transgenic sugarcane can be successfully commercialized.

  13. Highly improved chromium (III uptake capacity in modified sugarcane bagasse using different chemical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cristina Gonçalves Dos Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on improving chromium (III uptake capacity of sugarcane bagasse through its chemical modification with citric acid and/or sodium hydroxide. The chemical modifications were confirmed by infrared spectroscopy, with an evident peak observed at 1730 cm-1, attributed to carbonyl groups. Equilibrium was reached after 24 h, and the kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model. The highest chromium (III maximum adsorption capacity (MAC value was found when using sugarcane bagasse modified with sodium hydroxide and citric acid (58.00 mg g-1 giving a MAC value about three times greater (20.34 mg g-1 than for raw sugarcane bagasse.

  14. Sugarcane proteomics: establishment of a protein extraction method for 2-DE in stalk tissues and initiation of sugarcane proteome reference map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, Ramesh Sundar; Selvaraj, Nagarathinam; Veluswamy, Ganesh Kumar; Ramanujan, Rahul Pathirickal; Muthurajan, Raveendran; Palaniyandi, Malathi; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Viswanathan, Rasappa

    2010-06-01

    Sugarcane is an important commercial crop cultivated for its stalks and sugar is a prized commodity essential in human nutrition. Proteomics of sugarcane is in its infancy, especially when dealing with the stalk tissues, where there is no study to date. A systematic proteome analysis of stalk tissue yet remains to be investigated in sugarcane, wherein the stalk tissue is well known for its rigidity, fibrous nature, and the presence of oxidative enzymes, phenolic compounds and extreme levels of carbohydrates, thus making the protein extraction complicated. Here, we evaluated five different protein extraction methods in sugarcane stalk tissues. These methods are as follows: direct extraction using lysis buffer (LB), TCA/acetone precipitation followed by solubilization in LB, LB containing thiourea (LBT), and LBT containing tris, and phenol extraction. Both quantitative and qualitative protein analyses were performed for each method. 2-DE analysis of extracted total proteins revealed distinct differences in protein patterns among the methods, which might be due to their physicochemical limitations. Based on the 2-D gel protein profiles, TCA/acetone precipitation-LBT and phenol extraction methods showed good results. The phenol method showed a shift in pI values of proteins on 2-D gel, which was mostly overcome by the use of 2-D cleanup kit after protein extraction. Among all the methods tested, 2-D cleanup-phenol method was found to be the most suitable for producing high number of good-quality spots and reproducibility. In total, 30 and 12 protein spots commonly present in LB, LBT and phenol methods, and LBT method were selected and subjected to eLD-IT-TOF-MS/MS and nESI-LC-MS/MS analyses, respectively, and a reference map has been established for sugarcane stalk tissue proteome. A total of 36 nonredundant proteins were identified. This is a very first basic study on sugarcane stalk proteome analysis and will promote the unexplored areas of sugarcane proteome

  15. Ethanol Consumption by Wistar Rat Dams Affects Selenium Bioavailability and Antioxidant Balance in Their Progeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpia Carreras

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol consumption affects maternal nutrition, the mothers’ antioxidant balance and the future health of their progeny. Selenium (Se is a trace element cofactor of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GPx. We will study the effect of ethanol on Se bioavailability in dams and in their progeny. We have used three experimental groups of dams: control, chronic ethanol and pair-fed; and three groups of pups. Se levels were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Serum and hepatic GPx activity was determined by spectrometry. We have concluded that ethanol decreased Se retention in dams, affecting their tissue Se deposits and those of their offspring, while also compromising their progeny’s weight and oxidation balance. These effects of ethanol are caused by a reduction in Se intake and a direct alcohol-generated oxidation action.

  16. Selection of coffee progenies for resistance to nematode Meloidogyne paranaensis in infested area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Lima Salgado

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to select Coffea arabica progenies for resistance to M. paranaensis in an infested coffee growing area using Henderson’s mixed model methodology. Forty-one genotypes were selected at the Coffee Active Germplasm Bank of Minas Gerais, and evaluated in regard to stem diameter, number of plagiotropic branches, reaction to the nematode, and yield per plant. There was genetic variability among the genotypes studied for all the traits evaluated, and among the populations studied for yield and reaction to the nematode, indicating possibilities for obtaining genetic gains through selection in this population. There was high rate of genotypic association between all the traits studied. Coffee plants of Timor Hybrid UFV408-01 population, and F3 progenies derived from crossing Catuaí Vermelho and Amphillo MR 2161 were the most promising in the area infested by M. paranaensis.

  17. Behavior of 222Rn and its progeny in high-rise buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, J K; Tso, M Y; Ho, C W

    1998-09-01

    Unlike detached or semi-detached houses, the main source of indoor radon in high-rise buildings is the building material. Radon released from the building material will be removed by ventilation, either forced or natural, so that its concentration, its progeny's concentration, and the equilibrium between the two will be different for different types of buildings and environmental factors. A number of surveys were carried out in buildings throughout the territory to look at the seasonal variation of indoor 222Rn levels; the dependence of indoor 222Rn concentration on the living environment; the indoor gamma dose rate and its relation to indoor 222Rn concentration; and the dependence of 222Rn progeny concentration and equilibrium factor on the environment in high-rise buildings.

  18. AGROBIOLOGICAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF CHASSELAS DORÉ ELITE CLONAL ACCESSIONS

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    Elena Brînduse

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Four elite clonal accessions of Vitis vinifera L., Chasselas doré variety were identified in a very old plantation, of 110 years, located in Valea Cãlugãreascã, on the St. Nicolas Monastery vineyard. The vines, grafted on the SO4 (Selection Oppenheim 4 rootstock, were planted in 2007 in the germplasm collection belonging to the Research and Development Institute for Viticulture and Enology, Valea Cãlugãreascã. The evaluation of elite clonal accessions focused on the duration of their phenological cycles, grape fertility and productivity, resistance to diseases, quantity and quality of the grapes production. The elite clonal accessions have been distinguished from Chasselas doré through the grape production which is double at one of elite and higher for the other elites as a results of the average weight of the grapes. The potential of sugar accumulations in the must was approximately twice at the elite clonal accessions, with balanced total acidity and pH values. The elites will be further studied for confirming the genetic stability and to propose the most competitive for homologation.

