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Sample records for elevated fasting insulin

  1. Elevated fasting insulin levels increase the risk of abdominal obesity in Korean men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Keun; Oh, Chang-Mo; Jung, Taegi; Choi, Young-Jun; Chung, Ju Youn; Ryoo, Jae-Hong

    2017-04-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether an elevated fasting insulin level predicts abdominal obesity. A cohort study was conducted with 13,707 non-obese Korean men. They were categorized into 4 groups according to the quartile of fasting insulin level, and followed up from 2005 to 2010. Incidence rates of obesity were compared among the 4 groups during follow-up, and a Cox proportional hazards model was used to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for abdominal obesity according to fasting insulin level. The overall incidence rate of obesity was 16.2%, but the rate increased in proportion to the fasting insulin level (quartiles 1-4: 9.8%, 12.4%, 16.9%, 25.5%, Pfasting insulin level in an unadjusted model. However, after adjustment for covariates, including baseline waist circumference (WC), only in the quartile 4 group was the statistical significance of the association maintained [quartile 2-4; abdominal obesity: 0.89 (0.76-1.02), 1.00 (0.86-1.14) and 1.24 (1.08-1.43), P for trend fasting insulin levels, an overall proportional relationship between fasting insulin level and incident abdominal obesity was not found. Additionally, this association was largely accounted for by baseline WC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance and risk of hypertension in the general population: A meta-analysis.

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    Wang, Feng; Han, Lili; Hu, Dayi

    2017-01-01

    Studies on the association of fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance with subsequent risk of hypertension have yielded conflicting results. To quantitatively assess the association of fasting insulin concentrations or homeostasis model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) with incident hypertension in a general population by performing a meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed and Embase databases until August 31, 2016 for prospective observational studies investigating the elevated fasting insulin concentrations or HOMA-IR with subsequent risk of hypertension in the general population. Pooled risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of hypertension was calculated for the highest versus the lowest category of fasting insulin or HOMA-IR. Eleven studies involving 10,230 hypertension cases were identified from 55,059 participants. Meta-analysis showed that the pooled adjusted RR of hypertension was 1.54 (95% CI 1.34-1.76) for fasting insulin concentrations and 1.43 (95% CI 1.27-1.62) for HOMA-IR comparing the highest to the lowest category. Subgroup analysis results showed that the association of fasting insulin concentrations with subsequent risk of hypertension seemed more pronounced in women (RR 2.07; 95% CI 1.19-3.60) than in men (RR 1.48; 95% CI 1.17-1.88). This meta-analysis suggests that elevated fasting insulin concentrations or insulin resistance as estimated by homeostasis model assessment is independently associated with an exacerbated risk of hypertension in the general population. Early intervention of hyperinsulinemia or insulin resistance may help clinicians to identify the high risk of hypertensive population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fasting Serum Taurine-Conjugated Bile Acids Are Elevated in Type 2 Diabetes and Do Not Change With Intensification of Insulin

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    Wewalka, Marlene; Patti, Mary-Elizabeth; Barbato, Corinne; Houten, Sander M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Bile acids (BAs) are newly recognized signaling molecules in glucose and energy homeostasis. Differences in BA profiles with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) remain incompletely understood. Objective: The objective of the study was to assess serum BA composition in impaired glucose-tolerant, T2D, and normal glucose-tolerant persons and to monitor the effects of improving glycemia on serum BA composition in T2D patients. Design and Setting: This was a cross-sectional cohort study in a general population (cohort 1) and nonrandomized intervention (cohort 2). Patients and Interventions: Ninety-nine volunteers underwent oral glucose tolerance testing, and 12 persons with T2D and hyperglycemia underwent 8 weeks of intensification of treatment. Main Outcome Measures: Serum free BA and respective taurine and glycine conjugates were measured by HPLC tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Oral glucose tolerance testing identified 62 normal-, 25 impaired glucose-tolerant, and 12 T2D persons. Concentrations of total taurine-conjugated BA were higher in T2D and intermediate in impaired- compared with normal glucose-tolerant persons (P = .009). Univariate regression revealed a positive association between total taurine-BA and fasting glucose (R = 0.37, P fasting insulin (R = 0.21, P = .03), and homeostatic model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (R = 0.26, P = .01) and an inverse association with oral disposition index (R = −0.36, P fasting serum total BA or BA composition. Conclusion: Fasting taurine-conjugated BA concentrations are higher in T2D and intermediate in impaired compared with normal glucose-tolerant persons and are associated with fasting and postload glucose. Serum BAs are not altered in T2D in response to improved glycemia. Further study may elucidate whether this pattern of taurine-BA conjugation can be targeted to provide novel therapeutic approaches to treat T2D. PMID:24432996

  4. Preliminary evidence for obesity and elevations in fasting insulin mediating associations between cortisol awakening response and hippocampal volumes and frontal atrophy.

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    Ursache, Alexandra; Wedin, William; Tirsi, Aziz; Convit, Antonio

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated alterations in the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and brain abnormalities in adults with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). While adolescents with T2DM exhibit similar brain abnormalities, less is known about whether brain impairments and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis abnormalities are already present in adolescents with pre-diabetic conditions such as insulin resistance (IR). This study included 33 adolescents with IR and 20 without IR. Adolescents with IR had a blunted CAR, smaller hippocampal volumes, and greater frontal lobe atrophy compared to controls. Mediation analyses indicated pathways whereby a smaller CAR was associated with higher BMI which was in turn associated with fasting insulin levels, which in turn was related to smaller hippocampal volume and greater frontal lobe atrophy. While we had hypothesized that HPA dysregulation may result from brain abnormalities, our findings suggest that HPA dysregulation may also impact brain structures through associations with metabolic abnormalities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fasting in Ramadan with an insulin pump.

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    Kesavadev, Jothydev

    2015-05-01

    A good majority of subjects with diabetes on insulin therapies observe fasting during Ramadan. The challenge for the physician and the patient is to manage diabetes without an interruption to fasting by avoiding hypoglycaemia and simultaneously ensuring that blood glucose remain at acceptable safe levels. Insulin Pumps differ from syringes and insulin pens in that it offers a variable basal rate, different type of boluses and associated calculators. The technological advances that pumps offer, help educated subjects pre-programme a reduced basal rate throughout the day. Pumps ensure avoidance of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia and preserve quality of life and enhance confidence in patients during fasting. Due to multiple benefits, insulin pumps are considered the best delivery systems for insulin during the holy month of Ramadan, despite the prerequisites for its optimal output and cost concerns.

  6. Substrate Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity During Fasting in Obese Human Subjects: Impact of GH Blockade.

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    Pedersen, Morten Høgild; Svart, Mads Vandsted; Lebeck, Janne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility are features of obesity and are amplified by fasting. Growth hormone (GH) secretion increases during fasting and GH causes insulin resistance. To study the metabolic effects of GH blockade during fasting in obese subjects. Nine obese males were studied thrice in a randomized design: (1) after an overnight fast (control), (2) after 72 hour fasting (fasting), and (3) after 72 hour fasting with GH blockade (pegvisomant) [fasting plus GH antagonist (GHA)]. Each study day consisted of a 4-hour basal period followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry, assessment of glucose and palmitate turnover, and muscle and fat biopsies. GH levels increased with fasting (P fasting-induced reduction of serum insulin-like growth factor I was enhanced by GHA (P Fasting increased lipolysis and lipid oxidation independent of GHA, but fasting plus GHA caused a more pronounced suppression of lipid intermediates in response to hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Fasting-induced insulin resistance was abrogated by GHA (P Fasting plus GHA also caused elevated glycerol levels and reduced levels of counterregulatory hormones. Fasting significantly reduced the expression of antilipolytic signals in adipose tissue independent of GHA. Suppression of GH activity during fasting in obese subjects reverses insulin resistance and amplifies insulin-stimulated suppression of lipid intermediates, indicating that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and metabolic flexibility also in obese subjects. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  7. Short-term fasting promotes insulin expression in rat hypothalamus.

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    Dakic, Tamara B; Jevdjovic, Tanja V; Peric, Mina I; Bjelobaba, Ivana M; Markelic, Milica B; Milutinovic, Bojana S; Lakic, Iva V; Jasnic, Nebojsa I; Djordjevic, Jelena D; Vujovic, Predrag Z

    2017-07-01

    In the hypothalamus, insulin takes on many roles involved in energy homoeostasis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine hypothalamic insulin expression during the initial phase of the metabolic response to fasting. Hypothalamic insulin content was assessed by both radioimmunoassay and Western blot. The relative expression of insulin mRNA was examined by qPCR. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the distribution of insulin immunopositivity in the hypothalamus. After 6-h fasting, both glucose and insulin levels were decreased in serum but not in the cerebrospinal fluid. Our study showed for the first time that, while the concentration of circulating glucose and insulin decreased, both insulin mRNA expression and insulin content in the hypothalamic parenchyma were increased after short-term fasting. Increased insulin immunopositivity was detected specifically in the neurons of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus and in the ependymal cells of fasting animals. These novel findings point to the complexity of mechanisms regulating insulin expression in the CNS in general and in the hypothalamus in particular. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Fasting insulin has a stronger association with an adverse cardiometabolic risk profile than insulin resistance: the RISC study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Rooij, Susanne R; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Kozakova, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fasting insulin concentrations are often used as a surrogate measure of insulin resistance. We investigated the relative contributions of fasting insulin and insulin resistance to cardiometabolic risk and preclinical atherosclerosis. DESIGN AND METHODS: The Relationship between Insulin...... insulin, a simple and practical measure, may be a stronger and independent contributor to cardiometabolic risk and atherosclerosis in a healthy population than hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp-derived insulin sensitivity.......OBJECTIVE: Fasting insulin concentrations are often used as a surrogate measure of insulin resistance. We investigated the relative contributions of fasting insulin and insulin resistance to cardiometabolic risk and preclinical atherosclerosis. DESIGN AND METHODS: The Relationship between Insulin...... of the metabolic syndrome in 1177 participants. Carotid artery intima media thickness (IMT) was measured by ultrasound to assess preclinical atherosclerosis. RESULTS: Fasting insulin was correlated with all elements of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin sensitivity (M/I) was correlated with most elements. The odds...

  9. Preliminary evidence for obesity-associated insulin resistance in adolescents without elevations of inflammatory cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Jessica I

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain whether the associations between obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance established in human adult studies are found among adolescents. Methods We contrasted 36 obese and 24 lean youth on fasting glucose, insulin levels, lipid profile, hemoglobin A1C, markers of hepatic function, white blood cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP and fibrinogen levels. The cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-4 and the adipokines leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were also compared between the two groups. The fasting glucose and insulin values were used to estimate the degree of insulin resistance with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. T-tests and correlations were run to examine group differences and associations between groups. In addition, regression analyses were used to ascertain whether the markers of inflammation were predictive of the degree of insulin resistance. Results Although obese adolescents had clear evidence of insulin resistance, only CRP, fibrinogen and leptin were elevated; there were no group differences in pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokines nor adiponectin and resistin. Anthropometric measures of obesity and level of insulin resistance were highly correlated to the acute phase reactants CRP and fibrinogen; however, the degree of insulin resistance was not predicted by the pro- or anti-inflammatory cytokine markers. Obese adolescents had higher white blood cell counts. In addition they had higher circulating alanine aminotransferase concentrations and lower circulating albumin and total protein than lean adolescents, possibly as a result of hepatocyte damage from fatty liver. Conclusion Unlike rodent or adult studies, we found that wide-spread systemic inflammation is not necessarily associated with insulin resistance among adolescents. This finding does not support the current paradigm that the associations between obesity and insulin resistance are, to a

  10. Fasting insulin, insulin resistance, and risk of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality in non-diabetic adults: a meta-analysis.

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    Zhang, Xiaohong; Li, Jun; Zheng, Shuiping; Luo, Qiuyun; Zhou, Chunmei; Wang, Chaoyang

    2017-10-31

    Studies on elevated fasting insulin or insulin resistance (IR) and cardiovascular or all-cause mortality risk in non-diabetic individuals have yielded conflicting results. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the association of elevated fasting insulin levels or IR as defined by homeostasis model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR) with cardiovascular or all-cause mortality in non-diabetic adults. We searched for relevant studies in PubMed and Emabse databases until November 2016. Only prospective observational studies investigating the association of elevated fasting insulin levels or HOMA-IR with cardiovascular or all-cause mortality risk in non-diabetic adults were included. Risk ratio (RR) with its 95% confidence intervals (CIs) was pooled for the highest compared with the lowest category of fasting insulin levels or HOMA-IR. Seven articles involving 26976 non-diabetic adults were included. The pooled, adjusted RR of all-cause mortality comparing the highest with the lowest category was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.00-1.27; P =0.058) for fasting insulin levels and 1.34 (95% CI: 1.11-1.62; P =0.002) for HOMA-IR, respectively. When comparing the highest with the lowest category, the pooled adjusted RR of cardiovascular mortality was 2.11 (95% CI: 1.01-4.41; P =0.048) for HOMA-IR in two studies and 1.40 (95% CI: 0.49-3.96; P =0.526) for fasting insulin levels in one study. IR as measured by HOMA-IR but not fasting insulin appears to be independently associated with greater risk of cardiovascular or all-cause mortality in non-diabetic adults. However, the association of fasting insulin and HOMA-IR with cardiovascular mortality may be unreliable due to the small number of articles included. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Visceral Fat Accumulation, Insulin Resistance, and Elevated Depressive Symptoms in Middle-Aged Japanese Men.

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    Shuichiro Yamamoto

    Full Text Available To investigate visceral fat accumulation and markers of insulin resistance in relation to elevated depressive symptoms (EDS.Participants were 4,333 male employees (mean age, 49.3 years who underwent abdominal computed tomography scanning, measured fasting insulin, and did not self-report diabetes and mental disorders under treatment and history of cancer, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association of EDS with abdominal fat deposition and markers of insulin resistance.Visceral fat area (VFA and fasting insulin were significantly, positively associated with EDS. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence interval of high VFA for the lowest through highest quartile of depression score were 1 (reference, 1.18 (0.97-1.42, 1.25 (1.02-1.54, 1.23 (1.01-1.51, respectively, and corresponding figures for high fasting insulin were 1 (reference, 0.98 (0.80-1.19, 1.12 (0.91-1.38, and 1.29 (1.06-1.57, respectively. Subcutaneous fat area was not associated with EDS.Results suggest that EDS is related to visceral, but not subcutaneous, fat accumulation and insulin resistance in middle-aged Japanese men.

  12. Effect of HCV on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance in first 5 years of infection.

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    Ahmed, Naeema; Rashid, Amir; Naveed, Abdul Khaliq; Bashir, Qudsia

    2016-02-01

    To assess the effects of hepatitis C virus infection in the first 5 years on fasting glucose, fasting insulin and peripheral insulin resistance. The case-control study was conducted at the Army Medical College, Rawalpindi, from December 2011 to November 2012, and comprised subjects recruited from a government hospital in Rawalpindi. The subjects included known cases of hepatitis C virus infection for at least 5 years, and normal healthy controls. Fasting blood samples of all the subjects were collected and analysed for serum fasting insulin and serum fasting glucose levels. Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance was calculated SPSS 11 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 30 subjects, 20(66.6%) were cases, while 10(33.3%) were controls. Serum fasting glucose mean level in cases was 89.55±9.53 compared to 84.40±9.80 in the controls (p=0.188). The mean serum fasting insulin in controls was 7.52±3.23 and 6.79±3.30 in cases (p=0.567). Homeostatic model assessment-Insulin resistance level in controls was 1.60±0.76 and In the cases it was 1.49±0.74 (p=0.695). Peripheral insulin resistance and development of type 2 diabetes as a complication of hepatitis C virus infection was not likely at least within the first five years of infection.

  13. Insulin is a key determinant of elevated retinal arteriolar flicker response in insulin-resistant individuals.

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    Reimann, Manja; Vilser, Walthard; Gruber, Matthias; Bornstein, Stefan R; Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2015-09-01

    Insulin may link metabolic disorders to retinal microvascular pathology. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of early insulin resistance on retinal microcirculation. Retinal diameter responses to flicker-light stimulation were investigated in 81 clinically healthy participants (32 ± 6 years [mean ± SD], 59% women) who were recruited according to their BMI. All participants underwent an OGTT and euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp (40 mU/m(2) · min(-1) insulin dose). After stratification by low and high insulin sensitivity based on a clamp-derived glucose disposal rate of ≤ or >4.9 mg/kg body mass, respectively, baseline retinal diameters and their relative changes to flicker stimulation were compared while controlling for mean arterial pressure, BMI and sex. The arterial vasodilator response at the end of flicker stimulation (p = 0.044) and the area under the arterial reaction curve during flicker stimulation (p = 0.015) were significantly higher in individuals with low vs high insulin sensitivity. Vasodilatory responses of retinal veins to flicker stimulation and baseline retinal diameters did not differ between insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant participants (p > 0.05). In a stepwise linear regression analysis, fasting insulin remained the only predictor of the arterial vasodilator response to flicker-light (p flicker response in insulin-resistant states is a result of higher circulating insulin levels.

  14. Determinants of High Fasting Insulin and Insulin Resistance Among Overweight/Obese Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jerri Chiu Yun Ling; Mohd Nahar Azmi Mohamed; Muhammad Yazid Jalaludin; Sanjay Rampal; Nur Lisa Zaharan; Zahurin Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Hyperinsulinaemia is the earliest subclinical metabolic abnormality, which precedes insulin resistance in obese children. An investigation was conducted on the potential predictors of fasting insulin and insulin resistance among overweight/obese adolescents in a developing Asian country. A total of 173 overweight/obese (BMI?>?85th percentile) multi-ethnic Malaysian adolescents aged 13 were recruited from 23 randomly selected schools in this cross-sectional study. Waist circumference (WC), bod...

  15. Association of fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations with insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrannini, E; Muscelli, E.; Natali, A.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Hyperproinsulinaemia and relative hyperglucagonaemia are features of type 2 diabetes. We hypothesised that raised fasting glucagon and proinsulin concentrations may be associated with insulin resistance (IR) in non-diabetic individuals. METHODS: We measured IR [by a euglycaemic......, controlling for known determinants of insulin sensitivity (i.e. sex, age, BMI and glucose tolerance) as well as factors potentially affecting glucagon and proinsulin (i.e. fasting plasma glucose and C-peptide concentrations), glucagon and proinsulin were still positively associated, and adiponectin...

  16. Region-Specific Suppression of Hypothalamic Responses to Insulin To Adapt to Elevated Maternal Insulin Secretion During Pregnancy.

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    Ladyman, Sharon R; Grattan, David R

    2017-12-01

    As part of the adaptation of maternal glucose regulation during pregnancy to ensure glucose provision to the fetus, maternal insulin concentrations become elevated. However, increased central actions of insulin, such as suppression of appetite, would be maladaptive during pregnancy. We hypothesized that central nervous system targets of insulin become less responsive during pregnancy to prevent overstimulation by the increased circulating insulin concentrations. To test this hypothesis, we have measured insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt (pAkt) in specific hypothalamic nuclei as an index of hypothalamic insulin responsiveness. Despite higher endogenous insulin concentrations following feeding, arcuate nucleus pAkt levels were significantly lower in the pregnant group compared with the nonpregnant group. In response to an intracerebroventricular injection of insulin, insulin-induced pAkt was significantly reduced in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus of pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Similar levels of insulin receptor β and PTEN, a negative regulator of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway, were detected in hypothalamic areas of nonpregnant and pregnant rats. In the ventromedial nucleus, however, levels of phosphorylated PTEN were significantly lower in pregnancy, suggesting that reduced inactivation of PTEN may contribute to the attenuated insulin signaling in this area during pregnancy. In conclusion, these results demonstrate region-specific changes in responsiveness to insulin in the hypothalamus during pregnancy that may represent an adaptive response to minimize the impact of elevated circulating insulin on the maternal brain. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  17. Elevated TCA cycle function in the pathology of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and fatty liver[S

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    Satapati, Santhosh; Sunny, Nishanth E.; Kucejova, Blanka; Fu, Xiaorong; He, Tian Teng; Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Shelton, John M.; Perales, Jose C.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2012-01-01

    The manner in which insulin resistance impinges on hepatic mitochondrial function is complex. Although liver insulin resistance is associated with respiratory dysfunction, the effect on fat oxidation remains controversial, and biosynthetic pathways that traverse mitochondria are actually increased. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the site of terminal fat oxidation, chief source of electrons for respiration, and a metabolic progenitor of gluconeogenesis. Therefore, we tested whether insulin resistance promotes hepatic TCA cycle flux in mice progressing to insulin resistance and fatty liver on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 32 weeks using standard biomolecular and in vivo 2H/13C tracer methods. Relative mitochondrial content increased, but respiratory efficiency declined by 32 weeks of HFD. Fasting ketogenesis became unresponsive to feeding or insulin clamp, indicating blunted but constitutively active mitochondrial β-oxidation. Impaired insulin signaling was marked by elevated in vivo gluconeogenesis and anaplerotic and oxidative TCA cycle flux. The induction of TCA cycle function corresponded to the development of mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction, hepatic oxidative stress, and inflammation. Thus, the hepatic TCA cycle appears to enable mitochondrial dysfunction during insulin resistance by increasing electron deposition into an inefficient respiratory chain prone to reactive oxygen species production and by providing mitochondria-derived substrate for elevated gluconeogenesis. PMID:22493093

  18. Elevated TCA cycle function in the pathology of diet-induced hepatic insulin resistance and fatty liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satapati, Santhosh; Sunny, Nishanth E; Kucejova, Blanka; Fu, Xiaorong; He, Tian Teng; Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Shelton, John M; Perales, Jose C; Browning, Jeffrey D; Burgess, Shawn C

    2012-06-01

    The manner in which insulin resistance impinges on hepatic mitochondrial function is complex. Although liver insulin resistance is associated with respiratory dysfunction, the effect on fat oxidation remains controversial, and biosynthetic pathways that traverse mitochondria are actually increased. The tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the site of terminal fat oxidation, chief source of electrons for respiration, and a metabolic progenitor of gluconeogenesis. Therefore, we tested whether insulin resistance promotes hepatic TCA cycle flux in mice progressing to insulin resistance and fatty liver on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 32 weeks using standard biomolecular and in vivo (2)H/(13)C tracer methods. Relative mitochondrial content increased, but respiratory efficiency declined by 32 weeks of HFD. Fasting ketogenesis became unresponsive to feeding or insulin clamp, indicating blunted but constitutively active mitochondrial β-oxidation. Impaired insulin signaling was marked by elevated in vivo gluconeogenesis and anaplerotic and oxidative TCA cycle flux. The induction of TCA cycle function corresponded to the development of mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction, hepatic oxidative stress, and inflammation. Thus, the hepatic TCA cycle appears to enable mitochondrial dysfunction during insulin resistance by increasing electron deposition into an inefficient respiratory chain prone to reactive oxygen species production and by providing mitochondria-derived substrate for elevated gluconeogenesis.

  19. Acute insulin-induced elevations of circulating leptin and feeding inhibition in lean but not obese rats.

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    Singh, Kimberly A; Boozer, Carol N; Vasselli, Joseph R

    2005-08-01

    Insulin has been shown to stimulate leptin mRNA expression acutely in rat adipose tissue, but its short-term effects on circulating leptin levels, and subsequent feeding behavior, have not been well described. We used 11-mo-old female selectively bred obesity-resistant (OR) and obesity-prone (OP) Sprague-Dawley rats maintained on laboratory chow to investigate this question. At testing, body weights and basal leptin levels of the OP rats were significantly elevated compared with the OR rats. In the 3-h fasted state, injection of 2.0 U insulin/kg ip resulted in significant elevations of plasma leptin at 4 h postinjection in both OP and OR groups (hour 4, +2.50 and +5.98 ng/ml, respectively). In separate feeding tests with the same groups, intake of laboratory chow pellets was significantly inhibited during hours 2-4 after 2.0 U/kg of insulin in the OR (-80.1%, P < 0.05), but not in the OP group, compared with intake after saline injections. In feeding tests with palatable moderately high-fat pellets after 2.0 and 3.0 U insulin/kg ip, significant decreases between hours 2 and 4 in intake were seen in the OR group only (-41.0 and -68.3%, respectively). Thus feeding inhibition coincides with insulin-induced elevations of plasma leptin in lean but not obese Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that elevations of leptin within the physiological range may contribute to short-term inhibition of food intake in rats and that this process may be stimulated by feeding-related insulin release.

  20. Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR): A Better Marker for Evaluating Insulin Resistance Than Fasting Insulin in Women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Hafsa; Masood, Qamar; Khan, Aysha Habib

    2017-03-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Observational study. Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value insulin levels ≥12 µIU/ml. A total of 91 premenopausal women diagnosed with PCOS were included. Mean age was 30 ±5.5 years. Mean HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 ±1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 ±5.8 µIU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMAIR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR.

  1. Insulin resistance in obesity can be reliably identified from fasting plasma insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, K. W.; Gilijamse, P. W.; Koopman, K. E.; de Weijer, B. A.; Brands, M.; Kootte, R. S.; Romijn, J. A.; Ackermans, M. T.; Nieuwdorp, M.; Soeters, M. R.; Serlie, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is the major contributor to cardiometabolic complications of obesity. We aimed to (1) establish cutoff points for insulin resistance from euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps (EHCs), (2) identify insulin-resistant obese subjects and (3) predict insulin resistance from routinely

  2. Consensus on Insulin Dose Modification During Fasting in Type 2 Diabetes.

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    Unnikrishnan, A G; Lodha, Sailesh; Sharma, S K

    2017-03-01

    Fasting for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) carries a risk of an assortment of complications. The decision of T2DM patient to fast should be made after sufficient discussion with physician regarding the risks involved. The current consensus is developed to help physicians manage T2DM patients during fasting. To provide simple and easily implementable guidelines on insulin dose modification during fasting in T2DM patients. The expert group committee discussed and proposed six recommendations for the use of insulin regimens during fasting. The recommendations were proposed on diet, exercise and categorization of risks during fast, breaking fast, dose modification of basal insulins, premix insulins and prandial insulins. All these recommendations were based on established guidelines and published scientific literature. These evidences were then factored into the national context based on the expert committee representative's patient-physician experience in their clinical practice and common therapeutic practices followed in India to successfully achieve optimal glucose control. The final consensus-based recommendations were proposed and collectively recorded for each insulin regimen. Recommendations based on insulin dose modification during fasting in T2DM patients has been developed. Patients with diabetes, who fast are recommended to keep themselves hydrated, consume low glycaemic and high fibre food but, avoid sugary and caffeinated drinks along with fried foods. The main goal of insulin therapy during fasting is to provide adequate insulin to prevent post meal hyperglycaemia and prevent hypoglycaemia during fast. We hope that the consensus based recommendations mentioned in this paper will be a useful reference tool for health care practitioners to initiate and intensify insulin therapy in T2DM patients in order to successfully complete fasting without much complication.

  3. Fasting insulin is a stronger cardiovascular risk factor in women than in men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    Diabetes is a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women than in men. It is not known whether there is also a sex difference in the association between hyperinsulinaemia, reflecting insulin resistance, and CVD. Fasting insulin was assessed with a specific assay in 6916 fasting,

  4. Fasting and postprandial levels of ghrelin, leptin and insulin in lean, obese and anorexic subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Hanna; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena; Kupsz, Justyna; Piątek, Małgorzata; Piątek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Ghrelin, leptin and insulin are involved in neurohormonal regulation of energetic homeostasis. Aim We investigated the correlation between nutritional status and plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin and insulin in lean, obese and anorexic subjects. Material and methods Nineteen obese and 18 anorexic adults were enrolled in the study. Seventeen adults with normal body mass index (BMI) served as controls. Blood samples were taken twice: before breakfast and 2 h after breakfast. Fasting and postprandial ghrelin, leptin and insulin were examined. The following correlations were estimated: between BMI and basal level of tested hormones, between insulin and ghrelin, and between insulin and leptin. The threshold level of significance was p ≤ 0.05 for all calculations. Results Basal insulin level was lowest in anorexic patients and greatest in obese subjects. Fasting plasma ghrelin was lower in obesity and higher in anorexia as compared with the controls. Comparing with controls, fasting leptin levels were higher in obese and lower in anorexic subjects. There was positive correlation between BMI and basal leptin level in obesity. A significant postprandial increase was noted for insulin in all studied groups. Increased leptin and decreased ghrelin levels were detected 2 h after a meal in the control group. In obese patients, postprandial leptin was lower than before food intake, and fasting leptin showed positive correlation with basal insulin level. Conclusions Basal plasma ghrelin, leptin and insulin levels differ according to nutritional status. Impaired ghrelin and leptin secretion and insulin sensitivity may be involved in the pathogenesis of eating disorders. PMID:24868288

  5. Homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (homa-ir): a better marker for evaluating insulin resistance than fasting insulin in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, H.; Khan, A.H.; Masood, Q.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the utility of HOMA-IR in assessing insulin resistance in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and compare it with fasting insulin for assessing insulin resistance (IR). Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Section of Clinical Chemistry, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from January 2009 to September 2012. Methodology: Medical chart review of all women diagnosed with PCOS was performed. Of the 400 PCOS women reviewed, 91 met the inclusion criteria. Insulin resistance was assessed by calculating HOMA-IR using the formula (fasting glucose x fasting insulin)/405, taking normal value <2 in adults and hyperinsulinemia based on fasting insulin levels >=12 micro IU/ml. Results: A total of 91 premenopausal women diagnosed with PCOS were included. Mean age was 30 +-5.5 years. Mean HOMA-IR of women was 3.1 +-1.7, respectively with IR in 69% (n=63) women, while hyperinsulinemia was present in 60% (n=55) women (fasting Insulin 18.5 +-5.8 micro IU/ml). Hyperandrogenism was present in 53.8% (n=49), whereas 38.5% (n=35) women had primary infertility or subfertility, while 65.9% (n=60) had menstrual irregularities; and higher frequencies were observed in women with IR. Eight subjects with IR and endocrine abnormalities were missed by fasting insulin. Conclusion: Insulin resistance is common in PCOS and it is likely a pathogenic factor for development of PCOS. HOMA-IR model performed better than hyperinsulinemia alone for diagnosing IR. (author)

  6. Regulation of mouse hepatic genes in response to diet induced obesity, insulin resistance and fasting induced weight reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantzoros Christos

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is associated with insulin resistance that can often be improved by caloric restriction and weight reduction. Although many physiological changes accompanying insulin resistance and its treatment have been characterized, the genetic mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance are largely unknown. We used DNA microarrys and RT-PCR to investigate significant changes in hepatic gene transcription in insulin resistant, diet-induced obese (DIO-C57/BL/6J mice and DIO-C57/BL/6J mice fasted for 48 hours, whose weights returned to baseline levels during these conditions. Results Transcriptional profiling of hepatic mRNA revealed over 1900 genes that were significantly perturbed between control, DIO, and fasting/weight reduced DIO mice. From this set, our bioinformatics analysis identified 41 genes that rigorously discriminate these groups of mice. These genes are associated with molecular pathways involved in signal transduction, and protein metabolism and secretion. Of particular interest are genes that participate in pathways responsible for modulating insulin sensitivity. DIO altered expression of genes in directions that would be anticipated to antagonize insulin sensitivity, while fasting/ weight reduction partially or completely normalized their levels. Among these discriminatory genes, Sh3kbp1 and RGS3, may have special significance. Sh3kbp1, an endogenous inhibitor of PI-3-kinase, was upregulated by high-fat feeding, but normalized to control levels by fasting/weight reduction. Because insulin signaling occurs partially through PI-3-kinase, increased expression of Sh3kbp1 by DIO mice may contribute to hepatic insulin resistance via inhibition of PI-3-kinase. RGS3, a suppressor of G-protein coupled receptor generation of cAMP, was repressed by high-fat feeding, but partially normalized by fasting/weight reduction. Decreased expression of RGS3 may augment levels of cAMP and thereby contribute to increased, c

  7. In vivo differential effects of fasting, re-feeding, insulin and insulin stimulation time course on insulin signaling pathway components in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agouni, Abdelali; Owen, Carl; Czopek, Alicja; Mody, Nimesh; Delibegovic, Mirela

    2010-10-08

    Components of the insulin receptor signaling pathway are probably some of the best studied ones. Even though methods for studying these components are well established, the in vivo effects of different fasting regimens, and the time course of insulin receptor phosphorylation and that of its downstream components in insulin-sensitive peripheral tissues have not been analyzed in detail. When assessing insulin signaling, it may be beneficial to drive insulin levels as low as possible by performing an overnight fast before injecting a supra-physiological dose of insulin. Recent studies have shown however that 5 or 6 h fast in mice is sufficient to assess physiological responses to insulin and/or glucose in glucose tolerance tests, insulin tolerance tests and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies. Moreover, mice are nocturnal feeders, with ∼70% of their daily caloric intake occurring during the dark cycle, and their metabolic rate is much higher than humans. Therefore, an overnight fast in mice is closer to starvation than just food withdrawal. Thus our aim was to assess insulin signaling components from the insulin receptor to downstream targets IRS1, Akt/PKB, GSK3, Erk1/2 and ribosomal protein S6 in muscle, liver and adipose tissue in 5 h versus 16 h (overnight) fasted mice, and the time course (0-30 min) of these phosphorylation events. We also assessed whether re-feeding under 5 h and 16 h fasting conditions was a more robust stimulus than insulin alone. Our study determines that a short food withdrawal from mice, for a period of 5 h, results in a similar insulin-stimulated response in phosphorylation events as the long overnight fast, presenting a more physiological experimental set up. We also demonstrate that in vivo, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of its signaling components is different between different peripheral tissues, and depending on the tissue(s) and protein(s) of interest, an appropriate time course should be chosen. Copyright © 2010

  8. The basal insulin dose; a lesson from prolonged fasting in young individuals with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strich, David; Teomim, Renana; Gillis, David

    2015-12-01

    The insulin requirement for type 1 diabetes during prolonged fasting is unclear. In order to define this for clinical purposes, we investigated the total insulin dose associated with successful completion of a 25 h religious fast. Questionnaires were filled in during telephone interviews performed before and after 88 fasts in 57 young individuals with type 1 diabetes (age 20.4 ± 5.3, range: 12.3-31.2 yr). Duration of their diabetes was 8.7 ± 6.1 yr (range: 0.5-21.8) and latest HbA1c was 8.5 ± 1.9% (5.7-13.7). Twenty-eight patients fasted using multiple daily injections (MDI) and 30 were on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), including one who fasted in both categories. Subjects were instructed either to act as they had done for previous successful fasts or, for first-time fasts, to inject half their daily basal insulin injection or halve their basal CSII rate throughout the fast. The total daily insulin dose associated with successful completion of the fast was determined. Among those who completed the fast, average total insulin was 0.19 ± 0.16 U/kg, patients who discontinued their fast took on average 0.34 ± 0.15 U/kg. Seven MDI patients and 12 CSII patients terminated their fast early, mostly for mild hypoglycemia. No severe hypoglycemia or other serious adverse event occurred during any of the fasts. Fasting for 25 h is safe and can be undertaken in individuals with type 1 diabetes. The recommended total daily dose is 0.2 U/kg/day. This recommendation may possibly be used for other situations in which abstention from oral intake is required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Evaluation of fasting plasma insulin concentration as an estimate of insulin action in nondiabetic individuals: comparison with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Fahim; Okeke, QueenDenise; Reaven, Gerald M

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-mediated glucose disposal varies severalfold in apparently healthy individuals, and approximately one-third of the most insulin resistant of these individuals is at increased risk to develop various adverse clinical syndromes. Since direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are not practical in a clinical setting, several surrogate estimates of insulin action have been proposed, including fasting plasma insulin (FPI) concentration and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) calculated by a formula employing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and FPI concentrations. The objective of this study was to compare FPI as an estimate of insulin-mediated glucose disposal with values generated by HOMA-IR in 758 apparently healthy nondiabetic individuals. Measurements were made of FPG, FPI, triglyceride (TG), and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations, and insulin-mediated glucose uptake was quantified by determining steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentration during the insulin suppression test. FPI and HOMA-IR were highly correlated (r = 0.98, P HOMA-IR (r = 0.64). Furthermore, the relationship between FPI and TG (r = 0.35) and HDL-C (r = -0.40) was comparable to that between HOMA-IR and TG (r = 0.39) and HDL-C (r = -0.41). In conclusion, FPI and HOMA-IR are highly correlated in nondiabetic individuals, with each estimate accounting for ~40% of the variability (variance) in a direct measure of insulin-mediated glucose disposal. Calculation of HOMA-IR does not provide a better surrogate estimate of insulin action, or of its associated dyslipidemia, than measurement of FPI.

  10. Fasting insulin sensitivity indices are not better than routine clinical variables at predicting insulin sensitivity among Black Africans: a clamp study in sub-Saharan Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the predictive utility of common fasting insulin sensitivity indices, and non-laboratory surrogates [BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR)] in sub-Saharan Africans without diabetes. Methods We measured fasting glucose and insulin, and glucose uptake during 80/mU/m2/min euglycemic clamp in 87 Cameroonians (51 men) aged (SD) 34.6 (11.4) years. We derived insulin sensitivity indices including HOMA-IR, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and glucose-to-insulin ratio (GIR). Indices and clinical predictors were compared to clamp using correlation tests, robust linear regressions and agreement of classification by sex-specific thirds. Results The mean insulin sensitivity was M = 10.5 ± 3.2 mg/kg/min. Classification across thirds of insulin sensitivity by clamp matched with non-laboratory surrogates in 30-48% of participants, and with fasting indices in 27-51%, with kappa statistics ranging from −0.10 to 0.26. Fasting indices correlated significantly with clamp (/r/=0.23-0.30), with GIR performing less well than fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (both p insulin sensitivity indices are modest predictors of insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic clamp, and do not perform better than clinical surrogates in this population. PMID:25106496

  11. Diagnostic Performance of 48-Hour Fasting Test and Insulin Surrogates in Patients With Suspected Insulinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Keijiro; Kawabe, Ken; Lee, Lingaku; Tachibana, Yuichi; Fujimori, Nao; Igarashi, Hisato; Oda, Yoshinao; Jensen, Robert T; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Ito, Tetsuhide

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness of the 48-hour fasting test and insulin surrogates followed by a glucagon stimulatory test (GST) for the diagnosis of insulinoma. Thirty-five patients with suspected insulinoma who underwent 48-hour fasting test and GST were retrospectively included in our study: 15 patients with surgically proven insulinomas and 20 patients in whom insulinoma was clinically ruled out. We determined the duration of the fasting test, plasma glucose levels, serum levels of immunoreactive insulin and C-peptide, and insulin surrogates (serum levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, free fatty acid, and response of plasma glucose to intravenous glucagon [ΔPG]) at the end of the fast. The sensitivity and specificity of the 48-hour fasting test were 100.0% and 80.0%, respectively, for the diagnosis of insulinoma. When the 48-hour fasting test and immunoreactive insulin, C-peptide, or insulin surrogates were combined, the combination with GST showed the best results. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy rate were 93.3%, 95.0%, and 94.3%, respectively, with 1 false-negative case and 1 false-positive case occurring. A more accurate and less invasive diagnosis of insulinoma was possible by combining the 48-hour fasting test with the GST, compared with the existing method.

  12. The effect of Ramadan fasting on glycaemic control in insulin dependent diabetic patients: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabbood, Majid H; Ho, Kenneth W; Simons, Mary R

    Ramadan fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam. People with diabetes are exempted from fasting according to Islamic rules. However, many people with diabetes wish to fast. Physicians are asked frequently by their patients about their ability to fast and the possible impact of fasting on their glycaemic control. Studies about the effect of Ramadan on people with insulin-treated diabetes are scarce. This review aims to provide clinicians with the best recommendations for their patients with insulin-treated diabetes who wish to fast. Four databases (Medline, EMBASE, Scopus and PubMed) were searched using the following MeSH terms and keywords: "insulin dependent diabetes mellitus", "type 1 diabetes mellitus", 'Ramadan' "and" "fasting". In addition, a hand search of key journals and reference lists was performed. Sixteen full text articles were selected for review and critical analysis. All of the included studies except one found improvement or no change in glycaemic control parameters during Ramadan fasting. The incidence of major complications were negligible. Minor hypoglycaemic events were reported in some studies but did not adversely affect fasting. Postprandial hyperglycaemia was a major concern in other studies. However, the incidence of severe hyperglycaemia and diabetic ketoacidosis were trivial. Ramadan fasting is feasible for insulin dependent diabetic patient who wish to fast. Clinicians should advise their patients about the importance of adequate glycaemic control before Ramadan and frequent glucose monitoring during fasting. Certain types of Insulin seem to be more beneficial than other. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance in the prediction of myocardial infarction and mortality at long-term follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M. L.; Pareek, M.; Leosdottir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the additional prognostic value of fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), and homeostasis model assessment derived insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for predicting incident myocardial infarction (MI) and all-cause mortality, independently of traditional...... measured at baseline. Subsequently, HOMA-IR was derived using the computerized HOMA calculator and ranked into quartiles due to the non-normal distribution and presumably non-linear biological effect of insulin resistance. Prognostic values of FBG, FPI, HOMA-IR, and traditional risk factors were tested.......1-48.3] years, whereas median [IQR] HOMA-IR was 0.9 [0.4-1.4]. Over a median follow-up time of 20 years, 1448 events occurred (11.3 per 1000 person-years). The simple prediction model, i.e. the model with traditional CV risk factors only, included age, gender, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, total...

  14. The association between magnesium intake and fasting insulin concentration in healthy middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Teresa T; Manson, JoAnn E; Solomon, Caren G; Liu, Simin; Willett, Walter C; Hu, Frank B

    2003-12-01

    We assessed the association between magnesium intake and fasting insulin levels in a large cohort of women. Female nurses free of diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer from the Nurses Health Study provided blood samples between 1989-1990. We selected a sub-sample of 219 women for this analysis. Magnesium intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire in 1990 and categorized into quartiles. Cross-sectional geometric means of fasting insulin concentrations by quartiles of magnesium intake were obtained with Generalized Linear Model and adjusted for several risk factors and lifestyle characteristics. After adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI), total energy, physical activity, hours per week spent sitting outside work, alcohol intake, smoking, and family history of diabetes, magnesium intake was inversely associated with fasting insulin concentration. The multivariate adjusted geometric mean for women in the lowest quartile of magnesium intake was 11.0 microU/mL and 9.3 microU/mL among those in the highest quartile of magnesium intake (p for trend = 0.04). The inverse association remained when we considered magnesium from only food sources. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower fasting insulin concentrations among women without diabetes. Because lower fasting insulin concentrations generally reflect greater insulin sensitivity, these findings provide a mechanism through which higher dietary magnesium intake may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  15. Beneficial effects on fasting insulin and postprandial responses through 7-day intake of New Zealand blackcurrant powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Elisabeth Theodorus Willems

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Blood glucose and insulin are elevated after intake of carbohydrate, with levels returning to normal in about 2-3 hours after ingestion. We examined the effects of daily New Zealand blackcurrant intake over 7 days on fasting glucose and insulin levels and the responses of glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test (i.e. OGTT. Methods: Seventeen healthy participants (9 males, 8 females, age: 24±8 years, body mass: 75.4±16.4 kg, height 172±11 cm, body mass index: 25.3±3.3 consumed 6 g·day-1 New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC powder for 7 days. Every 6 g of the serving contained 138.6 mg anthocyanins, 49 mg vitamin C, and 5.2 g of carbohydrates with total phenolic content 271.6 mg. A cross-over design was used. Participants completed one OGTT before starting the supplementation (day 0 and another OGTT after 7 days of the supplementation (day 7. For the OGTT, participants were seated and consumed 75 g of glucose dissolved in 250 mL water. Finger prick capillary samples were taken before and every 30 minutes for a total of 120 minutes after consuming the glucose drink. Following duplicate glucose analysis, blood samples were centrifuged and then plasma was separated and frozen (-20°C for triplicate insulin analysis using a human 96-well insulin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IBL international, Hamburg, Germany. Results: NZBC had no effect on fasting glucose (control: 4.46±0.45; NZBC: 4.41±0.44 mmol·L1, P=0.657, although there was a trend for fasting insulin to be 14.3% lower (control: 66.5±28.2; NZBC: 57.0±29.5 pmol·L-1 (P=0.091. HOMA-IR was not different between the control and NZBC (1.81±0.73 vs 1.58±0.83 (P=0.126. With NZBC during the OGTT, plasma glucose at 60 min was 8.1% lower (control: 6.68±1.13; NZBC: 6.14±1.41 mmol·L-1; P=0.016, insulin at 30 min was 18.4% lower (control: 337.1±228.3; NZBC: 275.0±136.4 pmol·L-1; P= 0.021, and insulin at 60 min was 39.2% lower (control: 297.8±154.3; NZBC: 181.2

  16. Elevated hepatic 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 induces insulin resistance in uremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapagain, Ananda; Caton, Paul W; Kieswich, Julius; Andrikopoulos, Petros; Nayuni, Nanda; Long, Jamie H; Harwood, Steven M; Webster, Scott P; Raftery, Martin J; Thiemermann, Christoph; Walker, Brian R; Seckl, Jonathan R; Corder, Roger; Yaqoob, Muhammad Magdi

    2014-03-11

    Insulin resistance and associated metabolic sequelae are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are positively and independently associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. However, the pathogenesis has yet to be fully elucidated. 11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) catalyzes intracellular regeneration of active glucocorticoids, promoting insulin resistance in liver and other metabolic tissues. Using two experimental rat models of CKD (subtotal nephrectomy and adenine diet) which show early insulin resistance, we found that 11βHSD1 mRNA and protein increase in hepatic and adipose tissue, together with increased hepatic 11βHSD1 activity. This was associated with intrahepatic but not circulating glucocorticoid excess, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis. Oral administration of the 11βHSD inhibitor carbenoxolone to uremic rats for 2 wk improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, improved insulin signaling, and reduced hepatic expression of gluconeogenic and lipogenic genes. Furthermore, 11βHSD1(-/-) mice and rats treated with a specific 11βHSD1 inhibitor (UE2316) were protected from metabolic disturbances despite similar renal dysfunction following adenine experimental uremia. Therefore, we demonstrate that elevated hepatic 11βHSD1 is an important contributor to early insulin resistance and dyslipidemia in uremia. Specific 11βHSD1 inhibitors potentially represent a novel therapeutic approach for management of insulin resistance in patients with CKD.

  17. Hepatic ALT isoenzymes are elevated in gluconeogenic conditions including diabetes and suppressed by insulin at the protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Zhong, Shao; Xie, Keming; Yu, Daozhan; Yang, Rongze; Gong, Da-Wei

    2015-09-01

    Alanine transaminase (ALT) plays an important role in gluconeogenesis by converting alanine into pyruvate for glucose production. Early studies have shown that ALT activities are upregulated in gluconeogenic conditions and may be implicated in the development of diabetes. ALT consists of two isoforms, ALT1 and ALT2, with distinctive subcellular and tissue distributions. Whether and how they are regulated are largely unknown. By using Western blotting analysis, we measured hepatic ALT isoforms at the protein level in obese and diabetic animals and in Fao hepatoma cells treated with dexamethasone and insulin. In addition, we measured glucose output in Fao cells over-expressing ALT1 and ALT2. Both ALT isoforms in the liver were increased in diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats and during fasting. However, in ob/ob mice, only ALT2, but not ALT1, protein levels were elevated, and the increase of ALT2 was correlated with that of ALT activity. We further demonstrated that, in vitro, both ALT1 and ALT2 were induced by glucocorticoid dexamethasone, but suppressed by insulin in Fao cells. Finally, we showed that the over-expression of ALT1 and ALT2 in Fao cells directly increased glucose output. We have shown the similarity and difference in the regulation of ALT isoforms in gluconeogenic conditions at the protein level, supporting that ALT isoenzymes play an important role in glucose metabolism and may be implicated the development of insulin resistance and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Fast-food habits, weight gain, and insulin resistance (the CARDIA study): 15-year prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mark A; Kartashov, Alex I; Ebbeling, Cara B; Van Horn, Linda; Slattery, Martha L; Jacobs, David R; Ludwig, David S

    Fast-food consumption has increased greatly in the USA during the past three decades. However, the effect of fast food on risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes has received little attention. We aimed to investigate the association between reported fast-food habits and changes in bodyweight and insulin resistance over a 15-year period in the USA. Participants for the CARDIA study included 3031 young (age 18-30 years in 1985-86) black and white adults who were followed up with repeated dietary assessment. We used multiple linear regression models to investigate the association of frequency of fast-food restaurant visits (fast-food frequency) at baseline and follow-up with 15-year changes in bodyweight and the homoeostasis model (HOMA) for insulin resistance. Fast-food frequency was lowest for white women (about 1.3 times per week) compared with the other ethnic-sex groups (about twice a week). After adjustment for lifestyle factors, baseline fast-food frequency was directly associated with changes in bodyweight in both black (p=0.0050) and white people (p=0.0013). Change in fast-food frequency over 15 years was directly associated with changes in bodyweight in white individuals (pfast-food restaurant use at baseline and follow-up (n=203), those with frequent (more than twice a week) visits to fast-food restaurants at baseline and follow-up (n=87) gained an extra 4.5 kg of bodyweight (p=0.0054) and had a two-fold greater increase in insulin resistance (p=0.0083). Fast-food consumption has strong positive associations with weight gain and insulin resistance, suggesting that fast food increases the risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  19. Survey on diabetic patients treated with insulin during the fasting month of Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Mohamed; Hsairi, Mohamed; Elleuch, Mouna; Ben Aissa, Emna

    2018-01-01

    To estimate the proportion of diabetic patients on insulin, who interrupt fasting during Ramadan, and describe the reported reasons of this interruption. This is a national observational survey of diabetic patients treated with insulin and fasting during the month of Ramadan 2013, proposed to all endocrinologists willing to participate. Consecutive patients were included until the required sample size, estimated at 498 patients, was obtained. Conducted among patients recruited by endocrinologists during the month following Ramadan 2013. Five hundred twenty-six (526) patients were included, of which 51 (9.7%) had type 1 diabetes. The mean age was 36.8 ± 11.6 and 58.3 ± 10.0 years for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. The proportions of male subjects were 62.8% and 57.5% for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. The mean duration of diabetes was 11.0 ± 8.8 and 14.4 ± 7.9 years for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. During Ramadan, more than 55% (54.9% and 55.8% for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively) of patients were treated with insulin analog and over a third with mixed insulin. In this study population, 71.5% reported having fasted without interruption during the month of Ramadan. The average number of non-fasted days was 3.0 ± 6.7, mainly due to hypoglycemic episodes. According to this observational survey conducted in Tunisia, most patients with diabetes treated with insulin (insulin in more than half of the cases) were able to fast without interruption during Ramadan.

  20. Effect of intermittent fasting and refeeding on insulin action in healthy men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halberg, Nils; Henriksen, Morten; Söderhamn, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Insulin resistance is currently a major health problem. This may be because of a marked decrease in daily physical activity during recent decades combined with constant food abundance. This lifestyle collides with our genome, which was most likely selected in the late Paleolithic era (50...... (mean +/- SE); body mass index: 25.7 +/- 0.4 kg/m(2)] by subjecting them to intermittent fasting every second day for 20 h for 15 days. Euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU.min(-1).m(-2)) clamps were performed before and after the intervention period. Subjects maintained body weight (86.4 +/- 2.3 kg......; coefficient of variation: 0.8 +/- 0.1%). Plasma free fatty acid and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were 347 +/- 18 and 0.06 +/- 0.02 mM, respectively, after overnight fast but increased (P fasting, confirming that the subjects were fasting. Insulin...

  1. Elevated insulin and reduced insulin like growth factor binding protein-3/prostate specific antigen ratio with increase in prostate size in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenivasulu, Karli; Nandeesha, Hanumanthappa; Dorairajan, Lalgudi Narayanan; Rajappa, Medha; Vinayagam, Vickneshwaran

    2017-06-01

    Insulin and insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) have growth promoting effects, while insulin like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has growth inhibitory effects. The present study was designed to assess the concentrations of insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and their association with prostate size in patients with BPH. Ninety 90 BPH cases and 90 controls were enrolled in the study. Insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3, PSA, testosterone and estradiol were estimated in both the groups. Insulin, IGF-1 and estradiol were increased and IGFBP-3/PSA was decreased in BPH cases when compared with controls. Insulin (r=0.64, p=0.001) and IGF-1 (r=0.22, p=0.03) were positively correlated and IGFBP-3/PSA (r=-0.316, p=0.002) were negatively correlated with prostate size in BPH. Multivariate analysis showed that insulin (p=0.001) and IGFBP-3/PSA (p=0.004) predicts the prostate size in patients with BPH. Insulin was increased and IGFBP-3/PSA was reduced in BPH patients with increased prostate size. At a cutoff concentration of 527.52, IGFBP-3/PSA ratio was found to differentiate benign growth of prostate from normal prostate with 96% sensitivity and 96% specificity. Insulin is elevated and IGFBP-3/PSA is reduced with increase prostate size in BPH cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of insulin on ketogenesis following fasting in lean and obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeters, Maarten R; Sauerwein, Hans P; Faas, Linda; Smeenge, Martijn; Duran, Marinus; Wanders, Ronald J; Ruiter, An F; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Fliers, Eric; Houten, Sander M; Serlie, Mireille J

    2009-07-01

    The ketone bodies (KBs) D-3-hydroxybutyrate (D-3HB) and acetoacetate (AcAc) play a role in starvation and have been associated with insulin resistance. The dose-response relationship between insulin and KBs was demonstrated to be shifted to the right in type 2 diabetes patients. However, KB levels have also been reported to be decreased in obesity. We investigated the metabolic adaptation to fasting with respect to glucose and KB metabolism in lean and obese men without type 2 diabetes using stable glucose and D-3HB isotopes in a two-step pancreatic clamp after 38 h of fasting. We found that D-3HB fluxes in the basal state were higher in lean compared to obese men: 15.2 (10.7-27.1) vs. 7.0 (3.5-15.1) micromol/kg lean body mass (LBM) x min, respectively, P ketogenesis. This implies differential insulin sensitivity of intermediary metabolism in obesity.

  3. Kinetics of circulating endogenous insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin in fasting nondiabetic man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Tronier, B; Bülow, J B

    1987-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, and proinsulin were measured in different vascular beds in order to determine renal, hepatic, and systemic kinetics of the endogenous peptides in the fasting condition. Nineteen nondiabetic subjects were studied, two were normal, nine had minor vascular...

  4. Prolonged fasting induces peripheral insulin resistance, which is not ameliorated by high-dose salicylate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Allick, Gideon; Ackermans, Mariette T.; Endert, Erik; Romijn, Johannes A.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Elevated plasma free fatty acids, excess reactive oxygen species, inflammation, and gluco-counterregulatory hormones induce insulin resistance (IR) through activation of Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB inhibitor kappaB kinase, which leads to hyperphosphorylation of the

  5. Elevated circulating microRNA-122 is associated with obesity and insulin resistance in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Jie; Cao, Yanan; Shi, Juan; Gu, Weiqiong; Ning, Guang; Zhang, Yifei; Wang, Weiqing

    2015-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in the regulation of adiposity, but functional studies have yielded inconclusive results. Examining the associations of circulating miRNAs levels with obesity and insulin sensitivity in humans may lead to improved insights. Serum samples collected from 112 obese and control subjects (50.0% men) were randomly divided and combined into four pools (28 samples in each obese or control pool). The genome-wide circulating miRNA profiles were detected via microarray. Elevated miR-122 was selected and validated in individual serum samples from 123 obese (46.7% men) and 107 control (50.0% men) young adults. Associations between circulating miR-122 levels and parameters related to adiposity, insulin resistance, lipid profiles and hepatic enzymes were further assessed. Thirty-four miRNAs were found to be expressed differently in the sera of obese patients compared with control subjects (Pobese patients had 3.07-fold higher circulating miR-122 levels than controls (Pobesity and insulin resistance in young adults. These findings provide a better understanding regarding the role of miRNAs in adiposity and insulin sensitivity. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  6. Comparison of Insulin Pump Therapy and Multiple Daily Injections Insulin Regimen in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes During Ramadan Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamoudi, Reem; Alsubaiee, Maram; Alqarni, Ali; Saleh, Yousef; Aljaser, Saleh; Salam, Abdul; Eledrisi, Mohsen

    2017-06-01

    Fasting Ramadan carries a high risk for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Data on the optimum insulin regimen in these patients are limited. To compare glucose profiles in patients with T1DM who use continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) compared with those who use multiple daily injections (MDI) insulin regimen during Ramadan fast. The primary outcome was rates of hypoglycemia. Other outcomes included glycemic control, number of days needed to break fasting, and acute glycemic complications. Patients with T1DM who were on CSII or MDI and decided to fast Ramadan were recruited. Glucose data collected using self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) were compared in the two groups, CSII and MDI, and glucose control was assessed by measuring serum fructosamine levels. A total of 156 patients were recruited, 61 on CSII and 95 on MDI. There was no difference in the rate of mild hypoglycemia <4.4 mmol/L (<80 mg/dL) (8.6% ± 6.1% in the CSII group and 9.85% ± 9.34% in the MDI group, P = 0.96). The mean rate of severe hypoglycemia <2.7 mmol/L (<50 mg/dL) was also not different in both groups (0.99% ± 1.7% in the CSII group compared to 1.7% ± 4.7% in the MDI group, P = 0.23). There was no difference in glycemic control as measured by fructosamine levels or the number of days that patients have to stop fasting. Glucose variability was significantly better in CSII group (SMBG; standard deviation [SD] 66.9 ± 15.3 vs. 76.9 ± 29.9, P = 0.02) (CGM; SD 68.1 ± 19.6 vs. 78.7 ± 24.9, P = 0.04). No diabetic ketoacidosis was reported in either group. In patients with T1DM who fast Ramadan, there was no difference in rates of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia between CSII and MDI. However, CSII was associated with less glucose variability.

  7. Transcriptomic and metabolomic profiling of chicken adipose tissue in response to insulin neutralization and fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Bo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Domestic broiler chickens rapidly accumulate adipose tissue due to intensive genetic selection for rapid growth and are naturally hyperglycemic and insulin resistant, making them an attractive addition to the suite of rodent models used for studies of obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. Furthermore, chicken adipose tissue is considered as poorly sensitive to insulin and lipolysis is under glucagon control. Excessive fat accumulation is also an economic and environmental concern for the broiler industry due to the loss of feed efficiency and excessive nitrogen wasting, as well as a negative trait for consumers who are increasingly conscious of dietary fat intake. Understanding the control of avian adipose tissue metabolism would both enhance the utility of chicken as a model organism for human obesity and insulin resistance and highlight new approaches to reduce fat deposition in commercial chickens. Results We combined transcriptomics and metabolomics to characterize the response of chicken adipose tissue to two energy manipulations, fasting and insulin deprivation in the fed state. Sixteen to 17 day-old commercial broiler chickens (ISA915 were fed ad libitum, fasted for five hours, or fed but deprived of insulin by injections of anti-insulin serum. Pair-wise contrasts of expression data identified a total of 2016 genes that were differentially expressed after correction for multiple testing, with the vast majority of differences due to fasting (1780 genes. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analyses indicated that a short term fast impacted expression of genes in a broad selection of pathways related to metabolism, signaling and adipogenesis. The effects of insulin neutralization largely overlapped with the response to fasting, but with more modest effects on adipose tissue metabolism. Tissue metabolomics indicated unique effects of insulin on amino acid metabolism. Conclusions Collectively, these data provide a foundation

  8. Elevation of serum insulin concentration during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies leads to similar activation of insulin receptor kinase in skeletal muscle of subjects with and without NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, H H; Vestergaard, H; Kotzke, G

    1995-01-01

    The role of skeletal muscle insulin receptor kinase in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) was investigated. Muscle biopsies from 13 patients with NIDDM and 10 control subjects at fasting serum insulin concentrations and approximately 1,000 pmol/l steady-state serum...... insulin during euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps were immediately frozen. The biopsies were then solubilized, and the receptors were immobilized to anti-insulin receptor antibody-coated microwells. Receptor kinase and binding activities were consecutively measured in these wells. The increase in serum...... and control groups, respectively). Moreover, by selecting only the receptors that bound to anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, we found similar hyperinsulinemia-induced increases of this receptor fraction and its kinase activity in both study groups. In vitro activation of the immobilized receptors with 2 mmol...

  9. Knockdown of angiopoietin-like 2 mimics the benefits of intermittent fasting on insulin responsiveness and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Cécile; Pinçon, Anthony; Bélanger, Alexandre Maxime; Luo, Xiaoyan; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; de Montgolfier, Olivia; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Thorin, Éric

    2018-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like 2 (ANGPTL2) is an inflammatory adipokine linking obesity to insulin resistance. Intermittent fasting, on the other hand, is a lifestyle intervention able to prevent obesity and diabetes but difficult to implement and maintain. Our objectives were to characterize a link between ANGPTL2 and intermittent fasting and to investigate whether the knockdown of ANGPTL2 reproduces the benefits of intermittent fasting on weight gain and insulin responsiveness in knockdown and wild-type littermates mice. Intermittent fasting, access to food ad libitum once every other day, was initiated at the age of three months and maintained for four months. Intermittent fasting decreased by 63% (p fasting improved insulin sensitivity (p fasting regimen: insulin sensitivity and weight gain were identical, while intermittent fasting had no additional impact on these parameters in knockdown mice. Energy intake was similar between both wild-type fed intermittent fasting and ANGPTL2 knockdown mice fed ad libitum, suggesting that intermittent fasting and knockdown of ANGPTL2 equally lower feeding efficiency. These results suggest that the reduction of ANGPTL2 could be a useful and promising strategy to prevent obesity and insulin resistance, although further investigation of the mechanisms linking ANGPTL2 and intermittent fasting is warranted. Impact statement Intermittent fasting is an efficient diet pattern to prevent weight gain and improve insulin sensitivity. It is, however, a difficult regimen to follow and compliance is expected to be very low. In this work, we demonstrate that knockdown of ANGPTL2 in mice fed ad libitum mimics the beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on weight gain and insulin sensitivity in wild-type mice. ANGPTL2 is a cytokine positively associated with fat mass in humans, which inactivation in mice improves resistance to a high-fat metabolic challenge. This study provides a novel pathway by which IF acts to limit obesity despite equivalent

  10. Dietary fiber and associations with adiposity and fasting insulin among college students with plausible dietary reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd-Williams, Courtney E; Strother, Myra L; Kelly, Louise A; Huang, Terry T K

    2009-09-01

    We examined dietary fiber intake, food sources of dietary fiber, and relation of dietary fiber to body composition and metabolic parameters in college students with plausible dietary reports. Students (18-24 y of age) provided data on anthropometry, fasting blood chemistries, and body composition (bioelectric impedance). Diet and physical activity were assessed with the Diet History Questionnaire and the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Plausible dietary reporters were identified (+/-1 SD cutoffs for reported energy intake as a percentage of predicted energy requirement). Multiple regression analyses were conducted with the total (n = 298) and plausible (n = 123) samples, adjusting for age, race, sex, smoking status, physical activity, energy intake, and fat-free mass (where applicable). Food sources of dietary fiber were similar in men and women. In the plausible sample compared with the total sample, dietary fiber was more strongly associated with fat mass (beta = -0.24, P fasting insulin (beta = -0.15, P fasting insulin and fat mass in men and women and inversely related to percentage of body fat, body mass index, and waist circumference in men only (P fasting insulin levels in men and women and consistently associated with adiposity measurements in men.

  11. Glucose uptake in human brown adipose tissue is impaired upon fasting-induced insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Mark J W; Wierts, Roel; Hoeks, Joris; Gemmink, Anne; Brans, Boudewijn; Mottaghy, Felix M; Schrauwen, Patrick; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-03-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has recently emerged as a potential target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, owing to its capacity to actively clear glucose from the circulation—at least upon cold exposure. The effects of insulin resistance on the capacity of human BAT to take up glucose are unknown. Prolonged fasting is known to induce insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in order to spare glucose for the brain. We studied the effect of fasting-induced insulin resistance on the capacity of BAT to take up glucose during cold exposure as well as on cold-stimulated thermogenesis. BAT glucose uptake was assessed by means of cold-stimulated dynamic 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ([(18)F]FDG-PET/CT) imaging. We show that a 54 h fasting period markedly decreases both cold-induced BAT glucose uptake and nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) during cold stimulation. In vivo molecular imaging and modelling revealed that the reduction of glucose uptake in BAT was due to impaired cellular glucose uptake and not due to decreased supply. Interestingly, decreased BAT glucose uptake upon fasting was related to a decrease in core temperature during cold exposure, pointing towards a role for BAT in maintaining normothermia in humans. Cold-stimulated glucose uptake in BAT is strongly reduced upon prolonged fasting. When cold-stimulated glucose uptake in BAT is also reduced under other insulin-resistant states, such as diabetes, cold-induced activation of BAT may not be a valid way to improve glucose clearance by BAT under such conditions. www.trialregister.nl NTR3523 FUNDING: This work was supported by the EU FP7 project DIABAT (HEALTH-F2-2011-278373 to WDvML) and by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (TOP 91209037 to WDvML).

