WorldWideScience

Sample records for element method modeling

  1. Structural modeling techniques by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Yeong Jin; Kim, Geung Hwan; Ju, Gwan Jeong

    1991-01-01

    This book includes introduction table of contents chapter 1 finite element idealization introduction summary of the finite element method equilibrium and compatibility in the finite element solution degrees of freedom symmetry and anti symmetry modeling guidelines local analysis example references chapter 2 static analysis structural geometry finite element models analysis procedure modeling guidelines references chapter 3 dynamic analysis models for dynamic analysis dynamic analysis procedures modeling guidelines and modeling guidelines.

  2. Boundary element method for modelling creep behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarina Masood; Shah Nor Basri; Abdel Majid Hamouda; Prithvi Raj Arora

    2002-01-01

    A two dimensional initial strain direct boundary element method is proposed to numerically model the creep behaviour. The boundary of the body is discretized into quadratic element and the domain into quadratic quadrilaterals. The variables are also assumed to have a quadratic variation over the elements. The boundary integral equation is solved for each boundary node and assembled into a matrix. This matrix is solved by Gauss elimination with partial pivoting to obtain the variables on the boundary and in the interior. Due to the time-dependent nature of creep, the solution has to be derived over increments of time. Automatic time incrementation technique and backward Euler method for updating the variables are implemented to assure stability and accuracy of results. A flowchart of the solution strategy is also presented. (Author)

  3. Element-by-element parallel spectral-element methods for 3-D teleseismic wave modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shaolin

    2017-09-28

    The development of an efficient algorithm for teleseismic wave field modeling is valuable for calculating the gradients of the misfit function (termed misfit gradients) or Fréchet derivatives when the teleseismic waveform is used for adjoint tomography. Here, we introduce an element-by-element parallel spectral-element method (EBE-SEM) for the efficient modeling of teleseismic wave field propagation in a reduced geology model. Under the plane-wave assumption, the frequency-wavenumber (FK) technique is implemented to compute the boundary wave field used to construct the boundary condition of the teleseismic wave incidence. To reduce the memory required for the storage of the boundary wave field for the incidence boundary condition, a strategy is introduced to efficiently store the boundary wave field on the model boundary. The perfectly matched layers absorbing boundary condition (PML ABC) is formulated using the EBE-SEM to absorb the scattered wave field from the model interior. The misfit gradient can easily be constructed in each time step during the calculation of the adjoint wave field. Three synthetic examples demonstrate the validity of the EBE-SEM for use in teleseismic wave field modeling and the misfit gradient calculation.

  4. Modelling of Granular Materials Using the Discrete Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per

    1997-01-01

    With the Discrete Element Method it is possible to model materials that consists of individual particles where a particle may role or slide on other particles. This is interesting because most of the deformation in granular materials is due to rolling or sliding rather that compression of the gra...

  5. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  6. Finite-element method modeling of hyper-frequency structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Min

    1990-01-01

    The modelization of microwave propagation problems, including Eigen-value problem and scattering problem, is accomplished by the finite element method with vector functional and scalar functional. For Eigen-value problem, propagation modes in waveguides and resonant modes in cavities can be calculated in a arbitrarily-shaped structure with inhomogeneous material. Several microwave structures are resolved in order to verify the program. One drawback associated with the vector functional is the appearance of spurious or non-physical solutions. A penalty function method has been introduced to reduce spurious' solutions. The adaptive charge method is originally proposed in this thesis to resolve waveguide scattering problem. This method, similar to VSWR measuring technique, is more efficient to obtain the reflection coefficient than the matrix method. Two waveguide discontinuity structures are calculated by the two methods and their results are compared. The adaptive charge method is also applied to a microwave plasma excitor. It allows us to understand the role of different physical parameters of excitor in the coupling of microwave energy to plasma mode and the mode without plasma. (author) [fr

  7. Element-by-element parallel spectral-element methods for 3-D teleseismic wave modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shaolin; Yang, Dinghui; Dong, Xingpeng; Liu, Qiancheng; Zheng, Yongchang

    2017-01-01

    The development of an efficient algorithm for teleseismic wave field modeling is valuable for calculating the gradients of the misfit function (termed misfit gradients) or Fréchet derivatives when the teleseismic waveform is used for adjoint

  8. Non linear permanent magnets modelling with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavanne, J.; Meunier, G.; Sabonnadiere, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    In order to perform the calculation of permanent magnets with the finite element method, it is necessary to take into account the anisotropic behaviour of hard magnetic materials (Ferrites, NdFeB, SmCo5). In linear cases, the permeability of permanent magnets is a tensor. This one is fully described with the permeabilities parallel and perpendicular to the easy axis of the magnet. In non linear cases, the model uses a texture function which represents the distribution of the local easy axis of the cristallytes of the magnet. This function allows a good representation of the angular dependance of the coercitive field of the magnet. As a result, it is possible to express the magnetic induction B and the tensor as functions of the field and the texture parameter. This model has been implemented in the software FLUX3D where the tensor is used for the Newton-Raphson procedure. 3D demagnetization of a ferrite magnet by a NdFeB magnet is a suitable representative example. They analyze the results obtained for an ideally oriented ferrite magnet and a real one using a measured texture parameter

  9. A proposal for a determination method of element division on an analytical model for finite element elastic waves propagation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes an element size selection method named the 'Impact-Meshing (IM) method' for a finite element waves propagation analysis model, which is characterized by (1) determination of element division of the model with strain energy in the whole model, (2) static analysis (dynamic analysis in a single time step) with boundary conditions which gives a maximum change of displacement in the time increment and inertial (impact) force caused by the displacement change. In this paper, an example of application of the IM method to 3D ultrasonic wave propagation problem in an elastic solid is described. These examples showed an analysis result with a model determined by the IM method was convergence and calculation time for determination of element subdivision was reduced to about 1/6 by the IM Method which did not need determination of element subdivision by a dynamic transient analysis with 100 time steps. (author)

  10. Modeling 3D PCMI using the Extended Finite Element Method with higher order elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-03-31

    This report documents the recent development to enable XFEM to work with higher order elements. It also demonstrates the application of higher order (quadratic) elements to both 2D and 3D models of PCMI problems, where discrete fractures in the fuel are represented using XFEM. The modeling results demonstrate the ability of the higher order XFEM to accurately capture the effects of a crack on the response in the vicinity of the intersecting surfaces of cracked fuel and cladding, as well as represent smooth responses in the regions away from the crack.

  11. Use of the iterative solution method for coupled finite element and boundary element modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koteras, J.R.

    1993-07-01

    Tunnels buried deep within the earth constitute an important class geomechanics problems. Two numerical techniques used for the analysis of geomechanics problems, the finite element method and the boundary element method, have complementary characteristics for applications to problems of this type. The usefulness of combining these two methods for use as a geomechanics analysis tool has been recognized for some time, and a number of coupling techniques have been proposed. However, not all of them lend themselves to efficient computational implementations for large-scale problems. This report examines a coupling technique that can form the basis for an efficient analysis tool for large scale geomechanics problems through the use of an iterative equation solver

  12. The development of a curved beam element model applied to finite elements method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bento Filho, A.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for the evaluation of the stiffness matrix for a thick curved beam element is developed, by means of the minimum potential energy principle, applied to finite elements. The displacement field is prescribed through polynomial expansions, and the interpolation model is determined by comparison of results obtained by the use of a sample of different expansions. As a limiting case of the curved beam, three cases of straight beams, with different dimensional ratios are analised, employing the approach proposed. Finally, an interpolation model is proposed and applied to a curved beam with great curvature. Desplacements and internal stresses are determined and the results are compared with those found in the literature. (Author) [pt

  13. A Kriging Model Based Finite Element Model Updating Method for Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuming Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Model updating is an effective means of damage identification and surrogate modeling has attracted considerable attention for saving computational cost in finite element (FE model updating, especially for large-scale structures. In this context, a surrogate model of frequency is normally constructed for damage identification, while the frequency response function (FRF is rarely used as it usually changes dramatically with updating parameters. This paper presents a new surrogate model based model updating method taking advantage of the measured FRFs. The Frequency Domain Assurance Criterion (FDAC is used to build the objective function, whose nonlinear response surface is constructed by the Kriging model. Then, the efficient global optimization (EGO algorithm is introduced to get the model updating results. The proposed method has good accuracy and robustness, which have been verified by a numerical simulation of a cantilever and experimental test data of a laboratory three-story structure.

  14. Modelling of Conveyor Belt Passage by Driving Drum Using Finite Element Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikoleta Mikušová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The finite element methods are used in many disciplines by the development of products, typically in mechanical engineering (for example in automotive industry, biomechanics, etc.. Some modern programs of the finite element's methods have specific tools (electromagnetic, fluid and structural simulations. The finite elements methods allow detailed presentation of structures by bending or torsion, complete design, testing and optimization before the prototype production. The aims of this paper were to the model of conveyor belt passage by driving drum. The model was created by the program Abaqus CAE. The created model presented data about forces, pressures, and deformation of the belt conveyor.

  15. Application of the dual reciprocity boundary element method for numerical modelling of solidification process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Majchrzak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The dual reciprocity boundary element method is applied for numerical modelling of solidification process. This variant of the BEM is connected with the transformation of the domain integral to the boundary integrals. In the paper the details of the dual reciprocity boundary element method are presented and the usefulness of this approach to solidification process modelling is demonstrated. In the final part of the paper the examples of computations are shown.

  16. Crack modeling of rotating blades with cracked hexahedral finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Jiang, Dongxiang

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic analysis is the basis in investigating vibration features of cracked blades, where the features can be applied to monitor health state of blades, detect cracks in an early stage and prevent failures. This work presents a cracked hexahedral finite element method for dynamic analysis of cracked blades, with the purpose of addressing the contradiction between accuracy and efficiency in crack modeling of blades in rotor system. The cracked hexahedral element is first derived with strain energy release rate method, where correction of stress intensity factors of crack front and formulation of load distribution of crack surface are carried out to improve the modeling accuracy. To consider nonlinear characteristics of time-varying opening and closure effects caused by alternating loads, breathing function is proposed for the cracked hexahedral element. Second, finite element method with contact element is analyzed and used for comparison. Finally, validation of the cracked hexahedral element is carried out in terms of breathing effects of cracked blades and natural frequency in different crack depths. Good consistency is acquired between the results with developed cracked hexahedral element and contact element, while the computation time is significantly reduced in the previous one. Therefore, the developed cracked hexahedral element achieves good accuracy and high efficiency in crack modeling of rotating blades.

  17. Wave propagation numerical models in damage detection based on the time domain spectral element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostachowicz, W; Kudela, P

    2010-01-01

    A Spectral Element Method is used for wave propagation modelling. A 3D solid spectral element is derived with shape functions based on Lagrange interpolation and Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre points. This approach is applied for displacement approximation suited for fundamental modes of Lamb waves as well as potential distribution in piezoelectric transducers. The novelty is the model geometry extension from flat to curved elements for application in shell-like structures. Exemplary visualisations of waves excited by the piezoelectric transducers in curved shell structure made of aluminium alloy are presented. Simple signal analysis of wave interaction with crack is performed. The crack is modelled by separation of appropriate nodes between elements. An investigation of influence of the crack length on wave propagation signals is performed. Additionally, some aspects of the spectral element method implementation are discussed.

  18. A finite element modeling method for predicting long term corrosion rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, J.W.; Chan, S.

    1984-01-01

    For the analyses of galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, which have been identified as possible corrosion processes for nuclear waste isolation, a finite element method has been developed for the prediction of corrosion rates. The method uses a finite element mesh to model the corrosive environment and the polarization curves of metals are assigned as the boundary conditions to calculate the corrosion cell current distribution. A subroutine is used to calculate the chemical change with time in the crevice or the pit environments. In this paper, the finite element method is described along with experimental confirmation

  19. Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.R. Ghoreishy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the footprint analysis of a steel-belted radial tyre (185/65R14 under vertical static load using finite element method. Two models have been developed in which in the first model the tread patterns were replaced by simple ribs while the second model was consisted of details of the tread blocks. Linear elastic and hyper elastic (Arruda-Boyce material models were selected to describe the mechanical behavior of the reinforcing and rubbery parts, respectively. The above two finite element models of the tyre were analyzed under inflation pressure and vertical static loads. The second model (with detailed tread patterns was analyzed with and without friction effect between tread and contact surfaces. In every stage of the analysis, the results were compared with the experimental data to confirm the accuracy and applicability of the model. Results showed that neglecting the tread pattern design not only reduces the computational cost and effort but also the differences between computed deformations do not show significant changes. However, more complicated variables such as shape and area of the footprint zone and contact pressure are affected considerably by the finite element model selected for the tread blocks. In addition, inclusion of friction even in static state changes these variables significantly.

  20. Basic Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byeong Hae

    1992-02-01

    This book gives descriptions of basic finite element method, which includes basic finite element method and data, black box, writing of data, definition of VECTOR, definition of matrix, matrix and multiplication of matrix, addition of matrix, and unit matrix, conception of hardness matrix like spring power and displacement, governed equation of an elastic body, finite element method, Fortran method and programming such as composition of computer, order of programming and data card and Fortran card, finite element program and application of nonelastic problem.

  1. An Eulerian-Lagrangian finite-element method for modeling crack growth in creeping materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Hae Sung.

    1991-01-01

    This study is concerned with the development of finite-element-solution methods for analysis of quasi-static, ductile crack growth in history-dependent materials. The mixed Eulerian-Langrangian description (ELD) kinematic model is shown to have several desirable properties for modeling inelastic crack growth. Accordingly, a variational statement based on the ELD for history-dependent materials is developed, and a new moving-grid finite-element method based on the variational statement is presented. The moving-grid finite-element method based on the variational statement is presented. The moving-grid finite-element method is applied to the analysis of transient, quasi-static, mode-III crack growth in creeping materials. A generalized Petrov-Galerkin method (GPG) is developed that simultaneously stabilizes the statement to admit L 2 basis functions for the nonlinear strain field. Quasi-static, model-III crack growth in creeping materials under small-scale-yielding (SSY) conditions is considered. The GPG/ELD moving-grid finite-element formulation is used to model a transient crack-growth problem. The GPG/ELD results compare favorably with previously-published numerical results and the asymptotic solutions

  2. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  3. The next step in coastal numerical models: spectral/hp element methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskilsson, Claes; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we outline the application of spectral/hp element methods for modelling nonlinear and dispersive waves. We present one- and two-dimensional test cases for the shallow water equations and Boussinesqtype equations – including highly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations....

  4. Applications of discrete element method in modeling of grain postharvest operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grain kernels are finite and discrete materials. Although flowing grain can behave like a continuum fluid at times, the discontinuous behavior exhibited by grain kernels cannot be simulated solely with conventional continuum-based computer modeling such as finite-element or finite-difference methods...

  5. Multiscale Model Reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods in Geomathematics

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Presho, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we discuss multiscale model reduction using Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods (GMsFEM) in a number of geomathematical applications. GMsFEM has been recently introduced (Efendiev et al. 2012) and applied to various problems. In the current chapter, we consider some of these applications and outline the basic methodological concepts.

  6. Elastically deformable models based on the finite element method accelerated on graphics hardware using CUDA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschoor, M.; Jalba, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    Elastically deformable models have found applications in various areas ranging from mechanical sciences and engineering to computer graphics. The method of Finite Elements has been the tool of choice for solving the underlying PDE, when accuracy and stability of the computations are more important

  7. Multiscale Model Reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods in Geomathematics

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-09-02

    In this chapter, we discuss multiscale model reduction using Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods (GMsFEM) in a number of geomathematical applications. GMsFEM has been recently introduced (Efendiev et al. 2012) and applied to various problems. In the current chapter, we consider some of these applications and outline the basic methodological concepts.

  8. Spectral-element Method for 3D Marine Controlled-source EM Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Yin, C.; Zhang, B., Sr.; Liu, Y.; Qiu, C.; Huang, X.; Zhu, J.

    2017-12-01

    As one of the predrill reservoir appraisal methods, marine controlled-source EM (MCSEM) has been widely used in mapping oil reservoirs to reduce risk of deep water exploration. With the technical development of MCSEM, the need for improved forward modeling tools has become evident. We introduce in this paper spectral element method (SEM) for 3D MCSEM modeling. It combines the flexibility of finite-element and high accuracy of spectral method. We use Galerkin weighted residual method to discretize the vector Helmholtz equation, where the curl-conforming Gauss-Lobatto-Chebyshev (GLC) polynomials are chosen as vector basis functions. As a kind of high-order complete orthogonal polynomials, the GLC have the characteristic of exponential convergence. This helps derive the matrix elements analytically and improves the modeling accuracy. Numerical 1D models using SEM with different orders show that SEM method delivers accurate results. With increasing SEM orders, the modeling accuracy improves largely. Further we compare our SEM with finite-difference (FD) method for a 3D reservoir model (Figure 1). The results show that SEM method is more effective than FD method. Only when the mesh is fine enough, can FD achieve the same accuracy of SEM. Therefore, to obtain the same precision, SEM greatly reduces the degrees of freedom and cost. Numerical experiments with different models (not shown here) demonstrate that SEM is an efficient and effective tool for MSCEM modeling that has significant advantages over traditional numerical methods.This research is supported by Key Program of National Natural Science Foundation of China (41530320), China Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists (41404093), and Key National Research Project of China (2016YFC0303100, 2017YFC0601900).

  9. Numerical modeling of contaminant transport in fractured porous media using mixed finite-element and finitevolume methods

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen; Sun, Shuyu; Taylor, Glenn A.

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods; i.e., the mixed finite-element (MFE) method and the finite-volume method. Adaptive

  10. The Guidelines for Modelling the Preloading Bolts in the Structural Connection Using Finite Element Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Paulina Krolo; Davor Grandić; Mladen Bulić

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the development of the two different numerical techniques for the preloading of bolts by the finite element method using the software Abaqus Standard. Furthermore, this paper gave detailed guidelines for modelling contact, method for solving the numerical error problems such as numerical singularity error and negative eigenvalues due to rigid body motion or the problem of the extensive elongation of bolts after pretension which is occurring during the analysis. The be...

  11. Modeling of asphalt by means of discrete element method – an initial study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Hededal, Ole; Stang, Henrik

    of conducting time-consuming and lab-costly procedures. The use of numerical models, capable of reducing greatly the testing cost, has shown great potential in characterizing asphalt-aggregate mixtures for both material evaluation and structural design purposes, [1],[2]. Discrete element method (DEM) is one...... – will be applied. The work presented here will focus on the discrete element method as a tool for modelling composite materials, i.e. determination of a representative volume; boundary conditions; characterisation of the components mastic (binder + filler) and aggregates; and establishment of virtual test samples....... Results from initial tests will be presented and the future development of the model towards characterising asphalt from its composition will be outlined....

  12. A blended continuous–discontinuous finite element method for solving the multi-fluid plasma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, E.M., E-mail: sousae@uw.edu; Shumlak, U., E-mail: shumlak@uw.edu

    2016-12-01

    The multi-fluid plasma model represents electrons, multiple ion species, and multiple neutral species as separate fluids that interact through short-range collisions and long-range electromagnetic fields. The model spans a large range of temporal and spatial scales, which renders the model stiff and presents numerical challenges. To address the large range of timescales, a blended continuous and discontinuous Galerkin method is proposed, where the massive ion and neutral species are modeled using an explicit discontinuous Galerkin method while the electrons and electromagnetic fields are modeled using an implicit continuous Galerkin method. This approach is able to capture large-gradient ion and neutral physics like shock formation, while resolving high-frequency electron dynamics in a computationally efficient manner. The details of the Blended Finite Element Method (BFEM) are presented. The numerical method is benchmarked for accuracy and tested using two-fluid one-dimensional soliton problem and electromagnetic shock problem. The results are compared to conventional finite volume and finite element methods, and demonstrate that the BFEM is particularly effective in resolving physics in stiff problems involving realistic physical parameters, including realistic electron mass and speed of light. The benefit is illustrated by computing a three-fluid plasma application that demonstrates species separation in multi-component plasmas.

  13. Numerical model for the analysis of unbounded prestressed structures using the hybrid type finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbieri, R.A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.; Filho, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Unbounded prestressed concrete has a growing importance all over the world and may be an useful technique for the structures involved in the construction of nuclear facilities. The absence of bonding means no strain compatibility so that equations developed for reinforced concrete are no longer valid. Practical estimates about the ultimate stress in the unbounded tendons may be obtained with empirical or numerical methods only. In order to contribute to the understanding on the behaviour of unbounded prestressed concrete members, a numerical model has been developed using a hybrid type finite element formulation for planar frame structures. Instead of short elements, as in the conventional finite element formulation, long elements may be used, improving computational efficiency. A further advantage is that the curvature variation within the element is obtained with higher accuracy if compared to the traditional formulation. This feature is important for unbounded tendons since its stresses depend on the whole member deformation. Second order effects in the planar frame are considered with either Updated or Partially Updated Lagrangian approaches. Instantaneous and time dependent behaviour as well as cyclic loads are considered too. Comparison with experimental results for prestressed concrete beams shows the adequacy of the proposed model. (authors)

  14. A comparison of numerical methods used for finite element modelling of soft tissue deformation

    KAUST Repository

    Pathmanathan, P

    2009-05-01

    Soft tissue deformation is often modelled using incompressible non-linear elasticity, with solutions computed using the finite element method. There are a range of options available when using the finite element method, in particular the polynomial degree of the basis functions used for interpolating position and pressure, and the type of element making up the mesh. The effect of these choices on the accuracy of the computed solution is investigated, using a selection of model problems motivated by typical deformations seen in soft tissue modelling. Model problems are set up with discontinuous material properties (as is the case for the breast), steeply changing gradients in the body force (as found in contracting cardiac tissue), and discontinuous first derivatives in the solution at the boundary, caused by a discontinuous applied force (as in the breast during mammography). It was found that the choice of pressure basis functions is vital in the presence of a material interface, higher-order schemes do not perform as well as may be expected when there are sharp gradients, and in general it is important to take the expected regularity of the solution into account when choosing a numerical scheme. © IMechE 2009.

  15. A comparison of numerical methods used for finite element modelling of soft tissue deformation

    KAUST Repository

    Pathmanathan, P; Gavaghan, D; Whiteley, J

    2009-01-01

    Soft tissue deformation is often modelled using incompressible non-linear elasticity, with solutions computed using the finite element method. There are a range of options available when using the finite element method, in particular the polynomial degree of the basis functions used for interpolating position and pressure, and the type of element making up the mesh. The effect of these choices on the accuracy of the computed solution is investigated, using a selection of model problems motivated by typical deformations seen in soft tissue modelling. Model problems are set up with discontinuous material properties (as is the case for the breast), steeply changing gradients in the body force (as found in contracting cardiac tissue), and discontinuous first derivatives in the solution at the boundary, caused by a discontinuous applied force (as in the breast during mammography). It was found that the choice of pressure basis functions is vital in the presence of a material interface, higher-order schemes do not perform as well as may be expected when there are sharp gradients, and in general it is important to take the expected regularity of the solution into account when choosing a numerical scheme. © IMechE 2009.

  16. Hierarchical multiscale modeling for flows in fractured media using generalized multiscale finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale finite element method for solving flows in fractured media. Our approach is based on generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM), where we represent the fracture effects on a coarse grid via multiscale basis functions. These multiscale basis functions are constructed in the offline stage via local spectral problems following GMsFEM. To represent the fractures on the fine grid, we consider two approaches (1) discrete fracture model (DFM) (2) embedded fracture model (EFM) and their combination. In DFM, the fractures are resolved via the fine grid, while in EFM the fracture and the fine grid block interaction is represented as a source term. In the proposed multiscale method, additional multiscale basis functions are used to represent the long fractures, while short-size fractures are collectively represented by a single basis functions. The procedure is automatically done via local spectral problems. In this regard, our approach shares common concepts with several approaches proposed in the literature as we discuss. We would like to emphasize that our goal is not to compare DFM with EFM, but rather to develop GMsFEM framework which uses these (DFM or EFM) fine-grid discretization techniques. Numerical results are presented, where we demonstrate how one can adaptively add basis functions in the regions of interest based on error indicators. We also discuss the use of randomized snapshots (Calo et al. Randomized oversampling for generalized multiscale finite element methods, 2014), which reduces the offline computational cost.