  19. DNA alterations detected in the progeny of paternally irradiated Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Y; Shimada, A; Shima, A

    1995-01-01

    A nonmammalian test system for germ-cell mutagenesis has been developed by using the Japanese medaka fish. We describe a system for detecting DNA alterations in F1 progeny descended from the gamma-irradiated male medaka that uses an arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction and fingerprinting. A combination of these two methods has some advantages for screening changes in genomic DNA of individual progeny because this detection system can (i) screen for mutational events before embryos with dominant lethal mutations are eliminated during development and (ii) detect DNA changes in the progeny of irradiated males without functional selection and bias, such as resistance to chemicals. DNA alterations are detected as changes in patterns (i.e., band loss and/or band gain) of DNA fingerprints of progeny descended from males whose spermatozoa or spermatids were gamma-irradiated (4.75 or 9.50 Gy). We determined the frequency of gamma-irradiation-induced band loss in arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction fingerprints of DNA from severely malformed embryos with dominant lethal mutations and hatched viable embryos. The frequency of band loss in both dominant lethal embryos and hatched viable embryos increased with increasing gamma-ray dose, although more so in the former. We detected a new band in the fingerprints as a heritable DNA alteration but not a viability- or phenotype-affecting DNA alteration in two viable mutants recovered after gamma-irradiation experiments. A cloned amplified fragment of the new band contained a repeated sequence of p(ATGT)n. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7816843

  20. Early flowering and seed production in a yellow birch progeny test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knud E. Clausen

    1976-01-01

    Trees in a yellow birch progeny test began to bear seed when 7 years old and the proportion of fruiting trees increased in the following 2 years. Male catkins were produced at age 8 and the number of trees with males increased greatly the following years. Although there is much variation between and within families in earliness of flowering and in number of flowers and...

  1. Comparison of expected and actual progeny growth differences in crossbred calves

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrt, Garry Sonn

    1987-01-01

    The growth performance of Angus-Polled Hereford F1 calves was compared to the expected progeny differences (EPD) estimated by the American Polled Hereford Association to evaluate the usefulness of EPD estimates for improving commercial beef production. Polled Hereford sires were selected from the high accuracy sires listed in the American Polled Hereford Association's sire summary. Four types of sires were used: 1) Sires with high yearling weight and high maternal EPD's; ...

  2. Efficiency of Elite Fungicide for Control of Pistachio Gummosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Moradi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Several species of Phytophthora cause crown and root rot diseases of herbaceous and woody plants. Crown and root rot of pistachio trees cause significant damages in infected orchards. The effect of foliar application with Elite (fosetyl-Al in 2 and 2.5 g/l was evaluated in greenhouse experiments. The frequency of mortality, fresh and dry weight of roots and shoots, height, intensity of crown root colonization using CAMA-PARP medium was determined. Under greenhouse experiments, foliar application with Elite increased height, fresh and dry weight of shoots and root either in inoculation with and without Phytophthora drechsleri. The effects of Elite were more pronounced in roots, which increased the fresh and dry weight of root 1.3 and 2.5 times compared to those not sprayed with Elite, respectively. On the other hand, the application of Elite before or on the day of inoculation significantly reduced the frequency of mortality, which ranged from 35 to 90% (P ≤ 0.01. Crown and root colonization of pistachio seedling was affected by both the concentration of Elite and reduced the frequency of crown and root colonization of seedling. When fungicide and pathogen were applied at the same time, the frequency of colonization reduced to 18% and 36% for 2 and 2.5 g/l, respectively, and 43% and 60% when seedlings were treated with fungicide before P. drechsleri inoculations. The highest effect was seen in foliar application of Elite seven days before inoculation in 2.5 g/l. Further investigations have been conducted to understand the effect of Elite in infected trees as well as modeling of Elite application via soil drench, foliar application or trunk injection.

  3. Evaluation of relative biological efficiency of additives in sugarcane ensiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maria Oliveira Borgatti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding alkalis on the fermentative pattern, aerobic stability and nutritive value of the sugarcane silage. A completely randomized design with 6 additives in two concentrations (1 or 2%, plus a control group, totalizing 13 treatments [(6×2+1] with four replications, was used. The additives were sodium hydroxide (NaOH, limestone (CaCO3, urea (CO(NH22, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, quicklime (CaO and hydrated lime (Ca(OH2. The material was ensiled in 52 laboratory silos using plastic buckets with 12 L of capacity. Silos were opened 60 days after ensiling, when organic acids concentration, aerobic stability and chemical composition were determined. The Relative Biological Efficiency (RBE was calculated by the slope ratio method, using the data obtained from ratio between desirable and undesirable silage products, according to the equation: D/U ratio = [lactic/(ethanol + acetic + butyric]. All additives affected dry matter, crude protein, acid detergent fiber, neutral detergent fiber contents and buffering capacity. Except for urea and quicklime, all additives increased the in vitro dry matter digestibility. In general, these additives altered the fermentative pattern of sugarcane silage, inhibiting alcoholic fermentation and improving lactic acid production. The additive that showed the best RBE in relation to sodium hydroxide (100% was limestone (89.4%. The RBE values of urea, sodium bicarbonate and hydrated lime were 49.2%, 47.7% and 34.3%, respectively.