  12. The GCKR rs780094 polymorphism is associated with elevated fasting serum triacylglycerol, reduced fasting and OGTT-related insulinaemia, and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparsø, T; Andersen, G; Nielsen, T

    2007-01-01

    release (p = 3 x 10(-6)), reduced homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (p = 0.0004), WHO-defined dyslipidaemia (p = 6 x 10(-9)) and a modestly decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (p = 0.01). Significantly increased fasting serum insulin concentrations were demonstrated when analysing the GCK...

  13. Mechanisms for increased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calorie-restricted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Bhat, Abhijit D; Sequea, Donel A; Ho, Steve; Croff, Kelsey K; Sajan, Mini P; Farese, Robert V; Cartee, Gregory D

    2011-06-01

    Calorie restriction [CR; ~65% of ad libitum (AL) intake] improves insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. We aimed to elucidate the effects of CR on 1) processes that regulate Akt phosphorylation [insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine phosphorylation, IR substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (IRS-PI3K) activity, and Akt binding to regulatory proteins (heat shock protein 90, Appl1, protein phosphatase 2A)]; 2) Akt substrate of 160-kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on key phosphorylation sites; and 3) atypical PKC (aPKC) activity. Isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from AL or CR (6 mo duration) 9-mo-old male F344BN rats were incubated with 0, 1.2, or 30 nM insulin and 2-deoxy-[(3)H]glucose. Some CR effects were independent of insulin dose or muscle type: CR caused activation of Akt (Thr(308) and Ser(473)) and GU in both muscles at both insulin doses without CR effects on IRS1-PI3K, Akt-PP2A, or Akt-Appl1. Several muscle- and insulin dose-specific CR effects were revealed. Akt-HSP90 binding was increased in the epitrochlearis; AS160 phosphorylation (Ser(588) and Thr(642)) was greater for CR epitrochlearis at 1.2 nM insulin; and IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity were greater for CR in both muscles with 30 nM insulin. On the basis of these data, our working hypothesis for improved insulin-stimulated GU with CR is as follows: 1) elevated Akt phosphorylation is fundamental, regardless of muscle or insulin dose; 2) altered Akt binding to regulatory proteins (HSP90 and unidentified Akt partners) is involved in the effects of CR on Akt phosphorylation; 3) Akt effects on GU depend on muscle- and insulin dose-specific elevation in phosphorylation of Akt substrates, including, but not limited to, AS160; and 4) greater IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity may contribute at higher insulin doses.

  14. Mechanisms for increased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake in fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of calorie-restricted rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B.; Bhat, Abhijit D.; Sequea, Donel A.; Ho, Steve; Croff, Kelsey K.; Sajan, Mini P.; Farese, Robert V.

    2011-01-01

    Calorie restriction [CR; ∼65% of ad libitum (AL) intake] improves insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. We aimed to elucidate the effects of CR on 1) processes that regulate Akt phosphorylation [insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine phosphorylation, IR substrate 1-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (IRS-PI3K) activity, and Akt binding to regulatory proteins (heat shock protein 90, Appl1, protein phosphatase 2A)]; 2) Akt substrate of 160-kDa (AS160) phosphorylation on key phosphorylation sites; and 3) atypical PKC (aPKC) activity. Isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from AL or CR (6 mo duration) 9-mo-old male F344BN rats were incubated with 0, 1.2, or 30 nM insulin and 2-deoxy-[3H]glucose. Some CR effects were independent of insulin dose or muscle type: CR caused activation of Akt (Thr308 and Ser473) and GU in both muscles at both insulin doses without CR effects on IRS1-PI3K, Akt-PP2A, or Akt-Appl1. Several muscle- and insulin dose-specific CR effects were revealed. Akt-HSP90 binding was increased in the epitrochlearis; AS160 phosphorylation (Ser588 and Thr642) was greater for CR epitrochlearis at 1.2 nM insulin; and IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity were greater for CR in both muscles with 30 nM insulin. On the basis of these data, our working hypothesis for improved insulin-stimulated GU with CR is as follows: 1) elevated Akt phosphorylation is fundamental, regardless of muscle or insulin dose; 2) altered Akt binding to regulatory proteins (HSP90 and unidentified Akt partners) is involved in the effects of CR on Akt phosphorylation; 3) Akt effects on GU depend on muscle- and insulin dose-specific elevation in phosphorylation of Akt substrates, including, but not limited to, AS160; and 4) greater IR phosphorylation and aPKC activity may contribute at higher insulin doses. PMID:21386065

  15. Saccharin Increases Fasting Blood Glucose but Not Liver Insulin Resistance in Comparison to a High Fructose-Fed Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avshalom Leibowitz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent data indicate that artificial sweeteners (AS may have deleterious effects on glucose metabolism. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of AS and the effects of a high fructose diet (HFrD on glucose metabolism and insulin resistance (IR in Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. SD rats were fed either regular chow, chow with saccharin (Sac (0.1 mg/mL placed in their water, or HFrD for seven weeks. Glucose, insulin, and triglycerides (Tg levels were measured upon completion. A homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR index was used to determine insulin resistance. The liver was stained to detect signs of a fatty liver. Hepatic mRNA expression of glucose metabolism regulation genes, Srepb-1c (sterol regulatory element binding protein and ChREB (α & β (carbohydrate response element binding protein, as well as other glycolytic and lipogenic genes including glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc, were considered IR markers. Both HFrD and Sac significantly increased fasting blood glucose levels compare to the control (140 ± 5 and 137 ± 6 vs. 118 ± 3 mg/dL, respectively, p < 0.05. However, only HFrD increased insulin secretion (0.99 ± 0.12 vs. 0.7 ± 0.1 and 0.6 ± 0.1 ug/L, Tg levels (420 ± 43 vs. 152 ± 20 and 127 ± 13 mg/dL, and the HOMA-IR index (3.4 ± 0.4 vs. 2.3 ± 0.36 and 2.13 ± 0.3 (HFrD vs. control and sac, p < 0.05. Fatty liver changes were only observed in HFrD fed rats. The expression of ChREB β, Srepb-1c, and G6pc mRNA were only significantly elevated (between 2–10 times folds, p < 0.05 in HFrD fed rats. Sac may increase fasting blood glucose but has no effect on liver insulin resistance.

  16. Insulin elevates leptin secretion and mRNA levels via cyclic AMP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes deprived of glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Tsubai

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Insulin alone stimulates leptin secretion and elevates leptin mRNA levels via cAMP under the lack of glucose metabolism, while glucose is a significant and ambivalent effector on the insulin effects of leptin.

  17. Lower waist circumference in mildly-stunted adolescents is associated with elevated insulin concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Ana Paula Grotti; Santos, Carla Danusa da Luz; Martins, Vinicius J B; Albuquerque, Maria Paula; Fachim, Mariana B; Sawaya, Ana Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Augmented waist circumference (WC) is associated with non-communicable diseases and could represent a valuable marker in screening for metabolic dysfunctions in subjects with insufficient linear growth. The objective of the present study was to determine whether biochemical and hemodynamic parameters and waist circumference vary between mildly-stunted and non-stunted adolescents from impoverished communities of São Paulo, Brazil. The cross-sectional study involved 206 subjects, aged between 9 and 19 years and living in impoverished areas of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample population was divided according to height-for-age Z-score (HAZ) into stunted (-1 > HAZ ≥ -2) and non-stunted (HAZ ≥ -1) groups, and was sub-divided according to gender. Logistic regression analysis was employed to compare individuals with elevated (> 75th percentile) insulin concentrations. The receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine WC cut-off points that could be used to identify stunted and non-stunted individuals with elevated insulin concentrations. WC cut-off points of 58.25cm and 67.2cm allowed for correct classification of 90.7% of stunted and 88.7% of non-stunted individuals in the studied population. While the sensitivity of the model was high for stunted and non-stunted subjects (98.8% and 97.2%, respectively), the specificity was modest (57.1% and 41.2%, respectively). The results presented herein suggest that an increase in plasma insulin is one of the primary metabolic modifications in stunted individuals, and that this alteration could be identified at a lower WC cut-off point than in non-stunted counterparts. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Lower waist circumference in mildly-stunted adolescents is associated with elevated insulin concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Grotti Clemente

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Augmented waist circumference (WC is associated with non-communicable diseases and could represent a valuable marker in screening for metabolic dysfunctions in subjects with insufficient linear growth. The objective of the present study was to determine whether bio-chemical and hemodynamic parameters and waist circumference vary between mildly-stunted and non-stunted adolescents from impoverished communities of São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 206 subjects, aged between 9 and 19 years and living in impoverished areas of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample population was divided according to height-for-age Z-score (HAZ into stunted (−1 > HAZ ≥ −2 and non-stunted (HAZ ≥ −1 groups, and was sub-divided according to gender. Logistic regression analysis was employed to compare individuals with elevated (> 75th percentile insulin concentrations. The receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed to determine WC cut-off points that could be used to identify stunted and non-stunted individuals with elevated insulin concentrations. Results: WC cut-off points of 58.25 cm and 67.2 cm allowed for correct classification of 90.7% of stunted and 88.7% of non-stunted individuals in the studied population. While the sensitivity of the model was high for stunted and non-stunted subjects (98.8% and 97.2%, respectively, the specificity was modest (57.1% and 41.2%, respectively. Conclusion: The results presented herein suggest that an increase in plasma insulin is one of the primary metabolic modifications in stunted individuals, and that this alteration could be identified at a lower WC cut-off point than in non-stunted counterparts.

  19. Fasting time duration modulates the onset of insulin-induced hypoglycemic seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchaimani, Vigneshwaran; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan Amirthalingam; Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Afrin, Mst Rejina; Sreedhar, Remya; Harima, Meilei; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Miyashita, Shizuka; Nakamura, Takashi; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Masahiko; Ueno, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Kenichi

    2016-09-01

    Fasting (48h) in mice causes resistance to insulin-induced hypoglycemic seizures (IIHS) but in rats fasting (14-16h) predisposes IIHS. So we suspect the duration of fasting may possibly affect the onset of seizures and in this study, we investigated the IIHS by administering 8 Units (U) insulin (INS)/k.g., intraperitoneally to 8 weeks old male C57BL6/J mice. The mice were divided into group 1 (non-fasted), group 2 (6h fasted) and group 3 (24h fasted) and we administered the 8U INS. The first behavioral hypoglycemic seizure symptoms such as jump, clonus or barrel rotations considered as seizure onset and we analyzed the blood glucose level (BGL) and serum beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) level. The time of first seizure onset in group 1 was 109.7±4.3min, group 2 was 46.50±3.9min and group 3 was 165.4±13.26min. The seizure onset time in group 2 was significantly decreased compared to group 1. The seizure onset time in group 3 was significantly increased compared to group 1 and group 2. The decreased BGL after INS administration was correlated with the seizure onset time in group 1 and group 2 but not in group 3. The BHB level in group 3 was significantly higher compared to group 1 and 2. Our data show that the fasting time duration significantly modulates the onset of hypoglycemic seizures. The opposite effect of 6h or 24h fasting time duration is likely caused by different BHB levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Comparison of Two Methods of Exercise (intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on Fasting Sugar, Insulin and Insulin Resistance in Women with Mellitus Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Bazyar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Exercise is an important component of health and an integral approach to the management of diabetes mellitus. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of intense interval training and concurrent resistance- endurance training on fasting sugar, insulin and insulin resistance in women with mellitus diabetes.   Methods: Fifty-two overweight female diabetic type 2 patients (aged 45-60 years old with fasting blood glucose≥ 126 mg/dl were selected to participate in the present study. Participants were assigned to intense interval training group (N=17, concurrent resistance- endurance training group (N=17 and control group (N=18. The exercises incorporated 10 weeks of concurrent resistance- endurance training and intense interval training. Fasting blood sugar, serum insulin concentrations levels were measured. Concurrent training group trained eight weeks, three times a week of endurance training at 60% of maximum heart rate (MHR and two resistance training sessions per week with 70% of one repetition maximum (1-RM. Intense interval training group trained for eight weeks, three sessions per week for 4 to 10 repeats Wingate test on the ergometer 30s performed with maximum effort. The control group did no systematic exercise. At the end of experiment 42 subjects were succeed and completed the study period, and 10 subjects were removed due to illness and absence in the exercise sessions. Fasting blood sugar and insulin levels 24 hours before and 48 hours after the last training session was measured.   Results: The findings indicated that in periodic fasting, the blood sugar in intensive training group had a marked decrease (p= 0.000 however, the fasting blood sugar of exercise and power stamina groups reduced significantly (p=0.062. The results showed no significant difference between the groups (171/0 p =0.171. Fasting insulin (p <0.001 and insulin resistance (0001/0 = p=0.001 in periodic intensive training group were

  1. Fasting Ghrelin Levels Are Decreased in Obese Subjects and Are Significantly Related With Insulin Resistance and Body Mass Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Papandreou

    2017-10-01

    CONCLUSION: Obese subjects have low fasting ghrelin levels that they are significantly related to insulin resistance and body mass index. More prospective studies are needed to establish the role of ghrelin in the pathogenesis of human obesity.

  2. ELEVATED LIPID PEROXIDATION AND DNA OXIDATION IN NERVE FROM DIABETIC RATS: EFFECTS OF ALDOSE REDUCTASE INHIBITION, INSULIN AND NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Joice M.; Jolivalt, Corinne G.; Ramos, Khara M.; Gregory, Joshua A.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Mizisin, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of treatment with an aldose reductase inhibitor, insulin or select neurotrophic factors on the generation of oxidative damage in peripheral nerve. Rats were either treated with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce insulin-deficient diabetes or fed with a diet containing 40% D-galactose to promote hexose metabolism by aldose reductase. Initial time-course studies showed that lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation were significantly elevated in sciatic nerve after 1 week or 2...

  3. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  4. A persistent increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscles after a single exercise session by old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yuanyuan; Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Castorena, Carlos M; Cartee, Gregory D

    2013-06-01

    Exercise has been demonstrated to enhance subsequent insulin-stimulated glucose uptake (GU) by predominantly type II (fast-twitch) muscle of old rats, but previous research has not evaluated exercise effects on GU by type I (slow-twitch) muscle from old rats. Accordingly, we studied male Fischer 344/Brown Norway rats (24 months old) and determined GU (0, 100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) of isolated soleus (predominantly type I) and epitrochlearis (predominantly type II) muscles after one exercise session. Epitrochlearis (100, 200, and 5,000 μU/ml insulin) and soleus (100 and 200 μU/ml insulin) GU were greater at 3-h postexercise vs. age-matched sedentary controls. Insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation (Tyr1162/1163) was unaltered by exercise in either muscle. Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Ser473 and Thr308 with 100 and 200 μU/ml, respectively) and soleus (Ser473 with 200 μU/ml). AS160 phosphorylation (pAS160) was greater for exercised vs. sedentary rats in the epitrochlearis (Thr642 with 100 μU/ml), but not the soleus. Exercised vs. sedentary rats did not differ for total protein abundance of insulin receptor, Akt, AS160, or GLUT4 in either muscle. These results demonstrate that both predominantly type I and type II muscles from old rats are susceptible to exercise-induced improvement in insulin-mediated GU by mechanisms that are independent of enhanced insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation or altered abundance of important signaling proteins or GLUT4. Exercise-induced elevation in pAkt, and possibly pAS160, may contribute to this effect in the epitrochlearis of old rats, but other mechanisms are likely important for the soleus.

  5. Effect of home-based exercise intervention on fasting insulin and Adipocytokines in colorectal cancer survivors: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Kim, Ji-Young; Kim, Dong-Il; Kang, Dong-Woo; Park, Ji-Hye; Ahn, Ki-Yong; In Yang, Hyuk; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Yun Ho; Lee, Ji-Won; Chu, Sang-Hui; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Jones, Lee W; Kim, Nam-Kyu; Jeon, Justin Y

    2017-11-01

    Elevated circulating insulin is associated with increased risk of recurrence and cancer mortality in early-stage colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted a randomized controlled trial to determine the effect of a 12-week home-based exercise program on fasting insulin, adipocytokines, and physical function in CRC survivors. One hundred and twenty-three stage II-III CRC patients were randomly assigned to either a home-based exercise (n=62) or standard care control group (n=61) for 12weeks. Home-based exercise consisted of aerobic and resistance training, with a goal of obtaining ≥18 metabolic equivalent task (MET)-h/wk. Participants in the exercise group were instructed to participate in >18MET-h/wk. of aerobic and resistance exercise while the participants in the control group were asked to maintain their usual daily activity. The primary outcome was fasting insulin levels. Secondary outcomes were adiponectin, TNF-α levels and 6min walk distance from baseline to post-intervention. After the 12-weeks, moderate-vigorous physical activity participation increased from 9.1±14.7MET-h/wk. to 26.6±21.7MET-h/wk. in the exercise group, with no change in the control group (pinsulin level decreased by 1μU/ml (6.0±3.9 vs. 5.0±3.5, p=0.009) in the exercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.022 for group and time interaction). A similar trend was observed in TNF-α (p=0.030 for group and time interaction). Six minute walk distance increased by 25.2m in the exercise group with no change in the control group (p=0.061 for group and time interaction). The 12week home-based exercise program increased level of physical activity and decreased circulating insulin levels in CRC survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Endurance Exercise Training in the Fasted State on Muscle Biochemistry and Metabolism in Healthy Subjects: Can These Effects be of Particular Clinical Benefit to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Insulin-Resistant Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Dominique; De Strijcker, Dorien; Calders, Patrick

    2017-03-01

    Exercise training intervention is a cornerstone in the care of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance (IR), and it is pursued in order to optimize exercise interventions for these patients. In this regard, the nutritional state of patients during exercise (being in the fed or fasted state) can be of particular interest. The aim of the present review is to describe the impact of endurance exercise (training) in the fasted versus fed state on parameters of muscle biochemistry and metabolism linked to glycemic control or insulin sensitivity in healthy subjects. From these data it can then be deduced whether exercise training in the fasted state may be relevant to patients with T2DM or IR. In healthy subjects, acute endurance exercise in the fasted state is accompanied by lower blood insulin and elevated blood free fatty acid concentrations, stable blood glucose concentrations (in the first 60-90 min), superior intramyocellular triacylglycerol oxidation and whole-body lipolysis, and muscle glycogen preservation. Long-term exercise training in the fasted state in healthy subjects is associated with greater improvements in insulin sensitivity, basal muscle fat uptake capacity, and oxidation. Therefore, promising results of exercise (training) in the fasted state have been found in healthy subjects on parameters of muscle biochemistry and metabolism linked to insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Whether exercise training intervention in which exercise sessions are organized in the fasted state may be more effective in improving insulin sensitivity or glycemic control in T2DM patients and insulin-resistant individuals warrants investigation.

  7. Increased recovery rates of phosphocreatine and inorganic phosphate after isometric contraction in oxidative muscle fibres and elevated hepatic insulin resistance in homozygous carriers of the A-allele of FTO rs9939609

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Louise Groth; Brøns, Charlotte; Jacobsen, Stine

    2009-01-01

    diabetes. Methods. Forty-six young men underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp with excision of skeletal muscle biopsies, an intravenous glucose tolerance test, (31)phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy and 24-hour whole body metabolism was measured in a respiratory chamber. Results. The FTO rs......9939609 A-allele was associated with elevated fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin, hepatic insulin resistance and shorter recovery halftimes of phosphocreatine (PCr) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) after exercise in a primarily type I muscle. These relationships - except for fasting insulin - remained...... or mitochondrially encoded genes in skeletal muscle during rest. Conclusion. Increased energy efficiency - and potentially increased mitochondrial coupling - as suggested by faster recovery rates of PCr and Pi in oxidative muscle fibres may contribute to the increased risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes...

  8. High normal fasting glucose level in obese youth: a marker for insulin resistance and beta cell dysregulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, G

    2010-06-01

    A high but normal fasting plasma glucose level in adults is a risk factor for future development of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether normal fasting plasma glucose levels (<5.60 mmol\\/l) are associated with decreases in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, as well as an adverse cardiovascular profile in obese youth.

  9. The role of liver fat and insulin resistance as determinants of plasma aminotransferase elevation in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximos, Maryann; Bril, Fernando; Portillo Sanchez, Paola; Lomonaco, Romina; Orsak, Beverly; Biernacki, Diane; Suman, Amitabh; Weber, Michelle; Cusi, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Plasma aminotransferases (aspartate aminotransferase [AST] and alanine aminotransferase [ALT]) are usually increased in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the factors behind their elevation remain unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the role of insulin resistance (IR) and liver triglyceride content in relation to histology in patients with NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with normal or elevated ALT levels. To this end, we enrolled 440 patients, divided into three groups: no NAFLD (n = 60); NAFLD with normal ALT (n = 165); and NAFLD with elevated ALT (n = 215). We measured: (1) liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS); (2) severity of liver disease by biopsy (n = 293); and (3) insulin sensitivity in liver, muscle, and adipose tissue by a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with 3-(3)H-glucose. Patients with NAFLD and elevated ALT, even when well matched for body mass index to those with normal ALT, had worse adipose tissue insulin resistance (ATIR; P insulin resistance. Similar results were found when only patients with NASH were compared: both ATIR (P management. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. PPARγ agonists diminish serum VEGF elevation in diet-induced insulin resistant SD rats and ZDF rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Baichun; Lin Peiyuan; Carrick, Kevin M.; McNulty, Judi A.; Clifton, Lisa G.; Winegar, Deborah A.; Strum, Jay C.; Stimpson, Stephen A.; Pahel, Greg L.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists on serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in diet-induced insulin resistant SD rats and ZDF rats. SD rats fed a high fat/sucrose diet showed increases in serum insulin and VEGF (both p < 0.01). Treatment with a PPARγ agonist GI262570 normalized the diet-elevated insulin and VEGF (both p < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between serum insulin and VEGF (p < 0.05) in SD rats. ZDF rats had higher serum glucose, insulin, and VEGF than Zucker lean rats (all p < 0.01). Treatment of ZDF rats with PPARγ agonist pioglitazone decreased serum glucose and VEGF (both p < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between glucose and VEGF in ZDF rats (p < 0.05). In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, GI262570 did not affect insulin-stimulated VEGF secretion. These studies demonstrated that hyperinsulinemia in SD rats and hyperglycemia in ZDF rats were associated with increased serum VEGF; PPARγ agonists normalized serum insulin, glucose, and VEGF, but did not affect VEGF secretion in vitro

  11. Insulin Preconditioning Elevates p-Akt and Cardiac Contractility after Reperfusion in the Isolated Ischemic Rat Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamaki Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin induces cardioprotection partly via an antiapoptotic effect. However, the optimal timing of insulin administration for the best quality cardioprotection remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that insulin administered prior to ischemia provides better cardioprotection than insulin administration after ischemia. Isolated rat hearts were prepared using Langendorff method and divided into three groups. The Pre-Ins group (Pre-Ins received 0.5 U/L insulin prior to 15 min no-flow ischemia for 20 min followed by 20 min of reperfusion. The Post-Ins group (Post-Ins received 0.5 U/L insulin during the reperfusion period only. The control group (Control was perfused with KH buffer throughout. The maximum of left ventricular derivative of pressure development (dP/dt(max was recorded continuously. Measurements of TNF-α and p-Akt in each time point were assayed by ELISA. After reperfusion, dP/dt(max in Pre-Ins was elevated, compared with Post-Ins at 10 minutes after reperfusion and Control at all-time points. TNF-α levels at 5 minutes after reperfusion in the Pre-Ins were lower than the others. After 5 minutes of reperfusion, p-Akt was elevated in Pre-Ins compared with the other groups. Insulin administration prior to ischemia provides better cardioprotection than insulin administration only at reperfusion. TNF-α suppression is possibly mediated via p-Akt leading to a reduction in contractile myocardial dysfunction.

  12. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose and insulin modify dietary weight loss success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Ritz, Christian; Blaak, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Which diet is optimal for weight loss and maintenance remains controversial and implies that no diet fits all patients.Objective: We studied concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) as prognostic markers for successful weight loss and maintenance through...... diets with different glycemic loads or different fiber and whole-grain content, assessed in 3 randomized trials of overweight participants.Design: After an 8-wk weight loss, participants in the DiOGenes (Diet, Obesity, and Genes) trial consumed ad libitum for 26 wk a diet with either a high or a low...... in the NUGENOB (Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Human Obesity) trial consumed a hypocaloric low-fat and high-carbohydrate or a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet for 10 wk. On the basis of FPG before treatment, participants were categorized as normoglycemic (FPG

  13. Elevated C-peptide and insulin predict increased risk of colorectal adenomas in normal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, Adriana C; Keku, Temitope O; Lund, Pauline Kay; Hoyo, Cathrine; Galanko, Joseph; Burcal, Lauren; Holston, Rachel; Massa, Berri; Omofoye, Oluwaseun; Sandler, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Lower concentrations of the insulin–like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and elevated concentrations of insulin or C-peptide have been associated with an increase in colorectal cancer risk (CRC). However few studies have evaluated IGFBP-1 and C-peptide in relation to adenomatous polyps, the only known precursor for CRC. Between November 2001 and December 2002, we examined associations between circulating concentrations of insulin, C-peptide, IGFBP-1 and apoptosis among 190 individuals with one or more adenomatous polyps and 488 with no adenomatous polyps using logistic regression models. Individuals with the highest concentrations of C-peptide were more likely to have adenomas (OR = 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-4.0) than those with the lowest concentrations; associations that appeared to be stronger in men (OR = 4.4, 95% CI 1.7-10.9) than women. Individuals with high insulin concentrations also had a higher risk of adenomas (OR = 3.5, 95% CI 1.7-7.4), whereas higher levels of IGFBP-1 were associated with a reduced risk of adenomas in men only (OR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.7). Overweight and obese individuals with higher C-peptide levels (>1 st Q) were at increased risk for lower apoptosis index (OR = 2.5, 95% CI 0.9-7.1), an association that remained strong in overweight and obese men (OR = 6.3, 95% CI 1.0-36.7). Higher levels of IGFBP-1 in overweight and obese individuals were associated with a reduced risk of low apoptosis (OR = 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-1.0). Associations between these peptides and the apoptosis index in overweight and obese individuals, suggest that the mechanism by which C-peptide could induce adenomas may include its anti-apoptotic properties. This study suggests that hyperinsulinemia and IGF hormones predict adenoma risk, and that outcomes associated with colorectal carcinogenesis maybe modified by gender

  14. Effect of insulin degludec versus insulin glargine on glycemic control and daily fasting blood glucose variability in insulin-naïve Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes: I'D GOT trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Chiba, Yasuko; Sato, Minoru; Fujita, Nobuya; Takada, Yoshihisa; Murano, Shunichi; Kuroda, Hisamoto

    2017-08-01

    Insulin degludec (IDeg) is an ultra-long-acting insulin that has a smooth time/action profile over more than 42h. The present study compared the effects of IDeg and insulin glargine (IGlar) on HbA1c reduction and on within-subject day-to-day variability of fasting blood glucose (FBG) in insulin-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes. Eligible patients were randomly allocated at a 3:1 ratio to receive once-daily IDeg (n=31) or IGlar (n=12). Both basal insulins were administered before breakfast and titrated to achieve a target FBG type 2 diabetes. The day-to-day variation of FBG was smaller in patients receiving IDeg. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Ethanolic Extract of Butea monosperma Leaves Elevate Blood Insulin Level in Type 2 Diabetic Rats, Stimulate Insulin Secretion in Isolated Rat Islets, and Enhance Hepatic Glycogen Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Bin Samad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We measured a vast range of parameters, in an attempt to further elucidate previously claimed antihyperglycemic activity of Butea monosperma. Our study clearly negates the possibility of antidiabetic activity by inhibited gastrointestinal enzyme action or by reduced glucose absorption. Reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose level was reconfirmed (P<0.05. Improved serum lipid profile via reduced low density lipoprotein (LDL, cholesterol, triglycerides (TG, and increased high density lipoprotein (HDL was also reestablished (P<0.05. Significant insulin secretagogue activity of B. monosperma was found in serum insulin assay of B. monosperma treated type 2 diabetic rats (P<0.01. This was further ascertained by our study on insulin secretion on isolated rat islets (P<0.05. Improved sensitivity of glucose was shown by the significant increase in hepatic glycogen deposition (P<0.05. Hence, we concluded that antihyperglycemic activity of B. monosperma was mediated by enhanced insulin secretion and enhanced glycogen formation in the liver.

  16. Effects of insulin-like growth factor I or human growth hormone in fasted rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, K; Hizuka, N; Takano, K; Horikawa, R; Sukegawa, I; Demura, H; Shizume, K

    1992-03-01

    To study the effect of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) treatment on growth and metabolism in fasted rats and compare it with the effect of human growth hormone (hGH), we infused 120 micrograms/ml IGF-I continuously or injected 200 micrograms hGH twice a day in fasted rats. After a 3 1/2-day administration of IGF-I in fasted rats, the body weights, kidney, spleen and adrenal gland weights were greater than those for untreated fasted rats (control). The body weights and the organ weights in hGH treated rats did not differ from those in control rats. Serum IGF-I levels in control, hGH treated and IGF-I treated rats were 64.0 +/- 6.1, 107.5 +/- 6.9 and 129.8 +/- 6.3 ng/ml, respectively, which were significantly different from each other. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were 13.9 +/- 1.1 ng/ml in IGF-I treated rats, which were significantly lower than those of control rats. Human GH treatment did not change BUN but affected nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) and triglyceride. In IGF-I treated rats three-day urinary excretion of nitrogen and creatine were 163.5 +/- 14.6 mg and 9.53 +/- 1.53 mg, which were significantly less than those in control rats. These data indicate that IGF-I infusion inhibits body weight loss and catabolism in fasted rats and might be a useful therapy in catabolic conditions.

  17. "Ultra"-Fast Fracture Strength of Advanced Structural Ceramic Materials Studied at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1999-01-01

    The accurate determination of inert strength is important in reliable life prediction of structural ceramic components. At ambient temperature, the inert strength of a brittle material is typically regarded as free of the effects of slow crack growth due to stress corrosion. Therefore, the inert strength can be determined either by eliminating active species, especially moisture, with an appropriate inert medium, or by using a very high test rate. However, at elevated temperatures, the concept or definition of the inert strength of brittle ceramic materials is not clear, since temperature itself is a degrading environment, resulting in strength degradation through slow crack growth and/or creep. Since the mechanism to control strength is rate-dependent viscous flow, the only conceivable way to determine the inert strength at elevated temperatures is to utilize a very fast test rate that either minimizes the time for or eliminates slow crack growth. Few experimental studies have measured the elevated-temperature, inert (or "ultra"-fast fracture) strength of advanced ceramics. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, an experimental study was initiated to better understand the "ultra"-fast fracture strength behavior of advanced ceramics at elevated temperatures. Fourteen advanced ceramics - one alumina, eleven silicon nitrides, and two silicon carbides - have been tested using constant stress-rate (dynamic fatigue) testing in flexure with a series of stress rates including the "ultra"-fast stress rate of 33 000 MPa/sec with digitally controlled test frames. The results for these 14 advanced ceramics indicate that, notwithstanding possible changes in flaw populations as well as flaw configurations because of elevated temperatures, the strength at 33 000 MPa/sec approached the room-temperature strength or reached a higher value than that determined at the conventional test rate of 30 MPa/sec. On the basis of the experimental data, it can be stated that the elevated

  18. Enhanced expression of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-I in the fasted rat: the effects of insulin and growth hormone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, L J; Seneviratne, C; Moreira, P; Reid, R E

    1991-02-01

    The effect of fasting on insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) expression was examined in the rat. Food deprivation for a period of 24 h resulted in a 9.5 +/- 2.0-fold increase in hepatic IGFBP-1 mRNA abundance (P less than 0.001). An increase in circulating IGFBP-1 in sera from fasted rats was demonstrated by immunoblotting, and an increased abundance of a 30-kDa IGFBP in sera from fasted rats was apparent when [125I]IGF-I was used in ligand blotting experiments. Refeeding resulted in a prompt decline in hepatic IGFBP-1 mRNA. Administration of insulin (0.5-4 U, ip) to fasted rats resulted in profound hypoglycemia, but either increased or had no significant effect on hepatic IGFBP-1 mRNA abundance. In contrast, administration of human GH (hGH; 100 micrograms, ip) resulted in a prompt decline in hepatic IGFBP-1 mRNA, followed by a late rebound in IGFBP-1 mRNA to levels greater than those in fasted controls. Furthermore, hepatic IGFBP-1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in hGH-treated (100 micrograms every 8 h) food-deprived rats than in saline-treated food-deprived rats (2.25 +/- 1.55- vs. 8.99 +/- 3.80-fold increase; P less than 0.005). Similar changes were observed when serum IGFBP-1 was quantitated by immunoblotting. The effects of GH could not be explained by secondary hyperinsulinism, since no significant increase in insulin levels was observed in GH-treated rats. From these observations we conclude the enhanced expression of IGFBP-1 in the food-deprived rat may be a consequence of GH deficiency rather than insulin deficiency.

  19. Insulin induces a shift in lipid and primary carbon metabolites in a model of fasting-induced insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peripheral insulin resistance shifts metabolic fuel use away from carbohydrates, and towards lipids, and is most commonly associated with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, regulated insulin resistance is an evolved mechanism to preserve glucose for the brain in conditions of high demand or carbohy...

  20. Fasting levels of insulin and amylin after acute pancreatitis are associated with pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Nicola A; Pendharkar, Sayali A; Singh, Ruma G; Windsor, John A; Bhatia, Madhav; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of metabolic diseases continues to rise worldwide, with a growing recognition of metabolic dysregulation after acute inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis (AP). Adipokines and cytokines play an important role in metabolism and the course of AP, but there is a paucity of research investigating their relationship with pancreatic hormones after AP. This study aimed to explore associations between pancreatic hormones and adipokines as well as cytokines to provide insights into the pathophysiology of altered pancreatic hormone secretion following AP. A total of 83 patients previously diagnosed with AP and no prior diabetes or pre-diabetes were recruited into this cross-sectional follow up study. Fasting venous blood samples were collected to analyse a panel of pancreatic hormones and derivatives (amylin, C-peptide, glucagon, insulin, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin), adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, retinol binding protein-4, and resistin), and cytokines (interleukin-6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)). Linear regression analyses were used, and potential confounders were adjusted for in multivariate analyses. Insulin was significantly associated with IL-6 in both unadjusted and adjusted models (p = .029 and p = .040, respectively). Amylin was significantly associated with MCP-1 in the unadjusted model (p = .046), and TNF-α in unadjusted and adjusted models (p = .025 and p = .027, respectively). Insulin and amylin have a strong positive association with pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients following an episode of AP. These associations have possible relevance in the development of diabetes associated with diseases of the exocrine pancreas, providing the opportunity to develop novel treatment paradigms.

  1. French Registry on Acute ST-elevation and non ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction 2010. FAST-MI 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Michel; Cottin, Yves; Khalife, Khalife; Hammer, Laure; Goldstein, Patrick; Puymirat, Etienne; Mulak, Geneviève; Drouet, Elodie; Pace, Benoit; Schultz, Eric; Bataille, Vincent; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome

    2012-01-01

    Aim of FAST-MI 2010 To gather data on characteristics, management and outcomes of patients hospitalised for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) at the end of 2010 in France. Interventions To provide cardiologists and health authorities national and regional data on AMI management every 5 years. Setting Metropolitan France. 213 academic (n=38), community (n=110), army hospitals (n=2), private clinics (n=63), representing 76% of centres treating AMI patients. Inclusion from 1 October 2010. Population Consecutive patients included during 1 month, with a possible extension of recruitment up to one additional month (132 centres); 4169 patients included over the entire recruitment period, 3079 during the first 31 days; 249 additional patients declining participation (5.6%). Startpoints Consecutive adults with ST-elevation and non-ST-elevation AMI with symptom onset ≤48 h. Patients with AMI following cardiovascular procedures excluded. Data capture Web-based collection of 385 items (demographic, medical, biologic, management data) recorded online from source files by external research technicians; case-record forms with automatic quality checks. Centralised biology in voluntary centres to collect DNA samples and serum. Long-term follow-up organised centrally with interrogation of municipal registry offices, patients' physicians, and direct contact with the patients. Data quality Data management in Toulouse University. Statistical analyses: Université Paris Descartes, Université de Toulouse, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 06, Paris. Endpoints and linkages to other data In-hospital events; cardiovascular events, hospital admissions and mortality during follow-up. Linkage with Institute for National Statistics. Access to data Available for research to any participating clinician upon request to executive committee (fastmi2010@yahoo.fr). PMID:22523054

  2. Comparison of a carbohydrate-free diet vs. fasting on plasma glucose, insulin and glucagon in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Frank Q; Almokayyad, Rami M; Gannon, Mary C

    2015-02-01

    Hyperglycemia improves when patients with type 2 diabetes are placed on a weight-loss diet. Improvement typically occurs soon after diet implementation. This rapid response could result from low fuel supply (calories), lower carbohydrate content of the weight-loss diet, and/or weight loss per se. To differentiate these effects, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and glucagon were determined during the last 24 h of a 3-day period without food (severe calorie restriction) and a calorie-sufficient, carbohydrate-free diet. Seven subjects with untreated type 2 diabetes were studied. A randomized-crossover design with a 4-week washout period between arms was used. Results from both the calorie-sufficient, carbohydrate-free diet and the 3-day fast were compared with the initial standard diet consisting of 55% carbohydrate, 15% protein and 30% fat. The overnight fasting glucose concentration decreased from 196 (standard diet) to 160 (carbohydrate-free diet) to 127 mg/dl (fasting). The 24 h glucose and insulin area responses decreased by 35% and 48% on day 3 of the carbohydrate-free diet, and by 49% and 69% after fasting. Overnight basal insulin and glucagon remained unchanged. Short-term fasting dramatically lowered overnight fasting and 24 h integrated glucose concentrations. Carbohydrate restriction per se could account for 71% of the reduction. Insulin could not entirely explain the glucose responses. In the absence of carbohydrate, the net insulin response was 28% of the standard diet. Glucagon did not contribute to the metabolic adaptations observed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Radiolysis of water at elevated temperatures with γ-rays and fast neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsumura, Y.; Sunaryo, G.R.; Hiroishi, D.; Ishigure, K.

    1995-01-01

    Determination of G-values of water decomposition products in neutral water produced by irradiation with gamma-rays and fast neutrons at elevated temperatures up to 250degC was carried out by a combination of NaNO 2 , acetone + methanol, and HClO 4 + methanol solutions. In the gamma-radiolysis, the G-values obtained in the present experiment are in good agreement with recently reported ones except G OH and G H2O2 . In the fast neutron radiolysis, although a similar change of the G-values with temperature was observed, the higher molecular yields of G H2 and G H2O2 and lower radical ones of G H and, especially, G e-aq were determined. It was made clear that the LET effect still remains even at elevated temperatures. It suggests that the spur size would expand at higher temperatures and the fraction of the intraspur reactions decreases. Furthermore, in order to clarify the characteristics of the determined G-values, computer simulations under the simplified conditions in nuclear reactors have been carried out. The G-values for fast neutron radiolysis give a significant influence to the result. It was pointed out by the simulations that reverse reactions for H 2 + OH → H + H 2 O and e - aq + H + → H, which can be neglected at room temperature, become important at higher temperatures. (author)

  4. Fasting Plasma Insulin at 5 Years of Age Predicted Subsequent Weight Increase in Early Childhood over a 5-Year Period-The Da Qing Children Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yan Chen

    Full Text Available The association between hyperinsulinemia and obesity is well known. However, it is uncertain especially in childhood obesity, if initial fasting hyperinsulinemia predicts obesity, or obesity leads to hyperinsulinemia through insulin resistance.To investigate the predictive effect of fasting plasma insulin on subsequent weight change after a 5-year interval in childhood.424 Children from Da Qing city, China, were recruited at 5 years of age and followed up for 5 years. Blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, fasting plasma insulin, glucose and triglycerides were measured at baseline and 5 years later.Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age was significantly correlated with change of weight from 5 to 10 years (ΔWeight. Children in the lowest insulin quartile had ΔWeight of 13.08±0.73 kg compare to 18.39±0.86 in the highest insulin quartile (P<0.0001 in boys, and similarly 12.03±0.71 vs 15.80±0.60 kg (P<0.0001 in girls. Multivariate analysis showed that the predictive effect of insulin at 5 years of age on subsequent weight gain over 5 years remained statistically significant even after the adjustment for age, sex, birth weight, TV-viewing time and weight (or body mass index at baseline. By contrast, the initial weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent changes in insulin level 5 years later. Children who had both higher fasting insulin and weight at 5 years of age showed much higher levels of systolic blood pressures, fasting plasma glucose, the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and triglycerides at 10 years of age.Fasting plasma insulin at 5 years of age predicts weight gain and cardiovascular risk factors 5 year later in Chinese children of early childhood, but the absolute weight at 5 years of age did not predict subsequent change in fasting insulin.

  5. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Tong, Jenny; Montgomery, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 22 subjects with IFG (11 female and 11 male, mean +/- SD...

  6. Trans-ethnic Meta-analysis and Functional Annotation Illuminates the Genetic Architecture of Fasting Glucose and Insulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Raghavan, Sridharan; Maruthur, Nisa; Kabagambe, Edmond Kato; Hong, Jaeyoung; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Hivert, Marie-France; Lu, Yingchang; An, Ping; Bentley, Amy R.; Drolet, Anne M.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Guo, Xiuqing; Armstrong, Loren L.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Li, Man; Lipovich, Leonard; Rybin, Denis V.; Taylor, Kent D.; Agyemang, Charles; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Cade, Brian E.; Chen, Wei-Min; Dauriz, Marco; Delaney, Joseph A. C.; Edwards, Todd L.; Evans, Daniel S.; Evans, Michele K.; Lange, Leslie A.; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Jingmin; Liu, Yongmei; Nayak, Uma; Patel, Sanjay R.; Porneala, Bianca C.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Snijder, Marieke B.; Stallings, Sarah C.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R.; Zhao, Wei; Becker, Diane M.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Biggs, Mary L.; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Bowden, Donald W.; Chen, Guanjie; Correa, Adolfo; Couper, David J.; Crawford, Dana C.; Cushman, Mary; Eicher, John D.; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Fu, Yi-Ping; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Gottesman, Omri; Hara, Kazuo; Harris, Tamara B.; Jensen, Richard A.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Jhun, Min A.; Karter, Andrew J.; Keller, Margaux F.; Kho, Abel N.; Kizer, Jorge R.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Jingling; Liu, Simin; Lowe, William L.; Mosley, Thomas H.; North, Kari E.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Patrick, Alan L.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Sims, Mario; Smith, Jennifer A.; Tajuddin, Salman M.; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Wren, Mary P.; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Julie T.; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Miljkovic, Iva; Pankow, James S.; Rotimi, Charles N.; Sale, Michele M.; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Arnett, Donna K.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Nalls, Michael A.; Province, Michael A.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Siscovick, David S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wilson, James G.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Dupuis, Josée; Rich, Stephen S.; Florez, Jose C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meigs, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of the type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related quantitative traits fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) in African ancestry (AA) individuals has been limited. In non-diabetic subjects of AA (n = 20,209) and European ancestry (EA; n = 57,292), we performed trans-ethnic (AA+EA)

  7. A Fast Response Mechanism for Insulin Storage in Crystals May Involve a Novel Mode of Kink Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekilov, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Crystals, likely rhombohedral, of Zn-insulin hexamers form in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreases of many mammals. The suggested function of crystal formation is to protect the insulin from proteases and increase the degree of conversion of soluble proinsulin. To accomplish this, crystal growth should be fast and adaptable to rate fluctuations in the conversion reaction. Zn-insulin crystals grow layer-by-layer. Each layer spreads by the attachment of molecules to kinks located at the layers' edges, also called steps. The kinks are thought to be generated either by thermal fluctuations, as postulated by Gibbs, or by one-dimensional nucleation of new crystalline rows. The kink density determines the rate at which steps advance, and these two kink-generation mechanisms lead to weak near-linear responses of the growth rate to concentration variations. We demonstrate for the crystallization of Zn-insulin a novel mechanism of kink generation, whereby 2D clusters of several insulin molecules pre-formed on the terraces between steps associate to the steps. This mechanism results in several-fold higher kink density, faster rate of crystallization, and a high sensitivity of the kinetics to small increases of the solute concentration. If the found mechanism operates during insulin crystallization in vivo, it could be a part of the biological regulation of insulin production and function. For other crystallizing materials in biological and non-biological systems, this mechanism provides an understanding of the often seen non-linear acceleration of the kinetics.

  8. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretts, Amanda M; Follis, Jack L; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Ngwa, Julius S; Wojczynski, Mary K; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Varga, Tibor V; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Houston, Denise K; Lahti, Jari; Ericson, Ulrika; van den Hooven, Edith H; Mikkilä, Vera; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Rice, Kenneth; Renström, Frida; North, Kari E; McKeown, Nicola M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kanoni, Stavroula; Smith, Caren E; Garcia, Melissa E; Tiainen, Anna-Maija; Sonestedt, Emily; Manichaikul, Ani; van Rooij, Frank JA; Dimitriou, Maria; Raitakari, Olli; Pankow, James S; Djoussé, Luc; Province, Michael A; Hu, Frank B; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Keller, Margaux F; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Rotter, Jerome I; Hofman, Albert; Graff, Misa; Kähönen, Mika; Mukamal, Kenneth; Johansson, Ingegerd; Ordovas, Jose M; Liu, Yongmei; Männistö, Satu; Uitterlinden, André G; Deloukas, Panos; Seppälä, Ilkka; Psaty, Bruce M; Cupples, L Adrienne; Borecki, Ingrid B; Franks, Paul W; Arnett, Donna K; Nalls, Mike A; Eriksson, Johan G; Orho-Melander, Marju; Franco, Oscar H; Lehtimäki, Terho; Dedoussis, George V; Meigs, James B; Siscovick, David S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. Objective: We investigated the associations of meat intake and the interaction of meat with genotype on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in Caucasians free of diabetes mellitus. Design: Fourteen studies that are part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium participated in the analysis. Data were provided for up to 50,345 participants. Using linear regression within studies and a fixed-effects meta-analysis across studies, we examined 1) the associations of processed meat and unprocessed red meat intake with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations; and 2) the interactions of processed meat and unprocessed red meat with genetic risk score related to fasting glucose or insulin resistance on fasting glucose and insulin concentrations. Results: Processed meat was associated with higher fasting glucose, and unprocessed red meat was associated with both higher fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [not including body mass index (BMI)]. For every additional 50-g serving of processed meat per day, fasting glucose was 0.021 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.011, 0.030 mmol/L) higher. Every additional 100-g serving of unprocessed red meat per day was associated with a 0.037-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.023, 0.051-mmol/L) higher fasting glucose concentration and a 0.049–ln-pmol/L (95% CI: 0.035, 0.063–ln-pmol/L) higher fasting insulin concentration. After additional adjustment for BMI, observed associations were attenuated and no longer statistically significant. The association of processed meat and fasting insulin did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple comparisons. Observed associations were not modified by genetic

  9. Metabolomics reveals differences in postprandial responses to breads and fasting metabolic characteristics associated with postprandial insulin demand in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzami, Ali A; Shrestha, Aahana; Morrison, David A; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu

    2014-06-01

    Changes in serum metabolic profile after the intake of different food products (e.g., bread) can provide insight into their interaction with human metabolism. Postprandial metabolic responses were compared after the intake of refined wheat (RWB), whole-meal rye (WRB), and refined rye (RRB) breads. In addition, associations between the metabolic profile in fasting serum and the postprandial concentration of insulin in response to different breads were investigated. Nineteen postmenopausal women with normal fasting glucose and normal glucose tolerance participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover meal study. The test breads, RWB (control), RRB, and WRB, providing 50 g of available carbohydrate, were each served as a single meal. The postprandial metabolic profile was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance and targeted LC-mass spectrometry and was compared between different breads using ANOVA and multivariate models. Eight amino acids had a significant treatment effect (P effect (P fasting metabolic profile and the postprandial concentration of insulin. Women with higher fasting concentrations of leucine and isoleucine and lower fasting concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines had higher insulin responses despite similar glucose concentration after all kinds of bread (cross-validated ANOVA, P = 0.048). High blood concentration of branched-chain amino acids, i.e., leucine and isoleucine, has been associated with the increased risk of diabetes, which suggests that additional consideration should be given to bread proteins in understanding the beneficial health effects of different kinds of breads. The present study suggests that the fasting metabolic profile can be used to characterize the postprandial insulin demand in individuals with normal glucose metabolism that can be used for establishing strategies for the stratification of individuals in personalized nutrition. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  10. Low-dose spironolactone ameliorates insulin resistance and suppresses elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 during gestational testosterone exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Lawrence A; Usman, Taofeek O; Akinade, Aminat I; Adeyanju, Oluwaseun A; Kim, InKyeom; Soladoye, Ayodele O

    2017-12-01

    Elevated gestational circulating testosterone has been associated with pathological pregnancies that increase the risk of development of cardiometabolic disorder in later life. We hypothesised that gestational testosterone exposure, in late pregnancy, causes glucose deregulation and atherogenic dyslipidaemia that would be accompanied by high plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The study also hypothesise that low-dose spironolactone treatment would ameliorate these effects. Pregnant Wistar rats received vehicle, testosterone (0.5 mg/kg; sc), spironolactone (0.5 mg/kg, po) or testosterone and spironolactone daily between gestational days 15 and 19. Gestational testosterone exposure led to increased HOMA-IR, circulating insulin, testosterone, 1-h post-load glucose, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, PLR, PAI-1 and MDA. However, all these effects, except that of circulating testosterone, were ameliorated by spironolactone. These results demonstrate that low-dose spironolactone ameliorates glucose deregulation and atherogenic dyslipidaemia during elevated gestational testosterone exposure, at least in part, by suppressing elevated PAI-1.

  11. Association between HOMA-IR, fasting insulin and fasting glucose with coronary heart disease mortality in nondiabetic men: a 20-year observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurl, Sudhir; Zaccardi, Francesco; Onaemo, Vivian N; Jae, Sae Young; Kauhanen, Jussi; Ronkainen, Kimmo; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2015-02-01

    Whether glucose and insulin are differently associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality is unclear. We aimed to estimate the association between insulin resistance (estimated by the homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, HOMA-IR), fasting serum insulin (FI) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) with incident CHD mortality in a prospective study including middle-aged nondiabetic Finnish men. During an average follow-up of 20 years, 273 (11 %) CHD deaths occurred. In a multivariable Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, serum LDL-cholesterol, cigarette smoking, history of CHD, alcohol consumption, blood leukocytes and plasma fibrinogen, the hazard ratios (HRs) for CHD mortality comparing top versus bottom quartiles were as follows: 1.69 (95 % CI: 1.15-2.48; p = 0.008) for HOMA-IR; 1.59 (1.09-2.32; p = 0.016) for FI; and 1.26 (0.90-1.76; p = 0.173) for FPG. These findings suggest that IR and FI, but not FPG, are independent risk factors for CHD mortality. Further studies could help clarify these results in terms of screening and risk stratification, causality of the associations, and therapeutical implications.

  12. Alternate day fasting impacts the brain insulin-signaling pathway of young adult male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianghua; E, Lezi; Wang, Wenfang; Frontera, Jennifer; Zhu, Hao; Wang, Wen-Tung; Lee, Phil; Choi, In Young; Brooks, William M; Burns, Jeffrey M; Aires, Daniel; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2011-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) has recognized health benefits that may extend to brain. We examined how DR affects bioenergetics-relevant enzymes and signaling pathways in the brains of C57BL/6 mice. Five-month-old male mice were placed in ad libitum or one of two repeated fasting and refeeding (RFR) groups, an alternate day (intermittent fed; IF) or alternate day plus antioxidants (blueberry, pomegranate, and green tea extracts) (IF + AO) fed group. During the 24-h fast blood glucose levels initially fell but stabilized within 6 h of starting the fast, thus avoiding frank hypoglycemia. DR in general appeared to enhance insulin sensitivity. After six weeks brain AKT and glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta phosphorylation were lower in the RFR mice, suggesting RFR reduced brain insulin-signaling pathway activity. Pathways that mediate mitochondrial biogenesis were not activated; AMP kinase phosphorylation, silent information regulator 2 phosphorylation, peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1 alpha levels, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 levels did not change. ATP levels also did not decline, which suggests the RFR protocols did not directly impact brain bioenergetics. Antioxidant supplementation did not affect the brain parameters we evaluated. Our data indicate in young adult male C57BL/6 mice, RFR primarily affects brain energy metabolism by reducing brain insulin signaling, which potentially results indirectly as a consequence of reduced peripheral insulin production. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. A simple way to identify insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Ray

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD is increasing in India. Recent data suggesting insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity, or dyslipidemia, so a focus on the relation between acute coronary syndrome (ACS and insulin resistance is relevant. Several studies addressing serum lipoprotein ratios as surrogates for insulin resistance have found promising results. We analyzed the association of lipoprotein ratios with the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. Methods: One hundred non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. Admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The HOMA-IR was used to calculate insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C levels are used to calculate following lipid ratios: TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratio markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA Index >2 as compared to patients with Index <2. TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P < 0.05 as obtained by Pearson′s correlation analysis (r = 0.4459, P = 0.0012; r = 0.4815, P = 0.0004; r = 0.3993; P = 0.0041, respectively. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67-0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65-0.91, respectively. Conclusion: A plasma TG/HDL-C ratio and TC/HDL-C ratio provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistant and can be used as the markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  14. Does Reducing Basal Insulin During Ramadan Fasting by Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Decrease the Risk of Symptomatic Hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Al Qahtani, Nabras; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2016-09-01

    Ramadan fasting by patients with type 1 diabetes might predispose them to hypoglycemia. There are no data on the optimal way of adjusting basal insulin during fasting. We aim at studying whether reducing basal insulin during Ramadan reduces the frequency of symptomatic hypoglycemia. We enrolled children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes who intended to fast during Ramadan. Logbooks were given to subjects to mark days fasted, symptomatic hypoglycemia, and dose of basal insulin on all days of Ramadan. Logbooks were examined. Glucometers and insulin pumps were downloaded. Seventy-five patients were enrolled. The age was 10.2-18.9 (14.5) years. Sixty-eight patients had results analyzed. Forty-one patients were on pumps, and 27 patients were on multiple daily injections (MDI). Mean HbA1c was 7.9 (1.2) and 8.4 (1.3) for the pump and the MDI, respectively (P = 0.007). Thirty-nine patients had hypoglycemia leading to breaking fast. The mean number of episodes of breaking fast was 3 (1-8). Thirty-five of the 68 patients had reduced basal insulin. The difference in the frequency of hypoglycemia in those who reduced/did not reduce insulin was not statistically significant (P > 0.10). Fifteen patients on MDI and 24 patients on pumps had at least one episode of breaking fast. Six and 18 of the patients on MDI and pumps, respectively, reduced basal insulin (P > 0.10). This is the first study examining the impact of reduction of basal insulin on hypoglycemia in adolescents. Reducing basal insulin during Ramadan fasting does not decrease the risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Use of the insulin pump does not appear to be different from MDI in the frequency of occurrence of hypoglycemia.

  15. A Low-Frequency Inactivating AKT2 Variant Enriched in the Finnish Population Is Associated With Fasting Insulin Levels and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manning, Alisa K; Highland, Heather M.; Gasser, Jessica

    2017-01-01

    ,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in AKT2 and fasting insulin, a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are causal for monogenic glycemic disorders. The low-frequency allele is associated with a 12% increase...... in fasting plasma insulin (FI) levels. This variant is present at 1.1% frequency in Finns but virtually absent in individuals from other ancestries. Carriers of the FI-increasing allele had increased 2-hour insulin values, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio=1...

  16. High-fat diet feeding alters metabolic response to fasting/non fasting conditions. Effect on caveolin expression and insulin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ruiz, Ana; Milagro, Fermín I; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; de Miguel, Carlos

    2011-04-13

    The effect of food intake on caveolin expression in relation to insulin signalling was studied in skeletal muscle and adipocytes from retroperitoneal (RP) and subcutaneous (SC) adipose tissue, comparing fasted (F) to not fasted (NF) rats that had been fed a control or high-fat (HF) diet for 72 days. Serum glucose was analysed enzymatically and insulin and leptin by ELISA. Caveolins and insulin signalling intermediaries (IR, IRS-1 and 2 and GLUT4) were determined by RT-PCR and western blotting. Caveolin and IR phosphorylation was measured by immunoprecipitation. Data were analysed with Mann-Whitney U test. High-fat fed animals showed metabolic alterations and developed obesity and insulin resistance. In skeletal muscle, food intake (NF) induced activation of IR and increased expression of IRS-2 in control animals with normal metabolic response. HF animals became overweight, hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinemic, hyperleptinemic and showed insulin resistance. In skeletal muscle of these animals, food intake (NF) also induced IRS-2 expression together with IR, although this was not active. Caveolin 3 expression in this tissue was increased by food intake (NF) in animals fed either diet. In RP adipocytes of control animals, food intake (NF) decreased IR and IRS-2 expression but increased that of GLUT4. A similar but less intense response was found in SC adipocytes. Food intake (NF) did not change caveolin expression in RP adipocytes with either diet, but in SC adipocytes of HF animals a reduction was observed. Food intake (NF) decreased caveolin-1 phosphorylation in RP but increased it in SC adipocytes of control animals, whereas it increased caveolin-2 phosphorylation in both types of adipocytes independently of the diet. Animals fed a control-diet show a normal response to food intake (NF), with activation of the insulin signalling pathway but without appreciable changes in caveolin expression, except a small increase of caveolin-3 in muscle. Animals fed a high-fat diet

  17. Unmethylated Insulin DNA Is Elevated After Total Pancreatectomy With Islet Autotransplantation: Assessment of a Novel Beta Cell Marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, M D; Clark, P; Usmani-Brown, S; Dunn, T B; Beilman, G J; Chinnakotla, S; Pruett, T L; Ptacek, P; Hering, B J; Wang, Z; Gilmore, T; Wilhelm, J J; Hodges, J S; Moran, A; Herold, K C

    2017-04-01

    Beta cell death may occur both after islet isolation and during infusion back into recipients undergoing total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT) for chronic pancreatitis. We measured the novel beta cell death marker unmethylated insulin (INS) DNA in TPIAT recipients before and immediately after islet infusion (n = 21) and again 90 days after TPIAT, concurrent with metabolic functional assessments (n = 25). As expected, INS DNA decreased after pancreatectomy (p = 0.0002). All TPIAT recipients had an elevated unmethylated INS DNA ratio in the first hours following islet infusion. In four samples (three patients), INS DNA was also assessed immediately after islet isolation and again before islet infusion to assess the impact of the isolation process: Unmethylated and methylated INS DNA fractions both increased over this interval, suggesting death of beta cells and exocrine tissue before islet infusion. Higher glucose excursion with mixed-meal tolerance testing was associated with persistently elevated INS DNA at day 90. In conclusion, we observed universal early elevations in the beta cell death marker INS DNA after TPIAT, with pronounced elevations in the islet supernatant before infusion, likely reflecting beta cell death induced by islet isolation. Persistent posttransplant elevation of INS DNA predicted greater hyperglycemia at 90 days. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  18. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G.; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser858 of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. PMID:26499801

  19. Fasting and Systemic Insulin Signaling Regulate Phosphorylation of Brain Proteins That Modulate Cell Morphology and Link to Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Quan, Chao; Toth, Rachel; Campbell, David G; MacKintosh, Carol; Wang, Hong Yu; Chen, Shuai

    2015-12-11

    Diabetes is strongly associated with cognitive decline, but the molecular reasons are unknown. We found that fasting and peripheral insulin promote phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively, of specific residues on brain proteins including cytoskeletal regulators such as slit-robo GTPase-activating protein 3 (srGAP3) and microtubule affinity-regulating protein kinases (MARKs), in which deficiency or dysregulation is linked to neurological disorders. Fasting activates protein kinase A (PKA) but not PKB/Akt signaling in the brain, and PKA can phosphorylate the purified srGAP3. The phosphorylation of srGAP3 and MARKs were increased when PKA signaling was activated in primary neurons. Knockdown of PKA decreased the phosphorylation of srGAP3. Furthermore, WAVE1, a protein kinase A-anchoring protein, formed a complex with srGAP3 and PKA in the brain of fasted mice to facilitate the phosphorylation of srGAP3 by PKA. Although brain cells have insulin receptors, our findings are inconsistent with the down-regulation of phosphorylation of target proteins being mediated by insulin signaling within the brain. Rather, our findings infer that systemic insulin, through a yet unknown mechanism, inhibits PKA or protein kinase(s) with similar specificity and/or activates an unknown phosphatase in the brain. Ser(858) of srGAP3 was identified as a key regulatory residue in which phosphorylation by PKA enhanced the GAP activity of srGAP3 toward its substrate, Rac1, in cells, thereby inhibiting the action of this GTPase in cytoskeletal regulation. Our findings reveal novel mechanisms linking peripheral insulin sensitivity with cytoskeletal remodeling in neurons, which may help to explain the association of diabetes with neurological disorders such as Alzheimer disease. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Lower waist circumference in mildly‐stunted adolescents is associated with elevated insulin concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Grotti Clemente

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The results presented herein suggest that an increase in plasma insulin is one of the primary metabolic modifications in stunted individuals, and that this alteration could be identified at a lower WC cut‐off point than in non‐stunted counterparts.

  1. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorian S Houser

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris, which fasts from food and water for periods of up to three months. During this time, ~90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM. All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures

  2. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Dorian S; Champagne, Cory D; Crocker, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), which fasts from food and water for periods of up to 4 months. During this time, ∼90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM). All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures and therapies.

  3. Insulin resistance after a 72-h fast is associated with impaired AS160 phosphorylation and accumulation of lipid and glycogen in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelbo, M; Clasen, B F F; Treebak, Jonas Thue

    2012-01-01

    During fasting, human skeletal muscle depends on lipid oxidation for its energy substrate metabolism. This is associated with the development of insulin resistance and a subsequent reduction of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. The underlying mechanisms controlling insulin action on skeletal....... This was associated with accumulation of both lipid and glycogen in skeletal muscle. Intracellular insulin signaling to glucose transport was impaired by regulation of phosphorylation at specific sites on AS160 but not TBC1D1, both key regulators of glucose uptake. In contrast, fasting did not impact phosphorylation...... of AMPK or insulin regulation of Akt, both of which are established upstream kinases of AS160. These findings show that insulin resistance in muscles from healthy individuals is associated with suppression of site-specific phosphorylation of AS160, without Akt or AMPK being affected. This impairment of AS...

  4. A fast calculating two-stream-like multiple scattering algorithm that captures azimuthal and elevation variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Steven T.; Elmore, Brannon; Schmidt, Jaclyn; Matchefts, Elizabeth; Burley, Jarred L.

    2016-05-01

    Properly accounting for multiple scattering effects can have important implications for remote sensing and possibly directed energy applications. For example, increasing path radiance can affect signal noise. This study describes the implementation of a fast-calculating two-stream-like multiple scattering algorithm that captures azimuthal and elevation variations into the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) atmospheric characterization and radiative transfer code. The multiple scattering algorithm fully solves for molecular, aerosol, cloud, and precipitation single-scatter layer effects with a Mie algorithm at every calculation point/layer rather than an interpolated value from a pre-calculated look-up-table. This top-down cumulative diffusivity method first considers the incident solar radiance contribution to a given layer accounting for solid angle and elevation, and it then measures the contribution of diffused energy from previous layers based on the transmission of the current level to produce a cumulative radiance that is reflected from a surface and measured at the aperture at the observer. Then a unique set of asymmetry and backscattering phase function parameter calculations are made which account for the radiance loss due to the molecular and aerosol constituent reflectivity within a level and allows for a more accurate characterization of diffuse layers that contribute to multiple scattered radiances in inhomogeneous atmospheres. The code logic is valid for spectral bands between 200 nm and radio wavelengths, and the accuracy is demonstrated by comparing the results from LEEDR to observed sky radiance data.