  17. Simplified Qualitative Discrete Numerical Model to Determine Cracking Pattern in Brittle Materials by Means of Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    Ochoa-Avendaño, J.; Garzon-Alvarado, D. A.; Linero, Dorian L.; Cerrolaza, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the formulation, implementation, and validation of a simplified qualitative model to determine the crack path of solids considering static loads, infinitesimal strain, and plane stress condition. This model is based on finite element method with a special meshing technique, where nonlinear link elements are included between the faces of the linear triangular elements. The stiffness loss of some link elements represents the crack opening. Three experimental tests of bending...

  18. A New Method for 3D Finite Element Modeling of Human Mandible Based on CT Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于力牛; 叶铭; 王成焘

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a reliable method for the semi-automatic generation of an FE model, which determines both geometrical data and bone properties from patient CT scans.3D FE analysis is one of the best approaches to predict the stress and strain distribution in complex bone structures, but its accuracy strongly depends on the precision of input information. In geometric reconstruction, various methods of image processing, geometric modeling and finite element analysis are combined and extended. Emphasis is given to the assignment of the material properties based on the density values computed from CT data. Through this technique, the model with high geometric and material similarities were generated in an easy way. Consequently, the patient-specific FE model from mandible CT data is realized also.

  19. Discrete Element Method Modeling of the Rheological Properties of Coke/Pitch Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Majidi, Behzad; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Fafard, Mario; Ziegler, Donald P.; Alamdari, Houshang

    2016-01-01

    Rheological properties of pitch and pitch/coke mixtures at temperatures around 150 °C are of great interest for the carbon anode manufacturing process in the aluminum industry. In the present work, a cohesive viscoelastic contact model based on Burger’s model is developed using the discrete element method (DEM) on the YADE, the open-source DEM software. A dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of pitch at 150 °C. The experimental data obtained is then use...

  20. Hybrid Modeling and Optimization of Manufacturing Combining Artificial Intelligence and Finite Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Quiza, Ramón; Davim, J Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques and the finite element method (FEM) are both powerful computing tools, which are extensively used for modeling and optimizing manufacturing processes. The combination of these tools has resulted in a new flexible and robust approach as several recent studies have shown. This book aims to review the work already done in this field as well as to expose the new possibilities and foreseen trends. The book is expected to be useful for postgraduate students and researchers, working in the area of modeling and optimization of manufacturing processes.

  1. 2.5-D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modelling using finite-element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-guo; Huang, Xing-xing; Liu, Wei-fang; Zhao, Wei-jun; Song, Jian-yong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Shang-xu

    2017-10-01

    2-D seismic modelling has notable dynamic information discrepancies with field data because of the implicit line-source assumption, whereas 3-D modelling suffers from a huge computational burden. The 2.5-D approach is able to overcome both of the aforementioned limitations. In general, the earth model is treated as an elastic material, but the real media is viscous. In this study, we develop an accurate and efficient frequency-domain finite-element method (FEM) for modelling 2.5-D viscoelastic wave propagation. To perform the 2.5-D approach, we assume that the 2-D viscoelastic media are based on the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model and a 3-D point source. The viscoelastic wave equation is temporally and spatially Fourier transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain. Then, we systematically derive the weak form and its spatial discretization of 2.5-D viscoelastic wave equations in the frequency-wavenumber domain through the Galerkin weighted residual method for FEM. Fixing a frequency, the 2-D problem for each wavenumber is solved by FEM. Subsequently, a composite Simpson formula is adopted to estimate the inverse Fourier integration to obtain the 3-D wavefield. We implement the stiffness reduction method (SRM) to suppress artificial boundary reflections. The results show that this absorbing boundary condition is valid and efficient in the frequency-wavenumber domain. Finally, three numerical models, an unbounded homogeneous medium, a half-space layered medium and an undulating topography medium, are established. Numerical results validate the accuracy and stability of 2.5-D solutions and present the adaptability of finite-element method to complicated geographic conditions. The proposed 2.5-D modelling strategy has the potential to address modelling studies on wave propagation in real earth media in an accurate and efficient way.

  2. 3D airborne EM modeling based on the spectral-element time-domain (SETD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X.; Yin, C.; Huang, X.; Liu, Y.; Zhang, B., Sr.; Cai, J.; Liu, L.

    2017-12-01

    In the field of 3D airborne electromagnetic (AEM) modeling, both finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and finite-element time-domain (FETD) method have limitations that FDTD method depends too much on the grids and time steps, while FETD requires large number of grids for complex structures. We propose a time-domain spectral-element (SETD) method based on GLL interpolation basis functions for spatial discretization and Backward Euler (BE) technique for time discretization. The spectral-element method is based on a weighted residual technique with polynomials as vector basis functions. It can contribute to an accurate result by increasing the order of polynomials and suppressing spurious solution. BE method is a stable tine discretization technique that has no limitation on time steps and can guarantee a higher accuracy during the iteration process. To minimize the non-zero number of sparse matrix and obtain a diagonal mass matrix, we apply the reduced order integral technique. A direct solver with its speed independent of the condition number is adopted for quickly solving the large-scale sparse linear equations system. To check the accuracy of our SETD algorithm, we compare our results with semi-analytical solutions for a three-layered earth model within the time lapse 10-6-10-2s for different physical meshes and SE orders. The results show that the relative errors for magnetic field B and magnetic induction are both around 3-5%. Further we calculate AEM responses for an AEM system over a 3D earth model in Figure 1. From numerical experiments for both 1D and 3D model, we draw the conclusions that: 1) SETD can deliver an accurate results for both dB/dt and B; 2) increasing SE order improves the modeling accuracy for early to middle time channels when the EM field diffuses fast so the high-order SE can model the detailed variation; 3) at very late time channels, increasing SE order has little improvement on modeling accuracy, but the time interval plays

  3. A 2D Electromechanical Model of Human Atrial Tissue Using the Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Brocklehurst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac tissue is a syncytium of coupled cells with pronounced intrinsic discrete nature. Previous models of cardiac electromechanics often ignore such discrete properties and treat cardiac tissue as a continuous medium, which has fundamental limitations. In the present study, we introduce a 2D electromechanical model for human atrial tissue based on the discrete element method (DEM. In the model, single-cell dynamics are governed by strongly coupling the electrophysiological model of Courtemanche et al. to the myofilament model of Rice et al. with two-way feedbacks. Each cell is treated as a viscoelastic body, which is physically represented by a clump of nine particles. Cell aggregations are arranged so that the anisotropic nature of cardiac tissue due to fibre orientations can be modelled. Each cell is electrically coupled to neighbouring cells, allowing excitation waves to propagate through the tissue. Cell-to-cell mechanical interactions are modelled using a linear contact bond model in DEM. By coupling cardiac electrophysiology with mechanics via the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the DEM model successfully simulates the conduction of cardiac electrical waves and the tissue’s corresponding mechanical contractions. The developed DEM model is numerically stable and provides a powerful method for studying the electromechanical coupling problem in the heart.

  4. A numerical method to estimate AC loss in superconducting coated conductors by finite element modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Z; Jiang, Q; Pei, R; Campbell, A M; Coombs, T A [Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-15

    A finite element method code based on the critical state model is proposed to solve the AC loss problem in YBCO coated conductors. This numerical method is based on a set of partial differential equations (PDEs) in which the magnetic field is used as the state variable. The AC loss problems have been investigated both in self-field condition and external field condition. Two numerical approaches have been introduced: the first model is configured on the cross-section plane of the YBCO tape to simulate an infinitely long superconducting tape. The second model represents the plane of the critical current flowing and is able to simulate the YBCO tape with finite length where the end effect is accounted. An AC loss measurement has been done to verify the numerical results and shows a good agreement with the numerical solution.

  5. Study on validation method for femur finite element model under multiple loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Fengjiao; Zhang, Guanjun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Shujing; Luo, Xu

    2018-03-01

    Acquisition of accurate and reliable constitutive parameters related to bio-tissue materials was beneficial to improve biological fidelity of a Finite Element (FE) model and predict impact damages more effectively. In this paper, a femur FE model was established under multiple loading conditions with diverse impact positions. Then, based on sequential response surface method and genetic algorithms, the material parameters identification was transformed to a multi-response optimization problem. Finally, the simulation results successfully coincided with force-displacement curves obtained by numerous experiments. Thus, computational accuracy and efficiency of the entire inverse calculation process were enhanced. This method was able to effectively reduce the computation time in the inverse process of material parameters. Meanwhile, the material parameters obtained by the proposed method achieved higher accuracy.

  6. Detailed finite element method modeling of evaporating multi-component droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diddens, Christian, E-mail: C.Diddens@tue.nl

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation of sessile multi-component droplets is modeled with an axisymmetic finite element method. The model comprises the coupled processes of mixture evaporation, multi-component flow with composition-dependent fluid properties and thermal effects. Based on representative examples of water–glycerol and water–ethanol droplets, regular and chaotic examples of solutal Marangoni flows are discussed. Furthermore, the relevance of the substrate thickness for the evaporative cooling of volatile binary mixture droplets is pointed out. It is shown how the evaporation of the more volatile component can drastically decrease the interface temperature, so that ambient vapor of the less volatile component condenses on the droplet. Finally, results of this model are compared with corresponding results of a lubrication theory model, showing that the application of lubrication theory can cause considerable errors even for moderate contact angles of 40°. - Graphical abstract:.

  7. Discrete Element Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  8. Pellet Cladding Mechanical Interaction Modeling Using the Extended Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin W.; Jiang, Wen; Dolbow, John E.; Peco, Christian

    2016-09-01

    As a brittle material, the ceramic UO2 used as light water reactor fuel experiences significant fracturing throughout its life, beginning with the first rise to power of fresh fuel. This has multiple effects on the thermal and mechanical response of the fuel/cladding system. One such effect that is particularly important is that when there is mechanical contact between the fuel and cladding, cracks that extending from the outer surface of the fuel into the volume of the fuel cause elevated stresses in the adjacent cladding, which can potentially lead to cladding failure. Modeling the thermal and mechanical response of the cladding in the vicinity of these surface-breaking cracks in the fuel can provide important insights into this behavior to help avoid operating conditions that could lead to cladding failure. Such modeling has traditionally been done in the context of finite-element-based fuel performance analysis by modifying the fuel mesh to introduce discrete cracks. While this approach is effective in capturing the important behavior at the fuel/cladding interface, there are multiple drawbacks to explicitly incorporating the cracks in the finite element mesh. Because the cracks are incorporated in the original mesh, the mesh must be modified for cracks of specified location and depth, so it is difficult to account for crack propagation and the formation of new cracks at other locations. The extended finite element method (XFEM) has emerged in recent years as a powerful method to represent arbitrary, evolving, discrete discontinuities within the context of the finite element method. Development work is underway by the authors to implement XFEM in the BISON fuel performance code, and this capability has previously been demonstrated in simulations of fracture propagation in ceramic nuclear fuel. These preliminary demonstrations have included only the fuel, and excluded the cladding for simplicity. This paper presents initial results of efforts to apply XFEM to

  9. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  10. Analysis of pipe mitred bends using beam models - by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salles, A.C.S.L. de.

    1984-01-01

    The formulation of a recently proposed displacement based straight pipe element for the analysis of pipe mitred bends is summarized in this work. The element kinematics includes axial, bending, torsional and ovalisation displacements, all varying cubically along the axis of the element. Interaction effects between angle adjoined straight pipe section are modeled including the appropriate additional strain terms in the stiffness matrix formulation and by using a penalty procedure to enforce continuity of pipe skin flexural rotations at the common helical edge. The element model capabilities are ilustrated in some sample analysis and the results are compared with other available experimental, analytical or more complex numerical models. (Author) [pt

  11. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  12. A hierarchical updating method for finite element model of airbag buffer system under landing impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an impact finite element (FE model for an airbag landing buffer system. First, an impact FE model has been formulated for a typical airbag landing buffer system. We use the independence of the structure FE model from the full impact FE model to develop a hierarchical updating scheme for the recovery module FE model and the airbag system FE model. Second, we define impact responses at key points to compare the computational and experimental results to resolve the inconsistency between the experimental data sampling frequency and experimental triggering. To determine the typical characteristics of the impact dynamics response of the airbag landing buffer system, we present the impact response confidence factors (IRCFs to evaluate how consistent the computational and experiment results are. An error function is defined between the experimental and computational results at key points of the impact response (KPIR to serve as a modified objective function. A radial basis function (RBF is introduced to construct updating variables for a surrogate model for updating the objective function, thereby converting the FE model updating problem to a soluble optimization problem. Finally, the developed method has been validated using an experimental and computational study on the impact dynamics of a classic airbag landing buffer system.

  13. Three Different Ways of Calibrating Burger's Contact Model for Viscoelastic Model of Asphalt Mixtures by Discrete Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    modulus. Three different approaches have been used and compared for calibrating the Burger's contact model. Values of the dynamic modulus and phase angle of asphalt mixtures were predicted by conducting DE simulation under dynamic strain control loading. The excellent agreement between the predicted......In this paper the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was investigated by employing a three-dimensional discrete element method. Combined with Burger's model, three contact models were used for the construction of constitutive asphalt mixture model with viscoelastic properties...

  14. Influence of heterogeneity on rock strength and stiffness using discrete element method and parallel bond model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Liakas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The particulate discrete element method (DEM can be employed to capture the response of rock, provided that appropriate bonding models are used to cement the particles to each other. Simulations of laboratory tests are important to establish the extent to which those models can capture realistic rock behaviors. Hitherto the focus in such comparison studies has either been on homogeneous specimens or use of two-dimensional (2D models. In situ rock formations are often heterogeneous, thus exploring the ability of this type of models to capture heterogeneous material behavior is important to facilitate their use in design analysis. In situ stress states are basically three-dimensional (3D, and therefore it is important to develop 3D models for this purpose. This paper revisits an earlier experimental study on heterogeneous specimens, of which the relative proportions of weaker material (siltstone and stronger, harder material (sandstone were varied in a controlled manner. Using a 3D DEM model with the parallel bond model, virtual heterogeneous specimens were created. The overall responses in terms of variations in strength and stiffness with different percentages of weaker material (siltstone were shown to agree with the experimental observations. There was also a good qualitative agreement in the failure patterns observed in the experiments and the simulations, suggesting that the DEM data enabled analysis of the initiation of localizations and micro fractures in the specimens.

  15. Discrete Element Method Modeling of the Rheological Properties of Coke/Pitch Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Majidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of pitch and pitch/coke mixtures at temperatures around 150 °C are of great interest for the carbon anode manufacturing process in the aluminum industry. In the present work, a cohesive viscoelastic contact model based on Burger’s model is developed using the discrete element method (DEM on the YADE, the open-source DEM software. A dynamic shear rheometer (DSR is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of pitch at 150 °C. The experimental data obtained is then used to estimate the Burger’s model parameters and calibrate the DEM model. The DSR tests were then simulated by a three-dimensional model. Very good agreement was observed between the experimental data and simulation results. Coke aggregates were modeled by overlapping spheres in the DEM model. Coke/pitch mixtures were numerically created by adding 5, 10, 20, and 30 percent of coke aggregates of the size range of 0.297–0.595 mm (−30 + 50 mesh to pitch. Adding up to 30% of coke aggregates to pitch can increase its complex shear modulus at 60 Hz from 273 Pa to 1557 Pa. Results also showed that adding coke particles increases both storage and loss moduli, while it does not have a meaningful effect on the phase angle of pitch.

  16. Discrete Element Method Modeling of the Rheological Properties of Coke/Pitch Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Behzad; Taghavi, Seyed Mohammad; Fafard, Mario; Ziegler, Donald P; Alamdari, Houshang

    2016-05-04

    Rheological properties of pitch and pitch/coke mixtures at temperatures around 150 °C are of great interest for the carbon anode manufacturing process in the aluminum industry. In the present work, a cohesive viscoelastic contact model based on Burger's model is developed using the discrete element method (DEM) on the YADE, the open-source DEM software. A dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of pitch at 150 °C. The experimental data obtained is then used to estimate the Burger's model parameters and calibrate the DEM model. The DSR tests were then simulated by a three-dimensional model. Very good agreement was observed between the experimental data and simulation results. Coke aggregates were modeled by overlapping spheres in the DEM model. Coke/pitch mixtures were numerically created by adding 5, 10, 20, and 30 percent of coke aggregates of the size range of 0.297-0.595 mm (-30 + 50 mesh) to pitch. Adding up to 30% of coke aggregates to pitch can increase its complex shear modulus at 60 Hz from 273 Pa to 1557 Pa. Results also showed that adding coke particles increases both storage and loss moduli, while it does not have a meaningful effect on the phase angle of pitch.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Recycled Concrete Using Convex Aggregate Model and Base Force Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the Base Force Element Method (BFEM on potential energy principle, a new numerical concrete model, random convex aggregate model, is presented in this paper to simulate the experiment under uniaxial compression for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC which can also be referred to as recycled concrete. This model is considered as a heterogeneous composite which is composed of five mediums, including natural coarse aggregate, old mortar, new mortar, new interfacial transition zone (ITZ, and old ITZ. In order to simulate the damage processes of RAC, a curve damage model was adopted as the damage constitutive model and the strength theory of maximum tensile strain was used as the failure criterion in the BFEM on mesomechanics. The numerical results obtained in this paper which contained the uniaxial compressive strengths, size effects on strength, and damage processes of RAC are in agreement with experimental observations. The research works show that the random convex aggregate model and the BFEM with the curve damage model can be used for simulating the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of RAC.

  18. Hydrodynamics of free surface flows modelling with the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    A definitive guide for accurate state-of-the-art modelling of free surface flows Understanding the dynamics of free surface flows is the starting point of many environmental studies, impact studies, and waterworks design. Typical applications, once the flows are known, are water quality, dam impact and safety, pollutant control, and sediment transport. These studies used to be done in the past with scale models, but these are now being replaced by numerical simulation performed by software suites called "hydro-informatic systems". The Telemac system is the leading software package worldwide, and has been developed by Electricité de France and Jean-Michel Hervouet, who is the head and main developer of the Telemac project. Written by a leading authority on Computational Fluid Dynamics, the book aims to provide environmentalists, hydrologists, and engineers using hydro-informatic systems such as Telemac and the finite element method, with the knowledge of the basic principles, capabilities, different hypothese...

  19. Pseudo three-dimensional modeling of particle-fuel packing using distinct element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuki, Daisuke; Takata, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2007-01-01

    Vibration-based packing of sphere-pac fuel is a key technology in a nuclear fuel manufacturing. In the production process of sphere-pac fuel, a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel is formed to spherical form and is packed in a cladding tube by adding a vibration force. In the present study, we have developed a numerical simulation method to investigate the behavior of the particles in a vibrated tube using the Distinct Element Method (DEM). In general, the DEM requires a significant computational cost. Therefore we propose a new approach in which a small particle can move through the space between three larger particles even in the two-dimensional simulation. We take into account an equivalent three-dimensional effect in the equations of motion. Thus it is named pseudo three-dimensional modeling. (author)

  20. An assessment of the DORT method on simple scatterers using boundary element modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gélat, P; Ter Haar, G; Saffari, N

    2015-05-07

    The ability to focus through ribs overcomes an important limitation of a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) system for the treatment of liver tumours. Whilst it is important to generate high enough acoustic pressures at the treatment location for tissue lesioning, it is also paramount to ensure that the resulting ultrasonic dose on the ribs remains below a specified threshold, since ribs both strongly absorb and reflect ultrasound. The DORT (décomposition de l'opérateur de retournement temporel) method has the ability to focus on and through scatterers immersed in an acoustic medium selectively without requiring prior knowledge of their location or geometry. The method requires a multi-element transducer and is implemented via a singular value decomposition of the measured matrix of inter-element transfer functions. The efficacy of a method of focusing through scatterers is often assessed by comparing the specific absorption rate (SAR) at the surface of the scatterer, and at the focal region. The SAR can be obtained from a knowledge of the acoustic pressure magnitude and the acoustic properties of the medium and scatterer. It is well known that measuring acoustic pressures with a calibrated hydrophone at or near a hard surface presents experimental challenges, potentially resulting in increased measurement uncertainties. Hence, the DORT method is usually assessed experimentally by measuring the SAR at locations on the surface of the scatterer after the latter has been removed from the acoustic medium. This is also likely to generate uncertainties in the acoustic pressure measurement. There is therefore a strong case for assessing the efficacy of the DORT method through a validated theoretical model. The boundary element method (BEM) applied to exterior acoustic scattering problems is well-suited for such an assessment. In this study, BEM was used to implement the DORT method theoretically on locally reacting spherical scatterers, and to assess its focusing

  1. True Concurrent Thermal Engineering Integrating CAD Model Building with Finite Element and Finite Difference Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczak, Tim; Ring, Steve; Welch, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Thermal engineering has long been left out of the concurrent engineering environment dominated by CAD (computer aided design) and FEM (finite element method) software. Current tools attempt to force the thermal design process into an environment primarily created to support structural analysis, which results in inappropriate thermal models. As a result, many thermal engineers either build models "by hand" or use geometric user interfaces that are separate from and have little useful connection, if any, to CAD and FEM systems. This paper describes the development of a new thermal design environment called the Thermal Desktop. This system, while fully integrated into a neutral, low cost CAD system, and which utilizes both FEM and FD methods, does not compromise the needs of the thermal engineer. Rather, the features needed for concurrent thermal analysis are specifically addressed by combining traditional parametric surface based radiation and FD based conduction modeling with CAD and FEM methods. The use of flexible and familiar temperature solvers such as SINDA/FLUINT (Systems Improved Numerical Differencing Analyzer/Fluid Integrator) is retained.

  2. Compositional modeling of three-phase flow with gravity using higher-order finite element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2011-05-11

    A wide range of applications in subsurface flow involve water, a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) or oil, and a gas phase, such as air or CO2. The numerical simulation of such processes is computationally challenging and requires accurate compositional modeling of three-phase flow in porous media. In this work, we simulate for the first time three-phase compositional flow using higher-order finite element methods. Gravity poses complications in modeling multiphase processes because it drives countercurrent flow among phases. To resolve this issue, we propose a new method for the upwinding of three-phase mobilities. Numerical examples, related to enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration, are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the proposed algorithm. We pay special attention to challenges associated with gravitational instabilities and take into account compressibility and various phase behavior effects, including swelling, viscosity changes, and vaporization. We find that the proposed higher-order method can capture sharp solution discontinuities, yielding accurate predictions of phase boundaries arising in computational three-phase flow. This work sets the stage for a broad extension of the higher-order methods for numerical simulation of three-phase flow for complex geometries and processes.

  3. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günay, E. [Gazi University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 06570, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  4. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  5. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  6. Assessment of finite element and smoothed particles hydrodynamics methods for modeling serrated chip formation in hardened steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Umer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to perform comparative analyses in modeling serrated chip morphologies using traditional finite element and smoothed particles hydrodynamics methods. Although finite element models are being employed in predicting machining performance variables for the last two decades, many drawbacks and limitations exist with the current finite element models. The problems like excessive mesh distortions, high numerical cost of adaptive meshing techniques, and need of geometric chip separation criteria hinder its practical implementation in metal cutting industries. In this study, a mesh free method, namely, smoothed particles hydrodynamics, is implemented for modeling serrated chip morphology while machining AISI H13 hardened tool steel. The smoothed particles hydrodynamics models are compared with the traditional finite element models, and it has been found that the smoothed particles hydrodynamics models have good capabilities in handling large distortions and do not need any geometric or mesh-based chip separation criterion.