  4. Process integration and pinch analysis in sugarcane industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prado, Adelk de Carvalho; Pinheiro, Ricardo Brant [UFMG, Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear, Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: rbp@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2010-07-01

    Process integration techniques were applied, particularly through the Pinch Analysis method, to sugarcane industry. Research was performed upon harvest data from an agroindustrial complex which processes sugarcane plant in excess of 3.5 million metric tons per year, producing motor fuel grade ethanol, standard quality sugar, and delivering excess electric power to the grid. Pinch Analysis was used in assessing internal heat recovery as well as external utility demand targets, while keeping the lowest but economically achievable targets for entropy increase. Efficiency on the use of energy was evaluated for the plant as it was found (the base case) as well as for five selected process and/or plant design modifications, always with guidance of the method. The first alternative design (case 2) was proposed to evaluate equipment mean idle time in the base case, to support subsequent comparisons. Cases 3 and 4 were used to estimate the upper limits of combined heat and power generation while raw material supply of the base case is kept; both the cases did not prove worth implementing. Cases 5 and 6 were devised to deal with the bottleneck of the plant, namely boiler capacity, in order to allow for some production increment. Inexpensive, minor modifications considered in case 5 were found unable to produce reasonable outcome gain. Nevertheless, proper changes in cane juice evaporation section (case 6) could allow sugar and ethanol combined production to rise up to 9.1% relative to the base case, without dropping cogenerated power. (author)

  5. Efficiency of irrigation water application in sugarcane cultivation in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watto, Muhammad Arif; Mugera, Amin W

    2015-07-01

    Diminishing irrigation water supplies are threatening the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in Pakistan. Within the context of dwindling water resources and low agricultural water productivity, it is imperative to improve efficiency in agricultural production and to make efficient use of available water resources. This study employs a non-parametric approach to estimate the extent of technical and irrigation water efficiency in sugarcane cultivation in Pakistan. The mean technical efficiency score is 0.96 for tube-well owners whereas it is 0.94 for water buyers. The mean irrigation water efficiency score is 0.86 for tube-well owners whereas it is 0.72 for water buyers. We find that across all farms, 59% of the tube-well owners and 45% of the water buyers are fully technically efficient, whereas only 36% of the tube-well owners and 30% of the water buyer are fully efficient in irrigation water use. This study finds that sugarcane growers are operating at fairly high technical efficiency levels. But, there is considerable potential to improve irrigation water efficiency. This study proposes expanding the role of agricultural extension services from merely agronomic grounds to guide farmers to undertake cost benefit analysis of the available production technology, would help achieve higher efficiency levels. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  6. Food consumption of sugarcane workers' families in the Brazilian Northeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Messias Muniz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the food intake of sugarcane workers' family members. METHODS: The food intake of 159 family members of sugarcane workers from Gameleira, Pernambuco, Brazilian Northeast, was investigated by directly weighing the foods on three non-consecutive days. The percent risk of inadequate macro- and micronutrient intakes was analyzed according to the Reference Dietary Intakes. The macronutrients were analyzed in relation to acceptable distribution intervals. The energy consumed from the various food groups was expressed as a ratio of the total energy intake. RESULTS: The median intake of carbohydrates and proteins remained above the Estimated Average Requirement, and all age groups presented a low risk of inadequate carbohydrate and protein intakes. The median intakes of riboflavin, niacin, thiamin, and iron remained above the Estimated Average Requirement for all age groups, but children aged 1-3 years presented a high percent risk of inadequate iron intake. All age groups presented high percent risk of inadequate zinc, calcium, vitamin A, and vitamin C intakes. Grains and derivatives had a greater participation in the total energy intake, especially in men aged 19-30 years. The group "milk and dairy products" had a greater participation in the diet of children aged 1-3 years. CONCLUSION: The low percent risk of inadequate carbohydrate and protein intakes in all age groups was opposed to the high risk of inadequate mineral and vitamin intakes, making the population vulnerable to nutritional disorders caused by excess macronutrient intake and inadequate micronutrient intake.

  7. Sustainable management of varieties of sugarcane in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irenaldo Delgado

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the appearence of atypical dry and rainy seaso ns periods in the last years, has put up with the establishment of a new conception for the evalu ation and management of sugarcane varieties, with a view to framing correctly the harvesting stage and its p ossible lengthening in certain places. Under those new premises 48 experiments in blocks totally at random were de signed and established in four contrasting regions of the country. The behavior of three representative va rieties of sugarcane of three different maturity periods (early, middle and late, harvested during the whole ye ar, with ages between 9 and 24 months, in the variable t cane/ha,% pol in cane and t pol/ha was studied. The results corroborated the approach of maturity of the studied genotypes, the counties of Camagüey and Matanzas re ached the highest values in the pol percentage in cane at the beginnig of the harvesting period, while Holguín achieves them in the period from April - July. The results of the Factorial Analysis, showed that the best results in the cultivars were reached in Camagüey, followed by Holguín with ages among 13 - 16, 17 - 20 and 21 - 2 4 months fundamentally in the periods (February - March, April - May, June - August and September - O ctober, the environmental effect was the one that bigger contributed to the total phenotypic variation

  8. Microalgae cultivation in sugarcane vinasse: Selection, growth and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Hugo; Cereijo, Carolina R; Teles, Valérya C; Nascimento, Rodrigo C; Fernandes, Maiara S; Brunale, Patrícia; Campanha, Raquel C; Soares, Itânia P; Silva, Flávia C P; Sabaini, Priscila S; Siqueira, Félix G; Brasil, Bruno S A F

    2017-03-01

    Sugarcane ethanol is produced at large scale generating wastes that could be used for microalgae biomass production in a biorefinery strategy. In this study, forty microalgae strains were screened for growth in sugarcane vinasse at different concentrations. Two microalgae strains, Micractinium sp. Embrapa|LBA32 and C. biconvexa Embrapa|LBA40, presented vigorous growth in a light-dependent manner even in undiluted vinasse under non-axenic conditions. Microalgae strains presented higher biomass productivity in vinasse-based media compared to standard Bold's Basal Medium in cultures performed using 15L airlift flat plate photobioreactors. Chemical composition analyses showed that proteins and carbohydrates comprise the major fractions of algal biomass. Glucose was the main monosaccharide detected, ranging from 46% to 76% of the total carbohydrates content according to the strain and culture media used. This research highlights the potential of using residues derived from ethanol plants to cultivate microalgae for the production of energy and bioproducts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sugarcane bagasse as exclusive roughage for dairy heifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Gomes Inácio

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrate levels (40, 50, 60, and 70% on dry matter basis on intake, digestibility of nutrients, and performance of heifers fed sugarcane bagasse as exclusive roughage. Twenty Girolando heifers, with an average body weight of 198±25.6 kg were assigned to a completely randomized design, established according to body weight. The intake of dry matter (5.12 to 7.73 kg d-1, organic matter (4.72 to 7.32 kg d-1, crude protein (0.71 to 1.05 kg d-1, and digestible organic matter (3.09 to 4.77 kg d-1 linearly increased with the inclusion of concentrate in the diets. The final weight (238 to 299 kg d-1, body weight gain (0.50 to 1.20 kg d-1, and total weight gain (35.2 to 83.6 kg d-1 linearly increased with the concentrate levels. Considering the occurrence of the first calving at 24 months, a 50:50 ratio of sugarcane bagasse to concentrate seems to be the most appropriate for crossbred heifers.

