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Sample records for elevated mutation frequency

  1. Heart tissue of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice has elevated reactive oxygen species without significant impact on the frequency and nature of point mutations in nuclear DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabbe, Rory A. [Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Hill, Kathleen A., E-mail: khill22@uwo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2010-09-10

    Age is a major risk factor for heart disease, and cardiac aging is characterized by elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with compromised mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. To assess links between increased ROS levels and mutations, we examined in situ levels of ROS and cII mutation frequency, pattern and spectrum in the heart of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice. The hq mouse is a model of premature aging with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased risk of oxidative stress-induced heart disease with the means for in vivo mutation detection. The hq mutation produces a significant downregulation in the X-linked apoptosis-inducing factor gene (Aif) impairing both the antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation functions of AIF. Brain and skin of hq disease mice have elevated frequencies of point mutations in nuclear DNA and histopathology characterized by cell loss. Reports of associated elevations in ROS in brain and skin have mixed results. Herein, heart in situ ROS levels were elevated in hq disease compared to AIF-proficient mice (p < 0.0001) yet, mutation frequency and pattern were similar in hq disease, hq carrier and AIF-proficient mice. Heart cII mutations were also assessed 15 days following an acute exposure to an exogenous ROS inducer (10 mg paraquat/kg). Acute paraquat exposure with a short mutant manifestation period was insufficient to elevate mutation frequency or alter mutation pattern in the post-mitotic heart tissue of AIF-proficient mice. Paraquat induction of ROS requires mitochondrial complex I and thus is likely compromised in hq mice. Results of this preliminary survey and the context of recent literature suggest that determining causal links between AIF deficiency and the premature aging phenotypes of specific tissues is better addressed with assay of mitochondrial ROS and large-scale changes in mitochondrial DNA in specific cell types.

  2. Heart tissue of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice has elevated reactive oxygen species without significant impact on the frequency and nature of point mutations in nuclear DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabbe, Rory A.; Hill, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Age is a major risk factor for heart disease, and cardiac aging is characterized by elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with compromised mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. To assess links between increased ROS levels and mutations, we examined in situ levels of ROS and cII mutation frequency, pattern and spectrum in the heart of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice. The hq mouse is a model of premature aging with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased risk of oxidative stress-induced heart disease with the means for in vivo mutation detection. The hq mutation produces a significant downregulation in the X-linked apoptosis-inducing factor gene (Aif) impairing both the antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation functions of AIF. Brain and skin of hq disease mice have elevated frequencies of point mutations in nuclear DNA and histopathology characterized by cell loss. Reports of associated elevations in ROS in brain and skin have mixed results. Herein, heart in situ ROS levels were elevated in hq disease compared to AIF-proficient mice (p < 0.0001) yet, mutation frequency and pattern were similar in hq disease, hq carrier and AIF-proficient mice. Heart cII mutations were also assessed 15 days following an acute exposure to an exogenous ROS inducer (10 mg paraquat/kg). Acute paraquat exposure with a short mutant manifestation period was insufficient to elevate mutation frequency or alter mutation pattern in the post-mitotic heart tissue of AIF-proficient mice. Paraquat induction of ROS requires mitochondrial complex I and thus is likely compromised in hq mice. Results of this preliminary survey and the context of recent literature suggest that determining causal links between AIF deficiency and the premature aging phenotypes of specific tissues is better addressed with assay of mitochondrial ROS and large-scale changes in mitochondrial DNA in specific cell types.

  3. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    mutation (S768I), and two complex mutations. Seven percent of the patients were never smokers. The differences in median progression-free survival and overall survival between the mutated group and the wild-type group were 8.0 vs. 2.5 months, p...-1 vs. 2-3) and line of treatment (1st vs. 2nd and 3rd) had no influence on outcome in EGFR-mutated patients. CONCLUSION: We found a higher frequency of EGFR mutations than expected in a cohort with less than 10% never smokers. The outcome after treatment with erlotinib was much better in patients......OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...

  4. Modification of mutation frequency in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vashishat, R.K.; Kakar, S.N.

    1976-01-01

    In a reverse mutation system, using haploid, histidine-requirinq strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the frequency of uv-induced prototrophs increased if the post-irradiation minimal medium was supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. Addition of natural amino acids or RNA bases in the post-irradiation minimal medium, with or without histidine, also increased the uv-induced mutation frequency. Thus, post-irradiation conditions favouring protein and RNA synthesis, are effective in increasing uv-induced mutations in yeast. As compared to uv light, nitrous acid was more effective in inducing reversions in this strain and the frequency increased if the treated cells were plated on minimal medium supplemented with limited amounts of histidine. However, the addition of amino acids or RNA bases decreased the number of revertants. An additional inclusion of histidine reversed the suppressive effect of these metabolites. The mutation induction processes are thus different or differently modifiable in uv and nitrous acid. (author)

  5. Elevated mutation rate during meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Alison; Santoyo, Gustavo; Shafer, Brenda; Strathern, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Mutations accumulate during all stages of growth, but only germ line mutations contribute to evolution. While meiosis contributes to evolution by reassortment of parental alleles, we show here that the process itself is inherently mutagenic. We have previously shown that the DNA synthesis associated with repair of a double-strand break is about 1000-fold less accurate than S-phase synthesis. Since the process of meiosis involves many programmed DSBs, we reasoned that this repair might also be mutagenic. Indeed, in the early 1960's Magni and Von Borstel observed elevated reversion of recessive alleles during meiosis, and found that the revertants were more likely to be associated with a crossover than non-revertants, a process that they called "the meiotic effect." Here we use a forward mutation reporter (CAN1 HIS3) placed at either a meiotic recombination coldspot or hotspot near the MAT locus on Chromosome III. We find that the increased mutation rate at CAN1 (6 to 21 -fold) correlates with the underlying recombination rate at the locus. Importantly, we show that the elevated mutation rate is fully dependent upon Spo11, the protein that introduces the meiosis specific DSBs. To examine associated recombination we selected for random spores with or without a mutation in CAN1. We find that the mutations isolated this way show an increased association with recombination (crossovers, loss of crossover interference and/or increased gene conversion tracts). Polζ appears to contribute about half of the mutations induced during meiosis, but is not the only source of mutations for the meiotic effect. We see no difference in either the spectrum or distribution of mutations between mitosis and meiosis. The correlation of hotspots with elevated mutagenesis provides a mechanism for organisms to control evolution rates in a gene specific manner.

  6. The spontaneous chlorophyll mutation frequency in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    A total of 1866 barley plants were progeny tested in the greenhouse. Twenty-five plants segregated for newly arisen, spontaneous chlorophyll mutant genes. Among the total of 470,129 seedlings screened there were 79 mutants (1.7 .+-. 0.6 .times. 10-4). The data are added to data from three similar...... materials and the resulting estimate of the chlorophyll mutant frequency is 1.6 .times. 10-4 in about 1.43 million seedlings. The estimate of the chlorophyll mutation rate per generation is close to 67.3 .times. 10-4 per diploid genome or in the order of 6 .times. 10-7 per locus and haploid genome....

  7. The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate Isoniazid and Rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from untreated pulmonary Tuberculosis cases in urban Blantyre, Malawi.

  8. Frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutvei, Anders Peter; Fredlund, Erik; Lendahl, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated Notch signaling is linked to a variety of tumors and it is therefore important to learn more about the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a tumor context. In this report, we use data from the recently developed Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia to assess the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a large panel of cancer cell lines in silico. Our results show that the mutation frequency of Notch receptor and ligand genes is at par with that for established oncogenes and higher than for a set of house-keeping genes. Mutations were found across all four Notch receptor genes, but with notable differences between protein domains, mutations were for example more prevalent in the regions encoding the LNR and PEST domains in the Notch intracellular domain. Furthermore, an in silico estimation of functional impact showed that deleterious mutations cluster to the ligand-binding and the intracellular domains of NOTCH1. For most cell line groups, the mutation frequency of Notch genes is higher than in associated primary tumors. Our results shed new light on the spectrum of Notch mutations after in vitro culturing of tumor cells. The higher mutation frequency in tumor cell lines indicates that Notch mutations are associated with a growth advantage in vitro, and thus may be considered to be driver mutations in a tumor cell line context. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1278-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  9. Frequency of factor V Leiden mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasiruddin; Ali, W.; Rehman, Z.; Anwar, M.; Ayyub, M.; Ali, W.; Ahmed, S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation. Design: Observational study. Patients and Methods: Two hundred subjects each of apparently healthy and unrelated Punjabi and Pathan origins were included in the study. Peripheral blood samples were collected in EDTA and DNA extracted by phenol- chloroform extraction method. DNA analysis was done by PCR for restriction fragment length polymorphism. The product was digested overnight with Mn/1 and electrophoresed on acrylamide gel to detect 67 and 153 base pair fragments of factor V Leiden against 37, 67 and 116 base pair fragments of normal factor V. Results: In the 400 subjects studied, only 5 cases of heterozygotes for factor V Leiden were detected. The overall carrier rate was 1.3% (95% CI 0.2-2.2%). The carrier rate in Punjabis and Pathans was 1 % and 1.5% respectively. Conclusion: This study confirms that the prevalence of factor V Leiden is low in Asians and Africans as compared to the European population. (author)

  10. Mutation Rate Variation is a Primary Determinant of the Distribution of Allele Frequencies in Humans.

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    Arbel Harpak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The site frequency spectrum (SFS has long been used to study demographic history and natural selection. Here, we extend this summary by examining the SFS conditional on the alleles found at the same site in other species. We refer to this extension as the "phylogenetically-conditioned SFS" or cSFS. Using recent large-sample data from the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC, combined with primate genome sequences, we find that human variants that occurred independently in closely related primate lineages are at higher frequencies in humans than variants with parallel substitutions in more distant primates. We show that this effect is largely due to sites with elevated mutation rates causing significant departures from the widely-used infinite sites mutation model. Our analysis also suggests substantial variation in mutation rates even among mutations involving the same nucleotide changes. In summary, we show that variable mutation rates are key determinants of the SFS in humans.

  11. The Oenothera plastome mutator: effect of UV irradiation and nitroso-methyl urea on mutation frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, B.B.; Sokalski, M.B.

    1991-01-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for a recessive plastome mutator allele (pm) showed spontaneous mutation frequencies for plastome genes that are 200-fold higher than spontaneous levels. Mutations occurred at high frequencies in plants grown in the field, in a glasshouse, or as leaf tip cultures under fluorescent light, indicating that the plastome mutator activity is UV-independent. However, the chlorotic sectors became visible at an earlier stage of development when seedlings were irradiated, compared to seedlings that were not exposed to UV. These results imply that the rate of sorting-out was increased by the irradiation treatment, possibly due to a decrease in the effective number of multiplication-competent plastids, or a reduction in the extent of cytoplasmic mixing. Nitroso-methyl urea treatment of seeds had a dramatic effect on mutation frequency in both wild-type and plastome mutator samples. When the background mutation rates were low, the combination of the plastome mutator nucleus and the chemical mutagenesis treatment resulted in a synergistic effect, suggesting that the plastome mutator may involve a cpDNA repair pathway. (author)

  12. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) II. frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative study of frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations induced by two physical (gamma rays, fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU, EMS) in relation to the effects in M1 plants and induction of mutations in M2 was made in four chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) varieties, two desi (G 130 & H 214) one Kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345). The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 & 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 & 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU [0.01% (20h), & 0.02% (8h)] and EMS [0.1% (20h) & 0.2% (8h)]. The frequencies and spectrum of three different kinds of induced chlorophyll mutations in the order albina (43.5%), chlorina (27.3%) and xantha (24.2%) were recorded. Chemical mutagens were found to be efficient in inducing chlorophyll mutations in chickpea. Highest frequency of mutations was observed in green seeded var. L 345 (83% of M1 families and 19.9/1000 M2 plants). Kabuli var. C 104 was least responsive for chlorophyll mutations

  13. Frequency of diabetes in non st elevation myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, I.; Khan, A.N.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of diabetes mellitus in non ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Place and Duration of Study: The study was carried out at the Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology (AFIC) Rawalpindi, from Apr 2010 to Oct 2010. Material and Methods: In this study three hundred fifty two patients with non ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were studied while they were admitted to the hospital. They were divided into diabetic and non diabetic groups. Frequency of age, gender, rising levels of cardiac biochemical markers, plasma glucose and HbA1c were seen in both diabetic and non diabetic patients. Results were obtained by using chi-square method and independent t-test. Results: Out of 352 patients of NSTEMI 193 were diabetics. The study population was categorized in three groups according to age as; 30-45, 46-60, and 61-75 years respectively. It was found that 46-60 years group was most frequently affected with frequency of 46.1%, p<0.001 with male predominance as 67.9% and females as 32.1%. Cardiac biochemical markers were raised with mean for CK 528.51 U/L SD +- 275.82 and CK MB 79.39 U/L SD +- 32.5, p<0.001 respectively. Raised fasting plasma glucose was found in 189 patients mean 8.74 mmol/L SD +- 1.52, p<0.001 and elevated HbA1c seen in 187 patients mean 7.94% SD +- 0.83, p<0.001. Conclusion: Despite modern therapies for unstable angina (UA)/NSTEMI diabetes is an independent cardiovascular risk factor, therefore we need aggressive strategies to manage the high risk group of patients. (author)

  14. Frequencies, Laboratory Features, and Granulocyte Activation in Chinese Patients with CALR-Mutated Myeloproliferative Neoplasms.

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    Haixiu Guo

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the CALR gene have been recently identified as acquired alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. In this study, we evaluated mutation frequencies, laboratory features, and granulocyte activation in Chinese patients with MPNs. A combination of qualitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing was used to detect three driver mutations (i.e., CALR, JAK2V617F, and MPL. CALR mutations were identified in 8.4% of cases with essential thrombocythemia (ET and 5.3% of cases with primary myelofibrosis (PMF. Moreover, 25% of polycythemia vera, 29.5% of ET, and 48.1% of PMF were negative for all three mutations (JAK2V617F, MPL, and CALR. Compared with those patients with JAK2V617F mutation, CALR-mutated ET patients displayed unique hematological phenotypes, including higher platelet counts, and lower leukocyte counts and hemoglobin levels. Significant differences were not found between Chinese PMF patients with mutants CALR and JAK2V617F in terms of laboratory features. Interestingly, patients with CALR mutations showed markedly decreased levels of leukocyte alkaline phosphatase (LAP expression, whereas those with JAK2V617F mutation presented with elevated levels. Overall, a lower mutant rate of CALR gene and a higher triple-negative rate were identified in the cohort of Chinese patients with MPNs. This result indicates that an undiscovered mutant gene may have a significant role in these patients. Moreover, these pathological features further imply that the disease biology varies considerably between mutants CALR and JAK2V617F.

  15. Further evidence for elevated human minisatellite mutation rate in Belarus eight years after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Yuri E.; Buard, Jerome; Jeffreys, Alec J.; Nesterov, Valeri N.; Krouchinsky, Nicolay G.; Ostapenko, Vladislav A.; Vergnaud, Gilles; Giraudeau, Fabienne

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of germline mutation rate at human minisatellites among children born in areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus heavily polluted after the Chernobyl accident has been extended, both by recruiting more families from the affected region and by using five additional minisatellite probes, including multi-locus probe 33.6 and four hypervariable single-locus probes. These additional data confirmed a twofold higher mutation rate in exposed families compared with non-irradiated families from the United Kingdom. An elevated rate was seen at all three independent sets of minisatellites (detected separately by multi-locus probes 33.15, 33.6 and six single-locus probes), indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Belarus families. Within the Belarus cohort, mutation rate was significantly greater in families with higher parental radiation dose estimated for chronic external and internal exposure to caesium-137, consistent with radiation induction of germline mutation. The spectra of mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable, suggesting that increased mutation observed over multiple loci arises indirectly by some mechanism that enhances spontaneous minisatellite mutation

  16. Frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in Venezuelan patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez, Karen; Arcia, Orlando; Matute, Xiorama; Mindiola, Luz; Chaustre, Ismenia; Takiff, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the CFTR gene in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients have geographic differences and there is scant data on their prevalence in Venezuelan patients. This study determined the frequency of common CFTR gene mutations in these patients. We amplified and sequenced exons 7, 10, 11, 19, 20 and 21, which contain the most common CFTR mutations, from 105 Venezuelan patients in the National CF Program. Eleven different mutations were identified, four with frequencies greater than 1%: p.Phe508del...

  17. Gravitational torque frequency analysis for the Einstein elevator experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashenberg, Joshua [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), Cambridge, MA (United States); Lorenzini, Enrico C [University of Padova, Padua (Italy)

    2007-09-07

    Testing the principle of equivalence with a differential acceleration detector that spins while free falling requires a reliable extraction of a very small violation signal from the noise in the output signal frequency spectrum. The experiment is designed such that the violation signal is modulated by the spin of the test bodies. The possible violation signal is mixed with the intrinsic white noise of the detector and the colored noise associated with the modulation of gravitational perturbations, through the spin, and inertial-motion-related noise. In order to avoid false alarms the frequencies of the gravitational disturbances and the violation signal must be separate. This paper presents a model for the perturbative gravitational torque that affects the measurement. The torque is expanded in an asymptotic series to the fourth order and then expressed as a frequency spectrum. A spectral analysis shows the design conditions for frequency separation between the perturbing torque and the violation signal.

  18. Frequency and Prognostic Relevance of FLT3 Mutations in Saudi Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients

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    Ghaleb Elyamany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells. Mutations of FLT3 were first described in 1997 and account for the most frequent molecular mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. AML patients with FLT3 internal tandem duplication (ITD mutations have poor cure rates the prognostic significance of point mutations; tyrosine kinase domain (TKD is still unclear. We analyzed the frequency of FLT3 mutations (ITD and D835 in patients with AML at diagnosis; no sufficient data currently exist regarding FLT3 mutations in Saudi AML patients. This study was aimed at evaluating the frequency of FLT3 mutations in patients with AML and its significance for prognosis. The frequency of FLT3 mutations in our study (18.56% was lower than many of the reported studies, FLT3-ITD mutations were observed in 14.4%, and FLT3-TKD in 4.1%, of 97 newly diagnosed AML patients (82 adult and 15 pediatric. Our data show significant increase of FLT3 mutations in male more than female (13 male, 5 female. Our results support the view that FLT3-ITD mutation has strong prognostic factor in AML patients and is associated with high rate of relapse, and high leucocytes and blast count at diagnosis and relapse.

  19. Frequency Properties Research of Elevator Drive System with Direct Torque Control-Pulse with Modulation

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    A. S. Koval

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article problems of frequency properties research for electric drive system with direct torque control and pulse width modulator are described. The mathematical description of elevator is present. Simplified mathematical description of direct torque control - pulse width modulator electric drive system is shown. Transfer functions for torque and speed loops are determined. Logarithmic frequency characteristics are computed. Damping properties of elevator drive system are estimated.

  20. Elevated frequency of cataracts in birds from chernobyl.

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    Timothy Alexander Mousseau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804, which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials.

  1. Elevated Frequency of Cataracts in Birds from Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Møller, Anders Pape

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804), which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials. PMID:23935827

  2. HPRT gene mutation frequency and the factor of influence in adult peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingyong; Zheng Siying; Cui Fengmei; Wang Liuyi; Lao Qinhua; Wu Hongliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the HPRT gene loci mutation frequencies and the factor of influence in peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult with ages ranging from 21-50. Methods: HPRT gene mutation frequency (GMf) were examined by the technique of multinuclear cell assay. Relation between GMf and years were fitted with a computer. Results: Relation could be described by the following equation: y = 0.7555 + 0.0440x, r = 0.9829. Smoking has influence on GMf and sex hasn't. Conclusion: HPRT gene mutation frequency increases with increasing of age. Increasing rate is 0.00440% per year

  3. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, James W. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice were analyzed. • The frequency of ESTR mutation was established in sperm and blood. • Exposure to 10–300 μT for 2 and 15 h did not result in mutation induction. • Mutagenic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields are likely to be negligible. - Abstract: The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c × CBA/Ca F{sub 1} hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300 μT of 50 Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15 h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1 Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible.

  4. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, James W.; Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice were analyzed. • The frequency of ESTR mutation was established in sperm and blood. • Exposure to 10–300 μT for 2 and 15 h did not result in mutation induction. • Mutagenic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields are likely to be negligible. - Abstract: The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c × CBA/Ca F 1 hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300 μT of 50 Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15 h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1 Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible

  5. Estimating Exceptionally Rare Germline and Somatic Mutation Frequencies via Next Generation Sequencing.

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    Jordan Eboreime

    Full Text Available We used targeted next generation deep-sequencing (Safe Sequencing System to measure ultra-rare de novo mutation frequencies in the human male germline by attaching a unique identifier code to each target DNA molecule. Segments from three different human genes (FGFR3, MECP2 and PTPN11 were studied. Regardless of the gene segment, the particular testis donor or the 73 different testis pieces used, the frequencies for any one of the six different mutation types were consistent. Averaging over the C>T/G>A and G>T/C>A mutation types the background mutation frequency was 2.6x10-5 per base pair, while for the four other mutation types the average background frequency was lower at 1.5x10-6 per base pair. These rates far exceed the well documented human genome average frequency per base pair (~10-8 suggesting a non-biological explanation for our data. By computational modeling and a new experimental procedure to distinguish between pre-mutagenic lesion base mismatches and a fully mutated base pair in the original DNA molecule, we argue that most of the base-dependent variation in background frequency is due to a mixture of deamination and oxidation during the first two PCR cycles. Finally, we looked at a previously studied disease mutation in the PTPN11 gene and could easily distinguish true mutations from the SSS background. We also discuss the limits and possibilities of this and other methods to measure exceptionally rare mutation frequencies, and we present calculations for other scientists seeking to design their own such experiments.

  6. Frequency of BRAF V600E Mutation in the Mexican Population of Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ruiz-Garcia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The BRAF V600E mutation has been described in melanomas occurring in the Caucasian, European, and Asian populations. However, in the Mexican population, the status and clinical significance of BRAF mutation has not been researched on a large scale. Methods: Consecutive BRAF-tested Mexican patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 127 were analyzed for mutations in exon 15 of the BRAF gene in genomic DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction technology for amplification and detection. The results were correlated with the clinical-pathologic features and the prognosis of the patients. Results: The frequency of somatic mutation V600E within the BRAF gene was 54.6% (43 of 127 patients. Nodular melanoma was the most prevalent subtype in our population, with BRAF mutations in 37.2% (16 of 55 patients. In contrast, superficial spread had a frequency of 18.6% BRAF mutation (eight of 24. Other clinicopathologic features were assessed to correlate with the mutation status. Conclusion: This study searched for the most prevalent BRAF V600E mutation type in melanoma in a heterogeneous population from Mexico. Nodular melanoma was found to be the most prevalent in metastatic presentation and the presence of BRAF V600E mutation, perhaps related to the mixed ancestry; in the north, ancestry is predominantly European and in the south, it is predominantly Asian. The outcomes of the mutation correlations were similar to those found in other populations.

  7. Prevalence of common MEFV mutations and carrier frequencies in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Christian Oberkanins, oberkanins@viennalab.com. 1967; Pras et al. ... affected populations with spreading very diverse mutational patterns, especially ..... Arabs, mainly living in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan and Iraq, and North .... Mediterranean fever suspected patients and gender correlation: a retrospective study.

  8. Combination of the mutation process with the sensitization and repair processes leading to increased frequencies of mutations in algal populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Necas, J.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility of combining the mutation process with the induction of the repair processes was studied to increase the mutation frequencies in algal populations after UV treatment. The repair process induced by visible light was found to be much more effective than the dark repair processes in the chlorococcal algae used. In these algae, visible light possibly does not induce only those repair processes which affect their DNA, but probably also certain recovery processes which affect their damaged structures and physiological functions. A suitable combination of the sensitization of algae cells by a DNA-base analogue before UV treatment and the induction of the light repair and recovery processes resulted in a rather high increase of viable mutations in chlorococcal algae. These findings may be useful in breeding chlorococcal algae, which have no possibility of hybridization other than somatic. (author)

  9. Effect of combined mutagenic treatments on sensitivity and mutation frequency in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gopinathan Nair, V.

    1977-01-01

    Rice seeds were subjected to two sets of combination treatments of radiations and NMH. The effects of mutagenic treatments in the M 1 and M 2 generations were recorded and discussed. Mutation frequencies estimated as number of mutations per 100 M 1 years were not higher than the values expected on the basis of additive effects. When estimated as number of mutants per 100 M 2 plants, the frequencies revealed more than additive effects. The synergistic effect on mutant frequencies was due to increase in the segregation ratio of mutants. This effect was more pronounced at the higher dose combinations of fast neutrons and NMH. (author)

  10. Relationship between mutation frequency of GPA locus and cumulative dose among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Yu Wenru; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Li Zhen; Gao Zhiwei; Chen Zhenjun; Zhao Yongcheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of using GPA locus mutation assay as a bio-dosimeter for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Methods: An improved technique of GPA locus mutation assay was used in th study. The frequencies of mutant RBC in peripheral blood of 55 medical X-ray workers and 50 controls employed in different calendar-year periods were detected. The relationship between mutation frequencies (MFs) and period of entry, working years and cumulative doses were analyzed. Results: The MFs were significantly elevated among X-ray workers employed before 1970. This finding is similar to the result of cancer epidemiological study among medical X-ray workers , in which the cancer risk was significantly increased only X-ray workers employed before 1970. The MFs of GPA increased with increasing cumulative dose. The dose-effect relationship of Nφ MF with cumulative dose was closer than that of NN MF. Conclusion: There are many problems to be solved for using GPA MF assay as a bio-dosimeter such as individual variation, specificity and calibration curve of dose-effect relationship

  11. The Mutation Frequency in Different Spike Categories in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenberg, O.; Doll, Hans; Sandfær, J.

    1964-01-01

    After gamma irradiation of barley seeds, a comparison has been made between the chlorophyll-mutant frequencies in X1 spikes that had multicellular bud meristems in the seeds at the time of treatment (denoted as pre-formed spikes) and X1 spikes having no recognizable meristems at the time...

  12. Frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in single, double and triple dwarf wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhonukshe, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Induced mutation studies were carried with three dwarf wheat varieties viz., ''Sonalika'', ''Chhoti Lerma'' and ''Hira'', considered to be single, double and trible dwarfs, respectively. Gamma-rays were used as a source of irradiation. Frequency of chlorophyll mutations were comparatively low and the spectrum was narrow. Chlorophyll mutations were altogether absent in the variety ''Sonalika''. A very wide spectrum of viable mutations affecting stem, leaf, ear growth habit, maturity and fertility characteristics was observed in the M 2 . The cumulative frequency of all the mutants together was quite high, which varied with the varieties. There were varietal differences in the composition and width of the spectrum induced by gamma-rays. The dwarf mutants having desirable leaf and spike characters were isolated in all the three varieties. (author)

  13. Mutation frequencies in male mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Estimation of the genetic hazards of ionizing radiation in men is based largely on the frequency of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonial stem cells at low radiation dose rates. The publication of new data on this subject has permitted a fresh review of all the information available. The data continue to show no discrepancy from the interpretation that, although mutation frequency decreases markedly as dose rate is decreased from 90 to 0.8 R/min (1 R = 2.6 x 10/sup -4/ coulombs/kg) there seems to be no further change below 0.8 R/min over the range from that dose rate to 0.0007 R/min. Simple mathematical models are used to compute: (a) a maximum likelihood estimate of the induced mutation frequency at the low dose rates, and (b) a maximum likelihood estimate of the ratio of this to the mutation frequency at high dose rates in the range of 72 to 90 R/min. In the application of these results to the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man, the former value can be used to calcualte a doubling dose - i.e., the dose of radiation that induces a mutation frequency equal to the spontaneous frequency. The doubling dose based on the low-dose-rate data compiled here is 110 R. The ratio of the mutation frequency at low dose rate to to that at high dose rate is useful when it becomes necessary to extrapolate from experimental determinations, or from human data, at high dose rates to the expected risk at low dose rates. The ratio derived from the present analysis is 0.33

  14. Diversity and frequency of kdr mutations within Anopheles sinensis populations from Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chan; Feng, Xiangyang; Huang, Zushi; Li, Mei; Qiu, Xinghui

    2016-08-15

    Anopheles sinensis is a major vector of malaria in China and its control is under great threat as the development of insecticide resistance. Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of several classes of insecticides. Genetic mutations of VGSC have been documented to confer knockdown resistance (kdr) to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and pyrethroids in mosquitoes. To control this vector efficiently, it is important to know the resistance-associated genetic mutations, their distribution frequencies and genealogical relations. Three hundreds and thirteen (313) adults of An. sinensis collected from nine locations across Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region were used. The partial sequence of the An. sinensis voltage gated sodium channel gene (AS-VGSC) containing codon 1014 was sequenced. PHASE2.1 was used to construct the haplotypes of each individual, and the accuracy of haplotypes was further confirmed by clone sequencing. The genealogical relations of kdr mutations in AS-VGSC was analysed using TCS 2.1 and Network 5.0. Sixteen AS-VGSC haplotypes including seven haplotypes carrying non-synonymous mutations at codon 1014, and fifty-five AS-VGSC genotypes were identified from 313 mosquitoes collected from nine geographical locations across Guangxi. The number of haplotypes in each of the nine populations ranged from 5 to 13. The frequency of haplotypes carrying kdr mutations ranged from 2.7 to 80.0 % within the nine populations, of which 1014C was unexpectedly high in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggested multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis. Diverse haplotypes of AS-VGSC are distributed in Guangxi. The presence of haplotypes carrying mutations at codon 1014 indicates a risk of pyrethroid and DDT resistance. The kdr mutations show differential distribution geographically, with high frequencies occurred in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggests multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis populations

  15. Modification of radiation-induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutation frequency by tocopherol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckman, C.; Roy, R.M.; Sproule, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of supplementing culture medium with α-tocopherol acetate on the yield of sex-linked recessive lethal mutants induced by X-irradiation in mature sperm of Drosophila. Although tocopherol treatment of males had no impact on the yield of mutations, a drastic reduction in mutation frequency was observed when irradiated males were mated to females raised and subsequently maintained on tocopherol-enriched diet. (orig./MG)

  16. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  17. The observed human sperm mutation frequency cannot explain the achondroplasia paternal age effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Navidi, William; Grewal, Raji; Cohn, Dan; Eskenazi, Brenda; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Arnheim, Norman

    2002-01-01

    The lifelong spermatogonial stem cell divisions unique to male germ cell production are thought to contribute to a higher mutation frequency in males. The fact that certain de novo human genetic conditions (e.g., achondroplasia) increase in incidence with the age of the father is consistent with this idea. Although it is assumed that the paternal age effect is the result of an increasing frequency of mutant sperm as a man grows older, no direct molecular measurement of the germ-line mutation frequency has been made to confirm this hypothesis. Using sperm DNA from donors of different ages, we determined the frequency of the nucleotide substitution in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene that causes achondroplasia. Surprisingly, the magnitude of the increase in mutation frequency with age appears insufficient to explain why older fathers have a greater chance of having a child with this condition. A number of alternatives may explain this discrepancy, including selection for sperm that carry the mutation or an age-dependent increase in premutagenic lesions that remain unrepaired in sperm and are inefficiently detected by the PCR assay. PMID:12397172

  18. Survey on the frequency of somatic mutations in A-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Mitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Several methods have recently been established for quantitatively detecting somatic cell mutations on a specific locus using human blood cells. These methods have enabled the biological estimation of A-bomb radiation doses in surveys on somatic cell mutations. This paper outlines HPRT, GPA, and TCR assays used to measure somatic cell mutations, focusing on the outcome in A-bomb survivors. HPRT assay is based on colony formation with interleukin-2. The frequency of HPRT mutant cells was significantly increased with advancing age in A-bomb survivors and was positively correlated with the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes. There was also a significantly positive correlation between HPRT mutant cell frequencies and DS86 estimated doses, although the slope was slow. In GPA assay, flow cytometric measurements of fluorescence-labeled erythrocytes are used to detect somatic cell mutations. There was a positive correlation between GPA mutant cell frequencies and age in A-bomb survivors. The GPA mutant cell frequencies showed much more positive correlation with lymphocyte chromosomal aberration frequencies than the HPRT mutant cell frequencies. When anti-CD3 antibody and anti-CD4 antibody are labeled with different fluorescences and are analyzed by using flow cytometry, TCR mutant cells having CD3 - 4 + can be detected. When the frequency of TCR mutant cells was examined in 342 A-bomb survivors, it did not correlate with radiation doses. This implies that TCR assay may be unadequate for biological estimation of A-bomb radiation doses throughout a lifetime of A-bomb survivors, because TCR mutant cells seems to be unable to live for a long time due to national selection. (N.K.)

  19. High frequency of mutation G377S in Brazilian type 3 Gaucher disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rozenberg

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher disease (GD, the most prevalent lysosome storage disorder, presents an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. It is a paradigm for therapeutic intervention in medical genetics due to the existence of effective enzyme replacement therapy. We report here the analysis of GD in 262 unrelated Brazilian patients, carried out in order to establish the frequency of the most common mutations and to provide prognostic information based on genotype-phenotype correlations. Among 247 type 1 GD patients, mutation N370S was detected in 47% of all the alleles, but N370S/N370S homozygosity was found in only 10% of the patients, a much lower frequency than expected, suggesting that most individuals presenting this genotype may not receive medical attention. Recombinant alleles were detected at a high frequency: 44% of the chromosomes bearing mutation L444P had other mutations derived from the pseudogene sequence, present in 25% of patients. Three neuronopathic type 2 patients were homozygous for L444P, all presenting additional mutations (E326K or recombinant alleles that probably lead to the more severe phenotypes. Six children, classified as type 1 GD patients, had a L444P/L444P genotype, showing that neuronopathic symptoms may only manifest later in life. This would indicate the need for a higher treatment dose during enzyme replacement therapy. Finally, mutation G377S was present in 4 homozygous type 1 patients and also in compound heterozygosity in 5 (42% type 3 patients. These findings indicate that G377S cannot be unambiguously classified as mild and suggest an allele-dose effect for this mutation.

  20. Inherited and environmentally induced differences in mutation frequencies between wild strains of Sordaria fimicola from "Evolution Canyon".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B C; Saleem, M; Scott, W; Thapa, N; Nevo, E

    1998-05-01

    We have studied whether there is natural genetic variation for mutation frequencies, and whether any such variation is environment-related. Mutation frequencies differed significantly between wild strains of the fungus Sordaria fimicola isolated from a harsher or a milder microscale environment in "Evolution Canyon," Israel. Strains from the harsher, drier, south-facing slope had higher frequencies of new spontaneous mutations and of accumulated mutations than strains from the milder, lusher, north-facing slope. Collective total mutation frequencies over many loci for ascospore pigmentation were 2.3, 3.5 and 4.4% for three strains from the south-facing slope, and 0.9, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.3% for five strains from the north-facing slope. Some of this between-slope difference was inherited through two generations of selfing, with average spontaneous mutation frequencies of 1.9% for south-facing slope strains and 0.8% for north-facing slope strains. The remainder was caused by different frequencies of mutations arising in the original environments. There was also significant heritable genetic variation in mutation frequencies within slopes. Similar between-slope differences were found for ascospore germination-resistance to acriflavine, with much higher frequencies in strains from the south-facing slope. Such inherited variation provides a basis for natural selection for optimum mutation rates in each environment.

  1. C282Y and H63D Mutation Frequencies in a Population from Central Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alvarez

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the frequency of hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations, C282Y and H63D, from 125 autochthonous blood donors originating from a Central region of Spain, to provide epidemiological data about HFE gene in the Iberian Peninsula.

  2. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  3. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessendorf, Petra; Vijg, Jan; Nussenzweig, André; Digweed, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin

  4. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  5. High frequency and large deposition of acid fog on high elevation forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Manabu; Matsumura, Ko; Okochi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed fogwater on the mountainside of Mt. Oyama (1252 m) in the Tanzawa Mountains of Japan and observed the fog event frequency from the base of the mountain with a video camera. The fog event frequency increased with elevation and was observed to be present 46% of the year at the summit. The water deposition via throughfall increased with elevation because of the increase in fogwater interception and was about twice that via rain at the summit, where the air pollutant deposition via throughfall was several times that via rainwater. The dry deposition and the deposition via fogwater were dominant factors in the total ion deposition at high elevation sites. In a fog event, nitric acid, the major acid component on the mountain, is formed during the transport of the air mass from the base of the mountain along the mountainside, where gases including nitric acid deposit and are scavenged by fogwater. Therefore, high acidity caused by nitric acid and relatively low ion strength are observed in the fogwater at high elevation sites.

  6. Radio frequency-induced temperature elevations in the human head considering small anatomical structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, G.; Ueberbacher, R.; Samaras, T.

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable a detailed numerical radio frequency (RF) dosimetry and the computations of RF-induced temperature elevations, high-resolution (0.1 mm) numerical models of the human eye, the inner ear organs and the pineal gland were developed and inserted into a commercially available head model. As radiation sources, generic models of handsets at 400, 900 and 1850 MHz operating in close proximity to the head were considered. The results, obtained by finite-difference time domain-based computations, showed a highly heterogeneous specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution and SAR-peaks inside the inner ear structures; however, the corresponding RF-induced temperature elevations were well below 0.1 deg. C, when considering typical output power values of hand-held devices. In case of frontal exposure, with the radiation sources ∼2.5 cm in front of the closed eye, maximum temperature elevations in the eye in the range of ∼0.2-0.6 deg. C were found for typical device output powers. A reduction in tissue perfusion mainly affected the maximum RF-induced temperature elevation of tissues deep inside the head. Similarly, worst-case considerations regarding pulsed irradiation affected temperature elevations in deep tissue significantly more than in superficial tissues. (authors)

  7. Frequency and significance of troponin T elevation in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper K.; Kristensen, Søren R.; Bak, Søren

    2007-01-01

    Elevated levels of troponin have been reported in patients with acute ischemic stroke. In this prospective study, the prevalence and characteristics of troponin elevation were examined in 244 patients with acute ischemic stroke but without overt ischemic heart disease. Troponin T (TnT) and creatine...... for a mean of 19 +/- 7 months, with all-cause mortality as the clinical end point. Elevated levels of TnT (>0.03 micro g/L) and creatine kinase-MB (> or =10 micro g/L) were observed in 10% and 9% of patients, respectively. Patients with elevated TnT had higher frequencies of heart and/or renal failure....... Perfusion abnormalities on myocardial perfusion scintigraphy at rest were not more frequent or pronounced in patients with TnT levels of > or =0.10 micro g/L than in the control group. Only 7 patients (3%) had elevations of TnT or creatine kinase-MB and electrocardiographic changes suggesting acute...

  8. Frequency of CNKSR2 mutation in the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, John A; Burgess, Rosemary; Kivity, Sara; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Afawi, Zaid; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2017-03-01

    Synaptic proteins are critical to neuronal function in the brain, and their deficiency can lead to seizures and cognitive impairments. CNKSR2 (connector enhancer of KSR2) is a synaptic protein involved in Ras signaling-mediated neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation. Mutations in the X-linked gene CNKSR2 have been described in patients with seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits, especially those affecting language. In this study, we sequenced 112 patients with phenotypes within the epilepsy-aphasia spectrum (EAS) to determine the frequency of CNKSR2 mutation within this complex set of disorders. We detected a novel nonsense mutation (c.2314 C>T; p.Arg712*) in one Ashkenazi Jewish family, the male proband of which had a severe epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in sleep (ECSWS). His affected brother also had ECSWS with better outcome, whereas the sister had childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. This mutation segregated in the three affected siblings in an X-linked manner, inherited from their mother who had febrile seizures. Although the frequency of point mutation is low, CNKSR2 sequencing should be considered in families with suspected X-linked EAS because of the specific genetic counseling implications. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  9. High frequency of PTEN mutations in nevi and melanomas from xeroderma pigmentosum patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Taro; Wang, Yun; DiGiovanna, John J; Khan, Sikandar G; Raffeld, Mark; Beltaifa, Senda; Hornyak, Thomas J; Darling, Thomas N; Lee, Chyi-Chia R; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2014-05-01

    We examined nevi and melanomas in 10 xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients with defective DNA repair. The lesions had a lentiginous appearance with markedly increased numbers of melanocytes. Using laser capture microdissection, we performed DNA sequencing of 18 benign and atypical nevi and 75 melanomas (melanoma in situ and invasive melanomas). The nevi had a similar high frequency of PTEN mutations as melanomas [61% (11/18) versus 53% (39/73)]. Both had a very high proportion of UV-type mutations (occurring at adjacent pyrimidines) [91% (10/11) versus 92% (36/39)]. In contrast to melanomas in the general population, the frequency of BRAF mutations (11%, 7/61), NRAS mutations (21%, 13/62), and KIT mutations (21%, 6/28) in XP melanomas was lower than for PTEN. Phospho-S6 immunostaining indicated activation of the mTOR pathway in the atypical nevi and melanomas. Thus, the clinical and histological appearances and the molecular pathology of these UV-related XP nevi and melanomas were different from nevi and melanomas in the general population. © 2014 Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  10. Studies on induced mutation frequency in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don by gamma rays and EMS individually and in combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, M.; Susheelamma, B.N.; Kumar, P.; Subhash, K.

    1988-01-01

    Seeds of pink flowered (PF) and white flowered (WF) Catharanthus roseus were soaked in distilled water for 24 h and treated with gamma rays and 0.1% EMS separately and in combination. Six types of chlorophyll mutations, viz., xantha, albina, chlorina, viridis, maculata and tigrina were recovered to M 2 generation of both forms. The frequency of chlorophyll mutations was found to be dependent on the dose, of gamma rays and duration of treatment with EMS. Higher frequency of chlorophyll mutations was noticed in PF, which is mutagenically more sensitive than WF. It was also noticed that the combination treatments of gamma rays and EMS enhanced the frequency of chlorophyll mutations

  11. Frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations in young female mice induced by low dose γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Suyan; Zhang Chaoyang; Dai Lianlian; Gao Changwen

    1991-01-01

    Relationship between aneuploidy, dominant lethal mutations and doses in young feral mice induced by low dose γ-rays was examined. The results suggest that the frequencies of aneuploidy of embryos increased at 0.15 Gy, but increases at over 0.50 Gy after irradiation in groups. The frequencies of aneuploidy and dominant lethal mutations increased with increasing doses and fitted linear relationship. This dose-response relationship of trisomic was not significant. The frequency of dominant lethal mutations induced by 60 Co γ irradiation is 5.59%. The effect of dominant lethal mutation is higher than that of the aneuploidy

  12. A null mutation of Hhex results in abnormal cardiac development, defective vasculogenesis and elevated Vegfa levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallaq, Haifa; Pinter, Emese; Enciso, Josephine; McGrath, James; Zeiss, Caroline; Brueckner, Martina; Madri, Joseph; Jacobs, Harris C; Wilson, Christine M; Vasavada, Hemaxi; Jiang, Xiaobing; Bogue, Clifford W

    2004-10-01

    The homeobox gene Hhex has recently been shown to be essential for normal liver, thyroid and forebrain development. Hhex(-/-) mice die by mid-gestation (E14.5) and the cause of their early demise remains unclear. Because Hhex is expressed in the developing blood islands at E7.0 in the endothelium of the developing vasculature and heart at E9.0-9.5, and in the ventral foregut endoderm at E8.5-9.0, it has been postulated to play a critical role in heart and vascular development. We show here, for the first time, that a null mutation of Hhex results in striking abnormalities of cardiac and vascular development which include: (1) defective vasculogenesis, (2) hypoplasia of the right ventricle, (3) overabundant endocardial cushions accompanied by ventricular septal defects, outflow tract abnormalities and atrio-ventricular (AV) valve dysplasia and (4) aberrant development of the compact myocardium. The dramatic enlargement of the endocardial cushions in the absence of Hhex is due to decreased apoptosis and dysregulated epithelial-mesenchymal transformation (EMT). Interestingly, vascular endothelial growth factor A (Vegfa) levels in the hearts of Hhex(-/-) mice were elevated as much as three-fold between E9.5 and E11.5, and treatment of cultured Hhex(-/-) AV explants with truncated soluble Vegfa receptor 1, sFlt-1, an inhibitor of Vegf signaling, completely abolished the excessive epithelial-mesenchymal transformation seen in the absence of Hhex. Therefore, Hhex expression in the ventral foregut endoderm and/or the endothelium is necessary for normal cardiovascular development in vivo, and one function of Hhex is to repress Vegfa levels during development.

  13. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  14. Characterizing the Frequency and Elevation of Rapid Drainage Events in West Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, S.; Christoffersen, P.

    2016-12-01

    Rapid drainage of supraglacial lakes on the Greenland Ice Sheet is critical for the establishment of surface-to-bed hydrologic connections and the subsequent transfer of water from surface to bed. Yet, estimates of the number and spatial distribution of rapidly draining lakes vary widely due to limitations in the temporal frequency of image collection and obscureness by cloud. So far, no study has assessed the impact of these observation biases. In this study, we examine the frequency and elevation of rapidly draining lakes in central West Greenland, from 68°N to 72.6°N, and we make a robust statistical analysis to estimate more accurately the likelihood of lakes draining rapidly. Using MODIS imagery and a fully automated lake detection method, we map more than 500 supraglacial lakes per year over a 63000 km2 study area from 2000-2015. Through testing four different definitions of rapidly draining lakes from previously published studies, we find that the number of rapidly draining lakes varies from 3% to 38%. Logistic regression between rapid drainage events and image sampling frequency demonstrates that the number of rapid drainage events is strongly dependent on cloud-free observation percentage. We then develop three new drainage criteria and apply an observation bias correction that suggests a true rapid drainage probability between 36% and 45%, considerably higher than previous studies without bias assessment have reported. We find rapid-draining lakes are on average larger and disappear earlier than slow-draining lakes, and we also observe no elevation differences for the lakes detected as rapidly draining. We conclude a) that methodological problems in rapid drainage research caused by observation bias and varying detection methods have obscured large-scale rapid drainage characteristics and b) that the lack of evidence for an elevation limit on rapid drainage suggests surface-to-bed hydrologic connections may continue to propagate inland as climate warms.

  15. HFE H63D mutation frequency shows an increase in Turkish women with breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guler Emine

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hereditary hemochromatosis gene HFE plays a pivotal role in iron homeostasis. The association between cancer and HFE hetero- or homozygosity has previously been shown including hepatocellular and nonhepatocellular malignancies. This study was performed to compare frequencies of HFE C282Y and H63D variants in Turkish women with breast cancer and healthy controls. Methods Archived DNA samples of Hacettepe University Oncology Institute were used in this study. The HFE gene was investigated by PCR-RFLP. Results All subjects studied were free from C282Y mutation. Thirty-nine patients had H63D mutation and were all heterozygous. H63D allele frequency was 22.2% (39/176 in the breast cancer patients, and 14% (28/200 in the healthy volunteers. Statistical analysis of cases with HFE H63D phenotype showed significant difference between breast cancer and healthy volunteers (P = 0.02. Conclusion Our results suggest that HFE H63D mutation frequencies were increased in the breast cancer patients in comparison to those in the general population. Also, odds ratios (odds ratio = 2.05 computed in this study suggest that H63D has a positive association with breast cancer.

  16. Spectrum and frequency of chlorophyll mutations in urdbean (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) induced by EMS and gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, A.K.; Singh, V.P.; Sarma, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    In mutation breeding experiment, plants with altered characteristics such as chlorophyll changes, sterility, plant lethality etc. could be the marker of the mutability of a variety. In fact, spectrum and frequency of chlorophyll mutations have been studied in the great detail. The chlorophyll mutation is the clear-cut indication of non-directional nature of mutation and possibility of induction of useful mutations. The spectrum and frequency of chlorophyll mutation was estimated by using gamma rays (100, 200, 300 and 400 Gy doses), EMS (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8%) and combination of gamma rays (100, 200, 300 400 Gy) with 0.2 % concentration EMS on two cultivars, namely, Pant Urd-19 and Pant Urd-30 of urdbean ( Vigna mungo L. Hepper). Five different types of chlorophyll mutations viz., albina, xantha, viridis, chlorina and maculata were identified in both the cultivars. Almost all the combination treatments produced maximum frequency and wider spectrum of chlorophyll mutations followed by single treatment of gamma rays or EMS. The frequency of chlorophyll mutation increased with higher doses of mutagens but decreased at highest dose. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. India. 76(8), I, 2006. 64-68. (author)

  17. Resonant frequencies in an elevated spherical container partially filled with water: FEM and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curadelli, O.; Ambrosini, D.; Mirasso, A.; Amani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a numerical-experimental study of the overall dynamical response of elevated spherical tanks subjected to horizontal base motion is presented. The main objective is to gain insight in the physical response of this particular structural typology widely used in the petrochemical industry as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) containers. In order to identify the natural frequencies of the modes that mainly contribute to the response, experimental free vibration tests on an elevated spherical tank model for different liquid levels were carried out. Next, a numerical model that takes into account the coupling between fluid and structure was developed and validated against the experimental results. A very good agreement between experimental and numerical results was obtained. The results obtained show the influence of liquid levels on natural frequencies and indicate that the sloshing has a significant effect on the dynamical characteristics of the analyzed system. In order to obtain a good representation of the overall dynamical behaviour of the system by means of a simplified lumped mass model, a minimum of three masses is suggested. Finally, appropriate names of these three masses are proposed in the present paper.

  18. Frequency of p53 Gene Mutation and Protein Expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ara, N.; Atique, M.; Ahmed, S.; Bukhari, S. G. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of p53 gene mutation and protein expression in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) and to establish correlation between the two. Study Design: Analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Histopathology Department and Molecular Biology Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi, from May 2010 to May 2011. Methodology: Thirty diagnosed cases of OSCC were selected by consecutive sampling. Seventeen were retrieved from the record files of the AFIP, and 13 fresh/frozen sections were selected from patients reporting to the Oral Surgery Department, Armed Forces Institute of Dentistry (AFID). Gene p53 mutation was analyzed in all the cases using PCRSSCP analysis. DNA was extracted from the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections and fresh/frozen sections. DNA thus extracted was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. The amplified products were denatured and finally analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Gene mutation was detected as electrophoretic mobility shift. The immunohistochemical marker p53 was applied to the same 30 cases and overexpression of protein p53 was recorded. Results: Immunohistochemical expression of marker p53 was positive in 67% (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 48.7 - 80.9) of the cases. Mutations of the p53 gene were detected in 23% (95% CI 11.5 - 41.2) of the OSCC. No statistically significant correlation was found between p53 gene mutation and protein p53 expression (rs = - 0.057, p = 0.765). Conclusion: A substantial number of patients have p53 gene mutation (23%) and protein p53 expression (67%) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). (author)

  19. Frequency of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Smokers with Lung Cancer Without Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Ito-Nishii, Shizuka; Izumi, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Touge, Hirokazu; Kodani, Masahiro; Makino, Haruhiko; Yanai, Masaaki; Tanaka, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Araki, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a smoking-related disease, and is categorized into the emphysema and airway dominant phenotypes. We examined the relationship between emphysematous changes and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The medical records for 250 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were categorized into the emphysema or non-emphysema group. Wild-type EGFR was detected in 136 (54%) and mutant EGFR in 48 (19%). Emphysematous changes were observed in 87 (36%) patients. EGFR mutation was highly frequent in the non-emphysema group (p=0.0014). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that emphysema was an independent risk factor for reduced frequency of EGFR mutation (Odds Ratio=3.47, p=0.005). Our data showed a relationship between emphysematous changes and EGFR mutation status. There might be mutually exclusive genetic risk factors for carcinogenesis and development of emphysematous changes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Low frequency of c-MPL gene mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotaslou, A; Nadali, F; Chahardouli, B; Alizad Ghandforosh, N; Rostami, S H; Alimoghaddam, K; Ghavamzadeh, A

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative disorders are a group of diseases characterized by increased proliferation of myeloid lineage. In addition to JAK2V617F mutation, several mutations in the c-MPL gene have been reported in patients with philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders that could be important in the pathogenesis of diseases. The aim of the present study was to investigate the frequency of c-MPL and JAK2V617F mutations in Iranian patients with Philadelphia-negativemyeloproliferative disorders. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 60 patients with Philadelphia-negative MPD) Subgroups ET and PMF) and 25 healthy subjects as control group. The mutation status of c-MPL and Jak2V617F were investigated by using Amplification-refractory mutation system (ARMS) and Allele-Specific PCR (AS-PCR), respectively. The results were confirmed by sequencing. Among 60 patients, 34 (56.6%) and 1(1.7%) had Jak2V617F and c-MPL mutation, respectively. Patients with Jak2V617F mutation had higher WBC counts and hemoglobin concentration than those without the mutation (p= 0.005, p=0.003). In addition, for all healthy subjects in control group, mutations were negative. The present study revealed that the c-MPL mutations unlike the Jak2V617F mutations are rare in Iranian patients with Ph-negative MPNs and the low mutation rate should be considered in the design of screening strategies of MPD patients.

  1. Frequency of CHEK2 mutations in a population based, case–control study of breast cancer in young women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichsen, Danielle M; Malone, Kathleen E; Doody, David R; Daling, Janet R; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2004-01-01

    The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase (CHEK)2 protein truncating mutation 1100delC has been associated with increased risk for breast or prostate cancer. Multiple studies have found an elevated frequency of the 1100delC variant in specific stratifications of breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease, including BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families and families with a history of bilateral disease or male breast cancer. However, the 1100delC mutation has only been investigated in a few population-based studies and none from North America. We report here on the frequency of three CHEK2 variants that alter protein function – 1100delC, R145W, and I175T – in 506 cases and 459 controls from a population based, case–control study of breast cancer conducted in young women from western Washington. There was a suggestive enrichment in the 1100delC variant in the cases (1.2%) as compared with the controls (0.4%), but this was based on small numbers of carriers and the differences were not statistically significant. The 1100delC variant was more frequent in cases with a first-degree family history of breast cancer (4.3%; P = 0.02) and slightly enriched in cases with a family history of ovarian cancer (4.4%; P = 0.09). The CHEK2 variants are rare in the western Washington population and, based on accumulated evidence across studies, are unlikely to be major breast cancer susceptibility genes. Thus, screening for the 1100delC variant may have limited usefulness in breast cancer prevention programs in the USA

  2. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  3. HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations frequency in the Transylvania region, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifa, Adrian P; Popp, Radu A; Militaru, Mariela S; Farcaş, Marius F; Crişan, Tania O; Gana, Ionuţ; Cucuianu, Andrei; Pop, Ioan V

    2012-06-01

    HFE-associated haemochromatosis is one of the most frequent autosomal recessive disorders in the Caucasian population. Although most of the cases are homozygous individuals for the C282Y mutation, another two mutations, H63D and S65C, have been reported to be associated with milder forms of the disease. This study was a first attempt to evaluate the distribution of these HFE gene mutations in the Transylvania region. Two-hundred and twenty-five healthy, unrelated volunteers originating from the Transylvania region, Romania, were screened for the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations, using molecular genetics assays (Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragments Length Polymorphism). For the C282Y mutation, 7 heterozygotes (3.1%) were found, but no homozygous individual. In the case of the H63D mutation, 40 heterozygotes (17.8%) and 4 homozygotes (1.75%) for the mutant allele were evidenced. We found a compound heterozygous genotype (C282Y/H63D) in one individual (0.45%). Thus, the allele frequencies of the C282Y and H63D were 1.75% and 10.9%, respectively. Three individuals (1.3%) were found to harbour the S65C mutation in a heterozygous state, but none in a homozygous state: the allele frequency of the mutant allele was 0.75%. The distribution of the HFE gene C282Y, H63D and S65C mutations found in our group matches the tendencies observed in other European countries: a decreasing gradient from Northern to Southern Europe for the C282Y mutation; high frequency for the H63D mutation, and low frequency for the S65C mutation in most of the countries.