  7. Application of the method finite elements by numerical modeling stress-strain state in conveyor belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maras Michal

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Solving problems connected with damaging a conveyor belt at the transfer points is conditioned by knowing laws of this phenomenon. Acquiring the knowledge on this phenomen is possible to be gained either by experimental research or by the numerical model GEM 22, which enables to determine the distribution of stresses and strains in a suitably selected cross-section of a conveyor belt. The paper begins by defining the problem, determining the boundary model conditions and continues by modelling the dynamic force acting on the conveyor belt. In the conclusions of the paper there are given table and graphical results of the numerical modelling aimed at solving the problems connected with the damaging of a conveyor belt. By numerical modelling, in this case the finite element method, in the given way can be realized the parametric studies with changing values of input parameters, especially: - stretching force, - thickness of cover layers of the conveyor belt and strain properties of the rubber, - parameters of the steel cord of the conveyor belt.

  8. Finite Element Method Based Modeling of Resistance Spot-Welded Mild Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloud Zaoui

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper deals with Finite Element refined and simplified models of a mild steel spot-welded specimen, developed and validated based on quasi-static cross-tensile experimental tests. The first model was constructed with a fine discretization of the metal sheet and the spot weld was defined as a special geometric zone of the specimen. This model provided, in combination with experimental tests, the input data for the development of the second model, which was constructed with respect to the mesh size used in the complete car finite element model. This simplified model was developed with coarse shell elements and a spring-type beam element was used to model the spot weld behavior. The global accuracy of the two models was checked by comparing simulated and experimental load-displacement curves and by studying the specimen deformed shapes and the plastic deformation growth in the metal sheets. The obtained results show that both fine and coarse finite element models permit a good prediction of the experimental tests.

  9. Modeling reservoir geomechanics using discrete element method : Application to reservoir monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alassi, Haitham Tayseer

    2008-09-15

    Understanding reservoir geomechanical behavior is becoming more and more important for the petroleum industry. Reservoir compaction, which may result in surface subsidence and fault reactivation, occurs during reservoir depletion. Stress changes and possible fracture development inside and outside a depleting reservoir can be monitored using time-lapse (so-called '4D') seismic and/or passive seismic, and this can give valuable information about the conditions of a given reservoir during production. In this study we will focus on using the (particle-based) Discrete Element Method (DEM) to model reservoir geomechanical behavior during depletion and fluid injection. We show in this study that DEM can be used in modeling reservoir geomechanical behavior by comparing results obtained from DEM to those obtained from analytical solutions. The match of the displacement field between DEM and the analytical solution is good, however there is mismatch of the stress field which is related to the way stress is measured in DEM. A good match is however obtained by measuring the stress field carefully. We also use DEM to model reservoir geomechanical behavior beyond the elasticity limit where fractures can develop and faults can reactivate. A general technique has been developed to relate DEM parameters to rock properties. This is necessary in order to use correct reservoir geomechanical properties during modeling. For any type of particle packing there is a limitation that the maximum ratio between P- and S-wave velocity Vp/Vs that can be modeled is 3 . The static behavior for a loose packing is different from the dynamic behavior. Empirical relations are needed for the static behavior based on numerical test observations. The dynamic behavior for both dense and loose packing can be given by analytical relations. Cosserat continuum theory is needed to derive relations for Vp and Vs. It is shown that by constraining the particle rotation, the S-wave velocity can be

  10. Discrete Element Method for Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Unsaturated Granular Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tourani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although a significant portion of conditions encountered in geotechnical engineering, for investigating engineering behavior of soil, involves unsaturated soils; the traditional analysis and design approach has been to assume the limiting conditions of soils being either completely dry or completely saturated. In unsaturated soils the capillary force produce attractive forces between particles. Discrete Element Method (DEM is an appropriate tool to consider the capillary effects. The calculations performed in DEM is based on iterative application of Newton’s second law to the particles and force-displacement law at the contacts. In the present study, the behavior of unsaturated soils in pendular regime is simulated utilizing DEM. Triaxial  compression tests were modeled as two-dimensional, considering capillary force effects. Finally, capillary effects on Macro parameters of a simulated granular soil (stress, axial strain, volumetric strain and void ratio and Mohr Coulomb failure criteria parameters were studied.

  11. Modeling of heterogeneous elastic materials by the multiscale hp-adaptive finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimczak, Marek; Cecot, Witold

    2018-01-01

    We present an enhancement of the multiscale finite element method (MsFEM) by combining it with the hp-adaptive FEM. Such a discretization-based homogenization technique is a versatile tool for modeling heterogeneous materials with fast oscillating elasticity coefficients. No assumption on periodicity of the domain is required. In order to avoid direct, so-called overkill mesh computations, a coarse mesh with effective stiffness matrices is used and special shape functions are constructed to account for the local heterogeneities at the micro resolution. The automatic adaptivity (hp-type at the macro resolution and h-type at the micro resolution) increases efficiency of computation. In this paper details of the modified MsFEM are presented and a numerical test performed on a Fichera corner domain is presented in order to validate the proposed approach.

  12. Fuzzy cross-model cross-mode method and its application to update the finite element model of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yang; Xu Dejian; Li Yan; Duan Zhongdong

    2011-01-01

    As a novel updating technique, cross-model cross-mode (CMCM) method possesses a high efficiency and capability of flexible selecting updating parameters. However, the success of this method depends on the accuracy of measured modal shapes. Usually, the measured modal shapes are inaccurate since many kinds of measured noises are inevitable. Furthermore, the complete testing modal shapes are required by CMCM method so that the calculating errors may be introduced into the measured modal shapes by conducting the modal expansion or model reduction technique. Therefore, this algorithm is faced with the challenge of updating the finite element (FE) model of practical complex structures. In this study, the fuzzy CMCM method is proposed in order to weaken the effect of errors of the measured modal shapes on the updated results. Then two simulated examples are applied to compare the performance of the fuzzy CMCM method with the CMCM method. The test results show that proposed method is more promising to update the FE model of practical structures than CMCM method.

  13. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Youshan, E-mail: ysliu@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Teng, Jiwen, E-mail: jwteng@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Xu, Tao, E-mail: xutao@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Beijing, 100101 (China); Badal, José, E-mail: badal@unizar.es [Physics of the Earth, Sciences B, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  14. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  15. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José

    2017-01-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  16. Rayleigh's, Stoneley's, and Scholte's Interface Waves in Elastic Models Using a Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Flores-Mendez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on studying interface waves for three canonical models, that is, interfaces formed by vacuum-solid, solid-solid, and liquid-solid. These interfaces excited by dynamic loads cause the emergence of Rayleigh's, Stoneley's, and Scholte's waves, respectively. To perform the study, the indirect boundary element method is used, which has proved to be a powerful tool for numerical modeling of problems in elastodynamics. In essence, the method expresses the diffracted wave field of stresses, pressures, and displacements by a boundary integral, also known as single-layer representation, whose shape can be regarded as a Fredholm's integral representation of second kind and zero order. This representation can be considered as an exemplification of Huygens' principle, which is equivalent to Somigliana's representation theorem. Results in frequency domain for the three types of interfaces are presented; then, using the fourier discrete transform, we derive the results in time domain, where the emergence of interface waves is highlighted.

  17. A parallel Discrete Element Method to model collisions between non-convex particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakotonirina Andriarimina Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many dry granular and suspension flow configurations, particles can be highly non-spherical. It is now well established in the literature that particle shape affects the flow dynamics or the microstructure of the particles assembly in assorted ways as e.g. compacity of packed bed or heap, dilation under shear, resistance to shear, momentum transfer between translational and angular motions, ability to form arches and block the flow. In this talk, we suggest an accurate and efficient way to model collisions between particles of (almost arbitrary shape. For that purpose, we develop a Discrete Element Method (DEM combined with a soft particle contact model. The collision detection algorithm handles contacts between bodies of various shape and size. For nonconvex bodies, our strategy is based on decomposing a non-convex body into a set of convex ones. Therefore, our novel method can be called “glued-convex method” (in the sense clumping convex bodies together, as an extension of the popular “glued-spheres” method, and is implemented in our own granular dynamics code Grains3D. Since the whole problem is solved explicitly, our fully-MPI parallelized code Grains3D exhibits a very high scalability when dynamic load balancing is not required. In particular, simulations on up to a few thousands cores in configurations involving up to a few tens of millions of particles can readily be performed. We apply our enhanced numerical model to (i the collapse of a granular column made of convex particles and (i the microstructure of a heap of non-convex particles in a cylindrical reactor.

  18. Distinct Element Method modelling of fold-related fractures in a multilayer sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaserer, Klemens; Schöpfer, Martin P. J.; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    Natural fractures have a significant impact on the performance of hydrocarbon systems/reservoirs. In a multilayer sequence, both the fracture density within the individual layers and the type of fracture intersection with bedding contacts are key parameters controlling fluid pathways. In the present study the influence of layer stacking and interlayer friction on fracture density and connectivity within a folded sequence is systematically investigated using 2D Distinct Element Method modelling. Our numerical approach permits forward modelling of both fracture nucleation/propagation/arrest and (contemporaneous) frictional slip along bedding planes in a robust and mechanically sound manner. Folding of the multilayer sequence is achieved by enforcing constant curvature folding by means of a velocity boundary condition at the model base, while a constant overburden pressure is maintained at the model top. The modelling reveals that with high bedding plane friction the multilayer stack behaves mechanically as a single layer so that the neutral surface develops in centre of the sequence and fracture spacing is controlled by the total thickness of the folded sequence. In contrast, low bedding plane friction leads to decoupling of the individual layers (flexural slip folding) so that a neutral surface develops in the centre of each layer and fracture spacing is controlled by the thickness of the individual layers. The low interfacial friction models illustrate that stepping of fractures across bedding planes is a common process, which can however have two contrasting origins: The mechanical properties of the interface cause fracture stepping during fracture propagation. Originally through-going fractures are later offset by interfacial slip during folding. A combination of these two different origins may lead to (apparently) inconsistent fracture offsets across bedding planes within a flexural slip fold.

  19. Application of Finite Element Modeling Methods in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Research and Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fwu, Peter Tramyeon

    The medical image is very complex by its nature. Modeling built upon the medical image is challenging due to the lack of analytical solution. Finite element method (FEM) is a numerical technique which can be used to solve the partial differential equations. It utilized the transformation from a continuous domain into solvable discrete sub-domains. In three-dimensional space, FEM has the capability dealing with complicated structure and heterogeneous interior. That makes FEM an ideal tool to approach the medical-image based modeling problems. In this study, I will address the three modeling in (1) photon transport inside the human breast by implanting the radiative transfer equation to simulate the diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) in order to measurement the percent density (PD), which has been proven as a cancer risk factor in mammography. Our goal is to use MRI as the ground truth to optimize the DOSI scanning protocol to get a consistent measurement of PD. Our result shows DOSI measurement is position and depth dependent and proper scanning scheme and body configuration are needed; (2) heat flow in the prostate by implementing the Penne's bioheat equation to evaluate the cooling performance of regional hypothermia during the robot assisted radical prostatectomy for the individual patient in order to achieve the optimal cooling setting. Four factors are taken into account during the simulation: blood abundance, artery perfusion, cooling balloon temperature, and the anatomical distance. The result shows that blood abundance, prostate size, and anatomical distance are significant factors to the equilibrium temperature of neurovascular bundle; (3) shape analysis in hippocampus by using the radial distance mapping, and two registration methods to find the correlation between sub-regional change to the age and cognition performance, which might not reveal in the volumetric analysis. The result gives a fundamental knowledge of normal distribution in young

  20. The ab initio model potential method. Second series transition metal elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barandiaran, Z.; Seijo, L.; Huzinaga, S.

    1990-01-01

    The ab initio core method potential model (AIMP) has already been presented in its nonrelativistic version and applied to the main group and first series transition metal elements [J. Chem. Phys. 86, 2132 (1987); 91, 7011 (1989)]. In this paper we extend the AIMP method to include relativistic effects within the Cowan--Griffin approximation and we present relativistic Zn-like core model potentials and valence basis sets, as well as their nonrelativistic Zn-like core and Kr-like core counterparts. The pilot molecular calculations on YO, TcO, AgO, and AgH reveal that the 4p orbital is indeed a core orbital only at the end part of the series, whereas the 4s orbital can be safely frozen from Y to Cd. The all-electron and model potential results agree in 0.01--0.02 A in R e and 25--50 cm -1 in bar ν e if the same type of valence part of the basis set is used. The comparison of the relativistic results on AgH with those of the all-electron Dirac--Fock calculations by Lee and McLean is satisfactory: the absolute value of R e is reproduced within the 0.01 A margin and the relativistic contraction of 0.077 A is also very well reproduced (0.075 A). Finally, the relative magnitude of the effects of the core orbital change, mass--velocity potential, and Darwin potential on the net relativistic effects are analyzed in the four molecules studied

  1. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  2. Application of a circulation model in bays, using the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, R.

    1984-01-01

    The circulation of water was studied in different areas in 'Baia de Sepetiba', in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The method applied on the mathematical studies was Galerkin's method and ths originated a system of equations which described all the water motions. The Finite Element method used, had great sensitivity to modifications of input data. Comparison between computed and measured data was made in order to verify the conclusions. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Toward the modeling of combustion reactions through discrete element method (DEM) simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Martina Costa; Alobaid, Falah; Wang, Yongqi

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the process of combustion of coal particles under turbulent regime in a high-temperature reaction chamber is modeled through 3D discrete element method (DEM) simulations. By assuming the occurrence of interfacial transport phenomena between the gas and solid phases, one investigates the influence of the physicochemical properties of particles on the rates of heterogeneous chemical reactions, as well as the influence of eddies present in the gas phase on the mass transport of reactants toward the coal particles surface. Moreover, by considering a simplistic chemical mechanism for the combustion process, thermochemical and kinetic parameters obtained from the simulations are employed to discuss some phenomenological aspects of the combustion process. In particular, the observed changes in the mass and volume of coal particles during the gasification and combustion steps are discussed by emphasizing the changes in the chemical structure of the coal. In addition to illustrate how DEM simulations can be used in the modeling of consecutive and parallel chemical reactions, this work also shows how heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions become a source of mass and energy for the gas phase.

  4. Bending stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints applied with a use of finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Šimek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work focuses on bending moment stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints with a use of Finite Element Method. The joints are created from Minifix and Rondorfix cams combined with non-glued wooden dowels. Laminated particleboard 18 mm of thickness is used as a connected material. The connectors were chosen such as the most applied kind in furniture industry for the case furniture. All gained results were reciprocally compared to each other and also in comparison to experimental testing by the mean of stiffness. The non-linear numerical model of chosen joints was successfully created using the software Ansys Workbench. The detailed analysis of stress distribution in the joint was achieved with non-linear numerical simulation. A relationship between numerical si­mu­la­tion and experimental testing was showed by comparison stiffness tangents. A numerical simulation of RTA joint loads also demonstrated the important role of non-glued dowels in the tested joints. The low strength of particleboard in the tension parallel to surface (internal bond is the most likely the cause of the joint failure. Results are applicable for strength designing of furniture with the aid of Computer Aided Engineering.

  5. Distinct element method modeling of fracture behavior in near field rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekmark, H.

    1990-12-01

    This report concerns the numerical calculations of the behavior of the near field of a nuclear waste repository. The calculations were performed using the two-dimensional distinct element code UDEC. The distinct element method accounts specifically for discontinuities, e.g. fractures that intersect the model region. It is shown that, if an appropriate joint constitutive relation is applied, the calculated joint behavior can be brought in close agreement with empirically derived stress-strain relations. Three basic geometries are studied, namely a vertical tunnel section, a horizontal borehole section and a combination, i.e. a vertical section of tunnel and deposition hole. The effects of different processes and activities are investigated, e.g. effects of excavations, of thermal loads, of internal tunnel pressures and of pore pressures and fracture flow resulting from the hydraulic ground water pressure. The interpretation of the results concerns in particular joint behavior, especially joint openings, in the nearest surroundings of excavations and of thermally affected regions. The calculations show that joint shear and joint normal displacements induced by excavation and by thermal processes may be considerable, and that thermal cycles may result in residual joint aperture changes, especially in systems with loosely bound rock blocks. It is concluded that the UDEC code, when applied to problems that have a two-dimensional character, gives results that are probably quantitatively correct. The results appear to be strongly dependant on the detailed joint structure close to free boundaries such as tunnel walls, which indicated that the 3-D situation regarding joint orientation might have to be considered. It is recommended that 3-D calculations should be performed to verify and quantitatively interpret the 2-D results and to analyze situations that are actually three-dimensional. (au)

  6. Finite element modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Masson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a numerical technique for finding approximate solutions to boundary value problems. While FEM is commonly used to solve solid mechanics equations, it can be applied to a large range of BVPs from many different fields. FEM has been used for reactor fuels modelling for many years. It is most often used for fuel performance modelling at the pellet and pin scale, however, it has also been used to investigate properties of the fuel material, such as thermal conductivity and fission gas release. Recently, the United Stated Department Nuclear Energy Advanced Modelling and Simulation Program has begun using FEM as the basis of the MOOSE-BISON-MARMOT Project that is developing a multi-dimensional, multi-physics fuel performance capability that is massively parallel and will use multi-scale material models to provide a truly predictive modelling capability. (authors)

  7. Modeling the growth and interaction of stylolite networks, using the discrete element method for pressure solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makedonska, N.; Sparks, D. W.; Aharonov, E.

    2012-12-01

    Pressure solution (also termed chemical compaction) is considered the most important ductile deformation mechanism operating in the Earth's upper crust. This mechanism is a major player in a variety of geological processes, including evolution of sedimentary basins, hydrocarbon reservoirs, aquifers, earthquake recurrence cycles, and fault healing. Pressure solution in massive rocks often localizes into solution seams or stylolites. Field observations of stylolites often show elastic/brittle interactions in regions between pressure solution features, including and shear fractures, veins and pull-apart features. To understand these interactions, we use a grain-scale model based on the Discrete Element Method that allows granular dissolution at stressed contacts between grains. The new model captures both the slow chemical compaction process and the more abrupt brittle fracturing and sliding between grains. We simulate a sample of rock as a collection of particles, each representing either a grain or a unit of rock, bonded to each other with breakable cement. We apply external stresses to this sample, and calculate elastic and frictional interactions between the grains. Dissolution is modeled by an irreversible penetration of contacting grains into each other at a rate that depends on the contact stress and an adjustable rate constant. Experiments have shown that dissolution rates at grain contacts are greatly enhanced when there is a mineralogical contrast. Therefore, we dissolution rate constant can be increased to account for an amount of impurities (e.g. clay in a quartz or calcite sandstone) that can accumulate on dissolving contacts. This approach allows large compaction and shear strains within the rock, while allowing examination of local grain-scale heterogeneity. For example, we will describe the effect of pressure solution on the distribution of contact forces magnitudes and orientations. Contact forces in elastic granular packings are inherently

  8. Stress Wave Propagation in Soils Modelled by the Boundary Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.

    This thesis deals with different aspects of the boundary element method (BEM) applied to stress wave propagation problems in soils. Among other things BEM formulations for coupled FEM and BEM, moving loads, direct BEM and indirect BEM are presented. For all the formulations both analytical...

  9. Thermal Effects on Vibration and Control of Piezocomposite Kirchhoff Plate Modeled by Finite Elements Method

    OpenAIRE

    Sanbi, M.; Saadani, R.; Sbai, K.; Rahmoune, M.

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical results of the modeling of a smart plate are presented for optimal active vibration control. The smart plate consists of a rectangular aluminum piezocomposite plate modeled in cantilever configuration with surface bonded thermopiezoelectric patches. The patches are symmetrically bonded on top and bottom surfaces. A generic thermopiezoelastic theory for piezocomposite plate is derived, using linear thermopiezoelastic theory and Kirchhoff assumptions. Finite element eq...

  10. A multiscale finite element method for modeling fully coupled thermomechanical problems in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Sengupta, Arkaprabha; Papadopoulos, Panayiotis; Taylor, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This article proposes a two-scale formulation of fully coupled continuum thermomechanics using the finite element method at both scales. A monolithic approach is adopted in the solution of the momentum and energy equations. An efficient implementation of the resulting algorithm is derived that is suitable for multicore processing. The proposed method is applied with success to a strongly coupled problem involving shape-memory alloys. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. A multiscale finite element method for modeling fully coupled thermomechanical problems in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Sengupta, Arkaprabha

    2012-05-18

    This article proposes a two-scale formulation of fully coupled continuum thermomechanics using the finite element method at both scales. A monolithic approach is adopted in the solution of the momentum and energy equations. An efficient implementation of the resulting algorithm is derived that is suitable for multicore processing. The proposed method is applied with success to a strongly coupled problem involving shape-memory alloys. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Extended Finite Element Method with Simplified Spherical Harmonics Approximation for the Forward Model of Optical Molecular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended finite element method (XFEM for the forward model of 3D optical molecular imaging is developed with simplified spherical harmonics approximation (SPN. In XFEM scheme of SPN equations, the signed distance function is employed to accurately represent the internal tissue boundary, and then it is used to construct the enriched basis function of the finite element scheme. Therefore, the finite element calculation can be carried out without the time-consuming internal boundary mesh generation. Moreover, the required overly fine mesh conforming to the complex tissue boundary which leads to excess time cost can be avoided. XFEM conveniences its application to tissues with complex internal structure and improves the computational efficiency. Phantom and digital mouse experiments were carried out to validate the efficiency of the proposed method. Compared with standard finite element method and classical Monte Carlo (MC method, the validation results show the merits and potential of the XFEM for optical imaging.

  13. A finite element method based microwave heat transfer modeling of frozen multi-component foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy

    Microwave heating is fast and convenient, but is highly non-uniform. Non-uniform heating in microwave cooking affects not only food quality but also food safety. Most food industries develop microwavable food products based on "cook-and-look" approach. This approach is time-consuming, labor intensive and expensive and may not result in optimal food product design that assures food safety and quality. Design of microwavable food can be realized through a simulation model which describes the physical mechanisms of microwave heating in mathematical expressions. The objective of this study was to develop a microwave heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal profiles of various heterogeneous foods such as multi-component meal (chicken nuggets and mashed potato), multi-component and multi-layered meal (lasagna), and multi-layered food with active packages (pizza) during microwave heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed by solving electromagnetic and heat transfer equations using finite element method in commercially available COMSOL Multiphysics v4.4 software. The microwave heat transfer model included detailed geometry of the cavity, phase change, and rotation of the food on the turntable. The predicted spatial surface temperature patterns and temporal profiles were validated against the experimental temperature profiles obtained using a thermal imaging camera and fiber-optic sensors. The predicted spatial surface temperature profile of different multi-component foods was in good agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles in terms of hot and cold spot patterns. The root mean square error values of temporal profiles ranged from 5.8 °C to 26.2 °C in chicken nuggets as compared 4.3 °C to 4.7 °C in mashed potatoes. In frozen lasagna, root mean square error values at six locations ranged from 6.6 °C to 20.0 °C for 6 min of heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed to include susceptor assisted microwave heating of a

  14. 3D controlled-source electromagnetic modeling in anisotropic medium using edge-based finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Xiong, Bin; Han, Muran

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a linear edge-based finite element method for numerical modeling of 3D controlled-source electromagnetic data in an anisotropic conductive medium. We use a nonuniform rectangular mesh in order to capture the rapid change of diffusive electromagnetic field within the regions of...... are in a good agreement with the solutions obtained by the integral equation method....

  15. A Discrete Element Method Centrifuge Model of Monopile under Cyclic Lateral Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Nuo Duan; Yi Pik Cheng

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the data of a series of two-dimensional Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of a large-diameter rigid monopile subjected to cyclic loading under a high gravitational force. At present, monopile foundations are widely used to support the tall and heavy wind turbines, which are also subjected to significant from wind and wave actions. A safe design must address issues such as rotations and changes in soil stiffness subject to these loadings conditions. Design guidance ...