  10. Analysis of radon and thoron progeny measurements based on air filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajic, J M; Nikezic, D

    2015-02-01

    Measuring of radon and thoron progeny concentrations in air, based on air filtration, was analysed in order to assess the reliability of the method. Changes of radon and thoron progeny activities on the filter during and after air sampling were investigated. Simulation experiments were performed involving realistic measuring parameters. The sensitivity of results (radon and thoron concentrations in air) to the variations of alpha counting in three and five intervals was studied. The concentration of (218)Po showed up to be the most sensitive to these changes, as was expected because of its short half-life. The well-known method for measuring of progeny concentrations based on air filtration is rather unreliable and obtaining unrealistic or incorrect results appears to be quite possible. A simple method for quick estimation of radon potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), based on measurements of alpha activity in a saturation regime, was proposed. Thoron PAEC can be determined from the saturation activity on the filter, through beta or alpha measurements. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Generation of viable progeny from dead brooders of endangered catfish Clarias magur (Hamilton, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullip Kumar Majhi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The obligatory air-breathing catfish Clarias magur is a prime candidate for aquaculture owing to its unique taste, high growth rate, and hardy nature. However, recently the IUCN has listed the species under the endangered category because the population has critically declined in the wild. The sexually mature C. magur brooders are often collected from their natural habitats for seed production in captivity. In many cases, the brooder dies due to handling injuries or confinement stress. In this study, we demonstrated that viable progeny could be generated from freshly dead sexually mature C. magur. Three hours after death, the gonads were excised, macroscopically examined and gamete viability was evaluated. Artificial fertilization was performed by mixing the sperm suspension with the eggs. Water was added after 1 min of mixing to activate the fertilization process. We observed 85%-93% fertilization success from gametes derived from dead donors as opposed to 90%-95% from those derived from live control donors. The embryos showed normal development and resulted in the generation of 88%-92% viable progeny, which was similar to the progeny derived from control donors (92%-93%. The results obtained in this study will have profound implications in enhancing the seed production of endangered C. magur and could potentially be applied to other key commercially or endangered fish species. Keywords: Biological sciences, Developmental biology, Zoology

  12. Polyphenol variability in the fruits and juices of a cider apple progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdu, Cindy F; Childebrand, Nicolas; Marnet, Nathalie; Lebail, Gildas; Dupuis, Fabrice; Laurens, François; Guilet, David; Guyot, Sylvain

    2014-05-01

    Polyphenols have a favourable antioxidant potential on human health, suggesting that their high content in apple is responsible for the beneficial effects of apple consumption. They are also linked to the quality of apple juices and ciders since they are predominantly responsible for astringency, bitterness and colour. Major phenolic compounds were quantified by liquid chromatography in fruits and juices from a cider apple progeny harvested for 3 years. The total content of procyanidins and their average degree of polymerisation (DPn) were also determined in fruits by phloroglucinolysis. Variability and extraction yield of these compounds were determined. The variability observed in the progeny was representative of the variability observed in many cider apple varieties. Hydroxycinnamic acids were the most extractable group, with an average extraction yield of 67%, whereas flavonols and anthocyanins were the least. This study is the first to introduce variability and extraction yields of the main phenolic compounds in both fruits and juices of a cider apple progeny. This dataset will be used for an upcoming QTL mapping study, an original approach that has never been undertaken for cider apple. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  14. Reduction of radon progeny concentration in ordinary room due to a mixing fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Sextro, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Three experiments were carried out at the Indoor Air Quality Research House (IAQRH) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, to study the effect on the radon progeny of operating a mixing fan. At the beginning of every experiment, about 15 kBq.m/sup -3/ of radon was injected into a 36 m/sup 3/ ordinary room. Measurements were conducted with three different aerosol particle concentrations of about 10/sup 2/, 10/sup 4/ and 10/sup 5/ per cm/sup 3/. Real-time measurements of radon and progeny concentrations, particles and environmental parameters, were made throughout the experiments. Measurements of plated out activity on the surfaces of internal walls of the room and fan blades were measured directly by filter papers and CR-39 nuclear track detectors placed on the surfaces. The ratio of plated out activity to the total progeny activity in the room varied from 17% to 84%, in inverse relation to the particle concentrations. More than 99% of the plateout activity was found on walls and less than 1% on the fan blades. (author).

  15. Reduction of radon progeny concentration in ordinary room due to a mixing fan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F. (University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Sextro, R.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Three experiments were carried out at the Indoor Air Quality Research House (IAQRH) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, to study the effect of operating a mixing fan on the radon progeny. In every experiment, about 15 KBq.m{sup -3} of radon was injected into a 36 m3 ordinary room. Measurements were conducted with three different aerosol particle concentrations of about 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5} per cm3. Real-time measurements of radon and progeny concentrations, particles, and environmental parameters were made throughout the experiments. Measurements of plate-out activity on the surfaces of internal walls of the room were measured directly by filter papers and CR-39 nuclear track detectors, while on fan blades CR-39 detectors were used. The ratio of plated-out activity to the total progeny activity in the room varied from 17% to 84%. More than 99% of the plated-out activity was found on walls and less than 1% on fan blades. (author).