  5. Evidence of pleiotropic loci for fasting insulin, total fat mass, and abdominal visceral fat in a sedentary population: the HERITAGE family study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y; Després, J P; Rice, T; Nadeau, A; Province, M A; Gagnon, J; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Bouchard, C; Rao, D C

    2000-03-01

    To examine whether there is a major gene effect on fasting insulin and pleiotropic loci for fasting insulin, total fat mass (FM), and abdominal visceral fat (AVF). A major gene hypothesis for fasting plasma insulin levels was assessed using segregation analyses of data on 495 members in 98 normolipidemic sedentary families of white descent who participated in the HERITAGE Family Study. Segregation analyses were performed on insulin adjusted for age, on insulin adjusted for age and FM, and on insulin adjusted for age and AVF. Before adjustment for AVF and FM, a major gene effect on fasting insulin levels was indicated. The putative locus accounted for 54% of the variance under a recessive inheritance pattern, affecting 11% of the sample (i.e., allele frequency = 0.33). However, after adjusting for the effects of AVF or FM, neither a major effect alone nor a multifactorial component alone could be rejected, and support for a major gene was equivocal, i.e., neither the hypothesis of Mendelian tau values or that of the equal tau(s) were rejected and the equal tau model fit the data better than the Mendelian tau model. This pattern (i.e., major gene evidence for insulin before but not after adjustment for AVF or FM) suggests that there is a putative locus with pleiotropic effects on both insulin and FM and another pleiotropic locus for both insulin and AVF. Although these data do not directly support an additional major gene for insulin independent of AVF and FM, such support cannot be ruled out because there is still a significant major effect on FM- or AVF-adjusted insulin (albeit the Mendelian nature of this effect is ambiguous).

  6. Intermittent fasting reduces body fat but exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in young rats regardless of high protein and fat diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Yoo, Kyung Min; Hyun, Joo Suk; Kang, Suna

    2017-02-01

    Intermittent fasting (IMF) is a relatively new dietary approach to weight management, although the efficacy and adverse effects have not been full elucidated and the optimal diets for IMF are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that a one-meal-per-day intermittent fasting with high fat (HF) or protein (HP) diets can modify energy, lipid, and glucose metabolism in normal young male Sprague-Dawley rats with diet-induced obesity or overweight. Male rats aged 5 weeks received either HF (40% fat) or HP (26% protein) diets ad libitum (AL) or for 3 h at the beginning of the dark cycle (IMF) for 5 weeks. Epidydimal fat pads and fat deposits in the leg and abdomen were lower with HP and IMF. Energy expenditure at the beginning of the dark cycle, especially from fat oxidation, was higher with IMF than AL, possibly due to greater activity levels. Brown fat content was higher with IMF. Serum ghrelin levels were higher in HP-IMF than other groups, and accordingly, cumulative food intake was also higher in HP-IMF than HF-IMF. HF-IMF exhibited higher area under the curve (AUC) of serum glucose at the first part (0-40 min) during oral glucose tolerance test, whereas AUC of serum insulin levels in both parts were higher in IMF and HF. During intraperitoneal insulin tolerance test, serum glucose levels were higher with IMF than AL. Consistently, hepatic insulin signaling (GLUT2, pAkt) was attenuated and PEPCK expression was higher with IMF and HF than other groups, and HOMA-IR revealed significantly impaired attenuated insulin sensitivity in the IMF groups. However, surprisingly, hepatic and skeletal muscle glycogen storage was higher in IMF groups than AL. The higher glycogen storage in the IMF groups was associated with the lower expression of glycogen phosphorylase than the AL groups. In conclusion, IMF especially with HF increased insulin resistance, possibly by attenuating hepatic insulin signaling, and lowered glycogen phosphorylase expression despite decreased fat mass in young

  7. Linking lifestyle factors and insulin resistance, based on fasting plasma insulin and HOMA-IR in middle-aged Japanese men: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otake, Toshie; Fukumoto, Jin; Abe, Masao; Takemura, Shigeki; Mihn, Pham Ngoc; Mizoue, Tetsuya; Kiyohara, Chikako

    2014-09-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is regarded as one of the earliest features of many metabolic diseases, and major efforts are aimed at improving insulin function to confront this issue. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of body mass index (BMI), cigarette smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity, green tea and coffee consumption to IR. We performed a cross-sectional study of 1542 male self defense officials. IR was defined as the highest quartile of the fasting plasma insulin (≥ 50 pmol/L) or the homeostasis model assessment-estimated IR (HOMA-IR ≥ 1.81). An unconditional logistic model was used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between IR and influential factors. Stratified analysis by obesity status (BMI HOMA-IR in the non-obese group. Higher coffee consumption may be protective against IR among only the non-obese. Further studies are warranted to examine the effect modification of the obesity status on the coffee-IR association.

  8. Obese children and adolescents have elevated nighttime blood pressure independent of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Kristian N; Olsen, Michael H; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2014-01-01

    in obese children and adolescents. METHODS: Ninety-two obese patients aged 10-18 years were compared with 49 healthy control individuals. Insulin resistance was measured as the homeostatic assessment model (HOMA), and arterial stiffness was measured as carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). RESULTS...... group. HOMA index (obese: median = 3.7, interquartile range (IQR) = 2.3-6.0; control: median = 2.6, IQR = 1.8-3.4; P = 0.002) was higher, whereas cfPWV (obese: 4.8±0.8 m/s; control: 5.1±0.6 m/s; P = 0.03) was lower in the obese group. CfPWV was not related to logHOMA index. In multiple regression...... analyses, the higher nighttime BP in the obese group was independent of logHOMA and cfPWV. CONCLUSIONS: Obese children had a higher nighttime BP when compared with the control group independently of insulin resistance and arterial stiffness. No relationship was found between insulin resistance and arterial...

  9. Effects of insulin on ketogenesis following fasting in lean and obese men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, Maarten R.; Sauerwein, Hans P.; Faas, Linda; Smeenge, Martijn; Duran, Marinus; Wanders, Ronald J.; Ruiter, An F.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Fliers, Eric; Houten, Sander M.; Serlie, Mireille J.

    2009-01-01

    The ketone bodies (KBs) D-3-hydroxybutyrate (D-3HB) and acetoacetate (AcAc) play a role in starvation and have been associated with insulin resistance. The dose-response relationship between insulin and KBs was demonstrated to be shifted to the right in type 2 diabetes patients. However, KB levels

  10. Is fasting leptin associated with insulin resistance among nondiabetic individuals? The Miami Community Health Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, R P; Prineas, R J; Donahue, R D

    1999-01-01

    Whether serum leptin levels are associated with insulin resistance independent of the effects of hyperinsulinemia and adiposity is an important unanswered question. We examined the relationship between the rate of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and serum leptin concentrations among nondiabetic m...

  11. Is fasting leptin associated with insulin resistance among nondiabetic individuals? The Miami Community Health Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donahue, R P; Prineas, R J; Donahue, R D

    1999-01-01

    Whether serum leptin levels are associated with insulin resistance independent of the effects of hyperinsulinemia and adiposity is an important unanswered question. We examined the relationship between the rate of insulin-mediated glucose uptake and serum leptin concentrations among nondiabetic men...

  12. Peripheral effects of insulin dominate suppression of fasting hepatic glucose production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ader, M.; Bergman, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    Insulin may suppress hepatic glucose production directly, or indirectly via suppression of release of gluconeogenic substrates from extrasplanchnic tissues. To compare these mechanisms, we performed insulin dose-response experiments in conscious dogs at euglycemia, during somatostatin infusion, and intraportal glucagon replacement. Insulin was sequentially infused either intraportally (0.05, 0.20, 0.40, 1.0, 1.4, and/or 3.0; protocol I) or systemically at half the intraportal rate (0.025, 0.10, 0.20, 0.50, 0.70, and/or 1.5 mU.min-1.kg-1; protocol II). Exogenous glucose infused during clamps was labeled with 3-[3H]glucose (2 microCi/g) to prevent a fall in plasma specific activity (P greater than 0.2) that may have contributed to previous underestimations of hepatic glucose output (HGO). Portal insulins were up to threefold higher during intraportal infusion, but peripheral insulin levels were not different between the intraportal and systemic protocols [7 +/- 5 vs. 9 +/- 1, 12 +/- 4 vs. 13 +/- 6, 16 +/- 3 vs. 27 +/- 5, 70 +/- 23 vs. 48 +/- 8, 83 +/- 3 vs. 86 +/- 21, and 128 vs. 120 +/- 14 microU/ml for paired insulin doses; P greater than 0.06 by analysis of variance (ANOVA)]. Despite higher portal insulin levels in protocol I, HGO suppression was equivalent in the two protocols when systemic insulin was matched, from 3.3 +/- 0.1 to near-total suppression at 0.3 mg.min-1.kg-1 at the highest insulin infusion rate (3.0 mU.min-1.kg-1; P less than 0.0001) with intraportal insulin, from 2.9 +/- 0.8 to -0.8 +/- 0.2 mg.min-1.kg-1 in protocol II (P less than 0.001). Suppression of HGO was similar at matched systemic insulin, regardless of portal insulin, suggesting the primacy of insulin's action on the periphery in its restraint of hepatic glucose production

  13. Calorie restriction enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation in both fast-twitch and slow-twitch skeletal muscle of 24-month-old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequea, Donel A; Sharma, Naveen; Arias, Edward B; Cartee, Gregory D

    2012-12-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) induces enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in fast-twitch (type II) muscle from old rats, but the effect of CR on slow-twitch (type I) muscle from old rats is unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins in isolated epitrochlearis (fast-twitch) and soleus (slow-twitch) muscles from 24-month-old ad libitum fed and CR (consuming 65% of ad libitum, intake) rats. Muscles were incubated with and without 1.2 nM insulin. CR versus ad libitum rats had greater insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation (pAkt) on T308 and S473 for both muscles incubated with insulin. GLUT4 protein abundance and phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (Y1162/1163) and AS160 (T642) were unaltered by CR in both muscles. These results implicate enhanced pAkt as a potential mechanism for the CR-induced increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by the fast-twitch epitrochlearis and slow-twitch soleus of old rats.

  14. Baseline levels, and changes over time in body mass index and fasting insulin, and their relationship to change in metabolic trait clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Martin K; Sullivan, Lisa M; Fox, Caroline S; Wilson, Peter W F; Nathan, David M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Meigs, James B

    2014-09-01

    Multiple abnormal metabolic traits are found together or "cluster" within individuals more often than is predicted by chance. The individual and combined role of adiposity and insulin resistance (IR) on metabolic trait clustering is uncertain. We tested the hypothesis that change in trait clustering is a function of both baseline level and change in these measures. In 2616 nondiabetic Framingham Offspring Study participants, body mass index (BMI) and fasting insulin were related to a within-person 7-year change in a trait score of 0-4 Adult Treatment Panel III metabolic syndrome traits (hypertension, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hyperglycemia). At baseline assessment, mean trait score was 1.4 traits, and 7-year mean (SEM) change in trait score was +0.25 (0.02) traits, Pchange in fasting insulin were similarly related to trait score change. In models adjusted for age-sex-baseline cluster score, 7-year change in trait score was significantly related to both a 1-quintile difference in baseline BMI (0.07 traits) and fasting insulin (0.18 traits), and to both a 1-quintile 7-year increase in BMI (0.21 traits) and fasting insulin (0.18 traits). Change in metabolic trait clustering was significantly associated with baseline levels and changes in both BMI and fasting insulin, highlighting the importance of both obesity and IR in the clustering of metabolic traits.

  15. Elevation of Glucose 6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Activity Induced by Amplified Insulin Response in Low Glutathione Levels in Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Taniguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Weanling male Wistar rats were fed on a 10% soybean protein isolate (SPI diet for 3 weeks with or without supplementing 0.3% sulfur-containing amino acids (SAA; methionine or cystine to examine relationship between glutathione (GSH levels and activities of NADPH-producing enzymes, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and malic enzyme (ME, in the liver. Of rats on the 10% SPI diet, GSH levels were lower and the enzyme activities were higher than of those fed on an SAA-supplemented diet. Despite the lower GSH level, γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS activity was higher in the 10% SPI group than other groups. Examination of mRNAs of G6PD and ME suggested that the GSH-suppressing effect on enzyme induction occurred prior to and/or at transcriptional levels. Gel electrophoresis of G6PD indicated that low GSH status caused a decrease in reduced form and an increase in oxidized form of the enzyme, suggesting an accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme. In primary cultured hepatocytes, insulin response to induce G6PD activity was augmented in low GSH levels manipulated in the presence of buthionine sulfoximine. These findings indicated that elevation of the G6PD activity in low GSH levels was caused by amplified insulin response for expression of the enzyme and accelerated turnover rate of the enzyme molecule.

  16. Meta-analysis investigating associations between healthy diet and fasting glucose and insulin levels and modification by loci associated with glucose homeostasis in data from 15 cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whether loci that influence fasting glucose (FG) and fasting insulin (FI) levels, as identified by genome-wide association studies, modify associations of diet with FG or FI is unknown. We utilized data from 15 US and European cohort studies comprising 51,289 persons without diabetes to test whether...

  17. Greater early postprandial suppression of endogenous glucose production and higher initial glucose disappearance is achieved with fast-acting insulin aspart compared to insulin aspart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Ananda; Pieber, Thomas R; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Sach-Friedl, Stefanie; Erichsen, Lars; Basu, Rita; Haahr, Hanne

    2018-03-01

    Fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation with accelerated initial absorption after subcutaneous administration, leading to improved postprandial glucose control versus IAsp. We investigated the mechanisms behind the reduced postprandial glucose with faster aspart versus IAsp. In a randomised, double-blind, crossover trial, 41 subjects with type 1 diabetes received identical subcutaneous single faster aspart and IAsp doses (individualised for each subject) together with a standardised mixed meal (including 75 g carbohydrate labelled with [1- 13 C] glucose). Postprandial glucose turnover was determined by the triple-tracer meal method using continuous, variable [6- 3 H] glucose and [6,6- 2 H 2 ] glucose infusion. Insulin exposure within the first hour was 32% greater for faster aspart versus IAsp (treatment ratio faster aspart/IAsp [95% confidence interval] 1.32 [1.18;1.48], pIAsp [95% confidence interval] -0.59 mmol/L [-1.19;0.01], p=0.055). The trend towards reduced ΔPG 1h with faster aspart was due to 12% greater suppression of endogenous glucose production (treatment ratio 1.12 [1.01;1.25], p=0.040) and 23% higher glucose disappearance (1.23 [1.05;1.45], p=0.012) with faster aspart versus IAsp during the first hour. Suppression of free fatty acid levels during the first hour was 36% greater for faster aspart versus IAsp (1.36 [1.01;1.88], 0.042). The trend towards improved postprandial glucose control with faster aspart versus IAsp in this study was due to both greater early suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulation of glucose disappearance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Trans-ethnic Meta-analysis and Functional Annotation Illuminates the Genetic Architecture of Fasting Glucose and Insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Raghavan, Sridharan; Maruthur, Nisa; Kabagambe, Edmond Kato; Hong, Jaeyoung; Ng, Maggie C.Y.; Hivert, Marie-France; Lu, Yingchang; An, Ping; Bentley, Amy R.; Drolet, Anne M.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Guo, Xiuqing; Armstrong, Loren L.; Irvin, Marguerite R.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of the type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related quantitative traits fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) in African ancestry (AA) individuals has been limited. In non-diabetic subjects of AA (n = 20,209) and European ancestry (EA; n = 57,292), we performed trans-ethnic (AA+EA) fine-mapping of 54 established EA FG or FI loci with detailed functional annotation, assessed their relevance in AA individuals, and sought previously undescribed loci through trans-ethnic (AA+EA) m...

  19. Bitter gourd reduces elevated fasting plasma glucose levels in an intervention study among prediabetics in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawinkel, Michael B; Ludwig, Christine; Swai, Mark E; Yang, Ray-Yu; Chun, Kwok Pan; Habicht, Sandra D

    2018-04-24

    Impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus have become major health issues even in non-industrialized countries. As access to clinical management is often poor, dietary interventions and alternative medicines are required. For bitter gourd, Momordica charantia L., antidiabetic properties have been claimed. The main objective of the intervention study was to assess antidiabetic effects of daily bitter gourd consumption of 2.5g powder over the course of eight weeks among prediabetic individuals. In a randomized placebo-controlled single blinded clinical trial, 52 individuals with prediabetes were studied after consuming a bitter gourd or a cucumber juice. For reducing the impact of between subject differences in the study population, a crossover design was chosen with eight weeks for each study period and four weeks washout in between. Fasting plasma glucose was chosen as the primary outcome variable. Comparing the different exposures, the CROS analysis (t=-2.23, p=0.031, r=0.326) revealed a significant difference in the change of FPG of 0.31mmol/L (5.6mg/dL) with a trend (R 2 =0,42387). The number of 44 finally complete data sets achieved a power of 0.82, with a medium-to-large effect size (Cohen's d 0.62). The effect was also proven by a general linear mixed model (estimate 0.31; SE: 0.12; p: 0.01; 95%CI: 0.08; 0.54). Not all participants responded, but the higher the initial blood glucose levels were, the more pronounced the effect was. No serious adverse effects were observed. Bitter gourd supplementation appeared to have benefits in lowering elevated fasting plasma glucose in prediabetes. The findings should be replicated in other intervention studies to further investigate glucose lowering effects and the opportunity to use bitter gourd for dietary self-management, especially in places where access to professional medical care is not easily assured. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fast-acting insulin aspart in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes: Faster onset, higher early exposure and greater early glucose-lowering effect relative to insulin aspart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiramoto, Masanari; Nishida, Tomoyuki; Hansen, Ann Kathrine; Haahr, Hanne

    2018-03-01

    Fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation with two added excipients (niacinamide and L-arginine) in order to obtain accelerated absorption after subcutaneous dosing. The present study compared the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics of faster aspart vs IAsp in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design, 43 participants were given faster aspart and IAsp (0.2 U/kg single dose) at two separate dosing visits. Frequent pharmacokinetic blood sampling was carried out, and pharmacodynamics were assessed using an automated euglycemic clamp lasting for a maximum of 12 h after dosing (target 5.5 mmol/L). Faster aspart showed onset of appearance approximately twice-as-fast vs IAsp (least squares means: 3.0 vs 7.1 min; estimated treatment difference -4.1 min, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -5.0, -3.2; P IAsp (P IAsp (AUC IA sp,0-t ; estimated treatment ratio 0.99, 90% CI: 0.96-1.02), whereas the total glucose-lowering effect (AUC GIR ,0-t ) was slightly lower for faster aspart vs IAsp (estimated treatment ratio 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87-0.99, P = 0.020). Faster aspart showed faster onset, higher early exposure and a greater early glucose-lowering effect relative to IAsp in Japanese patients with type 1 diabetes, in accordance with previous findings in Caucasian type 1 diabetes patients. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. Insulin resistance without elevated mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity in muscles of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Thomas H; Cinquino, Nicholas; Anthony, Marcus; Phelps, Charles B; Zachary Berk, E

    2009-11-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) appears to mediate the development of insulin resistance in cultured cells. We studied in vivo insulin action and mTORC1 signaling in skeletal muscles of mice fed a normal chow [control (CON)] diet or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 wk. We assessed in vivo insulin action by measuring glucose tolerance (GT), insulin tolerance (IT), and insulin-assisted GT (IAGT). Although GT was not altered, the HFD significantly reduced IT and IAGT. Acute treatment with rapamycin, a highly specific inhibitor of mTORC1, did not improve GT, IT, or IAGT in mice fed the CON diet or the HFD. Phosphorylation of S6 kinase (S6K) on Thr(389), a surrogate measure of mTORC1 kinase activity, was assessed in skeletal muscles of mice 15 min after an intraperitoneal injection of insulin or saline. In the basal state and after insulin stimulation, phosphorylation of S6K on Thr(389) was similar in muscles of mice fed the HFD and mice fed the CON diet, indicating that mTORC1 activity is not elevated. Furthermore, phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 on Ser(636), a site phosphorylated by mTORC1, was similar in muscles of mice fed the HFD and mice fed the CON diet. Taken together, these findings indicate that in vivo insulin resistance can occur without an increase in mTORC1 activity in skeletal muscle and that inhibition of mTORC1 with rapamycin does not improve insulin action.

  2. High-density lipoprotein remains elevated despite reductions in total cholesterol in fasting adult male elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tift, Michael S; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2011-08-01

    We examined changes in lipid profiles of 40 adult northern elephant seal bulls over the 3-month breeding fast and the 1-month molting fast to investigate impacts of fasting on serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG) and lipoproteins. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were initially high (3930 ± 190mgL(-1)and 1610 ± 170mgL(-1), respectively) and decreased significantly over the breeding season. Total cholesterol and LDL declined significantly with adipose tissue reserves (pseals late in the breeding fast. Less dramatic but similar changes in lipid metabolism were observed across the molting fast. High-density lipoproteins (HDL) remained consistently elevated (>1750 mgL(-1)) suggesting that elephant seals defend HDL concentrations, despite significant depletion of TC and LDL across the breeding fast. Triglyceride levels were significantly higher during the molt, consistent with lower rates of lipid oxidation needed to meet metabolic energy demands during this period. The maintenance of HDL during breeding is consistent with its role in delivering cholesterol from adipose tissue for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis and potentially mitigates oxidative stress associated with fasting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interactions of dietary whole-grain intake with fasting glucose- and insulin-related genetic loci in individuals of European descent: a meta-analysis of 14 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleton, Jennifer A; McKeown, Nicola M; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Hivert, Marie-France; Ngwa, Julius; van Rooij, Frank J A; Sonestedt, Emily; Wojczynski, Mary K; Ye, Zheng; Tanaka, Tosh; Garcia, Melissa; Anderson, Jennifer S; Follis, Jack L; Djousse, Luc; Mukamal, Kenneth; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forouhi, Nita G; Groves, Christopher J; Hallmans, Goran; Harris, Tamara; Hofman, Albert; Houston, Denise K; Hu, Frank B; Johansson, Ingegerd; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J; Nalls, Michael; Orho-Melander, Marju; Renstrom, Frida; Rice, Kenneth; Riserus, Ulf; Rolandsson, Olov; Rotter, Jerome I; Saylor, Georgia; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Sjogren, Per; Smith, Albert; Steingrímsdóttir, Laufey; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Prokopenko, Inga; Pankow, James S; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Florez, Jose C; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Dupuis, Josée; Dedoussis, George V; Ordovas, Jose M; Ingelsson, Erik; Cupples, L Adrienne; Siscovick, David S; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B

    2010-12-01

    Whole-grain foods are touted for multiple health benefits, including enhancing insulin sensitivity and reducing type 2 diabetes risk. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with fasting glucose and insulin concentrations in individuals free of diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that whole-grain food intake and genetic variation interact to influence concentrations of fasting glucose and insulin. Via meta-analysis of data from 14 cohorts comprising ∼ 48,000 participants of European descent, we studied interactions of whole-grain intake with loci previously associated in GWAS with fasting glucose (16 loci) and/or insulin (2 loci) concentrations. For tests of interaction, we considered a P value fasting glucose and insulin concentrations independent of demographics, other dietary and lifestyle factors, and BMI (β [95% CI] per 1-serving-greater whole-grain intake: -0.009 mmol/l glucose [-0.013 to -0.005], P fasting insulin (P = 0.006), where greater whole-grain intake was associated with a smaller reduction in fasting insulin concentrations in those with the insulin-raising allele. Our results support the favorable association of whole-grain intake with fasting glucose and insulin and suggest a potential interaction between variation in GCKR and whole-grain intake in influencing fasting insulin concentrations.

  4. Circulating obestatin levels correlate with fasting insulin and HOMA-IR but not with hypertension in elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Li; Zhao, Yin-Tao; Teng, Li-Li; Li, Ming-Zhu; Jiang, Hua

    2014-05-01

    Obestatin, encoded by the same gene as ghrelin, was first described as a physiological opponent of ghrelin. The association between circulating obestatin levels and blood pressure remains unclear. Furthermore, adequate information is non-existent regarding the older male population with hypertension. For this purpose, we enrolled 185 unrelated hypertensive male patients aged ≥ 80 years (range 80-102 years). One hundred seventy nine age-matched healthy subjects served as controls. Plasma levels of obestatin and insulin were measured using commercial ELISA and RIA. HOMA-IR was calculated using standard method. We found that plasma obestatin levels correlated significantly with insulin levels (P = 0.034) and homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR: P = 0.028). However, plasma obestatin differed non-significantly between hypertensive (5.06 ± 0.68 ng/mL) and non-hypertensive (4.72 ± 0.82 ng/mL) individuals. Plasma obestatin levels were not associated with systolic (P = 0.818) or diastolic (P = 0.564) blood pressure, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR: P = 0.725), uric acid (P = 0.603), total cholesterol (TC: P = 0.589), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C: P = 0.057); high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C: P = 0.432), triglyceride (TG: P = 0.418), and fasting blood glucose (FBG: P = 0.101). We, therefore, concluded that fasting circulating obestatin levels did not directly correlate with blood pressure in men aged ≥ 80 years.

  5. A simple and fast non-radioactive bridging immunoassay for insulin autoantibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkas, Ingrid; Mallone, Roberto; Tubiana-Rufi, Nadia; Chevenne, Didier; Carel, Jean Claude; Créminon, Christophe; Volland, Hervé; Boitard, Christian; Morel, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease which results from the destruction of pancreatic beta cells. Autoantibodies directed against islet antigens are valuable diagnostic tools. Insulin autoantibodies (IAAs) are usually the first to appear and also the most difficult to detect amongst the four major islet autoantibodies. A non-radioactive IAA bridging ELISA was developed to this end. In this assay, one site of the IAAs from serum samples is bound to a hapten-labeled insulin (GC300-insulin), which is subsequently captured on anti-GC300 antibody-coated 96-well plates. The other site of the IAAs is bound to biotinylated insulin, allowing the complex to be detected by an enzyme-streptavidin conjugate. In the present study, 50 serum samples from patients with newly diagnosed T1D and 100 control sera from non-diabetic individuals were analyzed with our new assay and the results were correlated with an IAA radioimmunoassay (RIA). Using IAA bridging ELISA, IAAs were detected in 32 out of 50 T1D children, whereas with IAA RIA, 41 out of 50 children with newly diagnosed T1D were scored as positive. In conclusion, the IAA bridging ELISA could serve as an attractive approach for rapid and automated detection of IAAs in T1D patients for diagnostic purposes.

  6. Serum lipoprotein ratios as markers of insulin resistance: A study among non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome patients with impaired fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ray

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Recent data suggest that insulin resistance can predict cardiovascular disease independently of the other risk factors, such as hypertension, visceral obesity or dyslipidaemia. However, the majority of available methods to evaluate insulin resistance are complicated to operate, expensive, and time consuming. This study was undertaken to assess whether serum lipoprotein ratios could predict insulin resistance in non-diabetic acute coronary syndrome (ACS patients. Methods: Ninety non-diabetic patients with impaired fasting glucose admitted with a diagnosis of ACS were included in the study. At the time of admission fasting glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. The homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR was used for insulin resistance. The fasting serum total cholesterol (TC, triglycerides (TG and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were checked, and then TC/HDL-C and TG/HDL-C ratios were calculated. The areas under the curves (AUC of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were used to compare the power of these serum lipoprotein ratios as markers. Results: Lipoprotein ratios were significantly higher in patients with HOMA-IR index > 2.5 as compared to patients with index <2.5 (P < 0.05. Both TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR (P<0.05. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratio for predicting insulin resistance was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.67 to 0.93, 0.78 (95% CI, 0.65 to 0.91, respectively. Interpretation & conclusions: The findings of this study demonstrate that serum lipoprotein ratios can provide a simple means of identifying insulin resistance and can be used as markers of insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases risk in adult non-diabetic patients.

  7. Plasma ceramides are elevated in overweight Holstein dairy cows experiencing greater lipolysis and insulin resistance during the transition from late pregnancy to early lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J E; Bandaru, V V R; Dorskind, J M; Haughey, N J; McFadden, J W

    2015-11-01

    Insulin resistance is a homeorhetic adaptation to parturition in dairy cows transitioning from late pregnancy to early lactation. An increase in prepartum adiposity can predispose periparturient cows to greater lipolysis and insulin resistance, thus increasing the risk for metabolic disease. Mechanisms mediating the development of insulin resistance in overweight peripartal dairy cows may depend on ceramide metabolism. The sphingolipid ceramide accumulates in plasma and tissues of overweight monogastric animals, and facilitates saturated fatty acid-induced insulin resistance. Considering this evidence, we hypothesized that plasma ceramides would be elevated in periparturient dairy cattle and that these sphingolipids would correlate with the magnitude of lipolysis and insulin resistance. To test our central hypothesis, multiparous Holstein cows were allocated into 2 groups according to their body condition score (BCS) at d -30 prepartum: lean (BCS 4.0; n=11). Blood samples were collected at d -45, -30, -15, and -7, relative to expected parturition, and at d 4 postpartum. Plasma glucose, insulin, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations were measured, and insulin sensitivity was estimated. The concentrations of individual plasma ceramide and glycosylated ceramide were determined using liquid chromatography-based mass spectrometry. Results demonstrated that greater adiposity was associated with a greater loss in body condition during late pregnancy. Overweight cows had greater circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, and NEFA, and lower insulin sensitivity relative to lean cows. We detected 30 different sphingolipids across 6 lipid classes with acyl chains ranging from 16 to 26 carbons. The most abundant plasma sphingolipids detected were C24:0-ceramide, C24:0-monohexosylceramide, and C16:0-lactosylceramide. Plasma concentrations of total ceramide and monohexosylceramide increased as lactation approached, and saturated

  8. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Templeman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1 signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2+/− mice to Ins2+/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2+/− mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%–34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan.

  9. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Nicole M; Flibotte, Stephane; Chik, Jenny H L; Sinha, Sunita; Lim, Gareth E; Foster, Leonard J; Nislow, Corey; Johnson, James D

    2017-07-11

    The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2 +/- mice to Ins2 +/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2 +/- mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%-34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Agreement and Reliability of Fasted and Oral Glucose Tolerance Test-Derived Indices of Insulin Sensitivity and Beta Cell Function in Boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockcroft, Emma Joanne; Williams, Craig Anthony; Jackman, Sarah Rebecca; Armstrong, Neil; Barker, Alan R

    2017-06-01

    Assessment of plasma insulin and glucose outcomes is important in paediatric studies aimed at reducing future risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The aims of this study are to determine the between-method agreement and the day-to-day reliability of fasting and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-derived estimates of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function in healthy boys. Fasting and OGTT assesments of insulin resistance and β-cell function were performed on 28 boys (12.3±2.9 years). Measurements were repeated after 1 week (fasting, n=28) and 1 day (OGTT, n=8). Agreement between estimates of insulin resistance and β-cell function was examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Reliability was assessed using change in the mean, Pearson's correlation coefficient, and typical error expressed as a coefficient of variation (CV). The Matsuda index was positively related with QUICKI (r=0.88, PHOMA-IR (r=-0.76, P0.05). For reliability, QUICKI had the lowest CV% for the fasting (4.7%) and the Cederholm index for the OGTT (6.4%) estimates. The largest CV% was observed in fasting insulin (30.8%) and insulinogenic index 30' (62.5%). This study highlights differences in between-method agreement and day-to-day reliability for estimates of insulin resistance in youth. The low CV supports the use of the FGIR (fasting) and Cederholm (OGTT) indices in this population. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Feeding butter with elevated content of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid to obese-prone rats impairs glucose and insulin tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Melissa; Hopkins, Loren E; AlZahal, Ousama; MacDonald, Tara L; Cervone, Daniel T; Wright, David C; McBride, Brian W; Dyck, David J

    2015-09-28

    We recently demonstrated that feeding a natural CLAt10,c12-enriched butter to lean female rats resulted in small, but significant increases in fasting glucose and insulin concentrations, and impaired insulin tolerance. Our goal was to extend these findings by utilizing the diabetes-prone female fatty Zucker rat. Rats were fed custom diets containing 45 % kcal of fat derived from control and CLAt10,c12-enriched butter for 8 weeks. CLA t10,c12-enriched butter was prepared from milk collected from cows fed a high fermentable carbohydrate diet to create subacute rumen acidosis (SARA); control (non-SARA) butter was collected from cows fed a low grain diet. Female fatty Zucker rats (10 weeks old) were randomly assigned to one of four diet treatments: i) low fat (10 % kcal), ii) 45 % kcal lard, iii) 45 % kcal SARA butter, or iv) 45 % kcal non-SARA butter. A low fat fed lean Zucker group was used as a control group. After 8 weeks, i) glucose and insulin tolerance tests, ii) insulin signaling in muscle, adipose and liver, and iii) metabolic caging measurements were performed. Glucose and insulin tolerance were significantly impaired in all fatty Zucker groups, but to the greatest extent in the LARD and SARA conditions. Insulin signaling (AKT phosphorylation) was impaired in muscle, visceral (perigonadal) adipose tissue and liver in fatty Zucker rats, but was generally similar across dietary groups. Physical activity, oxygen consumption, food intake and weight gain were also similar amongst the various fatty Zucker groups. Increasing the consumption of a food naturally enriched with CLAt10,c12 significantly worsens glucose and insulin tolerance in a diabetes-prone rodent model. This outcome is not explained by changes in tissue insulin signaling, physical activity, energy expenditure, food intake or body mass.

  12. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with improved insulin sensitivity, reduced basal insulin secretion rate and lower fasting glucagon concentration in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, F; Disse, E; Laville, M

    2012-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes with a stronger effect in women. As the underlying mechanisms remain poorly characterised, we investigated its relationship with insulin resistance, insulin secretion, clearance of insulin and glucagon concentration....

  13. Fasting substrate oxidation in relation to habitual dietary fat intake and insulin resistance in non-diabetic women: a case for metabolic flexibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Madelaine T; Goedecke, Julia H; Dugas, Lara; Evans, Juliet; Kroff, Jacolene; Levitt, Naomi S; Lambert, Estelle V

    2013-01-14

    Metabolic flexibility described as "the capacity of the body to match fuel oxidation to fuel availability" has been implicated in insulin resistance. We examined fasting substrate oxidation in relation to dietary macronutrient intake, and markers of insulin resistance in otherwise healthy women, with and without a family history of diabetes mellitus (FH DM). We measured body composition (dual x-ray absorptiometry), visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue area (VAT, SAT, using Computerised Tomography), fasting [glucose], [insulin], [free fatty acids], [blood lipids], insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), resting energy expenditure (REE), respiratory exchange ratio(RER) and self-reported physical activity in a convenience sample of 180 women (18-45 yrs). A food frequency questionnaire was used to assess energy intake (EI) and calculate the RER: Food Quotient (FQ) ratio. Only those with EI:REE (1.05 -2.28) were included (N=140). Insulin resistance was defined HOMA-IR (>1.95). The Insulin Resistant (IR) group had higher energy, carbohydrate and protein intakes (p < 0.05) and lower PA levels than Insulin Sensitive (IS) group (P < 0.001), but there were no differences in RER or RER:FQ between groups. However, nearly 50% of the variance in HOMA-IR was explained by age, body fat %, VAT, RER:FQ and FH DM (adjusted R2 = 0.50, p < 0.0001). Insulin-resistant women, and those with FH DM had a higher RER:FQ than their counterparts (p < 0.01), independent of body fat % or distribution. In these apparently healthy, weight-stable women, insulin resistance and FH DM were associated with lower fat oxidation in relation to dietary fat intake, suggesting lower metabolic flexibility.

  14. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Fenxia; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Chu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Dan; Guo, Tong-Shuai; Wang, Jun-Kui; Guan, Gong-Chang; Ren, Ke-Yu; Mu, Jian-Jun

    2016-05-26

    Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years) were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl), then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day). The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA). High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL) than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL). The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p high-salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity.

  15. Indices of insulin sensitivity and secretion from a standard liquid meal test in subjects with type 2 diabetes, impaired or normal fasting glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farmer Mildred V

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To provide an initial evaluation of insulin sensitivity and secretion indices derived from a standard liquid meal tolerance test protocol in subjects with normal (NFG, impaired fasting glucose (IFG or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Areas under the curve (AUC for glucose, insulin and C-peptide from pre-meal to 120 min after consumption of a liquid meal were calculated, as were homeostasis model assessments of insulin resistance (HOMA2-IR and the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity. Results Subjects with NFG (n = 19, IFG (n = 19, and diabetes (n = 35 had mean ± SEM HOMA2-IR values of 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.6 ± 0.2 and 2.5 ± 0.3 and Matsuda insulin sensitivity index values of 15.6 ± 2.0, 8.8 ± 1.2 and 6.0 ± 0.6, respectively. The log-transformed values for these variables were highly correlated overall and within each fasting glucose category (r = -0.91 to -0.94, all p Conclusion These results provide initial evidence to support the usefulness of a standard liquid meal tolerance test for evaluation of insulin secretion and sensitivity in clinical and population studies.

  16. Blood homocysteine and fasting insulin levels are reduced and erythrocyte sedimentation rates increased with a glycophospholipid-vitamin formulation: a retrospective study in older subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita R. Ellithorpe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevations in Homocyteine (Hcys levels in the blood have been correlated with increased risk for coronary heart disease and stroke, loss of cognition and memory, and other chronic medical conditions. Objective: A retrospective study was initiated to determine if Hcys levels and other blood markers were altered in subjects taking an oral functional food supplement containing a mixture of phosphoglycolipids (NT Factor® and vitamins. Methods: Thirty-five patients (28 females, 7 males, Av. Age=60.7±9.6 years who had used the functional food Advanced Physician’s FormulaTM with NTFactor® in tablet form each day were enrolled in a retrospective study on blood chemistry. This retrospective study followed a prospective study on the use of the same supplement to reduce fatigue in patients with chronic fatigue. Participants were patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (myalgic encephalomyelitis or other fatiguing illnesses. Subjects had blood drawn over a 6-month period, and routine blood testing was performed. In this laboratory study the results were analyzed for differences, and statistical analyses were performed. Results: All participants responded in the study and showed an average reduction of 31.8% in Hcys levels (from 10.85±0.42 to 7.40±0.42 µmol/L; t-test, p<0.001; Wilcoxon, p<0.001. Women responded better than men: women (from 11.06±0.50 to 8.67±0.82 µmol/L, 34.4% reduction, t-test, p< 0.001; Wilcoxon, p<0.001 versus men (from 10.80±0.51 to 7.01±0.47 µmol/L, 21.6% reduction, t-test, p< 0.0862. Differences were also found in fasting insulin levels (from 12.80±3.11 to 5.30±1.77 µIU/mL, 58.6% reduction, t-test, p<0.005 and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR. ESR increased from 10.5±2.21 to 20.19±3.20 mm/hr (92.2% increase, t-test, p<0.0314; Wilcoxon, p<0.0154. Other tests were not significantly different after 6 months of supplement, there were no side effects from the test supplement, and none of the participants had

  17. Effects of fructose and graded levels of vanadate on insulin action and lipogenesis in fasted and refed rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pointer, R.H.; Mislo, B.S.; Basi, N.S.; Blakely, S.R. (Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States) Food and Drug Administration, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-03-11

    This study investigated the effects of fructose and vanadate on the conversion of glucose to CO{sub 2} and to lipid in fasted and refed rats. Male Wistar rats weighing 150 g were fasted three days and refed three days a diet containing either glucose (GLU) or fructose (FRU) at 27% (w/w) with sodium orthovanadate at 0 (control), 25 (VO{sub 4}1) and 50 (VO{sub 4}2) mg/kg of diet. Glucose oxidation was measured by incubating epididymal adipocytes in buffer, pH 2.4, containing 0.5 mM D(U-{sup 14}C)glucose and entrapping the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} on hyamine hydroxide impregnated filter paper. {sup 14}C-Lipids were extracted with Dole's Mixture. FRU caused a higher rate of basal glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} than GLU feeding. Basal glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} was enhanced in a dose-related fashion by GLU-VO{sub 4}, but greatly inhibited by FRU-VO{sub 4} treatments. Basal and insulin-stimulated glucose conversion to lipid was inhibited by VO{sub 4} irrespective of fructose. VO{sub 4} also resulted in the inhibition of hepatic glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malic enzyme activities. These results suggest that the insulin-mimetic aspect of vanadate in stimulating glucose oxidation to CO{sub 2} is removed by fructose and that vanadate inhibits lipogenesis irrespective of fructose.

  18. Natural history of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the progression from normal glucose tolerance to impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance: the Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, Kristine; Vaag, Allan; Holst, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS), early-phase insulin release (EPIR), and insulin secretion relative to insulin action (disposition index) were estimated. RESULTS: Five years before the pre-diabetes diagnoses (i-IFG, i-IGT, and IFG/IGT), ISI, HOMA-IS, EPIR, and disposition index were lower than...... in individuals who maintained NGT. During the 5-year follow-up, individuals developing i-IFG experienced a significant decline only in HOMA-IS, whereas individuals developing i-IGT experienced significant declines in ISI, EPIR, and disposition index. Individuals with IFG/IGT exhibited pronounced declines in ISI......, HOMA-IS, EPIR, and disposition index during the 5-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A stationary reduced insulin secretion followed by a decline in primarily hepatic insulin sensitivity characterizes the transition from NGT to i-IFG. In contrast, low whole-body insulin sensitivity with a secondary lack...

  19. High saturated fatty acid intake induces insulin secretion by elevating gastric inhibitory polypeptide levels in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itoh, Kazue; Moriguchi, Ririko; Yamada, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    insulin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) secretion. To clarify the effect of ingested fatty acid composition on glucose levels, we conducted an intervention study to investigate the insulin and plasma GIP responses in 11 healthy women, including a dietary control. Subjects were provided daily...... and FB-30 or F-30. However, insulin levels were higher after the FB-30 than after the F-20 (P incremental GIP between FB-30 and F-30 correlated significantly and positively...

  20. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A. C.; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B.; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants

  1. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals : findings from the RODAM study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to

  2. Elevation of Fasting Ghrelin in Healthy Human Subjects Consuming a High-Salt Diet: A Novel Mechanism of Obesity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Overweight/obesity is a chronic disease that carries an increased risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and premature death. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a clear relationship between salt intake and obesity, but the pathophysiologic mechanisms remain unknown. We hypothesized that ghrelin, which regulates appetite, food intake, and fat deposition, becomes elevated when one consumes a high-salt diet, contributing to the progression of obesity. We, therefore, investigated fasting ghrelin concentrations during a high-salt diet. Thirty-eight non-obese and normotensive subjects (aged 25 to 50 years were selected from a rural community in Northern China. They were sequentially maintained on a normal diet for three days at baseline, a low-salt diet for seven days (3 g/day, NaCl, then a high-salt diet for seven days (18 g/day. The concentration of plasma ghrelin was measured using an immunoenzyme method (ELISA. High-salt intake significantly increased fasting ghrelin levels, which were higher during the high-salt diet (320.7 ± 30.6 pg/mL than during the low-salt diet (172.9 ± 8.9 pg/mL. The comparison of ghrelin levels between the different salt diets was statistically-significantly different (p < 0.01. A positive correlation between 24-h urinary sodium excretion and fasting ghrelin levels was demonstrated. Our data indicate that a high-salt diet elevates fasting ghrelin in healthy human subjects, which may be a novel underlying mechanism of obesity.

  3. Effectiveness of the low-glucose suspend feature of insulin pump during fasting during Ramadan in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Nancy Samir

    2016-09-01

    Severe hypoglycaemia during the daytime of Ramadan fasting is a highly feared complication. In a prospective study, we investigated the effect of the low-glucose suspend (LGS) algorithm on the frequency of hypoglycaemia in adolescents with T1DM who wished to fast during Ramadan. Sixty patients (19 males and 41 females, 15.6 ± 2.7 years, duration of diabetes 5.8 ± 2.9 years, pump therapy for 1.73 ± 0.99 years, used the Paradigm(®) Veo(™) System (Medtronic) and were divided into two groups: first (n=25), those who used the sensor with low-glucose suspend (LGS) feature and second (n = 35), those who used the sensor but turned off low-glucose suspend (LGS) feature. A total of 2716 LGS alerts occurred, and 48.6% began in the afternoon between 4pm and 7pm. The mean duration of LGS events was 26.5 min, 38% lasted for insulin delivery was automatically resumed) and was 155.6 ± 11.1 mg/dL at 240 min. LGS usage significantly reduced area under the curve (AUC) 240 mg/dL (p = 0.006). None of the LGS-on group broke their fast versus 15 in the second group (p = 0.001). No episodes of severe hyperglycaemia or DKA were noticed in either groups. Usage of low-glucose suspend (LGS) significantly reduced exposure to hypoglycaemia without compromising safety. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Elevated fasting and postprandial C-terminal telopeptide after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghsoodi, Negar; Alaghband-Zadeh, Jamshid; Cross, Gemma F; Werling, Malin; Fändriks, Lars; Docherty, Neil G; Olbers, Torsten; Dew, Tracy; Sherwood, Roy A; Vincent, Royce P; le Roux, Carel W

    2017-07-01

    Background Roux-en-Y gastric bypass increases circulating bile acid concentrations, known mediators of postprandial suppression of markers of bone resorption. Long-term data, however, indicate that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass confers an increased risk of bone loss on recipients. Methods Thirty-six obese individuals, median age 44 (26-64) with median body mass index at baseline of 42.5 (40.4-46) were studied before and 15 months after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. After an overnight fast, patients received a 400 kcal mixed meal. Blood samples were collected premeal then at 30-min periods for 120 min. Pre and postmeal samples were analysed for total bile acids, parathyroid hormone and C-terminal telopeptide. Results Body weight loss post Roux-en-Y gastric bypass was associated with a median 4.9-fold increase in peak postprandial total bile acid concentration, and a median 2.4-fold increase in cumulative food evoked bile acid response. Median fasting parathyroid hormone, postprandial reduction in parathyroid hormone and total parathyroid hormone release over 120 min remained unchanged after surgery. After surgery, median fasting C-terminal telopeptide increased 2.3-fold, peak postprandial concentrations increased 3.8-fold and total release was increased 1.9-fold. Conclusions Fasting and postprandial total bile acids and C-terminal telopeptide are increased above reference range after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. These changes occur in spite of improved vitamin D status with supplementation. These results suggest that post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass increases in total bile acids do not effectively oppose an ongoing resorptive signal operative along the gut-bone axis. Serial measurement of C-terminal telopeptide may be of value as a risk marker for long-term skeletal pathology in patients post Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

  5. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125 I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  6. Feeding butter with elevated content of trans-10, cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid to lean rats does not impair glucose tolerance or muscle insulin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanson, Amanda; Hopkins, Loren E; AlZahal, Ousama; Ritchie, Ian R; MacDonald, Tara; Wright, David C; McBride, Brian W; Dyck, David J

    2014-06-23

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of isolated CLA supplementation on glucose homeostasis in humans and rodents. However, both the amount and relative abundance of CLA isomers in supplemental form are not representative of what is consumed from natural sources. No study to date has examined the effects of altered CLA isomer content within a natural food source. Our goal was to increase the content of the insulin desensitizing CLAt10,c12 isomer relative to the CLAc9,t11 isomer in cow's milk by inducing subacute rumenal acidosis (SARA), and subsequently investigate the effects of this milk fat on parameters related to glucose and insulin tolerance in rats. We fed female rats (~2.5 to 3 months of age) CLA t10,c12 -enriched (SARA) butter or non-SARA butter based diets for 4 weeks in either low (10% of kcal from fat; 0.18% total CLA by weight) or high (60% of kcal from fat; 0.55% total CLA by weight) amounts. In an effort to extend these findings, we then fed rats high (60% kcal) amounts of SARA or non-SARA butter for a longer duration (8 weeks) and assessed changes in whole body glucose, insulin and pyruvate tolerance in comparison to low fat and 60% lard conditions. There was a main effect for increased fasting blood glucose and insulin in SARA vs. non-SARA butter groups after 4 weeks of feeding (p butter, but not glucose or pyruvate tolerance. The non-SARA butter did not impair tolerance to glucose, insulin or pyruvate. This study suggests that increasing the consumption of a naturally enriched CLAt10,c12 source, at least in rats, has minimal impact on whole body glucose tolerance or muscle specific insulin response.

  7. Effects of insulin sensitizers on plaque vulnerability associated with elevated lipid content in atheroma in ApoE-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalu, W T; Wang, Z Q; Schneider, D J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L C; Taatjes, D J; Sobel, B E

    2004-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes are generally precipitated by rupture of lipid-laden, relatively acellular, vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with thin fibrous caps. We investigated whether a high-fat diet alters insulin sensitivity and whether insulin sensitizers (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) alter the composition of otherwise lipidladen atherosclerotic plaques in mice deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE-knockout mice were fed a high-fat (n=30) or standard chow (n=10) diet for two weeks. Thereafter, those fed the high-fat diet were treated with troglitazone (n=10), rosiglitazone (n=10) or no drug (n=10) for 16 weeks beginning at 8 weeks of age. Carbohydrate metabolism was assessed with intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests. Plaque composition was characterised with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The high-fat diet induced insulin resistance in the absence of weight gain. Compared with control animals on the high-fat diet, animals given troglitazone (400 mg/kg/day) or rosiglitazone (4 mg/kg/day) had significantly less area under the curve (AUC) for insulin ( p<0.05) and glucose disposal ( p<0.05). Despite significant increases in insulin sensitivity with drug treatment, no change in HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels, nor reduction in atheroma size or lipid content was noted. Thus, improvement in insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet in this animal model of vasculopathy did not alter plaque composition.

  8. Adverse outcome has a U-shaped relation with acute phase change in insulin sensitivity after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Filipe A; Cintra, Riobaldo; Carvalho, Luiz S F; Santos, Simone N; Modolo, Rodrigo; Munhoz, Daniel B; Quinaglia E Silva, Jose Carlos; Coelho, Otavio R; Nadruz, Wilson; Sposito, Andrei C

    2018-03-01

    Although stress hyperglycemia after myocardial infarction (MI) is consistently associated with increased mortality, recent studies suggest that the addition of upstream markers of glucose metabolism may improve risk identification. Hence, our aim was to evaluate the association between insulin sensitivity changes during MI hospitalization and outcomes. A prospective cohort of 331 consecutive ST-Elevation MI (STEMI) patients without insulin provision therapy was used for the analyses. Blood samples were collected upon admission (D1) and after 5days (D5) of the inciting event. We measured blood glucose and insulin to estimate insulin sensitivity using the updated Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2S). Patients were assessed for intra-hospital death and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) during follow-up. HOMA2S was 62%±52% on D1 and 86%±57% on D5 (p<0.001). Total follow-up was a median of 2 (0.9-2.8) years and found a U-shaped relation between the change in HOMA2S from D1 to D5 (ΔHOMA2S) and major adverse cardiac events (MACE) (p=0.017). Fully adjusted cox-regression models showed that patients from T1 and T3 were about 2.5 times more prone to suffer from MACE than those in T2. Net Reclassification Index adding ΔHOMA2S as a categorical variable dichotomized as T2 and T1 or T3 to a model of GRACE risk score with glucose D1 yielded a better predictive model (0.184 [95% CI 0.124-0.264]; p=0.032). A U-shaped curve describes the relation between insulin sensitivity change and MACE during acute phase STEMI and, thus indicating that acute dysglycemia must be appreciated in light of a time spectrum and insulin levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence of a major locus for lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity in addition to a pleiotropic locus for both LPL and fasting insulin: results from the HERITAGE Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y; Rice, T; Després, J P; Gagnon, J; Nadeau, A; Bergeron, J; Pérusse, L; Bouchard, C; Leon, A S; Skinner, J S; Wilmore, J H; Rao, D C

    1999-06-01

    A major gene hypothesis for heparin releasable plasma lipoprotein lipase (PH-LPL) activity was assessed using segregation analyses of data on 495 members in 98 normolipidemic sedentary families of Caucasian descent who participated in the HERITAGE Family Study. Segregation analyses were performed on PH-LPL adjusted for age, and on PH-LPL activity adjusted for age and fasting insulin. Prior to adjustment for insulin, neither a major gene effect nor a multifactorial component could be rejected, and support for a major gene was equivocal i.e. neither the Mendelian transmission nor the no transmission (equal tau s) models were rejected. However, after adjusting for the effects of insulin, a major gene effect on PH-LPL activity was unambiguous. The putative locus accounted for 60% of the total phenotypic variance, and the homozygous recessive form affected 10% (q2) of the sample (i.e. gene frequency (q) = 0.31), and led to a low PH-LPL value. The lack of a significant multifactorial effect suggested that the familial etiology of PH-LPL activity adjusted for insulin was likely to be primarily a function of the major locus. In conclusion, the present study is the first to report segregation analyses on PH-LPL activity prior to and after adjusting for insulin, and suggests that there is an indication of a pleiotropic genetic effect on PH-LPL activity and insulin, in addition to a major gene effect on PH-LPL activity alone.

  10. The effect of fasting/refeeding and insulin treatment on the expression of the regulatory genes of ketogenesis in intestine and liver of suckling rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, G; Asins, G; Hegardt, F G; Serra, D

    1997-04-15

    The influence of fasting/refeeding and insulin treatment on ketogenesis in 12-day-old suckling rats was studied in intestine and liver by determining mRNA levels and enzyme activity of the two genes responsible for regulation of ketogenesis: carnitine palmitoyl transferase I (CPT I) and mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Fasting produced hardly any change in mRNA or activity of CPT 1 in intestine, but led to a decrease in mitochondrial (mit.) HMG-CoA synthase. In liver, while mRNA levels and activity for CPT I increased, neither parameter was changed in HMG-CoA synthase. The comparison of these values with the ketogenic rate of both tissues under the fasting/refeeding treatment shows that HMG-CoA synthase could be the main gene responsible for regulation of ketogenesis in suckling rats. The small changes produced in serum ketone bodies in fasting/refeeding, with a profile similar to the ketogenic rate of the liver, indicate that liver contributes most to ketone body synthesis in suckling rats under these experimental conditions. Short-term insulin treatment produced increases in mRNA levels and activity in CPT I in intestine, but it also decreased both parameters in mit. HMG-CoA synthase. In liver, graphs of mRNA and activity were nearly identical in both genes. There was a marked decrease in mRNA levels and activity, resembling those values observed in adult rats. As in fasting/refeeding, the ketogenic rate correlated better to mit. HMG-CoA synthase than CPT I, and liver was the main organ regulating ketogenesis after insulin treatment. Serum ketone body concentrations were decreased by insulin but recovered after the second hour. Long-term insulin treatment had little effect on the mRNA levels for CPT I or mit. HMG-CoA synthase, but both the expressed and total activities of mit. HMG-CoA synthase were reduced by half in both intestine and liver. The ketogenic rate of both organs was decreased to 40% by long-term insulin treatment. The different effects of refeeding

  11. Thermogenesis induced by a high-carbohydrate meal in fasted lean and overweight young men: insulin, body fat, and sympathetic nervous system involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Lopes, Iva; Forga, Luis; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    This dietary trial was designed to evaluate the effect of an experimental short-term fasting period followed by a high-carbohydrate meal on energy expenditure, thermogenesis, and sympathetic nervous system activity in normal (body mass index 27 kg/m(2)) men who were healthy, non-diabetic or with no other endocrine disease, non-smokers, not taking oral prescription medications, and with a stable body weight for the previous 3 mo. Fasting and fed energy expenditures and diet-induced thermogenesis were measured after a high-carbohydrate meal in seven overweight and six lean young male subjects by indirect calorimetry. Heart rate, urinary excretion of catecholamines, serum glucose, and insulin were also measured over the experimental fasting (7.5 h) and postprandial (4 h) periods. After carbohydrate intake, overweight men showed a significantly higher energy production (kJ/kg of fat-free mass) than did lean individuals, and the diet-induced thermogenesis (percentage of energy intake) was positively correlated with body fat (kg), percentage of body fat, fat-free mass (kg), and fasting pre-meal serum insulin levels. Postprandial cumulative energy expenditure was directly associated with postprandial insulin response and with mean postprandial heart rate values. No significant differences in urinary catecholamines were found between lean and overweight men at basal conditions or during the study period. Overweight individuals showed similar short-term sympathetic nervous system responses induced by an experimental fasting period. Although diet-induced thermogenesis after carbohydrate intake was not statistically different between lean and overweight men, the postprandial insulin response and body fat content seemed to be involved in sympathetic nervous system activity.

  12. Impairment of extra-high frequency auditory thresholds in subjects with elevated levels of fasting blood glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Das

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to assess whether there is an association between elevated Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG and hearing impairment in Bangladeshi population. A total of 142 subjects (72 with elevated FBG; 70 control were included in the study. The mean auditory thresholds of the control subjects at 1, 4, 8 and 12 kHz frequencies were 6.35 ± 0.35, 10.07 ± 0.91, 27.57 ± 1.82, 51.28 ± 3.01 dB SPL (decibel sound pressure level, respectively and that of the subjects with elevated FBG were 8.33 ± 0.66, 14.37 ± 1.14, 38.96 ± 2.23, and 71.11 ± 2.96 dB, respectively. The auditory thresholds of the subjects with elevated FBG were significantly (p 10 years showed significantly (p 40 years and younger (≤40 years age groups compared to the respective controls. The binary logistic regression analysis showed a 5.79-fold increase in the odds of extra-high frequency hearing impairment in diabetic subjects after adjustment for age, gender and BMI. This study provides conclusive evidence that auditory threshold at an extra-high frequency could be a sensitive marker for hearing impairment in diabetic subjects.

  13. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose and insulin modify dietary weight loss success: results from 3 randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Mads F; Ritz, Christian; Blaak, Ellen E; Saris, Wim Hm; Langin, Dominique; Poulsen, Sanne Kellebjerg; Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Sørensen, Thorkild Ia; Zohar, Yishai; Astrup, Arne

    2017-08-01

    Background: Which diet is optimal for weight loss and maintenance remains controversial and implies that no diet fits all patients. Objective: We studied concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) as prognostic markers for successful weight loss and maintenance through diets with different glycemic loads or different fiber and whole-grain content, assessed in 3 randomized trials of overweight participants. Design: After an 8-wk weight loss, participants in the DiOGenes (Diet, Obesity, and Genes) trial consumed ad libitum for 26 wk a diet with either a high or a low glycemic load. Participants in the Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet (OPUS) Supermarket intervention (SHOPUS) trial consumed ad libitum for 26 wk the New Nordic Diet, which is high in fiber and whole grains, or a control diet. Participants in the NUGENOB (Nutrient-Gene Interactions in Human Obesity) trial consumed a hypocaloric low-fat and high-carbohydrate or a high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet for 10 wk. On the basis of FPG before treatment, participants were categorized as normoglycemic (FPG load diet, whereas normoglycemic individuals regained a mean of 1.44 kg (95% CI: 0.48, 2.41 kg; P = 0.003) more [mean group difference: 4.39 kg (95% CI: 1.76, 7.02 kg); P = 0.001]. In SHOPUS, prediabetic individuals lost a mean of 6.04 kg (95% CI: 4.05, 8.02 kg; P loss and maintenance among overweight patients consuming diets with a low glycemic load or with large amounts of fiber and whole grains. These trials were registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00390637 (DiOGenes) and NCT01195610 (SHOPUS), and at ISRNCT.com as ISRCTN25867281 (NUGENOB). © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. Increased CD19+CD24+CD27+ B regulatory cells are associated with insulin resistance in patients with type I Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Du, Changji; Wang, Yinping; Liu, Jun

    2017-06-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is characterized by dysregulated immune responses and is commonly associated with insulin resistance. However, the mechanism of insulin resistance in HT remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the percentage of B regulatory lymphocytes (Bregs) and insulin resistance in patients with HT but with normal thyroid function (type I). A total of 59 patients with type I HT and 38 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed to measure insulin secretion and assess β‑cell functions. Flow cytometry was performed to examine the percentages of lymphocyte populations. The patients with HT exhibited normal fasting and postprandial glucose and fasting insulin secretion, but increased secretion of early‑phase and total insulin. The patients with HT also had insufficient β‑cell compensation for insulin resistance, indicated by a reduced disposition index, in the fasting state. An elevation in the percentage of CD19+CD24+CD27+ Bregs was also observed, which correlated positively with insulin secretion and insulin resistance in the fasting state. The patients with type I HT had postprandial insulin resistance and insufficient β‑cell compensation for fasting insulin resistance. Therefore, the increase in CD19+CD24+CD27+ Bregs was closely associated with fasting insulin secretion. These results provide novel insight into the mechanism of insulin resistance in HT.

  15. The birth weight lowering C-allele of rs900400 near LEKR1 and CCNL1 associates with elevated insulin release following an oral glucose challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehm A Andersson

    Full Text Available The first genome-wide association study on birth weight was recently published and the most significant associated birth weight lowering variant was the rs900400 C-allele located near LEKR1 and CCNL1. We aimed to replicate the association with birth weight in the Danish Inter99 study and furthermore to evaluate associations between rs900400 and indices of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity obtained by oral glucose tolerance tests in adults from the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish, Metabolic Syndrome in Men (METSIM sample.For 4,744 of 6,784 Inter99 participants, midwife journals were traced through the Danish State Archives and association of rs900400 with birth weight was examined. Associations between rs900400 and fasting serum insulin, fasting plasma glucose, insulinogenic index, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and disposition index were studied in 5,484 Danish and 6,915 Finnish non-diabetic individuals and combined in meta-analyses.The C-allele of rs900400 was associated with a 22.1 g lower birth weight ([-41.3;-3.0], P = 0.024 per allele. Moreover, in combined analyses of the Danish Inter99 study and the Finnish METSIM study we found that the birth weight lowering allele was associated with increased insulin release measured by the insulinogenic index (β = 2.25% [0.59; 3.91], P = 0.008 and with an increased disposition index (β = 1.76% [0.04; 3.49], P = 0.05.The birth weight lowering effect of the C-allele of rs900400 located near LEKR1 and CCNL1 was replicated in the Danish population. Furthermore the C-allele was associated with increased insulin response following oral glucose stimulation in a meta-analysis based on Danish and Finnish non-diabetic individuals.