  16. 3D anisotropic modeling and identification for airborne EM systems based on the spectral-element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Yin, Chang-Chun; Cao, Xiao-Yue; Liu, Yun-He; Zhang, Bo; Cai, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The airborne electromagnetic (AEM) method has a high sampling rate and survey flexibility. However, traditional numerical modeling approaches must use high-resolution physical grids to guarantee modeling accuracy, especially for complex geological structures such as anisotropic earth. This can lead to huge computational costs. To solve this problem, we propose a spectral-element (SE) method for 3D AEM anisotropic modeling, which combines the advantages of spectral and finite-element methods. Thus, the SE method has accuracy as high as that of the spectral method and the ability to model complex geology inherited from the finite-element method. The SE method can improve the modeling accuracy within discrete grids and reduce the dependence of modeling results on the grids. This helps achieve high-accuracy anisotropic AEM modeling. We first introduced a rotating tensor of anisotropic conductivity to Maxwell's equations and described the electrical field via SE basis functions based on GLL interpolation polynomials. We used the Galerkin weighted residual method to establish the linear equation system for the SE method, and we took a vertical magnetic dipole as the transmission source for our AEM modeling. We then applied fourth-order SE calculations with coarse physical grids to check the accuracy of our modeling results against a 1D semi-analytical solution for an anisotropic half-space model and verified the high accuracy of the SE. Moreover, we conducted AEM modeling for different anisotropic 3D abnormal bodies using two physical grid scales and three orders of SE to obtain the convergence conditions for different anisotropic abnormal bodies. Finally, we studied the identification of anisotropy for single anisotropic abnormal bodies, anisotropic surrounding rock, and single anisotropic abnormal body embedded in an anisotropic surrounding rock. This approach will play a key role in the inversion and interpretation of AEM data collected in regions with anisotropic

  17. Simplified Qualitative Discrete Numerical Model to Determine Cracking Pattern in Brittle Materials by Means of Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ochoa-Avendaño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the formulation, implementation, and validation of a simplified qualitative model to determine the crack path of solids considering static loads, infinitesimal strain, and plane stress condition. This model is based on finite element method with a special meshing technique, where nonlinear link elements are included between the faces of the linear triangular elements. The stiffness loss of some link elements represents the crack opening. Three experimental tests of bending beams are simulated, where the cracking pattern calculated with the proposed numerical model is similar to experimental result. The advantages of the proposed model compared to discrete crack approaches with interface elements can be the implementation simplicity, the numerical stability, and the very low computational cost. The simulation with greater values of the initial stiffness of the link elements does not affect the discontinuity path and the stability of the numerical solution. The exploded mesh procedure presented in this model avoids a complex nonlinear analysis and regenerative or adaptive meshes.

  18. Finite Element Modeling of Thermo Creep Processes Using Runge-Kutta Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Dimitrienko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo creep deformations for most heat-resistant alloys, as a rule, nonlinearly depend on stresses and are practically non- reversible. Therefore, to calculate the properties of these materials the theory of plastic flow is most widely used. Finite-element computations of a stress-strain state of structures with account of thermo creep deformations up to now are performed using main commercial software, including ANSYS package. However, in most cases to solve nonlinear creep equations, one should apply explicit or implicit methods based on the Euler method of approximation of time-derivatives. The Euler method is sufficiently efficient in terms of random access memory in computations, however this method is cumbersome in computation time and does not always provide a required accuracy for creep deformation computations.The paper offers a finite-element algorithm to solve a three-dimensional problem of thermo creep based on the Runge-Kutta finite-difference schemes of different orders with respect to time. It shows a numerical test example to solve the problem on the thermo creep of a beam under tensile loading. The computed results demonstrate that using the Runge-Kutta method with increasing accuracy order allows us to obtain a more accurate solution (with increasing accuracy order by 1 a relative error decreases, approximately, by an order too. The developed algorithm proves to be efficient enough and can be recommended for solving the more complicated problems of thermo creep of structures.

  19. A high-order multiscale finite-element method for time-domain acoustic-wave modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kai; Fu, Shubin; Chung, Eric T.

    2018-05-01

    Accurate and efficient wave equation modeling is vital for many applications in such as acoustics, electromagnetics, and seismology. However, solving the wave equation in large-scale and highly heterogeneous models is usually computationally expensive because the computational cost is directly proportional to the number of grids in the model. We develop a novel high-order multiscale finite-element method to reduce the computational cost of time-domain acoustic-wave equation numerical modeling by solving the wave equation on a coarse mesh based on the multiscale finite-element theory. In contrast to existing multiscale finite-element methods that use only first-order multiscale basis functions, our new method constructs high-order multiscale basis functions from local elliptic problems which are closely related to the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre quadrature points in a coarse element. Essentially, these basis functions are not only determined by the order of Legendre polynomials, but also by local medium properties, and therefore can effectively convey the fine-scale information to the coarse-scale solution with high-order accuracy. Numerical tests show that our method can significantly reduce the computation time while maintain high accuracy for wave equation modeling in highly heterogeneous media by solving the corresponding discrete system only on the coarse mesh with the new high-order multiscale basis functions.

  20. Neutrinoless double-β decay matrix elements in large shell-model spaces with the generator-coordinate method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, C. F.; Engel, J.; Holt, J. D.

    2017-11-01

    We use the generator-coordinate method (GCM) with realistic shell-model interactions to closely approximate full shell-model calculations of the matrix elements for the neutrinoless double-β decay of 48Ca, 76Ge, and 82Se. We work in one major shell for the first isotope, in the f5 /2p g9 /2 space for the second and third, and finally in two major shells for all three. Our coordinates include not only the usual axial deformation parameter β , but also the triaxiality angle γ and neutron-proton pairing amplitudes. In the smaller model spaces our matrix elements agree well with those of full shell-model diagonalization, suggesting that our Hamiltonian-based GCM captures most of the important valence-space correlations. In two major shells, where exact diagonalization is not currently possible, our matrix elements are only slightly different from those in a single shell.

  1. Application of the integral method to modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolar, M.

    1995-06-01

    The starting point for this report is the discrepancy reported in previous work between the reaction-diffusion calculations and the CEX-1 experiment, which involves storage of defected fuel elements in air at 150 deg C. This discrepancy is considerably diminished here by a more critical choice of theoretical parameters, and by taking into account the fact that different CEX-1 fuel elements were oxidized at very different rates and that the fuel element used previously for comparison with theoretical calculations actually underwent two limited-oxygen-supply cycles. Much better agreement is obtained here between the theory and the third, unlimited-air, storage period of the CEX-1 experiment. The approximate integral method is used extensively for the solution of the one-dimensional diffusion moving-boundary problems that may describe various storage periods of the CEX-1 experiment. In some cases it is easy to extend this method to arbitrary precision by using higher moments of the diffusion equation. Using this method, the validity of quasi-steady-state approximation is verified. Diffusion-controlled oxidation is also studied. In this case, for the unlimited oxygen supply, the integral method leads to an exact analytical solution for linear geometry, and to a good analytical approximation of the solution for the spherically symmetric geometry. These solutions may have some application in the analysis of experiments on the oxidation of small UO 2 fragments or powders when the individual UO 2 grains may be considered to be approximately spherical. (author). 23 refs., 5 tabs., 11 figs

  2. Study of normal and shear material properties for viscoelastic model of asphalt mixture by discrete element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Stang, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was studied by using discrete element method. The dynamic properties of asphalt mixture were captured by implementing Burger’s contact model. Different ways of taking into account of the normal and shear material properties of asphalt mi...

  3. The use of the Finite Element method for the earthquakes modelling in different geodynamic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaldo, Raffaele; Tizzani, Pietro

    2016-04-01

    Many numerical models have been developed to simulate the deformation and stress changes associated to the faulting process. This aspect is an important topic in fracture mechanism. In the proposed study, we investigate the impact of the deep fault geometry and tectonic setting on the co-seismic ground deformation pattern associated to different earthquake phenomena. We exploit the impact of the structural-geological data in Finite Element environment through an optimization procedure. In this framework, we model the failure processes in a physical mechanical scenario to evaluate the kinematics associated to the Mw 6.1 L'Aquila 2009 earthquake (Italy), the Mw 5.9 Ferrara and Mw 5.8 Mirandola 2012 earthquake (Italy) and the Mw 8.3 Gorkha 2015 earthquake (Nepal). These seismic events are representative of different tectonic scenario: the normal, the reverse and thrust faulting processes, respectively. In order to simulate the kinematic of the analyzed natural phenomena, we assume, under the plane stress approximation (is defined to be a state of stress in which the normal stress, sz, and the shear stress sxz and syz, directed perpendicular to x-y plane are assumed to be zero), the linear elastic behavior of the involved media. The performed finite element procedure consist of through two stages: (i) compacting under the weight of the rock successions (gravity loading), the deformation model reaches a stable equilibrium; (ii) the co-seismic stage simulates, through a distributed slip along the active fault, the released stresses. To constrain the models solution, we exploit the DInSAR deformation velocity maps retrieved by satellite data acquired by old and new generation sensors, as ENVISAT, RADARSAT-2 and SENTINEL 1A, encompassing the studied earthquakes. More specifically, we first generate 2D several forward mechanical models, then, we compare these with the recorded ground deformation fields, in order to select the best boundaries setting and parameters. Finally

  4. Analyzing the Mixing Dynamics of an Industrial Batch Bin Blender via Discrete Element Modeling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitraye Sen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A discrete element model (DEM has been developed for an industrial batch bin blender in which three different types of materials are mixed. The mixing dynamics have been evaluated from a model-based study with respect to the blend critical quality attributes (CQAs which are relative standard deviation (RSD and segregation intensity. In the actual industrial setup, a sensor mounted on the blender lid is used to determine the blend composition in this region. A model-based analysis has been used to understand the mixing efficiency in the other zones inside the blender and to determine if the data obtained near the blender-lid region are able to provide a good representation of the overall blend quality. Sub-optimal mixing zones have been identified and other potential sampling locations have been investigated in order to obtain a good approximation of the blend variability. The model has been used to study how the mixing efficiency can be improved by varying the key processing parameters, i.e., blender RPM/speed, fill level/volume and loading order. Both segregation intensity and RSD reduce at a lower fill level and higher blender RPM and are a function of the mixing time. This work demonstrates the use of a model-based approach to improve process knowledge regarding a pharmaceutical mixing process. The model can be used to acquire qualitative information about the influence of different critical process parameters and equipment geometry on the mixing dynamics.

  5. Morphing methods to parameterize specimen-specific finite element model geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Ian A; Yang, Hongli; Roberts, Michael D; Downs, J Crawford

    2010-01-19

    Shape plays an important role in determining the biomechanical response of a structure. Specimen-specific finite element (FE) models have been developed to capture the details of the shape of biological structures and predict their biomechanics. Shape, however, can vary considerably across individuals or change due to aging or disease, and analysis of the sensitivity of specimen-specific models to these variations has proven challenging. An alternative to specimen-specific representation has been to develop generic models with simplified geometries whose shape is relatively easy to parameterize, and can therefore be readily used in sensitivity studies. Despite many successful applications, generic models are limited in that they cannot make predictions for individual specimens. We propose that it is possible to harness the detail available in specimen-specific models while leveraging the power of the parameterization techniques common in generic models. In this work we show that this can be accomplished by using morphing techniques to parameterize the geometry of specimen-specific FE models such that the model shape can be varied in a controlled and systematic way suitable for sensitivity analysis. We demonstrate three morphing techniques by using them on a model of the load-bearing tissues of the posterior pole of the eye. We show that using relatively straightforward procedures these morphing techniques can be combined, which allows the study of factor interactions. Finally, we illustrate that the techniques can be used in other systems by applying them to morph a femur. Morphing techniques provide an exciting new possibility for the analysis of the biomechanical role of shape, independently or in interaction with loading and material properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of the finite element method in the modelling of coil bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibui, M.; Zatz, I.J.; Bialek, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Three different FEM approaches are presented and evaluated as viable interpretations of an actual coil, each limited for use within specified parameter ranges. One is based on solid elements with correctly defined properties permitting the accurate representation of the global behavior of a coil bundle. The other two are more complex and are based on the combination of various elements each accounting for a different aspect of coil behavior which are best resolved via multi-level substructuring. The choice of the best model for the job rests with the analyst who must first resolve what the goals of the analysis are and given the parameters of the problem, which models can be used. The basic idea behind these models is the application of a systematic modelling technique requiring a close correspondence between the capability of the FE themselves and the true mechanical behavior of that portion of the coil being simulated. In order to have analytical solutions for confirming the bending and torsional capabilities of these coil bundle FEM, their behavior is studied via several basic examples. Laminated beam behavior which categorizes the structural nature of many conventional coil bundles is also examined in some depth. Also discussed is a generalized computer program that was developed to accept the description of any conventional coil section and determine an effective stiffness for it to be used in FEM. The various methodologies described in this paper should be applicable to any bundled coil design. Although only conventional coils are discussed, with the proper modifications the concepts and techniques presented can be applied to other configurations as well, such as superconductors. (orig./HP)

  7. Numerical modeling of contaminant transport in fractured porous media using mixed finite-element and finitevolume methods

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods; i.e., the mixed finite-element (MFE) method and the finite-volume method. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocity fields for both the fractures and matrix, which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite-volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms, respectively. The temporary evolution for the pressure distributions, streamline fields, and concentration profiles are obtained for six different arrangements of fractures. The results clearly show the distorted concentration effects caused by the ordered and disordered (random) patterns of the fractures and illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model. © 2011 by Begell House Inc.

  8. A time-domain finite element model reduction method for viscoelastic linear and nonlinear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Marcos Gonçalves de Lima

    Full Text Available AbstractMany authors have shown that the effective design of viscoelastic systems can be conveniently carried out by using modern mathematical models to represent the frequency- and temperature-dependent behavior of viscoelastic materials. However, in the quest for design procedures of real-word engineering structures, the large number of exact evaluations of the dynamic responses during iterative procedures, combined with the typically high dimensions of large finite element models, makes the numerical analysis very costly, sometimes unfeasible. It is especially true when the viscoelastic materials are used to reduce vibrations of nonlinear systems. As a matter of fact, which the resolution of the resulting nonlinear equations of motion with frequency- and temperature-dependent viscoelastic damping forces is an interesting, but hard-to-solve problem. Those difficulties motivate the present study, in which a time-domain condensation strategy of viscoelastic systems is addressed, where the viscoelastic behavior is modeled by using a four parameter fractional derivative model. After the discussion of various theoretical aspects, the exact and reduced time responses are calculated for a three-layer sandwich plate by considering nonlinear boundary conditions.

  9. Energy Sustainability Evaluation Model Based on the Matter-Element Extension Method: A Case Study of Shandong Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqi Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Energy sustainability is of vital importance to regional sustainability, because energy sustainability is closely related to both regional economic growth and social stability. The existing energy sustainability evaluation methods lack a unified system to determine the relevant influencing factors, are relatively weak in quantitative analysis, and do not fully describe the ‘paradoxical’ characteristics of energy sustainability. To solve those problems and to reasonably and objectively evaluate energy sustainability, we propose an energy sustainability evaluation model based on the matter-element extension method. We first select energy sustainability evaluation indexes based on previous research and experience. Then, a variation coefficient method is used to determine the weights of these indexes. Finally, the study establishes the classical domain, joint domain, and the matter-element relationship to evaluate energy sustainability through matter-element extension. Data from Shandong Province is used as a case study to evaluate the region’s energy sustainability. The case study shows that the proposed energy sustainability evaluation model, based on the matter-element extension method, can effectively evaluate regional energy sustainability.

  10. Accounting rigid support at the border in a mixed model the finite element method in problems of ice cover destruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Knyazkov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the force to damage the ice covers is necessary for estimation of icebreaking capability of vessels, as well as of hull strength of icebreakers, and navigation of ships in ice conditions. On the other hand, the use of ice cover support to arrange construction works from the ice is also of practical interest.By the present moment a great deal of investigations of ice cover deformation have been carried out to result, usually, in approximate calculations formula which was obtained after making a variety of assumptions. Nevertheless, we believe that it is possible to make further improvement in calculations. Application numerical methods, and, for example, FEM, makes possible to avoid numerous drawbacks of analytical methods dealing with both complex boundaries and load application areas and other problem peculiarities.The article considers an application of mixed models of FEM for investigating ice cover deformation. A simple flexible triangle element of mixed type was taken to solve this problem. Vector of generalized coordinates of the element contains apices flexures and normal bending moments in the middle of its sides. Compared to other elements mixed models easily satisfy compatibility requirements on the boundary of adjacent elements and do not require numerical displacement differentiation to define bending moments, because bending moments are included in vector of element generalized coordinates.The method of account of rigid support plate is proposed. The resulting ratio, taking into account the "stiffening", reduces the number of resolving systems of equations by the number of elements on the plate contour.To evaluate further the results the numerical realization of ice cover stress-strained problem it becomes necessary and correct to check whether calculation results correspond to accurate solution. Using an example of circular plate the convergence of numerical solutions to analytical solutions is showed.The article

  11. Conservative Eulerian-Lagrangian Methods and Mixed Finite Element Methods for Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Russell, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    New, improved computational methods for modeling of groundwater flow and transport have been formulated and implemented, with the intention of incorporating them as user options into the DoD Ground...

  12. Finite Element Method (FEM) Modeling of Freeze-drying: Monitoring Pharmaceutical Product Robustness During Lyophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Sadineni, Vikram; Maity, Mita; Quan, Yong; Enterline, Matthew; Mantri, Rao V

    2015-12-01

    Lyophilization is an approach commonly undertaken to formulate drugs that are unstable to be commercialized as ready to use (RTU) solutions. One of the important aspects of commercializing a lyophilized product is to transfer the process parameters that are developed in lab scale lyophilizer to commercial scale without a loss in product quality. This process is often accomplished by costly engineering runs or through an iterative process at the commercial scale. Here, we are highlighting a combination of computational and experimental approach to predict commercial process parameters for the primary drying phase of lyophilization. Heat and mass transfer coefficients are determined experimentally either by manometric temperature measurement (MTM) or sublimation tests and used as inputs for the finite element model (FEM)-based software called PASSAGE, which computes various primary drying parameters such as primary drying time and product temperature. The heat and mass transfer coefficients will vary at different lyophilization scales; hence, we present an approach to use appropriate factors while scaling-up from lab scale to commercial scale. As a result, one can predict commercial scale primary drying time based on these parameters. Additionally, the model-based approach presented in this study provides a process to monitor pharmaceutical product robustness and accidental process deviations during Lyophilization to support commercial supply chain continuity. The approach presented here provides a robust lyophilization scale-up strategy; and because of the simple and minimalistic approach, it will also be less capital intensive path with minimal use of expensive drug substance/active material.

  13. Model of the saltation transport by Discrete Element Method coupled with wind interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oger Luc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the Aeolian saltation transport problem by analysing the collision of incident energetic beads with granular packing. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyse the features of the consecutive collision process. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method with 20000 particles (2D. The grains were displayed randomly in a box (250X60. A few incident disks are launched with a constant velocity and angle with high random position to initiate the flow. A wind velocity profile is applied on the flowing zone of the saltation. The velocity profile is obtained by the calculi of the counter-flow due to the local packing fraction induced by the granular flow. We analyse the evolution of the upper surface of the disk packing. In the beginning, the saltation process can be seen as the classical “splash function” in which one bead hits a fully static dense packing. Then, the quasi-fluidized upper layer of the packing creates a completely different behaviour of the “animated splash function”. The dilation of the upper surface due to the previous collisions is responsible for a need of less input energy for launching new ejected disks. This phenomenon permits to maintain a constant granular flow with a “small” wind velocity on the surface of the disk bed.

  14. Finite element analysis of multi-material models using a balancing domain decomposition method combined with the diagonal scaling preconditioner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogino, Masao

    2016-01-01

    Actual problems in science and industrial applications are modeled by multi-materials and large-scale unstructured mesh, and the finite element analysis has been widely used to solve such problems on the parallel computer. However, for large-scale problems, the iterative methods for linear finite element equations suffer from slow or no convergence. Therefore, numerical methods having both robust convergence and scalable parallel efficiency are in great demand. The domain decomposition method is well known as an iterative substructuring method, and is an efficient approach for parallel finite element methods. Moreover, the balancing preconditioner achieves robust convergence. However, in case of problems consisting of very different materials, the convergence becomes bad. There are some research to solve this issue, however not suitable for cases of complex shape and composite materials. In this study, to improve convergence of the balancing preconditioner for multi-materials, a balancing preconditioner combined with the diagonal scaling preconditioner, called Scaled-BDD method, is proposed. Some numerical results are included which indicate that the proposed method has robust convergence for the number of subdomains and shows high performances compared with the original balancing preconditioner. (author)

  15. Thermal Modelling and Design of On-board DC-DC Power Converter using Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Pittini, R.

    2014-01-01

    Power electronic converters are widely used and play a pivotal role in electronics area. The temperature causes around 54 % of all power converters failures. Thermal loads are nowadays one of the bottlenecks in the power system design and the cooling efficiency of a system is primarily determined...... by numerical modelling techniques. Therefore, thermal design through thermal modelling and simulation is becoming an integral part of the design process as less expensive compared to the experimental cut-and-try approach. Here the investigation is performed using finite element method-based modelling, and also...

  16. Thermal Modeling and Design of On-board DC-DC Power Converter using Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    Power electronic converters are widely used and play a pivotal role in electronics area . The temperature causes around 54 % of all power converters failures. Thermal loads are nowadays one of the bottlenecks in the power system design and the cooling efficiency of a system is primarily determined...... by numerical modeling techniques. Therefore, thermal design through thermal modeling and simulation is becoming an integral part of the design process as less expensive compared to the experimenta l cut - and - try approach. Here the investigation is performed using finite element method - based modeling...

  17. Incorpararion of Topography Effect Into Two-Dimensional DC Resistivity Modelling by Using Finite-Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogan, E.