  16. Inheritance of nitrogen use efficiency in inbred progenies of tropical maize based on multivariate diallel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Fernando Lisboa; Diniz, Rafael Parreira; Balestre, Marcio; Ribeiro, Camila Bastos; Camargos, Renato Barbosa; Souza, João Cândido

    2014-01-01

    The objective of our study was to characterize and determine the patterns of genetic control in relation to tolerance and efficiency of nitrogen use by means of a complete diallel cross involving contrasting inbred progenies of tropical maize based on a univariate approach within the perspective of a multivariate mixed model. Eleven progenies, previously classified regarding the tolerance and responsiveness to nitrogen, were crossed in a complete diallel cross. Fifty-five hybrids were obtained. The hybrids and the progenies were evaluated at two different nitrogen levels, in two locations. The grain yield was measured as well as its yield components. The heritability values between the higher and lower nitrogen input environment did not differ among themselves. It was observed that the general combining ability values were similar for both approaches univariate and multivariate, when it was analyzed within each location and nitrogen level. The estimate of variance of the specific combining ability was higher than general combining ability estimate and the ratio between them was 0.54. The univariate and multivariate approaches are equivalent in experiments with good precision and high heritability. The nonadditive genetic effects exhibit greater quantities than the additive genetic effects for the genetic control of nitrogen use efficiency.

  17. Inheritance of Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Inbred Progenies of Tropical Maize Based on Multivariate Diallel Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lisboa Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to characterize and determine the patterns of genetic control in relation to tolerance and efficiency of nitrogen use by means of a complete diallel cross involving contrasting inbred progenies of tropical maize based on a univariate approach within the perspective of a multivariate mixed model. Eleven progenies, previously classified regarding the tolerance and responsiveness to nitrogen, were crossed in a complete diallel cross. Fifty-five hybrids were obtained. The hybrids and the progenies were evaluated at two different nitrogen levels, in two locations. The grain yield was measured as well as its yield components. The heritability values between the higher and lower nitrogen input environment did not differ among themselves. It was observed that the general combining ability values were similar for both approaches univariate and multivariate, when it was analyzed within each location and nitrogen level. The estimate of variance of the specific combining ability was higher than general combining ability estimate and the ratio between them was 0.54. The univariate and multivariate approaches are equivalent in experiments with good precision and high heritability. The nonadditive genetic effects exhibit greater quantities than the additive genetic effects for the genetic control of nitrogen use efficiency.

  18. The behavior of maize hybrids generated from contrasting progenies regarding the use of nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Lisboa Guedes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of maize hybrids synthesized from contrasting genotypes with regard to the use of nitrogen that were selected for their performance in topcrosses. Sixty-seven S0:1 progenies derived from the germplasm bank of Ufla were evaluated in topcross combinations with two testers  at two nitrogen levels. The six progenies with the greatest tolerance and responsiveness to nitrogen (RT and the five with the least tolerance and responsiveness (RnTn were selected and, were, afterwards, crossed in a complete diallel, for a total of 55 hybrid combinations. The following genetic parameters were estimated: genetic variance among the hybrids (σ^2G, broad sense heritability in the mean of the hybrids, and selective accuracy (r^2gg. It was observed that the genetic parameters were greater in the environments with available nitrogen and that the early selection by performance in topcrosses of progenies tolerant to low N levels may not be made with high intensity. The hybrids tolerant to low N levels were obtained by crossing contrasting parents.

  19. Genetic variation of phytochemical compounds in progenies of Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euclides Lara Cardozo Junior

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mate (Ilex paraguariensis St. Hil contains phytochemical compounds capable of preventing a number of healthproblems. Knowledge on the genetic contribution to the variability in these compounds can help to obtain mate progenies withhigher levels thereof in breeding programs. The composition of triterpene saponins, methylxanthines, chlorogenic acid andthe antioxidant activity of eight mate progenies were evaluated. Significant differences among progenies were verified incontents of triterpene saponins (0.003-0.080%, caffeine (0.226-1.377%, theobromine (0.176-0.831%, and chlorogenicacid (1.344-2.031% and in antioxidant activity (31.251-51.406%. The contents of theobromine were found to be negativelycorrelated with saponins and caffeine, and caffeine with chlorogenic acid, while theobromine was positively correlated withchlorogenic acid. The heritability values for saponins (75.09%, caffeine (75.19%, theobromine (66.87%, chlorogenic acid(52.86% and antioxidant activity (67.75% indicate the possibility of genetic gain in selection for these traits.

  20. Identification, classification and expression pattern analysis of sugarcane cysteine proteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Coelho Correa

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are peptidyl hydrolyses dependent on a cysteine residue at the active center. The physical and chemical properties of cysteine proteases have been extensively characterized, but their precise biological functions have not yet been completely understood, although it is known that they are involved in a number of events such as protein turnover, cancer, germination, programmed cell death and senescence. Protein sequences from different cysteine proteinases, classified as members of the E.C.3.4.22 sub-sub-class, were used to perform a T-BLAST-n search on the Brazilian Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tags project (SUCEST data bank. Sequence homology was found with 76 cluster sequences that corresponded to possible cysteine proteinases. The alignments of these SUCEST clusters with the sequence of cysteine proteinases of known origins provided important information about the classification and possible function of these sugarcane enzymes. Inferences about the expression pattern of each gene were made by direct correlation with the SUCEST cDNA libraries from which each cluster was derived. Since no previous reports of sugarcane cysteine proteinases genes exists, this study represents a first step in the study of new biochemical, physiological and biotechnological aspects of sugarcane cysteine proteases.Proteinases cisteínicas são peptidil-hidrolases dependentes de um resíduo de cisteína em seu sítio ativo. As propriedades físico-químicas destas proteinases têm sido amplamente caracterizadas, entretanto suas funções biológicas ainda não foram completamente elucidadas. Elas estão envolvidas em um grande número de eventos, tais como: processamento e degradação protéica, câncer, germinação, morte celular programada e processos de senescência. Diferentes proteinases cisteínicas, classificadas pelo Comitê de Nomenclatura da União Internacional de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular (IUBMB como pertencentes à sub

  1. Elite Framing of Inequality in the Press: Brazil and Uruguay Compared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias López

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Current elite studies argue that inequality produces negative externalities to elites, who may either promote democracy or adopt authoritarian measures in order to shield their interests from the actions of the rebellious poor. This article argues that elite framing of poverty and inequality in the press is a good thermometer of elite public response to such externalities. The press represents a communication tool shared by elites in the state, market, civil society, and, most evidently, the media itself. If inequality threatens elite rule, elites should share their concerns in order to move towards a solution. Since the literature links inequality and elite response, I propose undertaking a comparison of elite public responses to poverty and inequality in two South American cases with opposite records of inequality: Brazil and Uruguay. The article approaches elite framing of poverty and inequality in the press by analyzing opinion pieces and editorials in the main newspapers of both countries. Results invert the expected link between inequality and elite response. Elite framing of inequality in the Brazilian press did not suggest elite concern with externalities, neither an elite turn towards more democracy or authoritarianism. Contrastingly, a few Uruguayan elites did frame the poor as menacing.