  4. Frequency of diarrhoea as a predictor of elevated blood pressure in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Juan Jaime; Davies, Alisha R.; Smith, George Davey; Smeeth, Liam; Cabrera, Lilia; Gilman, Robert H.; García, Héctor H.; Ortega, Ynes R.; Cama, Vitaliano A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Diarrhoeal illness is a major public health problem for children worldwide, particularly among developing countries, and is a proxy condition for severe dehydration. It has been hypothesized that severe dehydration in the first 6 months of life could be associated with increased blood pressure later in life. This study aimed to explore whether frequency of diarrhoea is associated with elevated blood pressure in children in a setting with a high incidence of diarrhoeal disease. Methods The present study is a cross-sectional study of blood pressure among children from a longitudinal child diarrhoeal disease cohort in Lima, Peru. From 2001 to 2006, daily diarrhoeal surveillance was made. Children were revisited in 2006 and blood pressure was measured. Diarrhoeal exposures were evaluated in terms of total number of diarrhoea days, number of episodes of diarrhoea, persistent diarrhoeal episodes and by the quartiles of daily incidence and episode incidence of diarrhoea. Results The overall incidence of diarrhoeal episodes at age under 1 year was 4.35 (95% confidence interval: 3.79-4.98) and under 5 years was 2.80 (95% confidence interval: 2.69-2.92). No association was observed between the total number of diarrhoeal days, diarrhoeal episodes or diarrhoeal incidence rates with childhood blood pressure. There was weak evidence that hospital admission due to severe dehydration in the first year of life showed a gradient towards an increase in both, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Conclusion In the first study to date to examine the association in a setting with a high incidence of diarrhoeal disease, diarrhoeal frequency did not show an association with increased blood pressure. Our observations of elevated levels of blood pressure among those admitted into hospitals in the first year of life are in line with the original hypothesis of dehydration in early infancy and high blood pressure. However, the effect of episodes of severe dehydration on later blood

  5. Frequency of left ventricular thrombus after anterior wall st-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, M.W.; Fayyaz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular thrombus (LVT) formation is a well known complication seen in patients presenting with acute anterior wall ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). In previous studies the incidence of this complication, after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been reported to be 4% to 60% in large anterior wall STEMI, depending significantly upon the method as well as time of reperfusion therapy after STEMI. Objective: The objective of this descriptive case series study was to evaluate the frequency of left ventricular thrombus formation in patients after acute anterior wall ST-Segment elevation myocardial infarction. Methodology: In this study, 100 patients with anterior wall STEMI presenting to cardiac emergency or coronary care unit (CCU) of Cardiac complex, Gulab Devi Hospital, were selected on non-probability, purposive sampling meeting inclusion criteria, after taking written informed consent. All the patients were treated initially for management of acute STEMI, including use of thrombolytics where indicated. 2-D Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) was performed during the same admission to assess presence of LV thrombus (LVT). Results: The mean age of the patients was 54.3 +- 11.4 years. There were 84(84%) male patients and 16 (16%) female patients. LVT was present in 28 (28%) patients on TTE. Among those, there were 23 (82.1%) male and 5 (17.9%) female patients. However, out of 84 male patients 27.4% develop LVT and among 16 female patients this ratio was 31.3%. The LV thrombus was independent of age and gender. LV thrombus was significantly less in thrombolytic group as compared to those who were not given this therapy, i.e. p value <0.05. Conclusion: Patients with anterior wall acute STEMI not infrequently develop the complication of development of LV thrombus. In this study the frequency of LV thrombus formation after anterior wall acute STEMI was 28%. (author)

  6. Frequency and spectrum of hemoglobinopathy mutations in a Uruguayan pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Da Luz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are the most common recessive diseases worldwide but their prevalence in Uruguay has not been investigated. In this study, 397 unrelated outpatient children from the Pereira Rosell Hospital Center (CHPR, as well as 31 selected patients with microcytic anemia and 28 β-thalassemia carriers were analyzed for hemoglobinopathies by using biochemical and molecular biology methods. Parametric and non-parametric methods were used to compare the hematological indices between groups of genotypes. Of the 397 patients in the first group, approximately 1% (0.76% HbS and 0.25% β-thalassemia had a mutation in the HBB gene and 3.3% had α-thalassemia. These mutations had a heterogeneous distribution that varied according to individual ancestry. HbS was found exclusively in individuals with declared African ancestry and had a carrier frequency of 2.2%. The frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in outpatients of European and African ancestry was 1.2% and 6.5%, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in patients with microcytic anemia was 25.8%, significantly higher (p < 0.01 than that observed in the sample as a whole and in Afro-descendants and Euro-descendants. Significant differences were observed in the hematological parameters between individuals with thalassemia genotypes and those with a normal genotype. These results indicate that hemoglobinopathies are a relevant health problem in Uruguay.

  7. The Frequency and Type of K-RAS Mutations in Mexican Patients With Colorectal Cancer: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Ramos, Susana G; Alcázar-González, Gregorio; Reyes-Cortés, Luisa M; Torres-Grimaldo, Abdiel A; Calderón-Garcidueñas, Ana L; Morales-Casas, José; Flores-Sánchez, Patricia; De León-Escobedo, Raúl; Gómez-Díaz, Antonio; Moreno-Bringas, Carmen; Sánchez-Guillén, Jorge; Ramos-Salazar, Pedro; González-de León, César; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2017-06-01

    Current metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) therapy uses monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor. This treatment is only useful in the absence of K-RAS gene mutations; therefore the study of such mutations is part of a personalized treatment. The aim of this work is to determine the frequency and type of the most common K-RAS mutations in Mexican patients with metastatic disease by nucleotide sequencing. We studied 888 patients with mCRC from different regions of Mexico. The presence of mutations in exon 2, codons 12 and 13, of the K-RAS gene was determined by nucleotide sequencing. Patients exhibited K-RAS gene mutations in 35% (310/888) of cases. Mutation frequency of codons 12 and 13 was 71% (221/310) and 29% (89/310), respectively. The most common mutation (45.7%) in codon 12 was c.35G>A (p.G12D), whereas the one in codon 13 was c.38G>A (p.G13D) (78.7%). Given the frequency of K-RAS mutations in Mexicans, making a genetic study before deciding to treat mCRC patients with monoclonal antibodies is indispensable.

  8. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-04-09

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein.

  9. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein

  10. Mutation frequencies of the cytochrome CYP2D6 gene in Parkinson disease patients and in families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; Turpin, J.C. [CHR, Reims (France); Gerard, N. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    The frequencies of five mutations of the debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) gene (mutations D6-A, B, C, D, and T), corresponding to poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes, were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients with Parkinson disease, and compared with the findings in 47 healthy controls. These mutant alleles were about twice as frequent among patients as in controls, with an approximate relative risk ratio of 2.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.62). There seem to be no significant differences in frequencies of mutant genotypes in patients among gender and modalities of response with levodopa therapy; but frequency of the mutations was slightly enhanced after age-at-onset of 60 years. Mutations D6-B, D, and T were detected in 7 patients belonging to 10 Parkinson pedigrees. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Mutation frequency and genotype/phenotype correlation among phenylketonuria patients from Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.L.C.; Martinez, D.; Kuozmine, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). To determine the molecular basis of PKU in the state of Georgia, thirty-five Georgian PKU patients representing sixty independent alleles were examined by a combination of DGGE and direct sequence analysis. At present, this approach has led to the identification of 55/60 or about 92% of all mutant alleles. The relatively high frequencies of mutations common to the British Isles (R408W, I65T and L348V) are compatible with 1990 census data showing that 34% of the general Georgian population claim Irish, English or Scottish ancestors. Three new mutations, E76A (1/60), R241L (2/60), and R400R (2/60), were also detected in this study. Although the nucleotide substitution in codon 400 (AGG{r_arrow}CGG) did not change the amino acid sequence, it was the only base change detected in a scan of all 13 exons of two independent alleles. Since codon 400 is split between exons 11 and 12, this change may exert some effect on splicing, as has previously been seen in the PAH gene for the silent mutation Q304Q and the nonsense mutation Y356X, each of which effect codons immediately adjacent to splicing signals. This hypothesis remains to be tested by expression analysis or studies of ectopic transcripts. The remaining 19 characterized alleles contained one of 15 previously identified mutations. Twenty-five of the thirty non-related patients examined in this study were completely genotyped, and there was a strong correlation between mutant PAH genotype, PAH activity predicted from in vitro expression studies where known, and PKU or HPA phenotype. For mutations not yet studied by expression analysis, this correlation suggests that L213P, R241L, Y277D may drastically reduce residual PAH activity while F39L and E76A may retain significant amounts of PAH activity.

  12. Frequency and clinical features of the JAK2 V617F mutation in pediatric patients with sporadic essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Takuya; Imamura, Toshihiko; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Wakaizumi, Katsuji; Yamamoto, Tohru; Otabe, Osamu; Ishigami, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Souichi; Morimoto, Akira

    2008-12-01

    Pediatric essential thrombocythemia (ET) is a rare and heterogenous disease entity. While several recent studies have focused on the role of the JAK2 V617F mutation in pediatric ET, the frequency of pediatric ET cases with this mutation and the associated clinical features remain unclear. We examined six childhood cases who had been diagnosed with ET according to WHO criteria (onset age: 0.2-14 years) for the presence of the JAK2 V617F mutation, MPLW515L mutation and JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Two sensitive PCR-based methods were used for the JAK2 V617F genotyping. We also examined the expression of polycythemia rubra vera-1 (PRV-1), which is a diagnostic marker for clonal ET. We found that three of the six cases had the JAK2 V617F mutation and that all six cases expressed PRV-1 in their peripheral granulocytes. Neither MPL W515L mutation nor JAK2 exon 12 mutations was detected in the patients without JAK2 V617F mutation. The two patients who developed thrombocythemia during infancy were JAK2 V617F-negative. These findings suggest that the JAK2 V617F mutation is not rare in childhood sporadic ET cases, and that these cases might be older and myeloproliferative features.

  13. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . METHODS: We used a real-time PCR based method to determine KRAS mutations in 136 colorectal cancers with mutations identified in 53 (39%) tumors. RESULTS: KRAS mutations were significantly more often found in rectal cancer (21/38, 55%) than in colon cancer (32/98, 33%) (P = 0.02). This finding...... was explained by marked differences mutation rates in female patients who showed mutations in 33% of the colon cancers and in 67% of the rectal cancers (P = 0.01). Concurrent KRAS mutations were identified in three tumors; two colorectal cancers harbored Gly12Asp/Gly13Asp and Gly12Cys/Gly13Asp and a third tumor...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti...

  14. Detection of MPLW515L/K mutations and determination of allele frequencies with a single-tube PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Araki, Marito; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Hironaka, Yumi; Noda, Naohiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2014-01-01

    A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL) gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system)-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5%) of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  15. Detection of MPLW515L/K mutations and determination of allele frequencies with a single-tube PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takei

    Full Text Available A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5% of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  16. High Frequency of Alkaptonuria in Slovakia: Evidence for the Appearance of Multiple Mutations in HGO Involving Different Mutational Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatková, Andrea; de Bernabé, Daniel Beltrán Valero; Poláková, Helena; Zvarík, Marek; Feráková, Eva; Bošák, Vladimir; Ferák, Vladimír; Kádasi, L'udovít; de Córdoba , Santiago Rodríguez

    2000-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of homogentisate 1,2 dioxygenase (HGO) activity. AKU shows a very low prevalence (1:100,000–250,000) in most ethnic groups. One notable exception is in Slovakia, where the incidence of AKU rises to 1:19,000. This high incidence is difficult to explain by a classical founder effect, because as many as 10 different AKU mutations have been identified in this relatively small country. We have determined the allelic associations of 11 HGO intragenic polymorphisms for 44 AKU chromosomes from 20 Slovak pedigrees. These data were compared to the HGO haplotype data available in our laboratory for >80 AKU chromosomes from different European and non-European countries. The results show that common European AKU chromosomes have had only a marginal contribution to the Slovak AKU gene pool. Six of the ten Slovak AKU mutations, including the prevalent G152fs, G161R, G270R, and P370fs mutations, most likely originated in Slovakia. Data available for 17 Slovak AKU pedigrees indicate that most of the AKU chromosomes have their origins in a single very small region in the Carpathian mountains, in the northwestern part of the country. Since all six Slovak AKU mutations are associated with HGO mutational hot spots, we suggest that an increased mutation rate at the HGO gene is responsible for the clustering of AKU mutations in such a small geographical region. PMID:11017803

  17. Comparison of somatic mutation frequencies at HGPRT locus induced by radiation and chemical pollutant from energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Honglan; Cao Yi; Duan Zhikai; Wu Qiqing; Chen Ying; Zhang Shuxian

    1998-12-01

    The somatic induction frequencies of mutation at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus induced by 60 Co γ-rays and Benzo-a-pyrene (B(a)P), which are representative of hazardous emission and pollutant from nuclear energy cycle and fossil-fuelled energy cycle respectively, were detected by using forward mutation assay and cloning technique in both V 79 Chinese hamster cells and human peripheral blood T-lymphocytes. Resistant mutants were selected with 6-thioguanine (6-TG). Dose-response curves and mathematical expressions were obtained for mutation frequencies and survival following γ-ray and B(a)P(+S 9 ) treatments. The dose ranges for the two mutagens were compared when they induced the same mutation frequencies. In V 79 /HGPRT assay system, when the mutation frequencies were 5∼35 mutants/10 6 cells the response of γ-rays in the dose range from 0.93∼4.96 Gy at dose rate of 1.16 Gy/min is nearly equivalent to that in the B(a)P dose range from 0.52∼4.27 μg/ml. By using cloning technique in T-lymphocytes, when the mutation frequencies were 1∼14 mutants/10 5 cells the response of γ-rays in the dose range from 0.05∼4.77 Gy at dose rate of 1.03 Gy/min is nearly equivalent to that in the B(a)P dose range from 0.15∼7.36 μg/ml. When the survival fraction is 37%, the mutation frequency induced by B(a)P is higher than that induced by 60 Co γ-rays

  18. Characterization of a mutant of Escherichia coli B/R defective in mutation frequency decline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, D.L.

    1974-01-01

    A mutant of Escherichia coli B/r designated mfd is very deficient in the ability to exhibit mutation frequency decline (MFD), the characteristic loss of potential suppressor mutations which occurs when protein synthesis is briefly inhibited after irradiation with ultraviolet light (uv). This mutant is known to excise pyrimidine dimers very slowly, although it is as uv-resistant as its mfd + B/r parent strain. We have found that the mfd mutant performs the initial incision step of excision repair normally, but repairs the resulting single-strand breaks much more slowly than the mfd + strain. In spite of the slow dimer excision in the mfd mutant, single-strand DNA breaks do not accumulate during postirradiation incubation, implying that incision and excision are well corrdinated. the prolonged postirradiation lag in cell division and DNA synthesis which accompany slow excision in the mfd strain indicates that resumption of these processes of optimal rates is linked to the timing of excision repair. The normal uv-resistance of the mfd mutant also suggests such coordination and shows that the rate of excision repair is independent of its ultimate efficiency in the removal of potentially lethal uv-induced damage. (U.S.)

  19. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, G L; Murphy, S M; Polke, J M; Laura, M; Salih, M A M; Muntoni, F; Blake, J; Brandner, S; Davies, N; Horvath, R; Price, S; Donaghy, M; Roberts, M; Foulds, N; Ramdharry, G; Soler, D; Lunn, M P; Manji, H; Davis, M B; Houlden, H; Reilly, M M

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  20. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, G L

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  1. Microsatellite frequencies vary with body mass and body temperature in mammals, suggesting correlated variation in mutation rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Amos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Substitution rate is often found to correlate with life history traits such as body mass, a predictor of population size and longevity, and body temperature. The underlying mechanism is unclear but most models invoke either natural selection or factors such as generation length that change the number of mutation opportunities per unit time. Here we use published genome sequences from 69 mammals to ask whether life history traits impact another form of genetic mutation, the high rates of predominantly neutral slippage in microsatellites. We find that the length-frequency distributions of three common dinucleotide motifs differ greatly between even closely related species. These frequency differences correlate with body mass and body temperature and can be used to predict the phenotype of an unknown species. Importantly, different length microsatellites show complicated patterns of excess and deficit that cannot be explained by a simple model where species with short generation lengths have experienced more mutations. Instead, the patterns probably require changes in mutation rate that impact alleles of different length to different extents. Body temperature plausibly influences mutation rate by modulating the propensity for slippage. Existing hypotheses struggle to account for a link between body mass and mutation rate. However, body mass correlates inversely with population size, which in turn predicts heterozygosity. We suggest that heterozygote instability, HI, the idea that heterozygous sites show increased mutability, could provide a plausible link between body mass and mutation rate.

  2. The spectrum of HNF1A gene mutations in Greek patients with MODY3: relative frequency and identification of seven novel germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Vazeou-Gerassimidi, Adriani; Chrysis, Dionysios; Delis, Dimitrios; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine; Chrousos, George P; Sertedaki, Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is the most common type of monogenic diabetes accounting for 1-2% of the population with diabetes. The relative incidence of HNF1A-MODY (MODY3) is high in European countries; however, data are not available for the Greek population. The aims of this study were to determine the relative frequency of MODY3 in Greece, the type of the mutations observed, and their relation to the phenotype of the patients. Three hundred ninety-five patients were referred to our center because of suspected MODY during a period of 15 yr. The use of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA revealed 72 patients carrying Glucokinase gene mutations (MODY2) and 8 patients carrying HNF1A gene mutations (MODY3). After using strict criteria, 54 patients were selected to be further evaluated by direct sequencing or by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) for the presence of HNF1A gene mutations. In 16 unrelated patients and 13 of their relatives, 15 mutations were identified in the HNF1A gene. Eight of these mutations were previously reported, whereas seven were novel. Clinical features, such as age of diabetes at diagnosis or severity of hyperglycemia, were not related to the mutation type or location. In our cohort of patients fulfilling strict clinical criteria for MODY, 12% carried an HNF1A gene mutation, suggesting that defects of this gene are responsible for a significant proportion of monogenic diabetes in the Greek population. No clear phenotype-genotype correlations were identified. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The role of human demographic history in determining the distribution and frequency of transferase-deficient galactosaemia mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, J M

    2010-02-01

    Classical or transferase-deficient galactosaemia is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by mutation in the human Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. Of some 170 causative mutations reported, fewer than 10% are observed in more than one geographic region or ethnic group. To better understand the population history of the common GALT mutations, we have established a haplotyping system for the GALT locus incorporating eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and three short tandem repeat markers. We analysed haplotypes associated with the three most frequent GALT gene mutations, Q188R, K285N and Duarte-2 (D2), and estimated their age. Haplotype diversity, in conjunction with measures of genetic diversity and of linkage disequilibrium, indicated that Q188R and K285N are European mutations. The Q188R mutation arose in central Europe within the last 20 000 years, with its observed east-west cline of increasing relative allele frequency possibly being due to population expansion during the re-colonization of Europe by Homo sapiens in the Mesolithic age. K285N was found to be a younger mutation that originated in Eastern Europe and is probably more geographically restricted as it arose after all major European population expansions. The D2 variant was found to be an ancient mutation that originated before the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  4. The allele-frequency spectrum in a decoupled Moran model with mutation, drift, and directional selection, assuming small mutation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Clemente, Florian

    2012-05-01

    We analyze a decoupled Moran model with haploid population size N, a biallelic locus under mutation and drift with scaled forward and backward mutation rates θ(1)=μ(1)N and θ(0)=μ(0)N, and directional selection with scaled strength γ=sN. With small scaled mutation rates θ(0) and θ(1), which is appropriate for single nucleotide polymorphism data in highly recombining regions, we derive a simple approximate equilibrium distribution for polymorphic alleles with a constant of proportionality. We also put forth an even simpler model, where all mutations originate from monomorphic states. Using this model we derive the sojourn times, conditional on the ancestral and fixed allele, and under equilibrium the distributions of fixed and polymorphic alleles and fixation rates. Furthermore, we also derive the distribution of small samples in the diffusion limit and provide convenient recurrence relations for calculating this distribution. This enables us to give formulas analogous to the Ewens-Watterson estimator of θ for biased mutation rates and selection. We apply this theory to a polymorphism dataset of fourfold degenerate sites in Drosophila melanogaster. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The frequency pattern of dumpy mutations induced by x-rays in the successive stages of oocytes of Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Tomio; Nakao, Yoshio

    1978-01-01

    The frequency patterns of the different kinds of dumpy mutations induced by x-rays (1,500 and 3,000R) in the successive stages of oocyte development were investigated by transferring the inseminated females daily to fresh vials for 12 days. Under this transferring procedure, the first egg-laying period represents oocytes irradiated when they are at stage 14, and the subsequent ones represent progressively earlier stages of oocyte development at the time of irradiation. The results obtained indicate that (1) the overall yield of complete dumpy mutations recovered in the first six day egg-laying periods (1st-6th day) are relatively higher than that in the subsequent six day periods (7th-12th day), showing a response pattern with a higher mutation frequency in the early egg-laying periods and a lower frequency in the late egg-laying periods; (2) the frequency patterns for the exceptions of the ol and lv types and those of ov and olv types through the sampling periods are practically similar to those observed in the total dumpy mutations; (3) a somewhat peculiar frequency pattern, which seems to be variable by dose, is found in the yield of the o and v exceptions. At the exposure level of 1,500R, no definite difference in response pattern for these exceptions is found, though a response pattern which is practically similar to that observed in the total dumpy mutations is found at the exposure level of 3,000R. The foregoing findings seem to indicate that the different kinds of dumpy exceptions are affected at various degrees by the difference in the cell stages of oocyte. This may possibly suggest that these exceptions are different from each other in the nature of their mutations, that is to say, whether they are associated with chromosome breakage events or not. (auth.)

  6. [Mutational frequencies in usherin(USH2A gene) in 26 Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Greizy; Gelvez, Nancy Yaneth; Tamayo, Martalucía

    2011-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a disorder characterized by progressive retinitis pigmentosa, prelingual sensory hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction. It is the most frequent cause of deaf-blindness in humans. Three clinical types and twelve genetic subtypes have been characterized. Type II is the most common, and among these cases, nearly 80% have mutations in the USH2A gene. The aim of the study was to establish the mutational frequencies for the short isoform of USH2A gene in Usher syndrome type II. Twenty-six Colombian individuals with Usher syndrome type II were included. SSCP analysis for 20 exons of the short isoform was performed and abnormal patterns were sequenced. Sequencing of exon 13 of the USH2A gene was performed for all the individuals because the most frequent mutation is located in this exon. The most frequent mutation was c.2299delG, identified in the 27% (n=8) of the sample. The second mutation, p.R334W, showed a frequency of 15%. A new variant identified in the 5’UTR region, g.129G>T, was present in 1 individual (4%). Four polymorphisms were identified; one of them is a new deletion in exon 20, first reported in this study. Mutations in the usherin short isoform were identified in 38% of a sample of 26 USH2 cases. Molecular diagnosis was established in 7 of the 26.

  7. The homozygous VHL(D126N) missense mutation is associated with dramatically elevated erythropoietin levels, consequent polycythemia, and early onset severe pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Susmita; Lanikova, Lucie; Kapralova, Katarina; Acharya, Suchitra; Swierczek, Sabina; Lipton, Jeffrey M; Wolfe, Lawrence; Prchal, Josef T

    2014-11-01

    von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein is the principal negative regulator of hypoxia sensing mediated by transcription factors. Mutations in exon 3 of the VHL gene lead to Chuvash (VHL(R200W)) and Croatian (VHL(H191D)) polycythemias. Here, we describe an infant of Bangladesh ethnicity with a novel homozygous VHL(D126N) mutation with congenital polycythemia and dramatically elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, who developed severe fatal pulmonary hypertension. In contrast to Chuvash polycythemia, erythroid progenitors (BFU-Es) did not reveal a marked EPO hypersensitivity. Further, NF-E2 and RUNX1 transcripts that correlate with BFU-Es EPO hypersensitivity in polycythemic mutations were not elevated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll-deficient mutations in rice after treatment with radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, A.K.; Kaul, M.L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Three varieties of rice were treated with gamma rays and two alkylating agents EMS and DES, separately and in combinations, with a view to finding out the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in relation to the genotype and the nature of the mutagen. Chlorophyll mutation frequency was enhanced with increasing dose but dropped at very high doses (doses that induced over 90% seeding lethality in M 1 ). The fall was attributed to either the increased mutated sector and diplontic selection after exposure to very high doses or relatively high resistance of some of the seeds. Among chlorophyll mutants in M 2 induced by radiations as well as alkylating agents, the albina type formed the majority class. EMS induced a significantly higher proportion of albinas than did gamma rays

  9. Modifying effect of 5-fluoro-2-deoxiuridine on the frequency of x-ray-induced visible mutations in wheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azatyan, R.A.; Avakyan, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    A modifying effect of FUDR on the output of visible mutations induced by X-ray radiation has been studied at soft fall wheat (Tr. aestivum var. turcicum). It is shown that at X-ray radiation of dry seeds with subsequent treatment of FUDR increased is the mutant percent in M 3 which has constituted 0.61% at irradiation in dose of 100 Gy ad 1.03% at irradiation by the same dose and FUDR influence during 10 hours. In analogous variants at irradiation by 150 Gi dose the mutation frequency reached 1.47 and 2.07% respectively. It is shown that FUDR postradiation treatment promotes not only the increase of frequency but consderablly widens the spectrum of induced mutations. A supposition is made that FUDR modyfying effect is caused by DNA synthesis inhibition. A problem is discussed on a possible realization of potential DNA changes caused by irradiation, at additional influence of inhibitor

  10. The use of ionospheric tomography and elevation masks to reduce the overall error in single-frequency GPS timing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Julian A. R.; Tong, Jenna R.; Allain, Damien J.; Mitchell, Cathryn N.

    2011-01-01

    Signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites at the horizon or at low elevations are often excluded from a GPS solution because they experience considerable ionospheric delays and multipath effects. Their exclusion can degrade the overall satellite geometry for the calculations, resulting in greater errors; an effect known as the Dilution of Precision (DOP). In contrast, signals from high elevation satellites experience less ionospheric delays and multipath effects. The aim is to find a balance in the choice of elevation mask, to reduce the propagation delays and multipath whilst maintaining good satellite geometry, and to use tomography to correct for the ionosphere and thus improve single-frequency GPS timing accuracy. GPS data, collected from a global network of dual-frequency GPS receivers, have been used to produce four GPS timing solutions, each with a different ionospheric compensation technique. One solution uses a 4D tomographic algorithm, Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System (MIDAS), to compensate for the ionospheric delay. Maps of ionospheric electron density are produced and used to correct the single-frequency pseudorange observations. This method is compared to a dual-frequency solution and two other single-frequency solutions: one does not include any ionospheric compensation and the other uses the broadcast Klobuchar model. Data from the solar maximum year 2002 and October 2003 have been investigated to display results when the ionospheric delays are large and variable. The study focuses on Europe and results are produced for the chosen test site, VILL (Villafranca, Spain). The effects of excluding all of the GPS satellites below various elevation masks, ranging from 5° to 40°, on timing solutions for fixed (static) and mobile (moving) situations are presented. The greatest timing accuracies when using the fixed GPS receiver technique are obtained by using a 40° mask, rather than a 5° mask. The mobile GPS timing solutions are most

  11. Mutagenic effects of gamma rays and EMS on frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in urdbean (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usharani, K.S.; Ananda Kumar, C.R.

    2015-01-01

    Chlorophyll mutations act as a significant index in the judgment of induced genetic variations in mutagen treated populations. Different types of chlorophyll mutation have been observed in various crop plants. In the current study, the effect of different concentrations (40 kR, 50 kR and 60 kR) of gamma rays, Ethyl Methane Sulphonate (50 mM, 60 mM and 70 mM) in single and combination dose/concentration on the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutation and the effect of VBN 4 urdbean variety to such irradiation dose was observed. Results showed induction of broad spectrum of chlorophyll mutations which included albina, xantha, chlorina and viridis. Among these chlorina type was predominant in all the mutagenic treatments. The albina type of chlorophyll mutants occurred very rarely and was found only at 60 mM of EMS treatment and at 40 kR + 50 mM, 60 kR + 70 mM of combination treatments. Based on the chlorophyll mutation frequency, gamma rays were most effective followed by EMS and combination of treatments. (author)

  12. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Takata, R.I.; Rapaport, D.; Bakker, E.; Kneppers, A.L.J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Ommen, J.B. van

    1992-11-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly the authors observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved germ line' mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases they are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases (ratio 1:1). The authors conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, the findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a [open quote]proximal[close quote] new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a [open quote]distal[close quote] new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Effect of dose-rate on the frequency of X-linked lethal mutation in the nematode Panagrellus redivivus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.

    1984-01-01

    A total X-ray dose of 50 Gy was applied to the nematode Panagrellus redivivus using dose-rates ranging from 0.23 Gy/min to 10.49 Gy/min, and the frequency of lethal X-chromosomes was determined. This frequency ranged from approximately 1.6% at the lower dose-rate to 4.3% at the highest dose-rate, indicating a dose-rate dependency of mutation frequency in the spermatogonia and oogonia of this organism. (orig.)

  14. WFS1 and non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss: a novel mutation in a Portuguese case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A C; Matos, T D; Simões-Teixeira, H R; Pimenta Machado, M; Simão, M; Dias, O P; Andrea, M; Fialho, G; Caria, H

    2014-04-01

    Low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) is an unusual type of HL in which frequencies at 2,000 Hz and below are predominantly affected. Most of the families with LFSNHL carry missense mutations in WFS1 gene, coding for wolframin. A Portuguese patient aged 49, reporting HL since her third decade of life, and also referring tinnitus, was shown to display bilateral moderate LFSNHL after audiological evaluation. Molecular analysis led to the identification of a novel mutation, c.511G>A (p.Asp171Asn), found in heterozygosity in the exon 5 of the WFS1 gene, and changing the aspartic acid at position 171 to an asparagine, in the extracellular N-terminus domain of the wolframin protein. This novel mutation wasn't present either in 200 control chromosomes analyzed or in the hearing proband's half-brother, and it had not been reported in 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server, HGMD or dbSNP databases. No mutations were found in GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Multi-alignment of 27 wolframin sequences from mammalian species, against the human wolframin sequence in ConSurf, indicated a conservation score corresponding to 7 in a 1-9 color scale where 9 is conserved and 1 is variable. In addition, the mutation p.Asp171Asn was predicted to be damaging and possibly damaging by SIFT and Polyphen-2, respectively. The auditory phenotype of this patient could thus be due to the novel mutation p.Asp171Asn. Further functional characterization might enable to elucidate in which way the change in the residue 171, as other changes introduced by LFSNHL-associated mutations previously described, leads to this type of HL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Najia; Saboor, Mohammed; Ghani, Rubina; Moinuddin, Moinuddin

    2014-01-01

    Co-existence of myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and Janus associated kinase 2 mutation (JAK2 V617F) is a well-established fact. Only few case reports are available showing presence of JAK2 V617F mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of JAK2 V617F mutation in Philadelphia Chromosome positive (Ph (+)) CML patients in Pakistan. The study was conducted from August 2009 to July 2010 at Civil Hospital and Baqai Institute of Hematology (BIH) Karachi. Blood samples from 25 patients with CML were collected. Multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed for Breakpoint Cluster Region - Abelson (BCR-ABL) rearrangement. Conventional PCR was performed for JAK2 V617F mutation on BCR-ABL positive samples. All 25 samples showed BCR-ABL rearrangement. Out of these 11 samples (44%) had JAK2 V617F mutation; the remaining 14 (56%) cases showed JAK2 617V wild type. It is concluded that the co-existence of Ph (+)CML and JAK2 V617F mutation is possible.

  16. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Erdem-Eraslan (Lale); D. Heijsman (Daphne); M. De Wit (Maurice); A.E. Kremer (Andreas); A. Sacchetti (Andrea); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); P.A.E. Sillevis Smitt (Peter); P.J. French (Pim)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCausal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes

  17. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  18. Frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric carcinoma coming from high- and low-risk areas: metanalysis and systematic review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corso, Giovanni; Marrelli, Daniele; Pascale, Valeria; Vindigni, Carla; Roviello, Franco

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of E-cadherin germline mutations in countries with different incidence rates for gastric carcinoma has not been well established. The goal of this study was to assess the worldwide frequency of CDH1 germline mutations in gastric cancers coming from low- and high-risk areas. English articles using MEDLINE access (from 1998 to 2011). Search terms included CDH1, E-cadherin, germline mutation, gastric cancer, hereditary, familial and diffuse histotype. The study included all E-cadherin germline mutations identified in gastric cancer patients; somatic mutations and germline mutations reported in other tumors were excluded. The method of this study was scheduled in accordance with the 'PRISMA statement for reporting systematic reviews and meta-analyses'. Countries were classified as low- or middle/high risk-areas for gastric carcinoma incidence. Statistical analysis was performed to correlate the CDH1 mutation frequency with gastric cancer incidence areas. A total of 122 E-cadherin germline mutations have been identified; the majority (87.5%) occurred in gastric cancers coming from low-risk areas. In high-risk areas, we identified 16 mutations in which missense mutations were predominant. (68.8%). We verified a significant association between the mutation frequency and the gastric cancer risk area (p < 0.001: overall identified mutations in low- vs. middle/high-risk areas). E-cadherin genetic screenings performed in low-risk areas for gastric cancer identified a higher frequency of CDH1 germline mutations. This data could open new approaches in the gastric cancer prevention test; before proposing a proband candidate for the CDH1 genetic screening, geographic variability, alongside the family history should be considered

  19. Frequency of janus associated kinase 2 (jak2) mutation in patients of bcr-abl negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, M.A.; Ahmed, S.; Ali, N.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Janus associated kinase 2 mutation in the patients of BCR-ABL negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms. Study Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Molecular Department of Haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP), Rawalpindi from Jul 2011 to Jul 2012. Patients and Methods: Ninety three consecutive patients of Polycythaemia vera (PV), Essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and Idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) diagnosed by the conventional haematological criteria were included in the study. All patients were screened for G-T point mutation (V617F) in the JAK2 gene on chromosome 9 by an allele specific PCR. Results: Out of the 93 myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) patients, 33(35%) had polycythaemia vera, 36(39%) had essential thrombocythaemia and 24(26%) had idiopathic myelofibrosis. JAK2 mutation was seen in 64/93 (69%) patients including 33/33(100%) in PV, 19/36(52.6%) in ET and 12/24(50%) in IMF. Conclusion: Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms are an important group of heamatological disorder in our country. JAK2 gene mutation is seen in significant proportion of these disorders (69%). JAK2 mutation analysis can be used to differentiate between polycythemia vera and secondary polycythemia in most cases with near certainty, where it was found in 100% of the cases. (author)

  20. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequencies in Chinese hamster- cells by dose fractionation, cycloheximide and caffeine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.-C.; Schultz, R.; Trosko, J.E.; D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Setlow, R.B.

    1978-01-01

    Chinese hamster (V79) cells were irradiated with a fractionated regime of ultraviolet light (UV 1 +UV 2 ). The fractionation of a UV dose always increased the colony-forming ability but reduced (or it did not change) the mutation frequencies. Treatment with cycloheximide between the two UV irradiations resulted in two types of effects, depending on the protocols used. Long exposures to cycloheximide (i.e., >6h) for the entire period between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide (i.e., 3h) long before UV 2 always resulted in reduced colony-forming ability and enhanced or unchanged mutation frequencies. Exposure to cycloheximide for the entire period in the short fractionated regime (i.e., 4h) between UV 1 and UV 2 or partial treatment of cycloheximide just prior to UV 2 tended to give the opposite effects. Caffeine treatment before UV 2 , with or without UV 1 , significantly increased the mutation frequencies. These results suggest that an error-free postreplication repair system exists in Chinese hamster cells which is inhibitable by particular cycloheximide or caffeine treatments. (Auth.)

  1. The Number of Overlapping AID Hotspots in Germline IGHV Genes Is Inversely Correlated with Mutation Frequency in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chaohui; Chu, Charles C; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Bagnara, Davide; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; MacCarthy, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The targeting of mutations by Activation-Induced Deaminase (AID) is a key step in generating antibody diversity at the Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci but is also implicated in B-cell malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). AID has previously been shown to preferentially deaminate WRC (W = A/T, R = A/G) hotspots. WGCW sites, which contain an overlapping WRC hotspot on both DNA strands, mutate at much higher frequency than single hotspots. Human Ig heavy chain (IGHV) genes differ in terms of WGCW numbers, ranging from 4 for IGHV3-48*03 to as many as 12 in IGHV1-69*01. An absence of V-region mutations in CLL patients ("IGHV unmutated", or U-CLL) is associated with a poorer prognosis compared to "IGHV mutated" (M-CLL) patients. The reasons for this difference are still unclear, but it has been noted that particular IGHV genes associate with U-CLL vs M-CLL. For example, patients with IGHV1-69 clones tend to be U-CLL with a poor prognosis, whereas patients with IGHV3-30 tend to be M-CLL and have a better prognosis. Another distinctive feature of CLL is that ~30% of (mostly poor prognosis) patients can be classified into "stereotyped" subsets, each defined by HCDR3 similarity, suggesting selection, possibly for a self-antigen. We analyzed >1000 IGHV genes from CLL patients and found a highly significant statistical relationship between the number of WGCW hotspots in the germline V-region and the observed mutation frequency in patients. However, paradoxically, this correlation was inverse, with V-regions with more WGCW hotspots being less likely to be mutated, i.e., more likely to be U-CLL. The number of WGCW hotspots in particular, are more strongly correlated with mutation frequency than either non-overlapping (WRC) hotspots or more general models of mutability derived from somatic hypermutation data. Furthermore, this correlation is not observed in sequences from the B cell repertoires of normal individuals and those with autoimmune diseases.

  2. Rich Medium Composition Affects Escherichia coli Survival, Glycation, and Mutation Frequency during Long-Term Batch Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, Karin E; Finkel, Steven E

    2015-07-01

    Bacteria such as Escherichia coli are frequently grown to high density to produce biomolecules for study in the laboratory. To achieve this, cells can be incubated in extremely rich media that increase overall cell yield. In these various media, bacteria may have different metabolic profiles, leading to changes in the amounts of toxic metabolites produced. We have previously shown that stresses experienced during short-term growth can affect the survival of cells during the long-term stationary phase (LTSP). Here, we incubated cells in LB, 2× yeast extract-tryptone (YT), Terrific Broth, or Super Broth medium and monitored survival during the LTSP, as well as other reporters of genetic and physiological change. We observe differential cell yield and survival in all media studied. We propose that differences in long-term survival are the result of changes in the metabolism of components of the media that may lead to increased levels of protein and/or DNA damage. We also show that culture pH and levels of protein glycation, a covalent modification that causes protein damage, affect long-term survival. Further, we measured mutation frequency after overnight incubation and observed a correlation between high mutation frequencies at the end of the log phase and loss of viability after 4 days of LTSP incubation, indicating that mutation frequency is potentially predictive of long-term survival. Since glycation and mutation can be caused by oxidative stress, we measured expression of the oxyR oxidative stress regulator during log-phase growth and found that higher levels of oxyR expression during the log phase are consistent with high mutation frequency and lower cell density during the LTSP. Since these complex rich media are often used when producing large quantities of biomolecules in the laboratory, the observed increase in damage resulting in glycation or mutation may lead to production of a heterogeneous population of plasmids or proteins, which could affect the

  3. A second mutation associated with apparent [beta]-hexosaminidase A pseudodeficiency: Identification and frequency estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Z.; Chabot, T.; Triggs-Raine, B.L. (Univ. of Manitoba, Winnepeg (Canada)); Natowicz, M.R.; Prence, E.M. (Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham, MA (United States) Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Kaback, M.M.; Lim-Steele, S.T.; Brown, D. (Children' s Hospital, San Diego, CA (United States) Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-12-01

    Deficient activity of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene, typically causes Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy individuals lacking Hex A activity against synthetic substrates (i.e., individuals who are pseudodeficient) have been described. Recently, an apparently benign C[sub 739]-to-T (Arg247Trp) mutation was found among individuals with Hex A levels indistinguishable from those of carriers of Tay-Sachs disease. This allele, when in compound heterozygosity with a second [open quotes]disease-causing[close quotes] allele, results in Hex A pseudodeficiency. The authors examined the HEXA gene of a healthy 42-year-old who was Hex A deficient but did not have the C[sub 739]-to-T mutation. The HEXA exons were PCR amplified, and the products were analyzed for mutations by using restriction-enzyme digestion or single-strand gel electrophoresis. A G[sub 805]-to-A (Gly269Ser) mutation associated with adult-onset G[sub m2] gangliosidosis was found on one chromosome. A new mutation, C[sub 745]-to-T (Arg 249Trp), was identified on the second chromosome. This mutation was detected in an additional 4/63 (6%) non-Jewish and 0/218 Ashkenazi Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Although the Arg249Trp change may result in a late-onset form of G[sub M2] gangliosidosis, any phenotype must be very mild. This new mutation and the benign C[sub 739]-to-T mutation together account for [approximately]38% of non-Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Because carriers of the C[sub 739]-to-T and C[sub 745]-to-T mutations cannot be differentiated from carriers of disease-causing alleles by using the classical biochemical screening approaches, DNA-based analyses for these mutations should be offered for non-Jewish enzyme-defined heterozygotes, before definitive counseling is provided. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Mutation frequencies in female mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1977-01-01

    The female germ cell stage of primary importance in radiation genetic hazards is the immature, arrested oocyte. In the mouse, this stage has a near zero or zero sensitivity to mutation induction by radiation. However, the application of these mouse results to women has been questioned on the ground that the mouse arrested oocytes are highly sensitive to killing by radiation, while the human cells are not; and, furthermore, that the mature and maturing oocytes in the mouse, which are resistant to killing, are sensitive to mutation induction. The present results have a 2-fold bearing on this problem. First, a more detailed analysis of oocyte-stage sensitivity to killing and mutation induction shows that there is no consistent correlation, either negative or positive, between the two. This indicates that the sensitivity to cell killing of the mouse immature oocyte may not be sufficient reason to prevent its use in predicting the mutational response of the human immature oocyte. Second, if the much more cautious assumption is made that the human arrested oocyte might be as mutationally sensitive as the most sensitive of all oocyte stages in the mouse, namely the maturing and mature ones, then the present data on the duration of these stages permit more accurate estimates than were heretofore possible on the mutational response of these stages to chronic irradiation

  5. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD.

  6. Frequency of Somatic TP53 Mutations in Combination with Known Pathogenic Mutations in Colon Adenocarcinoma, Non–Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, and Gliomas as Identified by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Shajani-Yi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. It encodes p53, a DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates multiple genes involved in DNA repair, metabolism, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and senescence. TP53 is associated with human cancer by mutations that lead to a loss of wild-type p53 function as well as mutations that confer alternate oncogenic functions that enable them to promote invasion, metastasis, proliferation, and cell survival. Identifying the discrete TP53 mutations in tumor cells may help direct therapies that are more effective. In this study, we identified the frequency of individual TP53 mutations in patients with colon adenocarcinoma (48%, non–small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC (36%, and glioma/glioblastoma (28% at our institution using next-generation sequencing. We also identified the occurrence of somatic mutations in numerous actionable genes including BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, IDH1, and PIK3CA that occurred concurrently with these TP53 mutations. Of the 480 tumors examined that contained one or more mutations in the TP53 gene, 219 were colon adenocarcinomas, 215 were NSCLCs, and 46 were gliomas/glioblastomas. Among the patients positive for TP53 mutations diagnosed with colon adenocarcinoma, 50% also showed at least one mutation in pathogenic genes of which 14% were BRAF, 33% were KRAS, and 3% were NRAS. Forty-seven percent of NSCLC patients harboring TP53 mutations also had a mutation in at least one actionable pathogenic variant with the following frequencies: BRAF: 4%, EGFR: 10%, KRAS: 28%, and PIK3CA: 4%. Fifty-two percent of patients diagnosed with glioma/glioblastoma with a positive TP53 mutation had at least one concurrent mutation in a known pathogenic gene of which 9% were CDKN2A, 41% were IDH1, and 11% were PIK3CA.

  7. Frequency of Fanconi anemia in Brazil and efficacy of screening for the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Magdalena

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, susceptibility to cancer and multiple congenital anomalies. There is important clinical variability among patients and the knowledge of factors which might predict outcome would greatly help the decision making regarding the choices of treatment and the appropriate time to start it. Future studies of the possible correlation between specific mutations with specific clinical presentations will provide the answer to one of these factors. At our Center we standardized a rapid and precise screening test using a mismatch PCR assay for a specific mutation (3788-3790del in exon 38 of gene FANCA in Brazilian FA patients. We present the results obtained after screening 80 non-consanguineous FA patients referred from all regions of Brazil with a clinical diagnosis of FA supported by cellular hypersensitivity to diepoxybutane. We were able to detect the 3788-3790del allele in 24 of the 80 (30% FA patients studied. Thirteen of the 80 (16.25% were homozygotes and 11 of the 80 (13.75% were compound heterozygotes, thus confirming the high frequency of the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation in Brazilian FA patients. The identification of patients with specific mutations in the FA genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition, also providing data for genotype-phenotype correlations, to a better understanding of the interaction of this specific mutation with other mutations in compound heterozygote patients, and ultimately to the right choices of treatment for each patient with improvement of the prognosis on future studies.

  8. Frequency of Fanconi anemia in Brazil and efficacy of screening for the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalena, N; Pilonetto, D V; Bitencourt, M A; Pereira, N F; Ribeiro, R C; Jeng, M; Pasquini, R

    2005-05-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, susceptibility to cancer and multiple congenital anomalies. There is important clinical variability among patients and the knowledge of factors which might predict outcome would greatly help the decision making regarding the choices of treatment and the appropriate time to start it. Future studies of the possible correlation between specific mutations with specific clinical presentations will provide the answer to one of these factors. At our Center we standardized a rapid and precise screening test using a mismatch PCR assay for a specific mutation (3788-3790del in exon 38 of gene FANCA) in Brazilian FA patients. We present the results obtained after screening 80 non-consanguineous FA patients referred from all regions of Brazil with a clinical diagnosis of FA supported by cellular hypersensitivity to diepoxybutane. We were able to detect the 3788-3790del allele in 24 of the 80 (30%) FA patients studied. Thirteen of the 80 (16.25%) were homozygotes and 11 of the 80 (13.75%) were compound heterozygotes, thus confirming the high frequency of the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation in Brazilian FA patients. The identification of patients with specific mutations in the FA genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition, also providing data for genotype-phenotype correlations, to a better understanding of the interaction of this specific mutation with other mutations in compound heterozygote patients, and ultimately to the right choices of treatment for each patient with improvement of the prognosis on future studies.

  9. Somatic mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of stable and mutable clones of Tradescantia after acute gamma-ray treatments with small doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao; Takahashi, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Young inflorescences of two different Tradescantia clones heterozygous for flower and stamen-hair color, one stable (KU 9) and the other spontaneously mutable (KU 20), were irradiated acutely with small doses (approx. 3 to 50 R) of 60 Co gamma-rays. Somatic mutation frequencies from blue to pink in the stamen hairs scored on post-irradiation days 10 to 16 increased essentially linearly with increasing gamma-ray dose in both clones. Despite about a 5-fold difference in spontaneous mutation frequency per hair found between the two clones, the dose-response curves of pink mutations determined were similar to each other, giving average mutation frequencies of 1.51 and 1.41 pink-mutant events per 1000 hairs per R for KU 9 and KU 20, respectively. These frequencies are comparable to earlier results obtained from acute irradiation treatments of other clones with higher doses. The doubling dose of pink mutation (the radiation dose making the mutation frequency double the spontaneous level) was calculated to be 2.09 R for KU 9, and this low doubling dose must be given full attention. On the other hand, the doubling dose for KU 20 (calculated to be 10.4 R) is of questionable value, being greatly subject to change because of the diversely variable spontaneous mutation frequency of this clone

  10. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  11. Effects of diurnal temperature difference and gamma radiation on the frequency of somatic cell mutations in the stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Kim, Won Rok; Kim, Jae Sung; Shin, Hae Shick; Lee, Jeong Joo

    1998-01-01

    This study deals with the effects of diurnal temperature difference (DTD) on somatic cell mutation frequencies in Tradescantia stamen hairs irradiated with radiation. Potted plants of Tradescantia 4430 were irradiated with 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy of gamma radiation. The irradiated plants were maintained under two different experimental conditions; at constant temperature of 20 degree C (DTD0) and at 28 degree C for 14-h day and 8 degree C for 10-h night (DTD20). The somatic cell mutation rate in 0.5 Gy irradiated group showed a big increase on the 6th day and reached a maximum value on the 10th day after irradiation while the rate in the experimental group under the condition of DTD20 started to increase on the 8th day and got to a maximal value on the 14th day postirradiation. In both of the two experiments, the dose-response relationships were clearly linear. The slope of the DTD20 dose-response curve was much steeper than that of the DTD0 one. In conclusion, a great DTD, as one of environmental stresses, enhanced the effectiveness of radiation in the induction of somatic cell mutations and caused a shift of the peak interval of radiation-induced mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs

  12. A novel mutation in the WFS1 gene identified in a Taiwanese family with low-frequency hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Shing-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolfram syndrome gene 1 (WFS1 accounts for most of the familial nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL which is characterized by sensorineural hearing losses equal to and below 2000 Hz. The current study aimed to contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of LFSNHL in an affected Taiwanese family. Methods The Taiwanese family with LFSNHL was phenotypically characterized using audiologic examination and pedigree analysis. Genetic characterization was performed by direct sequencing of WFS1 and mutation analysis. Results Pure tone audiometry confirmed that the family members affected with LFSNHL had a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss equal to or below 2000 Hz. The hearing loss threshold of the affected members showed no progression, a characteristic that was consistent with a mutation in the WFS1 gene located in the DFNA6/14/38 locus. Pedigree analysis showed a hereditarily autosomal dominant pattern characterized by a full penetrance. Among several polymorphisms, a missense mutation Y669H (2005T>C in exon 8 of WFS1 was identified in members of a Taiwanese family diagnosed with LFSNHL but not in any of the control subjects. Conclusion We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 (i.e., Y669H which is likely responsible for the LFSNHL phenotype in this particular Taiwanese family.

  13. Frequency of MELAS main mutation in a phenotype-targeted young ischemic stroke patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka; Innilä, Markus; Enzinger, Christian; Metso, Tiina M; Curtze, Sami; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Tanislav, Christian; Thijs, Vincent; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Fazekas, Franz; Suomalainen, Anu; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial diseases, predominantly mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), may occasionally underlie or coincide with ischemic stroke (IS) in young and middle-aged individuals. We searched for undiagnosed patients with MELAS in a target subpopulation of unselected young IS patients enrolled in the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study (sifap1). Among the 3291 IS patients aged 18-55 years recruited to the sifap1 study at 47 centers across 14 European countries, we identified potential MELAS patients with the following phenotypic features: (a) diagnosed cardiomyopathy or (b) presence of two of the three following findings: migraine, short stature (≤165 cm for males; ≤155 cm for females), and diabetes. Identified patients' blood samples underwent analysis of the common MELAS mutation, m.3243A>G in the MTTL1 gene of mitochondrial DNA. Clinical and cerebral MRI features of the mutation carriers were reviewed. We analyzed blood samples of 238 patients (177 with cardiomyopathy) leading to identification of four previously unrecognized MELAS main mutation carrier-patients. Their clinical and MRI characteristics were within the expectation for common IS patients except for severe hearing loss in one patient and hyperintensity of the pulvinar thalami on T1-weighted MRI in another one. Genetic testing for the m.3243A>G MELAS mutation in young patients with IS based on phenotypes suggestive of mitochondrial disease identifies previously unrecognized carriers of MELAS main mutation, but does not prove MELAS as the putative cause.

  14. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O. S.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Methods Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. Results A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation. PMID:28078112

  15. [Frequency of the most common mutations of the CFTR gene in peruvian patients with cystic fibrosis using the ARMS-PCR technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Ruth; Protzel, Ana; Rivera, Juan; Abarca, Hugo; Dueñas, Milagros; Nestarez, Cecilia; Purizaga, Nestor; Diringer, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of the ten most common mutations of the CFTR gene reported in Latin Americausing amplification-refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (ARMS-PCR) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) in two referral hospitals in Peru during the year 2014. The frequency of the ten most common mutations of the CFTR gene was assessed in patients of the Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins and the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño, both located in Lima, Peru. Blood samples were collected from 36 patients with CF, and the ARMS-PCR technique was used to determine the presence of these mutations. The study group included 73.5% of patients with a known diagnosis of CF in the country when the study was carried out. ARMS-PCR allowed three of the mutations to be identified in a combined 30.6% of the alleles from patients with CF, and 64.9% of the mutated alleles were not identified. The mutations found were p.Phe508del (22,2%), p.Gly542* (6,9%), and p.Arg1162* (1,4%). There is significant variability in both the frequency and type of mutations present in our study population and in what has been reported in other Latin American countries. It is necessary to perform studies that use complete sequencing technology for the CFTR gene to identify other mutations present in our population.

  16. Extreme assay sensitivity in molecular diagnostics further unveils intratumour heterogeneity in metastatic colorectal cancer as well as artifactual low-frequency mutations in the KRAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Sara; Bertero, Luca; Osella-Abate, Simona; Di Bello, Cristiana; Francia di Celle, Paola; Coppola, Vittoria; Sapino, Anna; Cassoni, Paola; Marchiò, Caterina

    2017-07-25

    Gene mutations in the RAS family rule out metastatic colorectal carcinomas (mCRCs) from anti-EGFR therapies. We report a retrospective analysis by Sequenom Massarray and fast COLD-PCR followed by Sanger sequencing on 240 mCRCs. By Sequenom, KRAS and NRAS exons 2-3-4 were mutated in 52.9% (127/240) of tumours, while BRAF codon 600 mutations reached 5% (12/240). Fast COLD-PCR found extra mutations at KRAS exon 2 in 15/166 (9%) of samples, previously diagnosed by Sequenom as wild-type or mutated at RAS (exons 3-4) or BRAF genes. After UDG digestion results were reproduced in 2/12 analysable subclonally mutated samples leading to a frequency of true subclonal KRAS mutations of 1.2% (2.1% of the previous Sequenom wild-type subgroup). In 10 out of 12 samples, the subclonal KRAS mutations disappeared (9 out of 12) or turned to a different sequence variant (1 out of 12). mCRC can harbour coexisting multiple gene mutations. High sensitivity assays allow the detection of a small subset of patients harbouring true subclonal KRAS mutations. However, DNA changes with mutant allele frequencies <3% detected in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded samples may be artifactual in a non-negligible fraction of cases. UDG pre-treatment of DNA is mandatory to identify true DNA changes in archival samples and avoid misinterpretation due to artifacts.