  16. Serum cortisol level and its correlation to serum insulin and fasting blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jianzhong; Zhang Jun

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the change of serum cortisol levels and its correlation to blood sugar and serum insulin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: Blood sugar with oxidase method and serum cortisol insulin levels with RIA (8 AM fasting specimen) were measured in 26 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 30 controls. Results: The serum cortisol levels in the diabetic patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). The cortisol levels were positively correlated to the blood sugar levels (r=0.32, p<0.01), but not correlated to insulin levels. Conclusion: There were cortisol secretion disturbances in patients with type 2 diabetes

  17. Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Earl S.; Wheaton, Anne G.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Li, Chaoyang; Perry, Geraldine S.; Croft, Janet B.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited information from population-based investigations of the associations between sleep duration and sleep disorders and parameters of glucose homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to examine cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and sleep disordered breathing with concentrations of insulin, fasting and 2-h glucose, and HbA1c. Methods Data from 11 815 adults aged ≥20 years without diagnosed diabetes (5002 with an oral glucose tolerance test) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005–2010 were used. Information about sleep duration (2005–2010) and sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing (2005–2008) was obtained via questionnaire. Results An estimated 36.0% of participants reported sleeping ≤6 h/night, 62.0% reported sleeping 7–9 h/night, and 2.0% reported sleeping ≥10 h/night. In 2005–2008, 33.0% reported snoring ≥5 nights per week, 5.9% reported they snorted, gasped, or stopped breathing ≥5 nights/week, and 4.2% reported sleep apnea. Sleep duration was significantly associated with fasting concentrations of insulin and concentrations of HbA1c only in models that did not adjust for body mass index (BMI). Concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose were significantly associated with sleep duration in models that adjusted only for age. Snoring frequency was positively associated with concentrations of insulin and HbA1c. Frequency of snorting or stopping breathing and sleep apnea status were associated with concentrations of insulin and of HbA1c only when BMI was not accounted for. Conclusion In a representative sample of US adults, concentrations of insulin and HbA1c were significantly associated with short sleep duration, possibly mediated by BMI. PMID:24164804

  18. Associations between self-reported sleep duration and sleeping disorder with concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose, insulin, and glycosylated hemoglobin among adults without diagnosed diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Earl S; Wheaton, Anne G; Chapman, Daniel P; Li, Chaoyang; Perry, Geraldine S; Croft, Janet B

    2014-07-01

    There is limited information from population-based investigations of the associations between sleep duration and sleep disorders and parameters of glucose homeostasis. The objective of the present study was to examine cross-sectional associations between sleep duration and sleep disordered breathing with concentrations of insulin, fasting and 2-h glucose, and HbA1c. Data from 11 815 adults aged ≥20 years without diagnosed diabetes (5002 with an oral glucose tolerance test) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010 were used. Information about sleep duration (2005-2010) and sleep apnea and sleep-disordered breathing (2005-2008) was obtained via questionnaire. An estimated 36.0% of participants reported sleeping ≤6 h/night, 62.0% reported sleeping 7-9 h/night, and 2.0% reported sleeping ≥10 h/night. In 2005-2008, 33.0% reported snoring ≥5 nights per week, 5.9% reported they snorted, gasped, or stopped breathing ≥5 nights/week, and 4.2% reported sleep apnea. Sleep duration was significantly associated with fasting concentrations of insulin and concentrations of HbA1c only in models that did not adjust for body mass index (BMI). Concentrations of fasting and 2-h glucose were significantly associated with sleep duration in models that adjusted only for age. Snoring frequency was positively associated with concentrations of insulin and HbA1c. Frequency of snorting or stopping breathing and sleep apnea status were associated with concentrations of insulin and of HbA1c only when BMI was not accounted for. In a representative sample of US adults, concentrations of insulin and HbA1c were significantly associated with short sleep duration, possibly mediated by BMI. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Serum zonulin is elevated in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and correlates with insulin resistance and severity of anovulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Zhang, Li; Yue, Fangzhi; Zheng, Yingying; Russell, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that increased gut permeability may be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Human zonulin is currently the only physiological mediator known to reversibly regulate gut permeability by disassembling intestinal tight junctions. So far, no data on serum zonulin levels in patients with PCOS are available. This study aimed to determine circulating serum zonulin levels in women with PCOS and discuss the relationship between zonulin, insulin resistance, and menstrual disorders in this group. A case-control study. The study includes 78 women recently diagnosed with PCOS and 63 age-matched healthy controls recruited. Serum zonulin levels were determined by ELISA. Insulin resistance was assessed by homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and Matsuda and DeFronzo's insulin sensitivity index (ISI). PCOS women had higher serum zonulin levels (P=0.022). After adjustment for age and BMI, zonulin levels significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and ISI. Furthermore, PCOS women with more severe menstrual disorders had significantly higher zonulin levels and displayed an inverse correlation between zonulin and the number of menstrual cycles per year (r=-0.398, Pzonulin, a biomarker for gut permeability, is increased in PCOS women and correlates with insulin resistance and severity of menstrual disorders. It suggests that alterations in gut permeability may play a role in the pathophysiology of PCOS, and serum zonulin might be used as a biomarker for both risk stratification and therapeutic outcomes in PCOS women. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  20. Cardioprotective Effect of Intermittent Fasting is Associated with an Elevation of Adiponectin Levels in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ruiqian; Ahmet, Ismayil; Brown, Martin; Cheng, Aiwu; Kamimura, Naomi; Talan, Mark; Mattson, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that dietary energy restriction, including intermittent fasting (IF), can protect heart and brain cells against injury and improve functional outcome in animal models of myocardial infarction and stroke. Here we report that IF improves glycemic control and protects the myocardium against ischemia-induced cell damage and inflammation in rats. Echocardiographic analysis of heart structural and functional variables revealed that IF attenuates the growth-related increase in posterior ventricular wall thickness, , end systolic and diastolic volumes, and reduces the ejection fraction. The size of the ischemic infarct 24 hours following permanent ligation of a coronary artery was significantly smaller, and markers of inflammation (infiltration of leukocytes in the area at risk and plasma IL-6 levels) were less, in IF rats compared to rats on the control diet. IF resulted in increased levels of circulating adiponectin prior to and after myocardial infarction. Because recent studies have shown that adiponectin can protect the heart against ischemic injury, our findings suggest a potential role for adiponectin as a mediator of the cardioprotective effect of IF. PMID:19423320

  1. A low-frequency inactivating AKT2 variant enriched in the Finnish population is associated with fasting insulin levels and type 2 diabetes risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grarup, Niels; Rivas, Manuel A; Mahajan, Anubha; Locke, Adam E; Cingolani, Pablo; Pers, Tune H; Viñuela, Ana; Brown, Andrew A; Wu, Ying; Flannick, Jason; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gamazon, Eric R; Gaulton, Kyle J; Im, Hae Kyung; Teslovich, Tanya M; Blackwell, Thomas W; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Yuhui; Green, Todd; Hartl, Christopher; Kang, Hyun Min; Kumar, Ashish; Ladenvall, Claes; Ma, Clement; Moutsianas, Loukas; Pearson, Richard D; Perry, John R B; Rayner, N William; Robertson, Neil R; Scott, Laura J; van de Bunt, Martijn; Eriksson, Johan G; Jula, Antti; Koskinen, Seppo; Lehtimäki, Terho; Palotie, Aarno; Raitakari, Olli T; Jacobs, Suzanne BR; Wessel, Jennifer; Chu, Audrey Y; Scott, Robert A; Goodarzi, Mark O; Blancher, Christine; Buck, Gemma; Buck, David; Chines, Peter S; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P; Groves, Christopher J; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Jackson, Anne U; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S; Stringham, Heather M; Trakalo, Joseph; Banks, Eric; Carey, Jason; Carneiro, Mauricio O; DePristo, Mark; Farjoun, Yossi; Fennell, Timothy; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Grant, George; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Maguire, Jared; Neale, Benjamin M; Poplin, Ryan; Purcell, Shaun; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Shakir, Khalid; Smith, Joshua D; Strom, Tim M; Wieland, Thomas; Lindstrom, Jaana; Brandslund, Ivan; Christensen, Cramer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Lakka, Timo A; Doney, Alex S F; Nilsson, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Langenberg, Claudia; Varga, Tibor V; Franks, Paul W; Rolandsson, Olov; Rosengren, Anders H; Farook, Vidya S; Thameem, Farook; Puppala, Sobha; Kumar, Satish; Lehman, Donna M; Jenkinson, Christopher P; Curran, Joanne E; Hale, Daniel Esten; Fowler, Sharon P; Arya, Rector; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Abboud, Hanna E; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hicks, Pamela J; Palmer, Nicholette D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Bowden, Donald W; Freedman, Barry I; Esko, Tõnu; Mägi, Reedik; Milani, Lili; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Narisu, Narisu; Kinnunen, Leena; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Swift, Amy; Pasko, Dorota; Wood, Andrew R; Fadista, João; Pollin, Toni I; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil; Glaser, Benjamin; Thorand, Barbara; Strauch, Konstantin; Peters, Annette; Roden, Michael; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Liang, Liming; Kriebel, Jennifer; Illig, Thomas; Grallert, Harald; Gieger, Christian; Meisinger, Christa; Lannfelt, Lars; Musani, Solomon K; Griswold, Michael; Taylor, Herman A; Wilson, Gregory; Correa, Adolfo; Oksa, Heikki; Scott, William R; Afzal, Uzma; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Loh, Marie; Chambers, John C; Sehmi, Jobanpreet; Kooner, Jaspal Singh; Lehne, Benjamin; Cho, Yoon Shin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Käräjämäki, Annemari; Qi, Qibin; Qi, Lu; Huang, Jinyan; Hu, Frank B; Melander, Olle; Orho-Melander, Marju; Below, Jennifer E; Aguilar, David; Wong, Tien Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Chia, Kee Seng; Lim, Wei Yen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chan, Edmund; Tai, E Shyong; Aung, Tin; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Meitinger, Thomas; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Hakaste, Liisa; Kravic, Jasmina; Jørgensen, Marit E; Lauritzen, Torsten; Deloukas, Panos; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Owen, Katharine R; Farmer, Andrew J; Frayling, Timothy M; O'Rahilly, Stephen P; Walker, Mark; Levy, Jonathan C; Hodgkiss, Dylan; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Stančáková, Alena; Barroso, Inês; Bharadwaj, Dwaipayan; Chan, Juliana; Chandak, Giriraj R; Daly, Mark J; Donnelly, Peter J; Ebrahim, Shah B; Elliott, Paul; Fingerlin, Tasha; Froguel, Philippe; Hu, Cheng; Jia, Weiping; Ma, Ronald C W; McVean, Gilean; Park, Taesung; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Sandhu, Manjinder; Scott, James; Sladek, Rob; Tandon, Nikhil; Teo, Yik Ying; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Watanabe, Richard M; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kesaniemi, Y Antero; Uusitupa, Matti; Spector, Timothy D; Salomaa, Veikko; Rauramaa, Rainer; Palmer, Colin N A; Prokopenko, Inga; Morris, Andrew D; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Jørgensen, Torben; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Kuusisto, Johanna; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Bell, Graeme I; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G; Dupuis, Josee; Ripatti, Samuli; Hanis, Craig L; Florez, Jose C; Mohlke, Karen L; Meigs, James B; Laakso, Markku; Morris, Andrew P; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L; Lindgren, Cecilia M

    2017-01-01

    To identify novel coding association signals and facilitate characterization of mechanisms influencing glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes risk, we analyzed 109,215 variants derived from exome array genotyping together with an additional 390,225 variants from exome sequence in up to 39,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in AKT2 and fasting insulin, a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are causal for monogenic glycemic disorders. The low-frequency allele is associated with a 12% increase in fasting plasma insulin (FI) levels. This variant is present at 1.1% frequency in Finns but virtually absent in individuals from other ancestries. Carriers of the FI-increasing allele had increased 2-hour insulin values, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio=1.05). In cellular studies, the AKT2-Thr50 protein exhibited a partial loss of function. We extend the allelic spectrum for coding variants in AKT2 associated with disorders of glucose homeostasis and demonstrate bidirectional effects of variants within the pleckstrin homology domain of AKT2. PMID:28341696

  2. Fast-food-based hyper-alimentation can induce rapid and profound elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kechagias, S; Ernersson, A; Dahlqvist, O; Lundberg, P; Lindström, T; Nystrom, F H

    2008-05-01

    To study the effect of fast-food-based hyper-alimentation on liver enzymes and hepatic triglyceride content (HTGC). Prospective interventional study with parallel control group. University Hospital of Linköping, Sweden. 12 healthy men and six healthy women with a mean (SD) age of 26 (6.6) years and a matched control group. Subjects in the intervention group aimed for a body weight increase of 5-15% by eating at least two fast-food-based meals a day with the goal to double the regular caloric intake in combination with adoption of a sedentary lifestyle for 4 weeks. Weekly changes of serum aminotransferases and HTGC measured by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy at baseline and after the intervention. Subjects in the intervention group increased from 67.6 (9.1) kg to 74.0 (11) kg in weight (p19 U/l, men >30 U/l) during the intervention. Sugar (mono- and disaccharides) intake during week 3 correlated with the maximal ALT/baseline ALT ratio (r = 0.62, p = 0.006). HTGC increased from 1.1 (1.9)% to 2.8 (4.8)%, although this was not related to the increase in ALT levels. ALT levels were unchanged in controls. Hyper-alimentation per se can induce profound ALT elevations in less than 4 weeks. Our study clearly shows that in the evaluation of subjects with elevated ALT the medical history should include not only questions about alcohol intake but also explore whether recent excessive food intake has occurred.

  3. Short-term administration of isotretinoin elevates plasma triglyceride concentrations without affecting insulin sensitivity in healthy humans

    OpenAIRE

    Stoll, D.

    2004-01-01

    Résumé: Les mécanismes responsables de la résistance à l'insuline associée à l'hypertriglycéridémie chez l'homme sont mal connus. Il a été proposé que l'hypertriglycéridémie n'engendrait une résistance à l'insuline que lorsqu'elle est associée à une augmentation du transfert de lipides dans le muscle. Selon cette hypothèse, une hypertriglycéridémie secondaire à la diminution de l'élimination de particules riches en triglycérides ne devrait pas engendrer de résistance à l'insuline. Afin ...

  4. Insulin-like growth factor I and glucagon-like peptide-2 responses to fasting followed by controlled or ad libitum refeeding in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, David W; Murali, Sangita G; Liu, Xiaowen

    2008-01-01

    Luminal nutrients stimulate structural and functional regeneration in the intestine through mechanisms thought to involve insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2). We investigated the relationship between IGF-I and GLP-2 responses and mucosal growth in rats fasted...... for 48 h and then refed for 2 or 4 days by continuous intravenous or intragastric infusion or ad libitum feeding. Fasting induced significant decreases in body weight, plasma concentrations of IGF-I and bioactive GLP-2, jejunal mucosal cellularity (mass, protein, DNA, and villus height), IGF-I m...

  5. Glucose tolerance, insulin release, and insulin binding to monocytes in kidney transplant recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, W.A.; Wielechowski, K.S.; Mahajan, S.K.; Migdal, S.D.; McDonald, F.D.

    1982-01-01

    In order to evaluate glucose tolerance following renal transplantation, intravenous glucose tolerance tests (IVGTT), with evaluation of hormonal responses to the intravenous glucose load and percent specific 125 I-insulin binding to peripheral blood monocytes, were studied in eight clinically stable kidney transplant recipients. For comparison purposes, identical studies were done in eight control subjects and seven clinically stable hemodialysis patients. One transplant recipient was glucose intolerant, with fasting hyperglycemia, elevated HbA1C, and abnormal glucose decay constant. Impaired pancreatic insulin release appeared to be the major factor accounting for his glucose intolerance. The seven glucose-tolerant transplant recipients had significantly increased insulin release during IVGTT compared to control subjects, and significant correlations were found among insulin release, glucose decay constant, and fasting blood sugar in those patients. Insulin binding to monocytes was significantly greater in transplant recipients than control subjects due to an increase in insulin binding capacity per cell. A significant correlation was found between percent specific 125 I-insulin binding and steroid dose, expressed as mg/kg body weight/day, in those patients. Thus, chronic steroid administration does not cause glucose intolerance in transplant recipients who manifest steroid-associated increases in pancreatic insulin release and cellular insulin binding capacity

  6. Higher magnesium intake is associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin, with no evidence of interaction with select genetic loci, in a meta-analysis of 15 charge consortium studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assoc...

  7. YKL-40, a biomarker of inflammation, is elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes and is related to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathcke, C N; Johansen, J S; Vestergaard, H

    2006-01-01

    YKL-40 participates in inflammatory states and vascular processes, which implies that comparison can be made with other inflammatory markers associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In the present study levels of plasma YKL-40 and serum hsCRP were evaluated in patients with T2D....

  8. Ovarian acyclicity in zoo African elephants (Loxodonta africana) is associated with high body condition scores and elevated serum insulin and leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfeld, Kari A; Brown, Janine L

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether excessive body fat and altered metabolic hormone concentrations in the circulation were associated with ovarian acyclicity in the world's largest land mammal, the African elephant. We compared body condition, glucose, insulin and leptin concentrations and the glucose-to-insulin ratio (G:I) between cycling (n=23; normal 14-16 week cycles based on serum progestagens for at least 2 years) and non-cycling (n=23; consistent baseline progestagen concentrations for at least 2 years) females. A validated body condition score (BCS) index (five-point scale; 1=thinnest, 5=fattest) was used to assess the degree of fatness of the study elephants. The mean BCS of non-cycling elephants was higher than that of their cycling counterparts. There were differences in concentrations of serum metabolic biomarkers, with non-cycling elephants in the BCS 5 category having higher leptin and insulin concentrations and a lower G:I ratio than cycling BCS 5 females. Using 'non-cycling' as the outcome variable in regression models, high BCS was a strong predictor of a non-cycling status. This study provides the first evidence that ovarian acyclicity in zoo African elephants is associated with body condition indicative of obesity, as well as elevated, perturbed biomarkers of metabolic status.

  9. Trans-ethnic Meta-analysis and Functional Annotation Illuminates the Genetic Architecture of Fasting Glucose and Insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Ti; Raghavan, Sridharan; Maruthur, Nisa; Kabagambe, Edmond Kato; Hong, Jaeyoung; Ng, Maggie C Y; Hivert, Marie-France; Lu, Yingchang; An, Ping; Bentley, Amy R; Drolet, Anne M; Gaulton, Kyle J; Guo, Xiuqing; Armstrong, Loren L; Irvin, Marguerite R; Li, Man; Lipovich, Leonard; Rybin, Denis V; Taylor, Kent D; Agyemang, Charles; Palmer, Nicholette D; Cade, Brian E; Chen, Wei-Min; Dauriz, Marco; Delaney, Joseph A C; Edwards, Todd L; Evans, Daniel S; Evans, Michele K; Lange, Leslie A; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Jingmin; Liu, Yongmei; Nayak, Uma; Patel, Sanjay R; Porneala, Bianca C; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Snijder, Marieke B; Stallings, Sarah C; Tanaka, Toshiko; Yanek, Lisa R; Zhao, Wei; Becker, Diane M; Bielak, Lawrence F; Biggs, Mary L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bowden, Donald W; Chen, Guanjie; Correa, Adolfo; Couper, David J; Crawford, Dana C; Cushman, Mary; Eicher, John D; Fornage, Myriam; Franceschini, Nora; Fu, Yi-Ping; Goodarzi, Mark O; Gottesman, Omri; Hara, Kazuo; Harris, Tamara B; Jensen, Richard A; Johnson, Andrew D; Jhun, Min A; Karter, Andrew J; Keller, Margaux F; Kho, Abel N; Kizer, Jorge R; Krauss, Ronald M; Langefeld, Carl D; Li, Xiaohui; Liang, Jingling; Liu, Simin; Lowe, William L; Mosley, Thomas H; North, Kari E; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Peyser, Patricia A; Patrick, Alan L; Rice, Kenneth M; Selvin, Elizabeth; Sims, Mario; Smith, Jennifer A; Tajuddin, Salman M; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Wren, Mary P; Yao, Jie; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Ziegler, Julie T; Zmuda, Joseph M; Zonderman, Alan B; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Boerwinkle, Eric; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kardia, Sharon L R; Miljkovic, Iva; Pankow, James S; Rotimi, Charles N; Sale, Michele M; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Arnett, Donna K; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Nalls, Michael A; Province, Michael A; Kao, W H Linda; Siscovick, David S; Psaty, Bruce M; Wilson, James G; Loos, Ruth J F; Dupuis, Josée; Rich, Stephen S; Florez, Jose C; Rotter, Jerome I; Morris, Andrew P; Meigs, James B

    2016-07-07

    Knowledge of the genetic basis of the type 2 diabetes (T2D)-related quantitative traits fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) in African ancestry (AA) individuals has been limited. In non-diabetic subjects of AA (n = 20,209) and European ancestry (EA; n = 57,292), we performed trans-ethnic (AA+EA) fine-mapping of 54 established EA FG or FI loci with detailed functional annotation, assessed their relevance in AA individuals, and sought previously undescribed loci through trans-ethnic (AA+EA) meta-analysis. We narrowed credible sets of variants driving association signals for 22/54 EA-associated loci; 18/22 credible sets overlapped with active islet-specific enhancers or transcription factor (TF) binding sites, and 21/22 contained at least one TF motif. Of the 54 EA-associated loci, 23 were shared between EA and AA. Replication with an additional 10,096 AA individuals identified two previously undescribed FI loci, chrX FAM133A (rs213676) and chr5 PELO (rs6450057). Trans-ethnic analyses with regulatory annotation illuminate the genetic architecture of glycemic traits and suggest gene regulation as a target to advance precision medicine for T2D. Our approach to utilize state-of-the-art functional annotation and implement trans-ethnic association analysis for discovery and fine-mapping offers a framework for further follow-up and characterization of GWAS signals of complex trait loci. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  10. Chromosome X-wide association study identifies Loci for fasting insulin and height and evidence for incomplete dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukiainen, Taru; Pirinen, Matti; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Ladenvall, Claes; Kettunen, Johannes; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Sinisalo, Juha; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Eriksson, Johan G; Groop, Leif; Jula, Antti; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Raitakari, Olli T; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    The X chromosome (chrX) represents one potential source for the "missing heritability" for complex phenotypes, which thus far has remained underanalyzed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Here we demonstrate the benefits of including chrX in GWAS by assessing the contribution of 404,862 chrX SNPs to levels of twelve commonly studied cardiometabolic and anthropometric traits in 19,697 Finnish and Swedish individuals with replication data on 5,032 additional Finns. By using a linear mixed model, we estimate that on average 2.6% of the additive genetic variance in these twelve traits is attributable to chrX, this being in proportion to the number of SNPs in the chromosome. In a chrX-wide association analysis, we identify three novel loci: two for height (rs182838724 near FGF16/ATRX/MAGT1, joint P-value = 2.71×10(-9), and rs1751138 near ITM2A, P-value = 3.03×10(-10)) and one for fasting insulin (rs139163435 in Xq23, P-value = 5.18×10(-9)). Further, we find that effect sizes for variants near ITM2A, a gene implicated in cartilage development, show evidence for a lack of dosage compensation. This observation is further supported by a sex-difference in ITM2A expression in whole blood (P-value = 0.00251), and is also in agreement with a previous report showing ITM2A escapes from X chromosome inactivation (XCI) in the majority of women. Hence, our results show one of the first links between phenotypic variation in a population sample and an XCI-escaping locus and pinpoint ITM2A as a potential contributor to the sexual dimorphism in height. In conclusion, our study provides a clear motivation for including chrX in large-scale genetic studies of complex diseases and traits.

  11. A Pooled Analysis of Clinical Pharmacology Trials Investigating the Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Characteristics of Fast-Acting Insulin Aspart in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Tim; Pieber, Thomas R; Danne, Thomas; Erichsen, Lars; Haahr, Hanne

    2017-05-01

    Fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) is insulin aspart (IAsp) in a new formulation aiming to mimic the fast endogenous prandial insulin release more closely than currently available insulin products. In a post hoc analysis of pooled data from six clinical pharmacology trials, the pharmacological characteristics of faster aspart and IAsp were compared. The analysis included 218 adult subjects with type 1 diabetes from six randomised, double-blind, crossover trials in the faster aspart clinical development programme. Subjects received subcutaneous dosing (0.2 U/kg) of faster aspart and IAsp. In three trials, a 12-h euglycaemic clamp was performed (target 5.5 mmol/L; 100 mg/dL) to assess pharmacodynamics. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles were left-shifted for faster aspart versus IAsp. Onset of appearance occurred 4.9 min earlier (95% confidence interval [CI] faster aspart-IAsp: [-5.3 to -4.4], p IAsp,0-30min ) was two times greater (estimated ratio faster aspart/IAsp 2.01 [1.87-2.17], p IAsp. Accordingly, onset of action occurred 4.9 min earlier [-6.9 to -3.0] (p IAsp. Total exposure and total glucose-lowering effect did not differ significantly between treatments. Faster aspart has the potential to better mimic the physiologic prandial insulin secretion and thereby to improve postprandial glucose control compared with IAsp. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT02035371, NCT01924637, NCT02131246, NCT02033239, NCT02003677, NCT01618188.

  12. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  13. Effect of telmisartan on selected adipokines, insulin sensitivity, and substrate utilization during insulin-stimulated conditions in patients with metabolic syndrome and impaired fasting glucose

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wohl, P.; Krušinová, E.; Hill, M.; Kratochvílová, S.; Zídková, K.; Kopecký, J.; Neškudla, T.; Pravenec, Michal; Klementová, M.; Vrbíková, J.; Wohl, P.; Mlejnek, Petr; Pelikánová, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 163, č. 4 (2010), s. 573-583 ISSN 0804-4643 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR9359; GA MZd(CZ) NS10528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : telmisartan * insulin resistance * adipokines Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.482, year: 2010

  14. Original paper: Efficacy and safety analysis of insulin degludec/insulin aspart compared with biphasic insulin aspart 30: A phase 3, multicentre, international, open-label, randomised, treat-to-target trial in patients with type 2 diabetes fasting during Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Mohamed; Echtay, Akram Salim; Malek, Rachid; Omar, Mahomed; Shaikh, Shehla Sajid; Ekelund, Magnus; Kaplan, Kadriye; Kamaruddin, Nor Azmi

    2018-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of insulin degludec/insulin aspart (IDegAsp) and biphasic insulin aspart 30 (BIAsp 30) before, during and after Ramadan in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) who fasted during Ramadan. In this multinational, randomised, treat-to-target trial, patients with T2DM who intended to fast and were on basal, pre- or self-mixed insulin ± oral antidiabetic drugs for ≥90 days were randomised (1:1) to IDegAsp twice daily (BID) or BIAsp 30 BID. Treatment period included pre-Ramadan treatment initiation (with insulin titration for 8-20 weeks), Ramadan (4 weeks) and post-Ramadan (4 weeks). Insulin doses were reduced by 30-50% for the pre-dawn meal (suhur) on the first day of Ramadan, and readjusted to the pre-Ramadan levels at the end of Ramadan. Hypoglycaemia was analysed as overall (severe or plasma glucose Ramadan, despite achieving significantly lower pre-iftar (meal at sunset) self-measured plasma glucose (estimated treatment difference: -0.54 mmol/L [-1.02; -0.07] 95% CI , p = .0247; post hoc) with similar overall glycaemic efficacy, IDegAsp showed significantly lower overall and nocturnal hypoglycaemia rates versus BIAsp 30. IDegAsp is a suitable therapeutic agent for patients who need insulin for sustained glucose control before, during and after Ramadan fasting, with a significantly lower risk of hypoglycaemia, versus BIAsp 30, an existing premixed insulin analogue. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effect of Fish Oil on Serum Levels of Lipid Profile, Lipoprotein (a, Apolipoprotein A-1 and B, Fasting Sugar and Insulin, and InsulinResistance in the Elderly Residents of Kahrizak Charity Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Fakhrzadeh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was performed to investigate the effect of ω-3 fatty acids on lipid profiles, lipoprotein (a, apolipoprotein A-1 and apolipoprotein B, fasting glucose and insulin, and insulin resistance in a group of Iranian elderly subjects. Methods & Materials: In this clinical trial, 124 elderly residents of the KahrizakCharity Foundation, aged 65 and older were divided into two intervention (consumption of 1 gram per day of fish oil and control (consumption of placebo groups. Blood sampling was done at the baseline and at the end of the study. Results: After 6 months, TG and apo A-1 increased significantly (P=0.01 and P=0.02, respectively and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased significantly in the control group (P=0.009. Overall and comparative effects of fish oil were positively significant (P=0.02. Conclusion: fish oil intake can be effective in reduction of serumtriglycerides in elderly.

  16. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and β-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathw...

  17. Fasting and postprandial remnant-like particle cholesterol concentrations in obese participants are associated with plasma triglycerides, insulin resistance, and body fat distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hees, Anneke M. J.; Saris, Wim H. M.; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.

    2008-01-01

    (n = 613) also participated in a 10-wk weight loss program (-2510 kJ/d), being randomized to either a low-fat or a high-fat diet (20-25 vs. 40-45en% fat). Postprandial RLP-C was associated with fasting RLP-C, waist:hip ratio (WHR), HOMA(IR) (homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance......, independently mediated by weight loss, improvements in HOMA(IR), and the fat content of the prescribed diet. However, after inclusion of plasma triglyceride (TG), HDL-cholesterol, and FFA concentrations in the models, HOMA(IR) and WHR no longer significantly predicted fasting RLP-C, although WHR remained...... of lean and obese participants. All participants (n = 740) underwent a test meal challenge containing 95 energy % (en%) fat (energy content 50% of predicted daily resting metabolic rate). Fasting and postprandial concentrations of circulating metabolites were measured over a 3-h period. Obese participants...

  18. Chronic fructose substitution for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages has little effect on fasting blood glucose, insulin, or triglycerides: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Rebecca A; Frese, Michael; Romero, Julio; Cunningham, Judy H; Mills, Kerry E

    2017-08-01

    Background: Conflicting evidence exists on the role of long-term fructose consumption on health. No systematic review has addressed the effect of isoenergetic fructose replacement of other sugars and its effect on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting blood glucose, insulin, and triglycerides. Objective: The objective of this study was to review the evidence for a reduction in fasting glycemic and insulinemic markers after chronic, isoenergetic replacement of glucose or sucrose in foods or beverages by fructose. The target populations were persons without diabetes, those with impaired glucose tolerance, and those with type 2 diabetes. Design: We searched the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and clinicaltrials.gov The date of the last search was 26 April 2016. We included randomized controlled trials of isoenergetic replacement of glucose, sucrose, or both by fructose in adults or children with or without diabetes of ≥2 wk duration that measured fasting blood glucose. The main outcomes analyzed were fasting blood glucose and insulin as well as fasting triglycerides, blood lipoproteins, HbA1c, and body weight. Results: We included 14 comparison arms from 11 trials, including 277 patients. The studies varied in length from 2 to 10 wk (mean: 28 d) and included doses of fructose between 40 and 150 g/d (mean: 68 g/d). Fructose substitution in some subgroups resulted in significantly but only slightly lowered fasting blood glucose (-0.14 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.24, -0.036 mmol/L), HbA1c [-10 g/L (95% CI: -12.90, -7.10 g/L; impaired glucose tolerance) and -6 g/L (95% CI: -8.47, -3.53 g/L; normoglycemia)], triglycerides (-0.08 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.02 mmol/L), and body weight (-1.40 kg; 95% CI: -2.07, -0.74 kg). There was no effect on fasting blood insulin or blood lipids. Conclusions: The evidence suggests that the substitution of fructose for glucose or sucrose in food or beverages may be of benefit

  19. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Karlsson, Håkan K R; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  20. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied....... In conclusion, peripheral insulin resistance in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients may arise from a negative feedback regulation of the canonical insulin-signaling cascade from excessive serine phosphorylation of IRS-1, possibly as a consequence of immunosuppressive therapy and hyperinsulinemia....... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  1. FAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathavitharana, R R; Daru, P; Barrera, A E; Mostofa Kamal, S M; Islam, S; Ul-Alam, M; Sultana, R; Rahman, M; Hossain, Md S; Lederer, P; Hurwitz, S; Chakraborty, K; Kak, N; Tierney, D B; Nardell, E

    2017-09-01

    National Institute of Diseases of the Chest and Hospital, Dhaka; Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes, Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders, Dhaka; and Chittagong Chest Disease Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. To present operational data and discuss the challenges of implementing FAST (Find cases Actively, Separate safely and Treat effectively) as a tuberculosis (TB) transmission control strategy. FAST was implemented sequentially at three hospitals. Using Xpert® MTB/RIF, 733/6028 (12.2%, 95%CI 11.4-13.0) patients were diagnosed with unsuspected TB. Patients with a history of TB who were admitted with other lung diseases had more than twice the odds of being diagnosed with unsuspected TB as those with no history of TB (OR 2.6, 95%CI 2.2-3.0, P stakeholder engagement and laboratory capacity are important for sustainability and scalability.

  2. Chromosome X-wide association study identifies Loci for fasting insulin and height and evidence for incomplete dosage compensation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taru Tukiainen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The X chromosome (chrX represents one potential source for the "missing heritability" for complex phenotypes, which thus far has remained underanalyzed in genome-wide association studies (GWAS. Here we demonstrate the benefits of including chrX in GWAS by assessing the contribution of 404,862 chrX SNPs to levels of twelve commonly studied cardiometabolic and anthropometric traits in 19,697 Finnish and Swedish individuals with replication data on 5,032 additional Finns. By using a linear mixed model, we estimate that on average 2.6% of the additive genetic variance in these twelve traits is attributable to chrX, this being in proportion to the number of SNPs in the chromosome. In a chrX-wide association analysis, we identify three novel loci: two for height (rs182838724 near FGF16/ATRX/MAGT1, joint P-value = 2.71×10(-9, and rs1751138 near ITM2A, P-value = 3.03×10(-10 and one for fasting insulin (rs139163435 in Xq23, P-value = 5.18×10(-9. Further, we find that effect sizes for variants near ITM2A, a gene implicated in cartilage development, show evidence for a lack of dosage compensation. This observation is further supported by a sex-difference in ITM2A expression in whole blood (P-value = 0.00251, and is also in agreement with a previous report showing ITM2A escapes from X chromosome inactivation (XCI in the majority of women. Hence, our results show one of the first links between phenotypic variation in a population sample and an XCI-escaping locus and pinpoint ITM2A as a potential contributor to the sexual dimorphism in height. In conclusion, our study provides a clear motivation for including chrX in large-scale genetic studies of complex diseases and traits.

  3. Differences in Body Fat Distribution Play a Role in the Lower Levels of Elevated Fasting Glucose amongst Ghanaian Migrant Women Compared to Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Mary; Kunst, Anton E; Busschers, Wim B; van Valkengoed, Irene G; Dijkshoorn, Henriette; Boateng, Linda; Brewster, Lizzy M; Snijder, Marieke B; Stronks, Karien; Agyemang, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Despite higher levels of obesity, West African migrant women appear to have lower rates of type 2 diabetes than their male counterparts. We investigated the role of body fat distribution in these differences. Cross-sectional study of Ghanaian migrants (97 men, 115 women) aged 18-60 years in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Weight, height, waist and hip circumferences were measured. Logistic regression was used to explore the association of BMI, waist and hip measurements with elevated fasting glucose (glucose≥5.6 mmol/L). Linear regression was used to study the association of the same parameters with fasting glucose. Mean BMI, waist and hip circumferences were higher in women than men while the prevalence of elevated fasting glucose was higher in men than in women, 33% versus 19%. With adjustment for age only, men were non-significantly more likely than women to have an elevated fasting glucose, odds ratio (OR) 1.81, 95% CI: 0.95, 3.46. With correction for BMI, the higher odds among men increased and were statistically significant (OR 2.84, 95% CI: 1.32, 6.10), but with consideration of body fat distribution (by adding both hip and waist in the analysis) differences were no longer significant (OR 1.56 95% CI: 0.66, 3.68). Analysis with fasting glucose as continuous outcome measure showed somewhat similar results. Compared to men, the lower rates of elevated fasting glucose observed among Ghanaian women may be partly due to a more favorable body fat distribution, characterized by both hip and waist measurements.

  4. Differences in Body Fat Distribution Play a Role in the Lower Levels of Elevated Fasting Glucose amongst Ghanaian Migrant Women Compared to Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Nicolaou

    Full Text Available Despite higher levels of obesity, West African migrant women appear to have lower rates of type 2 diabetes than their male counterparts. We investigated the role of body fat distribution in these differences.Cross-sectional study of Ghanaian migrants (97 men, 115 women aged 18-60 years in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Weight, height, waist and hip circumferences were measured. Logistic regression was used to explore the association of BMI, waist and hip measurements with elevated fasting glucose (glucose≥5.6 mmol/L. Linear regression was used to study the association of the same parameters with fasting glucose.Mean BMI, waist and hip circumferences were higher in women than men while the prevalence of elevated fasting glucose was higher in men than in women, 33% versus 19%. With adjustment for age only, men were non-significantly more likely than women to have an elevated fasting glucose, odds ratio (OR 1.81, 95% CI: 0.95, 3.46. With correction for BMI, the higher odds among men increased and were statistically significant (OR 2.84, 95% CI: 1.32, 6.10, but with consideration of body fat distribution (by adding both hip and waist in the analysis differences were no longer significant (OR 1.56 95% CI: 0.66, 3.68. Analysis with fasting glucose as continuous outcome measure showed somewhat similar results.Compared to men, the lower rates of elevated fasting glucose observed among Ghanaian women may be partly due to a more favorable body fat distribution, characterized by both hip and waist measurements.

  5. Improvement of both fasting and postprandial glycemic control by the two-step addition of miglitol and mitiglinide to basal insulin therapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihana, Noriko; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kishimoto, Miyako; Kajio, Hiroshi; Noto, Hiroshi; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Combination therapy consisting of basal insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs) is effective for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) that cannot be adequately controlled using OHAs alone. Though basal insulin with metformin or sulfonylurea is an effective therapy, it cannot reduce postprandial glycemia without the risk of hypoglycemia. We examined a two-step regimen consisting of the addition of postprandial hypoglycemic agents (an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor and a glinide) in patients whose T2DM was poorly controlled using basal insulin therapy. Inpatients between the ages of 30-79 years who had T2DM and an HbA1c level of more than 7.0% were recruited. The patients were treated with once-daily insulin glargine with or without metformin, depending on the patient's age and renal function. Insulin glargine was titrated to achieve a target fasting glucose level of 70-130 mg/dL as a first step (STEP0). If the 2-hour postprandial glucose (PBG) level was higher than the target of 180 mg/dL, miglitol treatment (150 mg/day) was initiated, with dose adjustments (75-225 mg) allowed depending on abdominal symptoms and the PBG (STEP1). If the PBG of the patients remained higher than the target after 3 days of treatment, mitiglinide (30 mg/day, titrated up to 60 mg) was added (STEP2). We then evaluated the proportion of patients who achieved the target PBG before and after the two-step regimen. Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) was performed throughout the two-step protocol in most of the patients. Of the 16 patients who were recruited (median age, 67.0 [58.0-71.0] years; body mass index, 25.0 [22.0-27.9] kg/m(2); HbA1c level at admission, 9.1% [8.35-10.4%]), 1 patient (6.25%) achieved the target PBG at STEP 0 and 14 patients (87.5%) had achieved the target PBG at the end of the treatment protocol (P = 0.002). CGM showed a significant decrease in the glucose level at each step of the protocol. The standard deviations in the CGM glucose levels for 24

  6. Epigenome-wide association study of fasting measures of glucose, insulin, and HOMA-IR in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Bertha; Irvin, M Ryan; Sha, Jin; Zhi, Degui; Aslibekyan, Stella; Absher, Devin; Tiwari, Hemant K; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Ordovas, Jose M; Arnett, Donna K

    2014-02-01

    Known genetic susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) explain only a small proportion of heritable T2D risk. We hypothesize that DNA methylation patterns may contribute to variation in diabetes-related risk factors, and this epigenetic variation across the genome can contribute to the missing heritability in T2D and related metabolic traits. We conducted an epigenome-wide association study for fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) among 837 nondiabetic participants in the Genetics of Lipid Lowering Drugs and Diet Network study, divided into discovery (N = 544) and replication (N = 293) stages. Cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG) methylation at ∼470,000 CpG sites was assayed in CD4(+) T cells using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation 450 Beadchip. We fit a mixed model with the methylation status of each CpG as the dependent variable, adjusting for age, sex, study site, and T-cell purity as fixed-effects and family structure as a random-effect. A Bonferroni corrected P value of 1.1 × 10(-7) was considered significant in the discovery stage. Significant associations were tested in the replication stage using identical models. Methylation of a CpG site in ABCG1 on chromosome 21 was significantly associated with insulin (P = 1.83 × 10(-7)) and HOMA-IR (P = 1.60 × 10(-9)). Another site in the same gene was significant for HOMA-IR and of borderline significance for insulin (P = 1.29 × 10(-7) and P = 3.36 × 10(-6), respectively). Associations with the top two signals replicated for insulin and HOMA-IR (P = 5.75 × 10(-3) and P = 3.35 × 10(-2), respectively). Our findings suggest that methylation of a CpG site within ABCG1 is associated with fasting insulin and merits further evaluation as a novel disease risk marker.

  7. Acacia nilotica leave extract and glyburide: comparison of fasting flood glucose, serum insulin, b-thromboglubulin levels and platelet aggregation in treptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asad, M.; Munir, T.A.; Afzal, N.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the hypoglycaemic and anti-platelet aggregation effect of aqueous methanol extract of Acacia Nilotica (AN) leaves compared with glyburide on streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Methods: Diabetes mellitus was induced in 90 out of 120 albino rats by administering 50 mg/kg body weight (b.w) streptozotocin and was confirmed by measuring fasting blood glucose level >200 mg/dL on fourth post-induction day. The rats were equally divided into 4 groups, A (normal control), B (diabetic control), C (diabetic rats treated with AN extract) and group D (diabetic rats treated with glyburide). The rats of group C and D were given 300 mg/kg b.w AN extract and 900 mu gm/kg b.w glyburide respectively for 3 weeks. Blood glucose was measured by gluco meter, platelet aggregation by Dia-Med method and insulin and b-thrombo globulin by ELISA technique. Results: A significant increase (p<0.05) in fasting blood glucose, b-thrombo globulin and platelet aggregation and a significant decrease (p<0.05) in insulin levels was observed in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats than the normal controls. The rats treated with AN extract and glyburide showed a significant decrease (p<0.05) in fasting blood glucose and increase (p<0.05) in insulin levels than the diabetic control rats. However, the levels in both the treatment groups remained significantly different than the normal controls. A significant decrease (p<0.05) in b-thrombo globulin levels was seen in diabetic rats treated with glyburide than the diabetic control rats and diabetic rats treated with AN extract. Conclusions: AN leaves extract result into hypoglycaemic and anti-platelet aggregation activity in diabetic rats as that of glyburide. (author)

  8. Pearson bone marrow-pancreas syndrome with insulin-dependent diabetes, progressive renal tubulopathy, organic aciduria and elevated fetal haemoglobin caused by deletion and duplication of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superti-Furga, A; Schoenle, E; Tuchschmid, P; Caduff, R; Sabato, V; DeMattia, D; Gitzelmann, R; Steinmann, B

    1993-01-01

    We report a patient with a clinical picture consisting of small birth weight, connatal hypoplastic anaemia, vacuolised bone marrow precursors, failure to thrive, and, subsequently, by insulin-dependent diabetes, renal Fanconi syndrome, lactic acidosis, complex organic aciduria, and elevation of haemoglobin F and of adenosine deaminase activity. The clinical course was progressive and death occurred at age 19 months. A high proportion of mitochondrial (mt) DNA molecules with a deletion of nucleotides 9238 to 15575 were identified in several tissues; about half of the shortened mtDNA molecules were concatenated to form circular dimers. The clinical and laboratory findings support recent conclusions that Pearson syndrome is not confined to bone marrow and pancreas, as originally described, but is a multi-organ disorder associated with deletions in part of the mtDNA molecules. The tissue distribution and the relative proportions of the abnormal mtDNA molecules apparently determine the phenotype and clinical course.

  9. Percentiles of fasting serum insulin, glucose, HbA1c and HOMA-IR in pre-pubertal normal weight European children from the IDEFICS cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplies, J; Jiménez-Pavón, D; Savva, S C; Buck, C; Günther, K; Fraterman, A; Russo, P; Iacoviello, L; Veidebaum, T; Tornaritis, M; De Henauw, S; Mårild, S; Molnár, D; Moreno, L A; Ahrens, W

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to present age- and sex-specific reference values of insulin, glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and the homeostasis model assessment to quantify insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for pre-pubertal children. The reference population consists of 7074 normal weight 3- to 10.9-year-old pre-pubertal children from eight European countries who participated in at least one wave of the IDEFICS ('identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants') surveys (2007-2010) and for whom standardised laboratory measurements were obtained. Percentile curves of insulin (measured by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay), glucose, HbA1c and HOMA-IR were calculated as a function of age stratified by sex using the general additive model for location scale and shape (GAMLSS) method. Levels of insulin, fasting glucose and HOMA-IR continuously show an increasing trend with age, whereas HbA1c shows an upward trend only beyond the age of 8 years. Insulin and HOMA-IR values are higher in girls of all age groups, whereas glucose values are slightly higher in boys. Median serum levels of insulin range from 17.4 and 13.2 pmol l(-1) in 3-HOMA-IR, median values range from 0.5 and 0.4 in 3-<3.5-year-old girls and boys to 1.7 and 1.4 in 10.5-<11-year-old girls and boys, respectively. Our study provides the first standardised reference values for an international European children's population and provides the, up to now, largest data set of healthy pre-pubertal children to model reference percentiles for markers of insulin resistance. Our cohort shows higher values of Hb1Ac as compared with a single Swedish study while our percentiles for the other glucose metabolic markers are in good accordance with previous studies.

  10. Addition of Orange Pomace to Orange Juice Attenuates the Increases in Peak Glucose and Insulin Concentrations after Sequential Meal Ingestion in Men with Elevated Cardiometabolic Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Honglin; Rendeiro, Catarina; Kristek, Angelika; Sargent, Laura J; Saunders, Caroline; Harkness, Laura; Rowland, Ian; Jackson, Kim G; Spencer, Jeremy Pe; Lovegrove, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Prospective cohort studies show that higher dietary fiber intake is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk, yet the impact on postprandial glucose and insulin responses is unclear. This study aims to evaluate the effects of orange beverages with differing fiber concentrations on postprandial glycemic responses (secondary outcome measure) after a sequential breakfast and lunch challenge in men with increased cardiometabolic risk. Thirty-six men (aged 30-65 y; body mass index 25-30 kg/m(2): fasting triacylglycerol or total cholesterol concentrations: 0.8-2.2 or 6.0-8.0 mmol/L, respectively) were provided with a high-fat mixed breakfast and were randomly assigned to consume 240 mL Tropicana (PepsiCo, Inc.) pure premium orange juice without pulp (OJ), OJ with 5.5 g added orange pomace fiber (OPF), juice made from lightly blended whole orange, or an isocaloric sugar-matched control (Control) on 4 occasions separated by 2 wk. A medium-fat mixed lunch was provided at 330 min. Blood samples were collected before breakfast and on 11 subsequent occasions for 420 min (3 time points postlunch) to determine postprandial glucose, insulin, lipid, and inflammatory biomarker responses. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. OPF significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the maximal change in glucose concentrations (1.9 ± 0.21 mmol/L) reached after breakfast compared with other treatments (2.3-2.4 mmol/L) and after lunch (3.0 ± 0.05 mmol/L) compared with OJ (3.6 ± 0.05 mmol/L). The maximal change in insulin concentration (313 ± 25 pmol/L) was also lower compared with Control (387 ± 30 pmol/L) and OJ (418 ± 39 pmol/L) after breakfast. OPF significantly delayed the time to reach the peak glucose concentration compared with Control and OJ, and of insulin compared with Control after breakfast. OPF consumed with breakfast may lower postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses to typical meal ingestion in men with increased cardiometabolic risk. This trial is

  11. Beneficial metabolic effects of regular meal frequency on dietary thermogenesis, insulin sensitivity, and fasting lipid profiles in healthy obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshchi, Hamid R; Taylor, Moira A; Macdonald, Ian A

    2005-01-01

    Although a regular meal pattern is recommended for obese people, its effects on energy metabolism have not been examined. We investigated whether a regular meal frequency affects energy intake (EI), energy expenditure, or circulating insulin, glucose, and lipid concentrations in healthy obese women. Ten women [x +/- SD body mass index (in kg/m(2)): 37.1 +/- 4.8] participated in a randomized crossover trial. In phase 1 (14 d), the subjects consumed their normal diet on 6 occasions/d (regular meal pattern) or followed a variable meal frequency (3-9 meals/d, irregular meal pattern). In phase 2 (14 d), the subjects followed the alternative pattern. At the start and end of each phase, a test meal was fed, and blood glucose, lipid, and insulin concentrations were determined before and for 3 h after (glucose and insulin only) the test meal. Subjects recorded their food intake on 3 d during each phase. The thermogenic response to the test meal was ascertained by indirect calorimetry. Regular eating was associated with lower EI (P thermogenesis (P meal pattern, but peak insulin concentrations and area under the curve of insulin responses to the test meal were lower after the regular than after the irregular meal pattern (P thermogenesis.

  12. Fasting serum levels of ferritin are associated with impaired pancreatic beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, L.; Ellervik, C.; Friedrich, N.

    2014-01-01

    diabetes due to its association with impaired beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity. Methods: We investigated 6,392 individuals from the Danish general population. Surrogate measures of beta cell function and insulin sensitivity were calculated for approximately 6,100 individuals based...... on OGTT examinations. Results: The ORs for type 2 diabetes were 4.2 (95% CI 2.4, 7.2) for the highest vs the lowest quintile of serum ferritin, and 17 (95% CI 8.9, 33) for serum ferritin levels ≥97.5th percentile vs ... glucose levels at 0, 30 and 120 min (p beta cell function estimated as the insulinogenic index and corrected insulin response (p 

  13. Higher Magnesium Intake Is Associated with Lower Fasting Glucose and Insulin, with No Evidence of Interaction with Select Genetic Loci, in a Meta-Analysis of 15 CHARGE Consortium Studies1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Adela; Ngwa, Julius S.; Renström, Frida; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Ganna, Andrea; Hallmans, Göran; Houston, Denise K.; Jacques, Paul F.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Manichaikul, Ani; North, Kari E.; Ntalla, Ioanna; Sonestedt, Emily; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Djoussé, Luc; Grigoriou, Efi; Johansson, Ingegerd; Lohman, Kurt K.; Pankow, James S.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Riserus, Ulf; Yannakoulia, Mary; Zillikens, M. Carola; Hassanali, Neelam; Liu, Yongmei; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Uitterlinden, André G.; Viikari, Jorma; Groves, Christopher J.; Hofman, Albert; Lind, Lars; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mikkilä, Vera; Mukamal, Kenneth; Franco, Oscar H.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Dedoussis, George V.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hu, Frank B.; Ingelsson, Erik; Kähönen, Mika; Kao, W. H. Linda; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Orho-Melander, Marju; Prokopenko, Inga; Rotter, Jerome I.; Siscovick, David S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Meigs, James B.; McKeown, Nicola M.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Favorable associations between magnesium intake and glycemic traits, such as fasting glucose and insulin, are observed in observational and clinical studies, but whether genetic variation affects these associations is largely unknown. We hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either glycemic traits or magnesium metabolism affect the association between magnesium intake and fasting glucose and insulin. Fifteen studies from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology) Consortium provided data from up to 52,684 participants of European descent without known diabetes. In fixed-effects meta-analyses, we quantified 1) cross-sectional associations of dietary magnesium intake with fasting glucose (mmol/L) and insulin (ln-pmol/L) and 2) interactions between magnesium intake and SNPs related to fasting glucose (16 SNPs), insulin (2 SNPs), or magnesium (8 SNPs) on fasting glucose and insulin. After adjustment for age, sex, energy intake, BMI, and behavioral risk factors, magnesium (per 50-mg/d increment) was inversely associated with fasting glucose [β = −0.009 mmol/L (95% CI: −0.013, −0.005), P magnesium-related SNP or interaction between any SNP and magnesium reached significance after correction for multiple testing. However, rs2274924 in magnesium transporter-encoding TRPM6 showed a nominal association (uncorrected P = 0.03) with glucose, and rs11558471 in SLC30A8 and rs3740393 near CNNM2 showed a nominal interaction (uncorrected, both P = 0.02) with magnesium on glucose. Consistent with other studies, a higher magnesium intake was associated with lower fasting glucose and insulin. Nominal evidence of TRPM6 influence and magnesium interaction with select loci suggests that further investigation is warranted. PMID:23343670

  14. LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF LINOLEIC-ACID-ENRICHED DIET ON ALBUMINURIA AND LIPID-LEVELS IN TYPE-1 (INSULIN-DEPENDENT) DIABETIC-PATIENTS WITH ELEVATED URINARY ALBUMIN EXCRETION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DULLAART, RPF; BEUSEKAMP, BJ; MEIJER, S; HOOGENBERG, K; VANDOORMAAL, JJ; SLUITER, WJ

    We conducted a 2-year prospective randomised study to investigate the effects of a linoleic-acid-enriched diet on albuminuria and lipid levels in Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with elevated urinary albumin excretion (overnight urinary albumin excretion rate between 10 and

  15. Correlations between fasting plasma C-peptide, glucagon-stimulated plasma C-peptide, and urinary C-peptide in insulin-treated diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjessing, H J; Matzen, L E; Frøland, A

    1987-01-01

    This study correlated fasting plasma C-peptide (CP), plasma CP 6 min after stimulation with 1 mg glucagon i.v., and the mean of three 24-h urinary excretions of C-peptide (UCP)/creatinine in 132 insulin-treated diabetics. Patients were divided into three groups: group 1, stimulated CP less than 0.......06 nM (n = 51); group 2, stimulated CP 0.06-0.60 nM (n = 48); and group 3, stimulated CP greater than 0.60 nM (n = 33). In all patients fasting CP was closely correlated to stimulated CP (r = .988, P less than .001), whereas the correlations between UCP and both fasting CP (r = .904, P less than .001......) and stimulated CP r = .902, P less than .001) were slightly less pronounced. The associations between UCP and both fasting CP (r = .716, P less than .001) and stimulated CP (r = .731, P less than .001) were modest in group 2, and even more so in group 3 (r = .557, P less than .001 and r = .641, P less than .001...

  16. Impact of ENPP1 K121Q on change of insulin resistance after web-based intervention in Korean men with diabetes and impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ji Yeon; Sung, Sook Hee; Lee, Yeon Ju; Choi, Tae In; Choi, Seung Jin

    2014-10-01

    Ectoenzyme nucleotide pyrophosphate phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) gene has been studied in relation to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance (IR). We hypothesized that the difference in genotype may be one of the factors that affect the outcome of intervention. We genotyped 448 men with fasting glucose≥5.6 mM/L, including 371 in subjects with K allele (KK) (69 control group [CG]; and 302 intervention group [IG]) and 77 in subjects with Q allele (KQ+QQ) (13 CG and 64 IG). The web-based intervention based on a lifestyle modification was delivered by e-mail once a month for 10 months. In the KK, IG demonstrated significantly decreased levels of fasting serum insulin (FSI) as compared to CG and homeostasis model of assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). In the KQ+QQ IG group, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), FSI and HOMA-IR were significantly decreased, and showed further reduction in the HOMA-IR than KQ+QQ CG. After analysis of covariance, K121Q did significantly influence the change of HbA1c in CG after appropriate adjustment. In a multivariate model, BMI change predicted HOMA-IR change (adjusted β=0.801; P=0.022) in KK IG subjects with T2DM. ENPP1 K121Q did not influence the change in IR. However, individuals with T2DM carrying the K121 variant are very responsive to the effect of BMI reduction on HOMA-IR.

  17. Sustained Decrease of Early-Phase Insulin Secretion in Japanese Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus who Developed Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose Postpartum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Katayama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of this study was to compare glucose intolerance in the antenatal and the postpartum periods using a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in the Japanese women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM using a retrospective design. Patients and Methods Data were obtained from 85 Japanese women with GDM who delivered from April 2011 through April 2015 and who underwent an OGTT 6–14 weeks postpartum. The women were divided into two groups based on the results of the postpartum OGTT: one group with normal glucose tolerance (NGT and the other with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT as well as impaired fasting glucose (IFG. We analyzed the associations between postpartum IGT–IFG and various factors. Results Antenatally, a significant difference was observed between the groups only in the 1-hour plasma glucose level of the 75-g OGTT. Postpartum results of plasma glucose level were significantly higher at 0.5, 1, and 2 hours in the IGT–IFG group than those in the NGT group. Moreover, a significant decrease in the levels of 0.5-hour immunoreactive insulin and insulinogenic index was observed in the IGT–IFG group compared to those in the NGT group. Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance and homeostasis model assessment β-cell function of both groups were found to significantly decrease in the postpartum period; however, there was no significant change in the insulinogenic index of either group. Conclusions Our study clearly showed that the postpartum IGT and IFG levels of Japanese women with GDM are affected by impaired early-phase insulin secretion; however, insulin resistance promptly improves.

  18. Intensive lifestyle intervention including high-intensity interval training program improves insulin resistance and fasting plasma glucose in obese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Marquis-Gravel

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Following a 9-month intensive lifestyle intervention combining HIIT and MedD counseling, obese subjects experienced significant improvements of FPG and insulin resistance. This is the first study to expose the effects of a long-term program combining HIIT and MedD on glycemic control parameters among obese subjects.

  19. Obesity and the development of insulin resistance and impaired fasting glucose in black and white adolescent girls - A longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, DJ; Friedman, LA; Harlan, WR; Barton, BA; Schreiber, GB; Cohen, RM; Harlan, LC; Morrison, JA

    Objective-Age at onset of type 2 diabetes has decreased during the past 20 years, especially in black women. Studies of factors associated with insulin resistance and hyperglycemia in preadolescent and adolescent populations are essential to understanding diabetes development. Research Design and

  20. Efficacy and safety of fast-acting insulin aspart in comparison with insulin aspart in type 1 diabetes (onset 1): A 52-week, randomized, treat-to-target, phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Chantal; Bode, Bruce W; Franek, Edward; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Rose, Ludger; Graungaard, Tina; Birk Østerskov, Anne; Russell-Jones, David

    2018-01-08

    To compare the safety and efficacy of fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) with conventional insulin aspart (IAsp) in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). onset 1 was a randomized, multicentre, treat-to-target, phase III, 52-week (initial 26 weeks + additional 26 weeks) trial conducted at 165 sites across 9 countries. Adults with T1D were randomly allocated to double-blind mealtime faster aspart or IAsp, each with once- or twice-daily insulin detemir. The primary endpoint, change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) from baseline after the initial 26 weeks, has been reported previously. In the present paper, we report data from the full 52-week study period. Between August 2013 and June 2015, 381 participants were assigned to double-blind faster aspart and 380 participants to IAsp. After 52 weeks, estimated mean changes from baseline in HbA1c levels were -0.08% (faster aspart) and +0.01% (IAsp); estimated treatment difference significantly favoured faster aspart (-0.10% [95% confidence interval {CI} -0.19;-0.00]; P = .0424). Changes from baseline in 1-hour postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) increment (meal test; faster aspart -1.05 mmol/L; IAsp -0.14 mmol/L) also significantly favoured faster aspart (estimated treatment difference -0.91 mmol/L [95% CI -1.40;-0.43]; -16.48 mg/dL [95% CI -25.17;-7.80]; P = .0002). There was no difference in overall severe or blood glucose-confirmed hypoglycaemic episodes or treatment-emergent adverse events between treatments. At 52 weeks, overall glycaemic control had significantly improved with faster aspart vs IAsp, consistent with the 26-week study findings. Achieving an insulin profile closer to physiological insulin secretion with faster aspart translates into lower PPG and HbA1c levels compared with those achieved with IAsp in people with T1D. © 2018 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Elevated Serum Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Levels in Patients with Neurological Remission after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Moghaddam

    Full Text Available After traumatic spinal cord injury, an acute phase triggered by trauma is followed by a subacute phase involving inflammatory processes. We previously demonstrated that peripheral serum cytokine expression changes depend on neurological outcome after spinal cord injury. In a subsequent intermediate phase, repair and remodeling takes place under the mediation of growth factors such as Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1. IGF-1 is a promising growth factor which is thought to act as a neuroprotective agent. Since previous findings were taken from animal studies, our aim was to investigate this hypothesis in humans based on peripheral blood serum. Forty-five patients after traumatic spinal cord injury were investigated over a period of three months after trauma. Blood samples were taken according to a fixed schema and IGF-1 levels were determined. Clinical data including AIS scores at admission to the hospital and at discharge were collected and compared with IGF-1 levels. In our study, we could observe distinct patterns in the expression of IGF-1 in peripheral blood serum after traumatic spinal cord injury regardless of the degree of plegia. All patients showed a marked increase of levels seven days after injury. IGF-1 serum levels were significantly different from initial measurements at four and nine hours and seven and 14 days after injury, as well as one, two and three months after injury. We did not detect a significant correlation between fracture and the IGF-1 serum level nor between the quantity of operations performed after trauma and the IGF-1 serum level. Patients with clinically documented neurological remission showed consistently higher IGF-1 levels than patients without neurological remission. This data could be the base for the establishment of animal models for further and much needed research in the field of spinal cord injury.

  2. Peripheral insulin resistance rather than beta cell dysfunction accounts for geographical differences in impaired fasting blood glucose among sub-Saharan African individuals: findings from the RODAM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeks, Karlijn A C; Stronks, Karien; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Addo, Juliet; Bahendeka, Silver; Beune, Erik; Owusu-Dabo, Ellis; Danquah, Ina; Galbete, Cecilia; Henneman, Peter; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Mockenhaupt, Frank P; Osei, Kwame; Schulze, Matthias B; Spranger, Joachim; Smeeth, Liam; Agyemang, Charles

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the extent to which insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction account for differences in impaired fasting blood glucose (IFBG) levels in sub-Saharan African individuals living in different locations in Europe and Africa. We also aimed to identify determinants associated with insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction among this population. Data from the cross-sectional multicentre Research on Obesity and Diabetes among African Migrants (RODAM) study were analysed. Participants included Ghanaian individuals without diabetes, aged 18-96 years old, who were residing in Amsterdam (n = 1337), Berlin (n = 502), London (n = 961), urban Ghana (n = 1309) and rural Ghana (n = 970). Glucose and insulin were measured in fasting venous blood samples. Anthropometrics were assessed during a physical examination. Questionnaires were used to assess demographics, physical activity, smoking status, alcohol consumption and energy intake. Insulin resistance and beta cell function were determined using homeostatic modelling (HOMA-IR and HOMA-B, respectively). Logistic regression analysis was used to study the contribution of HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B (beta cell dysfunction) to geographical differences in IFBG (fasting glucose 5.6-6.9 mmol/l). Multivariate linear regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with HOMA-IR and inverse HOMA-B. IFBG was more common in individuals residing in urban Ghana (OR 1.41 [95% CI 1.08, 1.84]), Amsterdam (OR 3.44 [95% CI 2.69, 4.39]) and London (OR 1.58 [95% CI 1.20 2.08), but similar in individuals living in Berlin (OR 1.00 [95% CI 0.70, 1.45]), compared with those in rural Ghana (reference population). The attributable risk of IFBG per 1 SD increase in HOMA-IR was 69.3% and in inverse HOMA-B was 11.1%. After adjustment for HOMA-IR, the odds for IFBG reduced to 0.96 (95% CI 0.72, 1.27), 2.52 (95%CI 1.94, 3.26) and 1.02 (95% CI 0.78, 1.38) for individuals in Urban Ghana

  3. Fast assessment and management of chest pain without ST-elevation in the pre-hospital gateway : rationale and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishak, Maycel; Ali, Danish; Fokkert, Marion J; Slingerland, Robbert J; Dikkeschei, Bert; Tolsma, Rudolf T; Lichtveld, Rob A; Bruins, Wendy; Boomars, René; Bruheim, Kim; van Eenennaam, Fred; Timmers, Leo; Voskuil, Michiel; Doevendans, Pieter A; Mosterd, Arend; Hoes, Arno W; ten Berg, Jurriën M; van 't Hof, Arnoud W J

    BACKGROUND: For chest pain patients without ST-segment elevation in the pre-hospital setting, current clinical guidelines merely offer in-hospital risk stratification and management, as opposed to chest pain patients with ST-segment elevation for whom there is a straightforward pre-hospital strategy

  4. Occurrence of diabetes mellitus in obese nondiabetic patients, with correlative analysis of visceral fat, fasting insulin, and insulin resistance: A 3-year follow-up study (mysore visceral adiposity in diabetes follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Premanath

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the occurrence of diabetes in obese nondiabetic patients over a 3-year follow-up period with a correlative analysis of visceral fat (VF, fasting insulin levels, (FILs and insulin resistance (IR. Material and Methods: Thirty-seven obese and nineteen nonobese nondiabetics of our previous study, Mysore Visceral Adiposity in Diabetes were followed for the next 3 years. Their blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference (WC, fasting blood sugar (FBS, FIL, lipid profile and subcutaneous fat (SCF, and VF measurement by US method were repeated every 6 months for the next 3 years. The findings were analyzed with appropriate statistical methods. Results: Twenty-three obese and 18 nonobese nondiabetics completed the study. There were 17 dropouts. The changes in the physical and biochemical characteristics of the two groups before and after the study were not significant. SCF had no correlation with IR whereas VF correlated with FIL and IR. There were three diabetics in the obese group and two from the control group at the end of the study. There were 12 impaired glucose tolerance (IGT in the test group and 2 in the control group. Those who developed diabetes had higher VF, WC, FBS, FIL, and IR. Those who showed IGT also had these at higher levels compared to others. There was no change in the VF at the end of the study. Conclusions: This follow-up study on South Indians has shown that VF is a significant risk factor for the development of IR. IR can develop without any increase in the volume of the VF, is the essential finding of this study. SCF has not shown any significant relationship with IR. We recommend FBS and FIL in all the obese nondiabetics to calculate IR, which has given much insight in the development of IGT and diabetes. Large multicentric, longitudinal studies are required to establish the cause of IR.