  2. KINEMATICS THAT DIFFERENTIATE THE BEACH FLAGS START BETWEEN ELITE AND NON-ELITE SPRINTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study differentiated the kinematics of the beach flags sprint start between five elite (three males, two females; age = 21.2 ± 2.6 years; height = 1.71 ± 0.04 m; mass = 66.2 ± 5.9 kg) and five non-elite (three males, two females; age = 20.4 ± 1.7 years; height = 1.69 ± 0.08 meters [m]; mass = 61.6 ± 5.7 kilograms) sprinters. A high-speed camera filmed the start. Timing gates recorded the 0-2, 0-5, and 0-20 m intervals. Data included body position during the start and at take-off; start time; first step length; and sprint times. A Mann-Whitney U-test determined significant (p Elite sprinters had a greater take-off trajectory angle (p = 0.01; ES = 2.57), and were faster over the 0-2 (p = 0.02; ES = 1.77), 0-5 (p = 0.05; ES = 1.20), and 0-20 m (p = 0.02; ES = 1.83) intervals. Large effects were found for: greater take-off swing leg hip flexion (ES = 1.13) and trunk lean (ES = 1.37); longer duration start time (ES = 1.33); and longer first step length (ES = 1.23) in elite sprinters. A longer start time assists with force generation, which in conjunction with increased hip flexion, could translate to a longer first step. Increased trunk lean shifts the take-off trajectory angle towards the horizontal. A greater trajectory angle at start take-off, which could be advantageous for force production during sprint performance, is likely necessary for beach flags. PMID:24744496

  3. Island of the Sun: Elite and Non-Elite Observations of the June Solstice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, David S. P.; Bauer, Brian S.

    In Inca times (AD 1400-1532), two small islands in Lake Titicaca had temples dedicated to the sun and the moon. Colonial documents indicate that the islands were the focus of large-scale pilgrimages. Recent archaeoastronomical work suggests that rituals, attended by both elites and commoners, were held on the Island of the Sun to observe the setting sun on the June solstice.

  4. Anthropometric, physiological and maturational characteristics in selected elite and non-elite male adolescent basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Unda, Jon; Zarrazquin, Idoia; Gil, Javier; Ruiz, Fátima; Irazusta, Amaia; Kortajarena, Maider; Seco, Jesus; Irazusta, Jon

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anthropometric, physiological and maturation characteristics of young players (13-14 years old) associated with being successful in basketball. Body parameters were measured (stature, total body mass, skinfolds and lengths) and physiological capacities were assessed by endurance, sprint (20 m), jump and dribbling tests. Chronological age (CA) was recorded and maturity estimated using predicted age at peak height velocity (APHV). Anthropometric analysis indicated that elite players were taller, heavier and had a higher percentage of muscle. Further, physiological testing showed that these elite players perform better in jump, endurance, speed and agility tests (especially in the agility and ball tests). In addition, these skills are correlated with point average during the regular season. More basketball players born in the first semester of the year are selected and there is a predominance of early-maturing boys among those selected for the elite team. Those who are more mature have advantages in anthropometric characteristics and physiological test results. In conclusion, around puberty, physical and physiological parameters associated with maturity and CA are important in determining the success of basketball players. These findings should be taken into account by trainers and coaches, to avoid artificial bias in their selection choices.

  5. Particle size distribution of the radon progeny and ambient aerosols in the Underground Tourist Route "Liczyrzepa" Mine in Kowary Adit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołoszczuk, Katarzyna; Skubacz, Krystian

    2018-01-01

    Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, in cooperation with Central Mining Institute performed measurements of radon concentration in air, potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), particle size distribution of the radon progeny and ambient aerosols in the Underground Tourist-Educational Route "Liczyrzepa" Mine in Kowary Adit. A research study was developed to investigate the appropriate dose conversion factors for short-lived radon progeny. The particle size distribution of radon progeny was determined using Radon Progeny Particle Size Spectrometer (RPPSS). The device allows to receive the distribution of PAEC in the particle size range from 0.6 nm to 2494 nm, based on their activity measured on 8 stages composed of impaction plates or diffusion screens. The measurements of the ambient airborne particle size distribution were performed in the range from a few nanometres to about 20 micrometres using Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS) spectrometer and the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer Spectrometer (SMPS).

  6. Epstein-Barr Virus BKRF4 Gene Product Is Required for Efficient Progeny Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, H M Abdullah Al; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2017-09-13

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of human gammaherpesvirus, infects mainly B cells. EBV has two alternative life cycles, latent and lytic, and is reactivated occasionally from the latent stage to the lytic cycle. To combat EBV-associated disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of the EBV lytic replication cycle is also important. Here, we focused on an EBV lytic gene, BKRF4. Using our anti-BKRF4 antibody, we revealed that the BKRF4 gene product is expressed during the lytic cycle with late kinetics. To characterize the role of BKRF4, we constructed BKRF4-knockout mutants using the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. While disruption of the BKRF4 gene had almost no effect on viral protein expression and DNA synthesis, it significantly decreased progeny virion levels in HEK293 and Akata cells. Furthermore, we show that BKRF4 is involved not only in production of progeny virions but also in increasing the infectivity of the virus particles. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that BKRF4 interacted with a virion protein, BGLF2. We showed that the C-terminal region of BKRF4 was critical for this interaction and for efficient progeny production. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that BKRF4 partially colocalized with BGLF2 in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Finally, we showed that BKRF4 is a phosphorylated, possible tegument protein and that the EBV protein kinase BGLF4 may be important for this phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that BKRF4 is involved in the production of infectious virions.IMPORTANCE While the latent genes of EBV have been studied extensively, the lytic genes are less well characterized. This study focused on one such lytic gene, BKRF4, which is conserved only among gammaherpesviruses (ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or murine herpesvirus-68). After preparing the BKRF4 knockout virus using B95-8 EBV-BAC, we demonstrated that the BKRF4 gene was involved in infectious progeny