  17. A single polymerase (L) mutation in avian metapneumovirus increased virulence and partially maintained virus viability at an elevated temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul A; Lupini, Caterina; Catelli, Elena; Clubbe, Jayne; Ricchizzi, Enrico; Naylor, Clive J

    2011-02-01

    Previously, a virulent avian metapneumovirus, farm isolate Italy 309/04, was shown to have been derived from a live vaccine. Virulence due to the five nucleotide mutations associated with the reversion to virulence was investigated by their addition to the genome of the vaccine strain using reverse genetics. Virulence of these recombinant viruses was determined by infection of 1-day-old turkeys. Disease levels resulting from the combined two matrix mutations was indistinguishable from that produced by the recombinant vaccine, whereas the combined three L gene mutations increased disease to a level (P<0.0001) that was indistinguishable from that caused by the revertant Italy 309/04 virus. Testing of the L mutations individually showed that two mutations did not increase virulence, while the third mutation, corresponding to an asparagine to aspartic acid substitution, produced virulence indistinguishable from that caused by Italy 309/04. In contrast to the vaccine, the virulent mutant also showed increased viability at temperatures typical of turkey core tissues. The notion that increased viral virulence resulted from enhanced ability to replicate in tissues away from the cool respiratory tract, cannot be discounted.

  18. Analysis of mutation/rearrangement frequencies and methylation patterns at a given DNA locus using restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alex; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a difference in DNA sequences of organisms belonging to the same species. RFLPs are typically detected as DNA fragments of different lengths after digestion with various restriction endonucleases. The comparison of RFLPs allows investigators to analyze the frequency of occurrence of mutations, such as point mutations, deletions, insertions, and gross chromosomal rearrangements, in the progeny of stressed plants. The assay involves restriction enzyme digestion of DNA followed by hybridization of digested DNA using a radioactively or enzymatically labeled probe. Since DNA can be digested with methylation sensitive enzymes, the assay can also be used to analyze a methylation pattern of a particular locus. Here, we describe RFLP analysis using methylation-insensitive and methylation-sensitive enzymes.

  19. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Azinfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet.Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered.Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198 as cases and healthy (N=201 as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases.Results: In total, 17(8.6% of cases and 2(1% of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01. There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02, very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46, intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ,and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation.Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women

  20. Properties of nickel films growth by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at elevated substrate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muslim, Noormariah, E-mail: 14h8702@ubd.edu.bn [Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410 (Brunei Darussalam); Soon, Ying Woan [Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410 (Brunei Darussalam); Physical and Geological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410 (Brunei Darussalam); Lim, Chee Ming; Voo, Nyuk Yoong [Centre for Advanced Material and Energy Sciences, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, Jalan Tungku Link, Gadong BE1410 (Brunei Darussalam)

    2016-08-01

    Pure nickel (Ni) thin films of thicknesses of 100 nm were deposited on glass substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at a power of 100 W and at various substrate temperatures i.e., room temperature, 100, 200, and 300 °C. The crystalline structure, surface topography, surface morphology, electrical resistivity, and optical properties of the deposited films were studied. The properties of the Ni films could be controlled by altering the substrate temperature. Specifically, the films featured a face-centered cubic crystalline structure with predominant (111) crystallite orientation at all the substrate temperatures employed, as observed from the X-ray diffraction analysis. Films deposited at substrate temperatures greater than 200 °C additionally displayed crystalline (200) and (220) diffraction peaks. The surface morphology analysis revealed that the grain size of the Ni thin films increased with increasing substrate temperatures employed. This increase was accompanied with a decrease in the resistivity of the Ni films. The surface roughness of the films increased with increasing substrate temperatures employed, as observed from the atomic force microscopy analysis. - Highlights: • RF magnetron sputtering is a good alternative method to deposit Ni films. • Properties of Ni films could be controlled simply by tuning substrate temperatures. • Crystallite size and surface roughness increased with substrate temperatures. • Electrical resistivity reduced with increasing substrate temperatures. • Optical properties also changed with substrate temperatures.

  1. Frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Jordanian lung adenocarcinoma patients at diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheir Obeidat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study revealed that the EGFR mutations rate in Jordanian patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was higher than in African-American, and some white Caucasian patients, and was lower than in patients in East Asia, and other countries of South Asia.

  2. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti......-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping....

  3. Early-onset parkinsonism associated with PINK1 mutations: frequency, genotypes, and phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifati, V.; Rohe, C.F.; Breedveld, G.J.; Fabrizio, E.; Mari, M. De; Tassorelli, C.; Tavella, A.; Marconi, R.; Nicholl, D.; Chien, H.F.; Fincati, E.; Abbruzzese, G.; Marini, P.; Gaetano, A. De; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Maat-Kievit, J.A.; Sampaio, C.; Antonini, A.; Stocchi, F.; Montagna, P.; Toni, V.; Guidi, M.; Dalla Libera, A.; Tinazzi, M.; Pandis, F. De; Goldwurm, S.; Klein, A. de; Barbosa, E.; Lopiano, L.; Martignoni, E.; Lamberti, P.; Vanacore, N.; Meco, G.; Oostra, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence, nature, and associated phenotypes of PINK1 gene mutations in a large series of patients with early-onset (<50 years) parkinsonism. METHODS: The authors studied 134 patients (116 sporadic and 18 familial; 77% Italian) and 90 Italian controls. The whole PINK1

  4. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation in Iranian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zare-Bidaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC  chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (D 32 in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 D 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  5. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mette Hartung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome (CS may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS. We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  6. Mutagenic treatments towards increasing the frequency of day-neutral mutations and standardization of procedures for tissue culture, in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, M.D.; Chandra, R.; Abraham, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Various chemical mutagens and gamma radiation have been used on single dormant eyes and true seeds with a view to finding effective mutagenic treatment for the induction of day-length neutral mutants in potato using an effective screening technique for the isolation of day-length neutral mutants. Sodium meta bisulphite (SMS) was found to be an efficient mutagen in inducing mutations for this trait in true seeds although the same concentrations, when used for treating the single tuber eyes proved lethal. Pre-soaking the seeds for 24 hrs prior to treatment with 0.0025M SMS gave highest frequency of the mutants followed by 48 hrs presoaking, indicating a sensitive stage during the cell cycle in true seeds. Other mutagen treatments gave different frequencies of mutations. The highest frequency of day-length neutral mutants was observed when seeds irradiated with 40 Kr of gamma radiation were treated with 0.05M hydrazinium dichloride solution. Screening procedures have also been standardised with the development of synethetic media for the isolation of biochemical mutants at the true seed level. Initial efforts have yielded mutants resistant to LD 100 doses of ethionine. Another aspect of the study was to develop a proper potato callus culture technique. A medium has been developed to produce and maintain callus from potato leaf strips. Efforts on the regeneration of shoot and roots from callus, have so far lead to differentiation of callus to form roots. The ultimate aim of these studies is to develop plantlets from single cell which would form the units of mutation induction and isolation. (author)

  7. Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor with Elevated Inhibin B as a Cause of Secondary Amenorrhea in an Adolescent with Germ Line DICER1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Amy M; Moroney, John W; Snitchler, Andrea; Whiteway, Susan L

    2017-10-01

    Ovarian tumors, although uncommon in children, can retain endocrine function that disrupts normal feedback mechanisms leading to amenorrhea. Inheritance of germline DICER1 mutations can lead to increased risk for development of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (SLCTs). We report, to our knowledge, the first case of secondary amenorrhea due to elevated inhibin B levels in a female adolescent with an ovarian SLCT. Ovarian tumors should be included in the differential diagnosis for pediatric patients who present with menstrual irregularities. Early evaluation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis and inhibin levels is appropriate. Our case also emphasizes the need for testing for DICER1 mutations in pediatric patients with ovarian SLCTs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Detection of low frequency FGFR3 mutations in the urine of bladder cancer patients using next-generation deep sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millholl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available John M Millholland, Shuqiang Li, Cecilia A Fernandez, Anthony P ShuberPredictive Biosciences Inc, Lexington, MA, USAAbstract: Biological fluid-based noninvasive biomarker assays for monitoring and diagnosing disease are clinically powerful. A major technical hurdle for developing these assays is the requirement of high analytical sensitivity so that biomarkers present at very low levels can be consistently detected. In the case of biological fluid-based cancer diagnostic assays, sensitivities similar to those of tissue-based assays are difficult to achieve with DNA markers due to the high abundance of normal DNA background present in the sample. Here we describe a new urine-based assay that uses ultradeep sequencing technology to detect single mutant molecules of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 DNA that are indicative of bladder cancer. Detection of FGFR3 mutations in urine would provide clinicians with a noninvasive means of diagnosing early-stage bladder cancer. The single-molecule assay detects FGFR3 mutant DNA when present at as low as 0.02% of total urine DNA and results in 91% concordance with the frequency that FGFR3 mutations are detected in bladder cancer tumors, significantly improving diagnostic performance. To our knowledge, this is the first practical application of next-generation sequencing technology for noninvasive cancer diagnostics.Keywords: FGFR3, mutation, urine, single molecule, sequencing, bladder cancer

  9. Increased frequency of co-existing JAK2 exon-12 or MPL exon-10 mutations in patients with low JAK2(V617F) allelic burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussenzveig, Roberto H; Pham, Ha T; Perkins, Sherrie L; Prchal, Josef T; Agarwal, Archana M; Salama, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    The frequency of co-existing JAK2(V617F)/MPL and JAK2(V617F)/JAK2 exon-12 mutations has not been previously investigated in MPNs. Poor survival was reported in primary myelofibrosis with low JAK2(V617F) allelic burden. However, mutational status of JAK2 exon-12 or MPL were not reported in these patients. This study developed a cost-effective multiplex high resolution melt assay that screens for mutations in JAK2 gene exons-12 and -14 ((V617F)) and MPL gene exon-10. Co-existing mutations with JAK2(V617F) were detected in 2.9% (6/208; two JAK2 exon-12 and four MPL exon-10) patient specimens with known JAK2(V617F) (allelic-burden range: 0.1-96.8%). Co-existing mutations were detected in specimens with MPL exon-10 mutation should be pursued.

  10. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rozenberg

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. SETTING: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics - Institute of Biosciences - Universidade de São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. PROCEDURE: Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. RESULTS: Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70% elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. CONCLUSION: The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  11. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenberg, R; Pereira, L da V

    2001-07-05

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. Laboratory of Molecular Genetics--Institute of Biosciences--Universidade de São Paulo. 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70%) elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  12. Spectrum and Frequency of Mutations Induced by Gamma Radiations in Three Varieties of Nigerian Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Liman MUHAMMAD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient genetic variability is one of the major problems of plant breeding programmes, especially in sesame. Gamma radiation has been reported to be very effective in creating genetic variability in plants. Three varieties of Nigerian sesame were assessed for spectrum and frequency of mutation induced by Gamma radiations in M1 and M2 generations. The varieties (NCRIBEN-04E, NCRIBEN-01M and NCRIBEN-03L were treated with four different doses of gamma rays (250, 350, 450 and 550 Gy. The treated and untreated seeds (control were sown in planting bags (under field condition to raise M1 plants. Four treatments: V1D5, V2D3, V3D2 and V3D4 (from M1 plants were selected and bulked to obtain M2 populations. The results of M1 revealed four mutant fruit traits: multicarpellate capsule, multiple capsule per leaf axil, indehiscent capsule and terminal capsules. The highest frequencies of the traits in M1 generation were 2.50×10-2, 9.17×10-2, 1.67×10-2and3.33×10-2 respectively. The highest branching (7 was from NCRIBEN-01M, while the least (2 was from NCRIBEN-04E. The M2 plants were grouped into eight M2 lines. The dose range (250-550 Gy was proved to be effective in inducing viable mutations in sesame.

  13. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  14. The Frequency of MEFV Gene Mutations and Genotypes in Sanliurfa Province, South-Eastern Region of Turkey, after the Syrian Civil War by Using Next Generation Sequencing and Report of a Novel Exon 4 Mutation (I423T

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evren Gumus

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF is a genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and abdominal pain. Mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV gene are localized on the p arm of chromosome 16. Over 333 MEFV sequence variants have been identified so far in FMF patients, which occur mostly in the 2nd and 10th exons of the gene. Methods: In this study, 296 unrelated patients with clinical suspicion of FMF, which were admitted during January–December 2017, were retrospectively reviewed to identify the frequency of MEFV gene mutations by using next generation sequencing. Results: Eighteen different mutations, 45 different genotypes and a novel exon 4 (I423T mutation were identified in this study. This mutation is the fourth mutation identified in exon 4.The most frequent mutation was R202Q, followed by M694V, E148Q, M680I, R761H, V726A and R354W. Conclusions: One of the most important aims of this study is to investigate the MEFV mutation type and genotype of migrants coming to Sanliurfa after the civil war of Syria. This study also examines the effect of the condition on the region’s gene pool and the distribution of different types of mutations. Our results indicated that MEFV mutations are highly heterogeneous in our patient population, which is consistent with the findings of other studies in our region. Previously used methods, such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP, do not define uncommon or especially novel mutations. Therefore, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS analysis of the MEFV gene could be useful for finding novel mutations, except for those located on exon 2 and 10.

  15. The Frequency of MEFV Gene Mutations and Genotypes in Sanliurfa Province, South-Eastern Region of Turkey, after the Syrian Civil War by Using Next Generation Sequencing and Report of a Novel Exon 4 Mutation (I423T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Evren

    2018-05-07

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is a genetic disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and abdominal pain. Mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene are localized on the p arm of chromosome 16. Over 333 MEFV sequence variants have been identified so far in FMF patients, which occur mostly in the 2nd and 10th exons of the gene. In this study, 296 unrelated patients with clinical suspicion of FMF, which were admitted during January⁻December 2017, were retrospectively reviewed to identify the frequency of MEFV gene mutations by using next generation sequencing. Eighteen different mutations, 45 different genotypes and a novel exon 4 (I423T) mutation were identified in this study. This mutation is the fourth mutation identified in exon 4.The most frequent mutation was R202Q, followed by M694V, E148Q, M680I, R761H, V726A and R354W. One of the most important aims of this study is to investigate the MEFV mutation type and genotype of migrants coming to Sanliurfa after the civil war of Syria. This study also examines the effect of the condition on the region’s gene pool and the distribution of different types of mutations. Our results indicated that MEFV mutations are highly heterogeneous in our patient population, which is consistent with the findings of other studies in our region. Previously used methods, such as Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), do not define uncommon or especially novel mutations. Therefore, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) analysis of the MEFV gene could be useful for finding novel mutations, except for those located on exon 2 and 10.

  16. Mutation frequencies in male mice and the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in men: (specific-locus mutations/dose-rate effect/doubling dose/risk estimation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Estimation of the genetic hazards of ionizing radiation in men is based largely on the frequency of transmitted specific-locus mutations induced in mouse spermatogonial stem cells at low radiation dose rates. The publication of new data on this subject has permitted a fresh review of all the information available. The data continue to show no discrepancy from the interpretation that, although mutation frequency decreases markedly as dose rate is decreased from 90 to 0.8 R/min (1 R = 2.6 X 10 -4 coulombs/kg) there seems to be no further change below 0.8 R/min over the range from that dose rate to 0.0007 R/min. Simple mathematical models are used to compute: (a) a maximum likelihood estimate of the induced mutation frequency at the low dose rates, and (b) a maximum likelihood estimate of the ratio of this to the mutation frequency at high dose rates in the range of 72 to 90 R/min. In the application of these results to the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man, the former value can be used to calculate a doubling dose - i.e., the dose of radiation that induces a mutation frequency equal to the spontaneous frequency. The doubling dose based on the low-dose-rate data compiled here is 110 R. The ratio of the mutation frequency at low dose rate to that at high dose rate is useful when it becomes necessary to extrapolate from experimental determinations, or from human data, at high dose rates to the expected risk at low dose rates. The ratio derived from the present analysis is 0.33

  17. The Frequency of c.550delA Mutation of the CANP3 Gene in the Polish LGMD2A Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorobek, Małgorzata; Ryniewicz, Barbara; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Fidziańska, Anna; Styczyńska, Maria; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena

    2015-11-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent LGMD variant in the European population, representing about 40% of LGMD. The c.550delA mutation in the CANP3 (calcium activated neutral protease 3) gene is the most commonly reported mutation in LGMD2A. Prevalence of this mutation in the Polish population has not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to identify and estimate the frequency of the c.550delA mutation in Polish LGMD2A patients. Polymerase chain reaction-sequencing analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction method. We analyzed 76 families affected with LGMD and identified 62 probands with mutations in the CANP3 gene. C.550delA was the most common mutation identified, being found in 78% of the LGMD2A families. The remaining mutations observed multiple times were as follows: c.598-612del15ntd; c.2242C>T; c.418dupC; c.1356insT, listed in terms of decreasing frequency. Two novel variants in the CANP3 gene, that is, c.700G>A Gly234Arg and c.661G>A Gly221Ser were also characterized. Overall, mutations in the LGMD2A gene were estimated to be present in 81% of patients with the LGMD phenotype who were without sarcoglycans and dysferlin deficiency on immunocytochemical analysis. The frequency of the heterozygous c.550delA mutation in the healthy Polish population was estimated at 1/124. The c.550delA is the most frequent CANP3 mutation in the Polish population, thus sequencing of exon 4 of this gene could identify the majority of LGMD2A patients in Poland.

  18. Experimental evolution and the dynamics of genomic mutation rate modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynes, Y; Sniegowski, P D

    2014-11-01

    Because genes that affect mutation rates are themselves subject to mutation, mutation rates can be influenced by natural selection and other evolutionary forces. The population genetics of mutation rate modifier alleles has been a subject of theoretical interest for many decades. Here, we review experimental contributions to our understanding of mutation rate modifier dynamics. Numerous evolution experiments have shown that mutator alleles (modifiers that elevate the genomic mutation rate) can readily rise to high frequencies via genetic hitchhiking in non-recombining microbial populations. Whereas these results certainly provide an explanatory framework for observations of sporadically high mutation rates in pathogenic microbes and in cancer lineages, it is nonetheless true that most natural populations have very low mutation rates. This raises the interesting question of how mutator hitchhiking is suppressed or its phenotypic effect reversed in natural populations. Very little experimental work has addressed this question; with this in mind, we identify some promising areas for future experimental investigation.

  19. Radiation-induced mutation frequency in marked chromosome of Macaca mulatta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhemilev, Z.A.; Machavariani, M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The symmetric and asymmetric exchange frequencies of marked (nucleolus forming) chromosomes were studied in the lymphocytes and epithelial kidney cells irradiated by X-rays at G 0 , both in vivo and in vitro. Symmetric and asymmetric exchange frequencies were found to be equal. In both the types of Macaca mulatta cells, the exchange frequency in the long arm appeared to be higher than theoretically expected. The increased exchange in the long arm is thought to be due to a greater quantity of late replicating heterochromatin in it. The short arm of marked chromosome of epithelial kidney cells enters the exchange in accordance to its length in mitosis, but exchange number in the short arm chromosome in lymphocytes is lower than in epithelial cells. This difference is caused likely by different functioning of the nucleolus forming heterochromatin. (author)

  20. The influence of large deletions on the mutation frequency induced by tritiated water and X-radiation in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossett, N.G.; Byrne, B.J.; Kelley, S.J.; Tucker, A.B.; Arbour-Reily, P.; Lee, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium beta radiation ( 3 H β-radiation) in the form of tritiated water was used to induce mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells. All 23 Adh null mutations were large deletions (>20 kb), determined by genetic complementation and Southern blot analyses. 27 Adh null mutations have been induced by 100-kVp X-rays and have been genetically and molecularly characterized. In contrast to 3 H β-radiation, 100-kVp X-rays induced a bimodal distribution of Adh null mutations, intragenic mutations, ≤250 bp, and large deletions, >100 kb. A statistically significant difference was observed between the frequency of large deletions (23/23 or 1.0) induced by 3 H β-radiation and the frequency of large deletions (19/27 or 0.7) induced by 100-kVp X-rays. However, a statistical difference was not observed between the size distribution of the large deletions induced by 3 H β-radiation and X-rays. The relative deletion frequency (RDF) induced by 3 H β-radiation and 100-kVp X-rays was (1.0/0.7=1.4). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of these two radiation sources was 1.4, determined from the ratio of the regression coefficients of the respective 3 H β-radiation and X-ray sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) dose-response data. The large difference in size between the two classes of X-ray-induced Adh null mutations and the increase in mutation frequency and deletion frequency for 3 H β-radiation with respect to X-rays may indicate that the relative deletion frequency (RDF) is the molecular biological basis for the increase in the RBE for radiation sources with a mean LET value ≤10 keV/μm

  1. Frequency and clinical correlates of elevated plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA at diagnosis in peripheral T-cell lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Huang, Ying; Gru, Alejandro; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Mishra, Anjali; Ruppert, Amy S.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNAs (EBER) in tumor tissue and cell-free plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) are detected in EBV-associated lymphomas. Studies have suggested that EBER+ peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) have worse prognosis, but the role of EBV in these neoplasms remains unclear. pEBVd is quantitative and more easily amenable to standardization than EBER, but frequency of pEBVd detection, clinical impact, and agreement with EBER status in PTCL are unknown. We retrospectively assessed frequency of detectable pre-treatment pEBVd, presence of EBER in tumor tissue, and outcomes in 61 of 135 EBV-assessable PTCL patients. Fifteen of 61 patients (24.5%, 95% CI: 14–37%) were pre-treatment pEBVd+, with no significant differences in baseline characteristics or treatment between pEBVd+ and pEBVd− patients. EBER-ISH was performed on 10 pEBVd+ and 35 pEBVd− tumors. All 10 pEBVd+ patients were EBER+, but 9 pEBVd− patients were also EBER+. With median follow up of 24 months (range 1–96), overall survival (OS) was shorter in pEBVd+ compared to pEBVd− patients (13 vs. 72 months; p=0.04). In this retrospective study, pre-treatment pEBVd was elevated in 25% of PTCL patients, was highly specific for EBER+ tumors, and was associated with shorter survival. pEBVd should be further explored as a prognostic variable and tumor biomarker in PTCL. PMID:27943278

  2. Pathogenic mutation in the ALS/FTD gene, CCNF, causes elevated Lys48-linked ubiquitylation and defective autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Albert; Rayner, Stephanie L; Gwee, Serene S L; De Luca, Alana; Shahheydari, Hamideh; Sundaramoorthy, Vinod; Ragagnin, Audrey; Morsch, Marco; Radford, Rowan; Galper, Jasmin; Freckleton, Sarah; Shi, Bingyang; Walker, Adam K; Don, Emily K; Cole, Nicholas J; Yang, Shu; Williams, Kelly L; Yerbury, Justin J; Blair, Ian P; Atkin, Julie D; Molloy, Mark P; Chung, Roger S

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that have common molecular and pathogenic characteristics, such as aberrant accumulation and ubiquitylation of TDP-43; however, the mechanisms that drive this process remain poorly understood. We have recently identified CCNF mutations in familial and sporadic ALS and FTD patients. CCNF encodes cyclin F, a component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (SCF cyclin F ) complex that is responsible for ubiquitylating proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In this study, we examined the ALS/FTD-causing p.Ser621Gly (p.S621G) mutation in cyclin F and its effect upon downstream Lys48-specific ubiquitylation in transfected Neuro-2A and SH-SY5Y cells. Expression of mutant cyclin F S621G caused increased Lys48-specific ubiquitylation of proteins in neuronal cells compared to cyclin F WT . Proteomic analysis of immunoprecipitated Lys48-ubiquitylated proteins from mutant cyclin F S621G -expressing cells identified proteins that clustered within the autophagy pathway, including sequestosome-1 (p62/SQSTM1), heat shock proteins, and chaperonin complex components. Examination of autophagy markers p62, LC3, and lysosome-associated membrane protein 2 (Lamp2) in cells expressing mutant cyclin F S621G revealed defects in the autophagy pathway specifically resulting in impairment in autophagosomal-lysosome fusion. This finding highlights a potential mechanism by which cyclin F interacts with p62, the receptor responsible for transporting ubiquitylated substrates for autophagic degradation. These findings demonstrate that ALS/FTD-causing mutant cyclin F S621G disrupts Lys48-specific ubiquitylation, leading to accumulation of substrates and defects in the autophagic machinery. This study also demonstrates that a single missense mutation in cyclin F causes hyper-ubiquitylation of proteins that can indirectly impair the autophagy degradation pathway, which is

  3. Complexity of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response curve in Escherichia coli B/r: SOS induction, one-lesion and two-lesion mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.

    1976-01-01

    Three distinct sections of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response (MFR) curve toward tryptophan prototrophy have been demonstrated in Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp thy and its uvrA derivative in log-phase growth in minimal medium. The initial section, which appears fluence-squared, may reflect the necessity, if mutation is to result, for induction of two lesions, one located within the potentially mutated genetic locus and the other damaging deoxyribonucleic acid replication and resulting in induction of the error-prone SOS repair function. A second linear section is ascribed to the continued induction, after exposure above that sufficient for complete SOS expression, of isolated lesions which lead to mutation in potentially mutated loci. The third section demonstrates an increased rate of mutagenesis and suggests the induction of two lesions in proximity which result in additional mutations. Split-exposure studies support the inducible nature of the SOS function and suggest that mutation frequency decline (MFD) is due to excision resulting from or related to the prevention of SOS induction by inhibition of protein synthesis. Preirradiation tryptophan starvation of the uvr + strain for 30 min decreases MFR in the first and second sections of the curve. Reduction of MFR in the third section requires more prestarvation time and is blocked by nalidixic acid. The decreased MFR of the first and second sections is ascribed to promotion of postirradiation MFD based on excision and that of the third section to completion of the chromosome during the prestarvation period

  4. [A young boy with elevated aminotransferases in physical examination--Two novel missense mutations associated with Wilson's disease were found].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu; Deng, Si-Yan; Wan, Chao-Min

    2015-07-01

    A 3-year-old boy had abnormal liver function, which was found in physical examination, for 5 months before admission. He had no symptoms such as anorexia, poor appetite, and jaundice, had normal growth and development, and showed no hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory examination revealed significantly reduced ceruloplasmin (35 mg/L), as well as negative hepatotropic virus, cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. There were normal muscle enzymes, blood glucose, and blood ammonia and negative liver-specific autoantibodies. The boy had negative K-F ring and normal 24-hour urine copper (0.56 μmol/L). The ATP7B gene testing for the boy, his sister, and their parents detected two novel missense mutations in the boy and his sister, i.e., compound heterozygous mutations in exon 7 (c.2075T>C, p.L692P) and exon 13 (c.3044T>C, p.L1015P), which were inherited from their father and mother, respectively. Wilson's disease was confirmed by genetic diagnosis in the boy and his sister. The boy and his sister were given a low-copper diet. The boy was administered with penicillamine for decoppering and zinc supplement against copper uptake. His sister received zinc supplement alone because no clinical symptoms were observed. The boy showed normal liver function in the reexamination after 3 months of treatment.

  5. The mutation frequency of Drosophila melanogaster populations living under conditions of increased background radiation due to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainullin, V.G.; Rakin, A.O.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Myasnyankina, E.N.; Generalova, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    One of the problems facing the program in the wake of the Chernobyl accident is the estimation of genetic damage to plants and animals. Special attention was directed to studying the influence of radioactive pollutants at the accident site by means of an appropriate test system, using standard genetic subjects. The present study describes such investigations. Levels of persistent genetic damage in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster found in the vicinity of the Chernobyl accident site were examined from August 1986-September 1989. Evidence is presented which indicates a relationship between the levels of radioactive pollution resulting from the Chernobyl accident and increasing genetic damage to exposed populations. The possible reasons for the decrease of mutation frequency observed in 1988 and 1989 are also discussed. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that radiosensitive Drosophila mutants may be particularly sensitive indicators of radioactive pollution. (author). 16 refs.; 6 figs

  6. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  7. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  8. Frequency and Clinical Implication of the R450H Mutation in the Thyrotropin Receptor Gene in the Japanese Population Detected by Smart Amplification Process 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, Yoshimaro; Aoki, Tomoyuki; Morimura, Tadashi; Araki, Osamu; Kimura, Takao; Ogiwara, Takayuki; Kotajima, Nobuo; Yanagawa, Masumi; Murakami, Masami

    2014-01-01

    In Japanese pediatric patients with thyrotropin (TSH) resistance, the R450H mutation in TSH receptor gene (TSHR) is occasionally observed. We studied the frequency and clinical implication of the R450H mutation in TSHR in the general population of Japanese adults using smart amplification process 2 (SmartAmp2). We designed SmartAmp2 primer sets to detect this mutation using a drop of whole blood. We analyzed thyroid function, antithyroid antibodies, and this mutation in 429 Japanese participants who had not been found to have thyroid disease. Two cases without antithyroid antibodies were heterozygous for the R450H mutation in TSHR. Thus, the prevalence of this mutation was 0.47% in the general population and 0.63% among those without antithyroid antibodies. Their serum TSH concentrations were higher than the average TSH concentration not only in subjects without antithyroid antibodies but also in those with antithyroid antibodies. The R450H mutation in TSHR is relatively common in the Japanese population and potentially affects thyroid function. The present study demonstrates that the SmartAmp2 method is useful to detect the R450H mutation in TSHR, which is one of the common causes of TSH resistance in the Japanese population. PMID:24895636

  9. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  10. INVESTIGATION OF RANGES AND FREQUENCY OF MUTATIONS IN THE embB GENE IN MYCOBACTERIUMTUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH RESISTANCE TO ETHAMBUTOL USING REAL-TIME POLYMERASE CHAINREACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. S. Аlyapkinа

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on real-time allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, the ranges of potential mutations in codons of 306 and 405 of the embBgene in Mycobacterium tuberculosis associated with resistance to ethambutol were investigated. 5 different mutations were detected in codon 306 and 3 mutations were found in codon 406 of the embB gene. The detected mutations were confirmed by sequencing and mass spectrometry. By analyzing the frequency of detected mutations of , the set of reagents was developed for rapid testing of susceptibility tuberculous mycobacteria to ethambutol by multi-competitive allele-specific real-time PCR. Out of 107 tested specimens of clinical isolates, mutations of the embB gene of M. tuberculosis were detected in 49 (45.8% specimens, and no mutations were found in 58 (52.2% specimens. 39 (36.4% specimens had mutations in codon 306 of the embB gene, and 9 (8.4% specimens had a mutation in codon 406, and 1 (0.9% specimen had mutations in both codons 306 and 406. The high level of agreement in the results of molecular genetic and bacteriological tests (84% proved the significance of mutations in codons 306 and 406 of the embB gene in M. tuberculosis and the need for their identification in order to detect ethambutol resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. When using molecular genetic tests, the sensitivity level made 75.8%, while the specificity of standard culture-based methods makes 95.6%.

  11. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  12. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Frequency of canine nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in prone pure breeds, their crosses and mongrels in Israel - insights from a worldwide comparative perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, Yaron; Machluf, Yossy; Stoler, Aviad; Aderet, Arava; Baumel, Daniel; Kellerman, Efrat; Plotsky, Yoram; Noked Partouche, Oshrat; Elhalal, Gal; Ben-Shlomo, Izhar; Bercovich, Dani

    2017-11-13

    Sensitivity to macrocyclic lactones, which are commonly used in veterinary clinics, was first found in Rough Collies, and was attributed in 2001 to a 4 bp deletion in the MDR1 gene. The list of affected breeds currently includes 13 breeds. Researchers from different countries and continents examined the allelic frequencies of the nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation, emphasizing the clinical importance of this test not only to mutation-prone dogs, but also to their crosses and mongrels, since treatment of a deletion carrier with these compounds may lead to its death. In this study, the allelic frequencies of nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in affected breeds, their crosses, unrelated pure breeds and mongrels are reported for the state of Israel (n = 1416 dogs). The Israeli data were compared with reports from the US, Europe, UK, Australia and Japan. The allelic frequencies of nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in Israel for Australian, Swiss and German Shepherds (31%, 17% and 2.4%, respectively) are similar to the corresponding frequencies worldwide, much higher for Border Collies (4.8%), twice lower for Rough Collies (28%, compared to 55% or more elsewhere), and ~1% for mongrels. The frequencies for crosses of Australian Shepherd and Border Collies in Israel are 4 and 1.6 times lower, respectively, compared to the frequencies for the respective pure breeds. This work, that for the first time presents the frequency of nt230(del4) MDR1 mutation in Israel, along with a worldwide survey, has implications for clinicians, owners and breeders of sheepdogs and their crosses and supports the need for extra care in treatment and in future breeding. Of note, the relative proportion of affected breeds, in the overall tested dogs, might be higher than their actual proportion in Israel due to directed samples collection by veterinarians for clinical purposes, as these are mainly limited to certain affected breeds or dogs that resemble them.

  14. Frequency and phenotype of patients carrying TPM2 and TPM3 gene mutations in a cohort of 94 patients with congenital myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten

    2014-01-01

    , two related female patients and two sporadic, male patients were found to carry mutations in the tropomyosin 2 (TPM2) and tropomyosin 3 (TPM3) genes, respectively. This indicates a low (4.3%) frequency of TPM2 and TPM3 mutations as a cause of congenital myopathy. Compared to previously described...... patients carrying the same mutations as found in our study (c.503G>A, and c.502C>T in TPM3, and c.415_417delGAG in TPM2), clinical presentation and muscle morphological findings differed in our patients. Differences included variation in distribution of muscle weakness, presence of scoliosis and ptosis...... had nemaline myopathy and fiber size disproportion, while three patients had congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) on muscle biopsies. TPM2-related CFTD has only been described in two cases, indicating that mutations in TPM2 are rare causes of CFTD....

  15. Estimation of the frequency of occult mutations for an autosomal recessive disease in the presence of genetic heterogeneity: application to genetic hearing loss disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimberling, William J

    2005-11-01

    The routine testing for pathologic mutation(s) in a patient's DNA has become the foundation of modern molecular genetic diagnosis. It is especially valuable when the phenotype shows genetic heterogeneity, and its importance will grow as treatments become genotype specific. However, the technology of mutation detection is imperfect and mutations are often missed. This can be especially troublesome when dealing with a recessive disorder where the combination of genetic heterogeneity and missed mutation creates an imprecision in the genotypic assessment of individuals who do not appear to have the expected complement of two pathologic mutations. This article describes a statistical approach to the estimation of the likelihood of a genetic diagnosis under these conditions. In addition to providing a means of testing for missed mutations, it also provides a method of estimating and testing for the presence of genetic heterogeneity in the absence of linkage data. Gene frequencies as well as estimates of sensitivity and specificity can be obtained as well. The test is applied to GJB2 recessive nonsyndromic deafness, Usher syndrome types Ib and IIa, and Pendred-enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Analysis of relation between the mutation frequencies and somatic recombination induced by neutrons and the age of D. Melanogaster larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, J.; Zambrano A, F.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.; Quiroz R, C.

    1998-01-01

    Neutrons are subatomic particles with neutral electric charge, equal zero, which are emitted during the fissile material fission in nuclear reactors. It is known a little about biological effects induced by neutrons. There is a world interest in the use of reactors and accelerators for patients radiotherapy using neutrons with the purpose to destroy malignant cells of deep tumours where traditional methods have not given satisfactory results. There for it is required to do wide studies of biological effects of neutrons as well as their dosimetry. It was used the Smart test (Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test) of D. Melanogaster for quantifying the mutation induction and somatic recombination induced by neutrons of the National Institute of Nuclear Research reactor, at power of 300 and 1000 k W, with equivalent doses calculated 95.14 and 190.2 Sv for 300 k W and of 25.64 and 51.29 Sv for 1000 k W, using larvae with 72 or 96 hours aged. It was observed a linear relation between equivalent dose and genetic effects frequency, these last were greater when the reactor power was 1000 k W than those 300 k W. It was observed too that the damage was greater in 96 hours larvae than those 72 hours. The stain size presented an inverse relation with respect to larvae age. It is concluded that the Smart system is sensitive to neutrons effect and it responds of a directly proportional form to radiation dose, as well as to dose rate. It is noted more the effect when are used larvas in pre pupa stage where the irradiation target (imagal cells) is greater. The Smart is sensitive to damage induced by neutrons , thus can be used to studying its direct biological effects or by the use of chemical modulators. (Author)

  17. Effect of low dose gamma radiation on stamen-hairs of different clones of Tradescantia presenting variability in the frequency of spontaneous mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the frequency of spontaneous somatic mutations were studied for three different clones of Tradescantia heterozygotes for flower and stamen-hair color keeping them under controlled or natural conditions in order to verify the effect of different environmental conditions on the different genotypes. The effect of inflorescence age on the variation of spontaneous mutations was studied choosing young and old inflorescences of a same plant. Low dose irradiation experiments were carried out with those clones to elucidate the radiation effects on the clones presenting changes in the frequency of spontaneous mutations. The chronic-and acute irradiation effects of low dose irradiation of the stamen-hair of Tradescantia were also studied. Results are discussed. (M.A.) [pt

  18. Frequency of the hemochromatosis HFE mutations C282Y, H63D, and S65C in blood donors in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; á Steig, Torkil; Koefoed, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    on the HFE gene was assessed by genotyping using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique and calculated from direct allele counting. We found no C282Y homozygous subjects; 28 (14.0%) subjects were C282Y heterozygous and four subjects were C282Y/H63D compound heterozygous (2.0%). The C282Y allele......The aim of the study was to assess the frequencies of the hereditary hemochromatosis HFE mutations C282Y, H63D, and S65C in the population in the Faroe Islands. The series comprised 200 randomly selected blood donors of Faroese heritage. The frequency of the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations.......6%. Screening of larger groups of the Faroese population for HFE mutations especially C282Y should be considered in order to establish the penetrance....

  19. Somatic mutation frequency in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia KU 7 and KU 9 clones exposed to low-level gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, S.; Nagashima, C.; Takahashi, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Two triploid clones (KU 7 and KU 9) of Tradescantia heterozygous for flower color were exposed to 1 to 42.3R of gamma rays or the scattering radiation in the gamma field of the Institute of Radiation . Breeding. Occurrence of somatic pink mutations in the stamen hairs was investigated 10 to 16 (or 14) days after irradiation. The mutation frequency was found to increase linearly with increasing gamma-ray exposure in the both clones, and the frequencies of 0.437 and 0.468 pink mutant events per 10 3 hairs per R were determined for KU 7 and KU 9, respectively. When the data collected in the present study were analyzed together with those obtained in earlier experiments in the gamma field, linear relationships of the somatic mutation frequency with gamma-ray (2.1 to 201.6R) and scattering radiation (0.72 to 57.6R) exposures were confirmed. Scattering radiation was found to have a genetical efficiency more than two times higher than that of gamma rays. Variation of spontaneous mutation frequency observed in the present study and in earlier studies was inversely correlated to temperature variation

  20. Frequency of Tabagism and N34S and P55S Mutations of Serine Peptidase Inhibitor, Kazal Type 1 (SPINK1) and R254W Mutation of Chymotrypsin C (CTRC) in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Marianges Zadrozny Gouvêa; Pires, Júlia Glória Lucatelli; Nasser, Paulo Dominguez; Ferreira, Camila da Silva; Teixeira, Ana Cristina de Sá; Paranaguá-Vezozzo, Denise Cerqueira; Guarita, Dulce Reis; Carrilho, Flair José; Ono, Suzane Kioko

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between chronic pancreatitis and smoking or genetic mutations. The study sample comprised 148 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 110 chronic alcoholic subjects without pancreatic disease, and 297 volunteer blood donors. Of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, 74% had alcoholic etiology and 26% had idiopathic pancreatitis. The frequency of smoking was 91.4% in patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, higher than 73.3% in alcoholic subjects without pancreatitis (P pancreatitis and blood donors. The N34S mutation of serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) was found in 2.7% of patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, in 5.3% of patients with idiopathic pancreatitis, and in 0.4% of blood donors (P = 0.02). The P55S mutation of SPINK1 was found in 2.7% of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis and in 0.7% of blood donors (P = 0.12). The R254W mutation of chymotrypsin C was found in 0.9% of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, in 0.9% of chronic alcoholic subjects without pancreatitis, and in 0.4% of blood donors (P = 0.75). In all cases, the mutations were heterozygous. Smoking and the N34S mutation of SPINK1 were positively correlated with chronic pancreatitis.

  1. Frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation among women with breast cancer: an international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiyu; Phelan, Catherine M; Zhang, Phil; Rousseau, Francois; Ghadirian, Parviz; Robidoux, Andre; Foulkes, William; Hamel, Nancy; McCready, David; Trudeau, Maureen; Lynch, Henry; Horsman, Douglas; De Matsuda, Maria Lourdes Leon; Aziz, Zeba; Gomes, Magda; Costa, Mauricio Magalhaes; Liede, Alexander; Poll, Aletta; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2008-04-01

    A founder allele in the CHEK2 gene (1100delC) has been associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. This allele is responsible for the majority of CHEK2-associated breast cancers in women from northern European countries; however, within Europe, it seems to be rare in countries that are close to the Mediterranean. The frequency of the 1100delC allele has not been measured in non-White populations. We measured the frequency of the CHEK2 founder allele in 3,882 breast cancer patients and 8,609 controls from various countries. The allele was not seen among Asian patients (from Pakistan or the Philippines) and was present in 1 of 155 cases from Brazil. Among White women, the allele was present in 1.5% of 825 familial cases of breast cancer and in 0.7% of 1,106 patients with nonfamilial breast cancer. The allele was equally frequent in Jewish and non-Jewish patients. We estimate that the CHEK2 1100delC allele is associated with an odds ratio of 2.6 for breast cancer, which corresponds to a lifetime risk of approximately 24% in Ontario.

  2. Reduction of spontaneous somatic mutation frequency by a low-dose X irradiation of Drosophila larvae and possible involvement of DNA single-strand damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koana, Takao; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsujimura, Hidenobu

    2012-03-01

    The third instar larvae of Drosophila were irradiated with X rays, and the somatic mutation frequency in their wings was measured after their eclosion. In the flies with normal DNA repair and apoptosis functions, 0.2 Gy irradiation at 0.05 Gy/min reduced the frequency of the so-called small spot (mutant cell clone with reduced reproductive activity) compared with that in the sham-irradiated flies. When apoptosis was suppressed using the baculovirus p35 gene, the small spot frequency increased four times in the sham-irradiated control group, but the reduction by the 0.2-Gy irradiation was still evident. In a non-homologous end joining-deficient mutant, the small spot frequency was also reduced by 0.2 Gy radiation. In a mutant deficient in single-strand break repair, no reduction in the small spot frequency by 0.2 Gy radiation was observed, and the small spot frequency increased with the radiation dose. Large spot (mutant cell clone with normal reproductive activity) frequency was not affected by suppression of apoptosis and increased monotonically with radiation dose in wild-type larvae and in mutants for single- or double-strand break repair. It is hypothesized that some of the small spots resulted from single-strand damage and, in wild-type larvae, 0.2 Gy radiation activated the normal single-strand break repair gene, which reduced the background somatic mutation frequency.

  3. Polymorphism of the cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 gene in a European population: characterization of 48 mutations and 53 alleles, their frequencies and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marez, D; Legrand, M; Sabbagh, N; Lo Guidice, J M; Spire, C; Lafitte, J J; Meyer, U A; Broly, F

    1997-06-01

    The polymorphic cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 is involved in the metabolism of various drugs of wide therapeutic use and is a presumed susceptibility factor for certain environmentally-induced diseases. Our aim was to define the mutations and alleles of the CYP2D6 gene and to evaluate their frequencies in the European population. Using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism analysis, 672 unrelated subjects were screened for mutations in the 9 exons of the gene and their exon-intron boundaries. A total of 48 point mutations were identified, of which 29 were novel. Mutations 1749 G-->C, 2938 C-->T and 4268 G-->C represented 52.6%, 34.3% and 52.9% of the mutations in the total population, respectively. Of the eight detrimental mutations detected, the 1934 G-->A, the 1795 Tdel and the 2637 Adel accounted for 65.8%, 6.2% and 4.8% respectively, within the poor metabolizer subgroup. Fifty-three different alleles were characterized from the mutation pattern and by allele-specific sequencing. They are derived from three major alleles, namely the wild-type CYP2D6*1A, the functional CYP2D6*2 and the null CYP2D6*4A. Five allelic variants (CYP2D6*1A, *2, *2B, *4A and *5) account for about 87% of all alleles, while the remaining alleles occur with a frequency of 0.1%-2.7%. These data provide a solid basis for future epidemiological, clinical as well as interethnic studies of the CYP2D6 polymorphism and highlight that the described single strand conformation polymorphism method can be successfully used in designing such studies.

  4. Patients with primary breast and primary female genital tract diffuse large B cell lymphoma have a high frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xin-Xin; Li, Jian; Cai, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Ming-Hui; Zhou, Dao-Bin

    2017-11-01

    This study is to retrospectively evaluate the prevalence of MYD88 and CD79B mutations and the clinicopathologic characteristics of patients with primary diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the female genital tract and breast. The characteristics, treatments, and outcomes of 19 patients diagnosed with primary DLBCL of the female genital tract and breast, who had formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues obtained from diagnostic samples diagnosed between January 2004 and June 2016, were analyzed retrospectively. Nineteen female patients (7 with primary breast and 12 with primary female genital tract DLBCL) were included in this retrospective study. Eleven patients (57.9%) carried a MYD88 mutation, including 10 with MYD8 L265P and 1 with the MYD88 L265S mutation. Seven patients (36.8%) harbored a CD79B mutation, which included two cases with CD79B Y196H, two cases with CD79B Y196N, one case with CD79B Y196D, one case with CD79B Y196F, and one case with CD79B Y196X. Four cases had both MYD88 and CD79B mutations. The clinicopathologic parameters, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) of the MYD88 mutation-carrying group were not significantly different from those of the MYD88 wild-type group except for higher LDH levels. Six patients received cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP), while 13 patients received rituximab plus CHOP, and 13 patients received central nervous system prophylaxis. The median OS and PFS were 73 and 56 months, respectively. Patients with primary breast and primary female genital tract DLBCL have a high frequency of MYD88 and CD79B mutations. The presence of these mutations does not affect survival but may offer additional therapeutic options.

  5. Analysis of BRAF V600E mutation in 1,320 nervous system tumors reveals high mutation frequencies in pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma, ganglioglioma and extra-cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schindler, G.; Capper, D.; Meyer, J.; Janzarik, W.; Omran, H.; Herold-Mende, C.; Schmieder, K.; Wesseling, P.; Mawrin, C.; Hasselblatt, M.; Louis, D.N.; Korshunov, A.; Pfister, S.; Hartmann, C.; Paulus, W.; Reifenberger, G.; Deimling, A. Von

    2011-01-01

    Missense mutations of the V600E type constitute the vast majority of tumor-associated somatic alterations in the v-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) gene. Initially described in melanoma, colon and papillary thyroid carcinoma, these alterations have also been observed in primary

  6. Effect of Ku80 deficiency on mutation frequencies and spectra at a LacZ reporter locus in mouse tissues and cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita A Busuttil

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and gammaH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80-/- as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements.

  7. Influence of vegetation physiognomy, elevation and fire frequency on medium and large mammals in two protected areas of the Espinhaço Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ferreira de Pinho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objectives of this study were to determine the richness of medium and large mammal species in two protected areas of the Espinhaço Mountain Range, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil; and to investigate the factors affecting the occurrence of those species. To accomplish that we placed 49 camera traps activated by heat and motion at Rio Preto State Park (RPSP and 48 at Sempre Vivas National Park (SVNP. We also collected data on three environmental variables: vegetation physiognomy, elevation and wildfire frequency, to evaluate the influence of these factors on species richness and use intensity (inferred from camera trap detection rate by large mammals. We recorded 23 large mammal species in the two parks combined. The lowest species richness was found at the rupestrian habitat of RPSP, and in the open grasslands of SVNP. The forest and savannah physiognomies were used more intensively by large mammals. Species richness was higher and use was greater at lower elevations of RPSP. In SVNP, fire frequency did not affect species richness or use intensity. The savannah habitat had very similar richness compared to the forests of the two protected areas. The high species richness and use intensity observed in these forest habitats highlights the importance of riparian environments in the Cerrado biome. The highest species richness and use intensity observed at low elevation follows patterns found in the literature, probably due to variation in the vegetation, which results in greater resource availability. Although rupestrian habitats at high elevations of the Espinhaço Range are known to have a high degree of endemism for some taxa, large mammal richness and use were not high in this habitat. These results indicate that the protection of native vegetation at lower elevations is crucial for the long-term conservation of large mammals in the Espinhaço Range.

  8. Frequency of Antiretroviral Resistance Mutations among Infants Exposed to Single-Dose Nevirapine and Short Course Maternal Antiretroviral Regimens: ACTG A5207.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitti, Jane; Halvas, Elias K; Zheng, Lu; Panousis, Constantinos G; Kabanda, Joseph; Taulo, Frank; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Pape, Jean William; Lalloo, Umesh; Sprenger, Heather; Klingman, Karin L; Chan, Ellen S; McMahon, Deborah; Mellors, John W

    2014-11-01

    Intrapartum single-dose nevirapine (sdNVP) reduces HIV-1 perinatal transmission but selects NVP resistance among mothers and infants. We evaluated the frequency of antiretroviral resistance among infants with intrauterine HIV-1 infection exposed to sdNVP and maternal antenatal or breastfeeding antiretroviral therapy. This analysis included 429 infants from sub-Saharan Africa, India and Haiti whose 422 mothers received sdNVP plus maternal study treatment. At entry mothers had CD4>250/μL and were ART-naïve except for antenatal ZDV per local standard of care. Maternal study treatment started intrapartum and included ZDV/3TC, TDF/FTC or LPV/r for 7 or 21 days in a randomized factorial design. Infants received sdNVP study treatment and ZDV if local standard of care. Infant HIV RNA or DNA PCR and samples for genotype were obtained at birth and weeks 2, 4 and 12; infants who ever breast-fed were also tested at weeks 16, 24, 48 and 96. Samples from HIV-1-infected infants were tested for drug resistance by population genotype (ViroSeq). NVP or NRTI resistance mutations were assessed using the IAS-USA mutation list. Perinatal HIV-1 transmission occurred in 17 (4.0%) infants including 12 intrauterine infections. Resistance mutations were detected among 5 (42%) intrauterine-infected infants; of these, 3 had mutations conferring resistance to NVP alone, 1 had resistance to NRTI alone, and 1 had dual-class resistance mutations. Among the 2 infants with NRTI mutations, one (K70R) was likely maternally transmitted and one (K65R) occurred in the context of breastfeeding exposure to maternal antiretroviral therapy. Infants with intrauterine HIV infection are at risk of acquiring resistance mutations from exposure to maternal antiretroviral medications intrapartum and/or during breastfeeding. New approaches are needed to lower the risk of antiretroviral resistance in these infants.

  9. Carrier frequency of GJB2 gene mutations c.35delG, c.235delC and c.167delT among the populations of Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhemileva, Lilya U; Barashkov, Nikolay A; Posukh, Olga L; Khusainova, Rita I; Akhmetova, Vita L; Kutuev, Ildus A; Gilyazova, Irina R; Tadinova, Vera N; Fedorova, Sardana A; Khidiyatova, Irina M; Lobov, Simeon L; Khusnutdinova, Elza K

    2010-11-01

    Hearing impairment is one of the most common disorders of sensorineural function and the incidence of profound prelingual deafness is about 1 per 1000 at birth. GJB2 gene mutations make the largest contribution to hereditary hearing impairment. The spectrum and prevalence of some GJB2 mutations are known to be dependent on the ethnic origin of the population. This study presents data on the carrier frequencies of major GJB2 mutations, c.35delG, c.167delT and c.235delC, among 2308 healthy persons from 18 various populations of Eurasia: Russians, Bashkirs, Tatars, Chuvashes, Udmurts, Komi-Permyaks and Mordvins (Volga-Ural region of Russia); Belarusians and Ukrainians (East Europe); Abkhazians, Avars, Cherkessians and Ingushes (Caucasus); Kazakhs, Uighurs and Uzbeks (Central Asia); and Yakuts and Altaians (Siberia). The data on c.35delG and c.235delC mutation prevalence in the studied ethnic groups can be used to investigate the prospective founder effect in the origin and prevalence of these mutations in Eurasia and consequently in populations around the world.

  10. Maternal effects of the scid mutation on radiation-induced transgenerational instability in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatch, T.; Derijck, A.H.A.; Black, P.D.; Heijden, G.W. van der; Boer, P. de; Dubrova, Y.E.

    2007-01-01

    The results of a number of recent studies show that mutation rates in the offspring of irradiated parents are substantially elevated, however, the effect of parental genotype on transgenerational instability remains poorly understood. Here, we have analysed the mutation frequency at an expanded

  11. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Im, Kate M.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu; Green, Todd; Chow, Clement Y.; Vijai, Joseph; Korn, Joshua; Gaudet, Mia M.; Fredericksen, Zachary; Shane Pankratz, V.; Guiducci, Candace; Crenshaw, Andrew; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Asperen, Christi J.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; van Roozendaal, Cees E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Perez-Segura, Pedro; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Blecharz, Paweł; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Singer, Christian F.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Beattie, Mary S.; Chan, Salina; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Phelan, Catherine; Narod, Steven; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary-Beth; Tung, Nadine; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Durán, Mercedes; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare T.; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Paterson, Joan; Brewer, Carole; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary; Walker, Lisa; Rogers, Mark T.; Side, Lucy E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Laitman, Yael; Meindl, Alfons; Deissler, Helmut; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Klein, Robert J.; Daly, Mark J.; Friedman, Eitan; Dean, Michael; Clark, Andrew G.; Altshuler, David M.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Gold, Bert; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Houdayer, Claude; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Remenieras, Audrey; Byrde, Véronique; Caron, Olivier; Lenoir, Gilbert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Eisinger, François; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Coupier, Isabelle; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Vennin, Philippe; Adenis, Claude; Rouleau, Etienne; Lidereau, Rosette; Demange, Liliane; Nogues, Catherine; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Longy, Michel; Sevenet, Nicolas; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Cassini, Cécile; Faivre, Laurence; Prieur, Fabienne; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Frénay, Marc; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Lynch, Henry T.; Thorne, Heather; Niedermayr, Eveline; Pierotti, Marco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Ripamonti, Carla B.; Radice, Paolo; Barile, Monica; Bernard, Loris; Karlsson, Per; Nordling, Margareta; Bergman, Annika; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Liedgren, Sigrun; Borg, Åke; Loman, Niklas; Olsson, Håkan; Kristoffersson, Ulf; Jernström, Helena; Harbst, Katja; Henriksson, Karin; Lindblom, Annika; Arver, Brita; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Liljegren, Annelie; Barbany-Bustinza, Gisela; Rantala, Johanna; Melin, Beatrice; Grönberg, Henrik; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Emanuelsson, Monica; Ehrencrona, Hans; Brandell, Richard Rosenquist; Dahl, Niklas; Hogervorst, F. B. L.; Verhoef, S.; Verheus, M.; van 't Veer, L. J.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; Rookus, M. A.; Collée, M.; van den Ouweland, A. M. W.; Jager, A.; Hooning, M. J.; Tilanus-Linthorst, M. M. A.; Seynaeve, C.; van Asperen, C. J.; Wijnen, J. T.; Vreeswijk, M. P.; Tollenaar, R. A.; Devilee, P.; Ligtenberg, M. J.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Ausems, M. G.; van der Luijt, R. B.; Aalfs, C. M.; van Os, T. A.; Gille, J. J. P.; Waisfisz, Q.; Gomez-Garcia, E. B.; van Roozendaal, C. E.; Blok, Marinus J.; Caanen, B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; van der Hout, A. H.; Mourits, M. J.; Vasen, H. F.; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Gregory, Helen; Morrison, Patrick; Jeffers, Lisa; Cole, Trevor; Ong, Kai-Ren; Hoffman, Jonathan; Donaldson, Alan; James, Margaret; Downing, Sarah; Taylor, Amy; Murray, Alexandra; McCann, Emma; Kennedy, M. John; Barton, David; Drummond, Sarah; Kivuva, Emma; Searle, Anne; Goodman, Selina; Hill, Kathryn; Davidson, Rosemarie; Murday, Victoria; Bradshaw, Nicola; Snadden, Lesley; Longmuir, Mark; Watt, Catherine; Gibson, Sarah; Haque, Eshika; Tobias, Ed; Duncan, Alexis; Jacobs, Chris; Langman, Caroline; Whaite, Anna; Dorkins, Huw; Randhawa, Kashmir; Barwell, Julian; Patel, Nafisa; Adlard, Julian; Chu, Carol; Miller, Julie; Ellis, Ian; Houghton, Catherine; Lalloo, Fiona; Taylor, Jane; Side, Lucy; Male, Alison; Berlin, Cheryl; Eason, Jacqueline; Collier, Rebecca; Douglas, Fiona; Claber, Oonagh; Jobson, Irene; McLeod, Diane; Halliday, Dorothy; Durell, Sarah; Stayner, Barbara; Shanley, Susan; Rahman, Nazneen; Houlston, Richard; Bancroft, Elizabeth; D'Mello, Lucia; Page, Elizabeth; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Kohut, Kelly; Wiggins, Jennifer; Castro, Elena; Mitra, Anita; Robertson, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Quarrell, Oliver; Bardsley, Cathryn; Brice, Glen; Winchester, Lizzie; Eddy, Charlotte; Tripathi, Vishakha; Attard, Virginia; Eccles, Diana; Lucassen, Anneke; Crawford, Gillian; McBride, Donna; Smalley, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele

  12. Frequency of CCR5 Delta-32 Mutation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-seropositive and HIV-exposed Seronegative Individuals and in General Population of Medellin, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Díaz

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV does not always result in seroconversion. Modifications in coreceptors for HIV entrance to target cells are one of the factors that block the infection. We studied the frequency of Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene in Medellin, Colombia. Two hundred and eighteen individuals distributed in three different groups were analyzed for Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR: 29 HIV seropositive (SP, 39 exposed seronegative (ESN and 150 individuals as a general population sample (GPS. The frequency of the Delta-32 mutant allele was 3.8% for ESN, 2.7% for GPS and 1.7% for SP. Only one homozygous mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32 was found among the ESN (2.6%. The heterozygous genotype (ccr5/Delta-32 was found in eight GPS (5.3%, in one SP (3.4% and in one ESN (2.6%. The differences in the allelic and genotypic frequencies among the three groups were not statistically significant. A comparison between the expected and the observed genotypic frequencies showed that these frequencies were significantly different for the ESN group, which indirectly suggests a protective effect of the mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32. Since this mutant genotype explained the resistance of infection in only one of our ESN persons, different mechanisms of protection must be playing a more important role in this population.