  5. An uncommon cause of hypoglycemia: insulin autoimmune syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas-Erdeve, Senay; Yılmaz Agladioglu, Sebahat; Onder, Asan; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Sagsak, Elif; Cetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a condition characterized by hypoglycemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been injected with insulin. A female patient (aged 16 years and 3 months) presented with the complaint of being overweight. Physical examination revealed a body weight of 78.2 kg (+2.6 SD) and a height of 167 cm (+0.73 SD). While the patient's fasting blood glucose level was found to be 40 mg/dl, blood ketone was negative and the serum insulin level was determined as 379 mIU/ml. The patient was diagnosed with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Abdominal ultrasound, pancreas MRI and endoscopic ultrasound were normal. The daily blood glucose profile revealed postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia in addition to fasting hypoglycemia. The results of anti-insulin antibody measurements were as high as 41.8% (normal range 0-7%). A 1,600-calorie diet containing 40% carbohydrate and divided into 6 meals a day was given to the patient. Simple sugars were excluded from the diet. Hypoglycemic episodes were not observed, but during 2 years of observation, serum levels of insulin and anti-insulin antibodies remained elevated. In all hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia cases, IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis and insulin antibody measurements should be carried out. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Fasting c-peptide and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 levels help to distinguish childhood type 1 and type 2 diabetes at diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Lorraine E Levitt; Jawad, Abbas F; Ganesh, Jaya; Abraham, Máire; Murphy, Kathryn; Lipman, Terri H

    2007-04-01

    Children with new onset diabetes (n = 175) were evaluated over 12-months. Patients were presumptively diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (n = 26) based on obesity, a relative with T2DM, the ability to wean from insulin, and absence of glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD-65) antibodies. We hypothesized that markers of insulinization at diagnosis, including fasting C-peptide and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-1, in addition to initial CO(2) levels and urine ketones, would help in distinguishing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) from T2DM. Children with T1DM (84 male, 65 female) had a mean age of 8.7 +/- 4.3 yr and a racial background of 78% white, 19% black, and 3% other. In contrast, children with T2DM (13 female, 13 male) had a mean age of 14.2 +/- 3.1 yr with a racial background of 58% black, 27% white, and 15% other. Fasting C-peptide level was 0.38 +/- 0.37 ng/mL in T1DM vs. 2.66 +/- 2.14 ng/mL in T2DM; a C-peptide of 0.85 ng/mL had 83% sensitivity in distinguishing T1DM from T2DM. Fasting IGFBP-1 level was 38.1 +/- 39.1 ng/mL (T1DM) vs. 3.6 +/- 4.5 ng/mL (T2DM); a value of 3.6 ng/dL could distinguish the two types of diabetes with 93% sensitivity. Urinary ketones were found in 79% of children with T1DM compared with 56% of those with T2DM, and the magnitude was associated with type of diabetes. Initial CO(2) level for T1DM was 17.9 +/- 6.9 mmol/L vs. 22.7 +/- 5.7 mmol/L for T2DM; a value of 21.5 mmol/L could distinguish the two types of diabetes with 83% sensitivity. In addition to obesity, family history of T2DM, and absence of GAD-65 antibodies, children with new-onset T2DM may be distinguished from those with T1DM by a combination of biochemical parameters (C-peptide, IGFBP-1, CO(2), and urine ketones).

  7. Insulin detemir versus insulin glargine for type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swinnen, Sanne G.; Simon, Airin C. R.; Holleman, Frits; Hoekstra, Joost B.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2011-01-01

    Chronically elevated blood glucose levels are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Many diabetes patients will eventually require insulin treatment to maintain good glycaemic control. There are still uncertainties about the optimal insulin treatment regimens for type 2 diabetes, but

  8. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) elevation and arginase up-regulation contribute to endothelial dysfunction related to insulin resistance in rats and morbidly obese humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Santos-Ruiz, Marta; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Pindado, María Luz; Sánchez-Ferrer, Alberto; Hernández, Alberto; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of insulin resistance (IR) is determinant for endothelial dysfunction associated with obesity. Although recent studies have implicated the involvement of mitochondrial superoxide and inflammation in the defective nitric oxide (NO)-mediated responses and subsequent endothelial dysfunction in IR, other mechanisms could compromise this pathway. In the present study, we assessed the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and arginase with respect to IR-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in human morbid obesity and in a non-obese rat model of IR. We show that both increased ADMA and up-regulated arginase are determinant factors in the alteration of the l-arginine/NO pathway associated with IR in both models and also that acute treatment of arteries with arginase inhibitor or with l-arginine significantly alleviate endothelial dysfunction. These results help to expand our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction that are related to obesity and IR and establish potential therapeutic targets for intervention. Insulin resistance (IR) is determinant for endothelial dysfunction in human obesity. Although we have previously reported the involvement of mitochondrial superoxide and inflammation, other mechanisms could compromise NO-mediated responses in IR. We evaluated the role of the endogenous NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and arginase with respect to IR-induced impairment of l-arginine/NO-mediated vasodilatation in human morbid obesity and in a non-obese rat model of IR. Bradykinin-induced vasodilatation was evaluated in microarteries derived from insulin-resistant morbidly obese (IR-MO) and non-insulin-resistant MO (NIR-MO) subjects. Defective endothelial vasodilatation in IR-MO was improved by l-arginine supplementation. Increased levels of ADMA were detected in serum and adipose tissue from IR-MO. Serum ADMA positively correlated with IR score and negatively with pD2 for bradykinin. Gene

  9. Does the association of the triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio with fasting serum insulin differ by race/ethnicity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokdad Ali H

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL-C ratio has been reported to be as closely correlated with insulin resistance as is the fasting serum insulin concentration (FSI, and therefore it is seen as a clinically useful way to identify the concomitant presence of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. However, conflicting findings exist for the association of the TG/HDL-C ratio with FSI by race/ethnicity. Methods The associations of FSI concentration, serum triglyceride concentrations, and HDL-C were analyzed using log-binomial regression analyses and receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis among nondiabetic adults (n = 2652, aged ≥ 20 years, 51.2% men in the United States. Results After adjustment for potential confounding effects, the prevalence ratio of hyperinsulinemia was 2.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.74 to 2.08 when using a single cutoff point of 3.5, and 2.23 (95% CI, 1.83 to 2.72 when using race/ethnicity-specific cutoff points of 3.0 for non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans and 2.0 for non-Hispanic blacks for the TG/HDL-C ratio. The area under the ROC curve of the TG/HDL-C ratio for predicting hyperinsulinemia was 0.77 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.79, 0.75 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.77, and 0.74 (95% CI, 0.69 to 0.76 for non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans, respectively. Conclusion There was a significant association between the TG/HDL-C ratio and FSI among three major racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Our results add further support to the notion that the TG/HDL-C ratio may be a clinically simple and useful indicator for hyperinsulinemia among nondiabetic adults regardless of race/ethnicity.

  10. Effects of combination of zinc and vitamin A supplementation on serum fasting blood sugar, insulin, apoprotein B and apoprotein A-I in patients with type I diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidfar, Farzad; Aghasi, Mahshid; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Heydari, Iraj; Hosseini, Sharieh; Shidfar, Shahrzad

    2010-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence that shows the metabolism of zinc and vitamin A are altered in diabetes mellitus type I (DMTI), thus the present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of combination of zinc and vitamin A supplementation on serum fasting blood sugar (FBS), insulin, apoprotein B and apoprotein A-I in patients with DMTI. Forty-eight, 7-year-old to 20-year-old patients with at least 2 years of DMTI history, without any metabolic condition or medicine intake with insulin treatment, participated in a randomized double-blind clinical trial for 12 weeks. They were divided into zinc and vitamin A (VAZ)-supplemented (10 mg elemental zinc per day and one-half of a 25,000 IU vitamin A tablet every other day) and/or placebo groups after matching for sex, age and DMTI duration. Nutrient intake was estimated using 24 h recall and was analyzed by food processor program. Serum apoproteins B and A-I, FBS and insulin levels were determined at the beginning and end of the trial. There was significant increase in apoprotein A-I (P < 0.0001) and a significant decrease in apoprotein B (P < 0.0001) and apoprotein B/apoprotein A-I ratio (P < 0.0001) at the end of the study compared with baseline values in the VAZ group but apoprotein A-I had a significant increase (P < 0.0001) and the apoprotein B/apoprotein A-I ratio had a significant decrease (P = 0.02) at the end of study in the VAZ group compared with the control group It seems that combined zinc and vitamin A supplementation can improve serum apoprotein A-I, apoprotein B and the apoprotein B/apoprotein A-I ratio in patients with DMTI.

  11. Characterization of adiponectin multimers and the IGF-axis in humans with a heterozygote mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain of the Insulin Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Low levels of adiponectin, IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-1, and IGFBP-2, and high levels of leptin correlate with several indices of insulin resistance and risk of type 2 diabetes. However, in insulin receptoropathies plasma adiponectin is paradoxically increased despite severe insulin...... an euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp were examined for plasma adiponectin multimers, leptin, total IGF-I, IGF-II, free IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2.Results: Despite 10-fold elevated fasting insulin and marked insulin resistance in Arg1174Gln-carriers, the levels of total adiponectin, leptin, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2......1174Gln-carriers. Interestingly, exogenous insulin failed to suppress total adiponectin in Arg1174Gln-carriers, but reduced IGFBP-1 and increased IGFBP-2 as in controls.Conclusion: The normal levels of adiponectin, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 in the face of highly elevated insulin levels suggest an impaired...

  12. A web-based study of the relationship of duration of insulin pump infusion set use and fasting blood glucose level in adults with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson Perrin, Alysa J; Guzzetta, Russell C; Miller, Kellee M; Foster, Nicole C; Lee, Anna; Lee, Joyce M; Block, Jennifer M; Beck, Roy W

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of infusion set use duration on glycemic control, we conducted an Internet-based study using the T1D Exchange's online patient community, Glu ( myGlu.org ). For 14 days, 243 electronically consented adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) entered online that day's fasting blood glucose (FBG) level, the prior day's total daily insulin (TDI) dose, and whether the infusion set was changed. Mean duration of infusion set use was 3.0 days. Mean FBG level was higher with each successive day of infusion set use, increasing from 126 mg/dL on Day 1 to 133 mg/dL on Day 3 to 147 mg/dL on Day 5 (P<0.001). TDI dose did not vary with increased duration of infusion set use. Internet-based data collection was used to rapidly conduct the study at low cost. The results indicate that FBG levels increase with each additional day of insulin pump infusion set use.

  13. Effect of growth hormone (GH) on fasting and postprandial metabolism in GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepp, R; Stettler, C; Diem, P; Christ, E R

    2010-10-01

    Hypopituitarism with adult-onset growth hormone deficiency (GHD) is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality due to premature and progressive atherosclerosis. An underlying cause of atherosclerosis is increased insulin resistance. Elevated fasting and postprandial glucose and lipid levels may contribute to premature atherosclerosis. We studied effects of growth hormone replacement (GHRT) on fasting and postprandial metabolic parameters as well as on insulin sensitivity in patients with adult-onset GHD. Using a standardized mixed meal, we studied insulin, glucose, non-esterified free fatty acid (NEFA) and triglycerides (TG) concentrations in the fasting state and during a 4 h postprandial period in 15 patients with adult-onset GHD before and after 4 months of GHRT. Identical investigations were performed in healthy matched control subjects. GHD patients before and after GHRT: GHRT did not result in significant changes in fasting glucose, insulin, NEFA and TG concentrations. In the postprandial period GHRT resulted in a non-significant increase in glucose and a decrease in NEFA levels in the presence of unchanged postprandial insulin and TG concentrations. GHD patients vs. control subjects: GHD patients showed similar fasting glucose, insulin and NEFA concentrations, but TG were increased. In the postprandial period GHD patients exhibited similar glucose and TG, but increased insulin and NEFA concentrations. GHRT patients vs. control subjects: Patients after GHRT had similar fasting glucose, insulin and NEFA, but increased TG concentrations. In the postprandial period patients after GHRT had increased glucose and insulin levels in the presence of similar NEFA and TG concentrations. While impaired insulin action in patients with GHD translates mainly by an impaired fasting TG metabolism, GHRT induced insulin resistance additionally encompasses postprandial glucose metabolism. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Fatty Acids, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Arner

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Although elevated free fatty acid (FFA levels in obesity have been considered to be of importance for insulin resistance, a recent meta-analysis suggested normal FFA levels in obese subjects. We investigated fasting circulating FFA and glycerol levels in a large cohort of non-obese and obese subjects. Methods: Subjects recruited for a study on obesity genetics were investigated in the morning after an overnight fast (n = 3,888. Serum FFA (n = 3,306, plasma glycerol (n = 3,776, and insulin sensitivity index (HOMA-IR,n = 3,469 were determined. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 and insulin resistance as HOMA-IR ≥ 2.21. Results: In obese subjects, circulating FFA and glycerol levels were higher than in non-obese individuals (by 26% and 47%, respectively; both p Conclusion: Circulating FFA and glycerol levels are markedly elevated in obesity but only marginally influenced by insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Whether these differences persist during diurnal variations in circulating FFA/glycerol, remains to be established.

  15. Empowerment-Based Diabetes Self-Management Education to Maintain Glycemic Targets During Ramadan Fasting in People With Diabetes Who Are on Conventional Insulin: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmoud, Sahar I.; Abdelsalam, Mona M.; Eichorst, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Objective. This study aims to assess the feasibility of promoting safe Ramadan fasting through diabetes self-management education (DSME) and to determine the effect of such education on hypoglycemic episodes. Design and methods. This prospective study included subjects attending Ramadan reinforcement sessions for participants in the Educational Program for People with Diabetes (EPPWD) at the Ain-Shams University Diabetes Center in Cairo, Egypt. The DSME sessions started 2–3 weeks before Ramadan and included one experimental fasting day during the first week and one during the second week. Participants’ A1C and serum fructosamine levels were measured before and after Ramadan, and they completed weekly self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) logs. Results. Among 21 participants who were intending to fast for Ramadan, 14 completed the program. Their mean A1C was 6.7 ± 1.6%, and SMBG results showed a statistically nonsignificant difference in mean blood glucose levels before and after Ramadan (123.84 ± 39.96 and 123.84 ± 25.92 mg/dL, respectively; P >0.05). Serum fructosamine after Ramadan declined by 10% from pre-Ramadan levels. The mean number of hypoglycemic events before Ramadan was 3 ± 1.04, which declined to 1.4 ± 0.5 during Ramadan. Differences between group 1 (those without hypoglycemia, n = 8) and group 2 (those with hypoglycemia, n = 6) were nonsignificant for all variables, including A1C. Conclusion. Ramadan fasting is feasible for people with diabetes who are on a multiple daily injection insulin regimen and participate in the EPPWD. The number of hypoglycemic events per month declined with the attainment of DSME. PMID:28270713

  16. Fasting glucose, NT-proBNP, treatment with eptifibatide, and outcomes in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: An analysis from EARLY ACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Serdar; Clare, Robert M; Jarai, Rudolf; Giugliano, Robert P; Lokhnygina, Yuliya; Harrington, Robert A; Kristin Newby, L; Huber, Kurt

    2017-04-01

    Higher N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels have been linked to a more favorable glucometabolic profile. Little is known about the interaction of NT-proBNP and fasting glucose in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE ACS). Fasting glucose and NT-proBNP were measured in 2240 patients enrolled in the EARLY ACS trial. Multivariable Cox models were used to assess associations between fasting glucose and NT-proBNP and a 96-hour composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), recurrent ischemia, or thrombotic bailout; 30-day death or MI; and 1-year mortality. In adjusted Cox models, neither NT-proBNP nor fasting glucose was associated with the 96-hour endpoint (p=0.95 and p=0.87). NT-proBNP was associated with 30-day death or MI (hazard ratio [HR] 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.22, p=0.02) and 1-year mortality (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.42-1.89, pfasting glucose was associated only with 1-year death (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.08-2.16, p=0.02). NT-proBNP×glucose interaction terms were non-significant in all models. As fasting glucose levels increased, the risk of 96-hour and 30-day endpoints increased among patients who received early eptifibatide but not delayed, provisional use (p int =0.035 and p int =0.029). Higher NT-proBNP levels were associated with greater 30-day death or MI among patients who received early eptifibatide but not delayed, provisional use (p int =0.045). NT-proBNP and fasting glucose concentrations were associated with intermediate-term ischemic outcomes and may identify differential response to treatment with eptifibatide. CLINICALTRIALS. NCT00089895. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Differential effects of casein versus whey on fasting plasma levels of insulin, IGF-1 and IGF-1/IGFBP-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoppe, Camilla; Mølgaard, Christian; Dalum, Cathrine

    2009-01-01

    to the identification of which components in milk that stimulate growth, we have performed an intervention study with 57 eight-year-old boys in which we examined the effects of the two major milk protein fractions, whey and casein, and milk minerals (Ca and P) in a 2x2 factorial design on IGFs and glucose......–insulin metabolism. The amounts of whey and casein were identical to the content in 1.5 l skim milk. The amounts of Ca and P were similar to 1.5 l skim milk in the high-mineral drinks, whereas the amounts of Ca and P were reduced in the low-mineral drinks. Results: There were no interactions between milk mineral...... groups (high, low) and milk protein groups (whey, casein). Serum IGF-1 increased by 15% (P...

  18. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, Karim; Karlsson, Håkan K R; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied...... by altered signal transduction, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from pancreas-kidney transplant recipients (n = 4), nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients (receiving the same immunosuppressive drugs; n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 6) before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Basal...... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  19. IRS-1 serine phosphorylation and insulin resistance in skeletal muscle from pancreas tranplant recipient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzakri, K; Karlsson, HRK; Vestergaard, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetic recipients of successful pancreas allografts achieve self-regulatory insulin secretion and discontinue exogenous insulin therapy; however, chronic hyperinsulinemia and impaired insulin sensitivity generally develop. To determine whether insulin resistance is accompanied...... by altered signal transduction, skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained from pancreas-kidney transplant recipients (n = 4), nondiabetic kidney transplant recipients (receiving the same immunosuppressive drugs; n = 5), and healthy subjects (n = 6) before and during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Basal...... insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 Ser (312) and Ser (616) phosphorylation, IRS-1-associated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activity, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-1/2 phosphorylation were elevated in pancreas-kidney transplant recipients, coincident with fasting hyperinsulinemia. Basal...

  20. Mammary tumors that become independent of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor express elevated levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Craig I

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted therapies are becoming an essential part of breast cancer treatment and agents targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR are currently being investigated in clinical trials. One of the limitations of targeted therapies is the development of resistant variants and these variants typically present with unique gene expression patterns and characteristics compared to the original tumor. Results MTB-IGFIR transgenic mice, with inducible overexpression of the IGF-IR were used to model mammary tumors that develop resistance to IGF-IR targeting agents. IGF-IR independent mammary tumors, previously shown to possess characteristics associated with EMT, were found to express elevated levels of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. Furthermore, these receptors were shown to be inversely expressed with the IGF-IR in this model. Using cell lines derived from IGF-IR-independent mammary tumors (from MTB-IGFIR mice, it was demonstrated that PDGFRα and to a lesser extent PDGFRβ was important for cell migration and invasion as RNAi knockdown of PDGFRα alone or PDGFRα and PDGFRβ in combination, significantly decreased tumor cell migration in Boyden chamber assays and suppressed cell migration in scratch wound assays. Somewhat surprisingly, concomitant knockdown of PDGFRα and PDGFRβ resulted in a modest increase in cell proliferation and a decrease in apoptosis. Conclusion During IGF-IR independence, PDGFRs are upregulated and function to enhance tumor cell motility. These results demonstrate a novel interaction between the IGF-IR and PDGFRs and highlight an important, therapeutically relevant pathway, for tumor cell migration and invasion.

  1. Systematic review and meta-analysis reveals acutely elevated plasma cortisol following fasting but not less severe calorie restriction

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Yuko; Walker, Brian R.; Ikuta, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma cortisol has been reported following caloric restriction, and may contribute to adverse effects including stress-induced overeating, but results from published studies are inconsistent. To clarify the effects of caloric restriction on plasma cortisol, and to assess cortisol as an indicator of stress during caloric restriction, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies in which cortisol was measured following caloric restriction without other manip...

  2. Elevated resistin levels in cirrhosis are associated with the proinflammatory state and altered hepatic glucose metabolism but not with insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahr, Matthias J.; Ockenga, Johann; Boeker, Klaus H. W.; Manns, Michael P.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    The adipokine resistin has been implicated in obesity and insulin resistance. Liver cirrhosis is associated with decreased body fat mass and insulin resistance. We determined plasma resistin levels in 57 patients with cirrhosis, 13 after liver transplantation, and 30 controls and correlated these

  3. Insulin Secretagogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Spikes Is mealtime insulin right for you? Insulin Secretagogues September 2017 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors ... Additional Resources Affordable Insulin Project FDA What are insulin secretagogues? Insulin secretagogues are one type of medicine ...

  4. Insulin in ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Jawad, Fatema

    2015-05-01

    Many people with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, require insulin for maintainance of glycaemic control and health. Most of these people can observe the Ramadan fast, provided appropriate dosage adjustments are made, and basic rules of safety followed. This article describes modifications and precautions that are needed while prescribing insulin during Ramadan.

  5. Association of fasting serum insulin and cancer mortality in a healthy population - 28-year follow-up of the French TELECOM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargny, M; Balkau, B; Lange, C; Charles, M-A; Giral, P; Simon, D

    2018-02-01

    Epidemiologic, pharmacoepidemiologic and pathophysiologic evidence points consistently to an association between type 2 diabetes and cancer. This association could be explained by hyperinsulinemia induced by insulin resistance. We studied the association between fasting serum insulin (FSI) and cancer mortality in a population of non-diabetic individuals. We followed 3117 healthy workers (50.2% women), included in the TELECOM cohort study, between 1985 and 1987; their median age was 38 years (Q1-Q3=30-50). Baseline FSI was measured by radioimmunoassay, the INSI-PR method. People with diabetes or cancer at baseline were excluded. Vital status and causes of death were available until December 2013. The association between FSI and cancer deaths was analysed by sex, using a Cox proportional hazards model with age as the time scale, adjusting for body mass index, smoking habits, alcohol consumption, occupational category and ethnic origin. After a 28-year follow-up, 330 (10.6%) deaths were reported, among which, 150 were cancer-related (80 men, 70 women). In men, the association between FSI and death by cancer was J-shaped: compared to the average FSI of 7.1mU/L, men with 5mU/L and 12.9mU/L had respectively adjusted hazard-ratios (HR) of 1.88 (95% confidence interval, 1.00-3.56) and 2.30 (95% CI, 1.34-3.94). Among women, no significant association was found (adjusted HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.96-1.11) for an increase of 1mU/L in FSI. These results strengthen the hypothesis of an independent risk of cancer death associated with extreme values of FSI, mainly the highest, among men, but not among women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    suppressed lipid oxidation in the controls. It is concluded that patients with congenital generalized lipodystrophy may present severe insulin resistance with regard to hepatic glucose production as well as muscle glycogen synthesis and lipid oxidation. The results suggest a postreceptor defect in the action......, immunoreactive protein and mRNA levels. The patients had fasting hyperinsulinaemia, and the rate of total glucose disposal was severely impaired, primarily due to a decreased non-oxidative glucose metabolism. In the patient studied with muscle biopsy, the expected activation of glycogen synthase by insulin did...... not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  7. A role for Insulin-like growth factor 2 in specification of the fast skeletal muscle fibre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Tao

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibre type specification is a poorly understood process beginning in embryogenesis in which skeletal muscle myotubes switch myosin-type to establish fast, slow and mixed fibre muscle groups with distinct function. Growth factors are required to establish slow fibres; it is unknown how fast twitch fibres are specified. Igf-2 is an embryonically expressed growth factor with established in vitro roles in skeletal muscle. Its localisation and role in embryonic muscle differentiation had not been established. Results Between E11.5 and E15.5 fast Myosin (FMyHC localises to secondary myotubes evenly distributed throughout the embryonic musculature and gradually increasing in number so that by E15.5 around half contain FMyHC. The Igf-2 pattern closely correlates with FMyHC from E13.5 and peaks at E15.5 when over 90% of FMyHC+ myotubes also contain Igf-2. Igf-2 lags FMyHC and it is absent from muscle myotubes until E13.5. Igf-2 strongly down-regulates by E17.5. A striking feature of the FMyHC pattern is its increased heterogeneity and attenuation in many fibres from E15.5 to day one after birth (P1. Transgenic mice (MIG which express Igf-2 in all of their myotubes, have increased FMyHC staining, a higher proportion of FMyHC+ myotubes and loose their FMyHC staining heterogeneity. In Igf-2 deficient mice (MatDi FMyHC+ myotubes are reduced to 60% of WT by E15.5. In vitro, MIG induces a 50% excess of FMyHC+ and a 30% reduction of SMHyC+ myotubes in C2 cells which can be reversed by Igf-2-targeted ShRNA resulting in 50% reduction of FMyHC. Total number of myotubes was not affected. Conclusion In WT embryos the appearance of Igf-2 in embryonic myotubes lags FMyHC, but by E15.5 around 45% of secondary myotubes contain both proteins. Forced expression of Igf-2 into all myotubes causes an excess, and absence of Igf-2 suppresses, the FMyHC+ myotube component in both embryonic muscle and differentiated myoblasts. Igf-2 is thus required, not for

  8. Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) elevation and arginase up‐regulation contribute to endothelial dysfunction related to insulin resistance in rats and morbidly obese humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Santos‐Ruiz, Marta; Ruiz de Adana, Juan Carlos; Pindado, María Luz; Sánchez‐Ferrer, Alberto; Hernández, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Key points The presence of insulin resistance (IR) is determinant for endothelial dysfunction associated with obesity.Although recent studies have implicated the involvement of mitochondrial superoxide and inflammation in the defective nitric oxide (NO)‐mediated responses and subsequent endothelial dysfunction in IR, other mechanisms could compromise this pathway.In the present study, we assessed the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and arginase with respect to IR‐induced impairment of endothelium‐dependent vasodilatation in human morbid obesity and in a non‐obese rat model of IR.We show that both increased ADMA and up‐regulated arginase are determinant factors in the alteration of the l‐arginine/NO pathway associated with IR in both models and also that acute treatment of arteries with arginase inhibitor or with l‐arginine significantly alleviate endothelial dysfunction.These results help to expand our knowledge regarding the mechanisms of endothelial dysfunction that are related to obesity and IR and establish potential therapeutic targets for intervention. Abstract Insulin resistance (IR) is determinant for endothelial dysfunction in human obesity. Although we have previously reported the involvement of mitochondrial superoxide and inflammation, other mechanisms could compromise NO‐mediated responses in IR. We evaluated the role of the endogenous NOS inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and arginase with respect to IR‐induced impairment of l‐arginine/NO‐mediated vasodilatation in human morbid obesity and in a non‐obese rat model of IR. Bradykinin‐induced vasodilatation was evaluated in microarteries derived from insulin‐resistant morbidly obese (IR‐MO) and non‐insulin‐resistant MO (NIR‐MO) subjects. Defective endothelial vasodilatation in IR‐MO was improved by l‐arginine supplementation. Increased levels of ADMA were detected in serum and adipose tissue from IR‐MO. Serum ADMA positively correlated with

  9. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  10. Behavior of low-burnup metallic fuels for the integral fast reactor at elevated temperatures in ex-reactor tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hanchung; Liu, Yung Y.; Wang, Da-Yung; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-07-01

    A series of ex-reactor heating tests on low burnup U-26wt.%Pu-10wt.%Zr metallic fuel for the PRISM reactor was conducted to evaluate fuel/cladding metallurgical interaction and its effect on cladding integrity at elevated temperatures. The reaction between the fuel and cladding caused liquid-phase formation and dissolution of the inner surface of the cladding. The rate of cladding penetration was below the existing design correlation, which provides a conservative margin to cladding failure. In a test which enveloped a wide range of postulated reactor transient events, a substantial temporal cladding integrity margin was demonstrated for an intact, whole fuel pin. The cause of the eventual pin breach was reaction-induced cladding thinning combined with fission-gas pressure loading. The behavior of the breached pin was benign. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  11. Inhibition of cholinergic potentiation of insulin secretion from pancreatic islets by chronic elevation of glucose and fatty acids: Protection by casein kinase 2 inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai M. Doliba

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: These results show that chronic FA treatment decreases acetylcholine potentiation of insulin secretion and that this effect is strictly glucose dependent and might involve CK2 phosphorylation of β-cell M3 muscarinic receptors.

  12. Soluble CD36 and risk markers of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis are elevated in polycystic ovary syndrome and significantly reduced during pioglitazone treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glintborg, Dorte; Højlund, Kurt; Andersen, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the relation between soluble CD36 (sCD36), risk markers of atherosclerosis and body composition, and glucose and lipid metabolism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Research Design and Methods: Thirty PCOS patients were randomized to pioglitazone, 30 mg/day or placebo...... independent predictors of glucose, and lipid metabolism, whereas hsCRP and IL-6 showed no significant contribution. Following pioglitazone treatment, insulin sensitivity increased, whereas sCD36 (3.21(0.76 - 13.6) vs. 2.33 (0.84 - 6.46) relative units) and hsCRP decreased (p... measured in body composition. Conclusions: sCD36 and oxLDL correlated with measures of insulin sensitivity independent of central fat mass. Pioglitazone treatment reduced sCD36 while improving insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism, further supporting the association between sCD36 and insulin resistance...

  13. Plasma sphingosine-1-phosphate is elevated in obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg M Kowalski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysfunctional lipid metabolism is a hallmark of obesity and insulin resistance and a risk factor for various cardiovascular and metabolic complications. In addition to the well known increase in plasma triglycerides and free fatty acids, recent work in humans and rodents has shown that obesity is associated with elevations in the bioactive class of sphingolipids known as ceramides. However, in obesity little is known about the plasma concentrations of sphinogsine-1-phosphate (S1P, the breakdown product of ceramide, which is an important signaling molecule in mammalian biology. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the impact of obesity on circulating S1P concentration and its relationship with markers of glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Plasma S1P levels were determined in high-fat diet (HFD-induced and genetically obese (ob/ob mice along with obese humans. Circulating S1P was elevated in both obese mouse models and in obese humans compared with lean healthy controls. Furthermore, in humans, plasma S1P positively correlated with total body fat percentage, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, HbA1c (%, total and LDL cholesterol. In addition, fasting increased plasma S1P levels in lean healthy mice. CONCLUSION: We show that elevations in plasma S1P are a feature of both human and rodent obesity and correlate with metabolic abnormalities such as adiposity and insulin resistance.

  14. Insulin resistance in obese pre-pubertal children: Relation to body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting glucose to insulin ratio, Matsuda, and Cederholm indices. Results: All patients had BMI, waist circumference, and DXA trunk fat more than 2 SDS. Mean fasting glucose, insulin, fasting glucose to insulin ratio, ...

  15. Common variation in LMNA increases susceptibility to type 2 diabetes and associates with elevated fasting glycemia and estimates of body fat and height in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegner, Lise; Andersen, Gitte; Sparsø, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    . The minor T-allele of rs4641 was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.14 [95% CI 1.03-1.26], P = 0.01) in a study of 1,324 type 2 diabetic patients and 4,386 glucose-tolerant subjects and with elevated fasting plasma glucose levels in a population-based study of 5,395 middle......-aged individuals (P = 0.008). The minor T-allele of rs955383 showed nominal association with obesity in a study of 5,693 treatment-naïve subjects (1.25 [1.07-1.64], P = 0.01), and after dichotomization of waist circumference, the minor alleles of rs955383 and rs11578696 were nominally associated with increased...

  16. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... parameters, blood pressure, fasting glucose and insulin were measured. Homeostasis model ... Results: The hypertensive subjects had significantly higher fasting insulin and HOMA-IR compared with normotensives. (p =0.02 and 0.04) ..... demonstrated the benefit of early interventions to improve insulin ...

  17. FoxO6 integrates insulin signaling with gluconeogenesis in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Perdomo, German; Zhang, Ting; Slusher, Sandra; Lee, Sojin; Phillips, Brett E; Fan, Yong; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gramignoli, Roberto; Strom, Stephen; Ringquist, Steven; Dong, H Henry

    2011-11-01

    Excessive endogenous glucose production contributes to fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. This effect stems from inept insulin suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanisms, we studied the ability of forkhead box O6 (FoxO6) to mediate insulin action on hepatic gluconeogenesis and its contribution to glucose metabolism. We characterized FoxO6 in glucose metabolism in cultured hepatocytes and in rodent models of dietary obesity, insulin resistance, or insulin-deficient diabetes. We determined the effect of FoxO6 on hepatic gluconeogenesis in genetically modified mice with FoxO6 gain- versus loss-of-function and in diabetic db/db mice with selective FoxO6 ablation in the liver. FoxO6 integrates insulin signaling to hepatic gluconeogenesis. In mice, elevated FoxO6 activity in the liver augments gluconeogenesis, raising fasting blood glucose levels, and hepatic FoxO6 depletion suppresses gluconeogenesis, resulting in fasting hypoglycemia. FoxO6 stimulates gluconeogenesis, which is counteracted by insulin. Insulin inhibits FoxO6 activity via a distinct mechanism by inducing its phosphorylation and disabling its transcriptional activity, without altering its subcellular distribution in hepatocytes. FoxO6 becomes deregulated in the insulin-resistant liver, accounting for its unbridled activity in promoting gluconeogenesis and correlating with the pathogenesis of fasting hyperglycemia in diabetes. These metabolic abnormalities, along with fasting hyperglycemia, are reversible by selective inhibition of hepatic FoxO6 activity in diabetic mice. Our data uncover a FoxO6-dependent pathway by which the liver orchestrates insulin regulation of gluconeogenesis, providing the proof-of-concept that selective FoxO6 inhibition is beneficial for curbing excessive hepatic glucose production and improving glycemic control in diabetes.

  18. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, S P C; Surki, A A; de Vos, R C H; Kodde, J

    2012-11-01

    Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. methods: Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice.

  19. Seed storage at elevated partial pressure of oxygen, a fast method for analysing seed ageing under dry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, S. P. C.; Surki, A. A.; de Vos, R. C. H.; Kodde, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite differences in physiology between dry and relative moist seeds, seed ageing tests most often use a temperature and seed moisture level that are higher than during dry storage used in commercial practice and gene banks. This study aimed to test whether seed ageing under dry conditions can be accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. Methods Dry barley (Hordeum vulgare), cabbage (Brassica oleracea), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and soybean (Glycine max) seeds were stored between 2 and 7 weeks in steel tanks under 18 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. Storage under high-pressure nitrogen gas or under ambient air pressure served as controls. The method was compared with storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % relative humidity and long-term storage at the laboratory bench. Germination behaviour, seedling morphology and tocopherol levels were assessed. Key Results The ageing of the dry seeds was indeed accelerated by storing under high-pressure oxygen. The morphological ageing symptoms of the stored seeds resembled those observed after ageing under long-term dry storage conditions. Barley appeared more tolerant of this storage treatment compared with lettuce and soybean. Less-mature harvested cabbage seeds were more sensitive, as was the case for primed compared with non-primed lettuce seeds. Under high-pressure oxygen storage the tocopherol levels of dry seeds decreased, in a linear way with the decline in seed germination, but remained unchanged in seeds deteriorated during storage at 45 °C after equilibration at 85 % RH. Conclusions Seed storage under high-pressure oxygen offers a novel and relatively fast method to study the physiology and biochemistry of seed ageing at different seed moisture levels and temperatures, including those that are representative of the dry storage conditions as used in gene banks and commercial practice. PMID:22967856

  20. Hepatic Insulin Resistance Following Chronic Activation of the CREB Coactivator CRTC2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogan, Meghan F; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Matsumura, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    and dephosphorylation of the cAMP regulated CREB coactivators CRTC2 and CRTC3. In parallel, decreases in circulating insulin also increase gluconeogenic gene expression via the de-phosphorylation and activation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is increased in insulin resistance where...... accompanying decreases in FOXO1 activity, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression remained elevated in CRTC2S171,275A mice demonstrating that chronic increases in CRTC2 activity in the liver are indeed sufficient to promote hepatic insulin resistance and to disrupt glucose homeostasis....... increased gluconeogenic gene expression under fasting as well as feeding conditions. Circulating glucose concentrations were constitutively elevated in CRTC2S171,275A expressing mice, leading to compensatory increases in circulating insulin concentrations that enhance FOXO1 phosphorylation. Despite...

  1. Elevated fasting plasma cortisol is associated with ischemic heart disease and its risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes: the Edinburgh type 2 diabetes study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca M; Labad, Javier; Strachan, Mark W J; Braun, Anke; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Lee, Amanda J; Frier, Brian M; Seckl, Jonathan R; Walker, Brian R; Price, Jackie F

    2010-04-01

    Increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may underlie the metabolic syndrome, but whether circulating cortisol levels predict cardiovascular end points is less clear. People with type 2 diabetes are at increased cardiovascular disease risk and thus are suitable to study associations of plasma cortisol with cardiovascular risk. We aimed to assess whether altered HPA axis activity was associated with features of the metabolic syndrome and ischemic heart disease in people with type 2 diabetes. We conducted a cross-sectional cohort study in the general community, including 919 men and women aged 67.9 (4.2) yr with type 2 diabetes (the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study). We measured fasting morning plasma cortisol. Associations between cortisol levels, features of the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and ischemic heart disease were determined. Elevated plasma cortisol levels were associated with raised fasting glucose and total cholesterol levels (P cortisol levels were associated with prevalent ischemic heart disease (>800 vs. cortisol is also associated with a greater prevalence of ischemic heart disease, independent of conventional risk factors. Understanding the role of cortisol in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease merits further exploration.

  2. Ablation of fast-spiking interneurons in the dorsal striatum, recapitulating abnormalities seen post-mortem in Tourette syndrome, produces anxiety and elevated grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M; Li, L; Pittenger, C

    2016-06-02

    Tic disorders, including Tourette syndrome (TS), are thought to involve pathology of cortico-basal ganglia loops, but their pathology is not well understood. Post-mortem studies have shown a reduced number of several populations of striatal interneurons, including the parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), in individuals with severe, refractory TS. We tested the causal role of this interneuronal deficit by recapitulating it in an otherwise normal adult mouse using a combination transgenic-viral cell ablation approach. FSIs were reduced bilaterally by ∼40%, paralleling the deficit found post-mortem. This did not produce spontaneous stereotypies or tic-like movements, but there was increased stereotypic grooming after acute stress in two validated paradigms. Stereotypy after amphetamine, in contrast, was not elevated. FSI ablation also led to increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, but not to alterations in motor learning on the rotorod or to alterations in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating. These findings indicate that a striatal FSI deficit can produce stress-triggered repetitive movements and anxiety. These repetitive movements may recapitulate aspects of the pathophysiology of tic disorders. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of Dive Capacity in Northern Elephant Seals (Mirounga angustirostris): Reduced Body Reserves at Weaning Are Associated with Elevated Body Oxygen Stores during the Postweaning Fast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somo, Derek A; Ensminger, David C; Sharick, Jeffrey T; Kanatous, Shane B; Crocker, Daniel E

    2015-01-01

    Developmental increases in dive capacity have been reported in numerous species of air-breathing marine vertebrates. Previous studies in juvenile phocid seals suggest that increases in physiological dive capacity during the postweaning fast (PWF) are critical to support independent aquatic foraging. Although there is a strong relationship between size at weaning and PWF duration and body reserves at weaning vary considerably, few studies have considered whether such variation in body reserve magnitude promotes phenotypic modulation of dive capacity development during the PWF. Phenotypic modulation, a form of developmental plasticity in which rates and degrees of expression of the developmental program are modulated by environmental factors, may enhance diving capacity in weanlings with reduced PWF durations due to smaller body reserves at weaning if reduced body reserves promote accelerated development of dive capacity. We longitudinally measured changes in blood and muscle oxygen stores and muscle metabolic enzymes over the first 8 wk of the PWF in northern elephant seals and determined whether rates of change in these parameters varied with body reserves at weaning. We assessed whether erythropoietin (EPO), thyroid hormones, serum nonesterified fatty acid levels, and iron status influenced blood and muscle oxygen store development or were influenced by body reserves at weaning. Although mass-specific plasma volume and blood volume were relatively stable across the fast, both were elevated in animals with reduced body reserves. Surprisingly, hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentrations declined over the PWF while hematocrit remained stable, and these variables were not associated with body reserves or EPO. Swimming muscle myoglobin and serum iron levels increased rapidly early in the PWF and were not related to body reserves. Patterns in maximal activities of muscle enzymes suggested a decline in total aerobic and anaerobic metabolic capacity over the

  4. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wang, Xiaorui; Wang, Yue

    2010-01-01

    neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium...... tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain......BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define...

  5. Pre-germinated brown rice prevents high-fat diet induced hyperglycemia through elevated insulin secretion and glucose metabolism pathway in C57BL/6J strain mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Kuo-Ping; Hao, Chi-Long; Yen, Hsueh-Wei; Chen, Chun-Yen; Wu, Bin-Nan; Lin, Hui-Li

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect and mechanism of pre-germinated brown rice (PGBR) prevented hyperglycemia in C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat-diet (HFD). Normal six-week-old mice were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 was fed standard-regular-diet (SRD) and group 2 was fed HFD for 16 weeks. In group 3, the mice were fed a HFD with its carbohydrate replaced with PGBR for 16 weeks. Comparing the SRD and HFD groups, we found the HFD group had higher blood pressure, higher concentrations of blood glucose and HbA1c. The HFD group had less protein expression of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), glucose transporter-4 (GLUT-4) and glucokinase (GCK) and greater expression of glucogen synthase kinase (GSK) in skeletal muscle. The HFD group also had less expression of IR, serine/threonine kinase PI3K-linked protein kinase B (Akt/PKB), AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), GCK and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) in liver. In the HFD + PGBR group, the PGBR could reverse the disorders of blood pressure, blood glucose, HbA1c and increase insulin concentration. PGBR increased the IR, IRS-1, PI3K, Akt, GLUT-1 and GLUT-4 proteins, and ameliorated AMPK, GCK, GSK and PPARγ proteins. Together, PGBR prevented HFD-induced hyperglycemia through improving insulin levels, insulin receptor, glucose transporters and enhancing glucose metabolism.

  6. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, LH; De Vries, APJ; Van Son, WJ; Van Der Heide, JJH; Ploeg, RJ; Gansevoort, RT; De Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; Bakker, SJL

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin

  7. Validation of insulin resistance indexes in a stable renal transplant population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oterdoom, Leendert H.; de Vries, Aiko P. J.; van Son, Willem J.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; de Jong, Paul E.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the validity of established insulin resistance indexes, based on fasting blood parameters, in a stable renal transplant population. Fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), and

  8. Insulin Pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Insulin Pumps Insulin pumps are small computerized devices that deliver insulin in ... tissue and is taped in place. The insulin pump is not an artificial pancreas (because you still ...

  9. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  10. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: a meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. We investigated the associations of meat intake and the intera...

  11. Consumption of meat is associated with higher fasting glucose and insulin concentrations regardless of glucose and insulin genetic risk scores: A meta-analysis of 50,345 Caucasians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Fretts (Amanda M.); J.L. Follis (Jack ); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer ); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J.S. Ngwa; M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); T.V. Varga (Tibor V.); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis C.); D.K. Houston (Denise); J. Lahti (Jari); U. Ericson (Ulrika); E.H. van den Hooven (Edith); V. Mikkilä (Vera); J.C. Kiefte-de Jong (Jessica); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); K.M. Rice (Kenneth); F. Renström (Frida); K.E. North (Kari); N.M. McKeown (Nicola ); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); C.E. Smith (Caren); M. Garcia (Melissa); A.-M. Tiainen (Anna-Maija); E. Sonestedt (Emily); A. Manichaikul (Ani); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); M. Dimitriou (Maria); O. Raitakari (Olli); J.S. Pankow (James); L. Djoussé (Luc); M.A. Province (Mike); F.B. Hu (Frank); C.-Q. Lai (Chao-Qiang); M.F. Keller (Margaux); M.-M. Perälä (Mia-Maria); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); A. Hofman (Albert); M.J. Graff (Maud J.L.); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mukamal (Kenneth); I. Johansson (Ingegerd); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); Y. Liu (YongMei); S. Männistö (Satu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I. Seppälä (Ilkka); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P.W. Franks (Paul W.); D.K. Arnett (Donna); M.A. Nalls (Michael); K. Hagen (Knut); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); O.H. Franco (Oscar); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J.B. Meigs (James); D.S. Siscovick (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recent studies suggest that meat intake is associated with diabetes-related phenotypes. However, whether the associations of meat intake and glucose and insulin homeostasis are modified by genes related to glucose and insulin is unknown. Objective: We investigated the

  12. A physiological increase of insulin in the olfactory bulb decreases detection of a learned aversive odor and abolishes food odor-induced sniffing behavior in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Aimé

    Full Text Available Insulin is involved in multiple regulatory mechanisms, including body weight and food intake, and plays a critical role in metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. An increasing body of evidence indicates that insulin is also involved in the modulation of olfactory function. The olfactory bulb (OB contains the highest level of insulin and insulin receptors (IRs in the brain. However, a role for insulin in odor detection and sniffing behavior remains to be elucidated. Using a behavioral paradigm based on conditioned olfactory aversion (COA to isoamyl-acetate odor, we demonstrated that an intracerebroventricular (ICV injection of 14 mU insulin acutely decreased olfactory detection of fasted rats to the level observed in satiated animals. In addition, whereas fasted animals demonstrated an increase in respiratory frequency upon food odor detection, this effect was absent in fasted animals receiving a 14 mU insulin ICV injection as well as in satiated animals. In parallel, we showed that the OB and plasma insulin levels were increased in satiated rats compared to fasted rats, and that a 14 mU insulin ICV injection elevated the OB insulin level of fasted rats to that of satiated rats. We further quantified insulin receptors (IRs distribution and showed that IRs are preferentially expressed in the caudal and lateral parts of the main OB, with the highest labeling found in the mitral cells, the main OB projection neurons. Together, these data suggest that insulin acts on the OB network to modulate olfactory processing and demonstrate that olfactory function is under the control of signals involved in energy homeostasis regulation and feeding behaviors.

  13. Impact of metformin versus the prandial insulin secretagogue, repaglinide, on fasting and postprandial glucose and lipid responses in non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Søren S; Tarnow, Lise; Frandsen, Merete

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-obese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are characterized by predominant defective insulin secretion. However, in non-obese T2DM patients, metformin, targeting insulin resistance, is non-inferior to the prandial insulin secretagogue, repaglinide, controlling overall glycaemia (Hb...... non-obese (body mass index diet-only treatment, patients were randomized to repaglinide (2 mg) thrice daily followed by metformin (1 g) twice...

  14. Altered Daytime Fluctuation Pattern of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 in Type 2 Diabetes Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Strong Association with Persistently Elevated Plasma Insulin, Increased Insulin Resistance, and Abdominal Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Lalić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at investigating daily fluctuation of PAI-1 levels in relation to insulin resistance (IR and daily profile of plasma insulin and glucose levels in 26 type 2 diabetic (T2D patients with coronary artery disease (CAD (group A, 10 T2D patients without CAD (group B, 12 nondiabetics with CAD (group C, and 12 healthy controls (group D. The percentage of PAI-1 decrease was lower in group A versus group B (4.4 ± 2.7 versus 35.0 ± 5.4%; P<0.05 and in C versus D (14.0 ± 5.8 versus 44.7 ± 3.1%; P<0.001. HOMA-IR was higher in group A versus group B (P<0.05 and in C versus D (P<0.01. Simultaneously, AUCs of PAI-1 and insulin were higher in group A versus group B (P<0.05 and in C versus D (P<0.01, while AUC of glucose did not differ between groups. In multiple regression analysis waist-to-hip ratio and AUC of insulin were independent determinants of decrease in PAI-1. The altered diurnal fluctuation of PAI-1, especially in T2D with CAD, might be strongly influenced by a prolonged exposure to hyperinsulinemia in the settings of increased IR and abdominal obesity, facilitating altogether an accelerated atherosclerosis.

  15. Gestational Protein Restriction Impairs Insulin-Regulated Glucose Transport Mechanisms in Gastrocnemius Muscles of Adult Male Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesson, Chellakkan S.; Sathishkumar, Kunju; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar

    2014-01-01

    Type II diabetes originates from various genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies showed that an adverse uterine environment such as that caused by a gestational low-protein (LP) diet can cause insulin resistance in adult offspring. The mechanism of insulin resistance induced by gestational protein restriction is not clearly understood. Our aim was to investigate the role of insulin signaling molecules in gastrocnemius muscles of gestational LP diet–exposed male offspring to understand their role in LP-induced insulin resistance. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed a control (20% protein) or isocaloric LP (6%) diet from gestational day 4 until delivery and a normal diet after weaning. Only male offspring were used in this study. Glucose and insulin responses were assessed after a glucose tolerance test. mRNA and protein levels of molecules involved in insulin signaling were assessed at 4 months in gastrocnemius muscles. Muscles were incubated ex vivo with insulin to evaluate insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), Insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt, and AS160. LP diet-fed rats gained less weight than controls during pregnancy. Male pups from LP diet–fed mothers were smaller but exhibited catch-up growth. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were elevated in LP offspring when subjected to a glucose tolerance test; however, fasting levels were comparable. LP offspring showed increased expression of IR and AS160 in gastrocnemius muscles. Ex vivo treatment of muscles with insulin showed increased phosphorylation of IR (Tyr972) in controls, but LP rats showed higher basal phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Insulin receptor substrate-1 (Tyr608, Tyr895, Ser307, and Ser318) and AS160 (Thr642) were defective in LP offspring. Further, glucose transporter type 4 translocation in LP offspring was also impaired. A gestational LP diet leads to insulin resistance in adult offspring by a mechanism involving inefficient insulin-induced IR, Insulin receptor

  16. Gestational protein restriction impairs insulin-regulated glucose transport mechanisms in gastrocnemius muscles of adult male offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesson, Chellakkan S; Sathishkumar, Kunju; Chinnathambi, Vijayakumar; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar

    2014-08-01

    Type II diabetes originates from various genetic and environmental factors. Recent studies showed that an adverse uterine environment such as that caused by a gestational low-protein (LP) diet can cause insulin resistance in adult offspring. The mechanism of insulin resistance induced by gestational protein restriction is not clearly understood. Our aim was to investigate the role of insulin signaling molecules in gastrocnemius muscles of gestational LP diet-exposed male offspring to understand their role in LP-induced insulin resistance. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed a control (20% protein) or isocaloric LP (6%) diet from gestational day 4 until delivery and a normal diet after weaning. Only male offspring were used in this study. Glucose and insulin responses were assessed after a glucose tolerance test. mRNA and protein levels of molecules involved in insulin signaling were assessed at 4 months in gastrocnemius muscles. Muscles were incubated ex vivo with insulin to evaluate insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR), Insulin receptor substrate-1, Akt, and AS160. LP diet-fed rats gained less weight than controls during pregnancy. Male pups from LP diet-fed mothers were smaller but exhibited catch-up growth. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were elevated in LP offspring when subjected to a glucose tolerance test; however, fasting levels were comparable. LP offspring showed increased expression of IR and AS160 in gastrocnemius muscles. Ex vivo treatment of muscles with insulin showed increased phosphorylation of IR (Tyr972) in controls, but LP rats showed higher basal phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Insulin receptor substrate-1 (Tyr608, Tyr895, Ser307, and Ser318) and AS160 (Thr642) were defective in LP offspring. Further, glucose transporter type 4 translocation in LP offspring was also impaired. A gestational LP diet leads to insulin resistance in adult offspring by a mechanism involving inefficient insulin-induced IR, Insulin receptor

  17. Enhanced insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in young lambs with placental insufficiency-induced intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Leticia E; Chen, Xiaochuan; Hay, William W; Limesand, Sean W

    2017-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with persistent metabolic complications, but information is limited for IUGR infants. We determined glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and insulin sensitivity in young lambs with placental insufficiency-induced IUGR. Lambs with hyperthermia-induced IUGR ( n = 7) were compared with control lambs ( n = 8). GSIS was measured at 8 ± 1 days of age, and at 15 ± 1 days, body weight-specific glucose utilization rates were measured with radiolabeled d-glucose during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEC). IUGR lambs weighed 23% less ( P insulin concentrations were not different between IUGR and controls for either study. First-phase insulin secretion was enhanced 2.3-fold in IUGR lambs compared with controls. However, second-phase insulin concentrations, glucose-potentiated arginine-stimulated insulin secretion, and β-cell mass were not different, indicating that IUGR β-cells have an intrinsic enhancement in acute GSIS. Compared with controls, IUGR lambs had higher body weight-specific glucose utilization rates and greater insulin sensitivity at fasting (1.6-fold) and hyperinsulinemic periods (2.4-fold). Improved insulin sensitivity for glucose utilization was not due to differences in skeletal muscle insulin receptor and glucose transporters 1 and 4 concentrations. Plasma lactate concentrations during HEC were elevated in IUGR lambs compared with controls, but no differences were found for glycogen content or citrate synthase activity in liver and muscle. Greater insulin sensitivity for glucose utilization and enhanced acute GSIS in young lambs are predicted from fetal studies but may promote conditions that exaggerate glucose disposal and lead to episodes of hypoglycemia in IUGR infants. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Efficacy of 2-hour post glucose insulin levels in predicting insulin resistance in polycystic ovarian syndrome with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikee Saxena

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Insulin resistance (IR is central to the pathogenesis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS, but tests for determining IR are elaborate, tedious and expensive. Aims : To evaluate if "2-hour post-glucose insulin level" is an effective indicator of IR and can aid in diagnosing IR in infertile PCOS women. Settings and Design : Observational study at infertility clinic of a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods : 50 infertile women with PCOS and 20 females with tubal/male factor infertility were evaluated for the presence of IR, as defined by the fasting/2-hour post-glucose insulin levels cutoffs of >25/>41 μU/mL, respectively. The clinical, metabolic and endocrinologic profile was determined in both the groups. Statistical Analysis : Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS (Chicago, IL, USA. Results : Body mass index, post load glucose, insulin, glucose/insulin ratio, area under curve (AUC of glucose and insulin and insulinogenic index were significantly lower in the controls as compared to the PCOS group. "2-hour post-glucose insulin levels" were elevated in 88% of PCOS individuals but were normal in all females not suffering from PCOS. These levels significantly correlated with AUC of glucose and insulin, and insulinogenic index and inversely correlated with 2-hour glucose to insulin ratio (r=0.827, 0.749 and −0.732, respectively. Conclusions : "2-hour post-glucose insulin levels" appears to be a good indicator of IR. It can be a useful tool, especially in low resource setting where a single sample can confirm the diagnosis, thus reducing cost and repeat visits.

  19. Serum leptin and insulin tests in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yin; Jiang Xiaojin; Leng Xiumei

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance and the relations of leptin and insulin on obesity group. Methods: Leptin and insulin were tested with radioimmunoassay (RIA) in pre-obesity group and obesity group respectively. Results: Serum leptin and insulin levels were significantly elevated in obesity group compare with the controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: Changing with insulin, the elevation of leptin in obesity group has been identified as an important agent of diabetes mellitus (DM)

  20. Association between insulin resistance and c-reactive protein among Peruvian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelaye Bizu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Insulin resistance (IR, a reduced physiological response of peripheral tissues to the action of insulin, is one of the major causes of type 2 diabetes. We sought to evaluate the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation, and prevalence of IR among Peruvian adults. Methods This population based study of 1,525 individuals (569 men and 956 women; mean age 39 years old was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and CRP concentrations were measured using standard approaches. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model (HOMA-IR. Categories of CRP were defined by the following tertiles: 2.53 mg/l. Logistic regression procedures were employed to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Elevated CRP were significantly associated with increased mean fasting insulin and mean HOMA-IR concentrations (p 2.53 mg/l (upper tertile had a 2.18-fold increased risk of IR (OR = 2.18 95% CI 1.51-3.16 as compared with those in the lowest tertile ( Conclusion Our observations among Peruvians suggest that chronic systemic inflammation, as evidenced by elevated CRP, may be of etiologic importance in insulin resistance and diabetes.

  1. Insulin aspart in diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2008-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with diabetes is associated with an increased risk of obstetric complications and perinatal mortality. Maintenance of near-normal glycemia during pregnancy can bring the prevalence of fetal, neonatal and maternal complications closer to that of the nondiabetic population. Changes...... in insulin requirements during pregnancy necessitate short-acting insulins for postprandial control of hyperglycemia. The fast-acting insulin analogue insulin aspart has been tested in a large, randomized trial of pregnant women with Type 1 diabetes and offers benefits in control of postprandial...... hyperglycemia with a tendency towards fewer episodes of severe hypoglycemia compared with human insulin. Treatment with insulin aspart was associated with a tendency toward fewer fetal losses and preterm deliveries than treatment with human insulin. Insulin aspart could not be detected in the fetal circulation...

  2. Periapical lesions decrease insulin signal and cause insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Curbete, Mariane Machado; Colombo, Natalia Helena; Shirakashi, Daisy Jaqueline; Chiba, Fernando Yamamoto; Prieto, Annelise Katrine Carrara; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Bomfim, Suely Regina Mogami; Ervolino, Edilson; Sumida, Doris Hissako

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are associated with decreased insulin signal transduction. Moreover, local oral inflammation, such as that accompanying periodontal disease, is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of periapical lesions (PLs) on insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity in rats. We hypothesized that PLs alter systemic insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity via elevated plasmatic tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Wistar rats were divided into control (CN) and PL groups. PLs were induced by exposing pulpal tissue to the oral environment. After 30 days, insulin sensitivity was measured using the insulin tolerance test. After euthanization, maxillae were processed for histopathology. Plasmatic concentrations of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were determined via the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Insulin signal transduction was evaluated using insulin receptor substrate tyrosine phosphorylation status and serine phosphorylation status in periepididymal white adipose tissue via Western blotting. For insulin signaling and insulin tolerance tests, the analyses performed were analysis of variance followed by the Tukey post hoc test. For TNF-α analysis, the Student's t test was used. In all tests, P change in serine phosphorylation status in white adipose tissue after insulin stimulation. PLs can cause alterations to both insulin signaling and insulin sensitivity, probably because of elevation of plasmatic TNF-α. The results from this study emphasize the importance of the prevention of local inflammatory diseases, such as PLs, with regard to the prevention of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dual role of the coactivator TORC2 in modulating hepatic glucose output and insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canettieri, Gianluca; Koo, Seung-Hoi; Berdeaux, Rebecca; Heredia, Jose; Hedrick, Susan; Zhang, Xinmin; Montminy, Marc

    2005-11-01

    Under fasting conditions, the cAMP-responsive CREB coactivator TORC2 promotes glucose homeostasis by stimulating the gluconeogenic program in liver. Following its nuclear translocation in response to elevations in circulating glucagon, TORC2 regulates hepatic gene expression via an association with CREB on relevant promoters. Here, we show that, in parallel with their effects on glucose output, CREB and TORC2 also enhance insulin signaling in liver by stimulating expression of the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) gene. The induction of hepatic IRS2 during fasting appears critical for glucose homeostasis; knockdown of hepatic IRS2 expression leads to glucose intolerance, whereas hepatic IRS2 overexpression attenuates the gluconeogenic program and reduces fasting glucose levels. By stimulating the expression of IRS2 in conjunction with gluconeogenic genes, the CREB:TORC2 pathway thus triggers a feedback response that limits glucose output from the liver during fasting.

  4. Impaired glucose homeostasis in insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, K; Krsek, M; Dheen, S T; Murphy, L J

    1996-01-01

    Transgenic mice that overexpressed IGFBP-1 are hyperinsulinemic in the first week of life and gradually develop fasting hyperglycemia. In adult transgenic mice, the hypoglycemic response to IGF-I but not insulin or des (1-3) IGF-I was attenuated (P < 0.05) compared with wild-type mice. Furthermore, in isolated adipocytes from transgenic mice, the stimulatory effect of IGF-I but not insulin on 2-deoxy-[3H]-glucose uptake was reduced (P < 0.02). In contrast, in isolated soleus muscle, the effects of both IGF-I and insulin on 2-deoxy-3H-glucose uptake and on [3H]-glucose incorporation into glycogen were significantly reduced compared to wild-type mice. The decline in specific activity of the 2-deoxy-3H-glucose, a measure of glucose appearance in the circulation, was more marked in transgenic animals (P < 0.05). In addition, tissue uptake of glucose was significantly higher in diaphragm, heart, intestine, liver, soleus muscle, and adipose tissue from fasting transgenic mice. Plasma concentrations of alanine, lysine, and methionine were also elevated in transgenic mice. These data suggest that overexpression of IGFBP-1 attenuates the hypoglycemic effect of endogenous IGF-I, which is initially compensated for by enhanced pancreatic insulin production. However, in adult mice pancreatic insulin content is reduced, insulin resistance is demonstrable in skeletal muscle and fasting hyperglycemia develops. PMID:8878433

  5. Insulin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Prescription Medicines Insulin Therapy Insulin Therapy Share Print When you digest food, your ... you eat into glucose (a form of sugar). Insulin allows this glucose to enter all the cells ...

  6. Subchronic sleep restriction causes tissue-specific insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Madhu N; Neylan, Thomas C; Grunfeld, Carl; Mulligan, Kathleen; Schambelan, Morris; Schwarz, Jean-Marc

    2015-04-01

    Short sleep duration is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Subchronic sleep restriction (SR) causes insulin resistance, but the mechanisms and roles of specific tissues are unclear. The purpose of this article was to determine whether subchronic SR altered (1) hepatic insulin sensitivity, (2) peripheral insulin sensitivity, and (3) substrate utilization. This was a randomized crossover study in which 14 subjects underwent 2 admissions separated by a washout period. Each admission had 2 acclimatization nights followed by 5 nights of either SR (4 hours time in bed) or normal sleep (8 hours time in bed). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE/METHODS: Insulin sensitivity (measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp) and hepatic insulin sensitivity (measured by stable isotope techniques) were measured. In addition, we assayed stress hormone (24-hour urine free cortisol, metanephrine, and normetanephrine), nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OH butyrate) levels. Resting energy expenditure (REE) and respiratory quotient (RQ) were measured by indirect calorimetry. Compared to normal sleep, whole-body insulin sensitivity decreased by 25% (P = .008) with SR and peripheral insulin sensitivity decreased by 29% (P = .003). Whereas hepatic insulin sensitivity (endogenous glucose production) did not change significantly, percent gluconeogenesis increased (P = .03). Stress hormones increased modestly (cortisol by 21%, P = .04; metanephrine by 8%, P = .014; normetanephrine by 18%, P = .002). Fasting NEFA and β-OH butyrate levels increased substantially (62% and 55%, respectively). REE did not change (P = 0.98), but RQ decreased (0.81 ± .02 vs 0.75 ± 0.02, P = .045). Subchronic SR causes unique metabolic disturbances characterized by peripheral, but not hepatic, insulin resistance; this was associated with a robust increase in fasting NEFA levels (indicative of increased lipolysis), decreased RQ, and increased β-OH butyrate levels (indicative of whole

  7. In nondiabetic, human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy, hepatic insulin extraction and posthepatic insulin clearance rate are decreased in proportion to insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte R

    2005-01-01

    In healthy, nondiabetic individuals with insulin resistance, fasting insulin is inversely correlated to the posthepatic insulin clearance rate (MCRi) and the hepatic insulin extraction (HEXi). We investigated whether similar early mechanisms to facilitate glucose homeostasis exist in nondiabetic...... > .1). Our data suggest that HEXi and MCRi are decreased in proportion to the degree of insulin resistance in nondiabetic HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy....... insulin clearance rate was estimated as the ratio of posthepatic insulin appearance rate to steady-state plasma insulin concentration during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU.m-2 .min-1). Posthepatic insulin appearance rate during the clamp was calculated, taking into account the remnant...

  8. Short-term inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis has no effect on the elevated glomerular filtration rate of early insulin-dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Parving, H H

    1985-01-01

    Glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow (constant infusion technique using 125I-iothalamate and 131I-hippuran) were measured twice within a 1-week interval in nine young males with insulin-dependent diabetes of short duration (2-5 years). The study was performed in a randomized double......-blind design, with the patients receiving either indomethacin (150 mg/day) or placebo for 3 days before the study. Measures of metabolic control did not change. No differences were found in glomerular filtration rate (144 +/- 9 versus 144 +/- 9 ml/min X 1.73 m2, mean +/- S.E.M.) or renal plasma flow (579...... +/- 43 versus 560 +/- 52 ml/min X 1.73 m2), when measured during placebo or indomethacin treatment, respectively. It is concluded that the steady-state enhancement of glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow found in early insulin-dependent diabetes is not due to an excessive activity...