  7. The distributional preferences of an elite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisman, Raymond; Jakiela, Pamela; Kariv, Shachar; Markovits, Daniel

    2015-09-18

    We studied the distributional preferences of an elite cadre of Yale Law School students, a group that will assume positions of power in U.S. society. Our experimental design allows us to test whether redistributive decisions are consistent with utility maximization and to decompose underlying preferences into two qualitatively different tradeoffs: fair-mindedness versus self-interest, and equality versus efficiency. Yale Law School subjects are more consistent than subjects drawn from the American Life Panel, a diverse sample of Americans. Relative to the American Life Panel, Yale Law School subjects are also less fair-minded and substantially more efficiency-focused. We further show that our measure of equality-efficiency tradeoffs predicts Yale Law School students' career choices: Equality-minded subjects are more likely to be employed at nonprofit organizations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Influence of reaction temperature on yields of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of sugarcane residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suntorn Suttibak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study on production of pyrolysis oil from sugarcane residues, namely sugarcane bagasse (SB, sugarcane leaves (SL and sugarcane tops (ST. This research investigated the effects of reaction temperature on pyrolysis products of these residues. Pyrolysis oil samples were characterized. Their elemental composition, density, pH value, viscosity and heating values as well as water, solids, ash contents were determined. It was found that the optimal reaction temperatures for pyrolysis of SB, SL and ST were 499°C, 403°C and 402°C, which gave maximal oil yields of 64.6, 53.4, and 52.2 wt.% on a dry biomass basis, respectively.

  9. Frost Damage Detection in Sugarcane Crop Using Modis Images and Srtm Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudorff, B.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Adami, M.

    2011-12-01

    Brazil is the largest world producer of sugarcane which is used to produce almost equal proportions of either sugar (food) or ethanol (biofuel). In recent years sugarcane crop production has increased fast to meet the growing market demand for sugar and ethanol. This increase has been mainly due to expansion in crop area, but sugarcane production is also subjected to several factors that influence both the agricultural crop yield (tons of stalks/ha) and the industrial yield (kg of sugar/ton of stalks). Sugarcane is a semi-perennial crop that experiences major growth during spring and summer seasons with large demands for water and high temperatures to produce good stalk formation (crop yield). The harvest is performed mainly during fall and winter seasons when water availability and temperature should be low in order to accumulate sucrose in the stalks (industrial yield). These favorable climatic conditions for sugarcane crop are found in several regions in Brazil, particularly in São Paulo state, which is the major sugarcane producer in Brazil being responsible for almost 60% of its production. Despite the favorable climate in São Paulo state there is a certain probability of frost occurrence from time to time that has a negative impact on sugarcane crop, particularly on industrial yield, reducing the amount of sugar in the stalks; having consequences on price increase and product shortage. To evaluate the impact of frost on sugarcane crop, in the field, on a state level, is not a trivial task; however, this information is relevant due to its direct impact on the consumer market. Remote sensing images allow a synoptic view and present great potential to monitor large sugarcane plantations as has been done since 2003 in São Paulo state by the Canasat Project with Landsat type images (http://www.dsr.inpe.br/laf/canasat/en/). Images acquired from sensors with high temporal resolution such as MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) present the

  10. Performance Evaluation of Sweet Sorghum Juice and Sugarcane Molasses for Ethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatamipour Mohammad Sadegh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Sweet sorghum juice and traditional ethanol substrate i.e. sugarcane molasses were used for ethanol production in this work. At the end of the fermentation process, the sweet sorghum juice yielded more ethanol with higher ethanol concentration compared to sugarcane molasses in all experiments. The sweet sorghum juice had higher cell viability at high ethanol concentrations and minimum sugar concentration at the end of the fermentation process. The ethanol concentration and yield were 8.9% w/v and 0.45 g/g for sweet sorghum in 80 h and 6.5% w/v and 0.37 g/g for sugarcane molasses in 60 h, respectively. The findings on the physical properties of sweet sorghum juice revealed that it has better physical properties compared to sugarcane molasses, resulting to enhanced performance of sweet sorghum juice for ethanol production

  11. Integrated versus stand-alone second generation ethanol production from sugarcane bagasse and trash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marina O S; Junqueira, Tassia L; Cavalett, Otávio; Cunha, Marcelo P; Jesus, Charles D F; Rossell, Carlos E V; Maciel Filho, Rubens; Bonomi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials is often conceived considering independent, stand-alone production plants; in the Brazilian scenario, where part of the potential feedstock (sugarcane bagasse) for second generation ethanol production is already available at conventional first generation production plants, an integrated first and second generation production process seems to be the most obvious option. In this study stand-alone second generation ethanol production from surplus sugarcane bagasse and trash is compared with conventional first generation ethanol production from sugarcane and with integrated first and second generation; simulations were developed to represent the different technological scenarios, which provided data for economic and environmental analysis. Results show that the integrated first and second generation ethanol production process from sugarcane leads to better economic results when compared with the stand-alone plant, especially when advanced hydrolysis technologies and pentoses fermentation are included. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Air Emissions and Health Benefits from Using Sugarcane Waste as a Cellulosic Ethanol Feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C.; Campbell, E.; Chen, Y.; Carmichael, G.; Mena-Carrasco, M.; Spak, S.