  13. Temporal frequency of knockdown resistance mutations, F1534C and V1016G, in Aedes aegypti in Chiang Mai city, Thailand and the impact of the mutations on the efficiency of thermal fogging spray with pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plernsub, Suriya; Saingamsook, Jassada; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2016-10-01

    In Thailand, control of dengue outbreaks is currently attained by the use of space sprays, particularly thermal fogging using pyrethroids, with the aim of killing infected Aedes mosquito vectors in epidemic areas. However, the principal dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, is resistant to pyrethroids conferred mainly by mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, F1534C and V1016G, termed knockdown resistance (kdr). The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal frequencies of F1534C and V1016G in Ae. aegypti populations in relation to pyrethroid resistance in Chiang Mai city, and to evaluate the impact of the mutations on the efficacy of thermal fogging with the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Larvae and pupae were collected from several areas around Chiang Mai city during 2011-2015 and reared to adulthood for bioassays for deltamethrin susceptibility. These revealed no trend of increasing deltamethrin resistance during the study period (mortality 58.0-69.5%, average 62.8%). This corresponded to no overall change in the frequencies of the C1534 allele (0.55-0.66, average 0.62) and G1016 allele (0.34-0.45, average 0.38), determined using allele specific amplification. Only three genotypes of kdr mutations were detected: C1534 homozygous (VV/CC); G1016/C1534 double heterozygous (VG/FC); and G1016 homozygous (GG/FF) indicating that the F1534C and V1016G mutations occurred on separate haplotypic backgrounds and a lack of recombination between them to date. The F1 progeny females were used to evaluate the efficacy of thermal fogging spray with Damthrin-SP(®) (deltamethrin+S-bioallethrin+piperonyl butoxide) using a caged mosquito bioassay. The thermal fogging spray killed 100% and 61.3% of caged mosquito bioassay placed indoors and outdoors, respectively. The outdoor spray had greater killing effect on C1534 homozygous and had partially effect on double heterozygous mosquitoes, but did not kill any G1016 homozygous mutants living outdoors. As this selection

  14. Frequency of the LRRK2 G2019S mutation in late-onset sporadic patients with Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin Fen Chien

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LRRK2 gene, predominantly G2019S, have been reported in individuals with autosomal dominant inheritance and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD. The G2019S mutation has an age-dependent penetrance and evidence shows common ancestry. The clinical manifestations are indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Its prevalence varies according to the population studied ranging from less than 0.1% in Asians to 41% in North African Arabs. This study aimed to identify G2019S mutation in Brazilian idiopathic PD patients. Method: We sampled 100 PD patients and 100 age- and gender-matched controls. Genetical analysis was accomplished by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: No G2019S mutations were found in both patients with sporadic PD and controls. Conclusions: Our results may be explained by the relatively small sample size.

  15. Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) in Tunisia: Low frequencies of GCK and HNF1A mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khelifa, S; Martinez, R; Dandana, A; Khochtali, I; Ferchichi, S; Castaño, L

    2018-04-20

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is a monogenic form of diabetes characterized by autosomal dominant inheritance, an early clinical onset and a primary defect in β-cell function. Mutations in the GCK and HNF1A genes are the most common cause of MODY among Caucasians. The etiology of MODY in Tunisia stills a challenge for researchers. The aim of this study was to screen for mutations in GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS genes in North African Tunisians subjects, in whom the clinical profile was very suggestive of MODY. A total of 23 unrelated patients, with clinical presentation of MODY were tested for mutations in GCK, HNF1A, HNF4A and INS genes, using Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (DHPLC), Multiplex Ligation-depend Probe Amplification (MLPA) and sequencing analysis. We identified the previously reported mutation c-169C > T in one patient as well as a new mutation c-457C > T in two unrelated patients. No mutations were detected in the HNF1A and INS genes. Despite restrictive clinical criteria used for selecting patients in this study, the most common genes known for MODY do not explain the majority of cases in Tunisians. This suggests that there are others candidate or unidentified genes contributing to the etiology of MODY in Tunisians families. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A high current high frequency ions gun; Etude et realisation d'un canon a ions du type haute frequence a debit eleve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutant, J; Prevot, F; Vienet, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1959-07-01

    A 10 mA protons gun has been developed for different purposes. The first part of the report studies the plasma production with a RF electromagnetic field. Then the ion extraction process is analysed with particular reference to space charge phenomena. The last part describes a three electrode electrostatic lens which focusses the beam. (author) [French] Un canon a ions capable de delivrer un faisceau de protons d'une intensite de l'ordre de 10 mA a ete developpe pour differents usages. Dans la premiere partie les problemes relatifs a la production et a l'entretien d'un plasma excite par un champ electromagnetique de haute frequence sont exposes. Ensuite les auteurs analysent le mecanisme de l'extraction des ions et montrent en particulier le role de la charge d'espace. Enfin on decrit un dispositif de focalisation electrostatique a 3 electrodes. (auteur)

  17. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotouhi, Asal [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Hagos, Winta Woldai [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Gruijl, Frank de [Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • hMTH1 protects cells from mutagenesis induced by UVA and UVB, but not UVC. • No protective role of hMTH1 in cell survival post UVB and UVC irradiation. • hMTH1 prevents induction of transition-type mutations at AT and GC post UVA irradiation. • 2-OH-dATP rather than 8-oxo-dGTP in the nucleotide pool likely contributes in UVA-induced mutations. - Abstract: Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  18. Frequency of Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HFE) Gene Mutations in Egyptian Beta Thalassemia Patients and its Relation to Iron Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enein, Azza Aboul; El Dessouky, Nermine A; Mohamed, Khalda S; Botros, Shahira K A; Abd El Gawad, Mona F; Hamdy, Mona; Dyaa, Nehal

    2016-06-15

    This study aimed to detect the most common HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S56C) in Egyptian beta thalassemia major patients and its relation to their iron status. The study included 50 beta thalassemia major patients and 30 age and sex matched healthy persons as a control group. Serum ferritin, serum iron and TIBC level were measured. Detection of the three HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C) was done by PCR-RFLP analysis. Confirmation of positive cases for the mutations was done by sequencing. Neither homozygote nor carrier status for the C282Y or S65C alleles was found. The H63D heterozygous state was detected in 5/50 (10%) thalassemic patients and in 1/30 (3.3%) controls with no statistically significant difference between patients and control groups (p = 0.22). Significantly higher levels of the serum ferritin and serum iron in patients with this mutation (p = 001). Our results suggest that there is an association between H63D mutation and the severity of iron overload in thalassemic patients.

  19. Experimental Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages Results in Low-Frequency Mutations Not Associated with Selective Advantage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Guerrini

    Full Text Available Isolates of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from clinical samples exhibit genetic heterogeneity. Such variation may result from the stressful environment encountered by the pathogen inside the macrophage, which is the host cell tubercle bacilli parasitize. To study the evolution of the M. tuberculosis genome during growth inside macrophages, we developed a model of intracellular culture in which bacteria were serially passaged in macrophage-like THP-1 cells for about 80 bacterial generations. Genome sequencing of single bacterial colonies isolated before and after the infection cycles revealed that M. tuberculosis developed mutations at a rate of about 5.7 × 10-9 / bp/ generation, consistent with mutation rates calculated during in vivo infection. Analysis of mutant growth in macrophages and in mice showed that the mutations identified after the cyclic infection conferred no advantage to the mutants relative to wild-type. Furthermore, activity testing of the recombinant protein harboring one of these mutations showed that the presence of the mutation did not affect the enzymatic activity. The serial infection protocol developed in this work to study M. tuberculosis genome microevolution can be applied to exposure to stressors to determine their effect on genome remodeling during intra-macrophage growth.

  20. An inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair reduces the frequency of γ-ray mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.; Kuroda, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine, 3 - dA) is an RNA antimetabolite and a radiosensitizer in cultured mammalian cells. In the present paper, the effects of 3'-dA on γ-ray-induced lethality and 6-thioguanine (6TG)-resistant mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells were examined. 3'-dA had the effect of sensitizing the lethality induced by γ-rays. The potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair produced by post-incubation cells in Hanks' solution after γ-irradiation was almost completely suppressed by 5x10 -5 M 3'-dA. When cells were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays and incubated with 3'-dA for 5 h, the frequency of 6TG-resistant mutations induced by γ-rays decreased to 1/6 of that of the irradiated cells incubated without 3'-dA. The decrease in the frequency of γ-ray-induced mutations was dependent on the length of incubation time with 3'-dA. It is suggested that the inhibition of PLD repair by 3'-dA may be that of error-prone repair. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs

  1. A threshold in the dose-response relationship for X-ray induced somatic mutation frequency in drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, Takao; Sakai, Kazuo; Okada, M.O.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds for a long time. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays using germ cells of male fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, cancer-causing activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. In this paper, we examined the dose-response relationship of X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation in drosophila, and found a threshold at approximately 1 Gy in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was five times steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (author)

  2. Prevalence and evolution of low frequency HIV drug resistance mutations detected by ultra deep sequencing in patients experiencing first line antiretroviral therapy failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Bellecave, Pantxika; Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Reigadas, Sandrine; Bidet, Yannick; Bruyand, Mathias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Neau, Didier; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Morlat, Philippe; Masquelier, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Clinical relevance of low-frequency HIV-1 variants carrying drug resistance associated mutations (DRMs) is still unclear. We aimed to study the prevalence of low-frequency DRMs, detected by Ultra-Deep Sequencing (UDS) before antiretroviral therapy (ART) and at virological failure (VF), in HIV-1 infected patients experiencing VF on first-line ART. Twenty-nine ART-naive patients followed up in the ANRS-CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, having initiated ART between 2000 and 2009 and experiencing VF (2 plasma viral loads (VL) >500 copies/ml or one VL >1000 copies/ml) were included. Reverse transcriptase and protease DRMs were identified using Sanger sequencing (SS) and UDS at baseline (before ART initiation) and VF. Additional low-frequency variants with PI-, NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs were found by UDS at baseline and VF, significantly increasing the number of detected DRMs by 1.35 fold (plow-frequency DRMs modified ARV susceptibility predictions to the prescribed treatment for 1 patient at baseline, in whom low-frequency DRM was found at high frequency at VF, and 6 patients at VF. DRMs found at VF were rarely detected as low-frequency DRMs prior to treatment. The rare low-frequency NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs detected at baseline that correlated with the prescribed treatment were most often found at high-frequency at VF. Low frequency DRMs detected before ART initiation and at VF in patients experiencing VF on first-line ART can increase the overall burden of resistance to PI, NRTI and NNRTI.

  3. Sensitivity and Frequencies of Dystrophin Gene Mutations in Thai DMD/BMD Patients As Detected by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyachai Sura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a lethal X-linked disease affecting 1 in 3500 male births, and its more benign variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Because of its large size, analysing the whole gene is impractical. Methods have been developed to detect the commonest mutations i.e. the deletions of the exons. Although these tests are highly specific, their sensitivity is inherently limited by the prevalence of deletions, which differs among different populations.

  4. High Frequency of AML1/RUNX1 Point Mutations in Radiation-Associated Myelodysplastic Syndrome Around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    OpenAIRE

    Dinara, ZHARLYGANOVA; Hironori, HARADA; Yuka, HARADA; Sergey, SHINKAREV; Zhaxybay, ZHUMADILOV; Aigul, ZHUNUSOVA; Naylya J., TCHAIZHUNUSOVA; Kazbek N., APSALIKOV; Vadim, KEMAIKIN; Kassym, ZHUMADILOV; Noriyuki, KAWANO; Akiro, KIMURA; Masaharu, HOSHI; Department of Radiation Biophysics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University; Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University

    2008-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow is a sensitive organ to ionizing radiation, and many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have been diagnosed in radiation-treated cases and atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The AML1/RUNX1 gene has been known to be frequently mutated in MDS/AML patients among atomic bomb survivors and radiation therapy-related MDS/AML patients. In this study, we investigated the AML1 mutations in radiation-exposed patients wi...

  5. Elevated Frequencies of Micronuclei and other Nuclear Abnormalities of Chrome Plating Workers Occupationally Exposed to Hexavalent Chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, S; Kripa, S K; Shibily, P; Shyn, J

    2011-01-01

    Biomonitoring provides a useful tool to estimate the genetic risk from exposure to genotoxic agents. The aim of this study was to assess the potential cytogenetic damage associated with occupational exposure to hexavalent chromium by using micronuclei (MN) as a biomarker. This was a cross-sectional study and all participants were males. Both the exposed and control individuals were selected from Coimbatore, Southern India. Exfoliated buccal cells from 44 chrome plating workers and 40 age and sex matched control subjects were examined for MN frequency and nuclear abnormalities (NA) other than micronuclei, such as binucleates, broken eggs, karyorrhexis, karyolysis and pyknosis. Results showed statistically significant difference between chrome plating workers and control groups. MN and NA frequencies in chrome plating workers were significantly higher than those in control groups (p chrome plating workers are under risk of significant cytogenetic damage. Therefore, there is a need to educate those who work with heavy metals about the potential hazard of occupational exposure and the importance of using protective measures.

  6. High frequencies of elevated alkaline phosphatase activity and rickets exist in extremely low birth weight infants despite current nutritional support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Bruce R

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopenia and rickets are common among extremely low birth weight infants (ELBW, Methods We evaluated all ELBW infants admitted to Texas Children's Hospital NICU in 2006 and 2007. Of 211 admissions, we excluded 98 patients who were admitted at >30 days of age or did not survive/stay for >6 weeks. Bone radiographs obtained in 32 infants were reviewed by a radiologist masked to laboratory values. Results In this cohort of 113 infants, P-APA was found to have a significant inverse relationship with BW, gestational age and serum phosphorus. In paired comparisons, P-APA of infants Conclusion Elevation of P-APA >600 IU/L was very common in ELBW infants. BW was significantly inversely related to both P-APA and radiologic rickets. No single value of P-APA was related to radiological findings of rickets. Given the very high risk of osteopenia and rickets among ELBW infants, we recommend consideration of early screening and early mineral supplementation, especially among infants

  7. Frequency of V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Aedes aegypti in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Leslie C; Ponce, Gustavo; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Lopez, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2015-06-01

    The V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene have been associated with resistance to pyrethroids and DDT in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. A study was carried out to determine the frequency of I1016 and C1534 by real-time PCR in five natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela during 2008, 2010 and 2012, as well as in a strain selected with 0.14 µg of deltamethrin for 15 generations. In natural populations, frequencies of I1016 varied between 0.01 and 0.37, and frequencies of C1534 between 0.35 and 1.0. In the Pampanito strain, the frequency of I1016 increased from 0.02 in F1 up to 0.5 in F15 and from 0.35 up to fixation for C1534 after selection with deltamethrin. The results showed that C1534 frequencies are higher than I1016 frequencies in natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela, and that deltamethrin selected the C1534 more rapidly than I1016. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  9. Regional Patterns of Elevated Alpha and High-Frequency Electroencephalographic Activity during Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep in Chronic Insomnia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedner, Brady A.; Goldstein, Michael R.; Plante, David T.; Rumble, Meredith E.; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in insomnia using high-density electroencephalography (EEG). Methods: All-night sleep recordings with 256 channel high-density EEG were analyzed for 8 insomnia subjects (5 females) and 8 sex and age-matched controls without sleep complaints. Spectral analyses were conducted using unpaired t-tests and topographical differences between groups were assessed using statistical non-parametric mapping. Five minute segments of deep NREM sleep were further analyzed using sLORETA cortical source imaging. Results: The initial topographic analysis of all-night NREM sleep EEG revealed that insomnia subjects had more high-frequency EEG activity (> 16 Hz) compared to good sleeping controls and that the difference between groups was widespread across the scalp. In addition, the analysis also showed that there was a more circumscribed difference in theta (4–8 Hz) and alpha (8–12 Hz) power bands between groups. When deep NREM sleep (N3) was examined separately, the high-frequency difference between groups diminished, whereas the higher regional alpha activity in insomnia subjects persisted. Source imaging analysis demonstrated that sensory and sensorimotor cortical areas consistently exhibited elevated levels of alpha activity during deep NREM sleep in insomnia subjects relative to good sleeping controls. Conclusions: These results suggest that even during the deepest stage of sleep, sensory and sensorimotor areas in insomnia subjects may still be relatively active compared to control subjects and to the rest of the sleeping brain. Citation: Riedner BA, Goldstein MR, Plante DT, Rumble ME, Ferrarelli F, Tononi G, Benca RM. Regional patterns of elevated alpha and high-frequency electroencephalographic activity during nonrapid eye movement sleep in chronic insomnia: a pilot study. SLEEP 2016;39(4):801–812. PMID:26943465

  10. Frequency of the HFE C282Y and H63D mutations in Danish patients with clinical haemochromatosis initially diagnosed by phenotypic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Koefoed, Pernille; Pedersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations on the HFE gene in Danish patients with clinical hereditary haemochromatosis initially diagnosed by phenotypic methods. METHODS: In the period 1950-1985, an epidemiological survey in Denmark identified 179 patients with clinical...... diagnosis of clinical idiopathic haemochromatosis was made before blood samples were taken for HFE genotyping. The total series consisted of 58 patients (40 men and 18 women) with a median age of 60 yrs (range 18-74). HFE genotyping was performed by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. RESULTS...

  11. Frequent mutations of genes encoding ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis pathway components in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Guangwu; Gui, Yaoting; Gao, Shengjie

    2012-01-01

    We sequenced whole exomes of ten clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and performed a screen of similar to 1,100 genes in 88 additional ccRCCs, from which we discovered 12 previously unidentified genes mutated at elevated frequencies in ccRCC. Notably, we detected frequent mutations in the u...

  12. Effects of Loading Frequency on Fatigue Behavior, Residual Stress, and Microstructure of Deep-Rolled Stainless Steel AISI 304 at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, I.; Juijerm, P.

    2018-02-01

    The effects of loading frequency on the fatigue behavior of non-deep-rolled (NDR) and deep-rolled (DR) austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 were systematically clarified at elevated temperatures, especially at temperatures exhibiting the dynamic strain aging (DSA) phenomena. Tension-compression fatigue tests were performed isothermally at temperatures of 573 K and 773 K (300 °C and 500 °C) with different loading frequencies of 5, 0.5, 0.05, and 0.005 Hz. For the DR condition, the residual stresses and work-hardening states will be presented. It was found that DSA would be detected at appropriate temperatures and deformation rates. The cyclic deformation curves and the fatigue lives of the investigated austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 are considerably affected by the DSA, especially on the DR condition having high dislocation densities at the surface and in near-surface regions. In the temperature range of the DSA, residual stresses and work-hardening states of the DR condition seem to be stabilized. The microstructural alterations were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). At an appropriate temperature with low loading frequency, the plastic deformation mechanism shifted from a wavy slip manner to a planar slip manner in the DSA regimes, whereas the dislocation movements were obstructed.

  13. Frequency of c.35delG Mutation in GJB2 Gene (Connexin 26 in Syrian Patients with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Kaheel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hearing impairments (HI are the most common birth defect worldwide. Very large numbers of genes have been identified but the most profound is GJB2. The clinical interest regarding this gene is very pronounced due to its high carrier frequency (0.5–5.4% across different ethnic groups. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of common GJB2 mutations in Syrian patients with profound sensorineural HI. Methods. We carried out PCR, restriction enzyme based screening, and sequencing of 132 Syrian patients diagnosed clinically with hereditary deafness for different GJB2 mutations. Results. The result revealed that, in GJB2 gene, c.35delG is the most prevalent among affected studied subjects (13.64%, followed by c.457G>A (2.4%. Conclusion. The benefit of this study on the one hand is its first report of prelingual deafness causative gene mutations identified by sequencing technology in the Syrian families. It is obvious from the results that the deployment in biomedical research is highly effective and has a great impact on the ability to uncover the cause of genetic variation in different genetic diseases.

  14. SLC45A2 mutation frequency in Oculocutaneous Albinism Italian patients doesn't differ from other European studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Lucia; Barone, Luca; Al Oum, Muna; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Manfredini, Emanuela; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Penco, Silvana; Patrosso, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases involving hair, skin and eyes. To date, six forms are recognized on the effects of different melanogenesis genes. OCA4 is caused by mutations in SLC45A2 showing a heterogeneous phenotype ranging from white hair, blue irides and nystagmus to brown/black hair, brown irides and no nystagmus. The high clinic variety often leads to misdiagnosis. Our aim is to contribute to OCA4 diagnosis defining SLC45A2 genetic variants in Italian patients with OCA without any TYR, OCA2 and TYRP1 gene defects. After the clinical diagnosis of OCA, all patients received genetic counseling and genetic test. Automatic sequencing of TYR, OCA2, and TYRP1 genes was performed on DNA of 117 albino patients. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) was carried out on TYR and OCA2 genes to increase the mutation rate. SLC45A2 gene sequencing was then executed in the patients with a single mutation in one of the TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 genes and in the patients, which resulted negative at the screening of these genes. SLC45A2 gene analysis was performed in 41 patients and gene alterations were found in 5 patients. Four previously reported SLC45A2 mutations were found: p.G100S, p.W202C, p.A511E and c.986delC, and three novel variants were identified: p.M265L, p.H94D, and c.1156+1G>A. All the alterations have been detected in the group of patients without mutations in the other OCA genes. Three new variants were identified in OCA4 gene; the analysis allowed the classification of a patient previously misdiagnosed as OA1 because of skin and hair pigmentation presence. The molecular defects in SLC45A2 gene represent the 3.4% in this cohort of Italian patients, similar to other Caucasian populations; our data differ from those previously published by an Italian researcher group, obtained on a smaller cohort of patients. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The frequency of a disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S

    1993-01-01

    A number of rare inherited metabolic disorders are known to lead to death in infancy. Deficiency of medium-chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase has, on clinical grounds, been related particularly to sudden infant death syndrome. The contribution of this disorder to the etiology of sudden infant death...... syndrome is still a matter of controversy. The present study investigated 120 well-defined cases of sudden infant death syndrome in order to detect the frequency of the most common disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (G985) compared with the frequency...... in the general population. A highly specific polymerase chain reaction assay was applied on dried blood spots. No over-representation of homo- or heterozygosity for G985 appears to exist in such a strictly defined population, for which reason it may be more relevant to look at a broader spectrum of clinical...

  16. Resistance to DDT and pyrethroids and increased kdr mutation frequency in An. gambiae after the implementation of permethrin-treated nets in Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou O Ndiath

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility to insecticides of An. gambiae mosquitoes sampled in Dielmo (Senegal, in 2010, 2 years after the implementation of Long Lasting Insecticide-treated Nets (LLINs and to report the evolution of kdr mutation frequency from 2006 to 2010.WHO bioassay susceptibility tests to 6 insecticides were performed on adults F0, issuing from immature stages of An. gambiae s.l., sampled in August 2010. Species and molecular forms as well as the presence of L1014F and L1014S kdr mutations were assessed by PCR. Longitudinal study of kdr mutations was performed on adult mosquitoes sampled monthly by night landing catches from 2006 to 2010.No specimen studied presented the L1014S mutation. During the longitudinal study, L1014F allelic frequency rose from 2.4% in year before the implementation of LLINs to 4.6% 0-12 months after and 18.7% 13-30 months after. In 2010, An. gambiae were resistant to DDT, Lambda-cyhalothrin, Deltamethrin and Permethrin (mortality rates ranging from 46 to 63% but highly susceptible to Fenitrothion and Bendiocarb (100% mortality. There was significantly more RR genotype among An. gambiae surviving exposure to DDT or Pyrethroids. An. arabiensis represented 3.7% of the sampled mosquitoes (11/300 with no kdr resistance allele detected. An. gambiae molecular form M represented 29.7% of the mosquitoes with, among them, kdr genotypes SR (18% and SS (82%. An. gambiae molecular form S represented 66% of the population with, among them, kdr genotype SS (33.3%, SR (55.6% and RR (11.1%. Only 2 MS hybrid mosquitoes were sampled and presented SS kdr genotype.Biological evidence of resistance to DDT and pyrethroids was detected among An. gambiae mosquitoes in Dielmo (Senegal within 24 months of community use of LLINs. Molecular identification of L1014F mutation indicated that target site resistance increased after the implementation of LLINs.

  17. Allele frequencies of hemojuvelin gene (HJV I222N and G320V missense mutations in white and African American subjects from the general Alabama population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohannon Sean B

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for coding region mutations of the hemojuvelin gene (HJV in whites is a cause of early age-of-onset iron overload (juvenile hemochromatosis, and of hemochromatosis phenotypes in some young or middle-aged adults. HJV coding region mutations have also been identified recently in African American primary iron overload and control subjects. Primary iron overload unexplained by typical hemochromatosis-associated HFE genotypes is common in white and black adults in Alabama, and HJV I222N and G320V were detected in a white Alabama juvenile hemochromatosis index patient. Thus, we estimated the frequency of the HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V in adult whites and African Americans from Alabama general population convenience samples. Methods We evaluated the genomic DNA of 241 Alabama white and 124 African American adults who reported no history of hemochromatosis or iron overload to detect HJV missense mutations I222N and G320V using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. Analysis for HJV I222N was performed in 240 whites and 124 African Americans. Analysis for HJV G320V was performed in 241 whites and 118 African Americans. Results One of 240 white control subjects was heterozygous for HJV I222N; she was also heterozygous for HFE C282Y, but had normal serum iron measures and bone marrow iron stores. HJV I222N was not detected in 124 African American subjects. HJV G320V was not detected in 241 white or 118 African American subjects. Conclusions HJV I222N and G320V are probably uncommon causes or modifiers of primary iron overload in adult whites and African Americans in Alabama. Double heterozygosity for HJV I222N and HFE C282Y may not promote increased iron absorption.

  18. Few apparent short-term effects of elevated soil temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation on the abundance and taxonomic diversity of desert soil micro- and meso-fauna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, B.J.; Neher, D.A.; Housman, D.C.; Belnap, J.

    2011-01-01

    Frequent hydration and drying of soils in arid systems can accelerate desert carbon and nitrogen mobilization due to respiration, microbial death, and release of intracellular solutes. Because desert microinvertebrates can mediate nutrient cycling, and the autotrophic components of crusts are known to be sensitive to rapid desiccation due to elevated temperatures after wetting events, we studied whether altered soil temperature and frequency of summer precipitation can also affect the composition of food web consumer functional groups. We conducted a two-year field study with experimentally-elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation in the Colorado Plateau desert, measuring the change in abundance of nematodes, protozoans, and microarthropods. We hypothesized that microfauna would be more adversely affected by the combination of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than either effect alone, as found previously for phototrophic crust biota. Microfauna experienced normal seasonal fluctuations in abundance, but the effect of elevated temperature and frequency of summer precipitation was statistically non-significant for most microfaunal groups, except amoebae. The seasonal increase in abundance of amoebae was reduced with combined elevated temperature and increased frequency of summer precipitation compared to either treatment alone, but comparable with control (untreated) plots. Based on our findings, we suggest that desert soil microfauna are relatively more tolerant to increases in ambient temperature and frequency of summer precipitation than the autotrophic components of biological soil crust at the surface.

  19. Mutation in the α2 isoform of Na,K-ATPase associated Familial Hemiplegic Migraine type 2 (FHM2) leads to elevated contractility and vasodilatation of cerebral arteries in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hangaard, Lise; Lykke-Hartmann, Karin; Xie, Zijian

    is associated with few point mutations in the α2 isoform Na,K-ATPase. Mice bearing a mutation corresponding to the inherited mutation in FHM2 patients (G301R) were used in functional studies of middle cerebral arteries. Middle cerebral arteries from heterozygote G301R mice were not different in total α2 Na......,K-ATPase mRNA in comparison with WT, but 51±11% of their mRNA contained G301R mutation. G301R mice had elevated blood pressure and unchanged heart rate. Inner diameter of cerebral arteries from G301R mice was significantly larger than in WT. G301R arteries were more sensitive and had higher maximal...... contraction to U46619, endothelin and K+-depolarization. This was associated with increased depolarization and sensitization to [Ca2+]i (in spite of reduced Ca2+ influx) in G301R arteries. pNaKtide, a peptide inhibiting the Na,K-ATPase-dependent Src activation, abolished differences between G301R and WT mice...

  20. Effect of uvs1, uvs2 and xrs mutations on the radiosensitivity and the induced mitotic recombination frequency in diploid yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslova, N.G.; Fedorova, I.V.; Zheleznyakova, N.Yu.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of the loci of radiosensitivity uvs1, uvs2, and xrs in the homozygous state at the diploid level on the sensitivity to UV and ionizing radiation and induced mitotic recombination was studied in the yeast Sacch. cerevisiae. Hypersensitivity to UV irradiation was detected in the diploids uvs2 uvs2 xrs xrs in comparision with the corresponding control. The diploid uvs1 uvs1 uvs2 uvs2 does not differ in UV sensitivity from the diploid uvs1 uvs1 UVS2 UVS2. These facts demonstrate that the uvs1 and uvs2 mutations, on the one hand, and the xrs mutations, on the other, normally control different pathways of elimination of UV-induced damages. It was shown that the diploid uvs2 uvs2 xrs3 xrs3 is far more sensitive to the lethal action of x rays than the control diploid UVS2 UVS2 xrs3 xrs3. Consequently, the mutations uvs2 and xrs3 block different modes of repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation. In all the double-mutant diploids, the frequency of mitotic recombination induced by UV rays increases sharply in comparison with that of the radioresistant diploids UVS UVS XRS XRS and the UV-sensitive diploids uvs2 uvs2 XRS XRS. Possible causes of the observed phenomenon are discussed. It was established that in a diploid homozygous for the loci uvs2 xrs5, the frequency of mitotic recombination induced by x rays increases extremely sharply. This fact confirms the hypothesis that the gene product of the locus uvs2 participates in the repair of DNA after the action of ionizing radiation. (author)

  1. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Lotte F; Ciofu, Oana; Kirkby, N

    2009-01-01

    ,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased β-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found...... in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent...

  2. Regional Patterns of Elevated Alpha and High-Frequency Electroencephalographic Activity during Nonrapid Eye Movement Sleep in Chronic Insomnia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedner, Brady A; Goldstein, Michael R; Plante, David T; Rumble, Meredith E; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Tononi, Giulio; Benca, Ruth M

    2016-04-01

    To examine nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in insomnia using high-density electroencephalography (EEG). All-night sleep recordings with 256 channel high-density EEG were analyzed for 8 insomnia subjects (5 females) and 8 sex and age-matched controls without sleep complaints. Spectral analyses were conducted using unpaired t-tests and topographical differences between groups were assessed using statistical non-parametric mapping. Five minute segments of deep NREM sleep were further analyzed using sLORETA cortical source imaging. The initial topographic analysis of all-night NREM sleep EEG revealed that insomnia subjects had more high-frequency EEG activity (> 16 Hz) compared to good sleeping controls and that the difference between groups was widespread across the scalp. In addition, the analysis also showed that there was a more circumscribed difference in theta (4-8 Hz) and alpha (8-12 Hz) power bands between groups. When deep NREM sleep (N3) was examined separately, the high-frequency difference between groups diminished, whereas the higher regional alpha activity in insomnia subjects persisted. Source imaging analysis demonstrated that sensory and sensorimotor cortical areas consistently exhibited elevated levels of alpha activity during deep NREM sleep in insomnia subjects relative to good sleeping controls. These results suggest that even during the deepest stage of sleep, sensory and sensorimotor areas in insomnia subjects may still be relatively active compared to control subjects and to the rest of the sleeping brain. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. TED, an Autonomous and Rare Maize Transposon of the Mutator Superfamily with a High Gametophytic Excision Frequency[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor. PMID:24038653

  4. Influence of radiation exposure rate on somatic mutation frequency and loss of reproductive integrity in tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, S.; Nauman, C.H.; Sparrow, A.H.; Takahashi, C.S.

    1978-01-01

    Inflorescences of Tradescantia clone 02 (2n=12), hetero- or hemi-zygous for flower color, were exposed to a series of γ-ray exposures at two different exposure rates, 29.3 R/min and 0.026-0.52 R/min. Pink mutation-response curves, and survival curves based on reproductive integrity, were constructed for each of the exposure rates. Loss of reproductive integrity was also assessed at high (256 R/min) and low (0.52-4.17 R/min) γ-ray exposure rates in T. blossfeldiana (2n=72). All observations were made on stamen hairs. The higher exposure rate was 1.3-1.7 times more effective in inducing pink mutations in clone 02. A greater efficiency of the higher exposure rate was also found for both taxa at the loss of reproductive integrity endpoint. The D 0 values obtained at the higher exposure rates, 154 R for clone 02 and 720 R for T. blossfeldiana, were significantly lower than the corresponding values of 270 R and 1880 R obtained at the lower exposure rates. These D 0 's differ by factors of 1.75 and 2.61 for clone 02 and T. blossfeldiana, respectively. D 0 's for the two taxa were found to be inversely correlated with their interphase chromosome volumes. (Auth.)

  5. TED, an autonomous and rare maize transposon of the mutator superfamily with a high gametophytic excision frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K

    2013-09-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor.

  6. Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa is highly prevalent in the Jerusalem region with a high frequency of founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Dror; Banin, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is the most common inherited retinal degeneration, and prevalence of the disease has been reported in populations of American and European origin with a relatively low consanguinity rate. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in the Jerusalem region, which has a population of about 1 million individuals with a high rate of consanguinity. The patients' clinical data included eye exam findings (visual acuity, anterior segment, and funduscopy) as well as electroretinographic (ERG) testing results under scotopic and photopic conditions. Mutation analysis on a subgroup of patients was performed mainly with candidate gene analysis and homozygosity mapping. We evaluated the medical records of patients with degenerative retinal diseases residing in the Jerusalem region who were examined over the past 20 years in a large tertiary medical center. A total of 453 individuals affected with nonsyndromic RP were diagnosed at our center, according to funduscopic findings and ERG testing. Based on the estimated population size of 945,000 individuals who reside in the vicinity of Jerusalem, the prevalence of nonsyndromic RP in this region is 1:2,086. The prevalence of RP was higher among Arab Muslims (1:1,798) compared to Jews (1:2,230), mainly due to consanguineous marriages that are more common in the Arab Muslim population. To identify the genetic causes of RP in our cohort, we recruited 383 patients from 183 different families for genetic analysis: 70 with autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance, 15 with autosomal dominant, 86 isolate cases, and 12 with an X-linked inheritance pattern. In 64 (35%) of the families, we identified the genetic cause of the disease, and we revised the inheritance pattern of 20 isolate cases to the AR pattern; 49% of the families in our cohort had AR inheritance. Interestingly, in 42 (66%) of the genetically identified families, the cause of disease was a founder mutation. Previous studies

  7. Mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) are a common cause of low frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bespalova, I.N.; Camp, G. van; Bom, S.J.H.; Brown, D.J.; Cryns, K.; Wan, A.T. de; Erson, A.E.; Flothmann, K.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Kurnool, P.; Sivakumaran, T.A.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Leal, S.M.; Burmeister, M.; Lesperance, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) affecting only 2000 Hz and below is an unusual type of hearing loss that worsens over time without progressing to profound deafness. This type of LFSNHL may be associated with mild tinnitus but is not associated with vertigo. We have

  8. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) mutation induction in the male germline: Lessons learned from lab mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, Christopher M. [University of Regina, Department of Biology, 3737 Wascana Parkway, Regina, SK, S4S 0A2 (Canada)]. E-mail: chris.somers@uregina.ca

    2006-06-25

    Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) DNA loci that are unstable in the germline have provided the most sensitive tool ever developed for investigating low-dose heritable mutation induction in laboratory mice. Ionizing radiation exposures have shown that ESTR mutations occur mainly in pre-meiotic spermatogonia and stem cells. The average spermatogonial doubling dose is 0.62-0.69 Gy for low LET, and 0.18-0.34 Gy for high LET radiation. Chemical alkylating agents also cause significant ESTR mutation induction in pre-meiotic spermatogonia and stem cells, but are much less effective per unit dose than radiation. ESTR mutation induction efficiency is maximal at low doses of radiation or chemical mutagens, and may decrease at higher dose ranges. DNA repair deficient mice (SCID and PARP-1) with elevated levels of single and double-strand DNA breaks have spontaneously elevated ESTR mutation frequencies, and surprisingly do not show additional ESTR mutation induction following irradiation. In contrast, ESTR mutation induction in p53 knock-outs is indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice. Studies of sentinel mice exposed in situ to ambient air pollution showed elevated ESTR mutation frequencies in males exposed to high levels of particulate matter. These studies highlight the application of the ESTR assay for assessing environmental hazards under real-world conditions. All ESTR studies to date have shown untargeted mutations that occur at much higher frequencies than predicted. The mechanism of this untargeted mutation induction is unknown, and must be elucidated before we can fully understand the biological significance of ESTR mutations, or use these markers for formal risk assessment. Future studies should focus on the mechanism of ESTR mutation induction, refining dose responses, and developing ESTR markers for other animal species.

  9. Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) mutation induction in the male germline: Lessons learned from lab mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somers, Christopher M.

    2006-01-01

    Expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) DNA loci that are unstable in the germline have provided the most sensitive tool ever developed for investigating low-dose heritable mutation induction in laboratory mice. Ionizing radiation exposures have shown that ESTR mutations occur mainly in pre-meiotic spermatogonia and stem cells. The average spermatogonial doubling dose is 0.62-0.69 Gy for low LET, and 0.18-0.34 Gy for high LET radiation. Chemical alkylating agents also cause significant ESTR mutation induction in pre-meiotic spermatogonia and stem cells, but are much less effective per unit dose than radiation. ESTR mutation induction efficiency is maximal at low doses of radiation or chemical mutagens, and may decrease at higher dose ranges. DNA repair deficient mice (SCID and PARP-1) with elevated levels of single and double-strand DNA breaks have spontaneously elevated ESTR mutation frequencies, and surprisingly do not show additional ESTR mutation induction following irradiation. In contrast, ESTR mutation induction in p53 knock-outs is indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice. Studies of sentinel mice exposed in situ to ambient air pollution showed elevated ESTR mutation frequencies in males exposed to high levels of particulate matter. These studies highlight the application of the ESTR assay for assessing environmental hazards under real-world conditions. All ESTR studies to date have shown untargeted mutations that occur at much higher frequencies than predicted. The mechanism of this untargeted mutation induction is unknown, and must be elucidated before we can fully understand the biological significance of ESTR mutations, or use these markers for formal risk assessment. Future studies should focus on the mechanism of ESTR mutation induction, refining dose responses, and developing ESTR markers for other animal species

  10. Specific-locus mutation frequencies in mouse stem-cell spermatogonia at very low radiation dose rates, and their use in the estimation of genetic hazards of radiation in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.; Kelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to augment the information on the lowest radiation dose rates feasible for scoring transmitted induced mutations detected by the specific-locus method in the mouse. This is the type of information most suitable for estimating genetic hazards of radiation in man. The results also aid in resolving conflicting possibilities about the relationship between mutation frequency and radiation dose at low dose rates

  11. Induced micro-mutations in rice - the frequency and spectrum of gamma ray induced height variations in rice variety-Jaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, N.K.; Ninan, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Seeds of rice variety, Jaya, treated with moderate doses of (10, 20 and 30 kR) gamma rays were subjected to study the relative magnitude of induced variability and the type of mutations induced for height of plant in M 2 and M 3 generations. Progenies of 3352 M 1 spikes, totalling to 35691 M 2 plants and their subsequent progenies in M 3 were analysed. To get wider variability, very large populations in all the generations were studied. The mean value, genetic variance and phenotypic frequency distribution with and between generations were studied. The treated population showed no significant shift in mean values from that of control. The variance was greater in the irradiated material compared to control. The variability was found to shift in both plus and minus direction from that of control with a higher frequency in the minus direction in M 2 . A high frequency of dwarf mutants was observed in 20 kR treated population in the M 2 generation. The segregation ratio was higher in M 2 compared to M 3 generation. (author)

  12. Efficient molecular screening of Lynch syndrome by specific 3' promoter methylation of the MLH1 or BRAF mutation in colorectal cancer with high-frequency microsatellite instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Hitoshi; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Cullings, Harry M; Notohara, Kenji; Hoshijima, Naoko; Young, Joanne; Lynch, Henry T; Tanaka, Noriaki; Matsubara, Nagahide

    2009-06-01

    It is sometimes difficult to diagnose Lynch syndrome by the simple but strict clinical criteria, or even by the definitive genetic testing for causative germline mutation of mismatch repair genes. Thus, some practical and efficient screening strategy to select highly possible Lynch syndrome patients is exceedingly desirable. We performed a comprehensive study to evaluate the methylation status of whole MLH1 promoter region by direct bisulfite sequencing of the entire MLH1 promoter regions on Lynch and non-Lynch colorectal cancers (CRCs). Then, we established a convenient assay to detect methylation in key CpG islands responsible for the silencing of MLH1 expression. We studied the methylation status of MLH1 as well as the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) and immunohistochemical analysis of mismatch repair proteins on 16 cases of Lynch CRC and 19 cases of sporadic CRCs with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H). Sensitivity to detect Lynch syndrome by MLH1 (CCAAT) methylation was 88% and the specificity was 84%. Positive likelihood ratio (PLR) was 5.5 and negative likelihood ratio (NLR) was 0.15. Sensitivity by mutational analysis of BRAF was 100%, specificity was 84%, PLR was 6.3 and NLR was zero. By CIMP analysis; sensitivity was 88%, specificity was 79%, PLR was 4.2, and NLR was 0.16. BRAF mutation or MLH1 methylation analysis combined with MSI testing could be a good alternative to screen Lynch syndrome patients in a cost effective manner. Although the assay for CIMP status also showed acceptable sensitivity and specificity, it may not be practical because of its rather complicated assay.

  13. Incidence and Carrier Frequency of CFTR Gene Mutations in Pregnancies With Echogenic Bowel in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle E; Allen, Victoria M; Brock, Jo-Ann K

    2018-03-01

    Fetal echogenic bowel (echogenic bowel) is associated with cystic fibrosis (CF), with a reported incidence ranging from 1% to 13%. Prenatal testing for CF in the setting of echogenic bowel can be done by screening parental or fetal samples for pathogenic CFTR variants. If only one pathogenic variant is identified, sequencing of the CFTR gene can be undertaken, to identify a second pathogenic variant not covered in the standard screening panel. Full gene sequencing, however, also introduces the potential to identify variants of uncertain significance (VUSs) that can create counselling challenges and cause parental anxiety. To provide accurate counselling for families in the study population, the incidence of CF associated with echogenic bowel and the carrier frequency of CFTR variants were investigated. All pregnancies for which CF testing was undertaken for the indication of echogenic bowel (from Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island) were identified (January 2007-July 2017). The CFTR screening and sequencing results were reviewed, and fetal outcomes related to CF were assessed. A total of 463 pregnancies with echogenic bowel were tested. Four were confirmed to be affected with CF, giving an incidence of 0.9% in this cohort. The carrier frequency of CF among all parents in the cohort was 5.0% (1 in 20); however, when excluding parents of affected fetuses, the carrier frequency for the population was estimated at 4.1% (1 in 25). CFTR gene sequencing identified an additional VUS in two samples. The incidence of CF in pregnancies with echogenic bowel in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island is 0.9%, with an estimated population carrier frequency of 4.1%. These results provide the basis for improved counselling to assess the risk of CF in the pregnancy, after parental carrier screening, using Bayesian probability. Counselling regarding VUSs should be undertaken before gene sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by

  14. Enhancement of gamma-ray-induced mutation frequency in rice by post-treatment with chloral hydrate, methanol and their mixtures with ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, T.P.; Vaidyanath, K.

    1979-01-01

    An evaluation has been made of the mutagenic activity of ethanol, chlorate hydrate (CH) and methanol on rice seed. In independent treatments with ethanol, methanol, CH and four aqueous mixtures of these chemicals, chlorophyll-deficient mutants were not recovered in the M 2 generation. However, in sequential treatments with gamma rays + CH, gamma rays + methanol and gamma rays + aqueous mixtures of these chemicals, significant increases in the yields of chlorophyll mutations were observed as compared to that of a 30 kR gamma ray treatment. In contrast, post-irradiation treatment with ethanol failed to provoke any increase in the frequency of chlorophyll mutants in the M 2 generation. The results indicate that CH and methanol alone and mixed with ethanol can potentiate gamma ray-induced genetic lesions in rice seed. (author)

  15. Elevated frequencies of CD8 T cells expressing PD-1, CTLA-4 and Tim-3 within tumour from perineural squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linedale, Richard; Schmidt, Campbell; King, Brigid T; Ganko, Annabelle G; Simpson, Fiona; Panizza, Benedict J; Leggatt, Graham R

    2017-01-01

    Perineural spread of tumour cells along cranial nerves is a severe complication of primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. While surgical excision of the tumour is the treatment of choice, removal of all the tumour is often complicated by the neural location and recurrence is frequent. Non-invasive immune treatments such as checkpoint inhibitor blockade may be useful in this set of tumours although little is understood about the immune response to perineural spread of squamous cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry studies suggest that perineural tumour contains a lymphocyte infiltrate but it is difficult to quantitate the different proportions of immune cell subsets and expression of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1, Tim-3 and CTLA-4. Using flow cytometry of excised perineural tumour tissue, we show that a T cell infiltrate is prominent in addition to less frequent B cell, NK cell and NKT cell infiltrates. CD8 T cells are more frequent than other T cells in the tumour tissue. Amongst CD8 T cells, the frequency of Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 expressing cells was significantly greater in the tumour relative to the blood, a pattern that was repeated for Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 amongst non-CD8 T cells. Using immunohistochemistry, PD-1 and PD-L1-expression could be detected in close proximity amongst perineural tumour tissue. The data suggest that perineural SCC contains a mixture of immune cells with a predominant T cell infiltrate containing CD8 T cells. Elevated frequencies of tumour-associated Tim-3+, CTLA-4+ and PD-1+ CD8 T cells suggests that a subset of patients may benefit from local antibody blockade of these checkpoint inhibitors.

  16. Elevated frequencies of CD8 T cells expressing PD-1, CTLA-4 and Tim-3 within tumour from perineural squamous cell carcinoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Linedale

    Full Text Available Perineural spread of tumour cells along cranial nerves is a severe complication of primary cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region. While surgical excision of the tumour is the treatment of choice, removal of all the tumour is often complicated by the neural location and recurrence is frequent. Non-invasive immune treatments such as checkpoint inhibitor blockade may be useful in this set of tumours although little is understood about the immune response to perineural spread of squamous cell carcinomas. Immunohistochemistry studies suggest that perineural tumour contains a lymphocyte infiltrate but it is difficult to quantitate the different proportions of immune cell subsets and expression of checkpoint molecules such as PD-1, Tim-3 and CTLA-4. Using flow cytometry of excised perineural tumour tissue, we show that a T cell infiltrate is prominent in addition to less frequent B cell, NK cell and NKT cell infiltrates. CD8 T cells are more frequent than other T cells in the tumour tissue. Amongst CD8 T cells, the frequency of Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 expressing cells was significantly greater in the tumour relative to the blood, a pattern that was repeated for Tim-3, CTLA-4 and PD-1 amongst non-CD8 T cells. Using immunohistochemistry, PD-1 and PD-L1-expression could be detected in close proximity amongst perineural tumour tissue. The data suggest that perineural SCC contains a mixture of immune cells with a predominant T cell infiltrate containing CD8 T cells. Elevated frequencies of tumour-associated Tim-3+, CTLA-4+ and PD-1+ CD8 T cells suggests that a subset of patients may benefit from local antibody blockade of these checkpoint inhibitors.

  17. Mutator activity in Schizophyllum commune

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shneyour, Y.; Koltin, Y. (Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Dept. of Microbiology)

    1983-01-01

    A strain with an elevated level of spontaneous mutations and an especially high rate of reversion at a specific locus (pab/sup -/) was identified. The mutator trait is recessive. UV sensitivity and the absence of a UV-specific endonucleolytic activity were associated with the enhancement of the mutation rate in mutator strains. The endonuclease associated with the regulation of the mutation rate also acted on single-stranded DNA. The molecular weight of this enzyme is about 38,000 daltons.

  18. Frequencies of CCR5-D32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3’A mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV seropositive subjects and seronegative individuals from the state of Pará in Brazilian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Andreza de Pinho Lott Carvalhaes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of genetic polymorphisms of chemokine receptors CCR5-delta32, CCR2-64I and chemokine (SDF1-3’A mutations were studied in 110 Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 seropositive individuals (seropositive group and 139 seronegative individuals (seronegative group from the population of the northern Brazilian city of Belém which is the capital of the state of Pará in the Brazilian Amazon. The CCR5-delta32 mutation was found in the two groups at similar frequencies, i.e. 2.2% for the seronegative group and 2.7% for the seropositive group. The frequencies of the SDF1-3’A mutation were 21.0% for the seronegative group and 15.4% for the seropositive group, and the CCR2-64I allele was found at frequencies of 12.5% for the seronegative group and 5.4% for the seropositive group. Genotype distributions were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations in both groups, suggesting that none of the three mutations has a detectable selective effect. Difference in the allelic and genotypic frequencies was statistically significant for the CCR2 locus, the frequency in the seronegative group being twice that found in the seropositive group. This finding may indicate a protective effect of the CCR2-64I mutation in relation to HIV transmission. However, considering that the CCR2-64I mutation has been more strongly associated with a decreased risk for progression for AIDS than to the resistance to the HIV infection, this could reflect an aspect of population structure or a Type I error.

  19. Serotonin decreases the production of Th1/Th17 cytokines and elevates the frequency of regulatory CD4+ T cell subsets in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, Priscila M; Monteiro, Clarice; Dias, Aleida S O; Kasahara, Taissa M; Ferreira, Thaís B; Hygino, Joana; Wing, Ana Cristina; Andrade, Regis M; Rueda, Fernanda; Sales, Marisa C; Vasconcelos, Claudia Cristina; Bento, Cleonice A M

    2018-05-02

    Excessive levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the central nervous system (CNS) are associated with reduced serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, a neurotransmitter with diverse immune effects. In this study, we evaluated the ability of exogenous 5-HT to modulate the T-cell behavior of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a demyelinating autoimmune disease mediated by Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Here, 5-HT attenuated, in vitro, T-cell proliferation and Th1 and Th17 cytokines production in cell cultures from MS patients. Additionally, 5-HT reduced IFN-γ and IL-17 release by CD8 + T-cells. By contrast, 5-HT increased IL-10 production by CD4 + T-cells from MS patients. A more accurate analysis of these IL-10-secreting CD4 + T-cells revealed that 5-HT favors the expansion of FoxP3 + CD39 + regulatory T cells (Tregs) and type 1 regulatory T cells. Notably, this neurotransmitter also elevated the frequency of Treg17 cells, a novel regulatory T-cell subset. The effect of 5-HT in up-regulating CD39 + Treg and Treg17 cells was inversely correlated with the number of active brain lesions. Finally, in addition to directly reducing cytokine production by purified Th1 and Th17 cells, 5-HT enhanced in vitro Treg function. In summary, our data suggest that serotonin may play a protective role in the pathogenesis of MS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. High frequency of the recurrent c.1310_1313delAAGA BRCA2 mutation in the North-East of Morocco and implication for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Mezzouar, Loubna; Doubaj, Yassamine; Bouguenouch, Laila; Ouldim, Karim; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-02

    To date, a limited number of BRCA1/2 germline mutations have been reported in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in the Moroccan population. Less than 20 different mutations of these two genes have been identified in Moroccan patients, and recently we reported a further BRCA2 mutation (c.1310_1313delAAGA; p.Lys437IlefsX22) in three unrelated patients, all from the North-East of the country. We aimed in this study to evaluate the frequency and geographic distribution of this BRCA2 frameshift mutation, in order to access its use as the first-line BRCA genetic testing strategy for Moroccan patients. We enrolled in this study 122 patients from different regions of Morocco, with suggestive inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers. All subjects gave written informed consent to BRCA1/2 genetic testing. According to available resources of our lab and enrolled families, 51 patients were analyzed by the conventional individual exon-by-exon Sanger sequencing, 23 patients were able to benefit from a BRCA next generation sequencing and a target screening for exon 10 of BRCA2 gene was performed in 48 patients. Overall, and among the 122 patients analyzed for at least the exon 10 of the BRCA2 gene, the c.1310_1313delAAGA frameshift mutation was found in 14 patients. Genealogic investigation revealed that all carriers of this mutation shared the same geographic origin and were descendants of the North-East of Morocco. In this study, we highlighted that c.1310_1313delAAGA mutation of BRCA2 gene is recurrent with high frequency in patients from the North-East region of Morocco. Therefore, we propose to use, in public health strategies, the detection of this mutation as the first-line screening tests in patients with breast and ovarian cancer originated from this region.