  9. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in glucose and lipid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Seong Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-3 has roles in modulating the effect of IGFs by binding to IGFs and inhibiting cell proliferation in an IGF-independent manner. Although recent studies have been reported that IGFBP-3 has also roles in metabolic regulation, their exact roles in adipose tissue are poorly understood. In this review, we summarized the studies about the biological roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. IGFBP-3 overexpression in transgenic mice suggested that IGFBP-3 results in glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. IGFBP-3 knockout (KO mice exhibited normal insulin level and glucose response after glucose challenge. More recent study in IGFBP-3 KO mice with a high-fat diet demonstrated that IGFBP-3 KO mice exhibited elevated fasting glucose and insulin, but normal response to glucose challenge, suggesting that IGFBP-3 KO mice may induce insulin resistance even though preserved insulin sensitivity. In vitro and in vivo studies using 3T3-L1 adipocytes and rat, IGFBP-3 induced insulin resistance by inhibiting glucose uptake. In contrast, the reduced levels of IGFBP-3 in obesity might induce insulin resistance by suppression of IGFBP-3's anti-inflammatory function, suggesting IGFBP-3 has a protective effect on insulin resistance. Also, proteolysis of IGFBP-3 might contribute to the insulin resistance in obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. In addition, IGFBP-3 inhibited adipocyte differentiation, suggesting IGFBP-3 may contribute to the insulin insensitivity. Taken together, it is not yet certain that IGFBP-3 has a protective effect or enhancing effect on insulin resistance, and more studies will be needed to clarify the roles of IGFBP-3 in metabolic regulation.

  10. Insulin, glucagon, and liver regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, R.E.; Frith, L.O'C.; Vinik, A.; Terblanche, J.

    1980-01-01

    Partially hepatectomized rats receiving intragastric amino acids synthesize less DNA than similar rats receiving intragastric water alone. In the present study insulin and glucagon levels were measured in rats receiving amino acids or water alone. In both groups of rats insulin levels were depressed and glucagon levels elevated. These findings suggest that insulin and glucagon do not play a major role in the regulation of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy in the rat

  11. Spirulina platensis Improves Mitochondrial Function Impaired by Elevated Oxidative Stress in Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (ASCs) and Intestinal Epithelial Cells (IECs), and Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Daria; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka; Marycz, Krzysztof

    2017-08-03

    Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is a steadily growing life-threatening endocrine disorder linked to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Inflammatory microenvironment of adipose tissue constitutes the direct tissue milieu for various cell populations, including adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs), widely considered as a potential therapeutic cell source in the course of the treatment of metabolic disorders. Moreover, elevated oxidative stress induces inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs)-the first-line cells exposed to dietary compounds. In the conducted research, we showed that in vitro application of Spirulina platensis contributes to the restoration of ASCs' and IECs' morphology and function through the reduction of cellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Enhanced viability, suppressed senescence, and improved proliferation of ASCs and IECs isolated from metabolic syndrome-affected individuals were evident following exposition to Spirulina. A protective effect of the investigated extract against mitochondrial dysfunction and degeneration was also observed. Moreover, our data demonstrate that Spirulina extract effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. In vivo studies showed that horses fed with a diet based on Spirulina platensis supplementation lost weight and their insulin sensitivity improved. Thus, our results indicate the engagement of Spirulina platensis nourishing as an interesting alternative approach for supporting the conventional treatment of equine metabolic syndrome.

  12. Spirulina platensis Improves Mitochondrial Function Impaired by Elevated Oxidative Stress in Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (ASCs) and Intestinal Epithelial Cells (IECs), and Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocka, Daria; Kornicka, Katarzyna; Śmieszek, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is a steadily growing life-threatening endocrine disorder linked to insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and systemic inflammation. Inflammatory microenvironment of adipose tissue constitutes the direct tissue milieu for various cell populations, including adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (ASCs), widely considered as a potential therapeutic cell source in the course of the treatment of metabolic disorders. Moreover, elevated oxidative stress induces inflammation in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs)—the first-line cells exposed to dietary compounds. In the conducted research, we showed that in vitro application of Spirulina platensis contributes to the restoration of ASCs’ and IECs’ morphology and function through the reduction of cellular oxidative stress and inflammation. Enhanced viability, suppressed senescence, and improved proliferation of ASCs and IECs isolated from metabolic syndrome-affected individuals were evident following exposition to Spirulina. A protective effect of the investigated extract against mitochondrial dysfunction and degeneration was also observed. Moreover, our data demonstrate that Spirulina extract effectively suppressed LPS-induced inflammatory responses in macrophages. In vivo studies showed that horses fed with a diet based on Spirulina platensis supplementation lost weight and their insulin sensitivity improved. Thus, our results indicate the engagement of Spirulina platensis nourishing as an interesting alternative approach for supporting the conventional treatment of equine metabolic syndrome. PMID:28771165

  13. Identification of metformin poor responders, requiring supplemental insulin, during randomization of metformin versus insulin for the control of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoush, Sherif; El-Said, Mourrad; Fathi, Hisham; Abdelnaby, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate glycemic control among women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) under insulin versus metformin (with or without insulin supplementation), and to identify metformin poor responders requiring supplemental insulin. In Ain Shams University Hospital, mothers with 26-32-week GDM pregnancies, failing diet control, were randomized to receive metformin (n = 47) or insulin (n = 48). The primary outcome was glycemic control. Secondary outcomes included maternal weight, parameters predicting successful metformin monotherapy, neonatal hypoglycemia, and birthweight. Women using metformin (23.4% needing supplemental insulin) gained less weight (P metformin group was related to initial body mass index, HbA1c, oral glucose tolerance test (GTT), and first week mean glucose level. The 1-h glucose level during initial GTT (Hr1-GTT) and the mean fasting glucose level during the first week of therapy (Wk1-mFG) were the two independent parameters associated with requiring supplemental insulin. Women with Hr1-GTT >212 mg/dL and Wk1-mFG >95 mg/dL had a risk ratio of 58.6 (95%CI: 3.68-933.35, P = 0.004) and 11.5 (95%CI: 2.77-47.34,= 0.0008), respectively for needing supplemental insulin during the course of the study compared with women without. Metformin is an effective and safe alternative to insulin in GDM. Women using metformin (± supplemental insulin) had similar glycemic control, less weight gain, and similar rates of side-effects as those on insulin monotherapy. Insulin supplementation to metformin therapy was more likely with elevated Hr1-GTT and Wk1-mFG. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Elevating your elevator talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important and often overlooked item that every early career researcher needs to do is compose an elevator talk. The elevator talk, named because the talk should not last longer than an average elevator ride (30 to 60 seconds), is an effective method to present your research and yourself in a clea...

  15. The Birth Weight Lowering C-Allele of rs900400 Near LEKR1 and CCNL1 Associates with Elevated Insulin Release following an Oral Glucose Challenge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ehm A; Harder, Marie N; Pilgaard, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    and the Finnish METSIM study we found that the birth weight lowering allele was associated with increased insulin release measured by the insulinogenic index (ß = 2.25% [0.59; 3.91], P = 0.008) and with an increased disposition index (ß = 1.76% [0.04; 3.49], P = 0.05). Conclusion The birth weight lowering effect......-IR) and disposition index were studied in 5,484 Danish and 6,915 Finnish non-diabetic individuals and combined in meta-analyses. Results The C-allele of rs900400 was associated with a 22.1 g lower birth weight ([-41.3;-3.0], P = 0.024) per allele. Moreover, in combined analyses of the Danish Inter99 study...

  16. Effect of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance in pregnant women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asemi, Z; Samimi, M; Tabassi, Z; Naghibi Rad, M; Rahimi Foroushani, A; Khorammian, H; Esmaillzadeh, A

    2013-01-01

    Owing to excess body weight and increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines primarily during the third trimester, pregnancy is associated with elevated insulin resistance. To our knowledge, no report is available indicating the effects of probiotic yoghurt consumption on serum insulin levels in pregnant women. This study was designed to determine the effects of daily consumption of probiotic yoghurt on insulin resistance and serum insulin levels of Iranian pregnant women. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 70 primigravida pregnant women with singleton pregnancy at their third trimester were participated. We randomly assigned participants to consume 200 g per day of conventional (n=33) or the probiotic group (n=37) for 9 weeks. The probiotic yoghurt was a commercially available product prepared with the starter cultures of Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus, enriched with probiotic culture of two strains of lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA5) and bifidobacteria (Bifidobacterium animalis BB12) with a total of min 1 × 10⁷ colony-forming units. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9-week intervention to measure fasting plasma glucose and serum insulin levels. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance score. Although consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR score, significant differences were found comparing changes in these variables between probiotic and conventional yogurts (changes from baseline in serum insulin levels: +1.2±1.2 vs +5.0±1.1 μIU/ml, respectively, P=0.02; and in HOMA-IR score: -0.2±0.3 vs 0.7±0.2, respectively, P=0.01). It is concluded that in contrast to conventional yogurt, daily consumption of probiotic yogurt for 9 weeks maintains serum insulin levels and might help pregnant women prevent developing insulin resistance.

  17. Intranasal insulin therapy: the clinical realities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, Sten; Hvidberg, A

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate metabolic control and safety parameters (hypoglycaemia frequency and nasal mucosa physiology), 31 insulin-dependent diabetic patients were treated with intranasal insulin at mealtimes for 1 month and with subcutaneous fast-acting insulin at meals for another month in an open, crossover...... was low, since intranasal insulin doses were approximately 20 times higher than subcutaneous doses. The frequency of hypoglycaemia was similar during intranasal and subcutaneous insulin therapy, and nasal mucosa physiology was unaffected after intranasal insulin. We conclude that due to low...

  18. The Metabolic Syndrome and Inflammation: Role of Insulin Resistance and Increased Adiposity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajiha Farooq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to determine the role of obesity and insulin resistance (IR in the pathogenesis of inflammation in metabolic syndrome (MetS. Methods: Our study included 100 patients with MetS and 100 age and gender matched control patients who attended a tertiary care laboratory in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. Anthropometric data was obtained including height and weight to calculate body mass index. A record of patient’s blood pressure (BP, waist circumference (WC and hip circumference (HC was made. Biochemical analysis included measurements of fasting glucose, triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, insulin, and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP. IR was determined by the homeostasis mode assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR method. Results: The levels of hs-CRP were found to be elevated in all patients with MetS where it correlated significantly with all its components including measures of obesity, fasting insulin and glucose levels, IR, TG and HDL-c. However, on linear regression analysis only WC, fasting insulin, and HOMA-IR remained significantly correlated with hs-CRP. Conclusion: MetS is a condition characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, which arises because of increased abdominal adiposity and IR. Large multicenter studies are needed to gain insight into its pathogenesis and derive treatment strategies.

  19. CNC-bZIP protein Nrf1-dependent regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongzhi; Fu, Jingqi; Xue, Peng; Zhao, Rui; Dong, Jian; Liu, Dianxin; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Tong, Qingchun; Teng, Weiping; Qu, Weidong; Zhang, Qiang; Andersen, Melvin E; Pi, Jingbo

    2015-04-01

    The inability of pancreatic β-cells to secrete sufficient insulin in response to glucose stimulation is a major contributing factor to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We investigated both the in vitro and in vivo effects of deficiency of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 1 (Nrf1) in β-cells on β-cell function and glucose homeostasis. Silencing of Nrf1 in β-cells leads to a pre-T2D phenotype with disrupted glucose metabolism and impaired insulin secretion. Specifically, MIN6 β-cells with stable knockdown of Nrf1 (Nrf1-KD) and isolated islets from β-cell-specific Nrf1-knockout [Nrf1(b)-KO] mice displayed impaired glucose responsiveness, including elevated basal insulin release and decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Nrf1(b)-KO mice exhibited severe fasting hyperinsulinemia, reduced GSIS, and glucose intolerance. Silencing of Nrf1 in MIN6 cells resulted in oxidative stress and altered glucose metabolism, with increases in both glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis, which is associated with the elevated basal insulin release and reduced glucose responsiveness. The elevated glycolysis and reduced glucose responsiveness due to Nrf1 silencing likely result from altered expression of glucose metabolic enzymes, with induction of high-affinity hexokinase 1 and suppression of low-affinity glucokinase. Our study demonstrated a novel role of Nrf1 in regulating glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in β-cells and characterized Nrf1 as a key transcription factor that regulates the coupling of glycolysis and mitochondrial metabolism and GSIS. Nrf1 plays critical roles in regulating glucose metabolism, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion, suggesting that Nrf1 may be a novel target to improve the function of insulin-secreting β-cells.

  20. Islet cell proliferation and apoptosis in insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheen, S T; Rajkumar, K; Murphy, L J

    1997-12-01

    Transgenic mice which overexpress insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFPB-1) demonstrate fasting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and glucose intolerance in adult life. Here we have examined the ontogeny of pancreatic endocrine dysfunction and investigated islet cell proliferation and apoptosis in this mouse model. In addition we have examined pancreatic insulin content in transgenic mice derived from blastocyst transfer into non-transgenic mice. Transgenic mice were normoglycemic at birth but had markedly elevated plasma insulin levels, 56.2 +/- 4.5 versus 25.4 +/- 1.5 pmol/l, p < 0.001, and pancreatic insulin concentration, 60.5 +/- 2.5 versus 49.0 +/- 2.6 ng/mg of tissue, P < 0.01, compared with wild-type mice. Transgenic mice derived from blastocyst transfer to wild-type foster mothers had an elevated pancreatic insulin content similar to that seen in pups from transgenic mice. There was an age-related decline in pancreatic insulin content and plasma insulin levels and an increase in fasting blood glucose concentrations, such that adult transgenic mice had significantly less pancreatic insulin than wild-type mice. Pancreatic islet number and the size of mature islets were increased in transgenic animals at birth compared with wild-type mice. Both islet cell proliferation, measured by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling, and apoptosis, assessed by the in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase and nick translation assay, were increased in islets of newborn transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. In adult mice both islet cell proliferation and apoptosis were low and similar in transgenic and wild-type mice. Islets remained significantly larger and more numerous in adult transgenic mice despite a reduction in pancreatic insulin content. These data suggest that overexpression of IGFBP-1, either directly or indirectly via local or systemic mechanisms, has a positive trophic effect on islet development.

  1. Paradoxical effect of troglitazone in normal animals: enhancement of adipocyte but reduction of liver insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, M K; Van Citters, G W; Ader, M; Mittelman, S D; Sunehag, A L; Bergman, R N

    2000-12-01

    Troglitazone is an antidiabetic agent that improves the ability of adipocytes to store triglycerides by enhancing their insulin sensitivity. Although potent in insulin-resistant states, the effect of troglitazone on lipid and glucose turnover in normal animals has not been assessed. Euglycemic clamps were performed as an insulin dose response in normal mongrel dogs (n = 6). Somatostatin was infused without hormone replacement (zero insulin) for 90 min. Insulin was then either portally replaced (1.8 pmol x min(-1) x kg(-1), overreplaced (5.4 pmol x min(-1) x kg(-1)), or overreplaced peripherally to match the systemic levels of the portal overreplacement dose (2.3 pmol x min(-1) x kg(-1)) for 180 min. A total of 600 mg troglitazone was then given orally each day for 3 weeks and continued throughout a second experimental phase, at which point the euglycemic clamps were repeated. In concordance with previous studies, endogenous glucose production (EGP) was similar whether insulin was delivered portally or peripherally, both before and during troglitazone treatment. Although free fatty acids (FFAs) at zero insulin were not affected, there was a leftward shift of the insulin-FFA dose response curve secondary to a suppression of FFA release into plasma. EGP was paradoxically elevated by troglitazone treatment because of an elevation of both gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. In conclusion, troglitazone reduced hepatic sensitivity to FFAs. Because EGP is a primary determinant of fasting blood glucose, we hypothesize that a protective mechanism exists in normal animals, preventing hypoglycemia during insulin sensitization with troglitazone.

  2. Cloning and expression analysis of myostatin, fibroblast growth factor 6, insulin-like growth factor I and II in liver and muscle of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax, L. during long-term fasting and refeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saroglia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The exceptionally fast growth that fish experience after periods of fasting has been called “compensatory growth”. This phenomenon has been studied in intensive aquaculture as a means of enhancing growth rates, but the mechanisms by which food intake activates an increase in somatic growth, and especially in muscle growth, are complex and not yet fully understood. In the present paper, we describe the molecular cloning and sequencing of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax myostatin (MSTN and fibroblast growth factor 6 (FGF6, which have been shown to be major genetic determinants of skeletal muscle growth, together with insulin-like growth factor I (IGFI and IGF-II, which are potent mitogens known to play important roles in growth and development. We then report the pattern of expression of the four aforementioned genes, in liver and myotomal muscle in response to prolonged fasting and refeeding. Nutritional status significantly influenced the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II and MSTN, whereas the muscular FGF6 expression levels were not affected by the feeding status of the animals. Taken together these data indicate that IGF-I, IGF-II and MSTN are involved in the sea bass muscle compensatory growth induced by refeeding, whereas FGF6 probably has not a role in this phenomenon.

  3. Increased Insulin following an Oral Glucose Load, Genetic Variation near the Melatonin Receptor MTNR1B, but No Biochemical Evidence of Endothelial Dysfunction in Young Asian Men and Women.

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    Maria A Matuszek

    Full Text Available To identify biochemical and genetic variation relating to increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in young, lean male and female adults of different ethnicities.Fasting blood and urine and non-fasting blood following oral glucose intake were analysed in 90 Caucasians, South Asians and South East/East Asians.There were no differences in age, birthweight, blood pressure, body mass index, percent body fat, total energy, percentage of macronutrient intake, microalbumin, leptin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, nitric oxide metabolites, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, von Willebrand factor, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and tissue plasminogen activator. Fasting total cholesterol (P = .000, triglycerides (P = .050, low density lipoprotein (P = .009 and non-fasting blood glucose (15 min (P = .024 were elevated in South Asians compared with Caucasians, but there was no significant difference in glucose area under curve (AUC. Non-fasting insulin in South Asians (15-120 min, in South East/East Asians (60-120 min, and insulin AUC in South Asians and South East/East Asians, were elevated compared with Caucasians (P≤0.006. The molar ratio of C-peptide AUC/Insulin AUC (P = .045 and adiponectin (P = .037 were lower in South Asians compared with Caucasians. A significant difference in allele frequency distributions in Caucasians and South Asians was found for rs2166706 (P = 0.022 and rs10830963 (P = 0.009, which are both near the melatonin receptor MTNR1B.Elevated non-fasting insulin exists in young South Asians of normal fasting glucose and insulin. Hepatic clearance of insulin may be reduced in South Asians. No current biochemical evidence exists of endothelial dysfunction at this stage of development. MTNR1B signalling may be a useful therapeutic target in Asian populations in the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  4. Worsening diastolic function is associated with elevated fasting plasma glucose and increased left ventricular mass in a supra-additive fashion in an elderly, healthy, Swedish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Gerke, Oke

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To examine whether increasing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were associated with worsening left ventricular (LV) diastolic function, independently of LV mass index (LVMI) in elderly, otherwise healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested cross-sectional associations between...

  5. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific 125 I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of 125 I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific 125 I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens

  6. Osteopontin Affects Insulin Vesicle Localization and Ca2+ Homeostasis in Pancreatic Beta Cells from Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wendt

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetic patients suffer from insulin resistance and reduced insulin secretion. Osteopontin (OPN, a versatile protein expressed in several tissues throughout the body including the islets of Langerhans, has previously been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Here we have investigated the role of OPN in insulin secretion using an OPN knock out mouse model (OPN-/-. Ultra-structural analyzes of islets from OPN-/- and WT mice indicated weaker cell-cell connections between the islet cells in the OPN-/- mouse compared to WT. Analysis of the insulin granule distribution in the beta cells showed that although OPN-/- and WT beta cells have the same number of insulin granules OPN-/- beta cells have significantly fewer docked granules. Both OPN-/- and WT islets displayed synchronized Ca2+ oscillations indicative of an intact beta cell communication. OPN-/- islets displayed higher intracellular Ca2+ concentrations when stimulated with 16.7 mM glucose than WT islets and the initial dip upon elevated glucose concentrations (which is associated with Ca2+ uptake into ER was significantly lower in these islets. Glucose-induced insulin secretion was similar in OPN-/- and WT islets. Likewise, non-fasted blood glucose levels were the same in both groups. In summary, deletion of OPN results in several minor beta-cell defects that can be compensated for in a healthy system.

  7. Growth hormone response to insulin and to arginine in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggeo, M; Tiengo, A; Fedele, D; Crepaldi, G

    1975-01-01

    Human growth hormone (HGH) response to i.v. insulin (0.1 U/kg body weight) and arginine infusion (25 g of L-arginine for 30 min) was studied in 9 patients (5 males and 4 females) with primary familial hypercholesterolaemia and belonging to 4 families. Mean age was 28 +/- 2 years (range 18-36) and body weight was less than 105% of ideal body weight. Glucose tolerance and insulin response to oral glucose were normal in all patients. HGH release after insulin and after arginine was slightly increased as compared to 21 normal controls, but the differences were not significant. Insulin and glucagon response to arginine in these patients was within the normal range. Plasma glucose and free fatty acids were normal after both insulin and arginine. Moreover, no significant correlation was found between fasting cholesterol and HGH peaks after insulin and after arginine, nor between cholesterol and insulin and glucagon responses. Despite marked hyperlipidaemia, HGH-deficient patients examined by other authors never present signs of atherosclerotic disease. Our data suggest that HGH, in the presence of elevated cholesterol levels, might play an important role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions.

  8. Insulin analogues: have they changed insulin treatment and improved glycaemic control?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsbad, Sten

    2002-01-01

    To improve insulin therapy, new insulin analogues have been developed. Two fast-acting analogues with a more rapid onset of effect and a shorter duration of action combined with a low day-to-day variation in absorption rate are now available. Despite this favourable time-action profile most studies....... This is probably the main explanation for the absence of improvement in overall glycaemic control when compared with regular human insulin. A tendency to a reduction in hypoglycaemic events during treatment with fast-acting analogues has been observed in most studies. Recent studies have indicated that NPH insulin...... administered several times daily at mealtimes can improve glycaemic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia. The fast-acting analogues are now also available as insulin mixed with NPH. Insulin glargine is a new long-acting insulin which is soluble and precipitates after injection, resulting...

  9. Fast-Acting Insulin Aspart Improves Glycemic Control in Basal-Bolus Treatment for Type 1 Diabetes: Results of a 26-Week Multicenter, Active-Controlled, Treat-to-Target, Randomized, Parallel-Group Trial (onset 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Jones, David; Bode, Bruce W; De Block, Christophe; Franek, Edward; Heller, Simon R; Mathieu, Chantal; Philis-Tsimikas, Athena; Rose, Ludger; Woo, Vincent C; Østerskov, Anne Birk; Graungaard, Tina; Bergenstal, Richard M

    2017-07-01

    This multicenter, treat-to-target, phase 3 trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of fast-acting insulin aspart (faster aspart) versus conventional insulin aspart (IAsp) in adults with type 1 diabetes. The primary end point was change from baseline in HbA 1c after 26 weeks. After an 8-week run-in, subjects were randomized (1:1:1) to double-blind mealtime faster aspart ( n = 381), IAsp ( n = 380), or open-label postmeal faster aspart ( n = 382)-each with insulin detemir. HbA 1c was reduced in both treatment groups, and noninferiority to IAsp was confirmed for both mealtime and postmeal faster aspart (estimated treatment difference [ETD] faster aspart-IAsp, mealtime, -0.15% [95% CI -0.23; -0.07], and postmeal, 0.04% [-0.04; 0.12]); mealtime faster aspart statistically significantly reduced HbA 1c versus IAsp ( P = 0.0003). Postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) increments were statistically significantly lower with mealtime faster aspart at 1 h (ETD -1.18 mmol/L [95% CI -1.65; -0.71], -21.21 mg/dL [-29.65; -12.77]; P IAsp for the 2-h PPG increment was confirmed. The overall rate of severe or blood glucose-confirmed (plasma glucose IAsp was confirmed, with superior PPG control for mealtime faster aspart versus IAsp. Subjects randomized to postmeal faster aspart for all meals maintained HbA 1c noninferior to that obtained with mealtime IAsp. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. Neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is not involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis or insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Gustavsson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin secretion is a complex and highly regulated process. It is well established that cytoplasmic calcium is a key regulator of insulin secretion, but how elevated intracellular calcium triggers insulin granule exocytosis remains unclear, and we have only begun to define the identities of proteins that are responsible for sensing calcium changes and for transmitting the calcium signal to release machineries. Synaptotagmins are primarily expressed in brain and endocrine cells and exhibit diverse calcium binding properties. Synaptotagmin-1, -2 and -9 are calcium sensors for fast neurotransmitter release in respective brain regions, while synaptotagmin-7 is a positive regulator of calcium-dependent insulin release. Unlike the three neuronal calcium sensors, whose deletion abolished fast neurotransmitter release, synaptotagmin-7 deletion resulted in only partial loss of calcium-dependent insulin secretion, thus suggesting that other calcium-sensors must participate in the regulation of insulin secretion. Of the other synaptotagmin isoforms that are present in pancreatic islets, the neuronal calcium sensor synaptotagmin-9 is expressed at the highest level after synaptotagmin-7. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested whether synaptotagmin-9 participates in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release by using pancreas-specific synaptotagmin-9 knockout (p-S9X mice. Deletion of synaptotagmin-9 in the pancreas resulted in no changes in glucose homeostasis or body weight. Glucose tolerance, and insulin secretion in vivo and from isolated islets were not affected in the p-S9X mice. Single-cell capacitance measurements showed no difference in insulin granule exocytosis between p-S9X and control mice. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, synaptotagmin-9, although a major calcium sensor in the brain, is not involved in the regulation of glucose-stimulated insulin release from pancreatic β-cells.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-6 levels are elevated in serum of children with chronic renal failure: a report of the Southwest Pediatric Nephrology Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D R; Liu, F; Baker, B K; Hintz, R L; Durham, S K; Brewer, E D; Frane, J W; Tonshoff, B; Mehls, O; Wingen, A M; Watkins, S L; Hogg, R J; Lee, P D

    1997-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that growth retardation in children with chronic renal failure (CRF) results in part from inhibition of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) action by excess serum IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). Excess IGFBPs in CRF serum include IGFBP-1, -2, and -3 and a diffuse approximately 24- to 28-kDa IGFBP band identified by [125I]IGF ligand blot. The present studies characterized this diffuse approximately 24- to 28-kDa band. Initial studies identified this band as IGFBP-6, because it was immunoprecipitated by antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide of human IGFBP-6 (hIGFBP-6). Additional [125I]IGF ligand blots found that the immunoprecipitated band was 1) recognized by [125I]IGF-II but not [125I]IGF-1, 2) more abundant in CRF than in normal serum, and 3) more abundant in serum from dialyzed than nondialyzed prepubertal CRF children. Using the hIGFBP-6 antiserum in a specific and sensitive RIA, we found that serum IGFBP-6 levels were 4.7 +/- 1.7 nmol/L in 10 normal prepubertal children, 21.4 +/- 6.1 nmol/L in 44 nondialyzed prepubertal CRF children, 73.5 +/- 14.4 nmol/L in 7 dialyzed prepubertal CRF children, and 94.6 +/- 26.2 nmol/L in 14 dialyzed pubertal CRF children. IGFBP-6 levels were also elevated in 71 nondialyzed European children with CRF. In nondialyzed CRF children, serum IGFBP-6 levels 1) correlated inversely with the glomerular filtration rate, 2) did not correlate with height SD score, and 3) were not altered by 12 months of daily recombinant hGH treatment. In summary, a specific antiserum and RIA were used to demonstrate elevated levels of intact IGF-II-binding IGFBP-6 in serum of CRF children. We postulate that the excess IGFBP-6 may modulate the action of IGF-II on target tissues.

  12. Insulin Lispro Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diabetes, insulin lispro is always used with another type of insulin, unless it is used in an external insulin ... diabetes, insulin lispro may be used with another type of insulin or with oral medication(s) for diabetes. Insulin lispro ...

  13. Association of Insulin Resistance and Hematologic Parameters: Study of a Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese Population in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Kung Chen

    2006-06-01

    Conclusion: Elevated WBC count but not RBC count was significantly associated with insulin resistance and glycemic metabolism. The relationship between platelet count and insulin resistance deserves further investigations.

  14. Hepatic Insulin Resistance Following Chronic Activation of the CREB Coactivator CRTC2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Meghan F; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Huising, Mark O; Hull, Rebecca L; Kahn, Steven E; Montminy, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis via the induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway in hepatocytes stimulates the gluconeogenic program via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and dephosphorylation of the cAMP-regulated CREB coactivators CRTC2 and CRTC3. In parallel, decreases in circulating insulin also increase gluconeogenic gene expression via the de-phosphorylation and activation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is increased in insulin resistance where it contributes to the attendant hyperglycemia. Whether selective activation of the hepatic CREB/CRTC pathway is sufficient to trigger metabolic changes in other tissues is unclear, however. Modest hepatic expression of a phosphorylation-defective and therefore constitutively active CRTC2S171,275A protein increased gluconeogenic gene expression under fasting as well as feeding conditions. Circulating glucose concentrations were constitutively elevated in CRTC2S171,275A-expressing mice, leading to compensatory increases in circulating insulin concentrations that enhance FOXO1 phosphorylation. Despite accompanying decreases in FOXO1 activity, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression remained elevated in CRTC2S171,275A mice, demonstrating that chronic increases in CRTC2 activity in the liver are indeed sufficient to promote hepatic insulin resistance and to disrupt glucose homeostasis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Hepatic Insulin Resistance Following Chronic Activation of the CREB Coactivator CRTC2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Meghan F.; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Huising, Mark O.; Hull, Rebecca L.; Kahn, Steven E.; Montminy, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis via the induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Triggering of the cAMP pathway in hepatocytes stimulates the gluconeogenic program via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of CREB and dephosphorylation of the cAMP-regulated CREB coactivators CRTC2 and CRTC3. In parallel, decreases in circulating insulin also increase gluconeogenic gene expression via the de-phosphorylation and activation of the forkhead transcription factor FOXO1. Hepatic gluconeogenesis is increased in insulin resistance where it contributes to the attendant hyperglycemia. Whether selective activation of the hepatic CREB/CRTC pathway is sufficient to trigger metabolic changes in other tissues is unclear, however. Modest hepatic expression of a phosphorylation-defective and therefore constitutively active CRTC2S171,275A protein increased gluconeogenic gene expression under fasting as well as feeding conditions. Circulating glucose concentrations were constitutively elevated in CRTC2S171,275A-expressing mice, leading to compensatory increases in circulating insulin concentrations that enhance FOXO1 phosphorylation. Despite accompanying decreases in FOXO1 activity, hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression remained elevated in CRTC2S171,275A mice, demonstrating that chronic increases in CRTC2 activity in the liver are indeed sufficient to promote hepatic insulin resistance and to disrupt glucose homeostasis. PMID:26342077

  16. Insulin binding to erythrocytes after acute 16-methyleneprednisolone ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwenger, A; Holle, W; Zick, R; Trautschold, I

    1982-10-01

    The binding of [125I]insulin to erythrocytes, glucose and insulin were determined before and 1, 7 and 35 days after ingestion of 2 X 60-methyleneprednisolone. None of two groups of volunteers (7 males, 4 females showed clear alterations of the insulin binding parameters (Ka and R0), or of the fasting cortisol, glucose and insulin concentrations. These results exclude the possibility that the diabetogenic effect of glucocorticoides is accompanied by an alteration of the insulin receptor characteristics of erythrocytes.

  17. A variant in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting plasma glucose, increased basal hepatic glucose production and increased insulin release after oral and intravenous glucose loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, C S; Grarup, N; Krarup, N T

    2009-01-01

    to hepatic glucose production during a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Furthermore, we examined rs560887 for association with impaired fasting glycaemia (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), type 2 diabetes and components of the metabolic syndrome. METHODS: rs560887 was genotyped in the Inter99...... an increased acute insulin response (p = 4 x 10(-4)) during an IVGTT. Among elderly twins, G allele carriers had higher basal hepatic glucose production (p = 0.04). Finally, the G allele associated with the risk of having IFG (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.47, p = 0.002), but not with IGT (OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.......82-1.08, p = 0.4) or type 2 diabetes (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.84-1.04, p = 0.2). CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: The common rs560887 G allele in the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus is associated with increased fasting glycaemia and increased risk of IFG, associations that may be partly related to an increased basal hepatic glucose...

  18. Regulation of insulin sensitivity, insulin production, and pancreatic β cell survival by angiotensin-(1-7) in a rat model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Junhua; Yang, Zhiming; Yang, Huiyu; Wang, Li; Wu, Huilu; Fan, Yunjuan; Wang, Wei; Fan, Xin; Li, Xing

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the antidiabetic activity of Ang-(1-7), an important component of the renin-angiotensin system, in a rat model of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 36 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: control group fed standard laboratory diet, DM group fed high-fat diet and injected with STZ, and Ang-(1-7) group receiving injection of STZ followed by Ang-(1-7) treatment. Body weight, blood glucose levels, fasting serum Ang II and insulin levels, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured. The pancreas was collected for histological examination and gene expression analysis. Notably, the Ang-(1-7) group showed a significant decrease in fasting blood glucose and serum Ang II levels and HOMA-IR values and increase in fasting serum insulin levels. Pancreatic β cells in the control and Ang-(1-7) groups were normally distributed in the center of pancreatic islets with large clear nuclei. In contrast, pancreatic β cells in the DM group had a marked shrinkage of the cytoplasm and condensation of nuclear chromatin. Ang-(1-7) treatment significantly facilitated insulin production by β cells in diabetic rats. The DM-associated elevation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, and Bax and reduction of Bcl-2 was significantly reversed by Ang-(1-7) treatment. Taken together, Ang-(1-7) protects against STZ-induced DM through improvement of insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and pancreatic β cell survival, which is associated with reduction of iNOS expression and alteration of the Bcl-2 family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Abnormal glucose tolerance and insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome amongst the Taiwanese population- not correlated with insulin receptor substrate-1 Gly972Arg/Ala513Pro polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shu-Fen

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin resistance and glucose dysmetabolism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS are related with the polymorphisms in the genes encoding the insulin receptor substrate (IRS proteins, especially Gly972Arg/Ala513Pro polymorphism being reported to be associated with type-2 diabetes and PCOS. We intended to assess the prevalence of abnormal glucose tolerance (AGT and insulin resistance in Taiwanese PCOS women. We also tried to assess whether the particular identity of Gly972Arg/Ala513Pro polymorphic alleles of the IRS-1 gene mutation can be used as an appropriate diagnostic indicator for PCOS. Methods We designed a prospective clinical study. Forty-seven Taiwanese Hoklo and Hakka women, diagnosed with PCOS were enrolled in this study as were forty-five healthy Hoklo and Hakka women as the control group. Insulin resistance was evaluated with fasting insulin, fasting glucose/insulin ratio, and homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMAIR. The genomic DNA of the subjects was amplified by PCR and digested by restriction fragmented length polymorphism (RFLP with Bst N1 used for codon 972 and Dra III for codon 513. Results AGT was found in 46.8% of these PCOS patients and was significantly related to high insulin resistance rather than the low insulin resistance. Those patients with either insulin resistance or AGT comprised the majority of PCOS affected patients (AGT + fasting insulin ≥17: 83%, AGT + glucose/insulin ratio ≥6.5: 85.1%, AGT + HOMAIR ≥ 2: 87.2%, and AGT + HOMAIR ≥ 3.8: 72.3%. None of the tested samples revealed any polymorphism due to the absence of any Dra III recognition site or any Bst N1 recognition site in the amplified PCR fragment digested by restriction fragmented length polymorphism. Conclusion There is significantly high prevalence of AGT and insulin resistance in PCOS women, but Gly972Arg and Ala513Pro polymorphic alleles of IRS-1 are rare and are not associated with the elevated

  20. Impaired fasting glycaemia vs impaired glucose tolerance: similar impairment of pancreatic alpha and beta cell function but differential roles of incretin hormones and insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, K; Vaag, A; Holst, Jens Juul

    2008-01-01

    partially explain these discrepancies. Basal and post-load glucagon levels were significantly increased in both i-IFG and i-IGT individuals (p initiatives in prediabetic individuals should be tested, targeting......-dependent insulinotrophic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) levels were measured. A euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp with [3-3H]glucose preceded by an IVGTT was performed. RESULTS: Absolute first-phase insulin secretion during IVGTT was decreased in i-IFG (p = 0.026), but not in i-IGT (p = 0...... in both i-IFG and i-IGT (p levels of GIP in i-IGT (p = 0.045 vs NGT) vs increased levels of GLP-1 in i-IFG (p = 0.013 vs NGT) during the OGTT may...

  1. PGC-1 promotes insulin resistance in liver through PPAR-alpha-dependent induction of TRB-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seung-Hoi; Satoh, Hiroaki; Herzig, Stephan; Lee, Chih-Hao; Hedrick, Susan; Kulkarni, Rohit; Evans, Ronald M; Olefsky, Jerrold; Montminy, Marc

    2004-05-01

    Insulin resistance is a major hallmark in the development of type 2 diabetes, which is characterized by an impaired ability of insulin to inhibit glucose output from the liver and to promote glucose uptake in muscle. The nuclear hormone receptor coactivator PGC-1 (peroxisome proliferator-activated (PPAR)-gamma coactivator-1) has been implicated in the onset of type 2 diabetes. Hepatic PGC-1 expression is elevated in mouse models of this disease, where it promotes constitutive activation of gluconeogenesis and fatty acid oxidation through its association with the nuclear hormone receptors HNF-4 and PPAR-alpha, respectively. Here we show that PGC-1-deficient mice, generated by adenoviral delivery of PGC-1 RNA interference (RNAi) to the liver, experience fasting hypoglycemia. Hepatic insulin sensitivity was enhanced in PGC-1-deficient mice, reflecting in part the reduced expression of the mammalian tribbles homolog TRB-3, a fasting-inducible inhibitor of the serine-threonine kinase Akt/PKB (ref. 6). We show here that, in the liver, TRB-3 is a target for PPAR-alpha. Knockdown of hepatic TRB-3 expression improved glucose tolerance, whereas hepatic overexpression of TRB-3 reversed the insulin-sensitive phenotype of PGC-1-deficient mice. These results indicate a link between nuclear hormone receptor and insulin signaling pathways, and suggest a potential role for TRB-3 inhibitors in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  2. Diminished hepatic insulin removal in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cano, I.; Salvador, J.; Rodriguez, R.; Arraiza, M.C.; Goena, M.; Barberia, J.J.; Moncada, E.

    1986-01-01

    Peripheral insulin and C-peptide levels during oral glucose load were measured in 20 obese and 23 normal weight nondiabetic subjects. The fasting C-peptide to insulin molar ratios (Cp/I), as well as the relation between incremental areas of the two polypeptides (ACp-AI)/ACp, were used as relative measures of the hepatic insulin extraction (HIE). The insulin and C-peptide basal levels as well as incremental areas under plasma curves were higher in the obese subjects (P<0.001). HIE was lower in obeses than in controls assessed in the fasting state (P<0.05), as well as after glucose load (P<0.001). Nevertheless, obeses and controls with similar insulin fasting levels showed identical hepatic insulin extraction in fasting or after glucose load. HIE was independent of obesity degree, but was related to insulin basal levels (r=-0.60, P<0.01). This study suggests the hypothesis that the decreased hepatic insulin extraction in obeses is a result of the chronically increased insulin delivery to the liver and is not a consequence of obesity, although a contributory role cannot be ruled out

  3. Correction of Diabetic Hyperglycemia and Amelioration of Metabolic Anomalies by Minicircle DNA Mediated Glucose-Dependent Hepatic Insulin Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tausif Alam

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is caused by immune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Commonly used insulin injection therapy does not provide a dynamic blood glucose control to prevent long-term systemic T1DM-associated damages. Donor shortage and the limited long-term success of islet transplants have stimulated the development of novel therapies for T1DM. Gene therapy-based glucose-regulated hepatic insulin production is a promising strategy to treat T1DM. We have developed gene constructs which cause glucose-concentration-dependent human insulin production in liver cells. A novel set of human insulin expression constructs containing a combination of elements to improve gene transcription, mRNA processing, and translation efficiency were generated as minicircle DNA preparations that lack bacterial and viral DNA. Hepatocytes transduced with the new constructs, ex vivo, produced large amounts of glucose-inducible human insulin. In vivo, insulin minicircle DNA (TA1m treated streptozotocin (STZ-diabetic rats demonstrated euglycemia when fasted or fed, ad libitum. Weight loss due to uncontrolled hyperglycemia was reversed in insulin gene treated diabetic rats to normal rate of weight gain, lasting ∼1 month. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGT demonstrated in vivo glucose-responsive changes in insulin levels to correct hyperglycemia within 45 minutes. A single TA1m treatment raised serum albumin levels in diabetic rats to normal and significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia. Elevated serum levels of aspartate transaminase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase were restored to normal or greatly reduced in treated rats, indicating normalization of liver function. Non-viral insulin minicircle DNA-based TA1m mediated glucose-dependent insulin production in liver may represent a safe and promising approach to treat T1DM.

  4. Systemic insulin sensitivity is regulated by GPS2 inhibition of AKT ubiquitination and activation in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederquist, Carly T; Lentucci, Claudia; Martinez-Calejman, Camila; Hayashi, Vanessa; Orofino, Joseph; Guertin, David; Fried, Susan K; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Cardamone, M Dafne; Perissi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Insulin signaling plays a unique role in the regulation of energy homeostasis and the impairment of insulin action is associated with altered lipid metabolism, obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes. The main aim of this study was to provide further insight into the regulatory mechanisms governing the insulin signaling pathway by investigating the role of non-proteolytic ubiquitination in insulin-mediated activation of AKT. The molecular mechanism of AKT regulation through ubiquitination is first dissected in vitro in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and then validated in vivo using mice with adipo-specific deletion of GPS2, an endogenous inhibitor of Ubc13 activity (GPS2-AKO mice). Our results indicate that K63 ubiquitination is a critical component of AKT activation in the insulin signaling pathway and that counter-regulation of this step is provided by GPS2 preventing AKT ubiquitination through inhibition of Ubc13 enzymatic activity. Removal of this negative checkpoint, through GPS2 downregulation or genetic deletion, results in sustained activation of insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo . As a result, the balance between lipid accumulation and utilization is shifted toward storage in the adipose tissue and GPS2-AKO mice become obese under normal laboratory chow diet. However, the adipose tissue of GPS2-AKO mice is not inflamed, the levels of circulating adiponectin are elevated, and systemic insulin sensitivity is overall improved. Our findings characterize a novel layer of regulation of the insulin signaling pathway based on non-proteolytic ubiquitination of AKT and define GPS2 as a previously unrecognized component of the insulin signaling cascade. In accordance with this role, we have shown that GPS2 presence in adipocytes modulates systemic metabolism by restricting the activation of insulin signaling during the fasted state, whereas in absence of GPS2, the adipose tissue is more efficient at lipid storage, and obesity becomes uncoupled from inflammation and insulin

  5. Depression and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Sue; Schmidt, Mike; Patton, George; Dwyer, Terry; Blizzard, Leigh; Otahal, Petr; Venn, Alison

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association between depressive disorder and insulin resistance in a sample of young adults using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview to ascertain depression status. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Cross-sectional data were collected from 1,732 participants aged between 26 and 36 years. Insulin resistance was derived from blood chemistry measures of fasting insulin and glucose using the homeostasis model assessment method. Those identified with mild, moderate, or severe depression were classified as having depressive disorder. RESULTS The 12-month prevalence of depressive disorder was 5.4% among men and 11.7% among women. In unadjusted models mean insulin resistance was 17.2% (95% CI 0.7–36.0%, P = 0.04) higher in men and 11.4% (1.5–22.0%, P = 0.02) higher in women with depressive disorder. After adjustment for behavioral and dietary factors, the increased level of insulin resistance associated with depressive disorder was 13.2% (−3.1 to 32.3%, P = 0.12) in men and 6.1% (−4.1 to 17.4%, P = 0.25) in women. Waist circumference was identified as a mediator in the relationship between depression and insulin resistance, reducing the β coefficient in the fully adjusted models in men by 38% and in women by 42%. CONCLUSIONS A positive association was found between depressive disorder and insulin resistance in this population-based sample of young adult men and women. The association seemed to be mediated partially by waist circumference. PMID:20185745

  6. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals that limited daily carbohydrate intake to

  7. Third Exposure to a Reduced Carbohydrate Meal Lowers Evening Postprandial Insulin and GIP Responses and HOMA-IR Estimate of Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Ju; Borer, Katarina T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and insulin resistance increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease mortality. Postprandial hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also occur in metabolically healthy subjects consuming high-carbohydrate diets particularly after evening meals and when carbohydrate loads follow acute exercise. We hypothesized the involvement of dietary carbohydrate load, especially when timed after exercise, and mediation by the glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) in this phenomenon, as this incretin promotes insulin secretion after carbohydrate intake in insulin-sensitive, but not in insulin-resistant states. Methods Four groups of eight metabolically healthy weight-matched postmenopausal women were provided with three isocaloric meals (a pre-trial meal and two meals during the trial day) containing either 30% or 60% carbohydrate, with and without two-hours of moderate-intensity exercise before the last two meals. Plasma glucose, insulin, glucagon, GIP, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), free fatty acids (FFAs), and D-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations were measured during 4-h postprandial periods and 3-h exercise periods, and their areas under the curve (AUCs) were analyzed by mixed-model ANOVA, and insulin resistance during fasting and meal tolerance tests within each diet was estimated using homeostasis-model assessment (HOMA-IR). Results The third low-carbohydrate meal, but not the high-carbohydrate meal, reduced: (1) evening insulin AUC by 39% without exercise and by 31% after exercise; (2) GIP AUC by 48% without exercise and by 45% after exercise, and (3) evening insulin resistance by 37% without exercise and by 24% after exercise. Pre-meal exercise did not alter insulin-, GIP- and HOMA-IR- lowering effects of low-carbohydrate diet, but exacerbated evening hyperglycemia. Conclusions Evening postprandial insulin and GIP responses and insulin resistance declined by over 30% after three meals

  8. Serum LBP Is Associated with Insulin Resistance in Women with PCOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qibo Zhu

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP is closely associated with many metabolic disorders. However, no study has been done to explore the relationship between LBP and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the serum LBP level is elevated and associated with insulin resistance (IR in PCOS.In this cross-sectional study, 117 PCOS patients and 121 age-matched controls were recruited. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp was performed with an expression of M value for insulin sensitivity. Fasting serum samples were collected to detect LBP, lipids, insulin, sex hormones and high sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP. Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regression was used to analyze the associations between M value and LBP level.The study was performed in a clinical research center.Compared with controls, PCOS subjects had a significantly higher LBP concentration (33.03±14.59 vs. 24.35±10.31 μg/ml, p<0.001, and lower M value (8.21±3.06 vs. 12.31±1.72 mg/min/kg, p<0.001. Both in lean and overweight/obese individuals, serum LBP level was higher in PCOS subjects than that in controls. M value was negatively correlated with body mass index (BMI, fasting serum insulin, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c, free testosterone, high sensitive C reactive protein (hs-CRP and LBP, whereas positively correlated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG. Serum LBP level was associated with M value after adjusting for BMI, fasting serum insulin, SHBG, as well as hs-CRP.Serum LBP level significantly is elevated in PCOS, and is independently associated with IR in PCOS.

  9. Targeted disruption of the CREB coactivator Crtc2 increases insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiguo; Inoue, Hiroshi; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Viste, Kristin; Miller, Nina; Liu, Yi; Hedrick, Susan; Vera, Liliana; Montminy, Marc

    2010-02-16

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of pancreatic glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis through induction of gluconeogenic genes by the CREB coactivator CRTC2. Hepatic CRTC2 activity is elevated in obesity, although the extent to which this cofactor contributes to attendant increases in insulin resistance is unclear. Here we show that mice with a knockout of the CRTC2 gene have decreased circulating glucose concentrations during fasting, due to attenuation of the gluconeogenic program. CRTC2 was found to stimulate hepatic gene expression in part through an N-terminal CREB binding domain that enhanced CREB occupancy over relevant promoters in response to glucagon. Deletion of sequences encoding the CREB binding domain in CRTC2 (-/-) mice lowered circulating blood glucose concentrations and improved insulin sensitivity in the context of diet-induced obesity. Our results suggest that small molecules that attenuate the CREB-CRTC2 pathway may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  10. AS160 deficiency causes whole-body insulin resistance via composite effects in multiple tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong Yu; Ducommun, Serge; Quan, Chao; Xie, Bingxian; Li, Min; Wasserman, David H; Sakamoto, Kei; Mackintosh, Carol; Chen, Shuai

    2013-01-15

    AS160 (Akt substrate of 160 kDa) is a Rab GTPase-activating protein implicated in insulin control of GLUT4 (glucose transporter 4) trafficking. In humans, a truncation mutation (R363X) in one allele of AS160 decreased the expression of the protein and caused severe postprandial hyperinsulinaemia during puberty. To complement the limited studies possible in humans, we generated an AS160-knockout mouse. In wild-type mice, AS160 expression is relatively high in adipose tissue and soleus muscle, low in EDL (extensor digitorum longus) muscle and detectable in liver only after enrichment. Despite having lower blood glucose levels under both fasted and random-fed conditions, the AS160-knockout mice exhibited insulin resistance in both muscle and liver in a euglycaemic clamp study. Consistent with this paradoxical phenotype, basal glucose uptake was higher in AS160-knockout primary adipocytes and normal in isolated soleus muscle, but their insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and overall GLUT4 levels were markedly decreased. In contrast, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and GLUT4 levels were normal in EDL muscle. The liver also contributes to the AS160-knockout phenotype via hepatic insulin resistance, elevated hepatic expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase isoforms and pyruvate intolerance, which are indicative of increased gluconeogenesis. Overall, as well as its catalytic function, AS160 influences expression of other proteins, and its loss deregulates basal and insulin-regulated glucose homoeostasis, not only in tissues that normally express AS160, but also by influencing liver function.

  11. C-Peptide, Baseline and Postprandial Insulin Resistance after a Carbohydrate-Rich Test Meal - Evidence for an Increased Insulin Clearance in PCOS Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassek, J; Erdmann, J; Ohnolz, F; Berg, F D; Kiechle, M; Seifert-Klauss, V

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Known characteristics of patients with PCOS include infertility, menstrual disorders, hirsutism and also often insulin resistance. These symptoms increase with increasing body weight. In the LIPCOS study ( L ifestyle I ntervention for Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome [ PCOS ]) long-term changes of the PCOS in dependence on pregnancy and parenthood were systematically assessed. In the framework of the LIPCOS study, PCOS patients were given a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal in order to examine glucose homeostasis and insulin secretion. The results were compared with those of a eumenorrhoeic control group who all had corresponding BMI values and corresponding ages. Methods and Patients 41 PCOS patients (without diabetes) and 68 controls received a standardised carbohydrate-rich test meal (260 kcal, 62 % carbohydrates, 32 % fat, 6 % proteins) in order to generate a submaximal insulin and glucose stimulation. The values were determined at baseline and postprandial after 60, 120 and 180 minutes. In addition, the corresponding C-peptide levels were recorded. Results In the PCOS patients (n = 41), the insulin secretion test after a standardised test meal showed almost identical baseline and postprandial insulin levels when compared with those of the age- and BMI-matched eumenorrhoeic controls (n = 68). In the PCOS patients, the baseline and postprandial glucose levels were significantly elevated (92.88 ± 10.28 [PCOS] vs. 85.07 ± 9.42 mg/dL [controls]; p PCOS patients formally exhibit a higher fasting insulin resistance than controls. In spite of the higher stimulated C-peptide levels, the insulin levels did not increase more strongly with increasing glucose levels than in controls which may be indicative of a higher insulin clearance in PCOS patients.

  12. Heterogeneous effects of calorie restriction on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling of individual rat skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sharma

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR (consuming ~60% of ad libitum, AL, intake improves whole body insulin sensitivity and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by isolated skeletal muscles. However, little is known about CR-effects on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling in muscle. Accordingly, 9-month-old male AL and CR (initiated when 3-months-old Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were studied using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with plasma insulin elevated to a similar level (~140 µU/ml in each diet group. Glucose uptake (assessed by infusion of [(14C]-2-deoxyglucose, 2-DG, phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, Akt and Akt substrate of 160 kDa, AS160, abundance of GLUT4 and hexokinase proteins, and muscle fiber type composition (myosin heavy chain, MHC, isoform percentages were determined in four predominantly fast-twitch (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, plantaris and two predominantly slow-twitch (soleus, adductor longus muscles. CR did not result in greater GLUT4 or hexokinase abundance in any of the muscles, and there were no significant diet-related effects on percentages of MHC isoforms. Glucose infusion was greater for CR versus AL rats (P<0.05 concomitant with significantly (P<0.05 elevated 2-DG uptake in 3 of the 4 fast-twitch muscles (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, without a significant diet-effect on 2-DG uptake by the plantaris or either slow-twitch muscle. Each of the muscles with a CR-related increase in 2-DG uptake was also characterized by significant (P<0.05 increases in phosphorylation of both Akt and AS160. Among the 3 muscles without a CR-related increase in glucose uptake, only the soleus had significant (P<0.05 CR-related increases in Akt and AS160 phosphorylation. The current data revealed that CR leads to greater whole body glucose disposal in part attributable to elevated in vivo insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by fast-twitch muscles. The

  13. Perilipin 5 regulates islet lipid metabolism and insulin secretion in a cAMP-dependent manner: implication of its role in the postprandial insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Michelle B; Machida, Yui; Hallinger, Daniel R; Garcia, Eden; Christensen, Aaron; Dutta, Sucharita; Peake, David A; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Imai, Yumi

    2015-04-01

    Elevation of circulating fatty acids (FA) during fasting supports postprandial (PP) insulin secretion that is critical for glucose homeostasis and is impaired in diabetes. We tested our hypothesis that lipid droplet (LD) protein perilipin 5 (PLIN5) in β-cells aids PP insulin secretion by regulating intracellular lipid metabolism. We demonstrated that PLIN5 serves as an LD protein in human islets. In vivo, Plin5 and triglycerides were increased by fasting in mouse islets. MIN6 cells expressing PLIN5 (adenovirus [Ad]-PLIN5) and those expressing perilipin 2 (PLIN2) (Ad-PLIN2) had higher [(3)H]FA incorporation into triglycerides than Ad-GFP control, which support their roles as LD proteins. However, Ad-PLIN5 cells had higher lipolysis than Ad-PLIN2 cells, which increased further by 8-Br-cAMP, indicating that PLIN5 facilitates FA mobilization upon cAMP stimulation as seen postprandially. Ad-PLIN5 in islets enhanced the augmentation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by FA and 8-Br-cAMP in G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40)- and cAMP-activated protein kinase-dependent manners, respectively. When PLIN5 was increased in mouse β-cells in vivo, glucose tolerance after an acute exenatide challenge was improved. Therefore, the elevation of islet PLIN5 during fasting allows partitioning of FA into LD that is released upon refeeding to support PP insulin secretion in cAMP- and GPR40-dependent manners. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  14. Creep-fatigue design studies for a sodium-cooled fast reactor with tube sheet-to shell structure subjected to elevated temperature service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, Jae Han [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, creep-fatigue damage under elevated temperatures is investigated for a tube sheet-to-shell structure, which is one of the main structures under Gen-IV class 1 components. To do this, detailed step-by-step procedures, including the elastic structural analysis and the ASME-NH code application, are described for a defined representative load cycle. From the sensitivity studies for various design parameters, such as hold time duration, shell thickness, and operating temperature, it is found that a reduction of thickness can decrease the thermal bending stresses, but the negative effect is that it may increase the primary stress and enhance the creep damage. The normal operating temperature is the most significant parameter in the creep-fatigue design

  15. Insulin Sensitivity and Mortality Risk Estimation in Patients with Type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... Keskin M, Kurtogu S, Kendira M, Atabek ME, Yazici C. Homeostasis model assessment is more reliable than fasting glucose/insulin ratio and quantitative insulin check index for assessing insulin resistance among obese children and adolescents. Paediatrics 2005;115:e500‑3. 8. Levey AS, Bosch JP, Lewis ...

  16. Insulin resistance and muscle insulin receptor substrate‐1 serine hyperphosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Charles A.; Howell, Mary E. A.; Cartwright, Brian M.; McCurry, Melanie P.; Lee, Michelle L.; Ramsey, Michael W.; Stone, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome subjects is profound in spite of muscle insulin receptor and insulin‐responsive glucose transporter (GLUT4) expression being nearly normal. Insulin receptor tyrosine kinase phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 (IRS‐1) at Tyr896 is a necessary step in insulin stimulation of translocation of GLUT4 to the cell surface. Serine phosphorylation of IRS‐1 by some kinases diminishes insulin action in mice. We evaluated the phosphorylation status of muscle IRS‐1 in 33 subjects with the metabolic syndrome and seventeen lean controls. Each underwent euglycemic insulin clamps and a thigh muscle biopsy before and after 8 weeks of either strength or endurance training. Muscle IRS‐1 phosphorylation at six sites was quantified by immunoblots. Metabolic syndrome muscle IRS‐1 had excess phosphorylation at Ser337 and Ser636 but not at Ser307, Ser789, or Ser1101. Ser337 is a target for phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and Ser636 is phosphorylated by c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase 1 (JNK1). Exercise training without weight loss did not change the IRS‐1 serine phosphorylation. These data suggest that baseline hyperphosphorylation of at least two key serines within muscle IRS‐1 diminishes the transmission of the insulin signal and thereby decreases the insulin‐stimulated translocation of GLUT4. Excess fasting phosphorylation of muscle IRS‐1 at Ser636 may be a major cause of the insulin resistance seen in obesity and might prevent improvement in insulin responsiveness when exercise training is not accompanied by weight loss. PMID:25472611

  17. Changes in insulin and insulin signaling in Alzheimer’s disease: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Molly; Macauley, Shannon L.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD), although the causal relationship remains poorly understood. Alterations in insulin signaling (IS) are reported in the AD brain. Moreover, oligomers/fibrils of amyloid-β (Aβ) can lead to neuronal insulin resistance and intranasal insulin is being explored as a potential therapy for AD. Conversely, elevated insulin levels (ins) are found in AD patients and high insulin has been reported to increase Aβ levels and tau phosphorylation, which could exacerbate AD pathology. Herein, we explore whether changes in ins and IS are a cause or consequence of AD. PMID:27432942

  18. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Staph Infections and MRSA Stroke Testicular Cancer Thalassemia Thyroid Cancer Thyroid ... Get Tested? To help evaluate insulin production by the beta cells in the pancreas; to help diagnose the ...

  19. Insulin Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Association Events Messaging Tools Recruiting Advocates Local Market Planning Training Webinars News & Events Advocacy News Call ... be imported for personal use. Inside the pancreas, beta cells make the hormone insulin. With each meal, ...

  20. How to measure hepatic insulin resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choukem, S-P; Gautier, J-F

    2008-12-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in energy metabolism. Under the control of hormones, especially insulin, the liver stores or releases glucose as needed by the body's systems. It is also responsible for an important part of non-esterified fatty-acid and aminoacid metabolism. Assessing hepatic insulin resistance is almost always synonymous with measuring hepatic glucose production (HGP) and calculating indices of hepatic insulin resistance. The most frequently used method to this end is the isotope dilution technique using a tracer. Among tracers, stable isotope-labelled glucose molecules are particularly advantageous over radioactive isotope-labelled glucose and are, therefore, the tracers of choice. The tracer is infused either on its own after an overnight fast to evaluate fasting HGP, or with some among the usual insulin-sensitivity tests to assess HGP suppression by insulin and/or glucose. In a fasting state, HGP is easily calculated whereas, during insulin or glucose infusion, some formula are needed to correct for the non-steady-state condition. The hepatic insulin-resistance index is the product of HGP and the corresponding plasma insulin concentration. Although subject to error, the isotope dilution method nevertheless remains an irreplaceable tool for assessing hepatic insulin resistance in clinical research. From a practical point of view, some easily obtainable indices and clinical or biochemical parameters can serve as surrogates or markers of hepatic insulin resistance in clinical practice. Finally, drugs such as metformin or glitazones can improve hepatic insulin resistance, hence their use in hepatic insulin-resistant states such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  1. Paradoxical increase in liver ketogenesis during long-term insulin-induced hypoglycemia in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Fabiana P M; Gazola, Vilma A F G; Furlan, Maria M D P; Barrena, Helenton C; Bazotte, Roberto B

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that insulin inhibits liver ketogenesis. However, during insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) the release of counterregulatory hormones could overcome the insulin effect on ketogenesis. To clarify this question the ketogenic activity in livers from alloxan-diabetic rats submitted to long-term IIH was investigated. Moreover, liver glycogenolysis, gluconeogensis, ureagenesis and the production of L-lactate were measured, and its correlation with blood levels of ketone bodies (KB), L-lactate, glucose, urea and ammonia was investigated. For this purpose, overnight fasted alloxan-diabetic rats (DBT group) were compared with control non-diabetic rats (NDBT group). Long-term IIH was obtained with an intraperitoneal injection of Detemir insulin (1 U/kg), and KB, glucose, L-lactate, ammonia and urea were evaluated at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 h after insulin injection. Because IIH was well established two hours after insulin injection this time was used for liver perfusion experiments. The administration of Detemir insulin decreased (P < 0.05) blood KB and glucose levels, but there was an increase in the blood L-lactate levels and a rebound increase in blood KB during the glucose recovery phase of IIH. In agreement with these results, the capacity to produce KB from octanoate was increased in the livers of DBT rats. Moreover, the elevated blood L-lactate levels in DBT rats could be attributed to the higher (P < 0.05) glycogenolysis when part of glucose from glycogenolysis enters glycolysis, producing L-lactate. In contrast, except glycerol, gluconeogenesis was negligible in the livers of DBT rats. Therefore, during long-term IIH the higher liver ketogenic capacity of DBT rats increased the risk of hyperketonemia. In addition, in spite of the fact that the insulin injection decreased blood KB, there was a risk of worsening lactic acidosis.

  2. Impact of improving postprandial glycemic control with intensifying insulin therapy in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoub, Tamer

    2017-11-01

    Worldwide, many people with type 2 diabetes are not at recommended glycemic targets and remain at increased risk of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Reaching recommended glycemic targets requires normalizing both fasting and postprandial glucose (PPG). For some patients, this will require addition of a prandial insulin delivered by injection to control PPG excursions. Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests an association between postprandial hyperglycemia and cardiovascular disease, and thus, expert guidelines recommend that treatment for elevated PPG not be delayed. Indeed, studies have demonstrated that PPG makes the greatest contribution to HbA 1c in patients who are approaching, but have not yet reached HbA 1c insulin is critical in suppressing hepatic glucose output (and therefore PPG levels) after a meal. Rapid-acting insulin analogs, with their faster onset and shorter duration of action, offer advantages over regular human insulin. Unfortunately, even with improved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic characteristics, rapid-acting insulin analogs are still unable to fully reproduce the rapid release of insulin into the portal circulation and suppression of hepatic glucose output that occurs in the individual without diabetes after starting a meal. The next generation of rapid-acting insulin analogs will have an even more favorable pharmacokinetic profile that should allow patients to further improve glycemic control. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) represents another option for intensifying therapy and improving postprandial control in some patients, and studies have shown that the benefits are sustainable long-term. However, it is currently unclear which patients stand to benefit the most from the extra expense and complexity of a CSII regimen, and further studies are needed.

  3. [Interactions of insulin and estrogen in the regulation of cell proliferation and carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Zsuzsanna; Kásler, Miklós

    2012-01-29

    Equilibrium of sexual steroids and metabolic processes has close correlations. Insulin is a potent regulator of human sexual steroid hormone production and modulates their signals at receptor level. Insulin resistance and excessive insulin production provoke hyperandrogenism and estrogen deficiency in women resulting not only in anovulatory dysfunction but also a high risk for cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Physiologic functions of all female organs have higher estrogen demand as compared with men. In healthy women estrogen predominance against androgens is a favor in their reproductive period, which means a strong defense against insulin resistance and its complications. However, in postmenopausal cases the increasing prevalence of insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes associated with estrogen deficiency and androgen excess, result in a gender specific higher risk for precancerous lesions and cancer as compared with men. Estrogen has beneficial effect on the energy metabolism, glucose homeostasis and on the lipid metabolism of liver and of peripheral tissues as well. A moderate or severe decrease in serum estrogen level enhances the prevalence of insulin resistant states. In premenopausal women long or irregular menstrual cycles are predictors for the risk of insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. Moreover, in postmenopausal estrogen deficient cases elevated fasting glucose, increased body weight and abdominal fat deposition are often observed progressively with age in correlation with an impaired glucose tolerance. In the rare cases of estrogen deficient men severe type-2 diabetes seems to be a characteristic complication. Upon becoming familiar with the cancer risk of insulin resistance and estrogen deficiency, there would be plenty of possibilities for primary cancer prevention. In patients with cancer the treatment of hormonal and metabolic disturbances may become effective adjuvant therapy.