    2007-01-01

    In earth investigation done by using the direct current resistivity technique, impact of the change in the examined surface topography on determining the resistivity distrubition in the earth has been a frequently faced question. In order to get more fruitful results and make more correct interpretetions in earth surveying carried on the areas where topographical changes occur, modelling should be done by taking the change in surface topography into account and topography effect should be included into inversion. In this study impact of topography to the direct current resistivity method has been analysed. For this purpose, 2-D forward modeling algorithm has been developed by using finite element method. In this algorithm impact of topography can be incorporate into the model. Also the pseudo sections which is produced from the program can be imaged with topography. By using this algorithm response of models under different surface topography has been analysed and compared with the straight topography of same models

  18. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  19. A new magneto-cardiogram study using a vector model with a virtual heart and the boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chen; Lu Hong; Hua Ning; Tang Xue-Zheng; Tang Fa-Kuan; Shou Guo-Fa; Xia Ling; Ma Ping

    2013-01-01

    A cardiac vector model is presented and verified, and then the forward problem for cardiac magnetic fields and electric potential are discussed based on this model and the realistic human torso volume conductor model, including lungs. A torso—cardiac vector model is used for a 12-lead electrocardiographic (ECG) and magneto-cardiogram (MCG) simulation study by using the boundary element method (BEM). Also, we obtain the MCG wave picture using a compound four-channel HT c ·SQUID system in a magnetically shielded room. By comparing the simulated results and experimental results, we verify the cardiac vector model and then do a preliminary study of the forward problem of MCG and ECG. Therefore, the results show that the vector model is reasonable in cardiac electrophysiology. (general)

  20. Discrete element method based scale-up model for material synthesis using ball milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanam, Priya Radhi

    Mechanical milling is a widely used technique for powder processing in various areas. In this work, a scale-up model for describing this ball milling process is developed. The thesis is a combination of experimental and modeling efforts. Initially, Discrete Element Model (DEM) is used to describe energy transfer from milling tools to the milled powder for shaker, planetary, and attritor mills. The rolling and static friction coefficients are determined experimentally. Computations predict a quasisteady rate of energy dissipation, E d, for each experimental configuration. It is proposed that the milling dose defined as a product of Ed and milling time, t, divided by the mass of milled powder, mp characterizes the milling progress independently of the milling device or milling conditions used. Once the milling dose is determined for one experimental configuration, it can be used to predict the milling time required to prepare the same material in any milling configuration, for which Ed is calculated. The concept is validated experimentally for DEM describing planetary and shaker mills. For attritor, the predicted Ed includes substantial contribution from milling tool interaction events with abnormally high forces (>103 N). The energy in such events is likely dissipated to heat or plastically deform milling tools rather than refine material. Indeed, DEM predictions for the attritor correlate with experiments when such events are ignored in the analysis. With an objective of obtaining real-time indicators of milling progress, power, torque, and rotation speed of the impeller of an attritor mill are measured during preparation of metal matrix composite powders in the subsequent portion of this thesis. Two material systems are selected and comparisons made between in-situ parameters and experimental milling progress indicators. It is established that real-time measurements can certainly be used to describe milling progress. However, they need to be interpreted carefully

  1. Numeric simulation model for long-term orthodontic tooth movement with contact boundary conditions using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ryo; Yamaoka, Satoshi; Anh, Tuan Nguyen; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2017-11-01

    Although many attempts have been made to simulate orthodontic tooth movement using the finite element method, most were limited to analyses of the initial displacement in the periodontal ligament and were insufficient to evaluate the effect of orthodontic appliances on long-term tooth movement. Numeric simulation of long-term tooth movement was performed in some studies; however, neither the play between the brackets and archwire nor the interproximal contact forces were considered. The objectives of this study were to simulate long-term orthodontic tooth movement with the edgewise appliance by incorporating those contact conditions into the finite element model and to determine the force system when the space is closed with sliding mechanics. We constructed a 3-dimensional model of maxillary dentition with 0.022-in brackets and 0.019 × 0.025-in archwire. Forces of 100 cN simulating sliding mechanics were applied. The simulation was accomplished on the assumption that bone remodeling correlates with the initial tooth displacement. This method could successfully represent the changes in the moment-to-force ratio: the tooth movement pattern during space closure. We developed a novel method that could simulate the long-term orthodontic tooth movement and accurately determine the force system in the course of time by incorporating contact boundary conditions into finite element analysis. It was also suggested that friction is progressively increased during space closure in sliding mechanics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Mechanical modeling and characterization of meniscus tissue using flat punch indentation and inverse finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi, Behzad; Fatouraee, Nasser; Imeni, Milad

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, to characterize the mechanical properties of meniscus by considering its local microstructure, a novel nonlinear poroviscoelastic Finite Element (FE) model has been developed. To obtain the mechanical response of meniscus, indentation experiments were performed on bovine meniscus samples. The ramp-relaxation test scenario with different depths and preloads was designed to capture the mechanical characteristics of the tissue in different regions of the medial and lateral menisci. Thereafter, a FE simulation was performed considering experimental conditions. Constitutive parameters were optimized by solving a FE-based inverse problem using the heuristic Simulated Annealing (SA) optimization algorithm. These parameters were ranged according to previously reported data to improve the optimization procedure. Based on the results, the mechanical properties of meniscus were highly influenced by both superficial and main layers. At low indentation depths, a high percentage relaxation (p < 0.01) with a high relaxation rate (p < 0.05) was obtained, due to the poroelastic and viscoelastic nature of the superficial layer. Increasing both penetration depth and preload level involved the main layer response and caused alterations in hyperelastic and viscoelastic parameters of the tissue, such that for both layers, the shear modulus was increased (p < 0.01) while the rate and percentage of relaxation were decreased (p < 0.01). Results reflect that, shear modulus of the main layer in anterior region is higher than central and posterior sites in medial meniscus. In contrast, in lateral meniscus, posterior side is stiffer than central and anterior sides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of electron-molecule collisions via the finite-element method and R-matrix propagation technique: Model exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdolsalami, F.; Abdolsalami, M.; Gomez, P.

    1994-01-01

    We have applied the finite-element method to electron-molecule collisions. All the calculations are done in the body frame within the fixed-nuclei approximation. A model potential, which is added to the static and polarization potential, has been used to represent the exchange effect. The method is applied to electron-H 2 scattering and the eigenphase sums and the cross sections obtained are in very good agreement with the corresponding results from the linear-algebraic approach. Finite-element calculations of the R matrix in the region where the static and exchange interactions are strong, however, has about one-half to one-fourth of the memory requirement of the linear-algebraic technique

  4. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FBG_SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG sensors solutions in any arbitrary loaded structure or application. The software removes the need for a fibre optic expert user and makes the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using FBG sensors more simple and fast. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation.

  5. Thermal imbalance force modelling for a GPS satellite using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Schutz, Bob E.

    1991-01-01

    Methods of analyzing the perturbation due to thermal radiation and determining its effects on the orbits of GPS satellites are presented, with emphasis on the FEM technique to calculate satellite solar panel temperatures which are used to determine the magnitude and direction of the thermal imbalance force. Although this force may not be responsible for all of the force mismodeling, conditions may work in combination with the thermal imbalance force to produce such accelerations on the order of 1.e-9 m/sq s. If submeter accurate orbits and centimeter-level accuracy for geophysical applications are desired, a time-dependent model of the thermal imbalance force should be used, especially when satellites are eclipsing, where the observed errors are larger than for satellites in noneclipsing orbits.

  6. Magnetic modeling of a Linear Synchronous Machine with the spectral element method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curti, M.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Lomonova, E.

    2017-01-01

    The field calculus for electrical machines is realized solving subdomain problems. Most often, the latter are solved using either finite element analysis or the semi-analytical solution of a Laplace or Poisson equation obtained by separation of variables. The first option can capture complex

  7. Magnetic modeling of a Linear Synchronous Machine with the spectral element method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curti, M.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Lomonova, E.

    2017-01-01

    The field calculus for electrical machines (EMs) is realized solving subdomain problems. Most often, the latter are solved using either finite element analysis (FEA) or the semi-analytical solution of a Laplace or Poisson equation obtained by separation of variables. The first option can capture

  8. Modeling of the Through-the-Thickness Electric Potentials of a Piezoelectric Bimorph Using the Spectral Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjian Dong

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An efficient spectral element (SE with electric potential degrees of freedom (DOF is proposed to investigate the static electromechanical responses of a piezoelectric bimorph for its actuator and sensor functions. A sublayer model based on the piecewise linear approximation for the electric potential is used to describe the nonlinear distribution of electric potential through the thickness of the piezoelectric layers. An equivalent single layer (ESL model based on first-order shear deformation theory (FSDT is used to describe the displacement field. The Legendre orthogonal polynomials of order 5 are used in the element interpolation functions. The validity and the capability of the present SE model for investigation of global and local responses of the piezoelectric bimorph are confirmed by comparing the present solutions with those obtained from coupled 3-D finite element (FE analysis. It is shown that, without introducing any higher-order electric potential assumptions, the current method can accurately describe the distribution of the electric potential across the thickness even for a rather thick bimorph. It is revealed that the effect of electric potential is significant when the bimorph is used as sensor while the effect is insignificant when the bimorph is used as actuator, and therefore, the present study may provide a better understanding of the nonlinear induced electric potential for bimorph sensor and actuator.

  9. Geometry reconstruction method for patient-specific finite element models for the assessment of tibia fracture risk in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caouette, Christiane; Ikin, Nicole; Villemure, Isabelle; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Rauch, Frank; Aubin, Carl-Éric

    2017-04-01

    Lower limb deformation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) impairs ambulation and may lead to fracture. Corrective surgery is based on empirical assessment criteria. The objective was to develop a reconstruction method of the tibia for OI patients that could be used as input of a comprehensive finite element model to assess fracture risks. Data were obtained from three children with OI and tibia deformities. Four pQCT scans were registered to biplanar radiographs, and a template mesh was deformed to fit the bone outline. Cortical bone thickness was computed. Sensitivity of the model to missing slices of pQCT was assessed by calculating maximal von Mises stress for a vertical hopping load case. Sensitivity of the model to ±5 % of cortical thickness measurements was assessed by calculating loads at fracture. Difference between the mesh contour and bone outline on the radiographs was below 1 mm. Removal of one pQCT slice increased maximal von Mises stress by up to 10 %. Simulated ±5 % variation of cortical bone thickness leads to variations of up to 4.1 % on predicted fracture loads. Using clinically available tibia imaging from children with OI, the developed reconstruction method allowed the building of patient-specific finite element models.

  10. The finite element model for the propagation of light in scattering media: a direct method for domains with nonscattering regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arridge, S R; Dehghani, H; Schweiger, M; Okada, E

    2000-01-01

    We present a method for handling nonscattering regions within diffusing domains. The method develops from an iterative radiosity-diffusion approach using Green's functions that was computationally slow. Here we present an improved implementation using a finite element method (FEM) that is direct. The fundamental idea is to introduce extra equations into the standard diffusion FEM to represent nondiffusive light propagation across a nonscattering region. By appropriate mesh node ordering the computational time is not much greater than for diffusion alone. We compare results from this method with those from a discrete ordinate transport code, and with Monte Carlo calculations. The agreement is very good, and, in addition, our scheme allows us to easily model time-dependent and frequency domain problems.

  11. 3D adaptive finite element method for a phase field model for the moving contact line problems

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yi

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive finite element method for simulating the moving contact line problems in three dimensions. The model that we used is the coupled Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes equations with the generalized Navier boundary condition(GNBC) proposed in [18]. In our algorithm, to improve the efficiency of the simulation, we use the residual type adaptive finite element algorithm. It is well known that the phase variable decays much faster away from the interface than the velocity variables. There- fore we use an adaptive strategy that will take into account of such difference. Numerical experiments show that our algorithm is both efficient and reliable. © 2013 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  12. Sensitivity study of a method for updating a finite element model of a nuclear power station cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billet, L.

    1994-01-01

    The Research and Development Division of Electricite de France is developing a surveillance method of cooling towers involving on-site wind-induced measurements. The method is supposed to detect structural damage in the tower. The damage is identified by tuning a finite element model of the tower on experimental mode shapes and eigenfrequencies. The sensitivity of the method was evaluated through numerical tests. First, the dynamic response of a damaged tower was simulated by varying the stiffness of some area of the model shell (from 1 % to 24 % of the total shell area). Second, the structural parameters of the undamaged cooling tower model were updated in order to make the output of the undamaged model as close as possible to the synthetic experimental data. The updating method, based on the minimization of the differences between experimental modal energies and modal energies calculated by the model, did not detect a stiffness change over less than 3 % of the shell area. Such a sensitivity is thought to be insufficient to detect tower cracks which behave like highly localized defaults. (author). 8 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  13. A modal-based reduction method for sound absorbing porous materials in poro-acoustic finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpler, Romain; Deü, Jean-François; Göransson, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Structural-acoustic finite element models including three-dimensional (3D) modeling of porous media are generally computationally costly. While being the most commonly used predictive tool in the context of noise reduction applications, efficient solution strategies are required. In this work, an original modal reduction technique, involving real-valued modes computed from a classical eigenvalue solver is proposed to reduce the size of the problem associated with the porous media. In the form presented in this contribution, the method is suited for homogeneous porous layers. It is validated on a 1D poro-acoustic academic problem and tested for its performance on a 3D application, using a subdomain decomposition strategy. The performance of the proposed method is estimated in terms of degrees of freedom downsizing, computational time enhancement, as well as matrix sparsity of the reduced system.

  14. Modelling the clamping force distribution among chips in press-pack IGBTs using the finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasmasan, Adrian Augustin; Busca, Christian; Teodorescu, Remus

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a FEM (finite element method) based mechanical model for PP (press-pack) IGBTs (insulated gate bipolar transistors) is presented, which can be used to calculate the clamping force distribution among chips under various clamping conditions. The clamping force is an important parameter...... for the chip, because it influences contact electrical resistance, contact thermal resistance and power cycling capability. Ideally, the clamping force should be equally distributed among chips, in order to maximize the reliability of the PP IGBT. The model is built around a hypothetical PP IGBT with 9 chips......, and it has numerous simplifications in order to reduce the simulation time as much as possible. The developed model is used to analyze the clamping force distribution among chips, in various study cases, where uniform and non-uniform clamping pressures are applied on the studied PP IGBT....

  15. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL STRESSES IN ... the transverse residual stress in the x-direction (σx) had a maximum value of 375MPa ... the finite element method are in fair agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Sensitivity analysis of hydraulic fracturing Using an extended finite element method for the PKN model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garikapati, Hasini; Verhoosel, Clemens V.; van Brummelen, Harald; Diez, Pedro; Papadrakakis, M.; Papadopoulos, V.; Stefanou, G.; Plevris, V.

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a process that is surrounded by uncertainty, as available data on e.g. rock formations is scant and available models are still rudimentary. In this contribution sensitivity analysis is carried out as first step in studying the uncertainties in the model. This is done to

  17. 3-D direct current resistivity anisotropic modelling by goal-oriented adaptive finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Qiu, Lewen; Tang, Jingtian; Wu, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiao; Zhou, Zilong

    2018-01-01

    Although accurate numerical solvers for 3-D direct current (DC) isotropic resistivity models are current available even for complicated models with topography, reliable numerical solvers for the anisotropic case are still an open question. This study aims to develop a novel and optimal numerical solver for accurately calculating the DC potentials for complicated models with arbitrary anisotropic conductivity structures in the Earth. First, a secondary potential boundary value problem is derived by considering the topography and the anisotropic conductivity. Then, two a posteriori error estimators with one using the gradient-recovery technique and one measuring the discontinuity of the normal component of current density are developed for the anisotropic cases. Combing the goal-oriented and non-goal-oriented mesh refinements and these two error estimators, four different solving strategies are developed for complicated DC anisotropic forward modelling problems. A synthetic anisotropic two-layer model with analytic solutions verified the accuracy of our algorithms. A half-space model with a buried anisotropic cube and a mountain-valley model are adopted to test the convergence rates of these four solving strategies. We found that the error estimator based on the discontinuity of current density shows better performance than the gradient-recovery based a posteriori error estimator for anisotropic models with conductivity contrasts. Both error estimators working together with goal-oriented concepts can offer optimal mesh density distributions and highly accurate solutions.

  18. Implementation of the Modified Hoek-Brown Model into the Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Smed; Clausen, Johan Christian; Merifield, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The Hoek-Brown model for near-homogeneous rock masses will, in some cases, overpredict the tensile strength of the material. In some cases this can lead to unsafe design of structures. Therefore, a tension cut-off is introduced and the model is implemented into an elasto-plastic framework for use...

  19. An improved method for upscaling borehole thermal energy storage using inverse finite element modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tordrup, Karl Woldum; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Bjørn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Dimensioning of large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is inherently uncertain due to the natural variability of thermal conductivity and heat capacity in the storage volume. We present an improved method for upscaling a pilot BTES to full scale and apply the method to an operational...

  20. Modeling of the inhomogeneity of grain refinement during combined metal forming process by finite element and cellular automata methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majta, Janusz; Madej, Łukasz; Svyetlichnyy, Dmytro S.; Perzyński, Konrad; Kwiecień, Marcin, E-mail: mkwiecie@agh.edu.pl; Muszka, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    The potential of discrete cellular automata technique to predict the grain refinement in wires produced using combined metal forming process is presented and discussed within the paper. The developed combined metal forming process can be treated as one of the Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) techniques that consists of three different modes of deformation: asymmetric drawing with bending, namely accumulated angular drawing (AAD), wire drawing (WD) and wire flattening (WF). To accurately replicate complex stress state both at macro and micro scales during subsequent deformations two stage modeling approach was used. First, the Finite Element Method (FEM), implemented in commercial ABAQUS software, was applied to simulate entire combined forming process at the macro scale level. Then, based on FEM results, the Cellular Automata (CA) method was applied for simulation of grain refinement at the microstructure level. Data transferred between FEM and CA methods included set of files with strain tensor components obtained from selected integration points in the macro scale model. As a result of CA simulation, detailed information on microstructure evolution during severe plastic deformation conditions was obtained, namely: changes of shape and sizes of modeled representative volume with imposed microstructure, changes of the number of grains, subgrains and dislocation cells, development of grain boundaries angle distribution as well as changes in the pole figures. To evaluate CA model predictive capabilities, results of computer simulation were compared with scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction images (SEM/EBSD) studies of samples after AAD+WD+WF process.

  1. Application of the method finite elements by numerical modeling stress-strain state in conveyor belts

    OpenAIRE

    Maras Michal; Hatala Jozef; Marasová Daniela

    1997-01-01

    Solving problems connected with damaging a conveyor belt at the transfer points is conditioned by knowing laws of this phenomenon. Acquiring the knowledge on this phenomen is possible to be gained either by experimental research or by the numerical model GEM 22, which enables to determine the distribution of stresses and strains in a suitably selected cross-section of a conveyor belt. The paper begins by defining the problem, determining the boundary model conditions and continues by modellin...

  2. Finite Element Methods for real-time Haptic Feedback of Soft-Tissue Models in Virtual Reality Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andreas O.; Twombly, I. Alexander; Barth, Timothy J.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have applied the linear elastic finite element method to compute haptic force feedback and domain deformations of soft tissue models for use in virtual reality simulators. Our results show that, for virtual object models of high-resolution 3D data (>10,000 nodes), haptic real time computations (>500 Hz) are not currently possible using traditional methods. Current research efforts are focused in the following areas: 1) efficient implementation of fully adaptive multi-resolution methods and 2) multi-resolution methods with specialized basis functions to capture the singularity at the haptic interface (point loading). To achieve real time computations, we propose parallel processing of a Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method applied to a reduced system of equations resulting from surface domain decomposition. This can effectively be achieved using reconfigurable computing systems such as field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), thereby providing a flexible solution that allows for new FPGA implementations as improved algorithms become available. The resulting soft tissue simulation system would meet NASA Virtual Glovebox requirements and, at the same time, provide a generalized simulation engine for any immersive environment application, such as biomedical/surgical procedures or interactive scientific applications.

  3. Physical model construction for electrical anisotropy of single crystal zinc oxide micro/nanobelt using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Guangbin; Tang, Chaolong; Song, Jinhui; Lu, Wenqiang

    2014-01-01

    Based on conductivity characterization of single crystal zinc oxide (ZnO) micro/nanobelt (MB/NB), we further investigate the physical mechanism of nonlinear intrinsic resistance-length characteristic using finite element method. By taking the same parameters used in experiment, a model of nonlinear anisotropic resistance change with single crystal MB/NB has been deduced, which matched the experiment characterization well. The nonlinear resistance-length comes from the different electron moving speed in various crystal planes. As the direct outcome, crystallography of the anisotropic semiconducting MB/NB has been identified, which could serve as a simple but effective method to identify crystal growth direction of single crystal semiconducting or conductive nanomaterial

  4. On the residual stress modeling of shot-peened AISI 4340 steel: finite element and response surface methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Ali; Dehestani, Pouya; Poruraminaie, Iman

    2018-02-01

    Shot peening is a well-known process in applying the residual stress on the surface of industrial parts. The induced residual stress improves fatigue life. In this study, the effects of shot peening parameters such as shot diameter, shot speed, friction coefficient, and the number of impacts on the applied residual stress will be evaluated. To assess these parameters effect, firstly the shot peening process has been simulated by finite element method. Then, effects of the process parameters on the residual stress have been evaluated by response surface method as a statistical approach. Finally, a strong model is presented to predict the maximum residual stress induced by shot peening process in AISI 4340 steel. Also, the optimum parameters for the maximum residual stress are achieved. The results indicate that effect of shot diameter on the induced residual stress is increased by increasing the shot speed. Also, enhancing the friction coefficient magnitude always cannot lead to increase in the residual stress.

  5. The Blended Finite Element Method for Multi-fluid Plasma Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AFRL) DISTRIBUTION A: APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; UNLIMITED DISTRIBUTION PA #16298 6 / 28 ADVANTAGES OF THE MODEL Kinetic LTE , velocity moments...compressed to fusion conditions The compression is laser-driven Deuterium can accelerate faster than the tritium Low neutron yield measurements point

  6. Lagrangian Finite Element Method for 3D Time-Dependent Viscoelastic Flow Computations using Integral Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2000-01-01

    The 3D-LIM has as yet been used to simulate the following two three-dimensional problems. First, the method has been used to simulete for viscoelastic end-plate instability that occurs under certain conditions in the transient filament stretching apparatus for pressure sensitive adhesives (polyme...

  7. Transient Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractured Aquifer of Sechahoon Iron Mine Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Darabi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that a large volume of iron reserve in the Sechahoon Iron Mine in Yazd Province has located under the water table, it is necessary to conduct a comprehensive study on water flow within the pit and its surroundings. The conceptual model of the aquifer was created using surface and underground geological information compared with water table data of the area of interest. In the data preparation stages, in order to create the numerical model, Logan and Lufran tests were studied to determine the hydrodynamic coefficients of the layers, precipitation and evaporation were investigated, and fractures and faults of the region, as a medium for flow channels in the hard formation, were also studied. The model was created in a transient state between 2000 and 2014. To validate its results, the water table was measured 4 times in the last 4 months of 2014. Considering the complexities in the heterogeneous fractured aquifer of the study area, numerical modeling results for the basin in a transient state present 90 percent correlation with field studies. Having investigated the water balance in the region, the boundary condition of the model was determined as the input water from the eastern south and the runoff water in the western north of the region. Since the general trend of faults in the area is north-south, variation in the water table is slight on north-south and intense on the east-west direction. On the other hand, due to the fact that the maximum flow is along the faults and fractures, the water table contour lines in different locations over the region are closed.

  8. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeo, Ernest; Johnson, Jay R.; Kim, Eun-Hwa; Phillips, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  9. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  10. Summary of the models and methods for the FEHM application - a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Dash, Z.V.; Trease, L.L.

    1997-07-01

    The mathematical models and numerical methods employed by the FEHM application, a finite-element heat- and mass-transfer computer code that can simulate nonisothermal multiphase multi-component flow in porous media, are described. The use of this code is applicable to natural-state studies of geothermal systems and groundwater flow. A primary use of the FEHM application will be to assist in the understanding of flow fields and mass transport in the saturated and unsaturated zones below the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository in Nevada. The component models of FEHM are discussed. The first major component, Flow- and Energy-Transport Equations, deals with heat conduction; heat and mass transfer with pressure- and temperature-dependent properties, relative permeabilities and capillary pressures; isothermal air-water transport; and heat and mass transfer with noncondensible gas. The second component, Dual-Porosity and Double-Porosity/Double-Permeability Formulation, is designed for problems dominated by fracture flow. Another component, The Solute-Transport Models, includes both a reactive-transport model that simulates transport of multiple solutes with chemical reaction and a particle-tracking model. Finally, the component, Constitutive Relationships, deals with pressure- and temperature-dependent fluid/air/gas properties, relative permeabilities and capillary pressures, stress dependencies, and reactive and sorbing solutes. Each of these components is discussed in detail, including purpose, assumptions and limitations, derivation, applications, numerical method type, derivation of numerical model, location in the FEHM code flow, numerical stability and accuracy, and alternative approaches to modeling the component

  11. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  12. Finite element calculations illustrating a method of model reduction for the dynamics of structures with localized nonlinearities.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Daniel Todd; Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2006-10-01

    A technique published in SAND Report 2006-1789 ''Model Reduction of Systems with Localized Nonlinearities'' is illustrated in two problems of finite element structural dynamics. That technique, called here the Method of Locally Discontinuous Basis Vectors (LDBV), was devised to address the peculiar difficulties of model reduction of systems having spatially localized nonlinearities. It's illustration here is on two problems of different geometric and dynamic complexity, but each containing localized interface nonlinearities represented by constitutive models for bolted joint behavior. As illustrated on simple problems in the earlier SAND report, the LDBV Method not only affords reduction in size of the nonlinear systems of equations that must be solved, but it also facilitates the use of much larger time steps on problems of joint macro-slip than would be possible otherwise. These benefits are more dramatic for the larger problems illustrated here. The work of both the original SAND report and this one were funded by the LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. A three-dimensional cellular automata model coupled with finite element method and thermodynamic database for alloy solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Qin, R. S.; Chen, D. F.