  1. Early Death in Two Patients with Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Presenting the bcr3 Isoform, FLT3-ITD Mutation, and Elevated WT1 Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Greco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major advances in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, the problem of early death (ED remains unsolved. Alongside the currently known clinical and hematological risk factors, prognostic significance has been attributed to internal tandem duplication mutations of the fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3-ITD, hypogranular variant morphology, and the bcr-3 isoform of PML-RARα. We describe premature death of two patients with the hypogranular variant of APL who presented remarkably high expression levels of Wilms' tumor gene (WT1. Our results point to WT1 as an important prognostic factor of ED that needs to be promptly evaluated in all newly diagnosed cases of APL.

  2. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects.

  3. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  4. Characterization of an aquaporin-2 water channel gene mutation causing partial nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in a Mexican family: evidence of increased frequency of the mutation in the town of origin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boccalandro, C.; Mattia, F.P. de; Guo, D.C.; Xue, L.; Orlander, P.; King, T.M.; Gupta, P.; Deen, P.M.T.; Lavis, V.R.; Milewicz, D.M.

    2004-01-01

    A Mexican family with partial congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) that resulted from a mutation in the aquaporin-2 water channel (AQP2) was characterized, and the source of this rare mutation was traced to the family's town of origin in Mexico. Affected individuals with profound polyuria

  5. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Danielle P; Daeumer, Martin; Thielen, Alexander; Chang, Silvia; Martin, Ross; Cohen, Cal; Miller, Michael D; White, Kirsten L

    2015-12-07

    At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR) study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF) developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV)/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq) was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33), as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118). Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20%) were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study.

  6. Emergent HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Were Not Present at Low-Frequency at Baseline in Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor-Treated Subjects in the STaR Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle P. Porter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At Week 96 of the Single-Tablet Regimen (STaR study, more treatment-naïve subjects that received rilpivirine/emtricitabine/tenofovir DF (RPV/FTC/TDF developed resistance mutations compared to those treated with efavirenz (EFV/FTC/TDF by population sequencing. Furthermore, more RPV/FTC/TDF-treated subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA >100,000 copies/mL developed resistance compared to subjects with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≤100,000 copies/mL. Here, deep sequencing was utilized to assess the presence of pre-existing low-frequency variants in subjects with and without resistance development in the STaR study. Deep sequencing (Illumina MiSeq was performed on baseline and virologic failure samples for all subjects analyzed for resistance by population sequencing during the clinical study (n = 33, as well as baseline samples from control subjects with virologic response (n = 118. Primary NRTI or NNRTI drug resistance mutations present at low frequency (≥2% to 20% were detected in 6.6% of baseline samples by deep sequencing, all of which occurred in control subjects. Deep sequencing results were generally consistent with population sequencing but detected additional primary NNRTI and NRTI resistance mutations at virologic failure in seven samples. HIV-1 drug resistance mutations emerging while on RPV/FTC/TDF or EFV/FTC/TDF treatment were not present at low frequency at baseline in the STaR study.

  7. Transthyretin Ala36Pro mutation in a Chinese pedigree of familial transthyretin amyloidosis with elevated vitreous and serum vascular endothelial growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xuan; Dong, Fangtian; Zhang, Shuying; Tian, Rong; Sui, Ruifang

    2013-05-01

    The familial transthyretin (TTR) amyloidosis (FTA) demonstrates variable penetrance of clinical features associated with mutations in the plasma thyroid hormone-binding protein TTR gene. The purpose of this study was to assess the ocular features, to analyze vitreous and serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels, and to identify the genetic defect in a Chinese family with TTR FTA. The pedigree of interest was a three-generation family with eleven members. The primary ocular signs were vitreous opacities, beginning from the third or fourth decade, accompanied by retinal vasculitis, hemorrhages, and widespread pinpoint deposits in the peripheral retina. Two patients underwent vitrectomy with marked improvement of visual acuity postoperatively. Vitreous and serum samples for VEGF were analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Forty-eight healthy adult volunteers were enrolled as a control group for the analysis of serum VEGF. Eight subjects who underwent vitrectomy for a macular epiretinal membrane or macular hole were enrolled as control for the analysis of vitreous VEGF. Both serum and vitreous VEGF levels of patients were raised compared to that of controls. Venous blood was collected from family members and the genomic DNA was extracted. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the TTR gene were sequenced. A previously-described pathogenic transversion in exon 2 (c.G106C, p.Ala36Pro) was identified. Within this family eight individuals were confirmed as affected. In conclusion, a Chinese family with TTR Ala36Pro associated FTA is characterized by early ocular involvement. Widespread pinpoint lesions indicate RPE lesions caused by TTR deposition. FTA is associated with increased VEGF levels, both in serum and vitreous. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequency and cell survival of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 by treatment before irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.; Rinaldi, C.N.

    1984-01-01

    The UV radiation survival curve of exponentially growing cultures of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 was modified by pretreatment for short incubation periods (up to 20 min) with chloramphenicol such that an extended exponential section of intermediate slope appeared between the shoulder and the final exponential slope. Surges of mutation to tryptophan independence occurred with each increase in slope of the survival curve. These surges were separated by extended sections of little mutation. Nalidixic acid prevented both the changes in survival and mutation. Mutation curves obtained with overnight cultures had three extended sections of little mutation alternating with section of high mutation. Reincubation for 60 min in fresh medium reduced or eliminated the low-response sections. These reappeared after 80 to 90 min, when DNA had doubled in the culture and before the initial synchronous cell divisions had occurred. Nalidixic acid prevented this reappearance

  9. Studies on mutation techniques in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    Synthetical techniques for improving rice mutation breeding efficiency were studied. The techniques consist of corresponding relationship between radiosensitivity and mutation frequency, choosing appropriate materials, combination of physical and chemical mutagens, mutagenic effects of the new mutagenic agents as proton, ions, synchronous irradiation and space mutation. These techniques and methods for inducing mutations are very valuable to increase inducing mutation efficiency and breeding level

  10. Normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations: characterization of neuroendocrine phenotypes and novel mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Francou

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: TAC3/TACR3 mutations have been reported in normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH (OMIM #146110. In the absence of animal models, studies of human neuroendocrine phenotypes associated with neurokinin B and NK3R receptor dysfunction can help to decipher the pathophysiology of this signaling pathway. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of TAC3/TACR3 mutations, characterize novel TACR3 mutations and to analyze neuroendocrine profiles in nCHH caused by deleterious TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations. RESULTS: From a cohort of 352 CHH, we selected 173 nCHH patients and identified nine patients carrying TAC3 or TACR3 variants (5.2%. We describe here 7 of these TACR3 variants (1 frameshift and 2 nonsense deleterious mutations and 4 missense variants found in 5 subjects. Modeling and functional studies of the latter demonstrated the deleterious consequence of one missense mutation (Tyr267Asn probably caused by the misfolding of the mutated NK3R protein. We found a statistically significant (p<0.0001 higher mean FSH/LH ratio in 11 nCHH patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations than in 47 nCHH patients with either biallelic mutations in KISS1R, GNRHR, or with no identified mutations and than in 50 Kallmann patients with mutations in KAL1, FGFR1 or PROK2/PROKR2. Three patients with TAC3/TACR3 biallelic mutations had an apulsatile LH profile but low-frequency alpha-subunit pulses. Pulsatile GnRH administration increased alpha-subunit pulsatile frequency and reduced the FSH/LH ratio. CONCLUSION: The gonadotropin axis dysfunction associated with nCHH due to TAC3/TACR3 mutations is related to a low GnRH pulsatile frequency leading to a low frequency of alpha-subunit pulses and to an elevated FSH/LH ratio. This ratio might be useful for pre-screening nCHH patients for TAC3/TACR3 mutations.

  11. An alternative derivation of the stationary distribution of the multivariate neutral Wright-Fisher model for low mutation rates with a view to mutation rate estimation from site frequency data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrempf, Dominik; Hobolth, Asger

    2017-04-01

    Recently, Burden and Tang (2016) provided an analytical expression for the stationary distribution of the multivariate neutral Wright-Fisher model with low mutation rates. In this paper we present a simple, alternative derivation that illustrates the approximation. Our proof is based on the discrete multivariate boundary mutation model which has three key ingredients. First, the decoupled Moran model is used to describe genetic drift. Second, low mutation rates are assumed by limiting mutations to monomorphic states. Third, the mutation rate matrix is separated into a time-reversible part and a flux part, as suggested by Burden and Tang (2016). An application of our result to data from several great apes reveals that the assumption of stationarity may be inadequate or that other evolutionary forces like selection or biased gene conversion are acting. Furthermore we find that the model with a reversible mutation rate matrix provides a reasonably good fit to the data compared to the one with a non-reversible mutation rate matrix. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The ABCA4 2588G>C Stargardt mutation: single origin and increasing frequency from South-West to North-East Europe.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maugeri, A.; Flothmann, K.; Hemmrich, N.; Ingvast, S.; Jorge, P.; Paloma, E.; Patel, R.; Rozet, J.M.; Tammur, J.; Testa, F.; Balcells, S.; Bird, A.C.; Brunner, H.G.; Hoyng, C.B.; Metspalu, A.; Simonelli, F.; Allikmets, R.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Urso, M. D'; Gonzalez-Duarte, R.; Kaplan, J.; Meerman, G.J. te; Santos, R.L.; Schwartz, M.; Camp, G. van; Wadelius, C.; Weber, B.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    Inherited retinal dystrophies represent the most important cause of vision impairment in adolescence, affecting approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Mutations of the photoreceptor-specific gene ABCA4 (ABCR) are a common cause of retinal dystrophy. A number of mutations have been repeatedly

  13. The ABCA4 2588G > C Stargardt mutation : Single origin and increasing frequency from South-West to North-East Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maugeri, A; Flothmann, K; Hemmrich, N; Ingvast, S; Jorge, P; Paloma, E; Patel, R; Rozet, JM; Tammur, J; Testa, F; Balcells, S; Bird, AC; Brunner, HG; Hoyng, CB; Metspalu, A; Simonelli, F; Allikmets, R; Bhattacharya, SS; D'Urso, M; Gonzalez-Duarte, R; Kaplan, J; Meerman, GJT; Santoss, R; Schwartz, M; Van Camp, G; Wadelius, C; Weber, BHF; Cremers, FPM

    Inherited retinal dystrophies represent the most important cause of vision impairment in adolescence, affecting approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Mutations of the photoreceptor-specific gene ABCA4 (ABCR) are a common cause of retinal dystrophy. A number of mutations have been repeatedly

  14. The role of SLC2A1 mutations in myoclonic astatic epilepsy and absence epilepsy, and the estimated frequency of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Johannesen, Katrine Marie; Ek, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    The first mutations identified in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) protein of the blood-brain barrier, were associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. Recently, dominant SLC2A1 mutations were found in rare autosomal dominant families with various forms of epilepsy inc...

  15. Frequency of the allelic variant c.1150T > C in exon 10 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is not increased in patients with pathogenic mutations and related chondrodysplasia phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiane Yoshie Kanazawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the FGFR3 gene cause the phenotypic spectrum of FGFR3 chondrodysplasias ranging from lethal forms to the milder phenotype seen in hypochondroplasia (Hch. The p.N540K mutation in the FGFR3 gene occurs in ~70% of individuals with Hch, and nearly 30% of individuals with the Hch phenotype have no mutations in the FGFR3, which suggests genetic heterogeneity. The identification of a severe case of Hch associated with the typical mutation c.1620C > A and the occurrence of a c.1150T > C change that resulted in a p.F384L in exon 10, together with the suspicion that this second change could be a modulator of the phenotype, prompted us to investigate this hypothesis in a cohort of patients. An analysis of 48 patients with FGFR3 chondrodysplasia phenotypes and 330 healthy (control individuals revealed no significant difference in the frequency of the C allele at the c.1150 position (p = 0.34. One patient carrying the combination `pathogenic mutation plus the allelic variant c.1150T > C' had a typical achondroplasia (Ach phenotype. In addition, three other patients with atypical phenotypes showed no association with the allelic variant. Together, these results do not support the hypothesis of a modulatory role for the c.1150T > C change in the FGFR3 gene.

  16. Preceding weak noise sharpens the frequency tuning and elevates the response threshold of the mouse inferior collicular neurons through GABAergic inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Jen, Philip H-S; Wu, Fei-Jian; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2007-09-05

    In acoustic communication, animals must extract biologically relevant signals that are embedded in noisy environment. The present study examines how weak noise may affect the auditory sensitivity of neurons in the central nucleus of the mouse inferior colliculus (IC) which receives convergent excitatory and inhibitory inputs from both lower and higher auditory centers. Specifically, we studied the frequency sensitivity and minimum threshold of IC neurons using a pure tone probe and a weak white noise masker under forward masking paradigm. For most IC neurons, probe-elicited response was decreased by a weak white noise that was presented at a specific gap (i.e. time window). When presented within this time window, weak noise masking sharpened the frequency tuning curve and increased the minimum threshold of IC neurons. The degree of weak noise masking of these two measurements increased with noise duration. Sharpening of the frequency tuning curve and increasing of the minimum threshold of IC neurons during weak noise masking were mostly mediated through GABAergic inhibition. In addition, sharpening of frequency tuning curve by the weak noise masker was more effective at the high than at low frequency limb. These data indicate that in the real world the ambient noise may improve frequency sensitivity of IC neurons through GABAergic inhibition while inevitably decrease the frequency response range and sensitivity of IC neurons.

  17. Genotyping of friesian horses to detect a hydrocephalus-associated c.1423C>T mutation in B3GALNT2 using PCR-RFLP and PCR-PIRA methods: Frequency in stallion horses in México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Valdovinos, Miguel Angel; Galindo-García, Jorge; Sánchez-Chiprés, David; Duifhuis-Rivera, Theodor

    2017-04-01

    Hydrocephalus in Friesian horses is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease that can result in an abortion, a stillbirth, or euthanization of a newborn foal. Here, the hydrocephalus-associated c.1423C > T mutation in B3GALNT2 gene was detected with PCR-RFLP and PCR-PIRA methods for horse genotyping. A preliminary genotyping survey was performed on 83 randomly selected Friesian stallion horses to determine the current allele frequency in Mexico. The frequency of the mutant T allele was 9.6%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutagenic effects of gamma rays on the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll and viable macro mutations in chilli (Capsicum annuum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangaiah, S.; Manjunath, A.; Puttaramanaik

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, uniform dry and healthy seeds of two cultivars of chilli namely Ceylon and Byadagi were exposed to 60 Co gamma rays at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40 krad doses at BARC, Mumbai. Thus there were total 18 treatments, eight different doses of gamma rays and one control in each cultivar. The M2 populations were compared with the respective control populations for chlorophyll and viable mutations. The treated populations were compared with the respective control populations for chlorophyll mutations (M2 and M3) and viable mutations (M2)' The results of the study are presented

  19. High BRAF Mutation Frequency and Marked Survival Differences in Subgroups According to KRAS/BRAF Mutation Status and Tumor Tissue Availability in a Prospective Population-Based Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorbye, Halfdan; Dragomir, Anca; Sundström, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    were analyzed in a prospectively collected unselected population-based cohort of 798 non-resectable mCRC patients. The cohort contained many patients with poor performance status (39% PS 2-4) and elderly (37% age>75), groups usually not included in clinical trials. Patients without available tissue...... patients. Median survival in this cohort varied from 1 month in BRAF mutated patients not given chemotherapy to 26 months in wildtype KRAS/BRAF patients availability, BRAF mutation and KRAS mutation were all independent prognostic factors for survival. The observed 21% BRAF......CRC patients. Survival in unselected metastatic colorectal cancer patients is extremely variable and subgroups have an extremely short survival compared to trial patients. Patients without available TMA had worse prognostic factors and shorter survival, which questions the total generalizability of present TMA...

  20. Different effects of dose rate on radiation-induced mutation frequency in various germ-cell stages of the mouse, and their implications for the analysis of tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The following factors affecting mutation induction by radiation in mice are discussed: dose rate, cell stage, and sex. It is suggested that for cancers of presumed mutational origin, the risk from chronic radiation exposure may be only one-third the risk from acute exposure. This is based only on responses of spermatogonia; other cell types behave quite differently. Specific and general applications are discussed

  1. Loss of function JAK1 mutations occur at high frequency in cancers with microsatellite instability and are suggestive of immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacker, Lee A; Wu, Jeremy; Smith, Peter; Warmuth, Markus; Stephens, Philip J; Zhu, Ping; Yu, Lihua; Chmielecki, Juliann

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion is a well-recognized hallmark of cancer and recent studies with immunotherapy agents have suggested that tumors with increased numbers of neoantigens elicit greater immune responses. We hypothesized that the immune system presents a common selective pressure on high mutation burden tumors and therefore immune evasion mutations would be enriched in high mutation burden tumors. The JAK family of kinases is required for the signaling of a host of immune modulators in tumor, stromal, and immune cells. Therefore, we analyzed alterations in this family for the hypothesized signature of an immune evasion mutation. Here, we searched a database of 61,704 unique solid tumors for alterations in the JAK family kinases (JAK1/2/3, TYK2). We used The Cancer Genome Atlas and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data to confirm and extend our findings by analyzing gene expression patterns. Recurrent frameshift mutations in JAK1 were associated with high mutation burden and microsatellite instability. These mutations occurred in multiple tumor types including endometrial, colorectal, stomach, and prostate carcinomas. Analyzing gene expression signatures in endometrial and stomach adenocarcinomas revealed that tumors with a JAK1 frameshift exhibited reduced expression of interferon response signatures and multiple anti-tumor immune signatures. Importantly, endometrial cancer cell lines exhibited similar gene expression changes that were expected to be tumor cell intrinsic (e.g. interferon response) but not those expected to be tumor cell extrinsic (e.g. NK cells). From these data, we derive two primary conclusions: 1) JAK1 frameshifts are loss of function alterations that represent a potential pan-cancer adaptation to immune responses against tumors with microsatellite instability; 2) The mechanism by which JAK1 loss of function contributes to tumor immune evasion is likely associated with loss of the JAK1-mediated interferon response.

  2. Genetic study of the BRAF gene reveals new variants and high frequency of the V600E mutation among Iranian ameloblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Mohsenifar, Zhaleh; Pourreza, Mohammad Reza; Moridnia, Abbas; Shariati, Laleh; Razavi, Seyyed Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign, slow-growing and locally invasive tumor. It is one of the most prevalent odontogenic tumors, with an incidence rate of 1% of all oral tumors and approximately 18% of odontogenic tumors. A group of genes have been investigated in patients with ameloblastoma. The BRAF V600E mutation has been implicated as the most common mutation in ameloblastoma. The presence or absence of this mutation has been associated with several clinicopathological properties, including location, age at diagnosis, histology, and prognosis. Although some populations have been investigated so far, little data are available on the Iranian population. The current research was launched to study the BRAF V600E mutation among a cohort of Iranian patients with ameloblastoma. In this clinicopathological and molecular biology study, a total of 19 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were studied. DNA extraction was performed, followed by PCR-sequencing of exons 10 and 15 of the BRAF gene to identify mutations. In silico analysis was performed for the identified variants. Results were analyzed by T test, Chi-square, and Fisher's exact test. Totally, 12 of 19 samples (63%) harbored the p. V600E hotspot mutation. In addition, we identified several variants, two of which were novel. The c.1769T>G (p. V590G) and c.1751C>T (p.L584F) as the novel variants showed a possible damaging effect by in silico analysis. No variant was found within exon 10. Our study confirms the role of BRAF mutations in ameloblastoma in the Iranian patients studied. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The effects of duration of pre-soaking treatments on the frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by sodium azide in CES 14 Mungbean variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asencion, A.B.

    1982-04-01

    Seeds of mungbean variety CES 14 were treated with 10 - 3 sodium azide for 2 hours buffered at pH 3 after various pre-soaking treatment durations of 0, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 hours. The biological parameters that were significantly affected by the treatments in the M 1 were germination, seedling height and survival. The chlorophyll and other morphological mutations in the M 2 gradually increased with increasing pre-soaking time. The treatment that had the lowest mutation rate was the 16-hour pre-soaked seeds. No chlorophyll mutation was noted in both the water and buffer control. One variant was noted, however, in the buffer control. (author)

  4. A Threshold Exists in the Dose-response Relationship for Somatic Mutation Frequency Inducted by X-ray Irradiation of Drosophia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, T.; Takashima, Y.; Okada, M. O.; Ikehata, M.; Miyakoshi, J.; Sakai, K.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays in the male germ cells of fruits fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, carcinogenic activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. Here, the dose-response relationship of X- ray irradiation and somatic mutation is examined in Drosophila. A threshold at approximately 1Gy was observed in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was much steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (Author) 35 refs

  5. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation) in Yemen: an urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Azazy, Ahmed A; Fong, Mun Yik

    2011-05-27

    Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR) of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates). Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8%) (p = 0.031). The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045). Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001), low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027), no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025) and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs) (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01). Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.

  6. The mutation frequency of 8-oxo-7,8 dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) situated in a multiply damaged site: comparison of a single and two closely opposed 8-oxodG in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyarchuk, S.G.; Youngblood, R.C.; Landry, A.M.; Quillin, E.; Harrison, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A multiply damaged site (MDS) is defined as >= two lesions within a distance of 10-15 base pairs (bp). MDS generated by ionizing radiation contains oxidative base damage, and in vitro studies have indicated that if the base damage is less than 3 bp apart, repair of one lesion is inhibited until repair of the lesion in the opposite strand is completed. Inhibition of repair could result in an increase in the mutation frequency of the base damage. We have designed an assay to determine whether a closely opposed lesion causes an increase in adenine insertion opposite an 8-oxodG in bacteria. The double-stranded oligonucleotides (with no damage, each single 8-oxodG or the MDS) were ligated into the firefly luciferase coding region of a reporter vector and transformed into wild type or MutY-deficient bacteria. The MDS contained an 8-oxodG in the transcribed strand (T) and a second 8-oxodG immediately 5' to this lesion in the non-transcribed strand (NT). During two rounds of replication, insertion of adenine opposite the 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand results in a translation termination codon at position 444 or 445, respectively. In wild-type bacteria, we detected a translation stop at a frequency of 0.15% (codon 444) and 0.09% (codon 445) with a single 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand, respectively. This was enhanced ∼3 fold when single lesions were replicated in MutY-deficient bacteria. Positioning an 8-oxodG in the T strand within the MDS enhanced the mutation frequency by ∼2 fold in wild-type bacteria and 8 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria, while the mutation frequency of the 8-oxodG in the NT strand increased by 6 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria. This enhancement of mutation frequency supports the in vitro MDS studies, which demonstrated the inability of base excision repair to completely repair closely opposed lesions

  7. The frequencies and clinical implications of mutations in 33 kinase-related genes in locally advanced rectal cancer: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, Khairun I

    2014-08-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3\\/4 and\\/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative\\/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes.

  8. Features of the non-collinear one-phonon anomalous light scattering controlled by elastic waves with elevated linear losses: potentials for multi-frequency parallel spectrum analysis of radio-wave signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S; Arellanes, Adan Omar

    2017-12-01

    During subsequent development of the recently proposed multi-frequency parallel spectrometer for precise spectrum analysis of wideband radio-wave signals, we study potentials of new acousto-optical cells exploiting selected crystalline materials at the limits of their capabilities. Characterizing these wide-aperture cells is non-trivial due to new features inherent in the chosen regime of an advanced non-collinear one-phonon anomalous light scattering by elastic waves with significantly elevated acoustic losses. These features can be observed simpler in uniaxial, tetragonal, and trigonal crystals possessing linear acoustic attenuation. We demonstrate that formerly studied additional degree of freedom, revealed initially for multi-phonon regimes of acousto-optical interaction, can be identified within the one-phonon geometry as well and exploited for designing new cells. We clarify the role of varying the central acoustic frequency and acoustic attenuation using the identified degree of freedom. Therewith, we are strongly restricted by a linear regime of acousto-optical interaction to avoid the origin of multi-phonon processes within carrying out a multi-frequency parallel spectrum analysis of radio-wave signals. Proof-of-principle experiments confirm the developed approaches and illustrate their applicability to innovative technique for an advanced spectrum analysis of wideband radio-wave signals with the improved resolution in an extended frequency range.

  9. Frequency and phenotypic spectrum of germline mutations in POLE and seven other polymerase genes in 266 patients with colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spier, Isabel; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Altmüller, Janine; Zhao, Bixiao; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Vogt, Stefanie; Chen, Sophia; Morak, Monika; Raeder, Susanne; Kayser, Katrin; Stienen, Dietlinde; Adam, Ronja; Nürnberg, Peter; Plotz, Guido; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Lifton, Richard P; Thiele, Holger; Hoffmann, Per; Steinke, Verena; Aretz, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    In a number of families with colorectal adenomatous polyposis or suspected Lynch syndrome/HNPCC, no germline alteration in the APC, MUTYH, or mismatch repair (MMR) genes are found. Missense mutations in the polymerase genes POLE and POLD1 have recently been identified as rare cause of multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, a condition termed polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical relevance and phenotypic spectrum of polymerase germline mutations. Therefore, targeted sequencing of the polymerase genes POLD1, POLD2, POLD3, POLD4, POLE, POLE2, POLE3 and POLE4 was performed in 266 unrelated patients with polyposis or fulfilled Amsterdam criteria. The POLE mutation c.1270C>G;p.Leu424Val was detected in four unrelated patients. The mutation was present in 1.5% (4/266) of all patients, 4% (3/77) of all familial cases and 7% (2/30) of familial polyposis cases. The colorectal phenotype in 14 affected individuals ranged from typical adenomatous polyposis to a HNPCC phenotype, with high intrafamilial variability. Multiple colorectal carcinomas and duodenal adenomas were common, and one case of duodenal carcinoma was reported. Additionally, various extraintestinal lesions were evident. Nine further putative pathogenic variants were identified. The most promising was c.1306C>T;p.Pro436Ser in POLE. In conclusion, a PPAP was identified in a substantial number of polyposis and familial colorectal cancer patients. Screening for polymerase proofreading mutations should therefore be considered, particularly in unexplained familial cases. The present study broadens the phenotypic spectrum of PPAP to duodenal adenomas and carcinomas, and identified novel, potentially pathogenic variants in four polymerase genes. © 2014 UICC.

  10. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  11. Effect of Elevated Intracranial Pressure on Amplitudes and Frequency Tuning of Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials Elicited by Bone-Conducted Vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürkov, Robert; Speierer, Guillaume; Wittwer, Luis; Kalla, Roger

    Recently, it could be demonstrated that an increased intracranial pressure causes a modulation of the air conducted sound evoked ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP). The mechanism for this modulation is not resolved and may depend on a change of either receptor excitability or sound energy transmission. oVEMPs were elicited in 18 healthy subjects with a minishaker delivering 500 and 1000 Hz tone bursts, in supine and tilted positions. The study could confirm the frequency tuning of oVEMP. However, at neither stimulus frequency could a modulating effect of increased intracranial pressure be observed. These data suggest that the observed modulation of the oVEMP response by an increased intracranial pressure is primarily due to the effect of an increased intralabyrinthine pressure onto the stiffness of the inner ear contents and the middle ear-inner ear junction. Future studies on the effect of intracranial pressure on oVEMP should use air-conducted sound and not bone-conducted vibration.

  12. The effects of in utero irradiation on mutation induction and transgenerational instability in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Ruth C.; Hardwick, Robert J.; Shanks, Morag E.; Glen, Colin D.; Mughal, Safeer K.; Voutounou, Mariel; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that the deleterious effects of prenatal irradiation can manifest during childhood, resulting in an increased risk of leukaemia and solid cancers after birth. However, the mechanisms underlying the long-term effects of foetal irradiation remain poorly understood. This study was designed to analyse the impact of in utero irradiation on mutation rates at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) DNA loci in directly exposed mice and their first-generation (F 1 ) offspring. ESTR mutation frequencies in the germline and somatic tissues of male and female mice irradiated at 12 days of gestation remained highly elevated during adulthood, which was mainly attributed to a significant increase in the frequency of singleton mutations. The prevalence of singleton mutations in directly exposed mice suggests that foetal irradiation results in genomic instability manifested both in utero and during adulthood. The frequency of ESTR mutation in the F 1 offspring of prenatally irradiated male mice was equally elevated across all tissues, which suggests that foetal exposure results in transgenerational genomic instability. In contrast, maternal in utero exposure did not affect the F 1 stability. Our data imply that the passive erasure of epigenetic marks in the maternal genome can diminish the transgenerational effects of foetal irradiation and therefore provide important clues to the still unknown mechanisms of radiation-induced genomic instability. The results of this study offer a plausible explanation for the effects of in utero irradiation on the risk of leukaemia and solid cancers after birth.

  13. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginovskiy, V.I.; Medinger, N.V.; Rasskazov, V.A.; Solonitsyn, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body, spring loaded cams and a shut-off ring. To increase the reliability of the elevator by eliminating the possibility of spontaneous shifting of the shut-off ring, the latter is equipped with handles hinged to it and is made with evolvent grooves. The cams are equipped with rollers installed in the evolvent grooves of the shut off ring, where the body is made with grooves for the handles.

  14. High frequency of GATA2 mutations in patients with mild chronic neutropenia evolving to MonoMac syndrome, myelodysplasia, and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, Marlène; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Tavitian, Suzanne; Prade, Naïs; Beaupain, Blandine; Larochelle, Olivier; Petit, Arnaud; Rohrlich, Pierre; Ferrand, Christophe; Van Den Neste, Eric; Poirel, Hélène A; Lamy, Thierry; Ouachée-Chardin, Marie; Mansat-De Mas, Véronique; Corre, Jill; Récher, Christian; Plat, Geneviève; Bachelerie, Françoise; Donadieu, Jean; Delabesse, Eric

    2013-01-31

    Congenital neutropenia is a group of genetic disorders that involve chronic neutropenia and susceptibility to infections. These neutropenias may be isolated or associated with immunologic defects or extra-hematopoietic manifestations. Complications may occur as infectious diseases, but also less frequently as myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, the transcription factor GATA2 has been identified as a new predisposing gene for familial AML/MDS. In the present study, we describe the initial identification by exome sequencing of a GATA2 R396Q mutation in a family with a history of chronic mild neutropenia evolving to AML and/or MDS. The subsequent analysis of the French Severe Chronic Neutropenia Registry allowed the identification of 6 additional pedigrees and 10 patients with 6 different and not previously reportedGATA2 mutations (R204X, E224X, R330X, A372T, M388V, and a complete deletion of the GATA2 locus). The frequent evolution to MDS and AML in these patients reveals the importance of screening GATA2 in chronic neutropenia associated with monocytopenia because of the frequent hematopoietic transformation, variable clinical expression at onset, and the need for aggressive therapy in patients with poor clinical outcome. Mutations of key transcription factor in myeloid malignancies.

  15. Detection of high frequency of mutations in a breast and/or ovarian cancer cohort: implications of embracing a multi-gene panel in molecular diagnosis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Ashraf U; Singh, Jaya; Lakshmikeshava, Ravikiran; Thota, Nishita; Singh, Suhasini; Sowmya, T S; Mishra, Avshesh; Sinha, Aditi; Deshwal, Shivani; Soni, Megha R; Chandrasekar, Anbukayalvizhi; Ramesh, Bhargavi; Ramamurthy, Bharat; Padhi, Shila; Manek, Payal; Ramalingam, Ravi; Kapoor, Suman; Ghosh, Mithua; Sankaran, Satish; Ghosh, Arunabha; Veeramachaneni, Vamsi; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Hariharan, Ramesh; Subramanian, Kalyanasundaram

    2016-06-01

    Breast and/or ovarian cancer (BOC) are among the most frequently diagnosed forms of hereditary cancers and leading cause of death in India. This emphasizes on the need for a cost-effective method for early detection of these cancers. We sequenced 141 unrelated patients and families with BOC using the TruSight Cancer panel, which includes 13 genes strongly associated with risk of inherited BOC. Multi-gene sequencing was done on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Genetic variations were identified using the Strand NGS software and interpreted using the StrandOmics platform. We were able to detect pathogenic mutations in 51 (36.2%) cases, out of which 19 were novel mutations. When we considered familial breast cancer cases only, the detection rate increased to 52%. When cases were stratified based on age of diagnosis into three categories, ⩽40 years, 40-50 years and >50 years, the detection rates were higher in the first two categories (44.4% and 53.4%, respectively) as compared with the third category, in which it was 26.9%. Our study suggests that next-generation sequencing-based multi-gene panels increase the sensitivity of mutation detection and help in identifying patients with a high risk of developing cancer as compared with sequential tests of individual genes.

  16. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  17. Mitochondrial Mutation Rate, Spectrum and Heteroplasmy in Caenorhabditis elegans Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines of Differing Population Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Anke; Thompson, Owen; Waterston, Robert H; Moerman, Donald G; Keightley, Peter D; Bergthorsson, Ulfar; Katju, Vaishali

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial genomes of metazoans, given their elevated rates of evolution, have served as pivotal markers for phylogeographic studies and recent phylogenetic events. In order to determine the dynamics of spontaneous mitochondrial mutations in small populations in the absence and presence of selection, we evolved mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Caenorhabditis elegans in parallel over 409 consecutive generations at three varying population sizes of N = 1, 10, and 100 hermaphrodites. The N =1 populations should have a minimal influence of natural selection to provide the spontaneous mutation rate and the expected rate of neutral evolution, whereas larger population sizes should experience increasing intensity of selection. New mutations were identified by Illumina paired-end sequencing of 86 mtDNA genomes across 35 experimental lines and compared with published genomes of natural isolates. The spontaneous mitochondrial mutation rate was estimated at 1.05 × 10-7/site/generation. A strong G/C→A/T mutational bias was observed in both the MA lines and the natural isolates. This suggests that the low G + C content at synonymous sites is the product of mutation bias rather than selection as previously proposed. The mitochondrial effective population size per worm generation was estimated to be 62. Although it was previously concluded that heteroplasmy was rare in C. elegans, the vast majority of mutations in this study were heteroplasmic despite an experimental regime exceeding 400 generations. The frequencies of frameshift and nonsynonymous mutations were negatively correlated with population size, which suggests their deleterious effects on fitness and a potent role for selection in their eradication. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Elevation of the diaphragmatic cupola

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenov, V.M.; Talesnik, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    Altogether 45 patients with elevation of the diaphragmatic cupola were examined. A high frequency of erroneous initial interpretation of examination results was noted in inflammatory and tumorous lesions and congenital conditions. Routine and contrast methods (pneumoperitoneum, bronchography, pleurography and fistulography) were used. Disease-related methods of X-ray investigation were proposed. A variety of causes of diaphragm elevation was indicated

  19. Carrier frequency of a nonsense mutation in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common haplotype indicates common ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Monaghan, Gemma; Børsting, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Inherited adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder that causes immunodeficiency, varying from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the majority of cases to a less severe form in a small minority of patients. Five patients of Somali origin from four unrelated families......, with severe ADA-SCID, were registered in the Greater London area. Patients and their parents were investigated for the nonsense mutation Q3X (ADA c7C>T), two missense mutations K80R (ADA c239A>G) and R142Q (ADA c425G>A), and a TAAA repeat located at the 3' end of an Alu element (AluVpA) positioned 1.1 kb...... upstream of the ADA transcription start site. All patients were homozygous for the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7. Among 207 Somali immigrants to Denmark, the frequency of ADA c7C>T and the maximum likelihood estimate of the frequency of the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7 were both...

  20. Iron overload and HFE gene mutations in Czech patients with chronic liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostalikova-Cimburova, Marketa; Kratka, Karolina; Stransky, Jaroslav; Putova, Ivana; Cieslarova, Blanka; Horak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify the prevalence of HFE gene mutations in Czech patients with chronic liver diseases and the influence of the mutations on iron status. The presence of HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D, and S65C) analyzed by the PCR-RFLP method, presence of cirrhosis, and serum iron indices were compared among 454 patients with different chronic liver diseases (51 with chronic hepatitis B, 122 with chronic hepatitis C, 218 with alcoholic liver disease, and 63 patients with hemochromatosis). Chronic liver diseases patients other than hemochromatics did not have an increased frequency of HFE gene mutations compared to controls. Although 33.3% of patients with hepatitis B, 43% of patients with hepatitis C, and 73.2% of patients with alcoholic liver disease had elevated transferrin saturation or serum ferritin levels, the presence of HFE gene mutations was not significantly associated with iron overload in these patients. Additionally, patients with cirrhosis did not have frequencies of HFE mutations different from those without cirrhosis. This study emphasizes the importance, not only of C282Y, but also of the H63D homozygous genetic constellation in Czech hemochromatosis patients. Our findings show that increased iron indices are common in chronic liver diseases but {\\it HFE} mutations do not play an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, and alcoholic liver disease.

  1. Patterns of hepatitis B virus infection in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: high prevalence of occult infection and low frequency of lamivudine resistant mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel VF Sucupira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV molecular profiles were determined for 44 patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 and had antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc, with and without other HBV serological markers. In this population, 70% of the patients were under lamivudine treatment as a component of antiretroviral therapy. HBV DNA was detected in 14 (32% patients. Eight out of 12 (67% HBsAg positive samples, 3/10 (30% anti-HBc only samples, and 3/22 (14% anti-HBs positive samples were HBV DNA positive. HBV DNA loads, measured by real time polymerase chain reaction, were much higher in the HBsAg positive patients (mean, 2.5 × 10(9 copies/ml than in the negative ones (HBV occult infection; mean, 2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml. Nine out of the 14 HBV DNA positive patients were under lamivudine treatment. Lamivudine resistant mutations in the polymerase gene were detected in only three patients, all of them belonging to the subgroup of five HBsAg positive, HBV DNA positive patients. A low mean HBV load (2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml and an absence of lamivudine resistant mutations were observed among the cases of HBV occult infection.

  2. Evaluation of the correlation between KRAS mutated allele frequency and pathologist tumorous nuclei percentage assessment in colorectal cancer suggests a role for zygosity status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbrecht, Louis; Baldin, Pamela; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Jouret-Mourin, Anne

    2018-04-27

    Evaluation of molecular tumour heterogeneity relies on the tumorous nuclei percentage (TNP) assessment by a pathologist, which has been criticised for being inaccurate and suffering from interobserver variability. Based on the 'Big Bang theory' which states that KRAS mutation in colorectal cancer is mostly homogeneous, we investigated this issue by performing a critical analysis of the correlation of the KRAS mutant allele fraction with the TNP in 99 colorectal tumour samples with a positive KRAS mutation status as determined by next-generation sequencing. Our results yield indirect evidence that the KRAS zygosity status influences the correlation between these parameters and we show that a well-trained pathologist is indeed capable of accurately assessing TNP. Our findings indicate that tumour zygosity, a feature which has largely been neglected until now, should be taken into account in future studies on (colorectal) molecular tumour heterogeneity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Founder Mutations in Xeroderma Pigmentosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.; Kraemer, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    In this issue, Soufir et al. report a founder mutation in the XPC DNA repair gene in 74% of families with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) in the Maghreb region (Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia) of northern Africa. These patients have a high frequency of skin cancer. The presence of this founder mutation provides an opportunity for genetic counseling and early diagnosis of XP. PMID:20463673

  5. Developing a Game Interface to Assess Risk Perception with Respect to Two Key Dimensions of Risk (Frequency and Severity) in Contexts Where Risks Are Elevated from Their Accepted, "Typical" Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, William M; Ma, Zhenfeng; Andrade, Angie

    2015-06-01

    This four-stage study culminated in a game interface designed to calibrate people's perceptions of net risk (combining frequency and severity), in contexts where risks are elevated from their accepted, "typical" values, as when avalanche threats elevate the risks of "skiing" above levels skiers normally accept. Risk prompts are displayed dynamically, in naturalistic language, and not, for example, as static displays of dollar amounts or probabilities. Individual differences are measured. In Stage 1 (pilot), focus groups (n=9) piloted procedures, visual prompts, and examples of contexts where risks elevated from the "usual," for use in upcoming stages. In Stage 2 (exploratory), participants (primarily students; n=119; mean age, 20.1 years; 64 percent male) were assigned to risk contexts, answered demographic and risk-history questions, and then matched risk-description prompts to perceived "appropriate" levels along an ordinal risk scale. Descriptive measures and graphs showed response distributions; chi-squared analyses compared responses for different demographics. In Stage 3 (manipulating "cards"), participants (n=80; mean age, 37 years; 60 percent male) matched naturalistic risk prompts with ordinal risk positions. Regressions compared cards' placements with their "expected" (per exploratory Stage 2) placements. In Stage 4, the interface was coded in the Unity(®) (implemented at Business and IT Capstone, University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada) development environment. In Stage 1, ambiguities in draft wordings/displays for Stage 2 were identified and corrected. Three risk contexts emerged: traffic/hidden intersection; skiing/avalanche; and swimming/drowning. In Stage 2, for traffic and skiing contexts, responses relating ordinal risk categories to realistic examples were observed to cluster around values potentially usable as markers. No associations appeared with demographic variables. In Stage 3, actual and "expected" ordinal

  6. The effect of fast neutrons, as compared with X-rays upon mutation spectrum and mutation frequency in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Hordeum vulgare L. in relation to evaluation of the BARN-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellaert, L.M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Explanations were sought for the 'saturation' in mutant frequency, observed after relatively high irradiation doses (fast neutrons and X-rays) in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, when scoring for mutants is done in the siliques (Mueller's embryotest) of the 'main' inflorescence of M 1 -plants. Studies have been carried out on the effect of the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) during irradiation, on fast neutron and X-ray induced M 1 -ovule sterility, M 2 -embryonic lethals, M 2 -chlorophyll mutants and M 2 -viable mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. It was found that DTT provides considerable protection against both fast neutron and X-ray induced genetic damage. (Auth.)

  7. Elevator wheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhornik, V.I.; Cherkov, Ye.M.; Simonov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    An elevator wheel is suggested for unloading a sunken product from a bath of a heavy-average separator including discs of a bucket with inner walls, and covering sheets hinged to the buckets. In order to improve the degree of dehydration of the removed product, the inner wall of each bucket is made of sheets installed in steps with gaps of one in relation to the other.

  8. Combined exposure to X-irradiation followed by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea treatment alters the frequency and spectrum of Ikaros point mutations in murine T-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakinuma, Shizuko, E-mail: skakinum@nirs.go.jp [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishimura, Mayumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Takada, Mayumi; Yamauchi, Kazumi; Sudo, Satomi; Shang, Yi [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Doi, Kazutaka; Yoshinaga, Shinji [Regulatory Sciences Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Shimada, Yoshiya [Radiobiology for Children' s Health Research Program, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2012-09-01

    Ionizing radiation is a well-known carcinogen, but its potency may be influenced by other environmental carcinogens, which is of practical importance in the assessment of risk. Data are scarce, however, on the combined effect of radiation with other environmental carcinogens and the underlying mechanisms involved. We studied the mode and mechanism of the carcinogenic effect of radiation in combination with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) using doses approximately equal to the corresponding thresholds. B6C3F1 mice exposed to fractionated X-irradiation (Kaplan's method) followed by ENU developed T-cell lymphomas in a dose-dependent manner. Radiation doses above an apparent threshold acted synergistically with ENU to promote lymphoma development, whereas radiation doses below that threshold antagonized lymphoma development. Ikaros, which regulates the commitment and differentiation of lymphoid lineage cells, is a critical tumor suppressor gene frequently altered in both human and mouse lymphomas and shows distinct mutation spectra between X-ray- and ENU-induced lymphomas. In the synergistically induced lymphomas, we observed a low frequency of LOH and an inordinate increase of Ikaros base substitutions characteristic of ENU-indcued point mutations, G:C to A:T at non-CpG, A:T to G:C, G:C to T:A and A:T to T:A. This suggests that radiation doses above an apparent threshold activate the ENU mutagenic pathway. This is the first report on the carcinogenic mechanism elicited by combined exposure to carcinogens below and above threshold doses based on the mutation spectrum of the causative gene. These findings constitute a basis for assessing human cancer risk following exposure to multiple carcinogens.

  9. Impact of low-frequency hotspot mutation R282Q on the structure of p53 DNA-binding domain as revealed by crystallography at 1.54 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Tan, Yu-Hong [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Shaw, Gary [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhou, Zheng; Bai, Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Luo, Ray [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Ji, Xinhua, E-mail: jix@ncifcrf.gov [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The impact of hotspot mutation R282Q on the structure of human p53 DNA-binding domain has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and molecular-dynamics simulations. Tumor suppressor p53 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein and its central DNA-binding domain (DBD) harbors six hotspots (Arg175, Gly245, Arg248, Arg249, Arg273 and Arg282) for human cancers. Here, the crystal structure of a low-frequency hotspot mutant, p53DBD(R282Q), is reported at 1.54 Å resolution together with the results of molecular-dynamics simulations on the basis of the structure. In addition to eliminating a salt bridge, the R282Q mutation has a significant impact on the properties of two DNA-binding loops (L1 and L3). The L1 loop is flexible in the wild type, but it is not flexible in the mutant. The L3 loop of the wild type is not flexible, whereas it assumes two conformations in the mutant. Molecular-dynamics simulations indicated that both conformations of the L3 loop are accessible under biological conditions. It is predicted that the elimination of the salt bridge and the inversion of the flexibility of L1 and L3 are directly or indirectly responsible for deactivating the tumor suppressor p53.

  10. Studies of human mutation rates: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    Progress was recorded between January 1 and July 1, 1987 on a project entitled ''Studies of Human Mutation Rates''. Studies underway include methodology for studying mutation at the DNA level, algorithms for automated analyses of two-dimensional polyacrylamide DNA gels, theoretical and applied population genetics, and studies of mutation frequency in A-bomb survivors

  11. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...... in prostate cancer, and suggest interplay between nuclear and mitochondrial mutational profiles in prostate cancer....

  12. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, A.S.; Peshkov, L.P.; Rozin, M.M.; Shestov, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body, a flap, a lock with a catch and a spring-loaded shut-off clamp in the form of upper and lower horizontal levers which are connected by a handle and an axle and one end of which is made in the form of an eccentric cam. The size of the eccentricity of the cam of the levers is increased toward the handle of the clamp in order to increase the operational reliability and to extend the service life.

  13. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Maloyarovslavtesv, D.A.; Prokopov, O.I.; Tukayev, Sh.V.; Zanilov, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body with a turning collar locking device and a rod with longitudinal grooves, which are flexibly linked with jaws positioned in grooves in the body. To increase safety through ensuring automatic locking of the jaws in the closed position, the locking device is made in the form of head on wedges, spring loaded relative to the collar and made with cams and positioned with the capability of interacting with the grooves of the rod and through the cams with the collar.

  14. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Chromek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  15. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  16. Universal screening for Lynch syndrome in endometrial cancers: frequency of germline mutations and identification of patients with Lynch-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Jessica L; Gonzalez, Jorge L; DeMars, Leslie; Bloch, Katarzyna J; Tafe, Laura J

    2017-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited clinical syndrome characterized by a high risk of colorectal, endometrial (lifetime risk of up to 60%), ovarian, and urinary tract cancers. The diagnosis is confirmed by identification of germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, MSH6, or EPCAM. In 2015, our institution implemented universal screening of endometrial cancer (EC) hysterectomy specimens by mismatch repair immunohistochemistry (IHC) with reflex MLH1 promoter hypermethylation analysis for tumors with loss of MLH1/PMS2 expression. Patients with tumors negative for MLH1 methylation and those with a loss of the heterodimer pair MSH2 and MSH6, or isolated loss of either PMS2 or MSH6 were referred to the Familial Cancer Program for genetic counseling and consideration of germline testing. Between May 2015 to Dec 2016, 233 EC patients were screened by IHC for LS with a median age of 63 years. Sixty tumors (27%) had abnormal IHC staining results. Fifty-one (22%) harbored heterodimeric loss of MLH1 and PMS2, 49 of which showed MLH1 promoter methylation (1 failure, 1 negative). One showed loss of MLH1/PMS2 and MSH6, 2 showed loss of MSH2/MSH6, and 6 had isolated loss of MSH6 only. Ten patients underwent genetic counseling, and germline testing was performed in 8; LS was confirmed in 5 patients (2.1%). In addition, 3 patients with negative germline testing and presumed Lynch-like syndrome were identified and offered additional somatic testing. Universal screening for LS in EC patients has yielded positive results for identification of patients at risk for this inherited syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rare Mutations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma: Frequencies and Relationship with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Risk in the Mixed Ancestry Population from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vergotine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic variants in the nuclear transcription receptor, PPARG, are associated with cardiometabolic traits, but reports remain conflicting. We determined the frequency and the clinical relevance of PPARG SNPs in an African mixed ancestry population. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 820 participants were genotyped for rs1800571, rs72551362, rs72551363, rs72551364, and rs3856806, using allele-specific TaqMan technology. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin (HOMA-IR, β-cells function (HOMA-B%, fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI were calculated. Results. No sequence variants were found except for the rs3856806. The frequency of the PPARG-His447His variant was 23.8% in the overall population group, with no difference by diabetes status (P=0.215. The His447His allele T was associated with none of the markers of insulin resistance overall and by diabetes status. In models adjusted for 2-hour insulin, the T allele was associated with lower prevalent diabetes risk (odds ratio 0.56 (95% CI 0.31–0.95. Conclusion. Our study confirms the almost zero occurrences of known rare PPARG SNPs and has shown for the first time in an African population that one of the common SNPs, His447His, may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

  18. Stepwise Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to Pleuromutilins Is Associated with Stepwise Acquisition of Mutations in rplC and Minimally Affects Susceptibility to Retapamulin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Daniel R.; Rittenhouse, Stephen F.; McCloskey, Lynn; Holmes, David J.

    2007-01-01

    To assess their effects on susceptibility to retapamulin in Staphylococcus aureus, first-, second-, and third-step mutants with elevated MICs to tiamulin and other investigational pleuromutilin compounds were isolated and characterized through exposure to high drug concentrations. All first- and second-step mutations were in rplC, encoding ribosomal protein L3. Most third-step mutants acquired a third mutation in rplC. While first- and second-step mutations did cause an elevation in tiamulin and retapamulin MICs, a significant decrease in activity was not seen until a third mutation was acquired. All third-step mutants exhibited severe growth defects, and faster-growing variants arose at a high frequency from most isolates. These faster-growing variants were found to be more susceptible to pleuromutilins. In the case of a mutant with three alterations in rplC, the fast-growing variants acquired an additional mutation in rplC. In the case of fast-growing variants of isolates with two mutations in rplC and at least one mutation at an unmapped locus, one of the two rplC mutations reverted to wild type. These data indicate that mutations in rplC that lead to pleuromutilin resistance have a direct, negative effect on fitness. While reduction in activity of retapamulin against S. aureus can be seen through mutations in rplC, it is likely that target-specific resistance to retapamulin will be slow to emerge due to the need for three mutations for a significant effect on activity and the fitness cost of each mutational step. PMID:17404009

  19. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation and risk of retinal vein thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Soleiman Soltanpour

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy level has been established as a significant risk factor for venous thrombosis and cardiovascular disease. Homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutation has been associated with elevated plasma Hcy concentration and may contribute to retinal vein thrombosis (RVT development. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the hyperhomocysteinemia and/or homozygosity for the MTHFR C677T mutation are associated with an increased risk for RVT. Materials and Methods: Our study population consisted of 73 consecutive patients (50-78 years old with RVT and 73 control subjects (51-80 years old, matched for age and sex. Genotyping for the MTHFR C677T mutation was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique and Hcy level was determined by an enzyme immunoassay kit. Results: The prevalence of 677TT genotype was higher in patients than control subjects, but the difference in frequency didn′t reach a significant value (P = 0.07. The frequency of the 677T allele was 26% and 21.2% in patients and controls, respectively and did not differ significantly between the two groups (odds ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (0.75-2.24, P = 0.33. Fasting plasma total Hcy level was significantly higher in patients than controls (P = 0.001. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that hyperhomocysteinemia, but not the MTHFR C677T mutation, is associated with RVT.

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation and risk of retinal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanpour, Mohammad Soleiman; Soheili, Zahra; Shakerizadeh, Ali; Pourfathollah, Ali Akbar; Samiei, Shahram; Meshkani, Reza; Shahjahani, Mohammad; Karimi, Abbas

    2013-06-01

    Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level has been established as a significant risk factor for venous thrombosis and cardiovascular disease. Homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation has been associated with elevated plasma Hcy concentration and may contribute to retinal vein thrombosis (RVT) development. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the hyperhomocysteinemia and/or homozygosity for the MTHFR C677T mutation are associated with an increased risk for RVT. Our study population consisted of 73 consecutive patients (50-78 years old) with RVT and 73 control subjects (51-80 years old), matched for age and sex. Genotyping for the MTHFR C677T mutation was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism technique and Hcy level was determined by an enzyme immunoassay kit. The prevalence of 677TT genotype was higher in patients than control subjects, but the difference in frequency didn't reach a significant value (P = 0.07). The frequency of the 677T allele was 26% and 21.2% in patients and controls, respectively and did not differ significantly between the two groups (odds ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval (0.75-2.24), P = 0.33). Fasting plasma total Hcy level was significantly higher in patients than controls (P = 0.001). Our study demonstrated that hyperhomocysteinemia, but not the MTHFR C677T mutation, is associated with RVT.

  1. Identification of four new mutations in the short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCAD) gene in two patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Winter, V S; Corydon, M J

    1998-01-01

    We have shown previously that a variant allele of the short-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase ( SCAD ) gene, 625G-->A, is present in homozygous form in 7% of control individuals and in 60% of 135 patients with elevated urinary excretion of ethylmalonic acid (EMA). We have now characterized three disease......-causing mutations (confirmed by lack of enzyme activity after expression in COS-7 cells) and a new susceptibility variant in the SCAD gene of two patients with SCAD deficiency, and investigated their frequency in patients with elevated EMA excretion. The first SCAD-deficient patient was a compound heterozygote...... for two mutations, 274G-->T and 529T-->C. These mutations were not present in 98 normal control alleles, but the 529T-->C mutation was found in one allele among 133 patients with elevated EMA excretion. The second patient carried a 1147C-->T mutation and the 625G-->A polymorphism in one allele...

  2. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  3. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  4. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  5. Minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Techa River population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrova, Yuri E. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk; Ploshchanskaya, Olga G. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Department of Radiobiology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454021 (Russian Federation); Kozionova, Olga S. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Department of Radiobiology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454021 (Russian Federation); Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Department of Radiobiology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454021 (Russian Federation)

    2006-12-01

    Germline mutation at eight minisatellite loci has been studied among the irradiated families from the Techa River population and non-exposed families from the rural area of the Chelyabinsk and Kurgan Oblasts. The groups were matched by ethnicity, parental age, occupation and smoking habit. A statistically significant 1.7-fold increase in mutation rate was found in the germline of irradiated fathers, whereas maternal germline mutation rate in the exposed families was not elevated. Most of the minisatellite loci showed an elevated paternal mutation rate in the exposed group, indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Techa River population. These data suggest that the elevated minisatellite mutation rate can be attributed to radioactive exposure. The spectra of paternal mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable.

  6. Minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Techa River population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Yuri E.; Ploshchanskaya, Olga G.; Kozionova, Olga S.; Akleyev, Alexander V.