  4. Basal insulin and cardiovascular and other outcomes in dysglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstein, Hertzel C; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles R

    2012-01-01

    The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested.......The provision of sufficient basal insulin to normalize fasting plasma glucose levels may reduce cardiovascular events, but such a possibility has not been formally tested....

  5. Zinc Status Affects Glucose Homeostasis and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen B. Fung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Up to 20% of adult patients with Thalassemia major (Thal live with diabetes, while 30% may be zinc deficient. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between zinc status, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in Thal patients. Charts from thirty subjects (16 male, 27.8 ± 9.1 years with Thal were reviewed. Patients with low serum zinc had significantly lower fasting insulin, insulinogenic and oral disposition indexes (all p < 0.05 and elevated glucose response curve, following a standard 75 g oral load of glucose compared to those with normal serum zinc after controlling for baseline (group × time interaction p = 0.048. Longitudinal data in five patients with a decline in serum zinc over a two year follow up period (−19.0 ± 9.6 μg/dL, showed consistent increases in fasting glucose (3.6 ± 3.2 mg/dL and insulin to glucose ratios at 120 min post glucose dose (p = 0.05. Taken together, these data suggest that the frequently present zinc deficiency in Thal patients is associated with decreased insulin secretion and reduced glucose disposal. Future zinc trials will require modeling of oral glucose tolerance test data and not simply measurement of static indices in order to understand the complexities of pancreatic function in the Thal patient.

  6. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  7. Plasma insulin disturbances in primary hyperparathyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hakjoong; Kalkhoff, Ronald K.; Costrini, Nicholas V.; Cerletty, James M.; Jacobson, Mitchell

    1971-01-01

    Plasma insulin dynamics were evaluated in 10 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism before and after parathyroidectomy and correction of hypercalcemia. Before surgery fasting plasma insulin concentrations and insulin responses to administered glucose, tolbutamide, and glucagon were significantly greater than postoperative values. Hyperinsulinemia was not associated with altered glucose curves during glucose or glucagon tolerance tests, but a relatively greater insulin response to tolbutamide resulted in an increased hypoglycemic effect following its administration. The glucose-lowering action of intravenous insulin was slightly impaired before treatment. Intramuscular injections of parathormone to six normal men for 8 days induced mild hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia and reproduced augmented plasma insulin responses to oral glucose and intravenous tolbutamide. 4-hr intravenous infusions of calcium to another group of six normal men raised serum calcium concentrations above 11 mg/100 ml. This did not alter glucose or insulin curves during oral glucose tolerance but markedly accentuated insulin responses to tolbutamide and potentiated its hypoglycemic effect. When highly purified parathormone was incubated with isolated pancreatic islets of male rats, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was unaffected. These findings suggest that chronic hypercalcemia of hyperparathyroidism sustains a form of endogenous insulin resistance that necessitates augmented insulin secretion to maintain plasma glucose homeostasis. This state is insufficient to oppose tolbutamide-induced hypoglycemia because of an additional direct, selective enhancement of hypercalcemia on pancreatic beta cell responsiveness to the sulfonylurea. The possible direct role of parathormone in these events has not been established. PMID:5129311

  8. Estimation of insulin secretion, glucose uptake by tissues, and liver handling of glucose using a mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis in lean and obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Michael; Abadi, Sakineh Esmaeili Mohsen; Balouchzadeh, Ramin; Lee, H Felix; Ko, Hoo Sang; Johns, Michael; Malik, Nehal; Lee, Joshua J; Kwon, Guim

    2017-06-01

    Destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells is the key determinant of diabetes mellitus regardless of their types. Due to their anatomical location within the islets of Langerhans scattered throughout the pancreas, it is difficult to monitor β-cell function and mass clinically. To this end, we propose to use a mathematical model of glucose-insulin homeostasis to estimate insulin secretion, glucose uptake by tissues, and hepatic handling of glucose. We applied the mathematical model by Lombarte et al. (2013) to compare various rate constants representing glucose-insulin homeostasis between lean (11% fat)- and high fat diet (HFD; 45% fat)-fed mice. Mice fed HFD (n = 12) for 3 months showed significantly higher body weights (49.97 ± 0.52 g vs. 29.86 ± 0.46 g), fasting blood glucose levels (213.08 ± 10.35 mg/dl vs. 121.91 ± 2.26 mg/dl), and glucose intolerance compared to mice fed lean diet (n = 12). Mice were injected with 1 g/kg glucose intraperitoneally and blood glucose levels were measured at various intervals for 120 min. We performed simulation using Arena™ software based on the mathematical model and estimated the rate constants (9 parameters) for various terms in the differential equations using OptQuest™. The simulated data fit accurately to the observed data for both lean and obese mice, validating the use of the mathematical model in mice at different stages of diabetes progression. Among 9 parameters, 5 parameters including basal insulin, k 2 (rate constant for insulin-dependent glucose uptake to tissues), k 3 (rate constant for insulin-independent glucose uptake to tissues), k 4 (rate constant for liver glucose transfer), and I pi (rate constant for insulin concentration where liver switches from glucose release to uptake) were significantly different between lean- and HFD-fed mice. Basal blood insulin levels, k 3 , and I pi were significantly elevated but k 2 and k 4 were reduced in mice fed a HFD compared to those fed a lean diet. Non

  9. Strength and independence of associations between ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin and insulin in stimulating basic functions to energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda A. Nour

    2014-03-01

    Methods: The present study was conducted on 40 male albino rats that were divided into 4 groups (n = 10: (I: fed ad/libitum, (II: fasted group, refed group allowed for 20 min refeeding with food stuffs divided into two groups, (III: carbohydrate meal, (IV: fat meal. The present study suggests a physiological interaction of ghrelin and leptin in the periphery. Elevated fasting ghrelin appears to modulate other hormonal systems that participate in the regulation of food intake. Ghrelin inhibition after feeding is related to different nutrients satiating capacity. In addition to feeding, several hormonal states have also been involved in the suppression of postprandial ghrelin production. Meal and insulin were found to acutely affect leptin concentration. Inverse change in ghrelin and leptin between fasting and refeeding state may indicate a role of gastric leptin in regulating ghrelin secretion. Positive correlation between adiponectin and insulin with both macronutrients suggests a role of adiponectin in enhancing insulin action. The fact that gastric leptin is stimulated by diet and ghrelin responses could be due to direct effects of multiple hormonal signals which require postgastric feed back on the stomach among the latters (glucose and insulin.

  10. Clinical significance of determination of serum leptin, insulin levels and blood sugar in pregnant women with glucose metabolism disturbances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Suqing; Li Yusheng; Wang Lin; Chu Kaiqiu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum leptin, insulin levels and blood sugar contents in pregnant women with gestational glucose metabolism disturbances. Methods: Fasting and 3h after oral 50g glucose serum levels of leptin were measured with RIA in 36 pregnant women with glucose metabolism disturbances (gestational diabetes mellitus or gestational impaired glucose tolerance) and 34 controls. Also, fasting serum insulin levels (with CLIA) and blood sugar contents 1h after oral 50 glucose (with glucose oxidase method) were determined in all these subjects. Results: 1. Serum levels of leptin in pregnant women with glucose metabolism disturbances were 14.9 ± 4.3 μg/L (vs controls 9.8 ± 1.7 μg/L, P<0.01). 2. The serum levels of insulin and 1 h post - 50g glucose blood sugar contents in pregnant women with glucose metabolism disturbances were 12.9±4.3mU/L and 11.0±1.4mmol/L respectively, which were both significantly positively correlated with the serum leptin levels (r=0.835, r=0.758 respectively) (vs levels in controls: 8.45±3.0mU/L and 7.84±1.3mmol/L). Conclusion: Elevation of fasting serum levels of leptin was demonstrated in pregnant women with glucose metabolism disturbances and the level of leptin was positively correlated with that of insulin and blood sugar. (authors)

  11. Sodium retention and insulin treatment in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, K; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that total body exchangeable sodium (ENa) is elevated in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with short-duration diabetes and no signs of microangiopathy was tested. Also tested was whether peripheral hyperinsulinaemia, in terms of the amounts of insulin injected subcutane......The hypothesis that total body exchangeable sodium (ENa) is elevated in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with short-duration diabetes and no signs of microangiopathy was tested. Also tested was whether peripheral hyperinsulinaemia, in terms of the amounts of insulin injected...... subcutaneous insulin infusion for improvement of glycaemic control or to remain on conventional insulin treatment. In study 1, ENa was higher in short-duration type 1 diabetic men than in controls (3003 +/- 325 vs 2849 +/- 207 mEq/1.73 m2, P

  12. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horber, F F; Marsh, H M; Haymond, M W

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation [( 14C]leucine) increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horber, F.F.; Marsh, H.M.; Haymond, M.W. (Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation {sup 14}C leucine increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment.

  14. Benefits of exenatide on obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with elevated liver enzymes in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Ning; Kuang, Hong Yu; Hao, Ming; Gao, Xin Yuan; Lin, Wen Jian; Zou, Wei

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the advantages of exenatide treatment on obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with elevated liver enzymes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A total of 60 newly diagnosed patients with obesity, NAFLD with elevated liver enzymes and T2D were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. The exenatide treatment group (n = 30) were treated with exenatide and insulin glargine, and the intensive insulin therapy group (n = 30) were treated with insulin aspart and insulin glargine for 12 weeks. Selected clinical characteristics were determined, and ultrasonography was performed at both baseline and 12 weeks following treatment. At baseline, the clinical characteristics were matched between the two groups. After 12 weeks, fasting blood glucose (FBG), postprandial blood glucose (PBG), glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG) and total bilirubin levels were significantly decreased in the two groups (p fatty liver was significantly higher in the exenatide group (93.3%) than the intensive insulin group (66.7%) (p obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with elevated liver enzymes and T2D. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Dietary patterns and the insulin resistance phenotype among non-diabetic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Information on the relation between dietary patterns derived by cluster analysis and insulin resistance is scarce. Objective: To compare insulin resistance phenotypes, including waist circumference, body mass index, fasting and 2-hour post-challenge insulin, insulin sensitivity index (I...

  16. Adverse effects on insulin secretion of replacing saturated fat with refined carbohydrate but not with monounsaturated fat: A randomized controlled trial in centrally obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lin F; Vethakkan, Shireene R; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi; Sanders, Thomas A B; Teng, Kim-Tiu

    Current dietary guidelines recommend the replacement of saturated fatty acids (SAFAs) with carbohydrates or monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) based on evidence on lipid profile alone, the chronic effects of the mentioned replacements on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity are however unclear. To assess the chronic effects of the substitution of refined carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA on insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in centrally obese subjects. Using a crossover design, randomized controlled trial in abdominally overweight men and women, we compared the effects of substitution of 7% energy as carbohydrate or MUFA for SAFA for a period of 6 weeks each. Fasting and postprandial blood samples in response to corresponding SAFA, carbohydrate, or MUFA-enriched meal-challenges were collected after 6 weeks on each diet treatment for the assessment of outcomes. As expected, postprandial nonesterified fatty acid suppression and elevation of C-peptide, insulin and glucose secretion were the greatest with high-carbohydrate (CARB) meal. Interestingly, CARB meal attenuated postprandial insulin secretion corrected for glucose response; however, the insulin sensitivity and disposition index were not affected. SAFA and MUFA had similar effects on all markers except for fasting glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide concentrations, which increased after MUFA but not SAFA when compared with CARB. In conclusion, a 6-week lower-fat/higher-carbohydrate (increased by 7% refined carbohydrate) diet may have greater adverse effect on insulin secretion corrected for glucose compared with isocaloric higher-fat diets. In contrast, exchanging MUFA for SAFA at 7% energy had no appreciable adverse impact on insulin secretion. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. UP780, a chromone-enriched aloe composition improves insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Zhao, Jifu; Corneliusen, Brandon; Pantier, Mandee; Brownell, Lidia Alfaro; Jia, Qi

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic individuals experience elevated fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and plasma insulin and impaired glucose tolerance. Adiponectin is a hormone inversely correlated with insulin resistance. Here we describe the activity of aloesin, an aloe chromone that increases adiponectin production and, when formulated with an aloe polysaccharide composition, improves the insulin sensitivity in db/db and diet-induced obese-diabetic mice. Two aloe chromones, aloesin and aloesinol, were tested in vitro for adiponectin production. Following confirmation of glucose-lowering activity in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model, aloesin was formulated with an Aloe vera inner leaf gel powder polysaccharide preparation to yield a composition designated UP780. Efficacy of UP780 was evaluated in HDF-induced and db/db mouse models. GW1929, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonist, was used as a positive control. After 3 weeks of treatment of HDF-induced mice, plasma insulin levels were decreased 37.9% and 46.7% by aloesin and aloesinol, respectively. In db/db mice, the chromone- (2% chromone:98% aloe polysaccharide) enriched UP780 aloe composition showed a 33.7% and 46.0% decrease in fasting triglyceride and plasma glucose levels after 10 weeks of oral treatment, respectively. Diabetic mice gavaged with 200 mg/kg of UP780 for 10 weeks showed a 30.3% decrease in fasting blood glucose levels and a 32.2% reduction in plasma insulin. In both animal models, UP780 showed a statistically significant improvement in blood glucose clearance. These findings indicate that UP780, a chromone-standardized, aloe-based composition, could potentially be used as a natural product option to facilitate the maintenance of healthy blood glucose levels.

  18. Intermittent fasting up-regulates Fsp27/Cidec gene expression in white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Joanna; Kochan, Zdzislaw

    2012-03-01

    Fat-specific protein of 27 kDa (FSP27) is a novel lipid droplet protein that promotes triacylglycerol storage in white adipose tissue (WAT). The regulation of the Fsp27 gene expression in WAT is largely unknown. We investigated the nutritional regulation of FSP27 in WAT. The effects of intermittent fasting (48 d, eight cycles of 3-d fasting and 3-d refeeding), caloric restriction (48 d), fasting-refeeding (3-d fasting and 3-d refeeding), and fasting (3 d) on mRNA expression of FSP27, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ2), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), and M isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (a positive control for PPARγ activation) in epididymal WAT and on serum triacylglycerol, insulin, and leptin levels were determined in Wistar rats. We also determined the effects of PPARγ activation by rosiglitazone or pioglitazone on FSP27 mRNA levels in primary rat adipocytes. Long-term intermittent fasting, in contrast to other dietary manipulations, significantly up-regulated Fsp27 gene expression in WAT. Moreover, in rats subjected to intermittent fasting, serum insulin levels were elevated; PPARγ2 and C/EBPα mRNA expression in WAT was increased, and there was a positive correlation of Fsp27 gene expression with PPARγ2 and C/EBPα mRNA levels. FSP27 mRNA expression was also increased in adipocytes treated with PPARγ agonists. Our study demonstrates that the transcription of the Fsp27 gene in adipose tissue may be induced in response to nutritional stimuli. Furthermore, PPARγ2, C/EBPα, and insulin may be involved in the nutritional regulation of FSP27. Thus intermittent fasting, despite lower caloric intake, may promote triacylglycerol deposition in WAT by increasing the expression of genes involved in lipid storage, such as Fsp27. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Liver and Muscle Contribute Differently to the Plasma Acylcarnitine Pool During Fasting and Exercise in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.; Hansen, J S; Zhao, Jian-xin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma acylcarnitine levels are elevated by physiological conditions such as fasting and exercise but also in states of insulin resistance and obesity. AIM: To elucidate the contribution of liver and skeletal muscle to plasma acylcarnitines in the fasting state and during exercise...... in humans. METHODS: In 2 independent studies, young healthy males were fasted overnight and performed an acute bout of exercise to investigate either acylcarnitines in skeletal muscle biopsies and arterial-to-venous plasma differences over the exercising and resting leg (n = 9) or the flux over the hepato......-splanchnic bed (n = 10). RESULTS: In the fasting state, a pronounced release of C2- and C3-carnitines from the hepato-splanchnic bed and an uptake of free carnitine by the legs were detected. Exercise further increased the release of C3-carnitine from the hepato-splanchnic bed and the uptake of free carnitine...

  20. Insulin resistance in porphyria cutanea tarda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcinaro, F; Basta, G; Lisi, P; Cruciani, C; Pietropaolo, M; Santeusanio, F; Falorni, A; Calafiore, R

    1989-06-01

    It has been reported that patients with porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) develop carbohydrate (CHO) intolerance and manifest diabetes melitus (DM) more frequently than the normal population. In order to verify whether this is due to insulin resistance we studied 5 patients with PCT and 5 normal subjects matched for age, sex and weight. In all the patients an evaluation consisted of the glycemic curve and insulin response to an iv glucose tolerance test (IVGTT: 0.33 g/kg) as well as of an evaluation of the circulating monocyte insulin receptors. Blood samples were drawn in the basal state to measure plasma levels of NEFA, glycerol, and intermediate metabolites. The patients with PCT showed normal glucose tolerance which was obtained, however, at the expense of the elevated insulin levels: therefore a condition of insulin resistance was demonstrated in these subjects. An involvement of the lipid metabolism, observed by the raised levels of plasma NEFA and glycerol, was also evident. The insulin binding to circulating monocytes was reduced but not enough to justify the degree of insulin resistance observed. Therefore, it could be hypothesized, in agreement with similar studies, that a postreceptor defect is responsible for the insulin-resistance observed in patients with PCT and that the reduction of insulin receptors is determined by the down regulation in response to elevated insulinemic levels. An alteration of the porphyrin metabolism might be responsible for this disorder.

  1. Association Between the Visceral Adiposity Index and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance in Participants With Normal Waist Circumference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baolan; Qu, Hua; Wang, Hang; Wei, Huili; Deng, Huacong

    2017-09-01

    We assessed the correlation between the visceral adiposity index (VAI; a useful indicator of adipose distribution and function) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in participants with normal waist circumference. A cross-sectional study was conducted, which included 1834 Chinese adults. The blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, fasting and postprandial blood glucose, fasting insulin, and lipid profiles were measured. The VAI and HOMA-IR were calculated. Participants were divided into 4 groups according to the HOMA-IR level, and the correlation between the VAI and HOMA-IR was analyzed. The VAI gradually increased across the HOMA-IR quartiles ( P HOMA-IR ( P HOMA-IR. A logistic regression analysis indicated that VAI elevation was the main risk factor for the increased HOMA-IR in both genders. Overall, the VAI was closely correlated with the HOMA-IR in a population without central obesity.

  2. Syndrome of extreme insulin resistance (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype) with atrial septal defect: clinical presentation and treatment outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Deep; Maisnam, Indira; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2013-01-01

    Syndrome of extreme insulin resistance (SEIR) is a rare spectrum disorder with a primary defect in insulin receptor signalling, noted primarily in children, and is often difficult to diagnose due to the clinical heterogeneity.SEIR was diagnosed in an adolescent girl with facial dysmorphism,exuberant scalp and body hair, severe acanthosis, lipoatrophy, dental abnormalities, and short stature (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype). She had elevated fasting (422.95 pmol/L) and post-glucose insulin levels(>2083 pmol/L). Total body fat was decreased (11%; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry). Basal growth hormone (GH) was increased (7.9 μg/L)with normal insuline-like growth factor 1 (37.6 nmol/L) suggestive of GH resistance. She had fatty liver and polycystic ovaries. Echocardiography revealed ostium secundum type atrial septal defect (ASD). Blood glucose normalized with pioglitazone (30 mg/day). Delayed development, severe insulin resistance, mild hyperglycemia, absence of ketosis, and remarkable response of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia to pioglitazone which persisted even after 1 year of diagnosis are some of the notable features of this patient. This is perhaps the first report of occurrence of congenital heart disease (ASD) in a patient of SEIR (Rabson-Mendenhall phenotype). This report highlights the clinical features of SEIR and the role of insulin sensitizers like pioglitazone in the management of such patients.

  3. Cognitively impaired elderly exhibit insulin resistance and no memory improvement with infused insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jill K; Vidoni, Eric D; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Montgomery, Robert N; Johnson, David K; Thyfault, John P; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2016-03-01

    Insulin resistance is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), although its role in AD etiology is unclear. We assessed insulin resistance using fasting and insulin-stimulated measures in 51 elderly subjects with no dementia (ND; n = 37) and with cognitive impairment (CI; n = 14). CI subjects exhibited either mild CI or AD. Fasting insulin resistance was measured using the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was assessed using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp to calculate glucose disposal rate into lean mass, the primary site of insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Because insulin crosses the blood-brain barrier, we also assessed whether insulin infusion would improve verbal episodic memory compared to baseline. Different but equivalent versions of cognitive tests were administered in counterbalanced order in the basal and insulin-stimulated state. Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. Cognitively impaired subjects exhibited greater insulin resistance as measured at fasting (HOMA-IR; ND: 1.09 [1.1] vs. CI: 2.01 [2.3], p = 0.028) and during the hyperinsulinemic clamp (glucose disposal rate into lean mass; ND: 9.9 (4.5) vs. AD 7.2 (3.2), p = 0.040). Cognitively impaired subjects also exhibited higher fasting insulin compared to ND subjects, (CI: 8.7 [7.8] vs. ND: 4.2 [3.8] μU/mL; p = 0.023) and higher fasting amylin (CI: 24.1 [39.1] vs. 8.37 [14.2]; p = 0.050) with no difference in fasting glucose. Insulin infusion elicited a detrimental effect on one test of verbal episodic memory (Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test) in both groups (p insulin resistance was observed in cognitively impaired subjects compared to ND controls, insulin infusion did not improve memory. Furthermore, a significant correlation between HOMA-IR and glucose disposal rate was present only in ND (p = 0.0002) but not in cognitively impaired (p = 0.884) subjects, indicating potentially important

  4. Insulin resistance and the transcription of the glucose-6-phosphatase gene in newborn dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, B C; Li, J; Kliegman, R M

    1997-04-01

    In the present report changes in the mRNA level of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase; EC 3.1.39) in newborn and adult dogs in vivo were studied to further test the hypotheses that neonatal hyperglycemia may be due to unsuppressed gluconeogenesis by insulin and that the antidiabetic role of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) may be intact in newborn dogs who have consistently demonstrated insulin resistance. Our results were the following: (i) Both renal and hepatic G6Pase mRNA were expressed at birth and increased with time during a 24-h period of fasting after birth. (ii) The renal G6Pase mRNA levels in newborn dogs did not respond to either insulin or epinephrine. (iii) Hyperinsulinemia lowered the liver G6Pase mRNA by only 16.3% in newborn dogs, but reduced the liver G6Pase mRNA to an undetectable level in adult dogs. (iv) Hyperglycemia decreased the hepatic G6Pase mRNA by 14.3% in newborn dogs under hyperinsulinemia. (v) Infused epinephrine did not elevate the hepatic G6Pase mRNA level in newborn dogs in the presence of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. (vi) In newborn dogs, hyper-IGF-1 rapidly reduced the hepatic G6Pase mRNA level by 50%, and hypoglycemia was unable to elevate the hepatic G6Pase mRNA level under the hyper-IGF-1. We concluded that the reduced rate of suppression of transcription of the liver G6Pase gene by insulin in newborn dogs may reflect the unsuppressed neonatal hepatic gluconeogenesis due to insulin resistance and that the physiological roles of IGF-1 seemed to be intact in newborn dogs and may be not responsible for neonatal hyperglycemia.

  5. Diabetes and Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the abdomen just behind the stomach, produces insulin. Insulin is a hormone that takes glucose from the ... occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin or when the body doesn’t use insulin ...

  6. Insulin Resistance and Prediabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the normal range. What happens with insulin resistance? In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not ... they do not usually test specifically for insulin resistance. Insulin resistance can be assessed by measuring the level ...

  7. Comparison between basal insulin glargine and NPH insulin in patients with diabetes type 1 on conventional intensive insulin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin analog that mimics normal basal insulin secretion without pronounced peaks. The aim of this study was to compare insulin glargine with isophane insulin (NPH insulin for basal insulin supply in patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods. A total of 48 type 1 diabetics on long term conventional intensive insulin therapy (IIT were randomized to three different regimens of basal insulin substitution: 1. continuation of NPH insulin once daily at bedtime with more intensive selfmonitoring (n = 15; 2. NPH insulin twice daily (n = 15; 3. insulin glargine once daily (n = 18. Meal time insulin aspart was continued in all groups. Results. Fasting blood glucose (FBG was lower in the glargine group (7.30±0.98 mmol/l than in the twice daily NPH group (7.47±1.06 mmol/l, but without significant difference. FBG was significantly higher in the once daily NPH group (8.44±0.85 mmol/l; p < 0.05. HbA1c after 3 months did not change in the once daily NPH group, but decreased in the glargine group (from 7.72±0.86% to 6.87±0.50%, as well as in the twice daily NPH group (from 7.80±0.83% to 7.01±0.63%. Total daily insulin doses were similar in all groups but only in the glargine group there was an increase of basal and decrease of meal related insulin doses. The frequency of mild hypoglycemia was significantly lower in the glargine group (6.56±2.09 than in both NPH groups (9.0±1.65 in twice daily NPH group and 8.13±1.30 in other NPH group (episodes/patients-month, p < 0.05. Conclusion. Basal insulin supplementation in type 1 diabetes mellitus with either twice daily NPH insulin or glargine can result in similar glycemic control when combined with meal time insulin aspart. However, with glargine regimen FBG, HbA1c and frequency of hypoglycemic event are lower. These facts contribute to better patients satisfaction with insulin glargine versus NPH insulin in IIT in type 1 diabetics.

  8. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ting Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin antibodies (IA associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%, high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly.

  9. Effect of Ghrelin on Glucose-Insulin Homeostasis: Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Sangiao-Alvarellos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ghrelin is a 28-amino-acid peptide that displays a strong growth hormone- (GH- releasing activity through the activation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR. The first studies about role of ghrelin were focused on its orexigenic ability, but despite indisputable pharmacological data, the evidence for a physiological role for ghrelin in the control of appetite is much less clear. Mice with targeted deletion of either ghrelin or the GHSR exhibit an essentially normal metabolic phenotype when fed a regular chow diet, suggesting that ghrelin may have a redundant role in the regulation of food intake. RNAs for ghrelin as well as GHSR are expressed in the pancreas of rats and humans and several studies propose that ghrelin could have an important function in glucose homeostasis and insulin release, independent of GH secretion. Low plasma ghrelin levels are associated with elevated fasting insulin levels and insulin resistance, suggesting both physiological and pathophysiological roles for ghrelin. For this reason, at least theoretically, ghrelin and/or its signalling manipulation could be useful for the treatment or prevention of diseases of glucose homeostasis such as type 2 diabetes.

  10. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  11. Lipid-induced insulin resistance does not impair insulin access to skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Joyce M.; Castro, Ana Valeria B.; Broussard, Josiane L.; Ionut, Viorica; Bergman, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated plasma free fatty acids (FFA) induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle. Previously, we have shown that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion prevents the dispersion of insulin through the muscle, and we hypothesized that this would lead to an impairment of insulin moving from the plasma to the muscle interstitium. Thus, we infused lipid into our anesthetized canine model and measured the appearance of insulin in the lymph as a means to sample muscle interstitium under hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp conditions. Although lipid infusion lowered the glucose infusion rate and induced both peripheral and hepatic insulin resistance, we were unable to detect an impairment of insulin access to the lymph. Interestingly, despite a significant, 10-fold increase in plasma FFA, we detected little to no increase in free fatty acids or triglycerides in the lymph after lipid infusion. Thus, we conclude that experimental insulin resistance induced by lipid infusion does not reduce insulin access to skeletal muscle under clamp conditions. This would suggest that the peripheral insulin resistance is likely due to reduced cellular sensitivity to insulin in this model, and yet we did not detect a change in the tissue microenvironment that could contribute to cellular insulin resistance. PMID:25852002

  12. Insulin resistance alters islet morphology in nondiabetic humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mezza, Teresa; Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Sorice, Gian Pio

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by poor glucose uptake in metabolic tissues and manifests when insulin secretion fails to cope with worsening insulin resistance. In addition to its effects on skeletal muscle, liver, and adipose tissue metabolism, it is evident that insulin resistance also affects...... pancreatic β-cells. To directly examine the alterations that occur in islet morphology as part of an adaptive mechanism to insulin resistance, we evaluated pancreas samples obtained during pancreatoduodenectomy from nondiabetic subjects who were insulin-resistant or insulin-sensitive. We also compared...... insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and incretin levels between the two groups. We report an increased islet size and an elevated number of β- and α-cells that resulted in an altered β-cell-to-α-cell area in the insulin- resistant group. Our data in this series of studies suggest that neogenesis from...

  13. Dietary fibre consumption and insulin resistance - the role of body fat and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, Charity B; Tucker, Larry

    2013-07-28

    The present study was conducted to determine the association between fibre intake and insulin resistance in 264 women using a cross-sectional design. Insulin resistance was indexed using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (US formula: fasting insulin (μU/ml) × fasting glucose (mg/dl)/405 international formula: fasting glucose (mmol/l) × fasting insulin (μU/l)/22.5). Fibre and energy consumption were assessed using 7 d weighed food records. Fibre was expressed as g/4184 kJ (1000 kcal). Body fat percentage (BF%) was measured using the BOD POD, and physical activity (PA) was ascertained using Actigraph accelerometers (Health One Technology) worn for seven consecutive days. Women with high total fibre intakes (F= 4·58, P= 0·0332) or high soluble fibre intakes (F= 7·97, P= 0·0051) had significantly less insulin resistance than their counterparts. Participants with high insoluble fibre intakes did not differ from their counterparts (F= 0·7, P= 0·6875). Adjusting for either PA or BF% weakened the relationships significantly. Controlling for BF% nullified the total fibre–HOMA-IR link (F= 1·96, P= 0·1631) and attenuated the association between soluble fibre and HOMA-IR by 32 % (F= 6·86, P= 0·0094). To create dichotomous variables, fibre intake and HOMA-IR were each divided into two categories using the median (low and high). In women who had high soluble fibre intake (upper 50 %), the OR of having an elevated HOMA-IR level was 0·58 (95 % CI 0·36, 0·94) times that of women with low soluble fibre intake (lower 50 %). After controlling for all of the potential confounding factors simultaneously, the OR was 0·52 (95 % CI 0·29, 0·93). High fibre intake, particularly soluble fibre, is significantly related to lower levels of insulin resistance in women. Part of this association is a function of differences in PA and BF%.

  14. [Management of patients treated for acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction in Tunisia: Preliminary results of FAST-MI Tunisia Registry from Tunisian Society of Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addad, F; Gouider, J; Boughzela, E; Kamoun, S; Boujenah, R; Haouala, H; Gamra, H; Maatouk, F; Ben Khalfallah, A; Kachboura, S; Baccar, H; Ben Halima, N; Guesmi, A; Sayahi, K; Sdiri, W; Neji, A; Bouakez, A; Battikh, K; Chettaoui, R; Mourali, S

    2015-12-01

    FAST-MI Tunisian registry was initiated by the Tunisian Society of Cardiology and Cardio-vascular Surgery to assess characteristics, management, and hospital outcomes in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). We prospectively collected data from 203 consecutive patients (mean age 60.3 years, 79.8 % male) with STEMI who were treated in 15 public hospitals (representing 68.2 % of Tunisian public centres treating STEMI patients) during a 3-month period at the end of 2014. The most common risk factor was tobacco (64.9 %), hypertension (38.6 %), diabetes (36.9 %) and dyslipidemia (24.6 %). Among these patients, 66 % received reperfusion therapy, 35 % with primary percutaneous coronary interventions (PAMI), 31 % with thrombolysis (28.6 % of them by pre-hospital thrombolysis). The median time from symptom onset to thrombolysis was 185 and 358 min for PAMI, respectively. The in-hospital mortality was 7.0 %. Patients enrolled in interventional centers (n=156) were more likely to receive any reperfusion therapy (19.8 % vs 44.6 %; p<0.001) than at the regional system of care with less thrombolysis (26.9 % vs 44.6 %; p=0.008) and more PAMI (52.8 % vs 8.5 %; p<0.0001). Also the in-hospital mortality was lower (6.4 % vs 9.3 %) but not significant. Preliminary results from FAST-MI in Tunisia show that the pharmaco- invasive strategy should be promoted in non-interventional centers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  15. Insulin resistance causes inflammation in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimobayashi, Mitsugu; Albert, Verena; Woelnerhanssen, Bettina; Frei, Irina C; Weissenberger, Diana; Meyer-Gerspach, Anne Christin; Clement, Nicolas; Moes, Suzette; Colombi, Marco; Meier, Jerome A; Swierczynska, Marta M; Jenö, Paul; Beglinger, Christoph; Peterli, Ralph; Hall, Michael N

    2018-03-12

    Obesity is a major risk factor for insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In adipose tissue, obesity-mediated insulin resistance correlates with the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages and inflammation. However, the causal relationship of these events is unclear. Here, we report that obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice precedes macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue. Using a mouse model that combines genetically induced, adipose-specific insulin resistance (mTORC2-knockout) and diet-induced obesity, we found that insulin resistance causes local accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages. Mechanistically, insulin resistance in adipocytes results in production of the chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), which recruits monocytes and activates proinflammatory macrophages. Finally, insulin resistance (high homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) correlated with reduced insulin/mTORC2 signaling and elevated MCP1 production in visceral adipose tissue from obese human subjects. Our findings suggest that insulin resistance in adipose tissue leads to inflammation rather than vice versa.

  16. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose modifies dietary weight loss maintenance success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Due, Anette; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) were studied as diet-specific prognostic markers for successful weight loss maintenance in participants with overweight. METHODS: After losing ≥ 8% of body weight, participants received one of three ad libitum diets for 6...... months: (1) a moderate-fat diet high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA); (2) a low-fat, high-fiber diet (Nordic Nutrition Recommendations [NNR]); and (3) the Average Danish Diet (ADD). Participants were categorized as having low (....12 to -0.43]; P = 0.020). The addition of FI strengthened these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Slightly elevated pretreatment FPG determined success in dietary weight loss maintenance among overweight patients on ad libitum diets differing in macronutrient and fiber content....

  17. Pretreatment fasting plasma glucose modifies dietary weight loss maintenance success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Due, Anette; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and fasting insulin (FI) were studied as diet-specific prognostic markers for successful weight loss maintenance in participants with overweight. METHODS: After losing ≥ 8% of body weight, participants received one of three ad libitum diets for 6.......12 to -0.43]; P = 0.020). The addition of FI strengthened these associations. CONCLUSIONS: Slightly elevated pretreatment FPG determined success in dietary weight loss maintenance among overweight patients on ad libitum diets differing in macronutrient and fiber content....... regained 2.73 kg (95% CI 1.33 to 4.13; P weight regain on NNR compared to ADD (-4.21 kg [95% CI -6.83 to -1.59]; P = 0.002) and MUFA (95% CI -2.77 kg [-5...

  18. GDF15 Is a Novel Biomarker for Impaired Fasting Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hwa Hong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGrowth differentiation factor-15 (GDF15 is a protein that belongs to the transforming growth factor β superfamily. An elevated serum level of GDF15 was found to be associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. T2DM is an inflammatory disease that progresses from normal glucose tolerance (NGT to impaired fasting glucose (IFG. Hence, we aimed to validate the relationship between GDF15 and IFG.MethodsThe participants were divided into the following three groups: NGT (n=137, IFG (n=29, and T2DM (n=75. The controls and T2DM outpatients visited the hospital for routine health check-ups. We used fasting blood glucose to detect IFG in nondiabetic patients. We checked the body mass index (BMI, C-reactive protein level, metabolic parameters, and fasting serum GDF15 level.ResultsAge, BMI, triglyceride, insulin, glucose, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR, and GDF15 levels were elevated in the IFG and T2DM groups compared to the NGT group. In the correlation analysis between metabolic parameters and GDF15, age and HOMA-IR had a significant positive correlation with GDF15 levels. GDF15 significantly discriminated between IFG and NGT, independent of age, BMI, and HOMA-IR. The serum levels of GDF15 were more elevated in men than in women. As a biomarker for IFG based on the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the cutoff value of GDF15 was 510 pg/mL in males and 400 pg/mL in females.ConclusionGDF15 had a positive correlation with IR independent of age and BMI, and the serum level of GDF15 was increased in the IFG and T2DM groups. GDF15 may be a novel biomarker for detecting IFG in nondiabetic patients.

  19. Imprinting of female offspring with testosterone results in insulin resistance and changes in body fat distribution at adult age in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, C; Niklasson, M; Eriksson, E; Björntorp, P; Holmäng, A

    1998-01-01

    In women, a relative hyperandrogenicity is statistically associated with insulin resistance and centralization of body fat, which are predictors for the development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of androgenization of newborn female rats on insulin sensitivity at adult age. To mimic the neonatal androgen peak normally observed in male rats, female pups were administered one high dose of testosterone (T) subcutaneously within 3 h after birth. They were then given back to their mothers and followed to adult age. At the end of the week 9, tail samples were taken, showing no differences in fasting plasma concentrations of glucose, lactate, insulin, or free fatty acids between T-treated rats and controls. Plasma concentrations of T and progesterone were significantly lower in the T-treated rats, whereas no differences were found in the levels of corticosterone, estradiol, insulin-like growth factor I, or ACTH. After 10 wk, insulin sensitivity was studied with hyperglycemic and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (5 mU insulin/kg/min) clamp techniques. The T-treated rats showed insulin resistance with both techniques, which was overcome with time and increasing insulin concentrations during the clamp measurements. The T-treated rats were also heavier and had increased relative weights of skeletal muscles and the spleen. Parametrial, retroperitoneal, and inguinal adipose tissues decreased in weight while mesenteric adipose tissue tended to increase, resulting in an approximately 30-50% larger mesenteric than other adipose tissues. It is concluded that neonatal T imprinting of female rats is followed by insulin resistance, changes in adipose tissue distribution, and an enlarged lean mass, without elevation of circulating T. Similar changes are seen in adult female rats or women receiving T.

  20. Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Gang; Bai, Zhaoshuai; Li, Kaicheng; Yan, Junyan; Li, Fen; Ma, Shuai; Xu, Huibi; Huang, Kaixun

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests a potential pro-diabetic effect of selenite treatment in type 2 diabetics; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here we investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of selenite treatment in a nongenetic mouse model of type 2 diabetes. High-fat diet (HFD)/streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice were orally gavaged with selenite at 0.5 or 2.0 mg/kg body weight/day or vehicle for 4 weeks. High-dose selenite treatment significantly elevated fasting plasma insulin levels and insulin resistance index, in parallel with impaired glucose tolerance, insulin tolerance and pyruvate tolerance. High-dose selenite treatment also attenuated hepatic IRS1/Akt/FoxO1 signaling and pyruvate kinase gene expressions, but elevated the gene expressions of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxyl kinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6Pase), peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and selenoprotein P (SelP) in the liver. Furthermore, high-dose selenite treatment caused significant increases in MDA contents, protein carbonyl contents, and a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio in the liver, concurrent with enhanced ASK1/MKK4/JNK signaling. Taken together, these findings suggest that high-dose selenite treatment exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in mouse model of type 2 diabetes, at least in part through oxidative stress-mediated JNK pathway, providing new mechanistic insights into the pro-diabetic effect of selenite in type 2 diabetes. - Highlights: • Selenite exacerbates hepatic insulin resistance in HFD/STZ-induced diabetic mice. • Selenite elevates hepatic gluconeogenesis and reduces glycolysis in diabetic mice. • Selenite exacerbates hepatic oxidative stress and triggers JNK signaling pathway. • Selenite elevates hepatic selenoprotein P expression in diabetic mice.

  1. Effect of anti-gut inflammatory agent on insulin resistance and lipid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The level of fasting blood glucose, fasting plasma insulin and the curve of glucose tolerance test (GTT) in ... drugs (NSAIDs) show benefits in hyperlipidemia, steatohepatitis and atherosclerosis [11]. In addition .... fasting insulin and (C) GTT of mice fed different diets for 12 weeks. *p < 0.05 vs. LFD; #p < 0.05 vs. LFD 5-ASA.

  2. Systemic metabolic derangement, pulmonary effects, and insulin insufficiency following subchronic ozone exposure in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Desinia B.; Snow, Samantha J.; Henriquez, Andres; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Richards, Judy E.; Andrews, Debora L.; Kodavanti, Urmila P.

    2016-01-01

    Acute ozone exposure induces a classical stress response with elevated circulating stress hormones along with changes in glucose, protein and lipid metabolism in rats, with similar alterations in ozone-exposed humans. These stress-mediated changes over time have been linked to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that acute ozone-induced stress response and metabolic impairment would persist during subchronic episodic exposure and induce peripheral insulin resistance. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were exposed to air or 0.25 ppm or 1.00 ppm ozone, 5 h/day, 3 consecutive days/week (wk) for 13 wks. Pulmonary, metabolic, insulin signaling and stress endpoints were determined immediately after 13 wk or following a 1 wk recovery period (13 wk + 1 wk recovery). We show that episodic ozone exposure is associated with persistent pulmonary injury and inflammation, fasting hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, as well as, elevated circulating adrenaline and cholesterol when measured at 13 wk, however, these responses were largely reversible following a 1 wk recovery. Moreover, the increases noted acutely after ozone exposure in non-esterified fatty acids and branched chain amino acid levels were not apparent following a subchronic exposure. Neither peripheral or tissue specific insulin resistance nor increased hepatic gluconeogenesis were present after subchronic ozone exposure. Instead, long-term ozone exposure lowered circulating insulin and severely impaired glucose-stimulated beta-cell insulin secretion. Thus, our findings in young-adult rats provide potential insights into epidemiological studies that show a positive association between ozone exposures and type 1 diabetes. Ozone-induced beta-cell dysfunction may secondarily contribute to other tissue-specific metabolic alterations following chronic exposure due to impaired regulation of glucose, lipid, and protein metabolism. - Highlights: • Subchronic episodic ozone exposure caused pulmonary and metabolic effects. • These

  3. PKCδ regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity and hepatosteatosis in mice and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bezy, Olivier; Tran, Thien T; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2011-01-01

    C57BL/6J and 129S6/Sv (B6 and 129) mice differ dramatically in their susceptibility to developing diabetes in response to diet- or genetically induced insulin resistance. A major locus contributing to this difference has been mapped to a region on mouse chromosome 14 that contains the gene encodi...... of PKCδ between strains of mice and in obese humans play an important role in the genetic risk of hepatic insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and hepatosteatosis; and thus PKCδ may be a potential target in the treatment of metabolic syndrome....... PKCδ. Here, we found that PKCδ expression in liver was 2-fold higher in B6 versus 129 mice from birth and was further increased in B6 but not 129 mice in response to a high-fat diet. PRKCD gene expression was also elevated in obese humans and was positively correlated with fasting glucose...

  4. Insulin sensitivity in clinically healthy individuals with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Jensen, G

    1996-01-01

    (whole body glucose disposal) was similar in the two groups ((mean (95% C.I.)) 351 (321-381) vs. 364 (339-388) mg/(m2 x min); P = 0.51). Among urinary albumin excretion rate, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations, body mass index waist-hip ratio, fasting concentrations of serum insulin and blood...... glucose, tobacco and alcohol consumption, physical activity, and age and sex, fasting serum insulin concentration was the only variable independently associated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.55; P = 0.0001). It is concluded that microalbuminuria is not associated with impaired insulin sensitivity...

  5. Heterogeneous effects of calorie restriction on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling of individual rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Sequea, Donel A; Castorena, Carlos M; Arias, Edward B; Qi, Nathan R; Cartee, Gregory D

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) (consuming ~60% of ad libitum, AL, intake) improves whole body insulin sensitivity and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by isolated skeletal muscles. However, little is known about CR-effects on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling in muscle. Accordingly, 9-month-old male AL and CR (initiated when 3-months-old) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were studied using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with plasma insulin elevated to a similar level (~140 µU/ml) in each diet group. Glucose uptake (assessed by infusion of [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose, 2-DG), phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, Akt and Akt substrate of 160 kDa, AS160), abundance of GLUT4 and hexokinase proteins, and muscle fiber type composition (myosin heavy chain, MHC, isoform percentages) were determined in four predominantly fast-twitch (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, plantaris) and two predominantly slow-twitch (soleus, adductor longus) muscles. CR did not result in greater GLUT4 or hexokinase abundance in any of the muscles, and there were no significant diet-related effects on percentages of MHC isoforms. Glucose infusion was greater for CR versus AL rats (Pmuscles (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior), without a significant diet-effect on 2-DG uptake by the plantaris or either slow-twitch muscle. Each of the muscles with a CR-related increase in 2-DG uptake was also characterized by significant (Pmuscles without a CR-related increase in glucose uptake, only the soleus had significant (Pmuscles. The results also demonstrated that CR does not uniformly enhance either insulin signaling or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in all muscles in vivo.

  6. Heterogeneous Effects of Calorie Restriction on In Vivo Glucose Uptake and Insulin Signaling of Individual Rat Skeletal Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Sequea, Donel A.; Castorena, Carlos M.; Arias, Edward B.; Qi, Nathan R.; Cartee, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) (consuming ∼60% of ad libitum, AL, intake) improves whole body insulin sensitivity and enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by isolated skeletal muscles. However, little is known about CR-effects on in vivo glucose uptake and insulin signaling in muscle. Accordingly, 9-month-old male AL and CR (initiated when 3-months-old) Fischer 344xBrown Norway rats were studied using a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp with plasma insulin elevated to a similar level (∼140 µU/ml) in each diet group. Glucose uptake (assessed by infusion of [14C]-2-deoxyglucose, 2-DG), phosphorylation of key insulin signaling proteins (insulin receptor, Akt and Akt substrate of 160kDa, AS160), abundance of GLUT4 and hexokinase proteins, and muscle fiber type composition (myosin heavy chain, MHC, isoform percentages) were determined in four predominantly fast-twitch (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, plantaris) and two predominantly slow-twitch (soleus, adductor longus) muscles. CR did not result in greater GLUT4 or hexokinase abundance in any of the muscles, and there were no significant diet-related effects on percentages of MHC isoforms. Glucose infusion was greater for CR versus AL rats (Pmuscles (epitrochlearis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior), without a significant diet-effect on 2-DG uptake by the plantaris or either slow-twitch muscle. Each of the muscles with a CR-related increase in 2-DG uptake was also characterized by significant (Pmuscles without a CR-related increase in glucose uptake, only the soleus had significant (Pmuscles. The results also demonstrated that CR does not uniformly enhance either insulin signaling or insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in all muscles in vivo. PMID:23755179

  7. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  8. Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cani, Patrice D.; Amar, Jacques; Iglesias, Miguel Angel; Poggi, Marjorie; Knauf, Claude; Bastelica, Delphine; Neyrinck, Audrey M.; Fava, Francesca; Tuohy, Kieran; Chabo, Chantal; Waget, Aurélie; Delmée, Evelyne; Cousin, Béatrice; Sulpice, Thierry; Chamontin, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes and obesity are two metabolic diseases characterized by insulin resistance and a low-grade inflammation. Seeking an inflammatory factor causative of the onset of insulin resistance, obesity, and diabetes, we have identified bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a triggering factor. We found that normal endotoxemia increased or decreased during the fed or fasted state, respectively, on a nutritional basis and that a 4-week high-fat diet chronically increased plasma LPS concentration t...

  9. Data Elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-04-29

    Data Elevator: Efficient Asynchronous Data Movement in Hierarchical Storage Systems Multi-layer storage subsystems, including SSD-based burst buffers and disk-based parallel file systems (PFS), are becoming part of HPC systems. However, software for this storage hierarchy is still in its infancy. Applications may have to explicitly move data among the storage layers. We propose Data Elevator for transparently and efficiently moving data between a burst buffer and a PFS. Users specify the final destination for their data, typically on PFS, Data Elevator intercepts the I/O calls, stages data on burst buffer, and then asynchronously transfers the data to their final destination in the background. This system allows extensive optimizations, such as overlapping read and write operations, choosing I/O modes, and aligning buffer boundaries. In tests with large-scale scientific applications, Data Elevator is as much as 4.2X faster than Cray DataWarp, the start-of-art software for burst buffer, and 4X faster than directly writing to PFS. The Data Elevator library uses HDF5's Virtual Object Layer (VOL) for intercepting parallel I/O calls that write data to PFS. The intercepted calls are redirected to the Data Elevator, which provides a handle to write the file in a faster and intermediate burst buffer system. Once the application finishes writing the data to the burst buffer, the Data Elevator job uses HDF5 to move the data to final destination in an asynchronous manner. Hence, using the Data Elevator library is currently useful for applications that call HDF5 for writing data files. Also, the Data Elevator depends on the HDF5 VOL functionality.

  10. Insulin and Breast Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    hypothesis. Int J Cancer i1995; 62:403-6. 45) Kim YI. Diet, lifestyle and colonrectal cancer : Is hyperinsulinemia the missing link? Nutrition Reviews 1999...with colonrectal cancer , another type of cancer whose etiology has been related to impaired fasting glucose and * hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance...and colonrectal cancer : Is hyperinsulinemia the missing link? Nutrition Reviews 1999; 56:275-9. 46) Kaaks R. Nutrition, hormones, and breast cancer : Is

  11. Depressive symptoms and the glucose tolerance test and insulin tolerance test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heninger, G R; Mueller, P S; Davis, L S

    1975-12-01

    Patients with severe depression have been observed previously to have a reduced rate of glucose utilization accompanied by elevated serum insulin levels during the intravenous glucose tolerance test (GTT) and a reduced metabolic responsiveness to exogenous insulin during the insulin tolerance test (ITT). These abnormalities were less obvious in patients with neurotic depression as compared to patients with severe endogenous or "psychotic" depression. To evaluate more fully the relationships of depressive symptomatology to these metabolic abnormalities, patients were rated by nursing staff on a short clinical rating scale (SCRS) and by a psychiatrist on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) at the time the metabolic measurements were made. Patients were given the GTT and the ITT once when they were off medication and symptomatic and then again 3 to 8 weeks later when symptoms had decreased following amitriptyline treatment. Fasting serum-free fatty acid levels (FFA) had a significant positive correlation to rating of anxiety. Fasting levels of glucose, insulin, and human growth hormone (HGH) did not significantly correlate to any of the ratings. A decreased rate of glucose utilization (k) correlated significantly with increased ratings of motor retardation, emotional withdrawal, and blunt affects, but not to other depressive symptoms. The responsiveness of FFA and HGH during the ITT was significantly less in patients with more severe symptomatology; responsiveness improved when those patients improved. Neither incorrelated to the ratings. These data suggest that within the sydrome of depression, increased FFA is realated to anxiety, decreased glucose utilization is related to motor retardation, emotional withdrawal, and blunt affect, and that decreased FFA and HGH responsiveness to insulin is a nonspecific correlate of the general depressive syndrome.

  12. Characterisation of insulin analogues therapeutically available to patients

    KAUST Repository

    Adams, Gary G.

    2018-03-29

    The structure and function of clinical dosage insulin and its analogues were assessed. This included \\'native insulins\\' (human recombinant, bovine, porcine), \\'fast-acting analogues\\' (aspart, glulisine, lispro) and \\'slow-acting analogues\\' (glargine, detemir, degludec). Analytical ultracentrifugation, both sedimentation velocity and equilibrium experiments, were employed to yield distributions of both molar mass and sedimentation coefficient of all nine insulins. Size exclusion chromatography, coupled to multi-angle light scattering, was also used to explore the function of these analogues. On ultracentrifugation analysis, the insulins under investigation were found to be in numerous conformational states, however the majority of insulins were present in a primarily hexameric conformation. This was true for all native insulins and two fast-acting analogues. However, glargine was present as a dimer, detemir was a multi-hexameric system, degludec was a dodecamer (di-hexamer) and glulisine was present as a dimer-hexamer-dihexamer system. However, size-exclusion chromatography showed that the two hexameric fast-acting analogues (aspart and lispro) dissociated into monomers and dimers due to the lack of zinc in the mobile phase. This comprehensive study is the first time all nine insulins have been characterised in this way, the first time that insulin detemir have been studied using analytical ultracentrifugation and the first time that insulins aspart and glulisine have been studied using sedimentation equilibrium. The structure and function of these clinically administered insulins is of critical importance and this research adds novel data to an otherwise complex functional physiological protein.

  13. Ghrelin drives GH secretion during fasting in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Muller (Alex); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); L.J. Hofland (Leo); M. Bidlingmaier (Martin); C.J. Strasburger; E. Ghigo (Ezio); A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: In humans, fasting leads to elevated serum GH concentrations. Traditionally, changes in hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone and somatostatin release are considered as the main mechanisms that induce this elevated GH secretion during fasting. Ghrelin is an

  14. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-05-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references.

  15. The frequent UCP2 -866G>A polymorphism protects against insulin resistance and is associated with obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, G; Dalgaard, L T; Justesen, J M

    2013-01-01

    .894(0.826-0.968) P=0.00562, and AA vs GG OR(95% CI): 0.892(0.800-0.996), P=0.0415. Moreover, a meta-analysis for type 2 diabetes of 15¿107 individuals showed no association. The -866G-allele was associated with elevated fasting serum insulin levels (P=0.002) and HOMA insulin resistance index (P=0.0007). Insulin......CONTEXT:Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is involved in regulating ATP synthesis, generation of reactive oxygen species and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in ß-cells. Polymorphisms in UCP2 may be associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.OBJECTIVE:To determine the influence...... sensitivity measured during intravenous glucose tolerance test in young Caucasian subjects (n=377) was decreased in carriers of the GG genotype (P=0.05).CONCLUSIONS:The UCP2 -866G-allele is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity in Danish subjects and is associated with obesity in a combined meta...

  16. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, U.; Lustenberger, M.; Mueller-Brand, J.G.; Gerber, P.P.; Stauffacher, W.

    1989-01-01

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references

  17. C peptide and insulin releasing RIA test for the investigation of β cell function in diabetic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Ailan; Zhu Chengmo; Wang Qiyu; Wang Ping

    1993-01-01

    Results of C-peptide releasing RIA test in 15 normals, and 100 diabetes were summarized and compared with glucose tolerance test and serum insulin for investigating the characteristics in different types of diabetes and evaluating the functional state of islet β cell. In 36 cases of IDDM the fasting blood sugar was significantly increased, and further elevated after eating of bread, but its peak time delay in 2 hours (normalin 1 hour). The level of basal C-peptide is very low, but shows slightly weak on no response after bread stimulating test, all of this denotes that β cell function of islets severely injured. The increasing of fasting blood sugar in 64 cases of NIDDM was lower than those of IDDM. Fasting C-peptide and insulin was normal or increased, their peak value increased after bread stimulation with peak time delayed also at 2 hours. Above results demonstrated that the function of islets B cell decreased but not fully deprived. It is concluded that C-peptide and insulin stimulating test, together with OGTT can accurately assess the islets β cell function, and also have important significance in the pathogenesis, classification and staging, prognostic evaluation and monitoring of therapeutic effects in diabetes

  18. Insulin Human Inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin inhalation is used in combination with a long-acting insulin to treat type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not produce insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar ...

  19. Combined Usage of TanDEM-X and CryoSat-2 for Generating a High Resolution Digital Elevation Model of Fast Moving Ice Stream and Its Application in Grounding Line Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hee Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Definite surface topography of ice provides fundamental information for most glaciologists to study climate change. However, the topography at the marginal region of ice sheets exhibits noticeable dynamical changes from fast flow velocity and large thinning rates; thus, it is difficult to determine instantaneous topography. In this study, the surface topography of the marginal region of Thwaites Glacier in the Amundsen Sector of West Antarctica, where ice melting and thinning are prevailing, is extracted using TanDEM-X interferometry in combination with data from the near-coincident CryoSat-2 radar altimeter. The absolute height offset, which has been a persistent problem in applying the interferometry technique for generating DEMs, is determined by linear least-squares fitting between the uncorrected TanDEM-X heights and reliable reference heights from CryoSat-2. The reliable heights are rigorously selected at locations of high normalized cross-correlation and low RMS heights between segments of data points. The generated digital elevation model with the resolved absolute height offset is assessed with airborne laser altimeter data from the Operation IceBridge that were acquired five months after TanDEM-X and show high correlation with biases of 3.19 m and −4.31 m at the grounding zone and over the ice sheet surface, respectively. For practical application of the generated DEM, grounding line estimation assuming hydrostatic equilibrium was carried out, and the feasibility was seen through comparison with the previous grounding line. Finally, it is expected that the combination of interferometry and altimetery with similar datasets can be applied at regions even with a lack of ground control points.

  20. Monocular Elevation Deficiency - Double Elevator Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Monocular Elevation Deficiency/ Double Elevator Palsy En Español Read in Chinese What is monocular elevation deficiency (Double Elevator Palsy)? Monocular Elevation Deficiency, also known by the ...

  1. Concentrated insulins: the new basal insulins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamos EM

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth M Lamos,1 Lisa M Younk,2 Stephen N Davis3 1Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, 2Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA Introduction: Insulin therapy plays a critical role in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, there is still a need to find basal insulins with 24-hour coverage and reduced risk of hypoglycemia. Additionally, with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, the ability to provide clinically necessary high doses of insulin at low volume is also needed. Areas covered: This review highlights the published reports of the pharmacokinetic (PK and glucodynamic properties of concentrated insulins: Humulin-R U500, insulin degludec U200, and insulin glargine U300, describes the clinical efficacy, risk of hypoglycemic, and metabolic changes observed, and finally, discusses observations about the complexity of introducing a new generation of concentrated insulins to the therapeutic market. Conclusion: Humulin-R U500 has a similar onset but longer duration of action compared with U100 regular insulin. Insulin glargine U300 has differential PK/pharmacodynamic effects when compared with insulin glargine U100. In noninferiority studies, glycemic control with degludec U200 and glargine U300 is similar to insulin glargine U100 and nocturnal hypoglycemia is reduced. Concentrated formulations appear to behave as separate molecular entities when compared with earlier U100 insulin analog compounds. In the review of available published data, newer concentrated basal insulins may offer an advantage in terms of reduced intraindividual variability as well as reducing the injection burden in individuals requiring high-dose and large volume insulin therapy. Understanding the PK and pharmacodynamic properties of this new generation of insulins is critical to safe dosing, dispensing, and administration

  2. Circulating ApoJ is closely associated with insulin resistance in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji A; Kang, Min-Cheol; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Kim, Sang Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Choe, Charles; Hwang, Won Min; Lim, Dong Mee; Farr, Olivia; Mantzoros, Christos; Henry, Robert R; Kim, Young-Bum

    2018-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. ApolipoproteinJ (ApoJ) has been implicated in altered pathophysiologic states including cardiovascular and Alzheimer's disease. However, the function of ApoJ in regulation of glucose homeostasis remains unclear. This study sought to determine whether serum ApoJ levels are associated with insulin resistance in human subjects and if they change after interventions that improve insulin sensitivity. Serum ApoJ levels and insulin resistance status were assessed in nondiabetic (ND) and type 2 diabetic (T2D) subjects. The impacts of rosiglitazone or metformin therapy on serum ApoJ levels and glucose disposal rate (GDR) during a hyperinsulinemic/euglycemic clamp were evaluated in a separate cohort of T2D subjects. Total ApoJ protein or that associated with the HDL and LDL fractions was measured by immunoblotting or ELISA. Fasting serum ApoJ levels were greatly elevated in T2D subjects (ND vs T2D; 100±8.3 vs. 150.6±8.5AU, Pinsulin, HOMA-IR, and BMI. ApoJ levels were significantly and independently associated with HOMA-IR, even after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI. Rosiglitazone treatment in T2D subjects resulted in a reduction in serum ApoJ levels (before vs. after treatment; 100±13.9 vs. 77±15.2AU, P=0.015), whereas metformin had no effect on ApoJ levels. The change in ApoJ levels during treatment was inversely associated with the change in GDR. Interestingly, ApoJ content in the LDL fraction was inversely associated with HOMA-IR. Serum ApoJ levels are closely correlated with the magnitude of insulin resistance regardless of obesity, and decrease along with improvement of insulin resistance in response only to rosiglitazone in type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical utility of insulin and insulin analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanlioglu, Ahter D.; Altunbas, Hasan Ali; Balci, Mustafa Kemal; Griffith, Thomas S.; Sanlioglu, Salih

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is a pandemic disease characterized by autoimmune, genetic and metabolic abnormalities. While insulin deficiency manifested as hyperglycemia is a common sequel of both Type-1 and Type-2 diabetes (T1DM and T2DM), it does not result from a single genetic defect—rather insulin deficiency results from the functional loss of pancreatic β cells due to multifactorial mechanisms. Since pancreatic β cells of patients with T1DM are destroyed by autoimmune reaction, these patients require daily insulin injections. Insulin resistance followed by β cell dysfunction and β cell loss is the characteristics of T2DM. Therefore, most patients with T2DM will require insulin treatment due to eventual loss of insulin secretion. Despite the evidence of early insulin treatment lowering macrovascular (coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke) and microvascular (diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy and retinopathy) complications of T2DM, controversy exists among physicians on how to initiate and intensify insulin therapy. The slow acting nature of regular human insulin makes its use ineffective in counteracting postprandial hyperglycemia. Instead, recombinant insulin analogs have been generated with a variable degree of specificity and action. Due to the metabolic variability among individuals, optimum blood glucose management is a formidable task to accomplish despite the presence of novel insulin analogs. In this article, we present a recent update on insulin analog structure and function with an overview of the evidence on the various insulin regimens clinically used to treat diabetes. PMID:23584214

  4. [Insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: relationship with anthropometric and biochemical variables].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Ana Gabriela; Rehme, Marta Francis Benevides; Martins, Anice Maria Vieira de Camargo; Micussi, Maria Thereza Albuquerque Barbosa Cabral; Maranhão, Técia Maria de Oliveira; Pimenta, Walkyria de Paula; Pontes, Anaglória

    2012-02-01

    To analyze the prevalence of insulin resistance, according to different biochemical and anthropometric measurements in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. A total of 189 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome were retrospectively analyzed. Insulin resistance diagnosis was performed using fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, QUICKI, insulin sensibility index and glucose/fasting insulin ratio. Body mass index and lipid accumulation product were used. Data were analyzed statistically by descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Tukey post-test, and Pearson's correlation. The polycystic ovary syndrome patients had a mean age of 24.9 ± 5.2 and a mean body mass index of 31.8 ± 7.6. The percentage of obese patients was 57.14%. Among the methods of insulin resistance investigation, the insulin sensibility index was the technique that most detected (56.4%) the presence of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The insulin resistance was detected in 87% of obese patients. The fasting glucose/fasting insulin ratio and insulin sensibility index were strongly correlated with lipid accumulation product. The prevalence of insulin resistance varied according to the method used, and it was greater the higher the body mass index. Lipid accumulation product was also related to insulin resistance.

  5. Association Between Free Fatty Acid (FFA and Insulin Resistance: The Role of Inflammation (Adiponectin and high sensivity C-reactive Protein/hs-CRP and Stress Oxidative (Superoxide Dismutase/SOD in Obese Non-Diabetic Individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indriyanti Rafi Sukmawati

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is highly related to insulin resistance, therefore, the increased number of obesity is followed by the increased prevalence of type 2 Diabetes Melitus. Obesity is associated with increased of reactive oxygen species (ROS in muscle, liver and endothelial cells. The increase of ROS would lead to insulin resistance (IR and increased pro-inflammatory protein. FFA plays an important role in IR by inhibiting muscle glucose transport and oxidation via effects on serine/threonine phosphorylation of IRS-1. The aim of this study was discover the existence of SOD, hs-CRP and and adiponectin levels towards the occurrence of insulin resistance which was caused by elevated level of FFA and to discover the interaction between SOD, hs-CRP and adiponectin in non diabetic obese adult male. METHODS: This was observational study with cross sectional design. There were 65 obese male non diabetic subjects and 45 non obese male non diabetic subjects who met the criteria. In this study, measurements were done on body mass index (BMI, fasting glucose, insulin, adiponectin, hs-CRP and SOD. Obese was defined as BMI >25 kg/m2, normal weight was defined as BMI 18.5-23 kh/m2 and Insulin Resistance was defined as HOMA-IR >1. RESULTS: This study showed that Hypoadiponectinemia condition, decreased SOD level and high level of hs-CRP is associated with insulin resistance in obese non diabetic subject. Adiponectin and SOD were correlated negatively with insulin resistance in obese non diabetic (Adiponectin, r=-0.455, p<0.001; SOD, r=-0.262, p=0.003, hs-CRP was positively correlated with insulin resistance in obese non diabetic (r=0.592, p<0.001. FFA levels was increased in obese insulin resistance compared with non obese non insulin resistance. The Odds Ratio of Adiponectin, hs-CRP and SOD in this study was analyzed by logistic binary. The OR for SOD 3.6 (p=0.001, hs-CRP 9.1 (p<0.001 and Adiponectin 7.2 (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggested that FFA

  6. Physical activity, eating patterns, and insulin resistance in obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Emy Huriyati; Perdana Samekto Nugroho; Rina Susilowaty; Madarina Julia

    2014-01-01

    Background Unhealthy eating patterns and physical inactivity are associated with obesity. Insulin resistance, an early sign of type 2 diabetes mellitus, is common in obese individuals. Objective To assess for an association between physical activity and eating patterns to insulin resistance in obese female adolescents. Methods Subjects were 77 obese female adolescents aged 13-15 years. Peripheral blood specimens were obtained for measurements of fasting blood glucose, insulin, and the...