    2013-08-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) cellular automata (CA) model has been developed for the simulation of microstructure evolution in alloy solidification. The governing rule for the CA model is associated with the phase transition driving force which is obtained via a thermodynamic database. This determines the migration rate of the non-equilibrium solid-liquid (SL) interface and is calculated according to the local temperature and chemical composition. The curvature of the interface and the anisotropic property of the surface energy are taken into consideration. A 3D finite element (FE) method is applied for the calculation of transient heat and mass transfer. Numerical calculations for the solidification of Fe-1.5 wt% C alloy have been performed. The morphological evolution of dendrites, carbon segregation and temperature distribution in both isothermal and non-isothermal conditions are studied. The parameters affecting the growth of equiaxed and columnar dendrites are discussed. The calculated results are verified using the analytical model and previous experiments. The method provides a sophisticated approach to the solidification of multi-phase and multi-component systems.

  14. Modeling and Eigenfrequency Analysis of Sound-Structure Interaction in a Rectangular Enclosure with Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Mohamady

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration of structures due to external sound is one of the main causes of interior noise in cavities like automobile, aircraft, and rotorcraft, which disturb the comfort of passengers. Accurate modelling of such phenomena is required in eigenfrequency analysis and in designing an active noise control system to reduce the interior noise. In this paper, the effect of periodic noise travelling into a rectangular enclosure is investigated with finite element method (FEM using COMSOL Multiphysics software. The periodic acoustic wave is generated by a point source outside the enclosure and propagated through the enclosure wall and excites an aluminium flexible panel clamped onto the enclosure. The behaviour of the transmission of sound into the cavity is investigated by computing the modal characteristics and the natural frequencies of the cavity. The simulation results are compared with previous analytical and experimental works for validation and an acceptable match between them were obtained.

  15. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  16. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T

    2009-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  17. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  18. Conservative Eulerian-Lagrangian Methods and Mixed Finite Element Methods for Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Russell, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ... more detailed three-dimensional (3D) simulations than would otherwise be practical. For 3D solute transport, the methods have been implemented and perform as expected on representative test problems...

  19. Identification of material parameters for plasticity models: A comparative study on the finite element model updating and the virtual fields method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, J. M. P.; Thuillier, S.; Andrade-Campos, A.

    2018-05-01

    The identification of material parameters, for a given constitutive model, can be seen as the first step before any practical application. In the last years, the field of material parameters identification received an important boost with the development of full-field measurement techniques, such as Digital Image Correlation. These techniques enable the use of heterogeneous displacement/strain fields, which contain more information than the classical homogeneous tests. Consequently, different techniques have been developed to extract material parameters from full-field measurements. In this study, two of these techniques are addressed, the Finite Element Model Updating (FEMU) and the Virtual Fields Method (VFM). The main idea behind FEMU is to update the parameters of a constitutive model implemented in a finite element model until both numerical and experimental results match, whereas VFM makes use of the Principle of Virtual Work and does not require any finite element simulation. Though both techniques proved their feasibility in linear and non-linear constitutive models, it is rather difficult to rank their robustness in plasticity. The purpose of this work is to perform a comparative study in the case of elasto-plastic models. Details concerning the implementation of each strategy are presented. Moreover, a dedicated code for VFM within a large strain framework is developed. The reconstruction of the stress field is performed through a user subroutine. A heterogeneous tensile test is considered to compare FEMU and VFM strategies.

  20. Dual-mixed finite elements for the three-field Stokes model as a finite volume method on staggered grids

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-06-09

    In this paper, a new three-field weak formulation for Stokes problems is developed, and from this, a dual-mixed finite element method is proposed on a rectangular mesh. In the proposed mixed methods, the components of stress tensor are approximated by piecewise constant functions or Q1 functions, while the velocity and pressure are discretized by the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas element and the piecewise constant functions, respectively. Using quadrature rules, we demonstrate that this scheme can be reduced into a finite volume method on staggered grid, which is extensively used in computational fluid mechanics and engineering.

  1. Dual-mixed finite elements for the three-field Stokes model as a finite volume method on staggered grids

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new three-field weak formulation for Stokes problems is developed, and from this, a dual-mixed finite element method is proposed on a rectangular mesh. In the proposed mixed methods, the components of stress tensor are approximated

  2. Modelling NDE pulse-echo inspection of misorientated planar rough defects using an elastic finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettit, J. R.; Lowe, M. J. S. [UK Research Centre for NDE, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Walker, A. E. [Rolls-Royce Nuclear, PO BOX 2000, Derby, DE21 7XX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-31

    Pulse-echo ultrasonic NDE examination of large pressure vessel forgings is a design and construction code requirement in the power generation industry. Such inspections aim to size and characterise potential defects that may have formed during the forging process. Typically these defects have a range of orientations and surface roughnesses which can greatly affect ultrasonic wave scattering behaviour. Ultrasonic modelling techniques can provide insight into defect response and therefore aid in characterisation. However, analytical approaches to solving these scattering problems can become inaccurate, especially when applied to increasingly complex defect geometries. To overcome these limitations a elastic Finite Element (FE) method has been developed to simulate pulse-echo inspections of embedded planar defects. The FE model comprises a significantly reduced spatial domain allowing for a Monte-Carlo based approach to consider multiple realisations of defect orientation and surface roughness. The results confirm that defects aligned perpendicular to the path of beam propagation attenuate ultrasonic signals according to the level of surface roughness. However, for defects orientated away from this plane, surface roughness can increase the magnitude of the scattered component propagating back along the path of the incident beam. This study therefore highlights instances where defect roughness increases the magnitude of ultrasonic scattered signals, as opposed to attenuation which is more often assumed.

  3. Modeling of light dynamic cone penetration test - Panda 3 ® in granular material by using 3D Discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quoc Anh; Chevalier, Bastien; Benz, Miguel; Breul, Pierre; Gourvès, Roland

    2017-06-01

    The recent technological developments made on the light dynamic penetration test Panda 3 ® provide a dynamic load-penetration curve σp - sp for each impact. This curve is influenced by the mechanical and physical properties of the investigated granular media. In order to analyze and exploit the load-penetration curve, a numerical model of penetration test using 3D Discrete Element Method is proposed for reproducing tests in dynamic conditions in granular media. All parameters of impact used in this model have at first been calibrated by respecting mechanical and geometrical properties of the hammer and the rod. There is a good agreement between experimental results and the ones obtained from simulations in 2D or 3D. After creating a sample, we will simulate the Panda 3 ®. It is possible to measure directly the dynamic load-penetration curve occurring at the tip for each impact. Using the force and acceleration measured in the top part of the rod, it is possible to separate the incident and reflected waves and then calculate the tip's load-penetration curve. The load-penetration curve obtained is qualitatively similar with that obtained by experimental tests. In addition, the frequency analysis of the measured signals present also a good compliance with that measured in reality when the tip resistance is qualitatively similar.

  4. Application of the boundary elements method for modeling of the fracture of cylindrical bodies by hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legan, M. A.; Blinov, V. A.; Larichkin, A. Yu; Novoselov, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    Experimental study of hydraulic fracturing of thick-walled cylinders with a central circular hole was carried out using the machine that creates a high oil pressure. Experiments on the compression fracture of the solid cylinders by diameter and rectangular parallelepipeds perpendicular to the ends were carried out with a multipurpose test machine Zwick / Roell Z100. Samples were made of GF-177 material based on cement. Ultimate stresses in the material under study were determined for three types of stress state: under compression, with a pure shear on the surface of the hole under frecking conditions and under a compound stress state under conditions of diametral compression of a solid cylinder. The value of the critical stress intensity factor of GF-177 material was obtained. The modeling of the fracturing process taking into account the inhomogeneity of the stress state near the hole was carried out using the boundary elements method (in the variant of the fictitious load method) and the gradient fracture criterion. Calculation results of the ultimate pressure were compared with values obtained analytically on the basis of the Lame solution and with experimental data.

  5. Numerical Simulations of Microseisms in a NE Atlantic 3D Geological Model, using a Spectral-Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yingzi; Bean, Christopher J.

    2014-05-01

    Ocean-generated microseisms are faint Earth tremors associated with the interaction between ocean water waves and the solid Earth. The microseism noise recorded as low frequency ground vibrations by seismometers contains significant information about the Earth's interior and the sea states. In this work, we first aim to investigate the forward propagation of microseisms in a deep-ocean environment. We employ a 3D North-East Atlantic geological model and simulate wave propagation in a coupled fluid-solid domain, using a spectral-element method. The aim is to investigate the effects of the continental shelf on microseism wave propagation. A second goal of this work is to perform noise simulation to calculate synthetic ensemble averaged cross-correlations of microseism noise signals with time reversal method. The algorithm can relieve computational cost by avoiding time stacking and get cross-correlations between the designated master station and all the remaining slave stations, at one time. The origins of microseisms are non-uniform, so we also test the effect of simulated noise source distribution on the determined cross-correlations.

  6. A Multiscale Finite Element Model Validation Method of Composite Cable-Stayed Bridge Based on Structural Health Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumian Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-step response surface method for multiscale finite element model (FEM updating and validation is presented with respect to Guanhe Bridge, a composite cable-stayed bridge in the National Highway number G15, in China. Firstly, the state equations of both multiscale and single-scale FEM are established based on the basic equation in structural dynamic mechanics to update the multiscale coupling parameters and structural parameters. Secondly, based on the measured data from the structural health monitoring (SHM system, a Monte Carlo simulation is employed to analyze the uncertainty quantification and transmission, where the uncertainties of the multiscale FEM and measured data were considered. The results indicate that the relative errors between the calculated and measured frequencies are less than 2%, and the overlap ratio indexes of each modal frequency are larger than 80% without the average absolute value of relative errors. These demonstrate that the proposed method can be applied to validate the multiscale FEM, and the validated FEM can reflect the current conditions of the real bridge; thus it can be used as the basis for bridge health monitoring, damage prognosis (DP, and safety prognosis (SP.

  7. Selection Ideal Coal Suppliers of Thermal Power Plants Using the Matter-Element Extension Model with Integrated Empowerment Method for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfu Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce thermal power generation cost and improve its market competitiveness, considering fuel quality, cost, creditworthiness, and sustainable development capacity factors, this paper established the evaluation system for coal supplier selection of thermal power and put forward the coal supplier selection strategies for thermal power based on integrated empowering and ideal matter-element extension models. On the one hand, the integrated empowering model can overcome the limitations of subjective and objective methods to determine weights, better balance subjective, and objective information. On the other hand, since the evaluation results of the traditional element extension model may fall into the same class and only get part of the order results, in order to overcome this shortcoming, the idealistic matter-element extension model is constructed. It selects the ideal positive and negative matter-elements classical field and uses the closeness degree to replace traditional maximum degree of membership criterion and calculates the positive or negative distance between the matter-element to be evaluated and the ideal matter-element; then it can get the full order results of the evaluation schemes. Simulated and compared with the TOPSIS method, Romania selection method, and PROMETHEE method, numerical example results show that the method put forward by this paper is effective and reliable.

  8. Finite element methods for incompressible flow problems

    CERN Document Server

    John, Volker

    2016-01-01

    This book explores finite element methods for incompressible flow problems: Stokes equations, stationary Navier-Stokes equations, and time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations. It focuses on numerical analysis, but also discusses the practical use of these methods and includes numerical illustrations. It also provides a comprehensive overview of analytical results for turbulence models. The proofs are presented step by step, allowing readers to more easily understand the analytical techniques.

  9. Determination of the contact stresses in double-row tapered roller bearings using the finite element method, experimental analysis and analytical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lostado, Ruben [University of La Rioja, Logroño (Spain); Martinez, Roberto Fernandez [University of Basque Country UPV/EHU, Bilbao (Spain); MacDonald, Bryan J. [Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland)

    2015-11-15

    Double-row Tapered roller bearings (TRBs) are mechanical devices that are designed to support high axial, radial and torque loads. This combination of loads produces high contact stresses on the bearing raceways that are difficult to predict and validate experimentally, and can cause defects like pitting and fatigue spalling. In response, theoretical models have been proposed by many researchers to calculate the approximate distribution of contact stresses over the bearing raceways. More recently, numerical methods that are based on the Finite element method (FEM) have been used to obtain the contact stresses, although this method requires that the mesh size first be adjusted. This paper shows a process for adjusting a double-row TRB Finite element (FE) model. It is based on generating successive nonlinear FE submodels to calculate the distribution of contact stresses. A theoretical model and contact pressure sensors were used to adjust and validate the Finite element (FE) model.

  10. Some observations concerning blade-element-momentum (BEM) methods and vortex wake methods, including numerical experiments with a simple vortex model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snel, H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy (Netherlands)

    1997-08-01

    Recently the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method has been made more versatile. Inclusion of rotational effects on time averaged profile coefficients have improved its achievements for performance calculations in stalled flow. Time dependence as a result of turbulent inflow, pitching actions and yawed operation is now treated more correctly (although more improvement is needed) than before. It is of interest to note that adaptations in modelling of unsteady or periodic induction stem from qualitative and quantitative insights obtained from free vortex models. Free vortex methods and further into the future Navier Stokes (NS) calculations, together with wind tunnel and field experiments, can be very useful in enhancing the potential of BEM for aero-elastic response calculations. It must be kept in mind however that extreme caution must be used with free vortex methods, as will be discussed in the following chapters. A discussion of the shortcomings and the strength of BEM and of vortex wake models is given. Some ideas are presented on how BEM might be improved without too much loss of efficiency. (EG)

  11. Viscoelastic modeling of apples under quasi-static loading using finite element method to investigate the causes of bruising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ghasemi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Apple is one of the most important horticultural crops of Iran. Its production in the country stands in the second place after citrus. Iran holds the fourth place in the world production of apples and gains a major share in the export of this product. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the quantity and quality of the fruit in order to maintain and promote its position among the countries importing this product from Iran. Most of the mechanical damages to fruits and vegetables occur due to contact stresses under static, quasi-static and impact loading. To obtain stress distribution inside the fruit we can use finite element analysis. The aim of this study was to simulate the behavior of the apple as a viscoelastic body subjected to quasi-static loading and also to determine the failure criteria (maximum normal stress or shear stress of apple flesh to estimate its susceptibility to mechanical bruising. Materials and methods: In this study, Golab kohanz apple was used. Two samples were removed from each apple using a core sampler, one was used for uniaxial compression and the other was used for confined compression test using Instron universal tension and compression machine. Spherical indenter and parallel plate tests were performed in order to study apple susceptibility to bruising at four deformation levels (1, 2, 3 and 4 mm and the bruise volume was then measured after 24 hours. Stress-strain curves were plotted and then, the elastic and viscoelastic properties were obtained. Then, by using the data obtained from apple properties, the apple was modeled in Abaqus software as spherical and cylindrical shapes with viscoelastic behavior subjected to quasi-static loadings. Results and Discussion: The normal stress distribution of the modeled apple in the shape of a cylindrical sample is shown in Fig. 4. The value of maximum normal stress was obtained (0.51 MPa at the contact point of the loading plate with the sample. Experimental

  12. A practical method for computation of ductile crack growth by means of finite elements and parametric 3D-modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumjohann, F.; Kroening, J.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper originates from a contribution to the safety assessment of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Investigations evaluating the safety against brittle fracture (exclosure of crack initiation and arrest assessments) are completed by calculations concerning ductile crack extension. Crack geometries including the expected crack extension are generated parametrically by a computer code and are used for further calculations with finite element programs. J-integrals of ductile growing cracks located between two comparative contours are determined by interpolation. The comparative contours are loaded by instationary temperature and pressure fields and are evaluated in advance. Taking the stability condition into consideration, the ductile crack extension is determined by pursuing the equilibrium between loading and crack resistance. The automatic modelling and a mathematical program processing the finite element results evaluate the crack growth of the finite element results very effectively. (orig.)

  13. Discrete element method modeling of the triboelectric charging of polyethylene particles: Can particle size distribution and segregation reduce the charging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopka, Ladislav; Kosek, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene particles of various sizes are present in industrial gas-dispersion reactors and downstream processing units. The contact of the particles with a device wall as well as the mutual particle collisions cause electrons on the particle surface to redistribute in the system. The undesirable triboelectric charging results in several operational problems and safety risks in industrial systems, for example in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor. We studied the charging of polyethylene particles caused by the particle-particle interactions in gas. Our model employs the Discrete Element Method (DEM) describing the particle dynamics and incorporates the ‘Trapped Electron Approach’ as the physical basis for the considered charging mechanism. The model predicts the particle charge distribution for systems with various particle size distributions and various level of segregation. Simulation results are in a qualitative agreement with experimental observations of similar particulate systems specifically in two aspects: 1) Big particles tend to gain positive charge and small particles the negative one. 2) The wider the particle size distribution is, the more pronounced is the charging process. Our results suggest that not only the size distribution, but also the effect of the spatial segregation of the polyethylene particles significantly influence the resulting charge distribution ‘generated’ in the system. The level of particle segregation as well as the particle size distribution of polyethylene particles can be in practice adjusted by the choice of supported catalysts, by the conditions in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor and by the fluid dynamics. We also attempt to predict how the reactor temperature affects the triboelectric charging of particles. (paper)

  14. Finite element coiled cochlea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Velibor; Nikolic, Milica; Milosevic, Zarko; Saveljic, Igor; Nikolic, Dalibor; Radovic, Milos; Filipović, Nenad

    2015-12-01

    Cochlea is important part of the hearing system, and thanks to special structure converts external sound waves into neural impulses which go to the brain. Shape of the cochlea is like snail, so geometry of the cochlea model is complex. The simplified cochlea coiled model was developed using finite element method inside SIFEM FP7 project. Software application is created on the way that user can prescribe set of the parameters for spiral cochlea, as well as material properties and boundary conditions to the model. Several mathematical models were tested. The acoustic wave equation for describing fluid in the cochlea chambers - scala vestibuli and scala timpani, and Newtonian dynamics for describing vibrations of the basilar membrane are used. The mechanical behavior of the coiled cochlea was analyzed and the third chamber, scala media, was not modeled because it does not have a significant impact on the mechanical vibrations of the basilar membrane. The obtained results are in good agreement with experimental measurements. Future work is needed for more realistic geometry model. Coiled model of the cochlea was created and results are compared with initial simplified coiled model of the cochlea.

  15. Finite Element Methods and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhangxin

    2005-01-01

    This book serves as a text for one- or two-semester courses for upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students and as a professional reference for people who want to solve partial differential equations (PDEs) using finite element methods. The author has attempted to introduce every concept in the simplest possible setting and maintain a level of treatment that is as rigorous as possible without being unnecessarily abstract. Quite a lot of attention is given to discontinuous finite elements, characteristic finite elements, and to the applications in fluid and solid mechanics including applications to porous media flow, and applications to semiconductor modeling. An extensive set of exercises and references in each chapter are provided.

  16. Elements of modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozoki, E.

    1987-01-01

    There is burgeoning interest in modeling-based accelerator control. With more and more stringent requirements on the performance, the importance of knowing, controlling, predicting the behavior of the accelerator system is growing. Modeling means two things: (1) the development of programs and data which predict the outcome of a measurement, and (2) devising and performing measurements to find the machine physics parameter and their behavior under different conditions. These two sides should be tied together in an iterative process. With knowledge gained on the real system, the model will be modified, calibrated, and fine-tuned. The model of a system consists of data and the modeling program. The Modeling Based Control Programs (MBC) should in the on-line mode control, optimize, and correct the machine. In the off-line mode, the MBC is used to simulate the machine as well as explore and study its behavior and responses under a wide variety of circumstances. 15 refs., 3 figs

  17. Using finite element modelling and experimental methods to investigate planar coil sensor topologies for inductive measurement of displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Moreton

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The usage of planar sensors is widespread due to their non-contact nature and small size profiles, however only a few basic design types are generally considered. In order to develop planar coil designs we have performed extensive finite element modelling (FEM and experimentation to understand the performance of different planar sensor topologies when used in inductive sensing. We have applied this approach to develop a novel displacement sensor. Models of different topologies with varying pitch values have been analysed using the ANSYS Maxwell FEM package, furthermore the models incorporated a movable soft magnetic amorphous ribbon element. The different models used in the FEM were then constructed and experimentally tested with topologies that included mesh, meander, square coil, and circular coil configurations. The sensors were used to detect the displacement of the amorphous ribbon. A LabView program controlled both the displacement stage and the impedance analyser, the latter capturing the varying inductance values with ribbon displacement. There was good correlation between the FEM models and the experimental data confirming that the methodology described here offers an effective way for developing planar coil based sensors with improved performance.

  18. Using finite element modelling and experimental methods to investigate planar coil sensor topologies for inductive measurement of displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreton, Gregory; Meydan, Turgut; Williams, Paul

    2018-04-01

    The usage of planar sensors is widespread due to their non-contact nature and small size profiles, however only a few basic design types are generally considered. In order to develop planar coil designs we have performed extensive finite element modelling (FEM) and experimentation to understand the performance of different planar sensor topologies when used in inductive sensing. We have applied this approach to develop a novel displacement sensor. Models of different topologies with varying pitch values have been analysed using the ANSYS Maxwell FEM package, furthermore the models incorporated a movable soft magnetic amorphous ribbon element. The different models used in the FEM were then constructed and experimentally tested with topologies that included mesh, meander, square coil, and circular coil configurations. The sensors were used to detect the displacement of the amorphous ribbon. A LabView program controlled both the displacement stage and the impedance analyser, the latter capturing the varying inductance values with ribbon displacement. There was good correlation between the FEM models and the experimental data confirming that the methodology described here offers an effective way for developing planar coil based sensors with improved performance.

  19. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  20. Modeling the high-frequency complex modulus of silicone rubber using standing Lamb waves and an inverse finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Ulf; Lindahl, Olof; Andersson, Britt

    2014-12-01

    To gain an understanding of the high-frequency elastic properties of silicone rubber, a finite element model of a cylindrical piezoelectric element, in contact with a silicone rubber disk, was constructed. The frequency-dependent elastic modulus of the silicone rubber was modeled by a fourparameter fractional derivative viscoelastic model in the 100 to 250 kHz frequency range. The calculations were carried out in the range of the first radial resonance frequency of the sensor. At the resonance, the hyperelastic effect of the silicone rubber was modeled by a hyperelastic compensating function. The calculated response was matched to the measured response by using the transitional peaks in the impedance spectrum that originates from the switching of standing Lamb wave modes in the silicone rubber. To validate the results, the impedance responses of three 5-mm-thick silicone rubber disks, with different radial lengths, were measured. The calculated and measured transitional frequencies have been compared in detail. The comparison showed very good agreement, with average relative differences of 0.7%, 0.6%, and 0.7% for the silicone rubber samples with radial lengths of 38.0, 21.4, and 11.0 mm, respectively. The average complex elastic moduli of the samples were (0.97 + 0.009i) GPa at 100 kHz and (0.97 + 0.005i) GPa at 250 kHz.