    2006-01-01

    Germline mutation at eight minisatellite loci has been studied among the irradiated families from the Techa River population and non-exposed families from the rural area of the Chelyabinsk and Kurgan Oblasts. The groups were matched by ethnicity, parental age, occupation and smoking habit. A statistically significant 1.7-fold increase in mutation rate was found in the germline of irradiated fathers, whereas maternal germline mutation rate in the exposed families was not elevated. Most of the minisatellite loci showed an elevated paternal mutation rate in the exposed group, indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Techa River population. These data suggest that the elevated minisatellite mutation rate can be attributed to radioactive exposure. The spectra of paternal mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable

  7. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  8. Radiation induced chlorophyll mutations in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, G.; Mustafa, G.; Soomro, A.M.; Baloch, A.W.

    1985-01-01

    Air dried grains of four local varieties of rice were treated with gamma-rays and fast neutrons for determining their mutagenic effectiveness through the occurence of chlorophyll mutations. Fast neutrons were more effective in inducing chlorophyll mutations and the rice variety Basmati 370 produced maximum number of mutations followed by varieties Sonahri Sugdasi, Jajai 77 and Sada Gulab. The highest frequency of chlorophyll mutations was that of albina types followed by striata types. The xantha, viridis and tigrina types of mutations were less frequent. (authors)

  9. The effects of maternal irradiation during adulthood on mutation induction and transgenerational instability in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abouzeid Ali, Hamdy E.; Barber, Ruth C.; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2012-01-01

    The long-term genetic effects of maternal irradiation remain poorly understood. To establish the effects of radiation exposure on mutation induction in the germline of directly exposed females and the possibility of transgenerational effects in their non-exposed offspring, adult female BALB/c and CBA/Ca mice were given 1 Gy of acute X-rays and mated with control males. The frequency of mutation at expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) loci in the germline of directly exposed females did not differ from that of controls. Using a single-molecule PCR approach, ESTR mutation frequency was also established for both germline and somatic tissues in the first-generation offspring of irradiated parents. While the frequency of ESTR mutation in the offspring of irradiated males was significantly elevated, maternal irradiation did not affect stability in their F 1 offspring. Considering these data and the results of our previous study, we propose that, in sharp contrast to paternal exposure to ionising radiation, the transgenerational effects of maternal high-dose acute irradiation are likely to be negligible.

  10. Mutation direction by irradiation in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei; Lu Yimei

    2001-01-01

    The mutation directions of rice were studied. The results indicated that the mutation directions of rice induced by 14 C were invert correlation to their genetic backgrounds of tested rice varieties, i.e. early mature and short stem varieties produced later mature and higher stem mutation; late mature and high stem varieties produced earlier mature and shorter stem mutation; the varieties of middle maturity and height produced both direction mutations of earlier and later maturity or shorter and higher stem. The mutation directions induced by 14 C were also related to treated doses and stages. Frequency of earlier maturity mutation by protons treatment were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of later maturity by γ-rays were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of short stem mutation by synchronous irradiation (soft X-rays) were higher than those induced by other mutagens. Frequency of beneficial mutation induced by proton treatment were higher than those induced by γ-rays

  11. Molecular analysis using DHPLC of cystic fibrosis: increase of the mutation detection rate among the affected population in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardone Anna

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disorder characterised by mutations of the CFTR gene, which encodes for an important component in the coordination of electrolyte movement across of epithelial cell membranes. Symptoms are pulmonary disease, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, male infertility and elevated sweat concentrations. The CFTR gene has numerous mutations (>1000 and functionally important polymorphisms (>200. Early identification is important to provide appropriate therapeutic interventions, prognostic and genetic counselling and to ensure access to specialised medical services. However, molecular diagnosis by direct mutation screening has proved difficult in certain ethnic groups due to allelic heterogeneity and variable frequency of causative mutations. Methods We applied a gene scanning approach using DHPLC system for analysing specifically all CFTR exons and characterise sequence variations in a subgroup of CF Italian patients from the Lazio region (Central Italy characterised by an extensive allelic heterogeneity. Results We have identified a total of 36 different mutations representing 88% of the CF chromosomes. Among these are two novel CFTR mutations, including one missense (H199R and one microdeletion (4167delCTAAGCC. Conclusion Using this approach, we were able to increase our standard power rate of mutation detection of about 11% (77% vs. 88%.

  12. In Vitro Resistance Studies with Bacteria That Exhibit Low Mutation Frequencies: Prediction of “Antimutant” Linezolid Concentrations Using a Mixed Inoculum Containing both Susceptible and Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golikova, Maria V.; Strukova, Elena N.; Portnoy, Yury A.; Romanov, Andrey V.; Edelstein, Mikhail V.; Zinner, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial resistance studies using in vitro dynamic models are highly dependent on the starting inoculum that might or might not contain spontaneously resistant mutants (RMs). To delineate concentration-resistance relationships with linezolid-exposed Staphylococcus aureus, a mixed inoculum containing both susceptible cells and RMs was used. An RM selected after the 9th passage of the parent strain (MIC, 2 μg/ml) on antibiotic-containing media (RM9; MIC, 8 μg/ml) was chosen for the pharmacodynamic studies, because the mutant prevention concentration (MPC) of linezolid against the parent strain in the presence of RM9 at 102 (but not at 104) CFU/ml did not differ from the MPC value determined in the absence of the RMs. Five-day treatments with twice-daily linezolid doses were simulated at concentrations either between the MIC and MPC or above the MPC. S. aureus RMs (resistant to 2× and 4× MIC but not 8× and 16× MIC) were enriched at ratios of the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24) to the MIC that provide linezolid concentrations between the MIC and MPC for 100% (AUC24/MIC, 60 h) and 86% (AUC24/MIC, 120 h) of the dosing interval. No such enrichment occurred when linezolid concentrations were above the MIC and below the MPC for a shorter time (37% of the dosing interval; AUC24/MIC, 240 h) or when concentrations were consistently above the MPC (AUC24/MIC, 480 h). These findings obtained using linezolid-susceptible staphylococci supplemented with RMs support the mutant selection window hypothesis. This method provides an option to delineate antibiotic concentration-resistance relationships with bacteria that exhibit low mutation frequencies. PMID:25451050

  13. National Elevation Dataset (NED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). The NED is a seamless mosaic of best-available elevation data. The 7.5-minute elevation...

  14. Elevated Liver Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms Elevated liver enzymes By Mayo Clinic Staff Elevated liver enzymes may indicate inflammation or damage to cells in the liver. Inflamed or ... than normal amounts of certain chemicals, including liver enzymes, into the bloodstream, which can result in elevated ...

  15. Repair-resistant mutation in Neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Loo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations

  16. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  17. Calreticulin Mutations in Bulgarian MPN Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Ivan; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Alaikov, Tzvetan; Spassova, Sylva; Stoimenov, Angel; Naumova, Elissaveta; Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena

    2018-01-01

    Somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR are recurrently identified in most of the cases with Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We applied four molecular genetic methods for identification of CALR exon 9 mutations, including high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, Sanger sequencing, semiconductor target genes sequencing and whole exome sequencing. A total of 78 patients with myeloid malignancies were included in the study. We identified 14 CALR exon 9 mutated cases out of 78 studied patients with myeloid malignancies. All mutated patients were diagnosed with MPN being either PMF (n = 7) or ET (n = 7). Nine cases had type 1 mutations and 5 cases had type 2 mutations. CALR exon 9, MPL exon 10 and JAK2 p. V617F were mutually exclusive. There were no statistically significant differences in the hematological parameters between the cases with CALR and JAK2 or MPL mutations. Notably, all four techniques were fully concordant in the detection of CALR mutations. This is one of the few reports on the CALR mutations frequency in South-eastern populations. Our study shows that the frequency and patterns of these mutations is identical to those in the patients' cohorts from Western countries. Besides we demonstrated the utility of four different methods for their detection.

  18. Mutation Analysis in Classical Phenylketonuria Patients Followed by Detecting Haplotypes Linked to Some PAH Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghanian, Fatemeh; Silawi, Mohammad; Tabei, Seyed M B

    2017-02-01

    Deficiency of phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme and elevation of phenylalanine in body fluids cause phenylketonuria (PKU). The gold standard for confirming PKU and PAH deficiency is detecting causal mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons and splicing involved sequences of the PAH gene. Furthermore, haplotype analysis could be considered as an auxiliary approach for detecting PKU causative mutations before direct sequencing of the PAH gene by making comparisons between prior detected mutation linked-haplotypes and new PKU case haplotypes with undetermined mutations. In this study, 13 unrelated classical PKU patients took part in the study detecting causative mutations. Mutations were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct sequencing in all patients. After that, haplotype analysis was performed by studying VNTR and PAHSTR markers (linked genetic markers of the PAH gene) through application of PCR and capillary electrophoresis (CE). Mutation analysis was performed successfully and the detected mutations were as follows: c.782G>A, c.754C>T, c.842C>G, c.113-115delTCT, c.688G>A, and c.696A>G. Additionally, PAHSTR/VNTR haplotypes were detected to discover haplotypes linked to each mutation. Mutation detection is the best approach for confirming PAH enzyme deficiency in PKU patients. Due to the relatively large size of the PAH gene and high cost of the direct sequencing in developing countries, haplotype analysis could be used before DNA sequencing and mutation detection for a faster and cheaper way via identifying probable mutated exons.

  19. Haplotype structure in Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Im, Kate M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Wang, Xianshu

    2011-01-01

    Three founder mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 contribute to the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in Ashkenazi Jews (AJ). They are observed at increased frequency in the AJ compared to other BRCA mutations in Caucasian non-Jews (CNJ). Several authors have proposed that elevated allele...... the tools of statistical genomics to examine the likelihood of long-range LD at a deleterious locus in a population that faced a genetic bottleneck. We studied the genotypes of hundreds of women from a large international consortium of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and found that AJ women exhibited long......-range haplotypes compared to CNJ women. More than 50% of the AJ chromosomes with the BRCA1 185delAG mutation share an identical 2.1 Mb haplotype and nearly 16% of AJ chromosomes carrying the BRCA2 6174delT mutation share a 1.4 Mb haplotype. Simulations based on the best inference of Ashkenazi population demography...

  20. Elevated Hb A₂ Levels in a Patient with a Compound Heterozygosity for the (β⁺) -31 (A > G) and (β⁰) Codon 17 (A > T) Mutations Together with a Single α-Globin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyasai, Sitthichai; Jaiping, Kanokwan; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2015-01-01

    We report the molecular and hematological feature of a Thai woman who had clinical diagnosis of β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI). Hemoglobin (Hb) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis identified Hb A (64.4%), Hb F (12.3%) and Hb A2/E (15.9%) with small peaks of Hb Bart's (γ4) and Hb H (β4). She was initially diagnosed as EA Bart's disease, which occurs from combination of Hb H disease and Hb E (HBB: c.79G > A) trait. However, the Hb analysis using capillary electrophoresis (CE) demonstrated no Hb E, 68.5% Hb A, 15.5% Hb F and 16.0% Hb A2. DNA analysis showed a compound heterozygosity for (β(+)) -31 (A > G) (HBB: c.-81A > G) and (β(0)) codon 17 (A > T) (HBB: c.52A > T) mutations and deletional Hb H (- -(SEA)/-α(3.7)). Thus, she was finally diagnosed with a combination of Hb H disease and compound heterozygosity of β(+)/β(0)-thalassemia (β(+)/β(0)-thal). The β-globin mutations could affect not only hematological parameters but also elevate the Hb A2 levels. These effects could not be ameliorated by the coinheritance of Hb H disease. Therefore, a better understanding of the effects of this combination on hematological analysis data will be useful for providing accurate diagnosis, genetic counseling, prevention and control programs of β-thalassemia major (β-TM).

  1. Petroleum pollution and mutation in mangroves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klekowski, E.J. Jr.; Corredor, J.E.; Morell, J.M.; Del Castillo, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorophyll-deficiency has often been used as a sensitive genetic end-point in plant mutation research. The frequency of trees heterozygous for nuclear chlorophyll-deficient mutations was determined for mangrove populations growing along the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. The frequency of heterozygotes was strongly correlated with the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the underlying sediment and with both acute and chronic petroleum pollution. Although epidemiological studies can seldom prove causation, a strong correlation is certainly compatible with a cause-effect relationship. Our results suggest that the biota of oil-polluted habitats may be experiencing increased mutation. (Author)

  2. Comparison of hprt variant frequencies and chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes from radiotherapy and chemotherapy patients: A prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammenheuser, M.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Belli, J.A.; Ward, J.B. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The autoradiographic 6-thioguanine-resistant mutant lymphocyte assay and a chromosome aberration assay were used to determine the time-course of appearance and persistence of elevated frequencies of hprt variants and dicentric chromosomes in patients receiving x-irradiation therapy. The hprt mutation assays were done with frozen/thawed lymphocytes isolated from aliquots of the same blood samples used for the chromosome aberration assays. Five multiple sclerosis patients were also studied before and at 2 and 4 wk intervals after treatment with monthly i.v. doses of 750 mg/m 2 of cyclophosphamide (CP). There were no significant elevations in chromosome aberrations at these post-treatment sample times. The results demonstrate the complementary nature of these two human monitoring assays and emphasize the importance of careful selection of optimal sampling times

  3. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller AP

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1 Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2 Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. Results A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. Conclusion We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously

  4. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P.; You, Young-Hyun; Besaratinia, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms involving oxidized DNA

  5. Association of mutator activity with UV sensitivity in an aphidicolin-resistant mutant of Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, P.K.; Chang, C.; Trosko, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The spontaneous mutation rates of an ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitive aphidicolin-resistant mutant (aphsup(r)-4-2) and its revertants have been determined by 2 techniques. By using the fluctuation analysis, the mutant and its thymidine (TdR)-prototrophic 'revertant' were found to exhibit elevated spontaneous mutation rates at the 6-thioguanine- and diphtheria-toxin-resistant loci. In contrast, the TdR-auxotrophic 'revertant' did not show this property. Similar results were obtained by the multiple replating technique. From these comparative studies and other previous characterizations, it appears that a single gene mutation is responsible for the following pleiotropic phenotype: slow growth, UV sensitivity, high UV-induced mutability, high frequency of site-specific bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-dependent chromosome breaks and enhanced spontaneous mutation rate. Recent studies indicate that the mutation may be on the gene for DNA polymerase α. The results further indicate that thymidine auxotrophy or imbalance in nucleotide pools is not necessarily associated with the mutator activity in mammalian cells. (orig.)

  6. ASSOCIATION OF HFE GENE MUTATION IN THALASSEMIA MAJOR PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Tiwari

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Thalassemia major patients are dependent on frequent blood transfusion and consequently develop iron overload. HFE gene mutations (C282Y, H63D and S65C in hereditary haemochromatosis has been shown to be associated with iron overload. The study aims at finding the association of HFE gene mutations in β-thalassemia major patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS A descriptive observational pilot study was conducted including fifty diagnosed -thalassemia major cases. DNA analysis by PCR-RFLP method for HFE gene mutations was performed. RESULTS Only H63D mutation (out of three HFE gene mutations was detected in 8 out of 50 cases. Observed frequency of H63D mutation was 16%. While frequency of C282Y and S65C were 0% each. CONCLUSION The frequency of HFE mutation in -thalassemia major is not very common.

  7. Thalassemia mutations in Gaziantep, Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... Table 3. Frequency of β-thalassemia mutations in the Eastern Mediterranean. Mutation. This study Turkey Cyprus Greece Syria Palestine Bulgaria Azerbaijan Iran Iraq. IVS 1.110 (G>A). 29.1. 39.3. 79.7. 42.1. 24.1. 17.6. 24.2. 20.2. 4.8 1.9. IVS 2.1 (G>A). 12.3. 4.7. -. 3.3. 4.2. 2.9. -. -. 33.9 18.3. IVS 1.1 (G>A).

  8. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  9. Iowa Bedrock Surface Elevation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the bedrock surface elevation in Iowa was compiled using all available data, principally information from GEOSAM, supplemented...

  10. Prothrombin 20210 G: a mutation and Factor V Leiden mutation in women with a history of severe preeclampsia and (H)ELLP syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pampus, M. G.; Wolf, H.; Koopman, M. M.; van den Ende, A.; Buller, H. R.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    The 20210 G-A prothrombin gene variant and the Factor V Leiden mutation are mutations associated with venous thrombotic risk. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of these specific mutations in women with a history of preeclampsia or hemolysis elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet

  11. The spectrum of mutation produced by low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morley, Alexander A.; Turner, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Inherited mutations are the basis of evolution and acquired mutations in humans are important in ageing, cancer and possibly various forms of tissue degeneration. Mutations are responsible for many of the long-term effects of radiation. However, sensitive direct detection of mutations in humans has been difficult. The aims of the project were to develop methods for the sensitive enumeration of mutations in DNA, to measure mutation frequencies in a wide variety of tissue types and to quantify the mutational effect of direct oxidative damage produced by radiation, at both high and low doses. The project was successful in developing a sensitive method which could detect mutations directly in the genetic material, DNA at a sensitivity of 1 mutated molecule in 1000000000 unmutated molecules. However a number of methodological problems had to be overcome and lack of ongoing funding made it impossible to fulfill all of the aims of the project

  12. Plants with elevated levels of glucan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, Markus; Kraemer, Florian J.; Hake, Sarah

    2018-03-20

    The present disclosure relates to mutations in licheninase genes encoding polypeptides with decreased licheninase activity, which when expressed in plants results in elevated levels of glucan in the plants. In particular, the disclosure relates to licheninase nucleic acids and polypeptides related to glucan accumulation in plants, plants with reduced expression of a licheninase nucleic acid, and methods related to the generation of plants with increased glucan content in the cell walls of leaf tissue.

  13. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  14. Mutation Spectrum and Phenotypic Features in Noonan Syndrome with PTPN11 Mutations: Definition of Two Novel Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atik, Tahir; Aykut, Ayca; Hazan, Filiz; Onay, Huseyin; Goksen, Damla; Darcan, Sukran; Tukun, Ajlan; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the spectrum of PTPN11 gene mutations in Noonan syndrome patients and to study the genotype-phenotype associations. In this study, twenty Noonan syndrome patients with PTPN11 mutations were included. The patients underwent a detailed clinical and physical evaluation. To identify inherited cases, parents of all mutation positive patients were analyzed. Thirteen different PTPN11 mutations, two of them being novel, were detected in the study group. These mutations included eleven missense mutations: p.G60A, p.D61N, p.Y62D, p.Y63C, p.E69Q, p.Q79R, p.Y279C,p.N308D, p.N308S, p.M504V, p.Q510R and two novel missense mutations: p.I56V and p.I282M. The frequency of cardiac abnormalities and short stature were found to be 80 % and 80 %, respectively. Mental retardation was not observed in patients having exon 8 mutations. No significant correlations were detected between other phenotypic features and genotypes. By identifying genotype-phenotype correlations, this study provides information on phenotypes observed in NS patients with different PTPN11 mutations.

  15. The condensed mutation in sunflower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, P.

    1978-01-01

    Three inbred lines of sunflower were treated with gamma rays. In the progeny of one of these lines, the desired dwarf mutation appeared with a high frequency (23%). The dwarfing was accompanied by various undesirable characteristics (lateness, poor seed production, etc.), for which correction through genetic diversification and selection is in progress. The ratio capitulum diameter/stem height has increased from 1/8 up to 1/3 [fr

  16. Mutation breeding in rice in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminathan, M S; Siddiq, E A; Singh, C B; Pai, R A [Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi (India)

    1970-03-01

    Mutation research was continued in rice with the following aims; (a) to enhance the frequency and spectrum of mutations in indica and japonica rice varieties; (b) to change the grain quality of the japonica variety, Tainan-3, into the indica type; (c) to improve the grain quality of the indica variety, IR-8; (d) to increase the recombination frequency in japonica-indica hybrids. Both nitrosoguanidine and 5-MeV fast neutrons gave a high mutation frequency. The japonica variety was more sensitive to all mutagens than the indica types. Chemical mutagens had no particular advantage over ionizing radiations with reference to either mutation frequency or spectrum. Mutants with indica type of grain occurred readily in Tainan-3 in all treatments. Such mutants had a larger grain length/width ratio and were more resistant to alkali digestion. Fine grain types with better cooking quality occurred in the M{sub 2} populations of IR-8. These mutants are likely to render this high-yielding variety more popular. A wide range of chlorophyll and viable mutations occurred in IR-8 and Tainan-3. Some of these, like those involving dwarfing and slow senescence, are of economic interest, besides those affecting grain quality. Recombination frequency can be influenced in japonica x indica hybrids through the irradiation of F{sub 1} sporocytes. The precise influence varies with the stage at which the plant is irradiated, the dose given and the loci involved. (author)

  17. Mutation breeding in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baradjanegara, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    In Indonesia, soybean is one of the important crop after rice. It is generally cultivated in the lowlands and rarely in the highlands. Seeds of soybean variety ORBA were treated with various doses of fast neutrons, gamma rays, EMS and NaN 3 with the aims of studying the mutagen effects in M-1 and M-2 generations and also to select mutants adapted to highland conditions. D-50 doses for gamma rays, fast neutrons and EMS were around 23 krad, 2,300 rad, 0.3%, respectively. Much higher chlorophyll mutation frequency was observed in EMS treatment of 0.3%. Seven mutants were shorter and four early mutants matured from 4 to 20 days earlier than the control plants. Two early mutants were quite adaptable in both the low and highlands and produced better yields than the parental material. (author)

  18. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  19. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A.; Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I.; Chaudri, M.S.; Shakoori, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients

  20. Mutational synergism between p-fluorophenylalaline and UV in Coprinus lagopus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmud, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    The amino acid analogue p-fluorophenylalanine (PFP) is mutagenic to Coprinus lagopus due to its incorporation into proteins. Spontaneous mutations, PFP and UV mutagenesis and PFP/UV synergism have been studied in a UV resistant strain and in two complementing UV sensitive mutant strains. By comparison to the UV resistant strain, one UV sensitive strain shows normal spontaneous mutations, 1.4% PFP-induced mutations and 50-fold UV mutagenesis. The second UV sensitive strain has 19-fold spontaneous mutation frequency and slightly elevated UV mutagenesis. In all 3 strains the PFP/UV synergism is comparable (4-5 times the arithmetic expected). The results indicate that PFP mutagenesis is due to the incorporation of PFP into enzymes normally functioning in the organism but which also participate in UV repair mechanisms. A model is proposed for UV repair which is based on a PFP sensitive excision repair system of at least two enzymes, an alternative 'error-proof' pathway which is not susceptible to PFP and an 'error-prone' pathway which is responsible for UV mutagenesis and is susceptible to PFP as shown by the PFP/UV synergism. Because PFP is given before UV treatment, this implies a UV inducible cofactor and a PFP sensitive enzyme which only functions after UV activation

  1. Mutation breeding of autotetraploid Achimenes cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broertjes, C.

    1976-01-01

    Colchicine-induced autotetraploids of three Achimenes cultivars were irradiated with X-rays or fast neutrons. The results were compared, in one cultivar, with those of the irradiated diploid form. The mutation frequency after irradiation of the autotetraploid was a 20-40 fold higher as compared to the corresponding diploid. These results may open new possibilities for mutation breeding, though they are hard to explain. Several promising mutants were selected. (author)

  2. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Růžička

    Full Text Available Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs rarely associated with mutations (coldspots and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  3. De stille elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther-Lindqvist, Ditte Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Det er blevet en afgørende samværskompetence i uddannelsessystemet at stå aktivt frem og deltage verbalt i skoleklassens liv både fagligt og socialt. Men ikke alle elever deltager lige villigt verbalt i plenum. Artiklen handler om de stille elever og konsekvenserne af stillehed i skolen. Det...... foreslås at skolesystemet sanktionerer ældre elever hårdere for stillehed end yngre elever og det forklares med at skolelivet også er en kultivering henimod elevhed som social identitet og denne er der forventning om at eleverne mestrer i udskolingen....

  4. A Middle Eastern Founder Mutation Expands the Genotypic and Phenotypic Spectrum of Mitochondrial MICU1 Deficiency: A Report of 13 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Sara; Eyaid, Wafaa; Kamer, Kimberli; Ali, Rehab; Al-Mureikhi, Mariam; Shahbeck, Noora; Al Mesaifri, Fatma; Makhseed, Nawal; Mohamed, Zakkiriah; AlShehhi, Wafaa Ali; Mootha, Vamsi K; Juusola, Jane; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg

    2018-05-03

    MICU1 encodes a Ca 2+ sensing, regulatory subunit of the mitochondrial uniporter, a selective calcium channel within the organelle's inner membrane. Ca 2+ entry into mitochondria helps to buffer cytosolic Ca 2+ transients and also activates ATP production within the organelle. Mutations in MICU1 have previously been reported in 17 children from nine families with muscle weakness, fatigue, normal lactate, and persistently elevated creatine kinase, as well as variable features that include progressive extrapyramidal signs, learning disabilities, nystagmus, and cataracts. In this study, we report the clinical features of an additional 13 patients from consanguineous Middle Eastern families with recessive mutations in MICU1. Of these patients, 12/13 are homozygous for a novel founder mutation c.553C>T (p.Q185*) that is predicted to lead to a complete loss of function of MICU1, while one patient is compound heterozygous for this mutation and an intragenic duplication of exons 9 and 10. The founder mutation occurs with a minor allele frequency of 1:60,000 in the ExAC database, but in ~1:500 individual in the Middle East. All 13 of these patients presented with developmental delay, learning disability, muscle weakness and easy fatigability, and failure to thrive, as well as additional variable features we tabulate. Consistent with previous cases, all of these patients had persistently elevated serum creatine kinase with normal lactate levels, but they also exhibited elevated transaminase enzymes. Our work helps to better define the clinical sequelae of MICU1 deficiency. Furthermore, our work suggests that targeted analysis of the MICU1 founder mutation in Middle Eastern patients may be warranted.

  5. Prevalent mutations in fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    2000-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The mutational spectrum in a given disease-associated gene is often comprised of a large number of different mutations, of which a single or a few are present in a large proportion of diseased individuals. Such prevalent mutations are known in four genes of the fatty acid oxidation...... of the disease in question and determination of the carrier frequency in the general population may help in elucidating the penetrance of the genotype. This is exemplified in disorders of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation....

  6. Contribution of TARDBP mutations to sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, H; Valdmanis, P N; Kabashi, E; Dion, P; Dupré, N; Camu, W; Meininger, V; Rouleau, G A

    2009-02-01

    Mutations in the TARDBP gene, which encodes the TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43), have been described in individuals with familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We screened the TARDBP gene in 285 French sporadic ALS patients to assess the frequency of TARDBP mutations in ALS. Six individuals had potentially deleterious mutations of which three were novel including a Y374X truncating mutation and P363A and A382P missense mutations. This suggests that TARDBP mutations may predispose to ALS in approximately 2% of the individuals followed in this study. Our findings, combined with those from other collections, brings the total number of mutations in unrelated ALS patients to 17, further suggesting that mutations in the TARDBP gene have an important role in the pathogenesis of ALS.

  7. The yule approximation for the site frequency spectrum after a selective sweep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bossert

    Full Text Available In the area of evolutionary theory, a key question is which portions of the genome of a species are targets of natural selection. Genetic hitchhiking is a theoretical concept that has helped to identify various such targets in natural populations. In the presence of recombination, a severe reduction in sequence diversity is expected around a strongly beneficial allele. The site frequency spectrum is an important tool in genome scans for selection and is composed of the numbers S(1,...,S(n-1, where S(k is the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs present in k from n individuals. Previous work has shown that both the number of low- and high-frequency variants are elevated relative to neutral evolution when a strongly beneficial allele fixes. Here, we follow a recent investigation of genetic hitchhiking using a marked Yule process to obtain an analytical prediction of the site frequency spectrum in a panmictic population at the time of fixation of a highly beneficial mutation. We combine standard results from the neutral case with the effects of a selective sweep. As simulations show, the resulting formula produces predictions that are more accurate than previous approaches for the whole frequency spectrum. In particular, the formula correctly predicts the elevation of low- and high-frequency variants and is significantly more accurate than previously derived formulas for intermediate frequency variants.

  8. Enhancing the energy efficiency of elevators and conveyor systems by the development of a novel frequency converter; Verbesserung der Energieeffizienz von Aufzuegen und Foerderanlagen durch Entwicklung eines neuartigen Frequenzumformers - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanyo, P.; Bolla, M.

    2008-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work done concerning the development of a new type of frequency converter for drive applications. The converter is free of the disadvantages incurred when using voltage converters, where it is difficult to reduce standby power consumption since much energy is stored in the intermediate circuit condensers. The new current converter completely provides the desired advantages (recuperation, standby). In addition, it is suited to industrial applications with costs that are comparable to or lower than the systems used today. The report discusses the technical solution chosen, its applications and the costs involved. Prototypes are described and the results of measurements made are discussed.

  9. The directed mutation controversy and neo-Darwinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, R E; Mittler, J E

    1993-01-08

    According to neo-Darwinian theory, random mutation produces genetic differences among organisms whereas natural selection tends to increase the frequency of advantageous alleles. However, several recent papers claim that certain mutations in bacteria and yeast occur at much higher rates specifically when the mutant phenotypes are advantageous. Various molecular models have been proposed that might explain these directed mutations, but the models have not been confirmed. Critics contend that studies purporting to demonstrate directed mutation lack certain controls and fail to account adequately for population dynamics. Further experiments that address these criticisms do not support the existence of directed mutations.

  10. Mutations in CARD15 and smoking confer susceptibility to Crohn's disease in the Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernst, Anja; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius; Østergaard, Mette

    2007-01-01

    Three CAspase Recruitment Domain (CARD15) mutations have shown to predispose to Crohn's disease in Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation frequency in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in healthy controls in Denmark....

  11. Undervisning af tosprogede elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horst, Christian

    2003-01-01

    Artiklen fremdrager hovedresultaterne fra Virginia P. Collier's og Wayne P. Thomas's længdeundersøgelser af tosprogede elever i USA, som formentlig er de mest omfattende undersøgelser af undervisningen af tosprogede elever overhovedet. Resultaterne diskuteres i relation til udviklingen af en...

  12. Effects of elevated CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xue, Sha; Yang, Xiaomei; Liu, Guobin; Gai, Lingtong; Zhang, Changsheng; Ritsema, Coen J.; Geissen, Violette

    2017-01-01

    Elevated CO2 and drought are key consequences of climate change and affect soil processes and plant growth. This study investigated the effects of elevated CO2 and drought on the microbial biomass and enzymatic activities in the rhizospheres of Bothriochloa ischaemum and

  13. Molecular methods for the detection of mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, C; Marcelino, L A; Conde, A R; Saraiva, C; Giphart-Gassler, M; De Nooij-van Dalen, A G; Van Buuren-van Seggelen, V; Van der Keur, M; May, C A; Cole, J; Lehmann, A R; Steinsgrimsdottir, H; Beare, D; Capulas, E; Armour, J A

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of a collaborative study aimed at developing reliable, direct assays for mutation in human cells. The project used common lymphoblastoid cell lines, both with and without mutagen treatment, as a shared resource to validate the development of new molecular methods for the detection of low-level mutations in the presence of a large excess of normal alleles. As the "gold standard, " hprt mutation frequencies were also measured on the same samples. The methods under development included i) the restriction site mutation (RSM) assay, in which mutations lead to the destruction of a restriction site; ii) minisatellite length-change mutation, in which mutations lead to alleles containing new numbers of tandem repeat units; iii) loss of heterozygosity for HLA epitopes, in which antibodies can be used to direct selection for mutant cells; iv) multiple fluorescence-based long linker arm nucleotides assay (mf-LLA) technology, for the detection of substitutional mutations; v) detection of alterations in the TP53 locus using a (CA) array as the target for the screening; and vi) PCR analysis of lymphocytes for the presence of the BCL2 t(14:18) translocation. The relative merits of these molecular methods are discussed, and a comparison made with more "traditional" methods.

  14. Elevator and hydraulics; Elevator to yuatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, I. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-07-15

    A hydraulic type elevator is installed in relatively lower buildings as compared with a rope type elevator, but the ratio in the number of installation of the former elevator is increasing. This paper explains from its construction and features to especially various control systems for the riding comfort and safety. A direct push-up system with hydraulic jacks arranged beneath a car, and an indirect push-up system that has hydraulic jacks arranged on flank of a car and transmits the movement of a plunger via a rope are available. The latter system eliminates the need of large holes to embed hydraulic jacks. While the speed is controlled by controlling flow rates of high-pressure oil, the speed, position, acceleration and even time differential calculus of the acceleration must be controlled severely. The system uses two-step control for the through-speed and the landing speed. Different systems that have been realized may include compensation for temperatures in flow rate control valves, load pressures, and oil viscosity, from learning control to fuzzy control for psychological effects, or control of inverters in motors. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Elevators or stairs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sachin; O’Byrne, Michael; Wilson, Merne; Wilson, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff in hospitals frequently travel between floors and choose between taking the stairs or elevator. We compared the time savings with these two options. Methods: Four people aged 26–67 years completed 14 trips ranging from one to six floors, both ascending and descending. We compared the amount of time per floor travelled by stairs and by two banks of elevators. Participants reported their fatigue levels using a modified Borg scale. We performed two-way analysis of variance to compare the log-transformed data, with participant and time of day as independent variables. Results: The mean time taken to travel between each floor was 13.1 (standard deviation [SD] 1.7) seconds by stairs and 37.5 (SD 19.0) and 35.6 (SD 23.1) seconds by the two elevators (F = 8.61, p elevator equaled about 15 minutes a day. Self-reported fatigue was less than 13 (out of 20) on the Borg scale for all participants, and they all stated that they were able to continue their duties without resting. The extra time associated with elevator use was because of waiting for its arrival. There was a difference in the amount of time taken to travel by elevator depending on the time of day and day of the week. Interpretation: Taking the stairs rather than the elevator saved about 15 minutes each workday. This 3% savings per workday could translate into improved productivity as well as increased fitness. PMID:22159365

  16. Mutational influences of low-dose and high let ionizing radiation in drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huang; Fanjun, Kong; Sun, Yeqing

    For cosmic environment consists of a varying kinds of radiation particles including high Z and energy ions which was charactered with low-dose and high RBE, it is important to determine the possible biofuctions of high LET radiation on human beings. To analyse the possible effectes of mutational influences of low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, wild fruit flies drosophila melanogaster were irradiated by 12C6+ ions in two LET levels (63.3 and 30 keV/µum) with different low doses from 2mGy to 2000mGy (2, 20, 200, 2000mGy) in HIRFL (Heavy ion radiation facility laboratory, lanzhou, China).In the same LET value group, the average polymorphic frequency was elevated along with adding doses of irradation, the frequency in 2000 mGy dose samples was significantly higher than other samples (p<0.01).These results suggest that genomic DNA sequence could be effected by low-dose and high-LET ionizing radiation, the irradiation dose is an important element in genomic mutation frequency origination.

  17. The molecular anatomy of spontaneous germline mutations in human testes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Qin

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of the most common sporadic Apert syndrome mutation (C755G in the human fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene (FGFR2 is 100-1,000 times higher than expected from average nucleotide substitution rates based on evolutionary studies and the incidence of human genetic diseases. To determine if this increased frequency was due to the nucleotide site having the properties of a mutation hot spot, or some other explanation, we developed a new experimental approach. We examined the spatial distribution of the frequency of the C755G mutation in the germline by dividing four testes from two normal individuals each into several hundred pieces, and, using a highly sensitive PCR assay, we measured the mutation frequency of each piece. We discovered that each testis was characterized by rare foci with mutation frequencies 10(3 to >10(4 times higher than the rest of the testis regions. Using a model based on what is known about human germline development forced us to reject (p < 10(-6 the idea that the C755G mutation arises more frequently because this nucleotide simply has a higher than average mutation rate (hot spot model. This is true regardless of whether mutation is dependent or independent of cell division. An alternate model was examined where positive selection acts on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonial cells (SrAp carrying this mutation such that, instead of only replacing themselves, they occasionally produce two SrAp cells. This model could not be rejected given our observed data. Unlike the disease site, similar analysis of C-to-G mutations at a control nucleotide site in one testis pair failed to find any foci with high mutation frequencies. The rejection of the hot spot model and lack of rejection of a selection model for the C755G mutation, along with other data, provides strong support for the proposal that positive selection in the testis can act to increase the frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying a mutation

  18. Elevated temperature fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.

    1979-01-01

    The application of fracture mechanics concepts to cracks at elevated temperatures is examined. Particular consideration is given to the characterisation of crack tip stress-strain fields and parameters controlling crack extension under static and cyclic loads. (author)

  19. PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type IX: prevalence of deletion mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-04-21

    Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) is important to enable accurate diagnoses and make appropriate therapeutic plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD type IX. Thirteen Korean patients were tested for PHKA2 mutations using direct sequencing and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. A comprehensive review of the literature on previously reported PHKA2 mutations in other ethnic populations was conducted for comparison. Among 13 patients tested, six unrelated male patients with GSD IX aged 2 to 6 years at the first diagnostic work-up for hepatomegaly with elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were found to have PHKA2 mutations. These patients had different PHKA2 mutations: five were known mutations (c.537 + 5G > A, c.884G > A [p.Arg295His], c.3210_3212delGAG [p.Arg1072del], exon 8 deletion, and exons 27-33 deletion) and one was a novel mutation (exons 18-33 deletion). Notably, the most common type of mutation was gross deletion, in contrast to other ethnic populations in which the most common mutation type was sequence variant. This study expands our knowledge of the PHKA2 mutation spectrum of GSD IX. Considering the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD IX, molecular diagnostic methods for deletions should be conducted in conjunction with direct sequence analysis to enable accurate molecular diagnosis of this disease in the Korean population.

  20. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  1. Origin and spread of the 1278insTATC mutation causing Tay-Sachs disease in Ashkenazi Jews: genetic drift as a robust and parsimonious hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Amos; Colombo, Roberto; Michaelovsky, Elena; Karpati, Mazal; Goldman, Boleslaw; Peleg, Leah

    2004-03-01

    The 1278insTATC is the most prevalent beta-hexosaminidase A ( HEXA) gene mutation causing Tay-Sachs disease (TSD), one of the four lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) occurring at elevated frequencies among Ashkenazi Jews (AJs). To investigate the genetic history of this mutation in the AJ population, a conserved haplotype (D15S981:175-D15S131:240-D15S1050:284-D15S197:144-D15S188:418) was identified in 1278insTATC chromosomes from 55 unrelated AJ individuals (15 homozygotes and 40 heterozygotes for the TSD mutation), suggesting the occurrence of a common founder. When two methods were used for analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between flanking polymorphic markers and the disease locus and for the study of the decay of LD over time, the estimated age of the insertion was found to be 40+/-12 generations (95% confidence interval: 30-50 generations), so that the most recent common ancestor of the mutation-bearing chromosomes would date to the 8th-9th century. This corresponds with the demographic expansion of AJs in central Europe, following the founding of the Ashkenaz settlement in the early Middle Ages. The results are consistent with the geographic distribution of the main TSD mutation, 1278insTATC being more common in central Europe, and with the coalescent times of mutations causing two other LSDs, Gaucher disease and mucolipidosis type IV. Evidence for the absence of a determinant positive selection (heterozygote advantage) over the mutation is provided by a comparison between the estimated age of 1278insTATC and the probability of the current AJ frequency of the mutant allele as a function of its age, calculated by use of a branching-process model. Therefore, the founder effect in a rapidly expanding population arising from a bottleneck provides a robust parsimonious hypothesis explaining the spread of 1278insTATC-linked TSD in AJ individuals.

  2. Mutation accumulation may be a minor force in shaping life history traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dańko, Maciej Jan; Kozłowski, Jan; Vaupel, James Walton

    2012-01-01

    -strings to capture different age-specific mutational patterns. Each pattern represents a genotype and for each genotype we find the life history strategy that maximizes fitness. Genotypes compete with each other and are subject to selection and to new mutations over generations until equilibrium in gene......-frequencies is reached. The mutation-selection equilibrium provides information about mutational load and the differential effects of mutations on a life history trait--the optimal age at maturity. We find that mutations accumulate only at ages with negligible impact on fitness and that mutation accumulation has very...

  3. Indsatser for tosprogede elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Dines; Jakobsen, Vibeke; Jensen, Vibeke Myrup

    Fagligt set klarer tosprogede elever sig dårligere i skolen og det videre uddannelsessystem end ’danske’ elever. Kommuner og folkeskoler har derfor sat en række tiltag i værk, som sigter mod at forbedre de tosprogede elevers skole- og uddannelsessituation. Rapporten kortlægger og analyserer...... af klasseundervisningen. Analysen viser, at de elever, der bliver taget ud af klassen for at få ekstra undervisning i dansk som andetsprog, klarer sig dårligere end elever, der modtager ekstraundervisningen i klassen eller uden for skoletid. Undersøgelsen er baseret på spørgeskemaundersøgelser blandt...... kommunale forvaltningschefer, skoleledere, lærere og forældre til børn i 2. klasse samt lærere til og elever i 9. klasse, SFI’s forløbsundersøgelse af årgang 1995 og registerdata. Undersøgelsen er via Ministeriet for Børn og Undervisning betalt med midler fra satspuljeaftalen 2009 om integration....

  4. Progress of mutation breeding in Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purivirojkul, Watchara; Vithayatherarat, Pradab [Pathumthani Rice Research Center (Thailand)

    2001-03-01

    The objectives in rice improvement in Thailand are to improve not only for high yielding and good grain quality but also for resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to biotic stresses. Brief history of research and progress in rice mutation breeding in Thailand is presented. It includes the varieties of method such as using gamma rays, fast neutron and chemical mutagens, for example EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate) and EI (ethylene imine) for mutation works. Among all, improvements of Pathumthani 60 for short-statured plant type, RD23 for blast resistance, Basmati 370 for short-statured plant type, and Pra Doo Daeng for short-statured plant type and awnless grain are reported. To conclude, it is important to find the adequate doses of mutagen treatments that give maximum mutation frequencies, to know the optimal treatments or proper selection methods and to have well-defined objectives to create the success of mutation breeding. (S. Ohno)

  5. Progress of mutation breeding in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purivirojkul, Watchara; Vithayatherarat, Pradab

    2001-01-01

    The objectives in rice improvement in Thailand are to improve not only for high yielding and good grain quality but also for resistance to diseases and insects and tolerance to biotic stresses. Brief history of research and progress in rice mutation breeding in Thailand is presented. It includes the varieties of method such as using gamma rays, fast neutron and chemical mutagens, for example EMS (ethylmethane sulfonate) and EI (ethylene imine) for mutation works. Among all, improvements of Pathumthani 60 for short-statured plant type, RD23 for blast resistance, Basmati 370 for short-statured plant type, and Pra Doo Daeng for short-statured plant type and awnless grain are reported. To conclude, it is important to find the adequate doses of mutagen treatments that give maximum mutation frequencies, to know the optimal treatments or proper selection methods and to have well-defined objectives to create the success of mutation breeding. (S. Ohno)

  6. Deletion mutations of bacteriophage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryo, Yeikou

    1975-01-01

    Resolution of mutation mechanism with structural changes of DNA was discussed through the studies using bacteriophage lambda. One of deletion mutations inductions of phage lambda is the irradiation of ultraviolet ray. It is not clear if the inductions are caused by errors in reparation of ultraviolet-induced damage or by the activation of int gene. Because the effective site of int gene lies within the regions unnecessary for existing, it is considered that int gene is connected to deletion mutations induction. A certain system using prophage complementarity enables to detect deletion mutations at essential hereditary sites and to solve the relations of deletion mutations with other recombination system, DNA reproduction and repairment system. Duplication and multiplication of hereditary elements were discussed. If lambda deletion mutations of the system, which can control recombination, reproduction and repairment of added DNA, are constructed, mutations mechanism with great changes of DNA structure can be solved by phage lambda. (Ichikawa, K.)

  7. Alkylating agent (MNU)-induced mutation in space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, K.; Takahashi, S.; Masukawa, M.; Sekikawa, K.; Amano, T.; Nakano, T.; Nagaoka, S.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, some contradictory data about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments have been reported. We prepared a damaged template DNA produced with an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N-nitroso urea; MNU) to measure incorrect base-incorporation during DNA replication in microgravity. We examined whether mutation frequency is affected by microgravity during DNA replication for a DNA template damaged by an alkylating agent. Using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system, DNA synthesis by Taq polymerase or polymerase III was done during a US space shuttle mission (Discovery, STS-91). After the flight, DNA replication and mutation frequencies were measured. We found that there was almost no effect of microgravity on DNA replication and mutation frequency. It is suggested that microgravity might not affect at the stage of substrate incorporation in induced-mutation frequency.

  8. KRAS and BRAF mutations in anal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Høgdall, Estrid

    2015-01-01

    the frequency and the prognostic value of KRAS and BRAF mutations in a large cohort of patients with anal cancer. One hundred and ninety-three patients with T1-4N0-3M0-1 anal carcinoma were included in the study. Patients were treated with curative (92%) or palliative intent (8%) between January 2000...

  9. Frequency of the different mutations causing spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA in a large group of Brazilian patients Freqüência das mutações que causam ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 e DRPLA em um grupo numeroso de pacientes Brasileiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iscia Lopes-Cendesi

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1, spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 and Machado-Joseph disease or spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (MJD/SCA3 are three distinctive forms of autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA caused by expansions of an unstable CAG repeat localized in the coding region of the causative genes. Another related disease, dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA is also caused by an unstable triplet repeat and can present as SCA in late onset patients. We investigated the frequency of the SCA1, SCA2, MJD/SCA3 and DRPLA mutations in 328 Brazilian patients with SCA, belonging to 90 unrelated families with various patterns of inheritance and originating in different geographic regions of Brazil. We found mutations in 35 families (39%, 32 of them with a clear autosomal dominant inheritance. The frequency of the SCA1 mutation was 3% of all patients; and 6 % in the dominantly inherited SCAs. We identified the SCA2 mutation in 6% of all families and in 9% of the families with autosomal dominant inheritance. The MJD/SCA3 mutation was detected in 30 % of all patients; and in the 44% of the dominantly inherited cases. We found no DRPLA mutation. In addition, we observed variability in the frequency of the different mutations according to geographic origin of the patients, which is probably related to the distinct colonization of different parts of Brazil. These results suggest that SCA may be occasionally caused by the SCA1 and SCA2 mutations in the Brazilian population, and that the MJD/SCA3 mutation is the most common cause of dominantly inherited SCA in Brazil.Ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 1 (SCA1, ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 2 (SCA2 e doença de Machado-Joseph ou ataxia espinocerebelar tipo 3 (MJD/SCA3 são três formas de ataxia espinocerebelar (SCA que apresentam herança genética autossômica dominante. Nessas três doenças foi encontrada uma expansão instável de trinucleotídeo CAG localizada na região codificadora dos

  10. Prospective study of POLG mutations presenting in children with intractable epilepsy: prevalence and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusimaa, Johanna; Gowda, Vasantha; McShane, Anthony; Smith, Conrad; Evans, Julie; Shrier, Annie; Narasimhan, Manisha; O'Rourke, Anthony; Rajabally, Yusuf; Hedderly, Tammy; Cowan, Frances; Fratter, Carl; Poulton, Joanna

    2013-06-01

    To assess the frequency and clinical features of childhood-onset intractable epilepsy caused by the most common mutations in the POLG gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. Children presenting with nonsyndromic intractable epilepsy of unknown etiology but without documented liver dysfunction at presentation were eligible for this prospective, population-based study. Blood samples were analyzed for the three most common POLG mutations. If any of the three tested mutations were found, all the exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the POLG gene were sequenced. In addition, we retrospectively reviewed the notes of patients presenting with intractable epilepsy in which we had found POLG mutations. All available clinical data were collected by questionnaire and by reviewing the medical records. We analyzed 213 blood DNA samples from patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria of the prospective study. Among these, five patients (2.3%) were found with one of the three common POLG mutations as homozygous or compound heterozygous states. In addition, three patients were retrospectively identified. Seven of the eight patients had either raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate (n = 3) or brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes (n = 4) at presentation with intractable epilepsy. Three patients later developed liver dysfunction, progressing to fatal liver failure in two without previous treatment with sodium valproate (VPA). Furthermore, it is worth mentioning that one patient presented first with an autism spectrum disorder before seizures emerged. Mutations in POLG are an important cause of early and juvenile onset nonsyndromic intractable epilepsy with highly variable associated manifestations including autistic features. This study emphasizes that genetic testing for POLG mutations in patients with nonsyndromic intractable epilepsies is very important for clinical diagnostics, genetic counseling, and treatment decisions

  11. Hot spot mutations in Finnish non-small cell lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäki-Nevala, Satu; Sarhadi, Virinder Kaur; Rönty, Mikko; Kettunen, Eeva; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Wolff, Henrik; Knuuttila, Aija; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-09-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a common cancer with a poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to screen Finnish NSCLC tumor samples for common cancer-related mutations by targeted next generation sequencing and to determine their concurrences and associations with clinical features. Sequencing libraries were prepared from DNA isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor material of 425 patients using the AmpliSeq Colon and Lung panel covering mutational hot spot regions of 22 cancer genes. Sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Data analysis of the hot spot mutations revealed mutations in 77% of the patients, with 7% having 3 or more mutations reported in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. Two of the most frequently mutated genes were TP53 (46%) and KRAS (25%). KRAS codon 12 mutations were the most recurrently occurring mutations. EGFR mutations were significantly associated with adenocarcinoma, female gender and never/light-smoking history; CTNNB1 mutations with light ex-smokers, PIK3CA and TP53 mutations with squamous cell carcinoma, and KRAS with adenocarcinoma. TP53 mutations were most prevalent in current smokers and ERBB2, ERBB4, PIK3CA, NRAS, NOTCH1, FBWX7, PTEN and STK11 mutations occurred exclusively in a group of ever-smokers, however the association was not statistically significant. No mutation was found that associated with asbestos exposure. Finnish NSCLC patients have a similar mutation profile as other Western patients, however with a higher frequency of BRAF mutations but a lower frequency of STK11 and ERBB2 mutations. Moreover, TP53 mutations occurred frequently with other gene mutations, most commonly with KRAS, MET, EGFR and PIK3CA mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutation analysis of the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene in Azerbaijani population, a report from West Azerbaijan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Bagheri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Phenylketonuria (PKU is a genetic inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe metabolism resulting from insufficiency in the hepatic enzyme, phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH, which leads to elevated levels of Phe in the blood. The present study was carried out for mutation analysis of the PAH gene in West Azerbaijan province of Iran. Materials and Methods:A total of 218 alleles from 40 PKU families were studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR method. Results:The frequencies of IVS10-11, S67P, R261Q, R252W, IVS11nt-1 g>c, R408Q, and Q232Q mutations were 28(35, 17(21.25, 15(18.75, 3(3.75, 3(3.75, 2(2.5, and 1(1.25, in cases group, and 51(23.4, 31(14.2, 27(12.4, 6(2.75, 6(2.75, 4(1.83, and 2(0.92 in total group, respectively. The mutations of R243Q, 364delG, L333F, 261X, I65T, and R408W were not detected in our samples. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the IVS10-11 mutation has the highest frequency in the tested population. To our knowledge, this report is the first in its own kind and provides better understanding of the genetic heterogeneity, the origin and distributions of PAH mutations in West Azerbaijan province of Iran.

  13. National Elevation Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2002-01-01

    The National Elevation Dataset (NED) is a new raster product assembled by the U.S. Geological Survey. NED is designed to provide National elevation data in a seamless form with a consistent datum, elevation unit, and projection. Data corrections were made in the NED assembly process to minimize artifacts, perform edge matching, and fill sliver areas of missing data. NED has a resolution of one arc-second (approximately 30 meters) for the conterminous United States, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the island territories and a resolution of two arc-seconds for Alaska. NED data sources have a variety of elevation units, horizontal datums, and map projections. In the NED assembly process the elevation values are converted to decimal meters as a consistent unit of measure, NAD83 is consistently used as horizontal datum, and all the data are recast in a geographic projection. Older DEM's produced by methods that are now obsolete have been filtered during the NED assembly process to minimize artifacts that are commonly found in data produced by these methods. Artifact removal greatly improves the quality of the slope, shaded-relief, and synthetic drainage information that can be derived from the elevation data. Figure 2 illustrates the results of this artifact removal filtering. NED processing also includes steps to adjust values where adjacent DEM's do not match well, and to fill sliver areas of missing data between DEM's. These processing steps ensure that NED has no void areas and artificial discontinuities have been minimized. The artifact removal filtering process does not eliminate all of the artifacts. In areas where the only available DEM is produced by older methods, then "striping" may still occur.

  14. JAK and MPL mutations in myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew

    2008-03-01

    The Janus family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (JAK1, JAK2, JAK3 and tyrosine kinase 2) transduces signals downstream of type I and II cytokine receptors via signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). JAK3 is important in lymphoid and JAK2 in myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation. The thrombopoietin receptor MPL is one of several JAK2 cognate receptors and is essential for myelopoiesis in general and megakaryopoiesis in particular. Germline loss-of-function (LOF) JAK3 and MPL mutations cause severe combined immunodeficiency and congenital amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia, respectively. Germline gain-of-function (GOF) MPL mutation (MPLS505N) causes familial thrombocytosis. Somatic JAK3 (e.g. JAK3A572V, JAK3V722I, JAK3P132T) and fusion JAK2 (e.g. ETV6-JAK2, PCM1-JAK2, BCR-JAK2) mutations have respectively been described in acute megakaryocytic leukemia and acute leukemia/chronic myeloid malignancies. However, current attention is focused on JAK2 (e.g. JAK2V617F, JAK2 exon 12 mutations) and MPL (e.g. MPLW515L/K/S, MPLS505N) mutations associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). A JAK2 mutation, primarily JAK2V617F, is invariably associated with polycythemia vera (PV). The latter mutation also occurs in the majority of patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET) or primary myelofibrosis (PMF). MPL mutational frequency in MPNs is substantially less (<10%). In general, despite a certain degree of genotype - phenotype correlations, the prognostic relevance of harbouring one of these mutations, or their allele burden when present, remains dubious. Regardless, based on the logical assumption that amplified JAK-STAT signalling is central to the pathogenesis of PV, ET and PMF, several anti-JAK2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been developed and are currently being tested in humans with these disorders.

  15. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics in 100 Chinese Pediatric Patients with m.3243A>G Mutation in Mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yu Xia

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Our study showed that half of Chinese pediatric patients with m.3243A>G mutation presented seizures, short stature, abnormal MRI/CT changes, elevated plasma lactate, vomiting, and headache. Pediatric patients with these recurrent symptoms should be considered for screening m.3243A>G mutation. Clinical manifestations and laboratory abnormalities should be carefully monitored in patients with this point mutation.

  16. Mitochondrial mutations in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail K Mithani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. METHODOLOGY: The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77% carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6% carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9% with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH complex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication.