  7. Genome-wide association study of the modified Stumvoll Insulin Sensitivity Index identifies BCL2 and FAM19A2 as novel insulin sensitivity loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walford, Geoffrey A; Gustafsson, Stefan; Rybin, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found few common variants that influence fasting measures of insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a GWAS of an integrated assessment of fasting and dynamic measures of insulin sensitivity would detect novel common variants. We performed GWAS of the...

  8. The diagnosis of equine insulin dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, F R; de Laat, M A

    2017-09-01

    Insulin dysregulation is the hallmark of equine metabolic syndrome and has received attention because of its direct association with laminitis. In the absence of an adequate treatment for laminitis, a focus on prophylaxis is needed, making early detection of individuals at risk of developing laminitis one of the main challenges in equine endocrinology. Recent studies have shown that insulin dysregulation goes beyond tissue insulin resistance and it is now demonstrated that the equine enteroinsular axis plays a major role in insulin secretion and equine hyperinsulinaemia. In this review, we discuss the different tests currently available to diagnose insulin dysregulation in horses: the ones investigating tissue insulin resistance and those investigating the enteroinsular axis, detailing their goals, practicalities and limitations. This review supports the contention that the diagnosis of equine insulin dysregulation should now be based on the investigation of both tissue insulin resistance and the equine enteroinsular axis. Regardless of the tests used many factors of variation, such as breed, diet, fasting state or season, have been identified and could potentially confound the results of a specific test. Therefore, careful interpretation of the results of a given test in each individual situation is required to optimise the detection of horses at risk of laminitis. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  9. Ratiometric measurements of adiponectin by mass spectrometry in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus with iron overload reveal an association with insulin resistance and glucagon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Neely

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available High molecular weight (HMW adiponectin levels are reduced in humans with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Similar to humans with insulin resistance, managed bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus diagnosed with hemochromatosis (iron overload have higher levels of 2 h post-prandial plasma insulin than healthy controls. A parallel reaction monitoring assay for dolphin serum adiponectin was developed based on tryptic peptides identified by mass spectrometry. Using identified post-translational modifications, a differential measurement was constructed. Total and unmodified adiponectin levels were measured in sera from dolphins with (n=4 and without (n=5 iron overload. This measurement yielded total adiponectin levels as well as site specific percent unmodified adiponectin that may inversely correlate with HMW adiponectin. Differences in insulin levels between iron overload cases and controls were observed 2 h post-prandial, but not during the fasting state. Thus, post-prandial as well as fasting serum adiponectin levels were measured to determine whether adiponectin and insulin would follow similar patterns. There was no difference in total adiponectin or percent unmodified adiponectin from case or control fasting animals. There was no difference in post-prandial total adiponectin levels between case and control dolphins (mean ± S.D. at 763 ± 298 and 727 ± 291 pmol/ml, respectively (p = 0.91; however, percent unmodified adiponectin was significantly higher in post-prandial cases compared controls (30.0 ± 6.3 versus 17.0 ± 6.6%, respectively; p = 0.016. Interestingly, both total and percent unmodified adiponectin were correlated with glucagon levels in controls (r = 0.999, p < 0.001, but not in cases, which is possibly a reflection of insulin resistance. Although total adiponectin levels were not significantly different, the elevated percent unmodified adiponectin follows a trend similar to HMW adiponectin reported for humans with

  10. Degludec insulin: A novel basal insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Kalra, Sanjay; Unnikrishnan, Ambika Gopalakrishnan; Baruah, Manash; Kalra, Bharti

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews a novel insulin analogue, degludec, which has the potential to emerge as an ideal basal insulin. It reviews the limitations of existing basal insulin and analogues, and highlights the need for a newer molecule. The paper discusses the potential advantages of degludec, while reviewing its pharmacologic and clinical studies done so far. The paper assesses the potential role of insulin degludec and degludec plus in clinical diabetes practice.

  11. Delineation of molecular pathways that regulate hepatic PCSK9 and LDL receptor expression during fasting in normolipidemic hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minhao; Dong, Bin; Cao, Aiqin; Li, Hai; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Background PCSK9 has emerged as a key regulator of serum LDL-C metabolism by promoting the degradation of hepatic LDL receptor (LDLR). In this study, we investigated the effect of fasting on serum PCSK9, LDL-C, and hepatic LDLR expression in hamsters and further delineated the molecular pathways involved in fasting-induced repression of PCSK9 transcription. Results Fasting had insignificant effects on serum total cholesterol and HDL-C levels, but reduced LDL-C, triglyceride and insulin levels. The decrease in serum LDL-C was accompanied by marked reductions of hepatic PCSK9 mRNA and serum PCSK9 protein levels with concomitant increases of hepatic LDLR protein amounts. Fasting produced a profound impact on SREBP1 expression and its transactivating activity, while having modest effects on mRNA expressions of SREBP2 target genes in hamster liver. Although PPARα mRNA levels in hamster liver were elevated by fasting, ligand-induced activation of PPARα with WY14643 compound in hamster primary hepatocytes did not affect PCSK9 mRNA or protein expressions. Further investigation on HNF1α, a critical transactivator of PCSK9, revealed that fasting did not alter its mRNA expression, however, the protein abundance of HNF1α in nuclear extracts of hamster liver was markedly reduced by prolonged fasting. Conclusion Fasting lowered serum LDL-C in hamsters by increasing hepatic LDLR protein amounts via reductions of serum PCSK9 levels. Importantly, our results suggest that attenuation of SREBP1 transactivating activity owing to decreased insulin levels during fasting is primarily responsible for compromised PCSK9 gene transcription, which was further suppressed after prolonged fasting by a reduction of nuclear HNF1α protein abundance. PMID:22954675

  12. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension | Akande ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) was used to determine insulin resistance (IR). Results: The hypertensive subjects had significantly higher fasting insulin and HOMA-IR compared with normotensives (p =0.02 and 0.04) respectively. There were significant correlations between HOMA-IR, BMI, waist and hip ...

  13. Application of insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin release test in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Dong; Ma Yongxiu; Duan Wenruo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin release test (IRT) in understanding the extent of damage to ability of reducing blood sugar in different types of diabetes mellitus (DM) and in selection of treatment plan and adjustment of using drugs. OGTT, IRT and determination of IGF-I level of 67 normal subjects and 217 DM patients were performed. The result was analyzed comparatively. The level of IGF-I was negatively correlated with the level of fasting blood sugar, and positively correlated with the level of fasting insulin. Our conclusions are: There are two ways of reducing blood sugar: one is by insulin, and the other is by IGF-I. IRT can reflect the former better, and IGF-I the latter. The combination of these two is of significant value in diagnosis and treatment of DM

  14. The Mediterranean diet improves hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Marno C; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Thodis, Tania; Ward, Glenn; Trost, Nicholas; Hofferberth, Sophie; O'Dea, Kerin; Desmond, Paul V; Johnson, Nathan A; Wilson, Andrew M

    2013-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to 30% of the population and signifies increased risk of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Therapies are limited. Weight loss is of benefit but is difficult to maintain. We aimed at examining the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MD), a diet high in monounsaturated fatty acids, on steatosis and insulin sensitivity, using gold standard techniques. Twelve non-diabetic subjects (6 Females/6 Males) with biopsy-proven NAFLD were recruited for a randomised, cross-over 6-week dietary intervention study. All subjects undertook both the MD and a control diet, a low fat-high carbohydrate diet (LF/HCD), in random order with a 6-week wash-out period in- between. Insulin sensitivity was determined with a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study and hepatic steatosis was assessed with localized magnetic resonance (1)H spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). At baseline, subjects were abdominally obese with elevated fasting concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, ALT, and GGT. Insulin sensitivity at baseline was low (M=2.7 ± 1.0 mg/kg/min(-1)). Mean weight loss was not different between the two diets (p=0.22). There was a significant relative reduction in hepatic steatosis after the MD compared with the LF/HCD: 39 ± 4% versus 7 ± 3%, as measured by (1)H-MRS (p=0.012). Insulin sensitivity improved with the MD, whereas after the LF/HCD there was no change (p=0.03 between diets). Even without weight loss, MD reduces liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in an insulin-resistant population with NAFLD, compared to current dietary advice. This diet should be further investigated in subjects with NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of mealtime insulin aspart and bedtime NPH insulin on postprandial coagulation and fibrinolysis in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Henriksen, Je; Akram, S

    2012-01-01

    and Methods: This was tested in a parallel controlled study in well-controlled patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to bedtime NPH insulin (n=41) or mealtime insulin aspart (n=37). They were served standard diabetic meals for breakfast (8:00) and lunch (12:00). Blood samples were collected at 7:40 (fasting...

  16. High normal HbA(1c) levels were associated with impaired insulin secretion without escalating insulin resistance in Japanese individuals: the Toranomon Hospital Health Management Center Study 8 (TOPICS 8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heianza, Y; Arase, Y; Fujihara, K; Tsuji, H; Saito, K; Hsieh, S D; Kodama, S; Shimano, H; Yamada, N; Hara, S; Sone, H

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to characterize the association of insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion and β-cell dysfunction in relation to HbA(1c) levels in a non-diabetic range in Japanese individuals without clinically diagnosed diabetes. This cross-sectional study included 1444 individuals without a history of outpatient treatment of diabetes or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic agents. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and beta-cell function, insulinogenic index, Matsuda index and disposition index were calculated using data from 75-g oral glucose tolerance tests and compared across quintile (Q) categories of HbA(1c) levels. Fasting plasma glucose and 30-min and 60-min plasma glucose (PG) levels were significantly higher when HbA(1c) exceeded 36 mmol/mol (5.4%). A HbA(1c) concentration of 36-37 mmol/mol (5.4-5.5%) (Q3) was significantly associated with a 15% lower homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function value and 31% lower insulinogenic index value compared with HbA(1c) ≤ 32 mmol/mol (≤ 5.1%) (Q1) (P insulin resistance was not significantly elevated and the Matsuda index was not significantly lower unless HbA(1c) exceeded 41 mmol/mol (5.9%). Individuals with HbA(1c) ≥ 41 mmol/mol (≥ 5.9%) (Q5) had a 69% lower disposition index than those with a HbA(1c) concentration of ≤ 32 mmol/mol (≤ 5.1%) (Q1). Elevated HbA(1c) levels ≥ 41 mmol/mol (≥ 5.9%) were associated with substantial reductions in insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity and β-cell dysfunction in Japanese individuals not treated for diabetes. High normal HbA(1c) levels of 36-40 mmol/mol (5.4-5.8%) were also associated with impaired insulin secretion without marked insulin resistance in Japanese individuals. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  17. Studies of insulin resistance in congenital generalized lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søvik, O; Vestergaard, H; Trygstad, O

    1996-01-01

    not occur. In both patients there was severely increased hepatic glucose output in the basal state, suggesting a failure of insulin to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis. During insulin infusion a substantially elevated rate of lipid oxidation remained in the patients, in contrast to the almost completely...

  18. Insulin resistance, blood glucose and inflammatory cytokine levels are risk factors for cardiovascular events in diabetic patients complicated with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changmei; Li, Fang; Guo, Jingjing; Li, Congcong; Xu, Dashuai; Wang, Bin

    2018-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the relation of insulin resistance, blood glucose and inflammatory cytokines with cardiovascular events in diabetic patients complicated with coronary heart disease (CHD). A total of 120 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM) complicated with CHD admitted to Jinan Central Hospital from January 2015 to March 2016 were enrolled in this study. There were 60 cases complicated with cardiovascular events and 60 had no history of cardiovascular events; there were 40 cases with abnormal blood glucose, 40 with insulin resistance and 40 with elevated inflammatory cytokines. Changes in the levels of blood glucose, fasting serum insulin and inflammatory cytokines as well as changes in the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance indexes (HOMA-IR) were recorded and compared among groups of patients. Besides, changes in the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk score and the incidence rate of cardiovascular events were also detected and multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted so as to identify relevant risk factors. Our results showed the fasting blood glucose and the 2 h postprandial blood glucose levels in the non-cardiovascular event group were lower than those in the cardiovascular event group (Pcardiovascular event group were significantly higher than those in the cardiovascular event group (Pcardiovascular event group were significantly lower than those in the cardiovascular event group (Prisk scores in patients with elevated inflammatory cytokines were higher than those in patients with insulin resistance and those in patients with blood glucose abnormalities (Pcardiovascular events in patients with blood glucose abnormalities was lower than that in patients with insulin resistance and that in patients with elevated inflammatory cytokines. There was a positive correlation between TNF-α and HOMA-IR (Prisk score (Prisk factors for cardiovascular events. Based on our findings, stronger

  19. Insulin resistance in obese pre-pubertal children: Relation to body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heba Elsedfy

    2014-04-16

    Apr 16, 2014 ... and DXA scan for body composition. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), fasting glucose to insulin ratio, Matsuda, and. Cederholm indices. Results: All patients had BMI, waist circumference, and DXA trunk fat more than 2 SDS. Mean.

  20. Insulin Biosynthetic Interaction Network Component, TMEM24, Facilitates Insulin Reserve Pool Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Pottekat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin homeostasis in pancreatic β cells is now recognized as a critical element in the progression of obesity and type II diabetes (T2D. Proteins that interact with insulin to direct its sequential synthesis, folding, trafficking, and packaging into reserve granules in order to manage release in response to elevated glucose remain largely unknown. Using a conformation-based approach combined with mass spectrometry, we have generated the insulin biosynthetic interaction network (insulin BIN, a proteomic roadmap in the β cell that describes the sequential interacting partners of insulin along the secretory axis. The insulin BIN revealed an abundant C2 domain-containing transmembrane protein 24 (TMEM24 that manages glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from a reserve pool of granules, a critical event impaired in patients with T2D. The identification of TMEM24 in the context of a comprehensive set of sequential insulin-binding partners provides a molecular description of the insulin secretory pathway in β cells.

  1. Rab5 Activity Regulates GLUT4 Sorting Into Insulin-Responsive and Non-Insulin-Responsive Endosomal Compartments: A Potential Mechanism for Development of Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessneer, Kandice L.; Jackson, Robert M.; Griesel, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4) is the insulin-responsive glucose transporter mediating glucose uptake in adipose and skeletal muscle. Reduced GLUT4 translocation from intracellular storage compartments to the plasma membrane is a cause of peripheral insulin resistance. Using a chronic hyperinsulinemia (CHI)-induced cell model of insulin resistance and Rab5 mutant overexpression, we determined these manipulations altered endosomal sorting of GLUT4, thus contributing to the development of insulin resistance. We found that CHI induced insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by retaining GLUT4 in a Rab5-activity-dependent compartment that is unable to equilibrate with the cell surface in response to insulin. Furthermore, CHI-mediated retention of GLUT4 in this non-insulin-responsive compartment impaired filling of the transferrin receptor (TfR)-positive and TfR-negative insulin-responsive storage compartments. Our data suggest that hyperinsulinemia may inhibit GLUT4 by chronically maintaining GLUT4 in the Rab5 activity-dependent endosomal pathway and impairing formation of the TfR-negative and TfR-positive insulin-responsive GLUT4 pools. This model suggests that an early event in the development of insulin-resistant glucose transport in adipose tissue is to alter the intracellular localization of GLUT4 to a compartment that does not efficiently equilibrate with the cell surface when insulin levels are elevated for prolonged periods of time. PMID:24932807

  2. [Adverse reactions to insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liñana, J J; Montoro, F J; Hernández, M D; Basomba, A

    1997-07-01

    The prevalence of allergic reactions to insuline has decreased during the last few years. Probably this is due to the use of the newly-developed recombinant human insuline. At present, adverse reactions to insuline occur in 5-10% of patients on therapy with insuline. Adverse reactions may be local (more frequent) or systemic (rare). Insuline resistance consists in a different type of immunological reaction. Diagnosis of allergy to insuline is based on clinical history and cutaneous and serological tests. Treatment depends upon the severity of the reaction. When insuline is indispensable despite a previous allergic reaction, a desensitization protocol may be implemented.

  3. Endothelial Fcγ Receptor IIB Activation Blunts Insulin Delivery to Skeletal Muscle to Cause Insulin Resistance in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Chambliss, Ken L.; Yuhanna, Ivan S.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Ahmed, Mohamed; Atochin, Dmitriy N.; Huang, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Modest elevations in C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with type 2 diabetes. We previously revealed in mice that increased CRP causes insulin resistance and mice globally deficient in the CRP receptor Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB) were protected from the disorder. FcγRIIB is expressed in numerous cell types including endothelium and B lymphocytes. Here we investigated how endothelial FcγRIIB influences glucose homeostasis, using mice with elevated CRP expressing or lacking endothelial FcγRIIB. Whereas increased CRP caused insulin resistance in mice expressing endothelial FcγRIIB, mice deficient in the endothelial receptor were protected. The insulin resistance with endothelial FcγRIIB activation was due to impaired skeletal muscle glucose uptake caused by attenuated insulin delivery, and it was associated with blunted endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation in skeletal muscle. In culture, CRP suppressed endothelial cell insulin transcytosis via FcγRIIB activation and eNOS antagonism. Furthermore, in knock-in mice harboring constitutively active eNOS, elevated CRP did not invoke insulin resistance. Collectively these findings reveal that by inhibiting eNOS, endothelial FcγRIIB activation by CRP blunts insulin delivery to skeletal muscle to cause insulin resistance. Thus, a series of mechanisms in endothelium that impairs insulin movement has been identified that may contribute to type 2 diabetes pathogenesis. PMID:27207525

  4. Review of clinical trials: update on oral insulin spray formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzilli, Paolo; Raskin, Philip; Parkin, Christopher G

    2010-02-01

    Large clinical trials have shown that improving glycaemic control significantly reduces the risk of long-term microvascular complications in type 1 (T1DM) and type 2 (T2DM) diabetes. Achieving optimal glycaemic control often requires the use of multiple daily insulin injections. Current approaches to insulin administration are less than optimal; many T2DM patients view insulin therapy as inconvenient and uncomfortable and may delay starting insulin therapy because of this. A new oral insulin spray formulation and delivery system provides an alternative to injectable and inhaled insulin. The system allows a liquid oral spray insulin formulation to be delivered into the mouth via an aerosolized spray. The oral insulin spray is a tasteless liquid aerosol mist formulation that is administered to the buccal mucosa using a proprietary delivery system. The active pharmaceutical ingredient is recombinant human insulin; however, the formulation behaves in a fashion more similar to the synthetic fast-acting insulin analogues. In clinical studies of healthy subjects and subjects with T1DM and T2DM, investigators have shown that the oral insulin spray was absorbed in direct relation to the amount given and had a faster onset and a shorter duration of action when compared with regular insulin given subcutaneously. In all of the studies conducted, the oral insulin spray was generally well tolerated. Some healthy individuals and subjects with T1DM experienced transient (1-2 min) mild dizziness during dosing; these symptoms were mild and self-limited. No changes in vital signs, laboratory values or physical examination results were noted. The ease of use of the insulin spray formulation may increase patient acceptance and treatment compliance, thereby potentially reducing complications and improving quality of life for patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. This article provides an overview of the safety profile and proposed mechanism of action of this insulin formulation and

  5. Insulin causes insulin-receptor internalization in human erythrocyte ghosts.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelleher, R S; Murray, E F; Peterson, S W

    1987-01-01

    The effect of incubation with insulin on insulin-receptor internalization by erythrocyte ghosts was investigated. The number of surface insulin receptors decreased by 30-40% after incubation of ghosts with insulin. Total insulin-receptor binding to solubilized ghosts was the same in insulin-incubated and control ghosts, whereas insulin binding to an internal vesicular fraction was substantially increased in insulin-incubated ghosts. Our findings suggest that erythrocyte-ghost insulin receptor...

  6. Effect of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Mouhamed, D; Ezzaher, A; Neffati, F; Douki, W; Gaha, L; Najjar, M F

    2016-02-01

    Smoking is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The mechanism(s) of the effects of smoking on CVD are not clearly understood; however, a number of atherogenic characteristics, such as insulin resistance have been reported. We aim to investigate the effects of cigarette smoking on insulin resistance and to determine the correlation between this parameter with smoking status characteristics. This study was conducted on 138 non-smokers and 162 smokers aged respectively 35.6±16.0 and 38.5±21.9 years. All subjects are not diabetic. Fasting glucose was determined by enzymatic methods and insulin by chemiluminescence method. Insulin resistance (IR) was estimated using the Homeostasis Model of Assessment equation: HOMA-IR=[fasting insulin (mU/L)×fasting glucose (mmol/L)]/22.5. IR was defined as the upper quartile of HOMA-IR. Values above 2.5 were taken as abnormal and reflect insulin resistance. Compared to non-smokers, smokers had significantly higher levels of fasting glucose, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR index. These associations remained significant after adjustment for confounding factors (age, gender, BMI and alcohol consumption). A statistically significant association was noted between the smoking status parameters, including both the number of cigarettes smoked/day and the duration of smoking, and fasting insulin levels as well for HOMA-IR index. Among smokers, we noted a positive correlation between HOMA-IR index and both plasma thiocyanates and urinary cotinine. Our results show that smokers have a high risk to developing an insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, compared with a matched group of non-smokers, and may help to explain the high risk of cardiovascular diseases in smokers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Circulating interleukin-6 in relation to adiposity, insulin action, and insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, B; Weyer, C; Hanson, K

    2001-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine produced and released in part by adipose tissue, are elevated in people with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Because recent studies suggest that markers of inflammation predict the development of type 2 diabetes, we examined w...... whether circulating plasma IL-6 concentrations were related to direct measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretory dysfunction in Pima Indians, a population with high rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes....

  8. Changes in erythrocyte insulin receptors in normal dogs and keeshond dogs with inheritable, early onset, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaassen, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Validation of a procedure to evaluate insulin receptors on erythrocytes (RBC-IR) in dogs is described. The specific binding of (/sup 125/I)iodoinsulin to RBC-IR of normal dogs is significantly greater than binding in keeshonds with an inheritable form of early onset diabetes mellitus. This decreased binding was due to a significant decrease in RBC-IR affinity in the diabetic keeshonds. To determine the effect on RBC-IR, normal dogs were treated with either dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or prednisone (0.3 mg/kg) for 10 days: concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin, plus binding characteristics of RBC-IR were determined. In the dexamethasone treated group, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 6 and continued through day 10. Insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3 and remained elevated through day 10. In the prednisone treated group, glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3, while insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 8. Maximum binding of RBC-IR was unaffected by prednisone and neither affinities nor receptor numbers were significantly different from day 1. No changes in plasma cortisol concentration were seen. Diabetic keeshonds on daily insulin treatment were removed from exogenous insulin therapy for 48 hours. Significant increases in glucose concentrations were observed, but no significant changes in cortisol, insulin, average receptor binding affinity, or RBC-IR number per cell occurred.

  9. Changes in erythrocyte insulin receptors in normal dogs and keeshond dogs with inheritable, early onset, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaassen, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Validation of a procedure to evaluate insulin receptors on erythrocytes (RBC-IR) in dogs is described. The specific binding of ( 125 I)iodoinsulin to RBC-IR of normal dogs is significantly greater than binding in keeshonds with an inheritable form of early onset diabetes mellitus. This decreased binding was due to a significant decrease in RBC-IR affinity in the diabetic keeshonds. To determine the effect on RBC-IR, normal dogs were treated with either dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg) or prednisone (0.3 mg/kg) for 10 days: concentrations of plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin, plus binding characteristics of RBC-IR were determined. In the dexamethasone treated group, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 6 and continued through day 10. Insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3 and remained elevated through day 10. In the prednisone treated group, glucose concentrations were elevated significantly by day 3, while insulin concentrations were elevated significantly by day 8. Maximum binding of RBC-IR was unaffected by prednisone and neither affinities nor receptor numbers were significantly different from day 1. No changes in plasma cortisol concentration were seen. Diabetic keeshonds on daily insulin treatment were removed from exogenous insulin therapy for 48 hours. Significant increases in glucose concentrations were observed, but no significant changes in cortisol, insulin, average receptor binding affinity, or RBC-IR number per cell occurred

  10. Pseudo ?insulin allergy?

    OpenAIRE

    Chettiar, Pradeep Raman; Sanalkumar, Nishanth; John, Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Allergy to human insulin is relatively rare in clinical practice. This report describes a patient referred for suspected ?insulin allergy? due to lesions appearing at all sites of insulin injection. Careful evaluation confirmed contamination of the insulin syringes due to faulty techniques used by the patient. The report discusses the various types of insulin allergies and the need for proper diabetic education to avoid such infections.

  11. Insulin and the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grosu Cristina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain represents an important site for the action of insulin. Besides the traditionally known importance in glucoregulation, insulin has significant neurotrophic properties and influences the brain activity: insulin influences eating behavior, regulates the storage of energy and several aspects concerning memory and knowledge. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism could be associated with brain aging, vascular and metabolic pathologies. Elucidating the pathways and metabolism of brain insulin could have a major impact on future targeted therapies.

  12. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  13. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  14. Acanthosis nigricans: a flag for insulin resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-11-04

    Nov 4, 2013 ... Outcome measures: OGTT, fasting serum insulin and HOMA IR were the outcome measures studied. Results: This cross-sectional study revealed that 94 subjects with acanthosis nigricans (31.34%) had IR. Grades III and IV, and textures II and III, were more predictive of IR. Acanthosis nigricans grading was ...

  15. Restoring Mitochondrial Function: A Small Molecule-mediated Approach to Enhance Glucose Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Cholesterol Accumulated Pancreatic beta cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asalla, Suman; Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S.; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kandagatla, Bhaskar; Oruganti, Srinivas; Bhadra, Utpal; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Kalivendi, Shasi Vardhan; Rao, Swetha Pavani; Row, Anupama; Ibrahim, A.; Ghosh, Partha Pratim; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2016-06-01

    Dyslipidemia, particularly the elevated serum cholesterol levels, aggravate the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. In the present study we explored the relationship between fasting blood sugar and serum lipid parameters in human volunteers which revealed a significant linear effect of serum cholesterol on fasting blood glucose. Short term feeding of cholesterol enriched diet to rodent model resulted in elevated serum cholesterol levels, cholesterol accumulation in pancreatic islets and hyperinsulinemia with modest increase in plasma glucose level. To explore the mechanism, we treated cultured BRIN-BD11 pancreatic beta cells with soluble cholesterol. Our data shows that cholesterol treatment of cultured pancreatic beta cells enhances total cellular cholesterol. While one hour cholesterol exposure enhances insulin exocytosis, overnight cholesterol accumulation in cultured pancreatic beta cells affects cellular respiration, and inhibits Glucose stimulated insulin secretion. We further report that (E)-4-Chloro-2-(1-(2-(2,4,6-trichlorophenyl) hydrazono) ethyl) phenol (small molecule M1) prevents the cholesterol mediated blunting of cellular respiration and potentiates Glucose stimulated insulin secretion which was abolished in pancreatic beta cells on cholesterol accumulation.

  16. Peripheral Insulin Doesn’t Alter Appetite of Broiler Chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of peripheral insulin treatment on appetite in chicks. Six-d-age chicks with ad libitum feeding or fasting for 3 h before injection received a subcutaneous injection of 0, 1, 3, 5, 10, or 20 IU of insulin or vehicle (saline. The results showed peripheral insulin treatment (1 to 20 IU did not alter significantly the feed intake in chicks under either ad libitum feeding or fasting conditions within 4 h (p>0.05. Compared with the control, plasma glucose concentration was significantly decreased after insulin treatment of 3, 5, 10, and 20 IU for 4 h in chicks with ad libitum feeding (p0.05. All results suggest peripheral administration of insulin has no effect on appetite in chicks.

  17. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases...

  18. Alteration in insulin action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanti, J F; Gual, P; Grémeaux, T

    2004-01-01

    Insulin resistance, when combined with impaired insulin secretion, contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is characterised by a decrease in insulin effect on glucose transport in muscle and adipose tIssue. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS...... to phosphorylate these serine residues have been identified. These exciting results suggest that serine phosphorylation of IRS-1 is a possible hallmark of insulin resistance in biologically insulin responsive cells or tIssues. Identifying the pathways by which "diabetogenic" factors activate IRS-1 kinases......-1) and its binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) are critical events in the insulin signalling cascade leading to insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Modification of IRS-1 by serine phosphorylation could be one of the mechanisms leading to a decrease in IRS-1 tyrosine...

  19. Insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices among healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballerini, María G; Bergadá, Ignacio; Rodríguez, María E; Keselman, Ana; Bengolea, Viviana S; Pipman, Viviana; Domené, Horacio M; Jasper, Héctor G; Ropelato, María G

    2016-08-01

    Information on insulin reference values and insulin sensitivity indices in the field of pediatrics is scarce. To describe insulin range and insulin sensitivity surrogate indices during childhood. Fasting insulin level range and surrogate indices, such as the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), among healthy children and adolescents by age, body mass index, pubertal stage (PS), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Two hundred and twenty-six healthy children and adolescents (1-18 years old) were included. Insulin increased with age, body mass index, pubertal stage, IGF-1 and triglyceride levels (r2= 0.38, p 〈 0.0001). Prepubertal children 〉 7.5 years old had higher insulin levels [median (P3 and P97) pIU/mL: 5.0 (1.7-9.6)] than prepubertal children 〈 7.5 years old [2.9 pIU/ mL (1.3-10.9), p 〈 0.01]. During puberty (from PS II to PS V), insulin was higher in girls than in boys [7.4 (1.8-16.9) versus 5.8 (1.8-12.9), p 〈 0.01]. The HOMA-IR index increased in the group of prepubertal children 〉 7.5 years old: 1.1 (0.32.0) versus children 〈 7.5 years old: 0.6 (0.3-1.4, p 〈 0.01). The insulin level and HOMA-IR results were higher in pubertal children compared to the prepubertal group (p 〈 0.001). Known physiological changes were observed inboth insulin levels and the HOMA-IR index among children and adolescents. A fasting blood insulin level of 10 pIU/mL in prepubertal children and of 17 pIU/mL and 13 pIU/mL in pubertal girls and boys, respectively, may be considered as an acceptable cut-off value in healthy children. A HOMA-IR value 〉 2.0 and 〉 2.6 in prepubertal and pubertal children, respectively, may be considered a warning sign for pediatricians to further investigate insulin resistance. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  20. An elevator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastorguyev, M.A.; Maloyarovslavtesv, D.A.; Prokopov, O.I.; Tukayev, Sh.V.; Zanilov, I.F.

    1983-01-01

    An elevator is proposed which includes a body with a turning collar locking device and a rod with longitudinal grooves, which are flexibly linked with jaws positioned in grooves in the body. To increase safety through ensuring automatic locking of the jaws in the closed position, the locking device is made in the form of head on wedges, spring loaded relative to the collar and made with cams and positioned with the capability of interacting with the grooves of the rod and through the cams with the collar.

  1. High Prevalence of Dyslipidemia and Insulin Resistance in HIV-infected Prepubertal African Children on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Steve; Abdullah, Kameelah L; Haubrich, Richard; Cotton, Mark F; Browne, Sara H

    2016-01-01

    Data describing the true extent of antiretroviral therapy (ART)-induced dyslipidemia and insulin resistance in perinatally infected children on ART in Africa are sparse. Fasting total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), triglycerides, insulin and glucose were performed on the first 100 of 190 pediatric ART clinic attendees. Diet assessment was performed by a trained dietician. Lipoatrophy was formally graded by consensus between 2 expert HIV pediatricians. Durations of previous ART exposures, clinical stage, pre-ART viral load, nadir and current CD4 were recorded. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry was performed on a subset of 42 patients selected semi-randomly. Prevalences of insulin resistance, abnormal total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and triglyceride were 10%, 13%, 12%, 13% and 9%, respectively. Overall, 40% had at least 1 lipid abnormality or insulin resistance. Adjusted mean LDL cholesterol increased by 0.24 mmol/L for each additional year of cumulative lopinavir/r exposure (P = 0.03) after correcting for age, gender, body mass index, previous stavudine exposure, age at ART initiation, dietary fat and refined carbohydrate, whereas adjusted mean LDL cholesterol was 0.9 mmol/L higher in children exposed to efavirenz within the previous 6 months (P = 0.02). Adjusting for age, gender and ethnicity, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry revealed that greater trunk fat and lower peripheral subcutaneous fat were associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL or homeostatic model assessment. Similarly, the presence of visually obvious lipoatrophy was associated with elevated triglycerides but not with total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, homeostatic model assessment or lactate. Prevalences of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia were high. Cumulative lopinavir is an independent risk factor for dyslipidemia, with efavirenz exposure having only transitory effect.

  2. Surrogate Measures of Insulin Resistance in Middle-aged Non-diabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Csép

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Insulin resistance has been shown to be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The assessment of insulin sensitivity in the clinical practice, however, faces several difficulties. The study proposes to analyze surrogate measures of insulin resistance based on fasting insulin levels in central Romania, and check whether the diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome is an adequate strategy to identify middle-aged persons with reduced insulin sensitivity. Methods: Anthropometric measurements, metabolic profile, and surrogates measures of insulin sensitivity (GIR, HOMA, QUICKI, FIRI, Belfiore, Bennett, Raynaud, McAuley index based on fasting insulin levels were assessed in 233 non-diabetic middle aged subjects. Results: Cutoff values, determined as the lowest quartile of insulin sensitivity for fasting insulin, HOMA, IRI (1/QUICKI, FIRI and Belfiore's, Bennett's, Raynaud's and McAuley's insulin sensitivity indices were 10.49 mU/L, 2.1, 3.01, 2.32, and 0.03, 1.34, 3.81, 6.29, 5.82. Components of the metabolic syndrome showed moderate but significant correlations with the surrogate measures of insulin resistance (r = 0.22-0.56, p <0.05. HOMA-IR and McAuley indices were the best predictors of clustered cardiometabolic risk factors (AUC - 0.83, 0.81 and 0.82. The metabolic syndrome diagnosis performed well in identifying patients with reduced insulin sensitivity (McAuley 2: sensitivity - 0.78, specificity - 0.84. Conclusion: Fasting insulin derived insulin sensitivity indices may help the recognittion of insulin resistant states predicting cardiometabolic disorders. Actively looking for insulin resistance by these simple indices, or by diagnosing the metabolic syndrome, those at increased risk can be recognized

  3. [Postprandial glycemic control using insulin aspart with NPH in inadequately controlled diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Pan, Chang-Yu; Zou, Da-Jin; Xu, Zhang-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Guo, Xiao-Hui

    2009-07-28

    To compare the efficacy and safety of insulin aspart (IAsp) and human insulin (HI) when applied as meal-time insulin with neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin (NPH) at bedtime in diabetics. A total of 220 Chinese subjects with type 1 or type 2 diabetes from 5 different hospitals were randomized by a ratio of 1:1 into two groups accepting IAsp or HI combined with NPH respectively. The main endpoints were assessed by fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 hour postprandial plasma glucose (2 h PPG), HbAlc and hypoglycemia. A greater reduction in mean 2 h PPG was achieved in the IAsp group [(14.6 +/- 5.3) mmol/L] as compared with the HI group [(8.4 +/- 4.1) mmol/L] (P IAsp-treated subjects reached the 2 h PPG target (50.0% vs 25.5%, P IAsp/NPH group [(9.3 +/- 1.4)% vs (7.7 +/- 1.3)%] than in HI/NPH group [(9.2 +/- 1.2)% vs (7.7 +/- 1.2)%]. HbA1c target was reached by 24.5% (IAsp) vs 14.5% (HI) of subjects (P IAsp group. Lower incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia (IAsp/NPH: 3% vs HI/NPH: 4%) was reported in the IAsp group. Average daily insulin doses were 0.60/0.23 (IAsp/NPH) and 0.65/0.24 (HI/NPH) IU/kg respectively. Treatment of IAsp in basal-bolus therapy in combination with NPH provides a superior postprandial glucose control and allows more subjects to reach the glycemic target without elevating the nocturnal hypoglycemic risk or adverse events.

  4. Temporal partitioning of adaptive responses of the murine heart to fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Rachel A; Collins, Helen E; Berry, Ryan D; Brahma, Manoja K; Tirado, Brian A; Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo A; Stanley, Haley L; Wende, Adam R; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Rajasekaran, Namakkal Soorappan; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua; Frank, Stuart J; Chatham, John C; Young, Martin E

    2018-03-15

    Recent studies suggest that the time of day at which food is consumed dramatically influences clinically-relevant cardiometabolic parameters (e.g., adiposity, insulin sensitivity, and cardiac function). Meal feeding benefits may be the result of daily periods of feeding and/or fasting, highlighting the need for improved understanding of the temporal adaptation of cardiometabolic tissues (e.g., heart) to fasting. Such studies may provide mechanistic insight regarding how time-of-day-dependent feeding/fasting cycles influence cardiac function. We hypothesized that fasting during the sleep period elicits beneficial adaptation of the heart at transcriptional, translational, and metabolic levels. To test this hypothesis, temporal adaptation was investigated in wild-type mice fasted for 24-h, or for either the 12-h light/sleep phase or the 12-h dark/awake phase. Fasting maximally induced fatty acid responsive genes (e.g., Pdk4) during the dark/active phase; transcriptional changes were mirrored at translational (e.g., PDK4) and metabolic flux (e.g., glucose/oleate oxidation) levels. Similarly, maximal repression of myocardial p-mTOR and protein synthesis rates occurred during the dark phase; both parameters remained elevated in the heart of fasted mice during the light phase. In contrast, markers of autophagy (e.g., LC3II) exhibited peak responses to fasting during the light phase. Collectively, these data show that responsiveness of the heart to fasting is temporally partitioned. Autophagy peaks during the light/sleep phase, while repression of glucose utilization and protein synthesis is maximized during the dark/active phase. We speculate that sleep phase fasting may benefit cardiac function through augmentation of protein/cellular constituent turnover. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impaired basal glucose effectiveness but unaltered fasting glucose release and gluconeogenesis during short-term hypercortisolemia in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael F; Caumo, Andrea; Chandramouli, Visvanathan

    2004-01-01

    with hydrocortisone or saline. Glucose effectiveness was assessed by a combined somatostatin and insulin infusion protocol to maintain insulin concentration at basal level in the presence of prandial glucose infusions. Despite elevated insulin concentrations (P ... basal insulin concentrations were higher during hydrocortisone than during saline infusion (P

  6. Relationship between insulin resistance and plasma endothelin in hypertension patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yongqiang; Wang Zuobing; Yu Hui; Cao Wei; Wang Jing; Li Xiaoqin

    2011-01-01

    To explore the relationship between plasma endothelin and hypertension insulin resistance, and the improvement of insulin resistance in hypertension patients treated with captopril and l-amlodipine, 25 patients with primary hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance were selected and treated by captopril and l-amlodipine. Systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin and insulin antibody were measured before and after treatment and compared with healthy controls. The results showed that the plasma ET-1 level in hypertension group was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (P<0.01), and he plasma ET-1 level was positively correlated with FPG, FINS, Anti-INS, HOMA-IR. The systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, fasting blood glucose, insulin, insulin antibody and insulin resistance index in hypertension patients were decreased significantly after treatment (P<0.05). There is a good correlation between endothelin and insulin resistance index in hypertension patients. Captopril and l-amlodipine had obvious improvement effect on insulin resistance in hypertension patients. (authors)

  7. Bucket elevator

    OpenAIRE

    Chromek, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Cílem této bakalářské práce je návrh svislého korečkového elevátoru, který má sloužit k dopravě obilovin s dopravní výškou 19 m a dopravovaným množstvím 100 t/hod. Práce se skládá z popisu korečkového elevátoru a jeho hlavních částí, zmiňující se v úvodní rešerši. Tato práce je zaměřena na funkční a kapacitní výpočet, určení pohonu a napínacího zařízení. Další výpočet je kontrolní, skládající se z pevnostní kontroly hnacího hřídele, výpočtu pera, životnosti ložisek a výpočtu napínacího zaříze...

  8. Differential effects of age and sex on insulin sensitivity and body composition in adolescent offspring of women with type 1 diabetes: results from the EPICOM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Zuzana; Knorr, Sine; Bytoft, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    in fasting OGTT-derived indices for insulin sensitivity (BIGTT-SI0-30-120, Matsuda index, HOMA-IR) and insulin secretion (acute insulin response [BIGTT-AIR0-0-30-120], insulinogenic index, HOMA of insulin secretory function [HOMA-β], disposition index) and physical activity (International Physical Activity...

  9. Insulin Detemir Is Transported From Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid and Has Prolonged Central Anorectic Action Relative to NPH Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P.; May, Aaron A.; Mul, Joram D.; Liu, Min; D’Alessio, David A.; Seeley, Randy J.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin detemir (DET) reduces glycemia comparably to other long-acting insulin formulations but causes less weight gain. Insulin signaling in the brain is catabolic, reducing food intake. We hypothesized that DET reduces weight gain, relative to other insulins, owing to increased transport into the central nervous system and/or increased catabolic action within the brain. Transport of DET and NPH insulin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was compared over several hours and after the administration of different doses peripherally in rats. DET and NPH had comparable saturable, receptor-mediated transport into the CSF. CSF insulin remained elevated significantly longer after intraperitoneal DET than after NPH. When administered acutely into the 3rd cerebral ventricle, both DET and NPH insulin reduced food intake and body weight at 24 h, and both food intake and body weight remained lower after DET than after NPH after 48 h. In direct comparison with another long-acting insulin, insulin glargine (GLAR), DET led to more prolonged increases in CSF insulin despite a shorter plasma half-life in both rats and mice. Additionally, peripheral DET administration reduced weight gain and increased CSF insulin compared with saline or GLAR in mice. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that DET has distinct effects on energy balance through enhanced and prolonged centrally mediated reduction of food intake. PMID:25667307

  10. A study of the prevalence of diabetes, insulin resistance, lipid abnormalities, and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickson R Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association between psoriasis, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease remains largely unelucidated in the Indian population. Aims: To study the prevalence of diabetes, insulin resistance, lipid abnormalities, and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic plaque psoriasis. Materials and Methods: Seventy-seven patients of chronic plaque psoriasis and ninety two age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study over a period of one year. Clinical and biometric data were noted and fasting venous blood samples were collected. Nondiabetic patients were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test with 75 g glucose and postprandial venous blood samples collected at 120 mins. The fasting glucose, insulin, lipid levels, postprandial glucose and postprandial insulin levels were measured in samples from nondiabetic patients whereas fasting lipid levels only were measured in diabetic patients. Results: The prevalence of impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and diabetes mellitus in psoriatics was 5.2%, 9.1%, and 32.5%, respectively, as compared to 6.5%, 3.3%, and 15.2%, respectively, in the controls. The difference was statistically significant. The odds ratio of having an abnormal glucose metabolism in psoriasis was 2.63. Smoking had a positive association with insulin resistance in psoriatic cases. The serum cholesterol levels were elevated in 29 (37.7% cases with a mean of 186.27 ± 43.18 and 34 (37% controls with a mean of 194.38 ± 57.20. The serum HDL-cholesterol levels were reduced in 50 (64.9% cases with a mean of 53.29 ± 15.90 as compared to 71 (74.7% in controls with a mean of 48.76 ± 12.85. The serum LDL-cholesterol levels were elevated in 38 (49.4% cases with a mean of 102.56 ± 44.02 and 36 controls with a mean of 115.62 ± 54.37. The serum triglyceride levels were elevated in 25 (32.5% cases with a mean of 129.99 ± 61.32 and 38 (41.3% controls with a mean of 141.04 ± 80.10. The differences

  11. A common polymorphism near the interleukin-6 gene modifies the association between dietary fat intake and insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuda C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Cuda1, Bibiana Garcia-Bailo1,2, Mohamed Karmali1,2, Ahmed El-Sohemy1, Alaa Badawi21Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 2Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health, Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaBackground: Increasing evidence suggests a role for inflammation in the development of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, have been associated with insulin resistance, and dietary lipids can increase cytokine production. The objective of this study was to determine whether a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL6 gene (rs7801406 modifies the relationship between dietary fat and markers of insulin sensitivity.Methods: Subjects were healthy men and women aged 20–29 years from the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Dietary intake was estimated using a one-month semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were taken for genotyping and biomarker measurement.Results: The single nucleotide polymorphism was not associated with any of the measures of insulin sensitivity. However, it modified the relationship between total dietary fat and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.053 for interaction. Total fat intake was positively related to HOMA-IR in individuals homozygous for the G allele (ß = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = 0.03, but not among heterozygotes. There was an inverse relationship between total fat intake and HOMA-IR in individuals who were homozygous for the A allele (β= –0.012 ± 0.006, P = 0.047.Conclusion: These findings suggest that dietary fat influences insulin sensitivity differently depending on genotype.Keywords: interleukin-6, insulin sensitivity, nutrigenomics, dietary fat

  12. Human skeletal muscle disuse atrophy: effects on muscle protein synthesis, breakdown and insulin resistance- a qualitative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreeth S Rudrappa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing burden of an ageing population and pandemic of metabolic syndrome worldwide demands further understanding of the modifiable risk factors in reducing disability and morbidity associated with these conditions. Disuse skeletal muscle atrophy (sometimes referred to as simple atrophy and insulin resistance are ‘non-pathological’ events resulting from sedentary behaviour and periods of enforced immobilization e.g. due to fractures or elective orthopaedic surgery. Yet, the processes and drivers regulating disuse atrophy and insulin resistance and the associated molecular events remain unclear – especially in humans. The aim of this review is to present current knowledge of relationships between muscle protein turnover, insulin resistance and muscle atrophy during disuse, principally in humans. Immobilisation lowers fasted state muscle protein synthesis (MPS and induces fed-state ‘anabolic resistance’. While a lack of dynamic measurements of muscle protein breakdown (MPB precludes defining a definitive role for MPB in disuse atrophy, some proteolytic marker studies (e.g. MPB genes suggest a potential early elevation. Immobilisation also induces muscle insulin resistance (IR. Moreover, the trajectory of muscle atrophy appears to be accelerated in persistent IR states (e.g. Type II diabetes, suggesting IR may contribute to muscle disuse atrophy under these conditions. Nonetheless, the role of differences in insulin sensitivity across distinct muscle groups and its effects on rates of atrophy remains unclear. Multifaceted time-course studies into the collective role of insulin resistance and muscle protein turnover in the setting of disuse muscle atrophy, in humans, are needed to facilitate the development of appropriate countermeasures and efficacious rehabilitation protocols.

  13. Relationship between elevated triglyceride levels with the increase of HOMA-IR and HOMA-β in healthy children and adolescents with normal weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Castañeda-Chacón, Argelia; Rodriguez-Morán, Martha; Aradillas-García, Celia; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that mildly elevated triglyceride levels are associated with the increase of homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-β) indices in healthy children and adolescents with normal weight, we conducted a cross-sectional population study. Based on fasting triglyceride levels, participants were allocated into groups with and without triglyceride levels ≥1.2 mmol/L. Normal weight was defined by body mass index between the 15th and 85th percentiles, for age and gender. Insulin resistance and insulin secretion were estimated using HOMA-IR and HOMA-β indices. A total of 1660 children and adolescents were enrolled, of them 327 (19.7%) with mildly elevated triglycerides. The multivariate linear regression analysis showed that mildly elevated triglyceride levels in children were associated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.214, p HOMA-β (β = 0.139, p = 0.001), systolic (β = 0.094, p = 0.01), and diastolic blood pressure (β = 0.102, p = 0.007), whereas in adolescents, HOMA-IR (β = 0.267, p HOMA-β (β = 0.154, p HOMA-IR and HOMA-β indices in healthy children and adolescents with normal weight.

  14. Review of biphasic insulin aspart in the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Raja-Khan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nazia Raja-Khan, Sarah S Warehime, Robert A GabbayDivision of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Penn State Institute for Diabetes and Obesity, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USABackground: Insulin is an effective treatment for achieving glycemic control and preventing complications in patients with diabetes. In order to make insulin therapy more acceptable to patients, newer formulations of insulin have been developed, such as biphasic insulins. Biphasic insulins conveniently provide both prandial and basal insulin in a single injection. One of the most well-studied biphasic insulins is biphasic insulin aspart 70/30.Objective: Our goal was to review the current literature on the safety and efficacy of biphasic insulin aspart in type 1 and type 2 diabetes.Methods: A MEDLINE search was conducted using the terms “biphasic insulin aspart” to identify clinical studies and reviews.Results: Biphasic insulin aspart more effectively reduces post-prandial glucose compared to other biphasic insulins and basal insulins. Compared to biphasic insulin aspart, fasting glucose levels are lower with NPH, similar with glargine, and similar or lower with biphasic human insulin. Treat-to-target trials have shown that a goal HbA1c below 6.5 or 7% can be achieved with biphasic insulin aspart. The risk of hypoglycemia is similar to or less than that seen with other biphasic insulins or NPH insulin.Conclusion: Biphasic insulin aspart 70/30 is a safe and effective treatment option for patients with diabetes.Keywords: biphasic insulin aspart, insulin, diabetes

  15. Insulin delivery route for the artificial pancreas: subcutaneous, intraperitoneal, or intravenous? Pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Eric

    2008-07-01

    Insulin delivery is a crucial component of a closed-loop system aiming at the development of an artificial pancreas. The intravenous route, which has been used in the bedside artificial pancreas model for 30 years, has clear advantages in terms of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but cannot be used in any ambulatory system so far. Subcutaneous (SC) insulin infusion benefits from the broad expansion of insulin pump therapy that promoted the availability of constantly improving technology and fast-acting insulin analog use. However, persistent delays of insulin absorption and action, variability and shortterm stability of insulin infusion from SC-inserted catheters generate effectiveness and safety issues in view of an ambulatory, automated, glucose-controlled, artificial beta cell. Intraperitoneal insulin delivery, although still marginally used in diabetes care, may offer an interesting alternative because of its more-physiological plasma insulin profiles and sustained stability and reliability of insulin delivery.

  16. CCK increases the transport of insulin into the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Aaron A; Liu, Min; Woods, Stephen C; Begg, Denovan P

    2016-10-15

    Food intake occurs in bouts or meals, and numerous meal-generated signals have been identified that act to limit the size of ongoing meals. Hormones such as cholecystokinin (CCK) are secreted from the intestine as ingested food is being processed, and in addition to aiding the digestive process, they provide a signal to the brain that contributes to satiation, limiting the size of the meal. The potency of CCK to elicit satiation is enhanced by elevated levels of adiposity signals such as insulin. In the present experiments we asked whether CCK and insulin interact at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We first isolated rat brain capillary endothelial cells that comprise the BBB and found that they express the mRNA for both the CCK1R and the insulin receptor, providing a basis for a possible interaction. We then administered insulin intraperitoneally to another group of rats and 15min later administered CCK-8 intraperitoneally to half of those rats. After another 15min, CSF and blood samples were obtained and assayed for immunoreactive insulin. Plasma insulin was comparably elevated above baseline in both the CCK-8 and control groups, indicating that the CCK had no effect on circulating insulin levels given these parameters. In contrast, rats administered CCK had CSF-insulin levels that were more than twice as high as those of control rats. We conclude that circulating CCK greatly facilitates the transport of insulin into the brain, likely by acting directly at the BBB. These findings imply that in circumstances in which the plasma levels of both CCK and insulin are elevated, such as during and soon after meals, satiation is likely to be due, in part, to this newly-discovered synergy between CCK and insulin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of Insulin Lispro Protamine Suspension with NPH Insulin in Pregnant Women with Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Maternal and Perinatal Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Colatrella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin therapy is still the gold standard in diabetic pregnancy. Insulin lispro protamine suspension is an available basal insulin analogue. Aim. To study pregnancy outcomes of women with type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus when insulin lispro protamine suspension or human NPH insulin was added to medical nutrition therapy and/or short-acting insulin. Methods. In this retrospective study, for maternal outcome we recorded time and mode of delivery, hypertension, glycaemic control (fasting blood glucose and HbA1c, hypoglycemias, weight increase, and insulin need. For neonatal outcome birth weight and weight class, congenital malformations was recorded and main neonatal complications. Two-tail Student's t-test and chi-square test were performed when applicable; significant P<0.05. Results. Eighty-nine pregnant women (25 with type 2 diabetes and 64 with gestational diabetes mellitus; 53 under insulin lispro protamine suspension and 36 under human NPH insulin were recruited. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were quite similar between the two therapeutic approaches; however, insulin need was higher in NPH. At the end of pregnancy, eight women with gestational diabetes continued to use only basal insulin analogue. Conclusions. Pregnancy outcome in type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus with insulin lispro protamine suspension was similar to that with NPH insulin, except for a lower insulin requirement.

  18. Insulin pump (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The catheter at the end of the insulin pump is inserted through a needle into the abdominal ... with diabetes. Dosage instructions are entered into the pump's small computer and the appropriate amount of insulin ...

  19. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig [Jeollanamdo Forest Resources Research Institute, Naju 520-833 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Ho-jae [College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-741 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soo-hyun, E-mail: parksh@chonnam.ac.kr [College of Veterinary Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-05

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation.

  20. Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Chul-gon; Kim, Dong-il; Park, Min-jung; Choi, Joo-hee; Jeong, Jieun; Wi, Anjin; Park, Whoashig; Han, Ho-jae; Park, Soo-hyun

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported that CARM1 undergoes ubiquitination-dependent degradation in renal podocytes. It was also reported that CARM1 is necessary for fasting-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that treatment with insulin, a hormone typically present under the ‘fed’ condition, would inhibit gluconeogenesis via CARM1 degradation. HepG2 cells, AML-12 cells, and rat primary hepatocytes were treated with insulin to confirm CARM1 downregulation. Surprisingly, insulin treatment increased CARM1 expression in all cell types examined. Furthermore, treatment with insulin increased histone 3 methylation at arginine 17 and 26 in HepG2 cells. To elucidate the role of insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation, the HA-CARM1 plasmid was transfected into HepG2 cells. CARM1 overexpression did not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins generally increased by insulin signaling. Moreover, CARM1 knockdown did not influence insulin sensitivity. Insulin is known to facilitate hepatic proliferation. Like insulin, CARM1 overexpression increased CDK2 and CDK4 expression. In addition, CARM1 knockdown reduced the number of insulin-induced G2/M phase cells. Moreover, GFP-CARM1 overexpression increased the number of G2/M phase cells. Based on these results, we concluded that insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation. These observations indicate that CARM1 plays an important role in liver pathophysiology. - Highlights: • Insulin treatment increases CARM1 expression in hepatocytes. • CARM1 overexpression does not increase the expression of lipogenic proteins. • CARM1 knockdown does not influence insulin sensitivity. • Insulin-induced CARM1 upregulation facilitates hepatocyte proliferation

  1. Insulin secretion in lipodystrophic HIV-infected patients is associated with high levels of nonglucose secretagogues and insulin resistance of beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Storgaard, Heidi

    2004-01-01

    We examined whether plasma concentrations of nonglucose insulin secretagogues are associated with prehepatic insulin secretion rates (ISR) in nondiabetic, insulin-resistant, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected, lipodystrophic patients (LIPO). Additionally, the negative feedback of insulin...... on ISR was evaluated. ISR were estimated by deconvolution of plasma C-peptide concentrations during fasting (basal) and during the last 30 min of a 120-min euglycemic insulin clamp (40 mU.m(-2).min(-1)). Eighteen normoglycemic LIPO were compared with 25 normoglycemic HIV-infected patients without...... lipodystrophy (controls). Thirty minutes before start of the clamp, a bolus of glucose was injected intravenously to stimulate endogenous insulin secretion. Insulin sensitivity index (SiRd) was estimated from glucose tracer analysis. LIPO displayed increased basal ISR (69%), clamp ISR (114%), basal insulin (130...

  2. Glycosphingolipids and insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langeveld, Mirjam; Aerts, Johannes M. F. G.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for insulin resistance, a state characterized by impaired responsiveness of liver, muscle and adipose tissue to insulin. One class of lipids involved in the development of insulin resistance are the (glyco)sphingolipids. Ceramide, the most simple

  3. A meal replacement regimen improves blood glucose levels in prediabetic healthy individuals with impaired fasting glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Daniel; Kookhan, Sadaf; Schaffner, Denise; Deibert, Peter; Berg, Aloys

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a 6-wk intervention with either lifestyle intervention (increased physical activity and a low-calorie diet) or a meal replacement regimen on glycemic control in patients who are prediabetic and have impaired fasting glucose. Forty-two overweight or obese men and women (age 54 ± 8 y; weight 95.1 ± 11.9 kg; body mass index [BMI] 32.8 ± 2.89 kg/m(2)) were included in this randomized controlled clinical trial. Patients in the lifestyle group (LS; n = 14) received dietary counseling sessions (fat-restricted low-calorie diet) and instructions on how to increase physical activity. Patients in the meal replacement group (MR; n = 28) were instructed to replace two daily meals with a low-calorie, high soy-protein drink with a low glycemic index. Both interventions resulted in a significant decrease in body weight and BMI, although the reduction was more pronounced (P meal replacement is an effective intervention for rapid improvement of elevated fasting glucose and increased insulin concentrations, these being important biomarkers of the prediabetic state. The 6-wk intervention has shown that the effect of meal replacement on fasting blood glucose was comparable to the effect of lifestyle intervention. The alterations in BMI, insulin, and HOMA-IR were significantly more pronounced following the meal replacement regimen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transdermal delivery of insulin by amidated pectin hydrogel matrix patch in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats: effects on some selected metabolic parameters.

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    Silindile I Hadebe

    Full Text Available Studies in our laboratory are concerned with developing optional insulin delivery routes based on amidated pectin hydrogel matrix gel. We therefore investigated whether the application of pectin insulin (PI-containing dermal patches of different insulin concentrations sustain controlled release of insulin into the bloodstream of streptozotocin (STZ-induced diabetic rats with concomitant alleviation of diabetic symptoms in target tissues, most importantly, muscle and liver.Oral glucose test (OGT responses to PI dermal matrix patches (2.47, 3.99, 9.57, 16.80 µg/kg prepared by dissolving pectin/insulin in deionised water and solidified with CaCl2 were monitored in diabetic rats given a glucose load after an 18-h fast. Short-term (5 weeks metabolic effects were assessed in animals treated thrice daily with PI patches 8 hours apart. Animals treated with drug-free pectin and insulin (175 µg/kg, s.c. acted as untreated and treated positive controls, respectively. Blood, muscle and liver samples were collected for measurements of selected biochemical parameters.After 5 weeks, untreated diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycaemia and depleted hepatic and muscle glycogen concentrations. Compared to untreated STZ-induced diabetic animals, OGT responses of diabetic rats transdermally applied PI patches exhibited lower blood glucose levels whilst short-term treatments restored hepatic and muscle glycogen concentrations. Plasma insulin concentrations of untreated diabetic rats were low compared with control non-diabetic rats. All PI treatments elevated plasma insulin concentrations of diabetic rats although the levels induced by high doses (9.57 and 16.80 µg/kg were greater than those caused by low doses (2.47 and 3.99 µg/kg but comparable to those in sc insulin treated animals.The data suggest that the PI hydrogel matrix patch can deliver physiologically relevant amounts of pharmacologically active insulin.A new method to administer insulin into the

  5. Transdermal Delivery of Insulin by Amidated Pectin Hydrogel Matrix Patch in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats: Effects on Some Selected Metabolic Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadebe, Silindile I.; Ngubane, Phikelelani S.; Serumula, Metse R.; Musabayane, Cephas T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studies in our laboratory are concerned with developing optional insulin delivery routes based on amidated pectin hydrogel matrix gel. We therefore investigated whether the application of pectin insulin (PI)-containing dermal patches of different insulin concentrations sustain controlled release of insulin into the bloodstream of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with concomitant alleviation of diabetic symptoms in target tissues, most importantly, muscle and liver. Methods Oral glucose test (OGT) responses to PI dermal matrix patches (2.47, 3.99, 9.57, 16.80 µg/kg) prepared by dissolving pectin/insulin in deionised water and solidified with CaCl2 were monitored in diabetic rats given a glucose load after an 18-h fast. Short-term (5 weeks) metabolic effects were assessed in animals treated thrice daily with PI patches 8 hours apart. Animals treated with drug-free pectin and insulin (175 µg/kg, sc) acted as untreated and treated positive controls, respectively. Blood, muscle and liver samples were collected for measurements of selected biochemical parameters. Results After 5 weeks, untreated diabetic rats exhibited hyperglycaemia and depleted hepatic and muscle glycogen concentrations. Compared to untreated STZ-induced diabetic animals, OGT responses of diabetic rats transdermally applied PI patches exhibited lower blood glucose levels whilst short-term treatments restored hepatic and muscle glycogen concentrations. Plasma insulin concentrations of untreated diabetic rats were low compared with control non-diabetic rats. All PI treatments elevated plasma insulin concentrations of diabetic rats although the levels induced by high doses (9.57 and 16.80 µg/kg) were greater than those caused by low doses (2.47 and 3.99 µg/kg) but comparable to those in sc insulin treated animals. Conclusions The data suggest that the PI hydrogel matrix patch can deliver physiologically relevant amounts of pharmacologically active insulin. Novelty of the Work A new

  6. Common variants related to serum uric acid concentrations are associated with glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in a Chinese population.

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    Xue Sun

    Full Text Available Elevated serum uric acid concentration is an independent risk factor and predictor of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Whether the uric acid-associated genes have an impact on T2D remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the effects of the uric acid-associated genes on the risk of T2D as well as glucose metabolism and insulin secretion.We recruited 2,199 normal glucose tolerance subjects from the Shanghai Diabetes Study I and II and 2,999 T2D patients from the inpatient database of Shanghai Diabetes Institute. Fifteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs mapped in or near 11 loci (PDZK1, GCKR, LRP2, SLC2A9, ABCG2, LRRC16A, SLC17A1, SLC17A3, SLC22A11, SLC22A12 and SF1 were genotyped and serum biochemical parameters related to uric acid and T2D were determined.SF1 rs606458 showed strong association to T2D in both males and females (p = 0.034 and 0.0008. In the males, LRRC16A was associated with 2-h insulin and insulin secretion (p = 0.009 and 0.009. SLC22A11 was correlated with HOMA-B and insulin secretion (p = 0.048 and 0.029. SLC2A9 rs3775948 was associated with 2-h glucose (p = 0.043. In the females, LRP2 rs2544390 and rs1333049 showed correlations with fasting insulin, HOMA-IR and insulin secretion (p = 0.028, 0.033 and 0.052 and p = 0.034, 0.047 and 0.038, respectively. SLC2A9 rs11722228 was correlated with 2-h glucose, 2-h insulin and insulin secretion (p = 0.024, 0.049 and 0.049, respectively.Our results indicated that the uric acid-associated genes have an impact on the risk of T2D, glucose metabolism and insulin secretion in a Chinese population.

  7. Nature and regulation of the insulin receptor: structure and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech, M.P.

    1985-01-01

    Native, cell-surface insulin receptor consists of two glycoprotein subunit types with apparent masses of about 125,000 daltons (alpha subunit) and 90,000 daltons (beta subunit). The alpha and beta insulin-receptor subunits seem to have distinct functions such that alpha appears to bind hormone whereas beta appears to possess intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity. In detergent extracts, insulin activates receptor autophosphorylation of tyrosine residues on its beta subunit, whereas in the presence of reductant, the alpha subunit is also phosphorylated. In intact cells, insulin activates serine/threonine phosphorylation of insulin receptor beta subunit as well as tyrosine phosphorylation. The biological role of the receptor-associated tyrosine kinase is not known. The insulin receptor kinase is regulated by beta-adrenergic agonists and other agents that elevate cAMP in adipocytes, presumably via the cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Such agents decrease receptor affinity for insulin and partially uncouple receptor tyrosine kinase activity from activation by insulin. These effects appear to contribute to the biological antagonism between insulin and beta-agonists. These data suggest the hypothesis that a complex network of tyrosine and serine/threonine phosphorylations on the insulin receptor modulate its binding and kinase activities in an antagonistic manner

  8. Tacrolimus reversibly reduces insulin secretion, induces insulin resistance, and causes islet cell damage in rats.