  1. Finite Element Method in Machining Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Markopoulos, Angelos P

    2013-01-01

    Finite Element Method in Machining Processes provides a concise study on the way the Finite Element Method (FEM) is used in the case of manufacturing processes, primarily in machining. The basics of this kind of modeling are detailed to create a reference that will provide guidelines for those who start to study this method now, but also for scientists already involved in FEM and want to expand their research. A discussion on FEM, formulations and techniques currently in use is followed up by machining case studies. Orthogonal cutting, oblique cutting, 3D simulations for turning and milling, grinding, and state-of-the-art topics such as high speed machining and micromachining are explained with relevant examples. This is all supported by a literature review and a reference list for further study. As FEM is a key method for researchers in the manufacturing and especially in the machining sector, Finite Element Method in Machining Processes is a key reference for students studying manufacturing processes but al...

  2. Numerical study on two-point contact by an explicit integration finite element method : A contribution to the modeling of flange squeal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.; Tournay, H; Grassie, S

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanism which activates squeal, especially flange squeal has not been fully explained. The complex non-Hertzian contact and the broad-band high frequency feature bring great challenges to the modelling work of flange squeal. In this paper, an explicit integration finite element method

  3. Computation of the flash-temperature at the wheel-rail contact using a 3D finite element model and its comparison with analytical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.; Wu, J.; Petrov, R.H.; Sietsma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The coupled mechanical–thermal behaviour of wheel and rail materials under rolling contact is studied to determine the temperature rise due to the frictional heat. The wheel–rail frictional rolling contact problem is solved using the three–dimensional finite element (FE) method. The FE model

  4. Numerical Modeling of 3D Seismic Wave Propagation around Yogyakarta, the Southern Part of Central Java, Indonesia, Using Spectral-Element Method on MPI-GPU Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarmaji; Rudianto, Indra; Eka Nurcahya, Budi

    2018-04-01

    A strong tectonic earthquake with a magnitude of 5.9 Richter scale has been occurred in Yogyakarta and Central Java on May 26, 2006. The earthquake has caused severe damage in Yogyakarta and the southern part of Central Java, Indonesia. The understanding of seismic response of earthquake among ground shaking and the level of building damage is important. We present numerical modeling of 3D seismic wave propagation around Yogyakarta and the southern part of Central Java using spectral-element method on MPI-GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) computer cluster to observe its seismic response due to the earthquake. The homogeneous 3D realistic model is generated with detailed topography surface. The influences of free surface topography and layer discontinuity of the 3D model among the seismic response are observed. The seismic wave field is discretized using spectral-element method. The spectral-element method is solved on a mesh of hexahedral elements that is adapted to the free surface topography and the internal discontinuity of the model. To increase the data processing capabilities, the simulation is performed on a GPU cluster with implementation of MPI (Message Passing Interface).

  5. Discrete elements method of neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, K.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper a new neutron transport method, called discrete elements (L N ) is derived and compared to discrete ordinates methods, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is based on discretizing the Boltzmann equation over a set of elements of angle. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost-effective than discrete ordinates, in terms of accuracy versus execution time and storage, for the cases tested. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, the L N method is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution

  6. Physical model of Nernst element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Kazuaki; Yamaguchi, Satarou

    1998-08-01

    Generation of electric power by the Nernst effect is a new application of a semiconductor. A key point of this proposal is to find materials with a high thermomagnetic figure-of-merit, which are called Nernst elements. In order to find candidates of the Nernst element, a physical model to describe its transport phenomena is needed. As the first model, we began with a parabolic two-band model in classical statistics. According to this model, we selected InSb as candidates of the Nernst element and measured their transport coefficients in magnetic fields up to 4 Tesla within a temperature region from 270 K to 330 K. In this region, we calculated transport coefficients numerically by our physical model. For InSb, experimental data are coincident with theoretical values in strong magnetic field. (author)

  7. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  8. Modelling of pressurized water reactor fuel, rod time dependent radial heat flow with boundary element method; Modeliranje spremenljivega radijalnega toplotnega toka tlacnovodne gorivne palice z metodo robnih elementov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarler, B [Institut Jozef Stefan, Ljubljana (Yugoslavia)

    1987-07-01

    The basic principles of the boundary element method numerical treatment of the radial flow heat diffusion equation are presented. The algorithm copes the time dependent Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, temperature dependent material properties and regions from different materials in thermal contact. It is verified on the several analytically obtained test cases. The developed method is used for the modelling of unsteady radial heat flow in pressurized water reactor fuel rod. (author)

  9. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  10. A finite element method for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1978-01-01

    A variational treatment of the finite element method for neutron transport is given based on a version of the even-parity Boltzmann equation which does not assume that the differential scattering cross-section has a spherical harmonic expansion. The theory of minimum and maximum principles is based on the Cauchy-Schwartz equality and the properties of a leakage operator G and a removal operator C. For systems with extraneous sources, two maximum and one minimum principles are given in boundary free form, to ease finite element computations. The global error of an approximate variational solution is given, the relationship of one the maximum principles to the method of least squares is shown, and the way in which approximate solutions converge locally to the exact solution is established. A method for constructing local error bounds is given, based on the connection between the variational method and the method of the hypercircle. The source iteration technique and a maximum principle for a system with extraneous sources suggests a functional for a variational principle for a self-sustaining system. The principle gives, as a consequence of the properties of G and C, an upper bound to the lowest eigenvalue. A related functional can be used to determine both upper and lower bounds for the lowest eigenvalue from an inspection of any approximate solution for the lowest eigenfunction. The basis for the finite element is presented in a general form so that two modes of exploitation can be undertaken readily. The model can be in phase space, with positional and directional co-ordinates defining points of the model, or it can be restricted to the positional co-ordinates and an expansion in orthogonal functions used for the directional co-ordinates. Suitable sets of functions are spherical harmonics and Walsh functions. The latter set is appropriate if a discrete direction representation of the angular flux is required. (author)

  11. A high-order 3-D spectral-element method for the forward modelling and inversion of gravimetric data—Application to the western Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Seoane, Lucia; Spangenberg, Hannah; Wang, Yi; Dufréchou, Grégory; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Bruinsma, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We image the internal density structure of the Pyrenees by inverting gravity data using an a priori density model derived by scaling a Vp model obtained by full waveform inversion of teleseismic P-waves. Gravity anomalies are computed via a 3-D high-order finite-element integration in the same high-order spectral-element grid as the one used to solve the wave equation and thus to obtain the velocity model. The curvature of the Earth and surface topography are taken into account in order to obtain a density model as accurate as possible. The method is validated through comparisons with exact semi-analytical solutions. We show that the spectral-element method drastically accelerates the computations when compared to other more classical methods. Different scaling relations between compressional velocity and density are tested, and the Nafe-Drake relation is the one that leads to the best agreement between computed and observed gravity anomalies. Gravity data inversion is then performed and the results allow us to put more constraints on the density structure of the shallow crust and on the deep architecture of the mountain range.

  12. Influence of three-dimensional reconstruction method for building a model of the cervical spine on its biomechanical responses: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Zafarparandeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In some finite element analysis studies of models of sections of the spine, the three-dimensional solid model is built by assuming symmetry about the mid-sagittal plane of the section, whereas in other studies, the model is built from the exact geometry of the section. The influence of the method used to build the solid model on model parameters, in the case of the cervical spine, has not been reported in the literature. This issue is the subject of this study, with the section being C2–C7, the applied loadings being extension, flexion, left lateral bending, and right axial rotation (each of magnitude 1 Nm, and the model parameters determined being rotation, intradiskal pressure, and facet load at each of the segments. When all the parameter results were considered, it was found that, by and large, the influence of solid model construction method used (exact geometry vs assumption of symmetry about the mid-sagittal plane of the section was marginal. As construction of a symmetric finite element model requires less time and effort, construction of an asymmetric model may be justified in special cases only.

  13. A least-squares/finite element method for the numerical solution of the Navier–Stokes-Cahn–Hilliard system modeling the motion of the contact line

    KAUST Repository

    He, Qiaolin

    2011-06-01

    In this article we discuss the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard system modeling the motion of the contact line separating two immiscible incompressible viscous fluids near a solid wall. The method we employ combines a finite element space approximation with a time discretization by operator-splitting. To solve the Cahn-Hilliard part of the problem, we use a least-squares/conjugate gradient method. We also show that the scheme has the total energy decaying in time property under certain conditions. Our numerical experiments indicate that the method discussed here is accurate, stable and efficient. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Method of lightening radiation darkened optical elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, F.R.; Schwankoff, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    A method of lightening a radiation-darkened optical element in which visible optical energy or electromagnetic radiation having a wavelength in the range of from about 2000 to about 20,000 angstroms is directed into the radiation-darkened optical element; the method may be used to lighten radiation-darkened optical element in-situ during the use of the optical element to transmit data by electronically separating the optical energy from the optical output by frequency filtering, data cooling, or interlacing the optic energy between data intervals

  15. Convergence analysis of spectral element method for magnetic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curti, M.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2018-01-01

    This paper concerns the comparison of the performance of the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) for modeling a magnetostatic problem. The convergence of the vector magnetic potential, the magnetic flux density, and the total stored energy in the system is compared with

  16. Primal Domain Decomposition Method with Direct and Iterative Solver for Circuit-Field-Torque Coupled Parallel Finite Element Method to Electric Machine Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Marcsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and design of electromechanical devices involve the solution of large sparse linear systems, and require therefore high performance algorithms. In this paper, the primal Domain Decomposition Method (DDM with parallel forward-backward and with parallel Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG solvers are introduced in two-dimensional parallel time-stepping finite element formulation to analyze rotating machine considering the electromagnetic field, external circuit and rotor movement. The proposed parallel direct and the iterative solver with two preconditioners are analyzed concerning its computational efficiency and number of iterations of the solver with different preconditioners. Simulation results of a rotating machine is also presented.

  17. An inverse model for locating skin tumours in 3D using the genetic algorithm with the Dual Reciprocity Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Ribeiro Bueno

    Full Text Available Here, the Dual Reciprocity Boundary Element Method is used to solve the 3D Pennes Bioheat Equation, which together with a Genetic Algorithm, produces an inverse model capable of obtaining the location and the size of a tumour, having as data input the temperature distribution measured on the skin surface. Given that the objective function, which is solved inversely, involves the DRBEM (Dual Reciprocity Boundary Element Method the Genetic Algorithm in its usual form becomes slower, in such a way that it was necessary to develop functions based the solution history in order that the process becomes quicker and more accurate. Results for 8 examples are presented including cases with convection and radiation boundary conditions. Cases involving noise in the readings of the equipment are also considered. This technique is intended to assist health workers in the diagnosis of tumours.

  18. Numerical simulations and analysis for the Aespoe pillar stability experiment. Part 1. Continuum based approaches using finite element method and comparison with other analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chijimatsu, Masakazu; Koyama, Tomofumi; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nakama, Shigeo; Fujita, Tomoo

    2013-01-01

    DECOVALEX-2011 is an international cooperation project for enhancing the numerical models of radioactive waste repositories. In DECOVALEX-2011 project, the failure mechanism during excavation and heating processes observed in the Aespoe pillar stability experiment, which was carried out at the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, were simulated using Finite Element Method. When the calibrated parameters were used, simulation results agree qualitatively well with the experimental results. Therefore, it can be said that the spalling phenomenon is expressible even by the application with the continuum model by the use of the suitable parameters. (author)

  19. Coupling of smooth particle hydrodynamics with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attaway, S.W.; Heinstein, M.W.; Swegle, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A gridless technique called smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) has been coupled with the transient dynamics finite element code ppercase[pronto]. In this paper, a new weighted residual derivation for the SPH method will be presented, and the methods used to embed SPH within ppercase[pronto] will be outlined. Example SPH ppercase[pronto] calculations will also be presented. One major difficulty associated with the Lagrangian finite element method is modeling materials with no shear strength; for example, gases, fluids and explosive biproducts. Typically, these materials can be modeled for only a short time with a Lagrangian finite element code. Large distortions cause tangling of the mesh, which will eventually lead to numerical difficulties, such as negative element area or ''bow tie'' elements. Remeshing will allow the problem to continue for a short while, but the large distortions can prevent a complete analysis. SPH is a gridless Lagrangian technique. Requiring no mesh, SPH has the potential to model material fracture, large shear flows and penetration. SPH computes the strain rate and the stress divergence based on the nearest neighbors of a particle, which are determined using an efficient particle-sorting technique. Embedding the SPH method within ppercase[pronto] allows part of the problem to be modeled with quadrilateral finite elements, while other parts are modeled with the gridless SPH method. SPH elements are coupled to the quadrilateral elements through a contact-like algorithm. ((orig.))

  20. An automated method to morph finite element whole-body human models with a wide range of stature and body shape for both men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Cao, Libo; Fanta, Abeselom; Reed, Matthew P; Neal, Mark; Wang, Jenne-Tai; Lin, Chin-Hsu; Hu, Jingwen

    2017-07-26

    Field data analyses have shown that small female, obese, and/or older occupants are at increased risks of death and serious injury in motor-vehicle crashes compared with mid-size young men. The current adult finite element (FE) human models represent occupants in the same three body sizes (large male, mid-size male, and small female) as those for the contemporary adult crash dummies. Further, the time needed to develop an FE human model using the traditional method is measured in months or even years. In the current study, an improved regional mesh morphing method based on landmark-based radial basis function (RBF) interpolation was developed to rapidly morph a mid-size male FE human model into different geometry targets. A total of 100 human models with a wide range of human attributes were generated. A pendulum chest impact condition was applied to each model as an initial assessment of the resulting variability in response. The morphed models demonstrated mesh quality similar to the baseline model. The peak impact forces and chest deflections in the chest pendulum impacts varied substantially with different models, supportive of consideration of population variation in evaluating the occupant injury risks. The method developed in this study will enable future safety design optimizations targeting at various vulnerable populations that cannot be considered with the current models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Fuel elements handling device and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to nuclear equipment and more particularly to methods and apparatus for the non-destructive inspection, manipulation, disassembly and assembly of reactor fuel elements and the like. (author)

  2. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  3. Review on Finite Element Method * ERHUNMWUN, ID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    ABSTRACT: In this work, we have discussed what Finite Element Method (FEM) is, its historical development, advantages and ... residual procedures, are examples of the direct approach ... The paper centred on the "stiffness and deflection of ...

  4. The finite element method in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    A new edition of the leading textbook on the finite element method, incorporating major advancements and further applications in the field of electromagnetics The finite element method (FEM) is a powerful simulation technique used to solve boundary-value problems in a variety of engineering circumstances. It has been widely used for analysis of electromagnetic fields in antennas, radar scattering, RF and microwave engineering, high-speed/high-frequency circuits, wireless communication, electromagnetic compatibility, photonics, remote sensing, biomedical engineering, and space exploration. The

  5. PIXE - a new method for elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, S.A.E.

    1983-01-01

    With elemental analysis we mean the determination of which chemical elements are present in a sample and of their concentration. This is an old and important problem in chemistry. The earliest methods were purely chemical and many such methods are still used. However, various methods based on physical principles have gradually become more and more important. One such method is neutron activation. When the sample is bombarded with neutrons it becomes radioactive and the various radioactive isotopes produced can be identified by the radiation they emit. From the measured intensity of the radiation one can calculate how much of a certain element that is present in the sample. Another possibility is to study the light emitted when the sample is excited in various ways. A spectroscopic investigation of the light can identify the chemical elements and allows also a determination of their concentration in the sample. In the same way, if a sample can be brought to emit X-rays, this radiation is also characteristic for the elements present and can be used to determine the elemental concentration. One such X-ray method which has been developed recently is PIXE. The name is an acronym for Particle Induced X-ray Emission and indicates the principle of the method. Particles in this context means heavy, charged particles such as protons and a-particles of rather high energy. Hence, in PIXE-analysis the sample is irradiated in the beam of an accelerator and the emitted X-rays are studied. (author)

  6. Recent advances in boundary element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Manolis, GD

    2009-01-01

    Addresses the needs of the computational mechanics research community in terms of information on boundary integral equation-based methods and techniques applied to a variety of fields. This book collects both original and review articles on contemporary Boundary Element Methods (BEM) as well as on the Mesh Reduction Methods (MRM).

  7. Introducing the Boundary Element Method with MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Keng-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The boundary element method provides an excellent platform for learning and teaching a computational method for solving problems in physical and engineering science. However, it is often left out in many undergraduate courses as its implementation is deemed to be difficult. This is partly due to the perception that coding the method requires…

  8. Finite element method - theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baset, S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the mathematical basis of the finite element method. Attention is drawn to the natural development of the method from an engineering analysis tool into a general numerical analysis tool. A particular application to the stress analysis of rubber materials is presented. Special advantages and issues associated with the method are mentioned. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  9. Application of dynamic relaxation and finite elements methods for the structural analysis of a scale model of a prestressed concrete pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Masaru

    1979-01-01

    A stress and strain analysis was made of a scale model of a Prestressed Concrete Pressure Vessel for a Boiling Water Reactor. The aim of this work was to obtain an experimental verification of the calculation method actually used at IPEN. The 1/10 scale model was built and tested at the Instituto Sperimentale Modelli e Structture, ISMES, Italy. The dynamic relaxation program PV2-A and the finite element programs , FEAST-1 have been used. A comparative analysis of the final results was made. A preliminary analysis was made for a simplified monocavity model now under development at IPEN with the object of confirming the data and the calculation method used. (author)

  10. Investigation of rare elements by electrochemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarinskij, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    The use of electrochemical methods for the study of complexing, separation of rare element mixtures, their preparation in lower oxidation states, and also for the development of highly sensitive methods of the element determination, is considered in the review. Voltammetric methods of Pt, Au, Re determination are considered, as well as Re preparation in oxidation states +5, +3 by electrolytic methods. The possibility to use electrodialysis methods for purification of insoluble compounds of rare earths (RE) from impurities, and for separation of Re and Mo with simultaneous purification of Re from K and other elements is shown. The application of high-frequency conductometry to analytic chemistry and to the study of Th, In, RE complexing and kinetics of the reactions is considered

  11. Discrete elements method of neutral particle transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A new discrete elements (L/sub N/) transport method is derived and compared to the discrete ordinates S/sub N/ method, theoretically and by numerical experimentation. The discrete elements method is more accurate than discrete ordinates and strongly ameliorates ray effects for the practical problems studied. The discrete elements method is shown to be more cost effective, in terms of execution time with comparable storage to attain the same accuracy, for a one-dimensional test case using linear characteristic spatial quadrature. In a two-dimensional test case, a vacuum duct in a shield, L/sub N/ is more consistently convergent toward a Monte Carlo benchmark solution than S/sub N/, using step characteristic spatial quadrature. An analysis of the interaction of angular and spatial quadrature in xy-geometry indicates the desirability of using linear characteristic spatial quadrature with the L/sub N/ method

  12. Discrete element modeling of microstructure of nacre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Cheng, Jing-Ru C.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure of nacre consists of polygon-shaped aragonite mineral tablets bonded by very thin layers of organic materials and is organized in a brick-mortar morphology. In this research, the discrete element method was utilized to model this structure. The aragonite mineral tablets were modeled with three-dimensional polygon particles generated by the Voronoi tessellation method to represent the Voronoi-like patterns of mineral tablets assembly observed in experiments. The organic matrix was modeled with a group of spring elements. The constitutive relations of the spring elements were inspired from the experimental results of organic molecules from the literature. The mineral bridges were modeled with simple elastic bonds with the parameters based on experimental data from the literature. The bulk stress-strain responses from the models agreed well with experimental results. The model results show that the mineral bridges play important roles in providing the stiffness and yield strength for the nacre, while the organic matrix in providing the ductility for the nacre. This work demonstrated the suitability of particle methods for modeling microstructures of nacre.

  13. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  14. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  15. Finite-element-method (FEM model generation of time-resolved 3D echocardiographic geometry data for mitral-valve volumetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikinis Ron

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mitral Valve (MV 3D structural data can be easily obtained using standard transesophageal echocardiography (TEE devices but quantitative pre- and intraoperative volume analysis of the MV is presently not feasible in the cardiac operation room (OR. Finite element method (FEM modelling is necessary to carry out precise and individual volume analysis and in the future will form the basis for simulation of cardiac interventions. Method With the present retrospective pilot study we describe a method to transfer MV geometric data to 3D Slicer 2 software, an open-source medical visualization and analysis software package. A newly developed software program (ROIExtract allowed selection of a region-of-interest (ROI from the TEE data and data transformation for use in 3D Slicer. FEM models for quantitative volumetric studies were generated. Results ROI selection permitted the visualization and calculations required to create a sequence of volume rendered models of the MV allowing time-based visualization of regional deformation. Quantitation of tissue volume, especially important in myxomatous degeneration can be carried out. Rendered volumes are shown in 3D as well as in time-resolved 4D animations. Conclusion The visualization of the segmented MV may significantly enhance clinical interpretation. This method provides an infrastructure for the study of image guided assessment of clinical findings and surgical planning. For complete pre- and intraoperative 3D MV FEM analysis, three input elements are necessary: 1. time-gated, reality-based structural information, 2. continuous MV pressure and 3. instantaneous tissue elastance. The present process makes the first of these elements available. Volume defect analysis is essential to fully understand functional and geometrical dysfunction of but not limited to the valve. 3D Slicer was used for semi-automatic valve border detection and volume-rendering of clinical 3D echocardiographic

  16. Neutronics methods, models, and applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the advanced neutron source reactor three-element core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wemple, C.A.; Schnitzler, B.G.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1995-08-01

    A summary of the methods and models used to perform neutronics analyses on the Advanced Neutron Source reactor three-element core design is presented. The applications of the neutral particle Monte Carlo code MCNP are detailed, as well as the expansion of the static role of MCNP to analysis of fuel cycle depletion calculations. Results to date of these applications are presented also. A summary of the calculations not yet performed is also given to provide a open-quotes to-doclose quotes list if the project is resurrected

  17. Unified Modeling Language description of the object-oriented multi-scale adaptive finite element method for Step-and-Flash Imprint Lithography Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paszynski, Maciej; Gurgul, Piotr; Sieniek, Marcin; Pardo, David

    2010-01-01

    In the first part of the paper we present the multi-scale simulation of the Step-and-Flash Imprint Lithography (SFIL), a modern patterning process. The simulation utilizes the hp adaptive Finite Element Method (hp-FEM) coupled with Molecular Statics (MS) model. Thus, we consider the multi-scale problem, with molecular statics applied in the areas of the mesh where the highest accuracy is required, and the continuous linear elasticity with thermal expansion coefficient applied in the remaining part of the domain. The degrees of freedom from macro-scale element's nodes located on the macro-scale side of the interface have been identified with particles from nano-scale elements located on the nano-scale side of the interface. In the second part of the paper we present Unified Modeling Language (UML) description of the resulting multi-scale application (hp-FEM coupled with MS). We investigated classical, procedural codes from the point of view of the object-oriented (O-O) programming paradigm. The discovered hierarchical structure of classes and algorithms makes the UML project as independent on the spatial dimension of the problem as possible. The O-O UML project was defined at an abstract level, independent on the programming language used.

  18. Humic acids and their interactions with metallic elements: Cu II, Eu III, Th IV, U VI: contribution of size exclusion chromatography method and research of complexation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesourd-Moulin, V.