  17. Germline APC mutations in hepatoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Adeline; Sisson, Rebecca; Gupta, Anita; Tiao, Greg; Geller, James I

    2018-04-01

    Conflicting reports on the frequency of germline adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene mutations in patients with hepatoblastoma (HB) have called into question the clinical value of APC mutation testing on apparently sporadic HB. An Institutional Review Board approved retrospective review of clinical data collected from patients with HB who received APC testing at our institution was conducted. All HB patients seen at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center were eligible for testing. Potential genotype/phenotype correlations were assessed. As of July 2015, 29 patients with HB had received constitutional APC testing. Four (14%) were found to have APC pathogenic truncations of the APC protein and in addition two (7%) had APC missense variants of unknown clinical significance. Two patients (7%) had family histories indicative of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Response to chemotherapy tracked differently in APC pathogenic cases, with a slower imaging response despite an equivalent or slightly faster α-fetoprotein (AFP) response. The prevalence of pathogenic APC variants in apparently sporadic HB may be higher than previously detected. Differences in time to imaging response, despite similar AFP response, may impact surgical planning. All patients with HB warrant germline APC mutation testing for underlying FAP. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Geared-elevator flutter study. [transonic flutter characteristics of empennage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Gregory, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes an experimental and analytical study of the transonic flutter characteristics of an empennage flutter model having an all-movable horizontal tail with a geared elevator. Two configurations were flutter tested: one with a geared elevator and one with a locked elevator with the model cantilever-mounted on a sting in the wind tunnel. The geared-elevator configuration fluttered experimentally at about 20% higher dynamic pressures than the locked-elevator configuration. The experimental flutter boundary was nearly flat at transonic speeds for both configurations. It was found that an analysis which treated the elevator as a discrete surface predicted flutter dynamic pressure levels better than analyses which treated the stabilizer and elevator as a warped surface. Warped-surface methods, however, predicted more closely the experimental flutter frequencies and Mach number trends.

  19. Mutation effect of ion implantation on tomato breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Baoshan; Ling Haiqiu; Mao Peihong; Jin Xiang; Zeng Xianxian

    2003-01-01

    The mutation effects of N + ion implantation on cultivated tomato, Catchup type and Eatable type were studied. The result show that the mutation ranges of single-fruit weight and fruit number per plant were increased and their mutation frequencies were high, however the effect of ion implantation on germination rate of seed and quality of fruit was very weak. Using doses of 4 x 10 16 and 6 x 10 16 N + /cm 2 , the yield was greatly improved. The optimum mutation dosage was slightly different for seed of 2 tomato lines

  20. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. Methods The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Results Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype–phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy. PMID:21677794

  1. Human hereditary diseases associated with elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejima, Yosuke

    1988-01-01

    Human recessive diseases collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes include Fanconi's anemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. Cells from these patients show chromosome instabilities both spontaneously and following treatments with radiations or certain chemicals, where defects in DNA metabolisms are supposed to be involved. Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations, though DNA replication is less affected than in normal cells. Chromatid-type as well as chromosom-type aberrations are induced in cells irradiated in G 0 or G 1 phases. These unusual responses to radiations may provide clues for understanding the link between DNA replicative response and cellular radiosensitivity. Alterations in cellular radiosensitivity or spontaneous chromosome instabilities are observed in some patients with congenital chromosome anomalies or dominant diseases, where underlying defects may be different from those in recessive diseases. (author)

  2. Human hereditary diseases associated with elevated frequency of chromosome aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejima, Yosuke; Ikushima, Takaji (ed.)

    1988-07-01

    Human recessive diseases collectively known as chromosome breakage syndromes include Fanconi's anemia, Bloom's syndrome and ataxia telangiectasia. Cells from these patients show chromosome instabilities both spontaneously and following treatments with radiations or certain chemicals, where defects in DNA metabolisms are supposed to be involved. Cells from patients with ataxia telangiectasia are hypersensitive to ionizing radiations, though DNA replication is less affected than in normal cells. Chromatid-type as well as chromosom-type aberrations are induced in cells irradiated in G/sub 0/ or G/sub 1/ phases. These unusual responses to radiations may provide clues for understanding the link between DNA replicative response and cellular radiosensitivity. Alterations in cellular radiosensitivity or spontaneous chromosome instabilities are observed in some patients with congenital chromosome anomalies or dominant diseases, where underlying defects may be different from those in recessive diseases.

  3. Interaktive tavler - interaktive elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte F.; Otzen, Elsebeth

    Abstract, Poster-præsentation 13.-14. juni 2012, Pilotprojekt: Interaktive tavler – interaktive elever Lektor, cand. pæd., Elsebeth Otzen og Lektor, cand. mag., Charlotte Reusch, Institut for Skole og Læring, Læreruddannelsen, Professionshøjskolen Metropol, København Hvordan motiverer en interaktiv...... tavle lærere og elever? Hvad sker der mellem elev, stof og lærer, når læreren bliver i stand til at billedliggøre og dynamisere sine oplæg på tavlen? Bliver læreroplæg prioriteret? Bliver eleverne aktive, eller ender den interaktive tavle med blot at understøtte lærerens envejskommunikation til klassen......? Og hvad sker der mellem eleverne? Disse spørgsmål var igangsættende for arbejdet med pilotprojektet Interaktive tavler – interaktive elever, som blev afviklet i skoleåret 2010-2011. Projektet blev udført af en tværfaglig gruppe, bestående af lektorer i matematik, biologi og dansk i læreruddannelsen...

  4. Udeskole og elevers handlekompetence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiting, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Elever elsker at komme væk fra undervisningen i skolen. Er det positivt eller negativt? Og hvad har betydning for, at eleverne får mest muligt ud af oplevelserne uden for skolen? Forskellige former for udeskole giver nogle oplagte muligheder, så eleverne udvikler sig som engagerede borgere i et...

  5. Interaktive tavler - interaktive elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reusch, Charlotte; Otzen, Elsebeth

    Abstract, Poster-præsentation 13.-14. juni 2012, Pilotprojekt: Interaktive tavler ? interaktive elever Lektor, cand. pæd., Elsebeth Otzen og Lektor, cand. mag., Charlotte Reusch, Institut for Skole og Læring, Læreruddannelsen, Professionshøjskolen Metropol, København Hvordan motiverer en interaktiv...... tavle lærere og elever? Hvad sker der mellem elev, stof og lærer, når læreren bliver i stand til at billedliggøre og dynamisere sine oplæg på tavlen? Bliver læreroplæg prioriteret? Bliver eleverne aktive, eller ender den interaktive tavle med blot at understøtte lærerens envejskommunikation til klassen......? Og hvad sker der mellem eleverne? Disse spørgsmål var igangsættende for arbejdet med pilotprojektet Interaktive tavler ? interaktive elever, som blev afviklet i skoleåret 2010-2011. Projektet blev udført af en tværfaglig gruppe, bestående af lektorer i matematik, biologi og dansk i læreruddannelsen...

  6. New parkin mutations and atypical phenotypes in families with autosomal recessive parkinsonism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawal, N.; Periquet, M.; Lohmann, E.; Lucking, C.B.; Teive, H.; Ambrosio, G.; Raskin, S.; Lincoln, S.; Hattori, N.; Guimaraes, J.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Santos Bele, W. Dos; Brousolle, E.; Destee, A.; Mizuno, Y.; Farrer, M.; Deleuze, J.F.; Michele, G. de; Agid, Y.; Durr, A.; Brice, A.

    2003-01-01

    The frequency of parkin mutations was evaluated in 30 families of highly diverse geographic origin with early-onset autosomal recessive parkinsonism. Twelve different mutations, six of which were new, were found in 10 families from Europe and Brazil. Patients with parkin mutations had significantly

  7. Induced mutations in pomoid trees breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamed, Faysal

    1986-01-01

    Induction of mutations in fruit trees by ionizing radiation complements a cross-breeding program. The objectives are: 1) the improvements of methods of induction, identification and selection of useful mutations, and 2) the initiation of useful mutations either for immediate use as improved cultivars or as a parent material for conventional cross-breeding. The induction of mutants in pomoid fruits, with special emphasis on apple, was realized by gamma-ray treatment of dormant scions subsequently propagated on a rootstoch in the nursery. The aim was to obtain compacts, presuming the feasibility of selecting compact shoots formed by the irradiated scions in the first vegetative generation and also assuming that chance of finding (e.g. fruit mutants) would be thus increased rather than lessened. Selection was carried out on one-season old shoots, formed on the same material for two or three seasons, by using a cut-back at the end of the first and second season. The procedure was highly effective. Moderate exposures, resulting in 60% survival gave high mutation frequencies. Buds 6-10 on the primary shoot gave higher frequencies of recognizable mutations than either buds 1-5 or 11-15. Preliminary results seem to indicate that, at least in some apple cultivars, there is opportunity to obtain compact growth types with good biological characteristics. 8 refs. (author)

  8. HFE gene mutations in coronary atherothrombotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calado R.T.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Although iron can catalyze the production of free radicals involved in LDL lipid peroxidation, the contribution of iron overload to atherosclerosis remains controversial. The description of two mutations in the HFE gene (Cys282Tyr and His63Asp related to hereditary hemochromatosis provides an opportunity to address the question of the association between iron overload and atherosclerosis. We investigated the prevalence of HFE mutations in 160 survivors of myocardial infarction with angiographically demonstrated severe coronary atherosclerotic disease, and in 160 age-, gender- and race-matched healthy control subjects. PCR amplification of genomic DNA followed by RsaI and BclI restriction enzyme digestion was used to determine the genotypes. The frequency of the mutant Cys282Tyr allele was identical among patients and controls (0.022; carrier frequency, 4.4%, whereas the mutant His63Asp allele had a frequency of 0.143 (carrier frequency, 27.5% in controls and of 0.134 (carrier frequency, 24.5% in patients. Compound heterozygotes were found in 2 of 160 (1.2% controls and in 1 of 160 (0.6% patients. The finding of a similar prevalence of Cys282Tyr and His63Asp mutations in the HFE gene among controls and patients with coronary atherothrombotic disease, indirectly questions the possibility of an association between hereditary hemochromatosis and atherosclerosis.

  9. Frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Riehle, Fritz

    2006-01-01

    Of all measurement units, frequency is the one that may be determined with the highest degree of accuracy. It equally allows precise measurements of other physical and technical quantities, whenever they can be measured in terms of frequency.This volume covers the central methods and techniques relevant for frequency standards developed in physics, electronics, quantum electronics, and statistics. After a review of the basic principles, the book looks at the realisation of commonly used components. It then continues with the description and characterisation of important frequency standards

  10. Better plants through mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a public relations film describing problems associated with the genetic improvement of crop plants through induced mutations. Mutations are the ultimate source of genetic variation in plants. Mutation induction is now established as a practical tool in plant breeding. The Joint FAO/IAEA Division and the IAEA's laboratory at Seibersdorf have supported research and practical implementation of mutation breeding of both seed propagated and vegetatively propagated plants. Plant biotechnology based on in vitro culture and recombinant DNA technology will make a further significant contribution to plant breeding

  11. BRCA2 Mutations in 154 Finnish Male Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsi Syrjäkoski

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The etiology and pathogenesis of male breast cancer (MBC are poorly known. This is due to the fact that the disease is rare, and large-scale genetic epidemiologic studies have been difficult to carry out. Here, we studied the frequency of eight recurrent Finnish BRCA2 founder mutations in a large cohort of 154 MBC patients (65% diagnosed in Finland from 1967 to 1996. Founder mutations were detected in 10 patients (6.5%, eight of whom carried the 9346(-2 A>G mutation. Two novel mutations (4075 delGT and 5808 del5 were discovered in a screening of the entire BRCA2 coding region in 34 samples. However, these mutations were not found in the rest of the 120 patients studied. Patients with positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer were often BRCA2 mutation carriers (44%, whereas those with no family history showed a low frequency of involvement (3.6%; P < .0001. Finally, we found only one Finnish MBC patient with 999 dell, the most common founder mutation in Finnish female breast cancer (FBC patients, and one that explains most of the hereditary FBC and MBC cases in Iceland. The variation in BRCA2 mutation spectrum between Finnish MBC patients and FBC patients in Finland and breast cancer patients in Iceland suggests that modifying genetic and environmental factors may significantly influence the penetrance of MBC and FBC in individuals carrying germline BRCA2 mutations in some populations.

  12. Study on space mutation breeding of rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jianlong; Lin Yizi; Xi Yongan; Jiang Xingcun; Li Jinguo

    1997-01-01

    Air-dried seeds of rice variety ZR9 were carried by high altitude balloon (HAB) and recoverable satellite (RS) for space mutation. Mutagentic effects of high altitude environment (HAE) of 30∼38 km and outer space environment (OSE) of 218∼326 km above sea level on rice plant were studied. The results indicated that the germination percentage (GP) of seeds was obviously lower than that of the controls. the mutation in plant height (PH) and growth period duration (GPD) of SP 1 carried by HAB were induced. However, the GP of seeds and characters of SP 1 carried by RS had no evident change. More stronger segregation of major characters such as PH, GPD and length of panicle, appeared in the two SP 2 generations resulting from HAB and RS. And their mutation frequency were 4.31% and 4.10% respectively. Mutation lines selected from the two mutation progenies improved significantly in PH, GPD, disease resistance and yield. Therefore, space mutation could be considered as a new breeding method

  13. Frequency Synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, Salvatore; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus M.W.; Breems, Lucien J.; Nauta, Bram

    2016-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  14. Frequency synthesiser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drago, S.; Sebastiano, Fabio; Leenaerts, Dominicus Martinus Wilhelmus; Breems, Lucien Johannes; Nauta, Bram

    2010-01-01

    A low power frequency synthesiser circuit (30) for a radio transceiver, the synthesiser circuit comprising: a digital controlled oscillator configured to generate an output signal having a frequency controlled by an input digital control word (DCW); a feedback loop connected between an output and an

  15. Ultraviolet-induced mutations in Cockayne syndrome cells are primarily caused by cyclobutane dimer photoproducts while repair of other photoproducts is normal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parris, C.N.; Kraemer, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    The authors compared the contribution to mutagenesis on Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells of the major class of UV photoproducts, the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer, to that of other DNA photoproducts by using the mutagenesis shuttle vector pZ189. Lymphoblastoid cell lines from the DNA repair-deficient disorders CS and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and a normal line were transfected with UV-treated pZ189. Cyclobutane dimers were selectively removed before transfection by photoreactivation (PR), leaving nondimer photoproducts intact. After UV exposure and replication in CS and XP cells, plasmid survival was abnormally elevated. After PR, plasmid survival increased and mutation frequency in CS cells decreased to normal levels but remained abnormal in XP cells. Sequence analysis of >200 mutant plasmids showed that with CS cells a major mutational hot spot was caused by unrepaired cyclobutane dimers. These data indicate that with both CS and XP cyclobutane dimers are major photoproducts generating reduced plasmid survival and increased mutation frequency. However, unlike XP, CS cells are proficient in repair of nondimer photoproducts. Since XP but not CS patients have a high frequency of UV-induced skin cancers, the data suggest that prevention of UV-induced skin cancers is associated with proficient repair of nondimer photoproducts. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. IRF6 mutation screening in non-syndromic orofacial clefting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Koboldt, Daniel C; Kang, C. J.

    2016-01-01

    -syndromic OFCs. About 70% of causal VWS mutations occur in IRF6, a gene that is also associated with non-syndromic OFCs. Screening for IRF6 mutations in apparently non-syndromic cases has been performed in several modestly sized cohorts with mixed results. In this study, we screened 1521 trios with presumed non......-syndromic OFCs to determine the frequency of causal IRF6 mutations. We identified seven likely causal IRF6 mutations, although a posteriori review identified two misdiagnosed VWS families based on the presence of lip pits. We found no evidence for association between rare IRF6 polymorphisms and non......-syndromic OFCs. We combined our results with other similar studies (totaling 2472 families) and conclude that causal IRF6 mutations are found in 0.24–0.44% of apparently non-syndromic OFC families. We suggest that clinical mutation screening for IRF6 be considered for certain family patterns such as families...

  17. Mutational spectrum in a worldwide study of 29,700 families with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbeck, Timothy R; Friebel, Tara M; Friedman, Eitan; Hamann, Ute; Huo, Dezheng; Kwong, Ava; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Solano, Angela R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Thomassen, Mads; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Chan, T L; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Kruse, Torben A; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; Park, Sue Kyung; Torres, Diana; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; McGuffog, Lesley; Parsons, Michael T; Leslie, Goska; Aalfs, Cora M; Abugattas, Julio; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrews, Lesley; Andrulis, Irene L; Arason, Adalgeir; Arnold, Norbert; Arun, Banu K; Asseryanis, Ella; Auerbach, Leo; Azzollini, Jacopo; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Berger, Raanan; Blanco, Amie M; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Bonadona, Valérie; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bradbury, Angela R; Brewer, Carole; Buecher, Bruno; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caliebe, Almuth; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Caputo, Sandrine M; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Collée, J Margriet; Cook, Jackie; Davidson, Rosemarie; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Velazquez, Carolina; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eason, Jacqueline; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Engel, Christoph; Engert, Stefanie; Evans, D Gareth; Faivre, Laurence; Feliubadaló, Lidia; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Foretova, Lenka; Fowler, Jeffrey; Frost, Debra; Galvão, Henrique C R; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Gesta, Paul; Giannini, Giuseppe; Giraud, Sophie; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica; Hahnen, Eric; Hauke, Jan; Henderson, Alex; Hentschel, Julia; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Honisch, Ellen; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Kim, Sung-Won; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Korach, Jacob; Laitman, Yael; Lasa, Adriana; Lasset, Christine; Lázaro, Conxi; Lee, Annette; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindor, Noralane M; Longy, Michel; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen H; Lubinski, Jan; Machackova, Eva; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mari, Véronique; Martínez-Bouzas, Cristina; Matrai, Zoltan; Mebirouk, Noura; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Mickys, Ugnius; Miller, Austin; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Musinsky, Jacob; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ngeow, Joanne; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Henriette Roed; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Öfverholm, Anna; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Papp, Janos; Pasini, Barbara; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peixoto, Ana; Peruga, Nina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pohl, Esther; Pradhan, Nisha; Prajzendanc, Karolina; Prieur, Fabienne; Pujol, Pascal; Radice, Paolo; Ramus, Susan J; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rhiem, Kerstin; Robson, Mark; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rogers, Mark T; Rudaitis, Vilius; Schmidt, Ane Y; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Senter, Leigha; Shah, Payal D; Sharma, Priyanka; Side, Lucy E; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Slavin, Thomas P; Snape, Katie; Sobol, Hagay; Southey, Melissa; Steele, Linda; Steinemann, Doris; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tan, Yen Y; Teixeira, Manuel R; Terry, Mary Beth; Teulé, Alex; Thomas, Abigail; Thull, Darcy L; Tischkowitz, Marc; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Topka, Sabine; Trainer, Alison H; Tung, Nadine; van Asperen, Christi J; van der Hout, Annemieke H; van der Kolk, Lizet E; van der Luijt, Rob B; Van Heetvelde, Mattias; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Villarreal-Garza, Cynthia; von Wachenfeldt, Anna; Walker, Lisa; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Zanzottera, Cristina; Zidan, Jamal; Zorn, Kristin K; Hutten Selkirk, Christina G; Hulick, Peter J; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B; Antoniou, Antonis C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2018-05-01

    The prevalence and spectrum of germline mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 have been reported in single populations, with the majority of reports focused on White in Europe and North America. The Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA) has assembled data on 18,435 families with BRCA1 mutations and 11,351 families with BRCA2 mutations ascertained from 69 centers in 49 countries on six continents. This study comprehensively describes the characteristics of the 1,650 unique BRCA1 and 1,731 unique BRCA2 deleterious (disease-associated) mutations identified in the CIMBA database. We observed substantial variation in mutation type and frequency by geographical region and race/ethnicity. In addition to known founder mutations, mutations of relatively high frequency were identified in specific racial/ethnic or geographic groups that may reflect founder mutations and which could be used in targeted (panel) first pass genotyping for specific populations. Knowledge of the population-specific mutational spectrum in BRCA1 and BRCA2 could inform efficient strategies for genetic testing and may justify a more broad-based oncogenetic testing in some populations. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Iron overload and HFE gene mutations in Polish patients with liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Katarzyna; Romanowski, Tomasz; Stalke, Piotr; Iżycka-Świeszewska, Ewa; Bielawski, Krzysztof Piotr

    2011-06-01

    Increased liver iron stores may contribute to the progression of liver injury and fibrosis, and are associated with a higher risk of hepatocellular carcinoma development. Pre-transplant symptoms of iron overload in patients with liver cirrhosis are associated with higher risk of infectious and malignant complications in liver transplant recipients. HFE gene mutations may be involved in the pathogenesis of liver iron overload and influence the progression of chronic liver diseases of different origins. This study was designed to determine the prevalence of iron overload in relation to HFE gene mutations among Polish patients with liver cirrhosis. Sixty-one patients with liver cirrhosis included in the study were compared with a control group of 42 consecutive patients subjected to liver biopsy because of chronic liver diseases. Liver function tests and serum iron markers were assessed in both groups. All patients were screened for HFE mutations (C282Y, H63D, S65C). Thirty-six of 61 patients from the study group and all controls had liver biopsy performed with semiquantitative assessment of iron deposits in hepatocytes. The biochemical markers of iron overload and iron deposits in the liver were detected with a higher frequency (70% and 47% respectively) in patients with liver cirrhosis. There were no differences in the prevalence of all HFE mutations in both groups. In patients with a diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma, no significant associations with iron disorders and HFE gene mutations were found. Iron disorders were detected in patients with liver cirrhosis frequently but without significant association with HFE gene mutations. Only the homozygous C282Y mutation seems to occur more frequently in the selected population of patients with liver cirrhosis. As elevated biochemical iron indices accompanied liver iron deposits more frequently in liver cirrhosis compared to controls with chronic liver disease, there is a need for more extensive studies searching for

  19. Skuldertesten "Kombineret Elevation"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mikkel Bek; Overkær, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Formål: At udarbejde en testprotokol for testen Kombineret Elevation (KE) og undersøge test-retest variationen ved test af elite svømmere, samt diskutere testens relevans og validitet. Materiale og Metode: 9 elite og 10 sub-elite svømmere, heraf var 11 mænd og 8 kvinder, gennemførte testen KE 2...

  20. SPOP Mutations in Prostate Cancer across Demographically Diverse Patient Cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Blattner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recurrent mutations in the Speckle-Type POZ Protein (SPOP gene occur in up to 15% of prostate cancers. However, the frequency and features of cancers with these mutations across different populations is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate SPOP mutations across diverse cohorts and validate a series of assays employing high-resolution melting (HRM analysis and Sanger sequencing for mutational analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded material. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: 720 prostate cancer samples from six international cohorts spanning Caucasian, African American, and Asian patients, including both prostate-specific antigen-screened and unscreened populations, were screened for their SPOP mutation status. Status of SPOP was correlated to molecular features (ERG rearrangement, PTEN deletion, and CHD1 deletion as well as clinical and pathologic features. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: Overall frequency of SPOP mutations was 8.1% (4.6% to 14.4%, SPOP mutation was inversely associated with ERG rearrangement (P < .01, and SPOP mutant (SPOPmut cancers had higher rates of CHD1 deletions (P < .01. There were no significant differences in biochemical recurrence in SPOPmut cancers. Limitations of this study include missing mutational data due to sample quality and lack of power to identify a difference in clinical outcomes. CONCLUSION: SPOP is mutated in 4.6% to 14.4% of patients with prostate cancer across different ethnic and demographic backgrounds. There was no significant association between SPOP mutations with ethnicity, clinical, or pathologic parameters. Mutual exclusivity of SPOP mutation with ERG rearrangement as well as a high association with CHD1 deletion reinforces SPOP mutation as defining a distinct molecular subclass of prostate cancer.

  1. Mutation profiles of phenylketonuria in Quebec populations: Evidence of stratification and novel mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, R.; Mascisch, A.; Scriver, C.R. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)); Lambert, M. (Hopital Ste-Justine, Montreal (Canada)); Laframboise, R. (Centre Hospitalier Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-08-01

    Independent phenylketonuria (PKU) chromosomes (n=109) representing 80% of a proband cohort in Quebec province carry 18 different identified mutations in 20 different mutation/haplotype combinations. The study reported here, the third in a series on Quebec populations, was done in the Montreal region and predominantly on French Canadians. It has identified three novel mutations (A309D, D338Y, and 1054/1055delG [352fs]) and one unusual mutation/RFLP haplotype combination (E280K on Hp 2). The relative frequencies and distribution of PKU mutations were then compared in three regions and population subsets (eastern Quebec, French Canadian; western Quebec, French Canadian; and Montreal, non-French Canadian). The distributions of the prevalent and rare mutations are nonrandom and provide evidence for genetic stratification. The latter and the presence of eight unusual mutation/haplotype combinations in Quebec families with European ancestries (the aforementioned four and M1V, 165T, S349P, and R408W on Hp 1) corroborate demographic and anthropologic evidence, from elsewhere, for different origins of French Canadians in eastern and western Quebec. 29 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhimin; Liu, Lina; Li, Mei; Wang, Zhaohui; Feng, Lu; Zhang, Qiuping; Cheng, Shihua; Lu, Shen

    2011-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Kirsten-RAS (KRAS) mutations have been identified as predictors of response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancer. We aimed to screen the mutations of both genes in gastric carcinoma to detect the suitability of EGFR TKIs for patients with gastric carcinoma. We screened EGFR mutation in exons 19-21 and KRAS mutation in exon 2 in 58 gastric adenocarcinomas from China using high resolution melting analysis (HRMA). Positive samples were confirmed by DNA sequencing. Three EGFR missense mutations (5.2%) and 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP, Q787Q, 37.9%) were identified. To our knowledge, we report for the first time three mutation patterns of EGFR, Y801C, L858R and G863D, in gastric carcinoma. Two samples with EGFR mutation were mucinous adenocarcinoma. These three samples were collected from male patients aged over 75 years old. The frequency of KRAS mutation was 10.3% (6/58). The exclusiveness of EGFR and KRAS mutations was proven for the first time in gastric cancer. Gastric carcinoma of the mucinous adenocarcinoma type collected from older male patients may harbour EGFR mutations. The small subset of gastric adenocarcinoma patients may respond to EGFR TKIs.

  4. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  5. Inference of directional selection and mutation parameters assuming equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Bergman, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    In a classical study, Wright (1931) proposed a model for the evolution of a biallelic locus under the influence of mutation, directional selection and drift. He derived the equilibrium distribution of the allelic proportion conditional on the scaled mutation rate, the mutation bias and the scaled strength of directional selection. The equilibrium distribution can be used for inference of these parameters with genome-wide datasets of "site frequency spectra" (SFS). Assuming that the scaled mutation rate is low, Wright's model can be approximated by a boundary-mutation model, where mutations are introduced into the population exclusively from sites fixed for the preferred or unpreferred allelic states. With the boundary-mutation model, inference can be partitioned: (i) the shape of the SFS distribution within the polymorphic region is determined by random drift and directional selection, but not by the mutation parameters, such that inference of the selection parameter relies exclusively on the polymorphic sites in the SFS; (ii) the mutation parameters can be inferred from the amount of polymorphic and monomorphic preferred and unpreferred alleles, conditional on the selection parameter. Herein, we derive maximum likelihood estimators for the mutation and selection parameters in equilibrium and apply the method to simulated SFS data as well as empirical data from a Madagascar population of Drosophila simulans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Loss-of-function mutations in the thyrotropin receptor gene as a major determinant of hyperthyrotropinemia in a consanguineous community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Rakover, Yardena; Grasberger, Helmut; Mamanasiri, Sunee; Ringkananont, Usanee; Montanelli, Lucia; Barkoff, Marla S; Dahood, Ahmad Mahameed-Hag; Refetoff, Samuel

    2009-05-01

    Resistance to TSH (RTSH) is a condition of impaired responsiveness of the thyroid gland to TSH, characterized by elevated serum TSH, low or normal thyroid hormone levels, and hypoplastic or normal-sized thyroid gland. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical course and the genotype-phenotype relationship of RTSH caused by two different TSH receptor (TSHR) gene mutations in a consanguineous population. We conducted a clinical and genetic investigation of 46 members of an extended family and 163 individuals living in the same town. In vitro functional studies of the mutant TSHRs were also performed. Two TSHR gene mutations (P68S and L653V) were identified in 33 subjects occurring as homozygous L653V (five subjects), heterozygous L653V (20 subjects), heterozygous P68S (four subjects), and compound heterozygous L653V/P68S (four subjects). With the exception of one individual with concomitant autoimmune thyroid disease, all homozygotes and compound heterozygotes presented with compensated RTSH (high TSH with free T(4) and T(3) in the normal range). Only nine of 24 heterozygotes had mild hyperthyrotropinemia. The L653V mutation resulted in a higher serum TSH concentration and showed a more severe in vitro abnormality than P68S. Haplotype analysis predicted a founder of the L653V six to seven generations earlier, whereas the P68S is older. Cross-sectional and prospective longitudinal studies indicate that TSH and T(4) concentrations remain stable over time. High frequency hyperthyrotropinemia in an Israeli Arab-Muslim consanguineous community is attributed to two inactivating TSHR gene mutations. Concordant genotype-phenotype was demonstrated clinically and by in vitro functional analysis. Retrospective and prospective studies indicate that in the absence of concomitant autoimmune thyroid disease, elevated TSH levels reflect stable compensated RTSH.

  7. Lunar transportation scenarios utilising the Space Elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kilian A

    2005-01-01

    The Space Elevator (SE) concept has begun to receive an increasing amount of attention within the space community over the past couple of years and is no longer widely dismissed as pure science fiction. In light of the renewed interest in a, possibly sustained, human presence on the Moon and the fact that transportation and logistics form the bottleneck of many conceivable lunar missions, it is interesting to investigate what role the SE could eventually play in implementing an efficient Earth to Moon transportation system. The elevator allows vehicles to ascend from Earth and be injected into a trans-lunar trajectory without the use of chemical thrusters, thus eliminating gravity loss, aerodynamic loss and the need of high thrust multistage launch systems. Such a system therefore promises substantial savings of propellant and structural mass and could greatly increase the efficiency of Earth to Moon transportation. This paper analyzes different elevator-based trans-lunar transportation scenarios and characterizes them in terms of a number of benchmark figures. The transportation scenarios include direct elevator-launched trans-lunar trajectories, elevator launched trajectories via L1 and L2, as well as launch from an Earth-based elevator and subsequent rendezvous with lunar elevators placed either on the near or on the far side of the Moon. The benchmark figures by which the different transfer options are characterized and evaluated include release radius (RR), required delta v, transfer times as well as other factors such as accessibility of different lunar latitudes, frequency of launch opportunities and mission complexity. The performances of the different lunar transfer options are compared with each other as well as with the performance of conventional mission concepts, represented by Apollo. c2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Lunar transportation scenarios utilising the Space Elevator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Kilian A.

    2005-07-01

    The Space Elevator (SE) concept has begun to receive an increasing amount of attention within the space community over the past couple of years and is no longer widely dismissed as pure science fiction. In light of the renewed interest in a, possibly sustained, human presence on the Moon and the fact that transportation and logistics form the bottleneck of many conceivable lunar missions, it is interesting to investigate what role the SE could eventually play in implementing an efficient Earth to Moon transportation system. The elevator allows vehicles to ascend from Earth and be injected into a trans-lunar trajectory without the use of chemical thrusters, thus eliminating gravity loss, aerodynamic loss and the need of high thrust multistage launch systems. Such a system therefore promises substantial savings of propellant and structural mass and could greatly increase the efficiency of Earth to Moon transportation. This paper analyzes different elevator-based trans-lunar transportation scenarios and characterizes them in terms of a number of benchmark figures. The transportation scenarios include direct elevator-launched trans-lunar trajectories, elevator-launched trajectories via L1 and L2, as well as launch from an Earth-based elevator and subsequent rendezvous with lunar elevators placed either on the near or on the far side of the Moon. The benchmark figures by which the different transfer options are characterized and evaluated include release radius (RR), required Δv, transfer times as well as other factors such as accessibility of different lunar latitudes, frequency of launch opportunities and mission complexity. The performances of the different lunar transfer options are compared with each other as well as with the performance of conventional mission concepts, represented by Apollo.

  9. Energy parasites trigger oncogene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Jandová, Anna; Kobilková, Jitka; Vrba, Jan; Vrba, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Cancer initialization can be explained as a result of parasitic virus energy consumption leading to randomized genome chemical bonding. Analysis of experimental data on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) containing about 12,000 cases of healthy humans, cancer patients and patients with precancerous cervical lesions disclosed that the specific cancer and the non-specific lactate dehydrogenase-elevating (LDH) virus antigen elicit similar responses. The specific antigen is effective only in cancer type of its origin but the non-specific antigen in all examined cancers. CMI results of CIN patients display both healthy and cancer state. The ribonucleic acid (RNA) of the LDH virus parasitizing on energy reduces the ratio of coherent/random oscillations. Decreased effect of coherent cellular electromagnetic field on bonding electrons in biological macromolecules leads to elevating probability of random genome reactions. Overlapping of wave functions in biological macromolecules depends on energy of the cellular electromagnetic field which supplies energy to bonding electrons for selective chemical bonds. CMI responses of cancer and LDH virus antigens in all examined healthy, precancerous and cancer cases point to energy mechanism in cancer initiation. Dependence of the rate of biochemical reactions on biological electromagnetic field explains yet unknown mechanism of genome mutation.

  10. Analysis of relation between the mutation frequencies and somatic recombination induced by neutrons and the age of D. Melanogaster larvae; Analisis de la relacion entre las frecuencias de mutacion y recombinacion somaticas inducidas por neutrones y la edad de las larvas en D. Melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman R, J; Zambrano A, F; Paredes G, L; Delfin L, A; Quiroz R, C [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Neutrons are subatomic particles with neutral electric charge, equal zero, which are emitted during the fissile material fission in nuclear reactors. It is known a little about biological effects induced by neutrons. There is a world interest in the use of reactors and accelerators for patients radiotherapy using neutrons with the purpose to destroy malignant cells of deep tumours where traditional methods have not given satisfactory results. There for it is required to do wide studies of biological effects of neutrons as well as their dosimetry. It was used the Smart test (Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test) of D. Melanogaster for quantifying the mutation induction and somatic recombination induced by neutrons of the National Institute of Nuclear Research reactor, at power of 300 and 1000 k W, with equivalent doses calculated 95.14 and 190.2 Sv for 300 k W and of 25.64 and 51.29 Sv for 1000 k W, using larvae with 72 or 96 hours aged. It was observed a linear relation between equivalent dose and genetic effects frequency, these last were greater when the reactor power was 1000 k W than those 300 k W. It was observed too that the damage was greater in 96 hours larvae than those 72 hours. The stain size presented an inverse relation with respect to larvae age. It is concluded that the Smart system is sensitive to neutrons effect and it responds of a directly proportional form to radiation dose, as well as to dose rate. It is noted more the effect when are used larvas in pre pupa stage where the irradiation target (imagal cells) is greater. The Smart is sensitive to damage induced by neutrons , thus can be used to studying its direct biological effects or by the use of chemical modulators. (Author)

  11. Distribution of the PKU mutation 165T in Spain and Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, B.; deLucca, M.; Desviat, L.R. [UAM-CSIC, Madrid (Spain)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The 165T mutation is the second most common mutation in the Spanish PKU patients. In order to provide some additional data about the origin of this mutation, we have analyzed 452 PKU alleles from all regions of Spain. The mutation was found in 9% of alleles. We have found a South-North gradient with a highest frequency in the South and the lowest in the North. In the North-West regions (which has the greatest Celtic influence in Spain) the frequency was 7%. The chromosomes bearing this mutation contained the 8 repeat VNTR allele, as has been described in other populations. In view of these results, we suggest an origin other than Celtic for this mutation. On the other hand, we have analyzed 406 PKU alleles from five Latin American countries, 158 from Brazil, 170 from Chile, 56 from Argentina, 14 from Mexico and 8 from Venezuela. Unlike the results of the IVS10 mutation, 165T is present in Latin America with a low frequency. The results show that this mutation is rare in Chile (1%) and is absent in the chromosomes analyzed from Argentina, Mexico and Venezuela. Only in Brazil has this mutation been found in 5% of the alleles. Up to now, Spain is the only Mediterranean country where this mutation is present with a relatively high frequency. This mutation has been detected in the Portuguese patients and would also have migrated to Brazil.

  12. Freqüência da mutação gene da síndrome do estresse suíno e sua associação com características reprodutivas em marrãs híbridas Frequency of the porcine stress sindrome gene mutation and its association with reproductive traits in crossbred gilts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Eliza Facioni Guimarães

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar a freqüência do gene causador da síndrome do estresse em suíno (PSS e sua associação com características reprodutivas em marrãs híbridas. Setenta e duas marrãs híbridas Landrace x Large White, provenientes de granjas comerciais localizadas na região de Ponte Nova - Minas Gerais, foram analisadas para a presença da mutação PSS. No diagnóstico da mutação feito por reação em cadeia da polimerase - polimorfismo de comprimento de fragmentos de restrição (PCR-RFLP, o fragmento de 659pb do gene ryr-1 foi amplificado e, nos mutantes a substituição de citosina por timina, que acarreta mudança de aminoácidos da proteína madura de arginina para cisteína nos animais afetados, foi identificado. Dados relativos ao número de leitões nascidos vivos, leitões nascidos com baixa viabilidade e leitões natimortos por leitegada, peso médio dos leitões ao nascer e repetições de cio foram analisados. Do total de marrãs analisadas, foram encontradas 13,88% de marrãs heterozigotas e nenhuma homozigota recessiva. Não houve efeito dos genótipos sobre as características analisadas.The objective of this work was to determine the frequency of the porcine stress sindrome (PSS gene mutation and its association with reproductive traits in crossbred gilts. Seventy two crossbred Landrace x Large White females from commercial farms of Ponte Nova region location - Minas Gerais State, were analyzed for the PSS mutation. The mutation diagnose was made by polimerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polimorphism, where the 659pb fragment from the ryr-1 gene was amplifyied, and in the mutants the substitution of cytosine by thimine, that leads to the change in the mature protein amino acids from arginine to cysteine in the affected animals, was identified. Data relative to the number of piglets born alive, born alive with low viability and dead piglets per litter, average piglets born weight and

  13. TP53 mutation spectrum in smokers and never smoking lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Rita Halvorsen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: TP53 mutations are among the most common mutations found in lung cancers, identified as an independent prognostic factor in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in never-smokers and in different histological subtypes of lung cancer.Methods: We analysed tumour tissue from 394 non-small cell carcinomas including adenocarcinomas (n=229, squamous cell carcinomas (n=112, large cell carcinomas (n=30 and others (n=23 for mutations in TP53 by the use of Sanger sequencing (n=394 and next generation sequencing (n=100. Results: TP53 mutations were identified in 47.2% of the samples, with the highest frequency (65% of mutations among squamous cell carcinomas. Among never-smokers, 36% carried a TP53 mutation, identified as a significant independent negative prognostic factor in this subgroup. For large cell carcinomas, a significantly prolonged progression free survival was found for those carrying a TP53 mutation. In addition, the frequency of frameshift mutations was doubled in squamous cell carcinomas (20.3% compared to adenocarcinomas (9.1%.Conclusion: TP53 mutation patterns differ between the histological subgroups of lung cancers, as also influenced by smoking history. This indicates that the histological subtypes in lung cancer are genetically different, and that smoking-induced TP53 mutations may have a different biological impact than TP53 mutations occurring in never-smokers.

  14. Mutation induction of orchids by ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Affrida Abu Hassan; Zaiton Ahmad; Sakinah Ariffin; Oono, Yutaka; Hase, Yoshihiro; Shikazono; Naoya; Narumi, Issay; Tanaka, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Mutation induction using ionizing radiation provides an effective alternative means for improvement of orchids. In this study, ion beams were used because they have much higher linear energy transfer (LET) than X-rays or gamma rays, and subsequently lead to higher mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum. The proto corm-like bodies (PLBs) of three orchid species (Dendrobium crumenatum, Dendrobium mirbellianum) were irradiated at various doses with 320 MeV 12 C 6+ ions accelerated by Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron at JAEAs Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA). The optimum irradiation condition and the effect of irradiation on each species were studied, particularly on flower colour and morphology, flowering habit and insect resistance. Dose effects on plantlet regeneration for each species were also obtained. Some morphological changes were observed in flowers of Dendrobium crumenatum, whilst one insect resistant mutant was obtained in Dendrobium mirbellianum. (author)

  15. A spider elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butylkin, A.V.; Butylkin, V.A.; Izosimov, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    A spider elevator is proposed which contains a body, a wedge clamp with wedges hinged to each other, a subassembly for holding the wedge clamp in the open and closed positions and a mechanism for changing the wedge clamp, which is made in the form of levers with ears for cleats and installed in the body with the capability of turning. To increase reliability in the operational mode through using the external force for clamping the pipe, the free ends of the levers are hinged with the body by a power cylinder.

  16. Elevator Control Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Ceder, Frederick; Nordin, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this essay is to investigate if it is eective to switch strategies for elevators during one day in an oce building. This essay describes some of the strategies in use today, followed by a comparison and analysis of two of the strategies described. We have also implemented optimizations to one of these strategies. From our test results we can conclude that our optimized strategy worked and produced better results on average waiting time and total traveling time than the two stra...

  17. Challenging a dogma: co-mutations exist in MAPK pathway genes in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellety, Thomas; Gros, Audrey; Pedeutour, Florence; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Duranton-Tanneur, Valerie; Italiano, Antoine; Soubeyran, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    Sequencing of genes encoding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway proteins in colorectal cancer (CRC) has established as dogma that of the genes in a pathway only a single one is ever mutated. We searched for cases with a mutation in more than one MAPK pathway gene (co-mutations). Tumor tissue samples of all patients presenting with CRC, and referred between 01/01/2008 and 01/06/2015 to three French cancer centers for determination of mutation status of RAS/RAF+/-PIK3CA, were retrospectively screened for co-mutations using Sanger sequencing or next-generation sequencing. We found that of 1791 colorectal patients with mutations in the MAPK pathway, 20 had a co-mutation, 8 of KRAS/NRAS, and some even with a third mutation. More than half of the mutations were in codons 12 and 13. We also found 3 cases with a co-mutation of NRAS/BRAF and 9 with a co-mutation of KRAS/BRAF. In 2 patients with a co-mutation of KRAS/NRAS, the co-mutation existed in the primary as well as in a metastasis, which suggests that co-mutations occur early during carcinogenesis and are maintained when a tumor disseminates. We conclude that co-mutations exist in the MAPK genes but with low frequency and as yet with unknown outcome implications.

  18. RADIA: RNA and DNA integrated analysis for somatic mutation detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amie J Radenbaugh

    Full Text Available The detection of somatic single nucleotide variants is a crucial component to the characterization of the cancer genome. Mutation calling algorithms thus far have focused on comparing the normal and tumor genomes from the same individual. In recent years, it has become routine for projects like The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA to also sequence the tumor RNA. Here we present RADIA (RNA and DNA Integrated Analysis, a novel computational method combining the patient-matched normal and tumor DNA with the tumor RNA to detect somatic mutations. The inclusion of the RNA increases the power to detect somatic mutations, especially at low DNA allelic frequencies. By integrating an individual's DNA and RNA, we are able to detect mutations that would otherwise be missed by traditional algorithms that examine only the DNA. We demonstrate high sensitivity (84% and very high precision (98% and 99% for RADIA in patient data from endometrial carcinoma and lung adenocarcinoma from TCGA. Mutations with both high DNA and RNA read support have the highest validation rate of over 99%. We also introduce a simulation package that spikes in artificial mutations to patient data, rather than simulating sequencing data from a reference genome. We evaluate sensitivity on the simulation data and demonstrate our ability to rescue back mutations at low DNA allelic frequencies by including the RNA. Finally, we highlight mutations in important cancer genes that were rescued due to the incorporation of the RNA.

  19. Lethal mutagenesis: targeting the mutator phenotype in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Edward J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2010-10-01

    The evolution of cancer and RNA viruses share many similarities. Both exploit high levels of genotypic diversity to enable extensive phenotypic plasticity and thereby facilitate rapid adaptation. In order to accumulate large numbers of mutations, we have proposed that cancers express a mutator phenotype. Similar to cancer cells, many viral populations, by replicating their genomes with low fidelity, carry a substantial mutational load. As high levels of mutation are potentially deleterious, the viral mutation frequency is thresholded at a level below which viral populations equilibrate in a traditional mutation-selection balance, and above which the population is no longer viable, i.e., the population undergoes an error catastrophe. Because their mutation frequencies are fine-tuned just below this error threshold, viral populations are susceptible to further increases in mutational load and, recently this phenomenon has been exploited therapeutically by a concept that has been termed lethal mutagenesis. Here we review the application of lethal mutagenesis to the treatment of HIV and discuss how lethal mutagenesis may represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of solid cancers. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M 1 lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by γirradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and γ-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  1. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  2. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Hyun Ahn

    Full Text Available Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS, which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles.

  3. Oxidative Stress in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by MYBPC3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathies can result from mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins including MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C. However, whether oxidative stress is augmented due to contractile dysfunction and cardiomyocyte damage in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies has not been elucidated. To determine whether oxidative stress markers were elevated in MYBPC3-mutated cardiomyopathies, a previously characterized 3-month-old mouse model of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM expressing a homozygous MYBPC3 mutation (cMyBP-C(t/t was used, compared to wild-type (WT mice. Echocardiography confirmed decreased percentage of fractional shortening in DCM versus WT hearts. Histopathological analysis indicated a significant increase in myocardial disarray and fibrosis while the second harmonic generation imaging revealed disorganized sarcomeric structure and myocyte damage in DCM hearts when compared to WT hearts. Intriguingly, DCM mouse heart homogenates had decreased glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio and increased protein carbonyl and lipid malondialdehyde content compared to WT heart homogenates, consistent with elevated oxidative stress. Importantly, a similar result was observed in human cardiomyopathy heart homogenate samples. These results were further supported by reduced signals for mitochondrial semiquinone radicals and Fe-S clusters in DCM mouse hearts measured using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, we demonstrate elevated oxidative stress in MYPBC3-mutated DCM mice, which may exacerbate the development of heart failure.

  4. Novel mutations and mutation combinations of ryanodine receptor in a chlorantraniliprole resistant population of Plutella xylostella (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Liang, Pei; Zhou, Xuguo; Gao, Xiwu

    2014-01-01

    A previous study documented a glycine to glutamic acid mutation (G4946E) in ryanodine receptor (RyR) was highly correlated to diamide insecticide resistance in field populations of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae). In this study, a field population collected in Yunnan province, China, exhibited a 2128-fold resistance to chlorantraniliprole. Sequence comparison between resistant and susceptible P. xylostella revealed three novel mutations including a glutamic acid to valine substitution (E1338D), a glutamine to leucine substitution (Q4594L) and an isoleucine to methionine substitution (I4790M) in highly conserved regions of RyR. Frequency analysis of all four mutations in this field population showed that the three new mutations showed a high frequency of 100%, while the G4946E had a frequency of 20%. Furthermore, the florescent ligand binding assay revealed that the RyR containing multiple mutations displayed a significantly lower affinity to the chlorantraniliprole. The combined results suggested that the co-existence of different combinations of the four mutations was involved in the chlorantraniliprole resistance. An allele-specific PCR based method was developed for the diagnosis of the four mutations in the field populations of P. xylostella. PMID:25377064

  5. Automatic pipe elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, K.M.; Willis, C.A.

    1987-03-17

    This patent describes an elevator adapted for use with a power swivel for supporting a drilling or production tubular, the elevator comprising: at least two jaws, each jaw having a clamping surface; a connector member for supporting the jaws, the connector member comprising an upper end, a lower end, means for coupling the upper end to the power swivel, means for coupling the lower end to a tubular. The member also comprises means for defining a passageway extending from the upper end to the lower end through the connector member to allow drilling mud to be passed from the power swivel through the bore, into the tubular; and linkage means mounted between the connector member and the jaws for coupling the jaws to the connector member and for maintaining the clamping surfaces of the jaws in clamping engagement with the tubular when the connector member and the tubular are urged apart relative to one another. The linkage means is configured such that the force by which the clamping surfaces clamp the tubular increases as the force urging the connector member and the tubular apart increases.

  6. Hemochromatosis (HFE gene mutations in Brazilian chronic hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.V. Perícole

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI have reduced hemoglobin levels, mostly as a result of decreased kidney production of erythropoietin, but the relation between renal insufficiency and the magnitude of hemoglobin reduction has not been well defined. Hereditary hemochromatosis is an inherited disorder of iron metabolism. The importance of the association of hemochromatosis with treatment for anemia among patients with CRI has not been well described. We analyzed the frequency of the C282Y and H63D mutations in the HFE gene in 201 Brazilian individuals with CRI undergoing hemodialysis. The analysis of the effects of HFE mutations on iron metabolism and anemia with biochemical parameters was possible in 118 patients of this study (hemoglobin, hematocrit, ferritin levels, transferrin saturation, and serum iron. A C282Y heterozygous mutation was found in 7/201 (3.4% and H63D homozygous and heterozygous mutation were found in 2/201 (1.0% and 46/201 (22.9%, respectively. The allelic frequencies of the HFE mutations (0.017 for C282Y mutation and 0.124 for H63D mutation did not differ between patients with CRI and healthy controls. Regarding the biochemical parameters, no differences were observed between HFE heterozygous and mutation-negative patients, although ferritin levels were not higher among patients with the H63D mutation (P = 0.08. From what we observed in our study, C282Y/H63D HFE gene mutations are not related to degrees of anemia or iron stores in CRI patients receiving intravenous iron supplementation (P > 0.10. Nevertheless, the present data suggest that the H63D mutation may have an important function as a modulating factor of iron overload in these patients.

  7. Elevation data for floodplain mapping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Floodplain Mapping Technologies; National Research Council; Division on Earth and Life Studies; National Research Council

    2007-01-01

    .... Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping shows that there is sufficient two-dimensional base map imagery to meet FEMA's flood map modernization goals, but that the three-dimensional base elevation data...

  8. Frequency spirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call “frequency spirals.” These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  9. Frequency spirals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottino-Löffler, Bertrand; Strogatz, Steven H., E-mail: strogatz@cornell.edu [Center for Applied Mathematics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    We study the dynamics of coupled phase oscillators on a two-dimensional Kuramoto lattice with periodic boundary conditions. For coupling strengths just below the transition to global phase-locking, we find localized spatiotemporal patterns that we call “frequency spirals.” These patterns cannot be seen under time averaging; they become visible only when we examine the spatial variation of the oscillators' instantaneous frequencies, where they manifest themselves as two-armed rotating spirals. In the more familiar phase representation, they appear as wobbly periodic patterns surrounding a phase vortex. Unlike the stationary phase vortices seen in magnetic spin systems, or the rotating spiral waves seen in reaction-diffusion systems, frequency spirals librate: the phases of the oscillators surrounding the central vortex move forward and then backward, executing a periodic motion with zero winding number. We construct the simplest frequency spiral and characterize its properties using analytical and numerical methods. Simulations show that frequency spirals in large lattices behave much like this simple prototype.

  10. Hearing impairment and renal failure associated with RMND1 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Kirstine; Neland, Mette; Wibrand, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Recently, two research groups reported that mutations in RMND1 were associated with encephalopathy, elevated lactate, hypotonia, and in some patients seizures or myoclonia in individuals from two consanguineous families. A combined respiratory chain deficiency and a defect in mitochondrial protein...

  11. Genetic Mutations in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many different types of genetic mutations are found in cancer cells. This infographic outlines certain types of alterations that are present in cancer, such as missense, nonsense, frameshift, and chromosome rearrangements.

  12. Mutation breeding in peas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaranowski, J [Institute of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Academy of Agriculture, Poznan (Poland); Micke, A [Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Isotope and Radiation Applications of Atomic Energy for Food and Agricultural Development, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1985-02-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  13. Mutation breeding in peas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaranowski, J.; Micke, A.

    1985-01-01

    The pea as an ancient crop plant still today has wide uses and is an import source of food protein. It is also an important object for genetic studies and as such has been widely used in mutation induction experiments. However, in comparison with cereals this ancient crop plant (like several other grain legumes) has gained relatively little from advances in breeding. The review focuses on the prospects of genetic improvement of pea by induced mutations, discusses principles and gives methodological information. (author)

  14. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families Mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2: estudo da frequência em famílias brasileiras com câncer de mama e cólon hereditários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.INTRODUÇÃO: CHEK2 codifica uma proteína quinase envolvida em um ponto de checagem do ciclo celular que desempenha um papel importante na via de reparação do DNA, danos ativados principalmente por ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutado em resposta a danos na dupla hélice do DNA. A mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2 tem sido descrita como um alelo de baixa penetrância em um número significativo de famílias com câncer de mama e cólon em certos países e também está associada com risco

  15. Bulk Genotyping of Biopsies Can Create Spurious Evidence for Hetereogeneity in Mutation Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumen Kostadinov

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available When multiple samples are taken from the neoplastic tissues of a single patient, it is natural to compare their mutation content. This is often done by bulk genotyping of whole biopsies, but the chance that a mutation will be detected in bulk genotyping depends on its local frequency in the sample. When the underlying mutation count per cell is equal, homogenous biopsies will have more high-frequency mutations, and thus more detectable mutations, than heterogeneous ones. Using simulations, we show that bulk genotyping of data simulated under a neutral model of somatic evolution generates strong spurious evidence for non-neutrality, because the pattern of tissue growth systematically generates differences in biopsy heterogeneity. Any experiment which compares mutation content across bulk-genotyped biopsies may therefore suggest mutation rate or selection intensity variation even when these forces are absent. We discuss computational and experimental approaches for resolving this problem.

  16. Bulk Genotyping of Biopsies Can Create Spurious Evidence for Hetereogeneity in Mutation Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostadinov, Rumen; Maley, Carlo C; Kuhner, Mary K

    2016-04-01

    When multiple samples are taken from the neoplastic tissues of a single patient, it is natural to compare their mutation content. This is often done by bulk genotyping of whole biopsies, but the chance that a mutation will be detected in bulk genotyping depends on its local frequency in the sample. When the underlying mutation count per cell is equal, homogenous biopsies will have more high-frequency mutations, and thus more detectable mutations, than heterogeneous ones. Using simulations, we show that bulk genotyping of data simulated under a neutral model of somatic evolution generates strong spurious evidence for non-neutrality, because the pattern of tissue growth systematically generates differences in biopsy heterogeneity. Any experiment which compares mutation content across bulk-genotyped biopsies may therefore suggest mutation rate or selection intensity variation even when these forces are absent. We discuss computational and experimental approaches for resolving this problem.

  17. An elevator wheel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhornik, V.I.; Cherkov, Ye.M.; Simonov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    This invention deals with mineral enrichment and is primarily for unloading submerged products of enrichment during separation in heavy mediums. An elevator wheel is proposed for unloading the submerged product from the bath of a heavy to medium separator which includes ladle disks with internal walls and overlapping sheets hinged to the ends. In order to increase the degree of dehydration of the unloaded product, the internal wall of each ladle is made of sheets installed in stages with clearances relative to each other. The advantages of the proposed device include an improvement in the degree of dehydration of the submerged product in the ladles and a reduction in the carry away of the heavy medium with the enrichment products.

  18. Radiation in relation to mutation rate, mutational damage and human ill-health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1976-09-01

    The effect of radiation in increasing the frequency of gene mutations is now reasonably understood. We discuss first how an increase in the mutation rate is reflected in the mutational damage expressed in populations. It is shown that the mutational damage, assessed by the loss of fitness in a population or the number of eventual gene extinctions, is equal to the number of new mutations arising per generation or the mutation rate. In a population of stable size, a dose of 1 rem given to 10 6 people leads to roughly 600 gene extinctions when summed over all ensuing generations if the dose is applied to only one generation; this number of extinctions will occur in each succeeding generation if the dose is given to every generation. However, the concept of genetic extinction, although quantifiable, is of limited value in assessing radiation risks since its impact on human ill-health is very speculative. In particular, no estimate can be made of the total cost of effects which are minor in each individual in which they arise, but which, because they are so minor, persist in the population for many generations. The best current estimate is for 14-140 obvious defects in the first few generations following exposure of 10 6 people to a dose of 1 rem. (auth.)