    2010-12-01

    Brazil, as the largest ethanol exporter in the world, faces rapid expansion of ethanol production due to the increase of global biofuels demand. Current production of Brazilian sugarcane ethanol causes significant air emissions mainly from the open burning phase of agriculture wastes (i.e. sugarcane straws and leaves) resulting in potential health impacts. One possible measure to avoid undesired burning practices is to increase the utilization of unburned sugarcane residues as a feedstock for cellulosic ethanol. To explore the benefits of this substitution, here we first apply a bottom-up approach combining agronomic data and life-cycle models to investigate spatially and temporally explicit emissions from sugarcane waste burning. We further quantify the health benefits from preventing burning practices using the CMAQ regional air quality model and the BenMAP health benefit analysis tool adapted for Brazilian applications. Furthermore, the health impacts will be converted into monetary values which provide policymakers useful information for the development of cellulosic ethanol.

  13. High-Yield Endoglucanase Production by Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 Cultivated in Pretreated Sugarcane Mill Byproduct

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Castro, Aline Machado; Ferreira, Marcela Costa; da Cruz, Juliana Cunha; Pedro, Kelly Cristina Nascimento Rodrigues; Carvalho, Daniele Fernandes; Leite, Selma Gomes Ferreira; Pereira, Nei

    2010-01-01

    ... of the production of cellulosic ethanol. In the present paper, the filamentous fungus Trichoderma harzianum IOC-3844 was used for the production of cellulases from a pretreated sugarcane bagasse (namely, cellulignin...

  14. Plant regulators and invertase activity in sugarcane at the beginning of the harvest season

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leite, Glauber Henrique Pereira; Alexandre, Carlos; Crusciol, Costa; Siqueira, Gabriela Ferraz de; Silva, Marcelo de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    .... The objective of this study was to evaluate the activity of acid and neutral invertases and the role they play in controlling the accumulation of sucrose in sugarcane as a result of the application...

  15. Heat exposure in sugarcane workers in Costa Rica during the non-harvest season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Crowe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This observational pilot study was carried out at three sugarcane companies in Costa Rica. Its main objective was to determine the potential for heat stress conditions for workers in one sugarcane-growing region in Costa Rica during the maintenance (non-harvest period.Wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT variables were measured with a heat stress meter and threshold value limits and the Sweat Rate Indexes were calculated for each workplace. It was determined that workers in this study were in heat stress conditions. Costa Rica is likely to experience warmer temperatures and increased heat waves in the coming decades. It is therefore important to take action to decrease current and future heat-related risks for sugarcane workers in both harvest and non-harvest conditions and in all sugarcane growing regions in Costa Rica. It is also necessary to improve guidelines and occupational health standards for protecting worker health and productivity in the tropics.

  16. Agrobiodiversity of homegardens in a commercial sugarcane cultivation land matrix in Uganda

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mwavu, Edward N; Ariango, Esther; Ssegawa, Paul; Kalema, Vettes N; Bateganya, Fred; Waiswa, Daniel; Byakagaba, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    ...' needs in the face of global changes. We assessed agrobiodiversity in the 120 homegardens and its contribution to rural household livelihood strategies within a commercial monoculture sugarcane cultivation land matrix in eastern Uganda...

  17. Histological characterization of sugarcane shoots in vitro rooting in liquid culture medium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lelurlys Nápoles Borrero; Mariela Cid Ruíz; Maritza Escalona Morgado; Pedro Marrero Sánchez; Nelly Vásquez Morera; Oscar Concepción Laffitte

    2017-01-01

    In the sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) propagation in temporary immersion there are individual shoots or groups of shoots that require their in vitro rooting before being transferred to natural conditions...

  18. Reducing dissolved inorganic nitrogen in surface runoff water from sugarcane production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A J; Bartley, R; Armour, J D; Brodie, J E; Thorburn, P J

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) lost from farms, especially as the highly bioavailable dissolved inorganic form, may be damaging Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR). As sugarcane is the dominant cropping system in GBR catchments, its N management practises are coming under increasing scrutiny. This study measured dissolved inorganic N lost in surface runoff water and sugarcane productivity over 3 years. The experiment compared the conventional fertiliser N application rate to sugarcane (average 180kg N/ha/year) and a rate based on replacing N exported in the previous crop (average 94kg N/ha/year). Dissolved inorganic N losses in surface water were 72%, 48% and 66% lower in the three monitored years in the reduced N fertiliser treatment. There was no significant difference in sugarcane yield between the two fertiliser N treatments, nor any treatment difference in soil mineral N - both of these results are indicators of the sustainability of the lower fertiliser N applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Physicochemical and sensory changes in aged sugarcane spirit submitted to filtering with activated carbon filter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duarte, Felipe Cimino; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Pinheiro, Ana Carla Marques; Santiago, Wilder Douglas; Carvalho, Leonardo Luna de

    2012-01-01

    .... Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the activated carbon used in commercial filters on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of aged sugarcane spirit...

  20. Postactivation potentiation in elite young soccer players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titton, Adriano; Franchini, Emerson

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acute effects of 16 different combinations to cause the postactivation potentiation (PAP) in elite young soccer players. Squat exercise in 4 different intensities (40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% one-repetition maximum [1RM]) was performed and its effects were evaluated in the performance of countermovement jump (CMJ), after 4 different recovery times (1, 3, 5, and 10 min). For this purpose, 25 young soccer players, underwent five experimental sessions. At the first session the control to determine 1RM in half-squat was carried out. The following four experimental sessions were comprised of four intensity combinations with four different recovery intervals in order to perform the CMJ test later, randomly determined and with 30-min interval between each combination. The conditions were compared using an analysis of variance with repeated measurements, followed by Bonferroni test, using 5% significance level (P<0.05). The different intensities investigated did not provide significant increases in CMJ height, but significant differences were noted in recovery time, where, at CMJ maximum height, 1-min interval was better than after 3 min (P<0.05), 5, and 10 min (P<0.001). On the average jump performances, 1-min interval resulted in better results (P<0.001) compared to other intervals. The 10-min recovery resulted in poorer performances compared to the other intervals (P<0.001). Our results indicate that regardless the intensity used in the half-squat exercise with elite young soccer players, the 1-min recovery time was more appropriate to promote an increase in vertical jump. PMID:28503527