  19. Chloroplast mutations induced by 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride are independent of the plastome mutator in Oenothera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GuhaMajumdar, M; Baldwin, S; Sears, B B

    2004-02-01

    Oenothera plants homozygous for the recessive plastome mutator allele ( pm) show chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) mutation frequencies that are about 1,000-fold higher than spontaneous levels. The pm-encoded gene product has been hypothesized to have a function in cpDNA replication, repair and/or mutation avoidance. Previous chemical mutagenesis experiments with the alkylating agent nitroso-methyl urea (NMU) showed a synergistic effect of NMU on the induction of mutations in the pm line, suggesting an interaction between the pm-encoded gene product and one of the repair systems that corrects alkylation damage. The goal of the experiments described here was to examine whether the pm activity extends to the repair of damage caused by non-alkylating mutagens. To this end, the intercalating mutagen, 9-aminoacridine hydrochloride (9AA) was tested for synergism with the plastome mutator. A statistical analysis of the data reported here indicates that the pm-encoded gene product is not involved in the repair of the 9AA-induced mutations. However, the recovery of chlorotic sectors in plants derived from the mutagenized seeds shows that 9AA can act as a mutagen of the chloroplast genome.

  20. Mutational effects of space flight on Zea mays seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, M.; Qiu, Y.; He, Y.; Bucker, H.; Yang, C. H.

    1994-01-01

    The growth and development of more than 500 Zea mays seeds flown on Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) were studied. Somatic mutations, including white-yellow stripes on leaves, dwarfing, change of leaf sheath color or seedling color were observed in plants developed from these seeds. When the frequency of white-yellow formation was used as the endpoint and compared with data from ground based studies, the dose to which maize seeds might be exposed during the flight was estimated to be equivalent to 635 cGy of gamma rays. Seeds from one particular holder gave a high mutation frequency and a wide mutation spectrum. White-yellow stripes on leaves were also found in some of the inbred progenies from plants displayed somatic mutation. Electron microscopy studies showed that the damage of chloroplast development in the white-yellow stripe on leaves was similar between seeds flown on LDEF and that irradiated by accelerated heavy ions on ground.

  1. Compound heterozygous ASPM mutations in Pakistani MCPH families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhammad, Farooq; Mahmood Baig, Shahid; Hansen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is characterized by reduced head circumference (50% of all reported families. In spite of the high frequency of MCPH in Pakistan only one case of compound heterozygosity for mutations in ASPM has been reported yet. In this large MCPH study we...... confirmed compound heterozygosity in two and homozygous mutations in 20 families, respectively, showing that up to 10% of families with MCPH caused by ASPM are compound heterozygous. In total we identified 16 different nonsense or frameshift mutations of which 12 were novel thereby increasing the number...... of mutations in ASPM significantly from 35 to 47. We found no correlation between the severity of the condition and the site of truncation. We suggest that the high frequency of compound heterozygosity observed in this study is taken into consideration as part of future genetic testing and counseling...

  2. Somatic Mutations and Clonal Hematopoiesis in Aplastic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizato, Tetsuichi; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Hosokawa, Kohei; Makishima, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Townsley, Danielle; Sato-Otsubo, Aiko; Sato, Yusuke; Liu, Delong; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Wu, Colin O; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Clemente, Michael J; Kataoka, Keisuke; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Okuno, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Nagata, Yasunobu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Scheinberg, Phillip; Miyano, Satoru; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Nakao, Shinji; Young, Neal S; Ogawa, Seishi

    2015-07-02

    In patients with acquired aplastic anemia, destruction of hematopoietic cells by the immune system leads to pancytopenia. Patients have a response to immunosuppressive therapy, but myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia develop in about 15% of the patients, usually many months to years after the diagnosis of aplastic anemia. We performed next-generation sequencing and array-based karyotyping using 668 blood samples obtained from 439 patients with aplastic anemia. We analyzed serial samples obtained from 82 patients. Somatic mutations in myeloid cancer candidate genes were present in one third of the patients, in a limited number of genes and at low initial variant allele frequency. Clonal hematopoiesis was detected in 47% of the patients, most frequently as acquired mutations. The prevalence of the mutations increased with age, and mutations had an age-related signature. DNMT3A-mutated and ASXL1-mutated clones tended to increase in size over time; the size of BCOR- and BCORL1-mutated and PIGA-mutated clones decreased or remained stable. Mutations in PIGA and BCOR and BCORL1 correlated with a better response to immunosuppressive therapy and longer and a higher rate of overall and progression-free survival; mutations in a subgroup of genes that included DNMT3A and ASXL1 were associated with worse outcomes. However, clonal dynamics were highly variable and might not necessarily have predicted the response to therapy and long-term survival among individual patients. Clonal hematopoiesis was prevalent in aplastic anemia. Some mutations were related to clinical outcomes. A highly biased set of mutations is evidence of Darwinian selection in the failed bone marrow environment. The pattern of somatic clones in individual patients over time was variable and frequently unpredictable. (Funded by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research and others.).

  3. Influence of Antenna Characteristics on Elevation Dependence of Building Penetration Loss for High Elevation Links

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kvicera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Building penetration loss models presented in our previous paper [1] were valid for various scenarios, propagation conditions, frequency bands and hemispherical receiving antenna pointing towards zenith. These models had a significantly rising trend of penetration loss with increasing elevation angle of the link in common. In this paper we show that when working with non-isotropic terminal antennas, this trend relates primarily to the elevation trend of the corresponding reference level dependent on the receiving antenna radiation pattern. This is demonstrated by the results of single-input multiple-output (SIMO measurement trials performed at L-band in an office building and a brick building in the city of Prague. Further, based on the detailed analysis, a method to modify the elevation trend of a particular penetration loss model for different receiving antenna radiation patterns is derived and experimentally validated.

  4. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  5. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo; Tenca, Claudya; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Albesiano, Emilia; Bagnara, Davide; Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Chu, Charles C; Morabito, Fortunato; Bruno, Silvia; Ferrarini, Manlio; Tramontano, Anna; Fais, Franco; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV–diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation. PMID:21785810

  6. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV-diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥ 2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation.

  7. Lineage dynamics and mutation-selection balance in non-adapting asexual populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénisson, Sophie; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Colato, Alexandre; Gerrish, Philip J.

    2013-02-01

    In classical population genetics, mutation-selection balance refers to the equilibrium frequency of a deleterious allele established and maintained under two opposing forces: recurrent mutation, which tends to increase the frequency of the allele; and selection, which tends to decrease its frequency. In a haploid population, if μ denotes the per capita rate of production of the deleterious allele by mutation and s denotes the selective disadvantage of carrying the allele, then the classical mutation-selection balance frequency of the allele is approximated by μ/s. This calculation assumes that lineages carrying the mutant allele in question—the ‘focal allele’—do not accumulate deleterious mutations linked to the focal allele. In principle, indirect selection against the focal allele caused by such additional mutations can decrease the frequency of the focal allele below the classical mutation-selection balance. This effect of indirect selection will be strongest in an asexual population, in which the entire genome is in linkage. Here, we use an approach based on a multitype branching process to investigate this effect, analyzing lineage dynamics under mutation, direct selection, and indirect selection in a non-adapting asexual population. We find that the equilibrium balance between recurrent mutation to the focal allele and the forces of direct and indirect selection against the focal allele is closely approximated by γμ/(s + U) (s = 0 if the focal allele is neutral), where γ ≈ eθθ-(ω+θ)(ω + θ)(Γ(ω + θ) - Γ(ω + θ,θ)), \\theta =U/\\tilde {s}, and \\omega =s/\\tilde {s}; U denotes the genomic deleterious mutation rate and \\tilde {s} denotes the geometric mean selective disadvantage of deleterious mutations elsewhere on the genome. This mutation-selection balance for asexual populations can remain surprisingly invariant over wide ranges of the mutation rate.

  8. Mutation breeding research of wheat (T. aestivum) in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, B.; Shi, J.; Tao, S.; Fan, Q.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: 78 cultivars and various valuable strains have been obtained through induced genic mutation and chromosome translocation. Irradiation of hybrid seeds, gametes, zygotes and in vitro cultured cells, gave increased mutation frequency and expanded spectrum. Various physical agents were examined either singly or in combination with chemical agents. Combined use of γ-irradiation by low dose and in vitro culture proved effective in raising the percentage of seed-set in wide-crosses. (author)

  9. Identification of Constrained Cancer Driver Genes Based on Mutation Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoparnig, Thomas; Fried, Patrick; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-01-01

    Cancer drivers are genomic alterations that provide cells containing them with a selective advantage over their local competitors, whereas neutral passengers do not change the somatic fitness of cells. Cancer-driving mutations are usually discriminated from passenger mutations by their higher degree of recurrence in tumor samples. However, there is increasing evidence that many additional driver mutations may exist that occur at very low frequencies among tumors. This observation has prompted alternative methods for driver detection, including finding groups of mutually exclusive mutations and incorporating prior biological knowledge about gene function or network structure. Dependencies among drivers due to epistatic interactions can also result in low mutation frequencies, but this effect has been ignored in driver detection so far. Here, we present a new computational approach for identifying genomic alterations that occur at low frequencies because they depend on other events. Unlike passengers, these constrained mutations display punctuated patterns of occurrence in time. We test this driver–passenger discrimination approach based on mutation timing in extensive simulation studies, and we apply it to cross-sectional copy number alteration (CNA) data from ovarian cancer, CNA and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data from breast tumors and SNV data from colorectal cancer. Among the top ranked predicted drivers, we find low-frequency genes that have already been shown to be involved in carcinogenesis, as well as many new candidate drivers. The mutation timing approach is orthogonal and complementary to existing driver prediction methods. It will help identifying from cancer genome data the alterations that drive tumor progression. PMID:25569148

  10. Oncogenic mutations in melanomas and benign melanocytic nevi of the female genital tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Diane; Kim, Julie; Warrick, Andrea; Nelson, Dylan; Pukay, Marina; Beadling, Carol; Heinrich, Michael; Selim, Maria Angelica; Corless, Christopher L; Nelson, Kelly

    2014-08-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of melanomas and melanocytic nevi of the female genital tract is poorly understood. We aim to characterize the frequency of mutations of the following genes: BRAF, NRAS, KIT, GNA11, and GNAQ in female genital tract melanomas. We also characterize the frequency of BRAF mutations in female genital tract melanomas compared with melanocytic nevi. Mutational screening was performed on the following female genital tract melanocytic neoplasms: 25 melanomas, 7 benign melanocytic nevi, and 4 atypical melanocytic nevi. Of the 25 female genital tract melanoma specimens queried, KIT mutations were detected in 4 (16.0%), NRAS mutations in 4 (16.0%), and BRAF mutations in 2 (8.0%) samples. Two of the tumors with KIT mutations harbored double mutations in the same exon. No GNAQ or GNA11 mutations were identified among 11 melanomas screened. BRAF V600E mutations were detected in 7 of 7 benign melanocytic genital nevi (100%) and 3 of 4 atypical genital nevi (75%). Our study is limited by the small sample size of this rare subset of melanomas. KIT, NRAS, and BRAF mutations are found in a subset of female genital tract melanomas. Screening for oncogenic mutations is important for developing and applying clinical therapies for melanomas of the female genital tract. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High-speed elevators controlled by inverters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Yoshio; Takahashi, Hideaki; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    1988-10-25

    The super-high-speed elevator with superiority to 300m/min of speed, requires both the large capacity power and wide range speed controls. Therefore, in order to materialize the smooth and quiet operation characteristics, by applying the inverter control, the low torque ripple control in the low frequency range and high frequency large capacity inverting for lowering the motor in noise are necessary with their being assured of reliability. To satisfy the above necessary items, together with the development of a sine wave pulse width and frequency modulation (PWM/PFM) control system, to more precisely enable the sine wave electric current control, and 3kHz switching power converter, using a 800A power transistor module, a supervoltage control circuit under the extraordinary condition was designed. As a result of commercializing a 360m/min super-high speed inverter elevator, the power source unit, due to the effect of high power factor, could be reduced by 30% in capacity and also the higher harmonic wave including ratio could be considerably lowered to the inferiority to 5%. 2 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  12. Performance of mitochondrial DNA mutations detecting early stage cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakupciak, John P; Srivastava, Sudhir; Sidransky, David; O'Connell, Catherine D; Maragh, Samantha; Markowitz, Maura E; Greenberg, Alissa K; Hoque, Mohammad O; Maitra, Anirban; Barker, Peter E; Wagner, Paul D; Rom, William N

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been associated with cancer and many other disorders. These mutations can be point mutations or deletions, or admixtures (heteroplasmy). The detection of mtDNA mutations in body fluids using resequencing microarrays, which are more sensitive than other sequencing methods, could provide a strategy to measure mutation loads in remote anatomical sites. We determined the mtDNA mutation load in the entire mitochondrial genome of 26 individuals with different early stage cancers (lung, bladder, kidney) and 12 heavy smokers without cancer. MtDNA was sequenced from three matched specimens (blood, tumor and body fluid) from each cancer patient and two matched specimens (blood and sputum) from smokers without cancer. The inherited wildtype sequence in the blood was compared to the sequences present in the tumor and body fluid, detected using the Affymetrix Genechip ® Human Mitochondrial Resequencing Array 1.0 and supplemented by capillary sequencing for noncoding region. Using this high-throughput method, 75% of the tumors were found to contain mtDNA mutations, higher than in our previous studies, and 36% of the body fluids from these cancer patients contained mtDNA mutations. Most of the mutations detected were heteroplasmic. A statistically significantly higher heteroplasmy rate occurred in tumor specimens when compared to both body fluid of cancer patients and sputum of controls, and in patient blood compared to blood of controls. Only 2 of the 12 sputum specimens from heavy smokers without cancer (17%) contained mtDNA mutations. Although patient mutations were spread throughout the mtDNA genome in the lung, bladder and kidney series, a statistically significant elevation of tRNA and ND complex mutations was detected in tumors. Our findings indicate comprehensive mtDNA resequencing can be a high-throughput tool for detecting mutations in clinical samples with potential applications for cancer detection, but it is

  13. Gamma greenhouse for chronic irradiation in plant mutation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhar Mohamad; Rusli Ibrahim; Sobri Hussein

    2009-01-01

    The gamma greenhouse makes use of chronic irradiation from a 137 Cs source (double encapsulated 800 Ci caesium-137 pencil) producing a low dose rate, which is considered to be more effective in recovering and producing useful mutants in comparison to acute irradiation. The irradiation facility comprises an open topped irradiation area 30 m in diameter, protected by a partial concrete wall with entry maze and site topography. For safety, the facility is protected by a sophisticated interlock system, which only allows the source to be exposed when all the prerequisite safety conditions are met, and automatically returns the source to the safe storage position if any safety device is compromised. The main irradiation area is further protected by a 300 m diameter exclusion zone that is also protected by the safety interlock circuit. The facility can accommodate a wide range of plant materials such as seeds, seedlings in pots, cuttings, callus, somatic embryos and suspension cell cultures. Plant samples will be exposed to low dose gamma radiation over long periods of time (hours, weeks, months), depending on their nature and sensitivity. There was evidence whereby exposure of tissue culture materials to continuous low dose gamma irradiation resulting in considerably elevated somaclonal variation frequency without negative effects on culture response. It is not surprising that in vitro culture generating somaclonal variation together with in vitro mutagenesis inducing mutation lead to a higher variation frequency due to possible addition of mutagenic effect by in vitro mutagenesis to somaclonal variability arising from in vitro culture as well as the interaction between them. (Author)

  14. Phenylalanine hydroxylase gene mutations in the United States: Report from the maternal PKU collaborative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldberg, P.; Henriksen, K.F.; Guettler, F. [John F. Kennedy Inst., Glostrup (Denmark)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The major cause of hyperphenylalaninemia is mutations in the gene encoding phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). The known mutations have been identified primarily in European patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations responsible for PAH deficiency in the United States. One hundred forty-nine patients enrolled in the Maternal PKU Collaborative Study were subjects for clinical and molecular investigations. PAH gene mutations associated with phenylketonuria (PKU) or mild hyperphenylalaninemia (MHP) were identified on 279 of 294 independent mutant chromosomes, a diagnostic efficiency of 95%. The spectrum is composed of 71 different mutations, including 47 missense mutations, 11 splice mutations, 5 nonsense mutations, and 8 microdeletions. Sixteen previously unreported mutations were identified. Among the novel mutations, five were found in patients with MHP, and the remainder were found in patients with PKU. The most common mutations were R408W, IVS12nt1g{r_arrow}a, and Y414C, accounting for 18.7%, 7.8% and 5.4% of the mutant chromosomes, respectively. Thirteen mutations had relative frequencies of 1%-5%, and 55 mutations each had frequencies {le}1%. The mutational spectrum corresponded to that observed for the European ancestry of the U.S. population. To evaluate the extent of allelic variation at the PAH locus within the United States in comparison with other populations, we used allele frequencies to calculate the homozygosity for 11 populations where >90% ascertainment has been obtained. The United States was shown to contain one of the most heterogeneous populations, with homozygosity values similar to Sicily and ethnically mixed sample populations in Europe. The extent of allelic heterogeneity must be a major determining factor in the choice of mutation-detection methodology for molecular diagnosis in PAH deficiency. 47 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Mutation Screening of the Krüppel-like Factor 1 Gene in Individuals With Increased Fetal Hemoglobin Referred for Hemoglobinopathy Investigation in South of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Mohammad; Ershadi Oskouei, Sanaz; Shariati, Gholamreza; Babaei, Esmaeil; Galehdari, Hamid; Saberi, Alihossein; Sedaghat, Alireza

    2018-04-01

    Any mutation in the Krüppel-like factor 1 (KLF1) gene may interfere with its proper related function in the erythropoiesis process and lead to alterations in proper activation of its downstream protein through globin switching, which results in an increase in fetal hemoglobin (HbF). This study aimed to investigate whether KLF1 mutation can associate with high level of HbF in individuals with increased fetal hemoglobin referred for screening of hemoglobinopathies in south of Iran. The human KLF1 gene was amplified via the polymerase chain reaction procedure, and sequencing was used to determine any mutation in these patients. Moreover, XmnI polymorphisms in the position of -158 of γ-globin gene promoter were analyzed in all patients by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Analysis of sequencing revealed a missense mutation in the KLF1 gene, p.Ser102Pro (c.304T>C), which was detectable in 10 of 23 cases with elevated HbF level. This mutation was only detected in individuals who had a HbF level between 3.1% and 25.6%. Statistical analysis showed that the frequency of C allele is significantly correlated with a high level of HbF (PC) in the KLF1 gene in β-thalassemia patients with increased level of fetal hemoglobin. According to statistical results of p.Ser102Pro mutation and XmnI polymorphism, it has been strongly suggested that both polymorphisms have an association with increased HbF samples. These nucleotide changes alone may not be the only elements raising the level of HbF, and other regulatory and modifying factors also play a role in HbF production.

  16. FLT3 and JAK2 Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Promote Interchromosomal Homologous Recombination and the Potential for Copy Neutral Loss of Heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaymes, Terry J; Mohamedali, Azim; Eiliazadeh, Anthony L; Darling, David; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2017-04-01

    Acquired copy neutral LOH (CN-LOH) is a frequent occurrence in myeloid malignancies and is often associated with resistance to standard therapeutic modalities and poor survival. Here, we show that constitutive signaling driven by mutated FLT3 and JAK2 confers interchromosomal homologous recombination (iHR), a precedent for CN-LOH. Using a targeted recombination assay, we determined significant iHR activity in internal tandem duplication FLT3 (FLT3-ITD) and JAK2V617F-mutated cells. Sister chromatid exchanges, a surrogate measure of iHR, was significantly elevated in primary FLT3-ITD normal karyotype acute myeloid leukemia (NK-AML) compared with wild-type FLT3 NK-AML. HR was harmonized to S phase of the cell cycle to repair broken chromatids and prevent iHR. Increased HR activity in G 0 arrested primary FLT3-ITD NK-AML in contrast to wild-type FLT3 NK-AML. Cells expressing mutated FLT3-ITD demonstrated a relative increase in mutation frequency as detected by thymidine kinase (TK) gene mutation assay. Moreover, resistance was associated with CN-LOH at the TK locus. Treatment of FLT3-ITD- and JAK2V617F-mutant cells with the antioxidant N -acetylcysteine diminished reactive oxygen species (ROS), restoring iHR and HR levels. Our findings show that mutated FLT3-ITD and JAK2 augment ROS production and HR, shifting the cellular milieu toward illegitimate recombination events such as iHR and CN-LOH. Therapeutic reduction of ROS may thus prevent leukemic progression and relapse in myeloid malignancies. Cancer Res; 77(7); 1697-708. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. POLE mutations in families predisposed to cutaneous melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Heitzer, Ellen; Johansson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in the exonuclease domain of POLE have been shown to predispose to colorectal cancers and adenomas. POLE is an enzyme involved in DNA repair and chromosomal DNA replication. In order to assess whether such mutations might also predispose to cutaneous melanoma, we interrogated...... variants in the exonuclease domain of POLE. Although this frequency is not significantly higher than that in unselected Caucasian controls, we observed multiple cancer types in the melanoma families, suggesting that some germline POLE mutations may predispose to a broad spectrum of cancers, including...

  18. Genetic improvement of 'NPq' rice with induced mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Mahabal

    1974-01-01

    Exposure of the seeds of rice to different doses of gamma-rays increased the total mutation frequency with an increase in the dose rate, and the most economic mutations occurred around 30 kr. Induced mutants with dwarf plant type, early maturity, fine grain, high-yielding ability, and resistance to lodging and major diseases were isolated in the M, and M generations. Genetical studies indicated that height is controlled by 4 pairs of additive genes, grass-clumps by 2 pairs of non-allelic interacting genes (inhibitory), and chlorophyll mutations such as albina by 2 pairs of duplicate genes and xantha by a single gene pair. (author)

  19. Distinct Viral and Mutational Spectrum of Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Abate

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL is primarily found in children in equatorial regions and represents the first historical example of a virus-associated human malignancy. Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infection and MYC translocations are hallmarks of the disease, it is unclear whether other factors may contribute to its development. We performed RNA-Seq on 20 eBL cases from Uganda and showed that the mutational and viral landscape of eBL is more complex than previously reported. First, we found the presence of other herpesviridae family members in 8 cases (40%, in particular human herpesvirus 5 and human herpesvirus 8 and confirmed their presence by immunohistochemistry in the adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. Second, we identified a distinct latency program in EBV involving lytic genes in association with TCF3 activity. Third, by comparing the eBL mutational landscape with published data on sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL, we detected lower frequencies of mutations in MYC, ID3, TCF3 and TP53, and a higher frequency of mutation in ARID1A in eBL samples. Recurrent mutations in two genes not previously associated with eBL were identified in 20% of tumors: RHOA and cyclin F (CCNF. We also observed that polyviral samples showed lower numbers of somatic mutations in common altered genes in comparison to sBL specimens, suggesting dual mechanisms of transformation, mutation versus virus driven in sBL and eBL respectively.

  20. Distinct Viral and Mutational Spectrum of Endemic Burkitt Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Francesco; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Mundo, Lucia; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Fuligni, Fabio; Rossi, Maura; Zairis, Sakellarios; Gazaneo, Sara; De Falco, Giulia; Lazzi, Stefano; Bellan, Cristiana; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Amato, Teresa; Marasco, Elena; Etebari, Maryam; Ogwang, Martin; Calbi, Valeria; Ndede, Isaac; Patel, Kirtika; Chumba, David; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo; Pileri, Stefano; Leoncini, Lorenzo; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-10-01

    Endemic Burkitt lymphoma (eBL) is primarily found in children in equatorial regions and represents the first historical example of a virus-associated human malignancy. Although Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and MYC translocations are hallmarks of the disease, it is unclear whether other factors may contribute to its development. We performed RNA-Seq on 20 eBL cases from Uganda and showed that the mutational and viral landscape of eBL is more complex than previously reported. First, we found the presence of other herpesviridae family members in 8 cases (40%), in particular human herpesvirus 5 and human herpesvirus 8 and confirmed their presence by immunohistochemistry in the adjacent non-neoplastic tissue. Second, we identified a distinct latency program in EBV involving lytic genes in association with TCF3 activity. Third, by comparing the eBL mutational landscape with published data on sporadic Burkitt lymphoma (sBL), we detected lower frequencies of mutations in MYC, ID3, TCF3 and TP53, and a higher frequency of mutation in ARID1A in eBL samples. Recurrent mutations in two genes not previously associated with eBL were identified in 20% of tumors: RHOA and cyclin F (CCNF). We also observed that polyviral samples showed lower numbers of somatic mutations in common altered genes in comparison to sBL specimens, suggesting dual mechanisms of transformation, mutation versus virus driven in sBL and eBL respectively.

  1. Major contribution from recurrent alterations and MSH6 mutations in the Danish Lynch syndrome population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilbert, Mef; Wikman, Friedrik P; Hansen, Thomas V O

    2009-01-01

    mutations in 164 families are considered pathogenic and an additional 50 variants from 76 families are considered to represent variants of unknown pathogenicity. The different MMR genes contribute to 40% (MSH2), 29% (MLH1), and 22% (MSH6) of the mutations and the Danish population thus shows a considerably...... higher frequency of MSH6 mutations than previously described. Although 69/88 (78%) pathogenic mutations were present in a single family, previously recognized recurrent/founder mutations were causative in 75/137 (55%) MLH1/MSH2 mutant families. In addition, the Danish MLH1 founder mutation c.1667......+2_1667_+8TAAATCAdelinsATTT was identified in 14/58 (24%) MLH1 mutant families. The Danish Lynch syndrome population thus demonstrates that MSH6 mutations and recurrent/founder mutations have a larger contribution than previously recognized, which implies that the MSH6 gene should be included in routine diagnostics...

  2. Experimental mutations in soybean and their selection value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sichkar', V.I.

    1979-01-01

    Efficiency of widely used chemical mutagens and gamma irradiation in inducing chlorophyll changes in some soya varieties has been compared in order to further specify the relationship between this type of mutations and other morphological changes. The most active mutations found were NMU, NEU, EI and gamma radiation. The frequency of chrolophyll changes depended on the mutagen concentration and soya variety and varied from 1.58% to 19.04%. EO, NDMM and DMS produced 4-5 times lower yield of chlorophyll mutations. The following mutagen concentrations for the varieties studied were found optimum (in per cent): NMU - 0.0125, NEU - 0.025, EI - 0.03, EO - 0.05, NDMM - 0.0O625, DMS - 0.02. No relationship between the dose of gamma radiation and the mutation frequency was found. Varieties of VNIIMK 9186 and Lanka were the most mutable, 89-10 hybrid showed very low mutability. Mutagens that induced high frequency of mutations also gave the broadest spectrum of changes. Most frequent changes were xantha, lutescens and xanthaterminalis. Very few mutations from green color to white one were isolated

  3. Targeted cancer exome sequencing reveals recurrent mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenedini, E; Bernardis, I; Artusi, V; Artuso, L; Roncaglia, E; Guglielmelli, P; Pieri, L; Bogani, C; Biamonte, F; Rotunno, G; Mannarelli, C; Bianchi, E; Pancrazzi, A; Fanelli, T; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, G; Ferrari, S; Manfredini, R; Vannucchi, A M; Tagliafico, E

    2014-01-01

    With the intent of dissecting the molecular complexity of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), we designed a target enrichment panel to explore, using next-generation sequencing (NGS), the mutational status of an extensive list of 2000 cancer-associated genes and microRNAs. The genomic DNA of granulocytes and in vitro-expanded CD3+T-lymphocytes, as a germline control, was target-enriched and sequenced in a learning cohort of 20 MPN patients using Roche 454 technology. We identified 141 genuine somatic mutations, most of which were not previously described. To test the frequency of the identified variants, a larger validation cohort of 189 MPN patients was additionally screened for these mutations using Ion Torrent AmpliSeq NGS. Excluding the genes already described in MPN, for 8 genes (SCRIB, MIR662, BARD1, TCF12, FAT4, DAP3, POLG and NRAS), we demonstrated a mutation frequency between 3 and 8%. We also found that mutations at codon 12 of NRAS (NRASG12V and NRASG12D) were significantly associated, for primary myelofibrosis (PMF), with highest dynamic international prognostic scoring system (DIPSS)-plus score categories. This association was then confirmed in 66 additional PMF patients composing a final dataset of 168 PMF showing a NRAS mutation frequency of 4.7%, which was associated with a worse outcome, as defined by the DIPSS plus score. PMID:24150215

  4. HPRT gene locus mutation in peripheral blood lymphocytes induced by internal exposure to radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jingyong, Zhao; Yongzhong, Xu; Tao, Zhao; Fengmei, Cui; Liuyi, Wang; Qinhua, Lao [Suzhou Univ., Suzhou (China). Radiation Medicine Department

    2001-07-01

    HPRT gene locus mutation in peripheral blood lymphocytes induced by internal exposure to radionuclides was performed and the relationships between mutation frequency and dose were studied. Rats were injected intravenously with radionuclides, the blood was sampled at different time after injection; HPRT gene locus mutation frequency (GMF) were examined by methods of multi-nucleus cell and Brdurd assay, working out the Dose-response function. GMF rose with the increase of dose and dose-rates and were clearly interrelated. The HPRT gene locus mutation is very sensitive to radiation and may be used as a biological dosimeter.

  5. Gaucher disease: N370S glucocerebrosidase gene frequency in the Portuguese population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacerda, L.; Amaral, O.; Pinto, R.; Oliveira, P.; Aerts, J.; Sá Miranda, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    In the Portuguese population the most frequent form of Gaucher disease is type 1. The N370S glucocerebrosidase gene mutation accounts for 63% of mutated alleles. The frequency of this mutation was accurately determined in the Portuguese population, which does not present an Ashkenazi Jewish genetic

  6. Molecular genetic analysis of the calcium sensing receptor gene in patients clinically suspected to have familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia: phenotypic variation and mutation spectrum in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter H; Christensen, Signe E; Heickendorff, Lene

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: The autosomal dominantly inherited condition familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is characterized by elevated plasma calcium levels, relative or absolute hypocalciuria, and normal to moderately elevated plasma PTH. The condition is difficult to distinguish clinically from primary...... hyperparathyroidism and is caused by inactivating mutations in the calcium sensing receptor (CASR) gene. OBJECTIVE: We sought to define the mutation spectrum of the CASR gene in a Danish FHH population and to establish genotype-phenotype relationships regarding the different mutations. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS...

  7. Group control of elevators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, Yasukazu; Hikita, Shiro; Tuji, Sintaro (Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1988-09-05

    Items to be evaluated in the group control of elevators, and a typical control system are described. A new system in which the fuzzy rule base is employed is introduced together with the configuration. The items to be evaluated are waiting time, riding time, accuracy of forecasting, energy saving, and ease of usage. The everage waiting time of less than 20 seconds with less than 3% waiting rate of more than 60 seconds is accepted as a satisfactory service condition. There are many conflicting matters in group-controlling, and the study for the controlling must deal with the optimization of multi-purpose problems. The standards for group-control evaluation differ according to building structures and the tastes of users, and an important problem is where to give emphasis of the evaluation. The TRAFFIC PATTERN LEARNING METHOD has been applied in the system for careful control to accommodate the traffic. No specific function is provided for the evaluation, but the call allocation is made by fuzzy rule-base. The configuration of a new group-control system is introduced. 7 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  8. NPM1 mutations in therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with uncharacteristic features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Tolstrup; Andersen, Mette Klarskov; Christiansen, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    Frameshift mutations of the nucleophosmin gene (NPM1) were recently reported as a frequently occurring abnormality in patients with de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To evaluate the frequency of NPM1 mutations in patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia (t-MDS) and therapy-related AML (t......-/-7, the most frequent abnormalities of t-MDS/t-AML, were not observed (P=0.002). This raises the question whether some of the cases presenting NPM1 mutations were in fact cases of de novo leukemia. The close association to class I mutations and the inverse association to class II mutations suggest...

  9. Studies of human mutation rates, December 1, 1985--November 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    This program seeks to quantify native human mutation rates and to determine how man's activities may affect these rates. The program is divided into six tasks, i.e. The American Indian mutation rate, monitoring populations for frequency of mutation by electrophoresis of blood proteins, application of molecular biological approaches to the detection and study of mutational events in human populations, development of two-dimensional electrophoresis for identification of mutant proteins, co-operative program with the Radiation Effects Research Foundation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, and statistical problems associated with the estimation of mutation rates. Progress of each of the above tasks is related in detail. (DT)

  10. Perforation of the sinus membrane during sinus floor elevation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Fodich, Ivo; Bornstein, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To analyze the frequency of perforation of the sinus membrane during maxillary sinus floor elevation (SFE) and to assess possible risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-seven cases of SFE performed with a lateral window approach were evaluated retrospectively. Clinical and radiogra......PURPOSE: To analyze the frequency of perforation of the sinus membrane during maxillary sinus floor elevation (SFE) and to assess possible risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seventy-seven cases of SFE performed with a lateral window approach were evaluated retrospectively. Clinical...

  11. Parkinson's disease-related LRRK2 G2019S mutation results from independent mutational events in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Suzanne; Patin, Etienne; Condroyer, Christel; Leutenegger, Anne-Louise; Lohmann, Ebba; Giladi, Nir; Bar-Shira, Anat; Belarbi, Soraya; Hecham, Nassima; Pollak, Pierre; Ouvrard-Hernandez, Anne-Marie; Bardien, Soraya; Carr, Jonathan; Benhassine, Traki; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Pirkevi, Caroline; Hamadouche, Tarik; Cazeneuve, Cécile; Basak, A Nazli; Hattori, Nobutaka; Dürr, Alexandra; Tazir, Meriem; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Brice, Alexis

    2010-05-15

    Mutations in the leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified in families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and in sporadic cases; the G2019S mutation is the single most frequent. Intriguingly, the frequency of this mutation in PD patients varies greatly among ethnic groups and geographic origins: it is present at <0.1% in East Asia, approximately 2% in European-descent patients and can reach frequencies of up to 15-40% in PD Ashkenazi Jews and North African Arabs. To ascertain the evolutionary dynamics of the G2019S mutation in different populations, we genotyped 74 markers spanning a 16 Mb genomic region around G2019S, in 191 individuals carrying the mutation from 126 families of different origins. Sixty-seven families were of North-African Arab origin, 18 were of North/Western European descent, 37 were of Jewish origin, mostly from Eastern Europe, one was from Japan, one from Turkey and two were of mixed origins. We found the G2019S mutation on three different haplotypes. Network analyses of the three carrier haplotypes showed that G2019S arose independently at least twice in humans. In addition, the population distribution of the intra-allelic diversity of the most widespread carrier haplotype, together with estimations of the age of G2019S determined by two different methods, suggests that one of the founding G2019S mutational events occurred in the Near East at least 4000 years ago.

  12. Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anorexia. 2 (14.3). 9 (13.8). 12 (12.5). 0.965. 0.851. 0.803. Chest pain. 2 (14.3). 12 (18.5). 12 (12.5). 0.988. 0.851. 0.297. Headache. 2 (14.3). 8 (12.3). 9 (9.4). 0.839. 0.630. 0.552. Myalgia. 2 (14.3). 11 (16.9). 4 (4.2). 0.809. 0.168. 0.014. Splenomegaly. 2 (14.3). 2 (3.1). 2 (2.1). 0.142. 0.078. 0.691. Family history of renal failure.

  13. Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (34.6%), fatigue (31.5%), anorexia (22.9%) and chest pain (19.0%) were the most prevalent clinical features in ... In this study, the medical records of 383 FMF patients were ..... ranean fever: a survey of 470 cases and review of the literature.

  14. Indigenous and environmental modulation of mutation frequencies in Lactobacillus plantarum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Alen-Boerrigter, van I.J.; Koole, L.A.; Bongers, R.S.; Kleerebezem, M.; Hylckama-Vlieg, van J.E.T.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability of microbial (starter) strains in terms of quality, functional properties, growth performance and robustness is essential for industrial applications. In an industrial fermentation process, the bacterium should be able to successfully withstand various adverse conditions during

  15. Outcomes Following Traumatic Grain Elevator Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolefree, Sydnei; Truong, Anthony; Ward, Jeanette; Dong, Fanglong; Ablah, Elizabeth; Haan, James

    2017-01-01

    The absence of a comprehensive database of grain elevator-associated injuries hinders accurate evaluation of injury prevalence and may lead to discordant information about injury frequencies. The main purpose of this study was to identify the most common mechanisms of injury related to grain elevator events. Comparisons of hospital outcomes between patients who sustained traumatic injuries associated with grain elevators at Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)-regulated industrial sites versus those on OSHA-exempt farming operations were also made. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients' presenting with grain elevator-related injuries at a level-1 trauma center between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. Data collected included demographics, mechanism of injury, injury severity, hospitalization details, and discharge disposition. Data were summarized, and comparisons were made between the groups. All patients (N = 18) in the study were male, with a mean age of 37 years. Falls and being caught in equipment each accounted for 27.8% of injuries. Among the 18 patients, there were a total of 37 injuries. The majority of injuries were either lower extremity (29.7%) or chest injuries (21.6%). The average hospital length of stay was 4 ± 4.5 days, and one patient required mechanical ventilation. There were no reported deaths. The literature reports entrapments as the leading cause of grain elevator-related injuries; however, this study found that falls and being caught in equipment were the most common mechanisms of injury. This suggests that a greater emphasis should be placed on fall prevention and equipment safety.

  16. Albino mutation rates in red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle L.) as a bioassay of contamination history in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, C.E.; Travis, S.E.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the sensitivity of a viviparous estuarine tree species, Rhizophora mangle, to historic sublethal mutagenic stress across a fine spatial scale by comparing the frequency of trees producing albino propagules in historically contaminated (n=4) and uncontaminated (n=11) forests in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Data from uncontaminated forests were used to provide estimates of background mutation rates. We also determined whether other fitness parameters were negatively correlated with mutagenic stress (e.g., degree of outcrossing and numbers of reproducing trees km-1). Contaminated sites in Tampa Bay had significantly higher frequencies of trees that were heterozygous for albinism per 1000 total reproducing trees (FHT) than uncontaminated forests (mean ?? SE: 11.4 ?? 4.3 vs 4.3 ?? 0.73, P 25 yrs of subsequent recruitment and tree replacement may have allowed an initial elevation in the FHT to decay. Patterns of FHT were not explained by distance from the bay mouth or the degree of urbanization. However, there was a significant positive relationship between tree size and FHT (r=0.83, Pbioassay for the effects of mutagens will facilitate future monitoring of contamination events and comparisons of bay-wide recovery in future decades. Development of a database of FHT values for a range of subtropical and tropical estuaries is underway that will provide a baseline against which to compare mutational consequences of global change. ?? 2005, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  17. Radiation-induced mutations in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saamin, S [Cocoa and Coconut Research Division, Malaysian Agricultural Research and Development Institute (Malaysia); Thompson, M M [Department of Horticulture, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Full text: Dormant scions of 'Bing' were exposed to 1-2.5 kR gamma radiation. The main buds were excised and the scions grafted to allow the growth of accessory buds into primary shoots. The frequency and types of mutations were described in a population of 3307 M{sub 1}V{sub 2} shoot. The overall mutation frequency was 2.7% incl. 0.15% growth-reduced mutants. The experiment was repeated using 3kR and 4kR fractionated doses in water. Differences in mutation frequency at 3kR and 4kR were not significant. Of 2765 surviving M{sub 1}V{sub 2} shoots derived from irradiation of accessory buds of both standard and V{sub 1} shoots, the overall mutation frequency was 3.3% incl. 1.7% partial leaf mutants, 1.0% leaf mutants, and 0.54% growth-reduced mutants. For maximum mutation rate with adequate survival we suggest acute irradiation of accessory buds in air at dosages approximating LD50. Mutant sectors in M{sub 1}V{sub 1} shoots derived from accessory buds are larger than those from main buds, as revealed by the higher number of mutant repeats. (author)

  18. p16 mutation spectrum in the premalignant condition Barrett's esophagus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas G Paulson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutation, promoter hypermethylation and loss of heterozygosity involving the tumor suppressor gene p16 (CDKN2a/INK4a have been detected in a wide variety of human cancers, but much less is known concerning the frequency and spectrum of p16 mutations in premalignant conditions. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We have determined the p16 mutation spectrum for a cohort of 304 patients with Barrett's esophagus, a premalignant condition that predisposes to the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma. Forty seven mutations were detected by sequencing of p16 exon 2 in 44 BE patients (14.5% with a mutation spectrum consistent with that caused by oxidative damage and chronic inflammation. The percentage of patients with p16 mutations increased with increasing histologic grade. In addition, samples from 3 out of 19 patients (15.8% who underwent esophagectomy were found to have mutations. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest the environment of the esophagus in BE patients can both generate and select for clones with p16 mutations.

  19. The mutational spectrum of Lynch syndrome in cyprus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A Loizidou

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer and is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. Mutation carriers have an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer as well as other extracolonic tumours. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the frequency and distribution of mutations in the MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 genes within a cohort of Cypriot families that fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. The study cohort included 77 patients who fulfilled at least one of the revised Bethesda guidelines. Mutational analysis revealed the presence of 4 pathogenic mutations, 3 in the MLH1 gene and 1 in the MSH2 gene, in 5 unrelated individuals. It is noted that out of the 4 pathogenic mutations detected, one is novel (c.1610delG in exon 14 of the MLH1 and has been detected for the first time in the Cypriot population. Overall, the pathogenic mutation detection rate in our patient cohort was 7%. This percentage is relatively low but could be explained by the fact that the sole criterion for genetic screening was compliance to the revised Bethesda guidelines. Larger numbers of Lynch syndrome families and screening of the two additional predisposition genes, PMS2 and EPCAM, are needed in order to decipher the full spectrum of mutations associated with Lynch syndrome predisposition in Cyprus.

  20. Somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma identified by next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Tomaszewicz, Keith; Hutchinson, Lloyd; Hornick, Jason L; Woda, Bruce; Yu, Hongbo

    2016-08-01

    Histiocytic sarcoma is a rare malignant neoplasm of presumed hematopoietic origin showing morphologic and immunophenotypic evidence of histiocytic differentiation. Somatic mutation importance in the pathogenesis or disease progression of histiocytic sarcoma was largely unknown. To identify somatic mutations in histiocytic sarcoma, we studied 5 histiocytic sarcomas [3 female and 2 male patients; mean age 54.8 (20-72), anatomic sites include lymph node, uterus, and pleura] and matched normal tissues from each patient as germ line controls. Somatic mutations in 50 "Hotspot" oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes were examined using next generation sequencing. Three (out of five) histiocytic sarcoma cases carried somatic mutations in BRAF. Among them, G464V [variant frequency (VF) of 43.6 %] and G466R (VF of 29.6 %) located at the P loop potentially interfere with the hydrophobic interaction between P and activating loops and ultimately activation of BRAF. Also detected was BRAF somatic mutation N581S (VF of 7.4 %), which was located at the catalytic loop of BRAF kinase domain: its role in modifying kinase activity was unclear. A similar mutational analysis was also performed on nine acute monocytic/monoblastic leukemia cases, which did not identify any BRAF somatic mutations. Our study detected several BRAF mutations in histiocytic sarcomas, which may be important in understanding the tumorigenesis of this rare neoplasm and providing mechanisms for potential therapeutical opportunities.

  1. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  2. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder. The ...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  3. Disease-associated mutations disrupt functionally important regions of intrinsic protein disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vacic

    Full Text Available The effects of disease mutations on protein structure and function have been extensively investigated, and many predictors of the functional impact of single amino acid substitutions are publicly available. The majority of these predictors are based on protein structure and evolutionary conservation, following the assumption that disease mutations predominantly affect folded and conserved protein regions. However, the prevalence of the intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs and regions (IDRs in the human proteome together with their lack of fixed structure and low sequence conservation raise a question about the impact of disease mutations in IDRs. Here, we investigate annotated missense disease mutations and show that 21.7% of them are located within such intrinsically disordered regions. We further demonstrate that 20% of disease mutations in IDRs cause local disorder-to-order transitions, which represents a 1.7-2.7 fold increase compared to annotated polymorphisms and neutral evolutionary substitutions, respectively. Secondary structure predictions show elevated rates of transition from helices and strands into loops and vice versa in the disease mutations dataset. Disease disorder-to-order mutations also influence predicted molecular recognition features (MoRFs more often than the control mutations. The repertoire of disorder-to-order transition mutations is limited, with five most frequent mutations (R→W, R→C, E→K, R→H, R→Q collectively accounting for 44% of all deleterious disorder-to-order transitions. As a proof of concept, we performed accelerated molecular dynamics simulations on a deleterious disorder-to-order transition mutation of tumor protein p63 and, in agreement with our predictions, observed an increased α-helical propensity of the region harboring the mutation. Our findings highlight the importance of mutations in IDRs and refine the traditional structure-centric view of disease mutations. The results of this study

  4. Lærer-elev-relationer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Per Fibæk; Nielsen, Anne Maj

    2015-01-01

    I kapitlet belyser vi relationskompetence i forholdet mellem lærer og elever og hvordan læreren kan arbejde med forhold til elever og med sin opmærksomhed på relationsarbejdet. Afslutningsvis ser vi på hvordan lærere fortsat kan udvikle deres relationskompetence.......I kapitlet belyser vi relationskompetence i forholdet mellem lærer og elever og hvordan læreren kan arbejde med forhold til elever og med sin opmærksomhed på relationsarbejdet. Afslutningsvis ser vi på hvordan lærere fortsat kan udvikle deres relationskompetence....

  5. Tanzania Elevation and Surface Characteristics

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The dataset displays Elevation, Slope, Aspect, Topographic Position Index, Terrain Ruggedness, and Roughness based on Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) (3...

  6. Cancer risk and clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid nodules harboring thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon, Sann Y; Riedlinger, Gregory; Abbott, Collette E; Seethala, Raja; Ohori, N Paul; Nikiforova, Marina N; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Hodak, Steven P

    2018-05-01

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene mutations play a critical role in thyroid cell proliferation and function. They are found in 20%-82% of hyperfunctioning nodules, hyperfunctioning follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), and papillary thyroid cancers (PTC). The diagnostic importance of TSHR mutation testing in fine needle aspiration (FNA) specimens remains unstudied. To examine the association of TSHR mutations with the functional status and surgical outcomes of thyroid nodules, we evaluated 703 consecutive thyroid FNA samples with indeterminate cytology for TSHR mutations using next-generation sequencing. Testing for EZH1 mutations was performed in selected cases. The molecular diagnostic testing was done as part of standard of care treatment, and did not require informed consent. TSHR mutations were detected in 31 (4.4%) nodules and were located in exons 281-640, with codon 486 being the most common. Allelic frequency ranged from 3% to 45%. Of 16 cases (12 benign, 3 FTC, 1 PTC) with surgical correlation, 15 had solitary TSHR mutations and 1 PTC had comutation with BRAF V600E. Hyperthyroidism was confirmed in all 3 FTC (2 overt, 1 subclinical). Of 5 nodules with solitary TSHR mutations detected at high allelic frequency, 3 (60%) were FTC. Those at low allelic frequency (3%-22%) were benign. EZH1 mutations were detected in 2 of 4 TSHR-mutant malignant nodules and neither of 2 benign nodules. We report that TSHR mutations occur in ∼5% thyroid nodules in a large consecutive series with indeterminate cytology. TSHR mutations may be associated with an increased cancer risk when present at high allelic frequency, even when the nodule is hyperfunctioning. Benign nodules were however most strongly correlated with TSHR mutations at low allelic frequency. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. JAK2, MPL, and CALR mutations in Chinese Han patients with essential thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Biao; Chen, Bing; Zhou, Rong-Fu; Zhang, Qi-Guo; Li, Juan; Yang, Yong-Gong; Zhou, Min; Shao, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Yong; Xu, Xi-Hui; Ouyang, Jian; Xu, Jingyan; Ye, Qing

    2017-04-01

    Mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), myeloproliferative leukemia (MPL), and CALR are highly relevant to Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms. Assessing the prevalence of molecular mutations in Chinese Han patients with essential thrombocythemia (ET), and correlating their mutational profile with disease characteristics/phenotype. Of the 110 subjects studied, 62 carried the JAK2 V617F mutation, 21 had CALR mutations, one carried an MPL (W515) mutation, and 28 had non-mutated JAK2, CALR, and MPL (so-called triple-negative ET). Mutations in JAK2 exon 12 were not detected in any patient. Two ET patients had both CALR and JAK2 V617F mutations. Comparing the hematological parameters of the patients with JAK2 mutations with those of the patients with CALR mutations showed that the ET patients with CALR mutations were younger (p = 0.045) and had higher platelet counts (p = 0.043). Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2/MPL-negative ET, since the data suggest that CALR is much more prevalent than MPL, therefore testing for CALR should be considered in patients who are JAK2 negative as its frequency is almost 20 times that of MPL mutation.

  8. Spectrum of EGFR gene mutations in Vietnamese patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Hoang Anh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Ha, Hua Thi Ngoc; Hanh, Ngo Thi Tuyet; Bach, Nguyen Duc; Thao, Doan Thi Phuong; Dat, Ngo Quoc; Trung, Nguyen Sao

    2016-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutational status is a crucial biomarker for prediction of response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Although these mutations have been well characterized in other countries, little is known about the frequency or spectrum of EGFR mutations in Vietnamese NSCLC patients. Using Sanger DNA sequencing, we investigated mutations in EGFR exons 18-21 from 332 patients diagnosed with NSCLC at University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, followed by PCR amplification and sequencing. EGFR mutations were detected in 135 samples (40.7%), of which eight samples carried double mutations. In total, 46 different types of EGFR mutations were found, including six novel mutations (p.K713E, p.K714R, p.P794S, p.R803W, p.P848S, and p.K867E). Among the four exons investigated, exon 19 was most frequently mutated (63 out of 332 patients, 19%), with the p.E746_A750del appearing in 43 samples. Exon 21 was mutated in 56 samples (16.9%), of which 47 were p.L858R. Each of exons 18 and 20 was mutated in 12 samples (3.6%). The frequency of EGFR mutations was higher in females than in males (48.9% vs 35%, P = 0.012), but not statistically different between adenocarcinomas and other histological types of NSCLC (41.3% vs 34.5%, P = 0.478). DNA sequencing detected EGFR mutations with high frequency and revealed a broad spectrum of mutation type in Vietnamese patients with NSCLC. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Mutation screening of the HGD gene identifies a novel alkaptonuria mutation with significant founder effect and high prevalence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthivel, Srinivasan; Zatkova, Andrea; Nemethova, Martina; Surovy, Milan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Saravanan, Madurai P

    2014-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder; caused by the mutations in the homogentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene located on Chromosome 3q13.33. AKU is a rare disorder with an incidence of 1: 250,000 to 1: 1,000,000, but Slovakia and the Dominican Republic have a relatively higher incidence of 1: 19,000. Our study focused on studying the frequency of AKU and identification of HGD gene mutations in nomads. HGD gene sequencing was used to identify the mutations in alkaptonurics. For the past four years, from subjects suspected to be clinically affected, we found 16 positive cases among a randomly selected cohort of 41 Indian nomads (Narikuravar) settled in the specific area of Tamil Nadu, India. HGD gene mutation analysis showed that 11 of these patients carry the same homozygous splicing mutation c.87 + 1G > A; in five cases, this mutation was found to be heterozygous, while the second AKU-causing mutation was not identified in these patients. This result indicates that the founder effect and high degree of consanguineous marriages have contributed to AKU among nomads. Eleven positive samples were homozygous for a novel mutation c.87 + 1G > A, that abolishes an intron 2 donor splice site and most likely causes skipping of exon 2. The prevalence of AKU observed earlier seems to be highly increased in people of nomadic origin. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  10. Multi-center analysis of glucocerebrosidase mutations in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidransky, Ellen; Nalls, Michael A.; Aasly, Jan O.; Aharon-Peretz, Judith; Annesi, Grazia; Barbosa, Egberto Reis; Bar-Shira, Anat; Berg, Daniela; Bras, Jose; Brice, Alexis; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Clark, Lorraine N.; Condroyer, Christel; De Marco, Elvira Valeria; Dürr, Alexandra; Eblan, Michael J.; Fahn, Stanley; Farrer, Matthew; Fung, Hon-Chung; Gan-Or, Ziv; Gasser, Thomas; Gershoni-Baruch, Ruth; Giladi, Nir; Griffith, Alida; Gurevich, Tanya; Januario, Cristina; Kropp, Peter; Lang, Anthony E.; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen; Lesage, Suzanne; Marder, Karen; Mata, Ignacio F.; Mirelman, Anat; Mitsui, Jun; Mizuta, Ikuko; Nicoletti, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Catarina; Ottman, Ruth; Orr-Urtreger, Avi; Pereira, Lygia V.; Quattrone, Aldo; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Rolfs, Arndt; Rosenbaum, Hanna; Rozenberg, Roberto; Samii, Ali; Samaddar, Ted; Schulte, Claudia; Sharma, Manu; Singleton, Andrew; Spitz, Mariana; Tan, Eng-King; Tayebi, Nahid; Toda, Tatsushi; Troiano, André; Tsuji, Shoji; Wittstock, Matthias; Wolfsberg, Tyra G.; Wu, Yih-Ru; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Zhao, Yi; Ziegler, Shira G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent studies indicate an increased frequency of mutations in the gene for Gaucher disease, glucocerebrosidase (GBA), among patients with Parkinson disease. An international collaborative study was conducted to ascertain the frequency of GBA mutations in ethnically diverse patients with Parkinson disease. Methods Sixteen centers participated, including five from the Americas, six from Europe, two from Israel and three from Asia. Each received a standard DNA panel to compare genotyping results. Genotypes and phenotypic data from patients and controls were analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models and the Mantel Haenszel procedure to estimate odds ratios (ORs) across studies. The sample included 5691 patients (780 Ashkenazi Jews) and 4898 controls (387 Ashkenazi Jews). Results All 16 centers could detect GBA mutations, L444P and N370S, and the two were found in 15.3% of Ashkenazi patients with Parkinson disease (ORs = 4.95 for L444P and 5.62 for N370S), and in 3.2% of non-Ashkenazi patients (ORs = 9.68 for L444P and 3.30 for N370S). GBA was sequenced in 1642 non-Ashkenazi subjects, yielding a frequency of 6.9% for all mutations, demonstrate that limited mutation screens miss half the mutant alleles. The presence of any GBA mutation was associated with an OR of 5.43 across studies. Clinically, although phenotypes varied, subjects with a GBA mutation presented earlier, and were more likely to have affected relatives and atypical manifestations. Conclusion Data collected from sixteen centers demonstrate that there is a strong association between GBA mutations and Parkinson disease. PMID:19846850

  11. Ultrasonic Resonance of Metallic Spheres at Elevated Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson , W.

    1996-01-01

    A unique ultrasonic system has been constructed for measuring resonant frequencies and damping of metallic spheres at elevated temperatures. This system employs electromagnetic-acoustic transduction, with a solenoid coil surrounding the sphere in a uniform magnetic field. Temperature is measured with an optical pyrometer. Since the acoustic and temperature measurements are noncontacting, the uncertainties associated with external damping are relatively small. The resonant frequency and Q of t...

  12. Parameters