    1986-04-01

    The interest given to natural organic matter (humic and fulvic acids) as complexing agents of metallic ions in soils and natural waters becomes more and more important in environmental area. Cation - humic matter interactions have a great importance, a better understanding of the contribution of these substances in natural media specially towards radioactive elements with long life time. Interactions are studied by a chromatographic technique of gel filtration: the dynamic equilibrium method is based on the separation of the formed complex humic macromolecule - metallic ion and the free metallic ion, which due to its size penetrates totally in the pores of the gel. Separation mechanisms of the chromatographic support and the contribution of each parameter, are studied as a function of the buffer nature, its concentration, the PH, the gel porosity and the valence of the metallic cation. This study led to the determination of the appropriate experimental conditions for each cation. A study of metallic binding with humic acid has been undertaken with Cu 2+ , Eu 3+ , Th 4+ , Uo 2 2+ . These elements, except copper, have been chosen for their properties similar to the transuranic elements. Different samples of humic acids (commercial, podzolic soil, rendzine soil) are also studied. A deeper research of europium - humic acid interactions by means of different treatment models (discrete or gaussian models) has been undertaken in order to determine the number, the binding site strength and the global interaction constants [fr

  19. Spectral/hp element methods for CFD

    CERN Document Server

    Karniadakis, George Em

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally spectral methods in fluid dynamics were used in direct and large eddy simulations of turbulent flow in simply connected computational domains. The methods are now being applied to more complex geometries, and the spectral/hp element method, which incorporates both multi-domain spectral methods and high-order finite element methods, has been particularly successful. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to these methods. Written by leaders in the field, the book begins with a full explanation of fundamental concepts and implementation issues. It then illustrates how these methods can be applied to advection-diffusion and to incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Drawing on both published and unpublished material, the book is an important resource for experienced researchers and for those new to the field.

  20. Dynamic relaxation method in analysis of reinforced concrete bent elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Szcześniak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method for the analysis of nonlinear behaviour of reinforced concrete bent elements subjected to short-term static load. The considerations in the range of modelling of deformation processes of reinforced concrete element were carried out. The method of structure effort analysis was developed using the finite difference method. The Dynamic Relaxation Method, which — after introduction of critical damping — allows for description of the static behaviour of a structural element, was used to solve the system of nonlinear equilibrium equations. In order to increase the method effectiveness in the range of the post-critical analysis, the Arc Length Parameter on the equilibrium path was introduced into the computational procedure.[b]Keywords[/b]: reinforced concrete elements, physical nonlinearity, geometrical nonlinearity, dynamic relaxation method, arc-length method

  1. New mixed finite-element methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, L.P.

    1987-01-01

    New finite-element methods are proposed for mixed variational formulations. The methods are constructed by adding to the classical Galerkin method various least-squares like terms. The additional terms involve integrals over element interiors, and include mesh-parameter dependent coefficients. The methods are designed to enhance stability. Consistency is achieved in the sense that exact solutions identically satisfy the variational equations.Applied to several problems, simple finite-element interpolations are rendered convergent, including convenient equal-order interpolations generally unstable within the Galerkin approach. The methods are subdivided into two classes according to the manner in which stability is attained: (1) circumventing Babuska-Brezzi condition methods; (2) satisfying Babuska-Brezzi condition methods. Convergence is established for each class of methods. Applications of the first class of methods to Stokes flow and compressible linear elasticity are presented. The second class of methods is applied to the Poisson, Timoshenko beam and incompressible elasticity problems. Numerical results demonstrate the good stability and accuracy of the methods, and confirm the error estimates

  2. The finite element response matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.; Martin, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    A new technique is developed with an alternative formulation of the response matrix method implemented with the finite element scheme. Two types of response matrices are generated from the Galerkin solution to the weak form of the diffusion equation subject to an arbitrary current and source. The piecewise polynomials are defined in two levels, the first for the local (assembly) calculations and the second for the global (core) response matrix calculations. This finite element response matrix technique was tested in two 2-dimensional test problems, 2D-IAEA benchmark problem and Biblis benchmark problem, with satisfatory results. The computational time, whereas the current code is not extensively optimized, is of the same order of the well estabilished coarse mesh codes. Furthermore, the application of the finite element technique in an alternative formulation of response matrix method permits the method to easily incorporate additional capabilities such as treatment of spatially dependent cross-sections, arbitrary geometrical configurations, and high heterogeneous assemblies. (Author) [pt

  3. Extended Finite Element Method XFEM for ductile tearing: Large crack growth modelization based on the transition from a continuous medium to the crack via a cohesive zone model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simatos, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work extends the applicability of local models for ductile fracture to large crack growth modelization for ductile tearing. This is done inserting a cohesive zone model whose constitutive law is identified in order to be consistent with the local model. The consistency is obtained through the cohesive law incremental construction which ensures the equivalence of the energy and of the mechanical response of the models. The extension of the applicability domain of the local modelization is enabled via the XFEM framework which allows for maintaining the mechanical energy during the crack extension step. This method permits also to introduce the cohesive zone model during the calculation without regards to the mesh of the structure for its maximal tensile stress. To apply the XFEM to ductile tearing, this method is extended to non linear problems (Updated Lagrangian Formulation, large scale yield plasticity). The cohesive zone model grows when the criterion defined in term of porosity, tested at the front of the cohesive crack front, is verified. The cohesive zone growth criterion is determined in order to model most of the damaging phase with the local model to ensure that the modelization takes into account the triaxiality ratio history accurately. The proposed method is applied to the Rousselier local model for ductile fracture in the XFEM framework of Cast3M, the FE software of the CEA. (author) [fr

  4. A finite element evaluation of mechanical function for 3 distal extension partial dental prosthesis designs with a 3-dimensional nonlinear method for modeling soft tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshinori; Kanbara, Ryo; Ochiai, Kent T; Tanaka, Yoshinobu

    2014-10-01

    The mechanical evaluation of the function of partial removable dental prostheses with 3-dimensional finite element modeling requires the accurate assessment and incorporation of soft tissue behavior. The differential behaviors of the residual ridge mucosa and periodontal ligament tissues have been shown to exhibit nonlinear displacement. The mathematic incorporation of known values simulating nonlinear soft tissue behavior has not been investigated previously via 3-dimensional finite element modeling evaluation to demonstrate the effect of prosthesis design on the supporting tissues. The purpose of this comparative study was to evaluate the functional differences of 3 different partial removable dental prosthesis designs with 3-dimensional finite element analysis modeling and a simulated patient model incorporating known viscoelastic, nonlinear soft tissue properties. Three different designs of distal extension removable partial dental prostheses were analyzed. The stress distributions to the supporting abutments and soft tissue displacements of the designs tested were calculated and mechanically compared. Among the 3 dental designs evaluated, the RPI prosthesis demonstrated the lowest stress concentrations on the tissue supporting the tooth abutment and also provided wide mucosa-borne areas of support, thereby demonstrating a mechanical advantage and efficacy over the other designs evaluated. The data and results obtained from this study confirmed that the functional behavior of partial dental prostheses with supporting abutments and soft tissues are consistent with the conventional theories of design and clinical experience. The validity and usefulness of this testing method for future applications and testing protocols are shown. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A finite element method for neutron transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackroyd, R.T.

    1983-01-01

    A completely boundary-free maximum principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation is derived from the completely boundary-free maximum principle for the mixed-parity Boltzmann equation. When continuity is imposed on the trial function for directions crossing interfaces the completely boundary-free principle for the first-order Boltzmann equation reduces to a maximum principle previously established directly from first principles and indirectly by the Euler-Lagrange method. Present finite element methods for the first-order Boltzmann equation are based on a weighted-residual method which permits the use of discontinuous trial functions. The new principle for the first-order equation can be used as a basis for finite-element methods with the same freedom from boundary conditions as those based on the weighted-residual method. The extremum principle as the parent of the variationally-derived weighted-residual equations ensures their good behaviour. (author)

  6. Loading method of core constituting elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Shigeo

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a remote-controlled replacing method for core constituting elements in a liquid-metal cooling fast breeder, wherein particularly, the core constituting elements are prevented from being loaded on the core position other than as designated. Constitution: The method comprises a first step which determines a position of a suitable neutron shielding body in order to measure a reference level of complete insertion of the core constituting elements, a second step which inserts a gripper for a fuel exchanger, a third step which decides stroke dimensions of the complete insertion, and a fourth step which discriminates the core constituting elements to begin handling of fuel rods. The method further comprises a fifth step which determines a loading position of fuel rod, and a sixth step which inserts and loads fuel rods into the core. The method still further comprises a seventh step which compares and judges the dimension of loading stroke and the dimension of complete inserting stroke so that when coincided, loading is completed, and when not coincided, loading is not completed and then the cycle of the fourth step is repeated. (Kawakami, Y.)

  7. Image segmentation with a finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdin, Blaise

    1999-01-01

    regularization results, make possible to imagine a finite element resolution method.In a first time, the Mumford-Shah functional is introduced and some existing results are quoted. Then, a discrete formulation for the Mumford-Shah problem is proposed and its $\\Gamma$-convergence is proved. Finally, some...

  8. Effect of process variables on the Drucker-Prager cap model and residual stress distribution of tablets estimated by the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Otoguro, Saori; Miura, Takahiro; Onuki, Yoshinori; Obata, Yasuko; Takayama, Kozo

    2014-01-01

    A multivariate statistical technique was applied to clarify the causal correlation between variables in the manufacturing process and the residual stress distribution of tablets. Theophylline tablets were prepared according to a Box-Behnken design using the wet granulation method. Water amounts (X1), kneading time (X2), lubricant-mixing time (X3), and compression force (X4) were selected as design variables. The Drucker-Prager cap (DPC) model was selected as the method for modeling the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders. Simulation parameters, such as Young's modulus, Poisson rate, internal friction angle, plastic deformation parameters, and initial density of the powder, were measured. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the simulation parameters were significantly affected by process variables. The constructed DPC models were fed into the analysis using the finite element method (FEM), and the mechanical behavior of pharmaceutical powders during the tableting process was analyzed using the FEM. The results of this analysis revealed that the residual stress distribution of tablets increased with increasing X4. Moreover, an interaction between X2 and X3 also had an effect on shear and the x-axial residual stress of tablets. Bayesian network analysis revealed causal relationships between the process variables, simulation parameters, residual stress distribution, and pharmaceutical responses of tablets. These results demonstrated the potential of the FEM as a tool to help improve our understanding of the residual stress of tablets and to optimize process variables, which not only affect tablet characteristics, but also are risks of causing tableting problems.

  9. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FDandE SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are observed

  10. Finite element method (FEM) model of the mechanical stress on phospholipid membranes from shock waves produced in nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald; Roth, Caleb C.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Beier, Hope; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation of phospholipid membranes by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsEP) remains unknown. The passage of a high electric field through a conductive medium creates two primary contributing factors that may induce poration: the electric field interaction at the membrane and the shockwave produced from electrostriction of a polar submersion medium exposed to an electric field. Previous work has focused on the electric field interaction at the cell membrane, through such models as the transport lattice method. Our objective is to model the shock wave cell membrane interaction induced from the density perturbation formed at the rising edge of a high voltage pulse in a polar liquid resulting in a shock wave propagating away from the electrode toward the cell membrane. Utilizing previous data from cell membrane mechanical parameters, and nsEP generated shockwave parameters, an acoustic shock wave model based on the Helmholtz equation for sound pressure was developed and coupled to a cell membrane model with finite-element modeling in COMSOL. The acoustic structure interaction model was developed to illustrate the harmonic membrane displacements and stresses resulting from shockwave and membrane interaction based on Hooke's law. Poration is predicted by utilizing membrane mechanical breakdown parameters including cortical stress limits and hydrostatic pressure gradients.

  11. A Novel Polygonal Finite Element Method: Virtual Node Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X. H.; Zheng, C.; Zhang, J. H.

    2010-05-01

    Polygonal finite element method (PFEM), which can construct shape functions on polygonal elements, provides greater flexibility in mesh generation. However, the non-polynomial form of traditional PFEM, such as Wachspress method and Mean Value method, leads to inexact numerical integration. Since the integration technique for non-polynomial functions is immature. To overcome this shortcoming, a great number of integration points have to be used to obtain sufficiently exact results, which increases computational cost. In this paper, a novel polygonal finite element method is proposed and called as virtual node method (VNM). The features of present method can be list as: (1) It is a PFEM with polynomial form. Thereby, Hammer integral and Gauss integral can be naturally used to obtain exact numerical integration; (2) Shape functions of VNM satisfy all the requirements of finite element method. To test the performance of VNM, intensive numerical tests are carried out. It found that, in standard patch test, VNM can achieve significantly better results than Wachspress method and Mean Value method. Moreover, it is observed that VNM can achieve better results than triangular 3-node elements in the accuracy test.

  12. Mixed Element Formulation for the Finite Element-Boundary Integral Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Meese, J; Kempel, L. C; Schneider, S. W

    2006-01-01

    A mixed element approach using right hexahedral elements and right prism elements for the finite element-boundary integral method is presented and discussed for the study of planar cavity-backed antennas...

  13. Generalized multiscale finite element method. Symmetric interior penalty coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Galvis, Juan; Lazarov, Raytcho D.; Moon, M.; Sarkis, Marcus V.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by applications to numerical simulations of flows in highly heterogeneous porous media, we develop multiscale finite element methods for second order elliptic equations. We discuss a multiscale model reduction technique in the framework of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We propose two different finite element spaces on the coarse mesh. The first space is based on a local eigenvalue problem that uses an interior weighted L2-norm and a boundary weighted L2-norm for computing the "mass" matrix. The second choice is based on generation of a snapshot space and subsequent selection of a subspace of a reduced dimension. The approximation with these multiscale spaces is based on the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method framework. We investigate the stability and derive error estimates for the methods and further experimentally study their performance on a representative number of numerical examples. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  14. Generalized multiscale finite element method. Symmetric interior penalty coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by applications to numerical simulations of flows in highly heterogeneous porous media, we develop multiscale finite element methods for second order elliptic equations. We discuss a multiscale model reduction technique in the framework of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We propose two different finite element spaces on the coarse mesh. The first space is based on a local eigenvalue problem that uses an interior weighted L2-norm and a boundary weighted L2-norm for computing the "mass" matrix. The second choice is based on generation of a snapshot space and subsequent selection of a subspace of a reduced dimension. The approximation with these multiscale spaces is based on the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method framework. We investigate the stability and derive error estimates for the methods and further experimentally study their performance on a representative number of numerical examples. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A method to evaluate chemical element concentrations in samples by generating an effective polychromatic beam using as initial input real monochromatic beam data is presented. There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s)

  16. Modeling heat transfer and inactivation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in precooked meat products in Argentina using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Califano, A

    2008-07-01

    The presence of Escherichia coli is linked with sanitary deficiencies and undercooking of meat products. Recent studies have detected E. coli O157:H7 in black blood sausages. Minimum time-temperature specifications to kill the bacteria were obtained by numerical simulations of the microscopic heat conduction equation using the finite element method, and calculating the temperature profile of the sausage and the population of E. coli at the coldest point during heating. The model was validated by heating sausages in a water-bath. The effects of heat transfer coefficients and water temperatures on the required time to achieve an inactivation value (IV) of 12(log) are reported. Macroscopic heat balances were simultaneously solved to consider the temperature drop in the water batch as a function of the ratio between the mass of thermally treated sausage and the heat capacity of the system.

  17. Crack Propagation by Finite Element Method

    OpenAIRE

    H. Ricardo, Luiz Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyh...

  18. Modeling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    Simulation models are widely used in all types of hydrologic studies, and many of these models can be used to estimate recharge. Models can provide important insight into the functioning of hydrologic systems by identifying factors that influence recharge. The predictive capability of models can be used to evaluate how changes in climate, water use, land use, and other factors may affect recharge rates. Most hydrological simulation models, including watershed models and groundwater-flow models, are based on some form of water-budget equation, so the material in this chapter is closely linked to that in Chapter 2. Empirical models that are not based on a water-budget equation have also been used for estimating recharge; these models generally take the form of simple estimation equations that define annual recharge as a function of precipitation and possibly other climatic data or watershed characteristics.Model complexity varies greatly. Some models are simple accounting models; others attempt to accurately represent the physics of water movement through each compartment of the hydrologic system. Some models provide estimates of recharge explicitly; for example, a model based on the Richards equation can simulate water movement from the soil surface through the unsaturated zone to the water table. Recharge estimates can be obtained indirectly from other models. For example, recharge is a parameter in groundwater-flow models that solve for hydraulic head (i.e. groundwater level). Recharge estimates can be obtained through a model calibration process in which recharge and other model parameter values are adjusted so that simulated water levels agree with measured water levels. The simulation that provides the closest agreement is called the best fit, and the recharge value used in that simulation is the model-generated estimate of recharge.

  19. Finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods for transient wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Gary

    2017-01-01

    This monograph presents numerical methods for solving transient wave equations (i.e. in time domain). More precisely, it provides an overview of continuous and discontinuous finite element methods for these equations, including their implementation in physical models, an extensive description of 2D and 3D elements with different shapes, such as prisms or pyramids, an analysis of the accuracy of the methods and the study of the Maxwell’s system and the important problem of its spurious free approximations. After recalling the classical models, i.e. acoustics, linear elastodynamics and electromagnetism and their variational formulations, the authors present a wide variety of finite elements of different shapes useful for the numerical resolution of wave equations. Then, they focus on the construction of efficient continuous and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their accuracy by plane wave techniques and a priori error estimates. A chapter is devoted to the Maxwell’s system and the important problem ...

  20. Modeling Fatigue Damage Onset and Progression in Composites Using an Element-Based Virtual Crack Closure Technique Combined With the Floating Node Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Nelson V.; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to model the onset and propagation of matrix cracks and delaminations in carbon-epoxy composites subject to fatigue loading. An extended interface element, based on the Floating Node Method, is developed to represent delaminations and matrix cracks explicitly in a mesh independent fashion. Crack propagation is determined using an element-based Virtual Crack Closure Technique approach to determine mixed-mode energy release rates, and the Paris-Law relationship to obtain crack growth rate. Crack onset is determined using a stressbased onset criterion coupled with a stress vs. cycle curve and Palmgren-Miner rule to account for fatigue damage accumulation. The approach is implemented in Abaqus/Standard® via the user subroutine functionality. Verification exercises are performed to assess the accuracy and correct implementation of the approach. Finally, it was demonstrated that this approach captured the differences in failure morphology in fatigue for two laminates of identical stiffness, but with layups containing ?deg plies that were either stacked in a single group, or distributed through the laminate thickness.

  1. The finite element response Matrix method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.; Martin, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    A new method for global reactor core calculations is described. This method is based on a unique formulation of the response matrix method, implemented with a higher order finite element method. The unique aspects of this approach are twofold. First, there are two levels to the overall calculational scheme: the local or assembly level and the global or core level. Second, the response matrix scheme, which is formulated at both levels, consists of two separate response matrices rather than one response matrix as is generally the case. These separate response matrices are seen to be quite beneficial for the criticality eigenvalue calculation, because they are independent of k /SUB eff/. The response matrices are generated from a Galerkin finite element solution to the weak form of the diffusion equation, subject to an arbitrary incoming current and an arbitrary distributed source. Calculational results are reported for two test problems, the two-dimensional International Atomic Energy Agency benchmark problem and a two-dimensional pressurized water reactor test problem (Biblis reactor), and they compare well with standard coarse mesh methods with respect to accuracy and efficiency. Moreover, the accuracy (and capability) is comparable to fine mesh for a fraction of the computational cost. Extension of the method to treat heterogeneous assemblies and spatial depletion effects is discussed

  2. Introduction to finite and spectral element methods using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    The Finite Element Method in One Dimension. Further Applications in One Dimension. High-Order and Spectral Elements in One Dimension. The Finite Element Method in Two Dimensions. Quadratic and Spectral Elements in Two Dimensions. Applications in Mechanics. Viscous Flow. Finite and Spectral Element Methods in Three Dimensions. Appendices. References. Index.

  3. A 3D finite element-based model order reduction method for parametric resonance and whirling analysis of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yu; Zi, Yanyang; He, Zhengjia

    2015-12-01

    A generalized and efficient model for rotating anisotropic rotor-bearing systems is presented in this paper with full considerations of the system's anisotropy in stiffness, inertia and damping. Based on the 3D finite element model and the model order reduction method, the effects of anisotropy in shaft and bearings on the forced response and whirling of anisotropic rotor-bearing systems are systematically investigated. First, the coefficients of journal bearings are transformed from the fixed frame to the rotating one. Due to the anisotropy in shaft and bearings, the motion is governed by differential equations with periodically time-variant coefficients. Then, a free-interface complex component mode synthesis (CMS) method is employed to generate efficient reduced-order models (ROM) for the periodically time-variant systems. In order to solve the obtained equations, a variant of Hill's method for systems with multiple harmonic excitations is developed. Four dimensionless parameters are defined to quantify the types and levels of anisotropy of bearings. Finally, the effects of the four types of anisotropy on the forced response and whirl orbits are studied. Numerical results show that the anisotropy of bearings in stiffness splits the sole resonant peak into two isolated ones, but the anisotropy of bearings in damping coefficients mainly affect the response amplitudes. Moreover, the whirl orbits become much more complex when the shaft and bearings are both anisotropic. In addition, the cross-coupling stiffness coefficients of bearings significantly affect the dynamic behaviors of the systems and cannot be neglected, though they are often much smaller than the principle stiffness terms.

  4. Linear finite element method for one-dimensional diffusion problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Michele A.; Dominguez, Dany S.; Iglesias, Susana M., E-mail: micheleabrandao@gmail.com, E-mail: dany@labbi.uesc.br, E-mail: smiglesias@uesc.br [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (LCC/DCET/UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas. Laboratorio de Computacao Cientifica

    2011-07-01

    We describe in this paper the fundamentals of Linear Finite Element Method (LFEM) applied to one-speed diffusion problems in slab geometry. We present the mathematical formulation to solve eigenvalue and fixed source problems. First, we discretized a calculus domain using a finite set of elements. At this point, we obtain the spatial balance equations for zero order and first order spatial moments inside each element. Then, we introduce the linear auxiliary equations to approximate neutron flux and current inside the element and architect a numerical scheme to obtain the solution. We offer numerical results for fixed source typical model problems to illustrate the method's accuracy for coarse-mesh calculations in homogeneous and heterogeneous domains. Also, we compare the accuracy and computational performance of LFEM formulation with conventional Finite Difference Method (FDM). (author)

  5. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  6. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  7. Boundary element methods for electrical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    POLJAK, D

    2005-01-01

    In the last couple of decades the Boundary Element Method (BEM) has become a well-established technique that is widely used for solving various problems in electrical engineering and electromagnetics. Although there are many excellent research papers published in the relevant literature that describe various BEM applications in electrical engineering and electromagnetics, there has been a lack of suitable textbooks and monographs on the subject. This book presents BEM in a simple fashion in order to help the beginner to understand the very basic principles of the method. It initially derives B

  8. Boundary element method for internal axisymmetric flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhman Alexander

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an accurate fast method for the computation of potential internal axisymmetric flow based on the boundary element technique. We prove that the computed velocity field asymptotically satisfies reasonable boundary conditions at infinity for various types of inlet/exit. Computation of internal axisymmetric potential flow is an essential ingredient in the three-dimensional problem of computation of velocity fields in turbomachines. We include the results of a practical application of the method to the computation of flow in turbomachines of Kaplan and Francis types.

  9. The blade element momentum (BEM) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The current chapter presents the blade element momentum (BEM) method. The BEM method for a steady uniform inflow is presented in a first section. Some of the ad-hoc corrections that are usually added to the algorithm are discussed in a second section. An exception is made to the tip-loss correction...... which is introduced early in the algorithm formulation for practical reasons. The ad-hoc corrections presented are: the tip-loss correction, the high-thrust correction (momentum breakdown) and the correction for wake rotation. The formulation of an unsteady BEM code is given in a third section...

  10. An implicit finite element method for discrete dynamic fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerken, Jobie M. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1999-12-01

    A method for modeling the discrete fracture of two-dimensional linear elastic structures with a distribution of small cracks subject to dynamic conditions has been developed. The foundation for this numerical model is a plane element formulated from the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The distribution of small cracks is incorporated into the numerical model by including a small crack at each element interface. The additional strain field in an element adjacent to this crack is treated as an externally applied strain field in the Hu-Washizu energy principle. The resulting stiffness matrix is that of a standard plane element. The resulting load vector is that of a standard plane element with an additional term that includes the externally applied strain field. Except for the crack strain field equations, all terms of the stiffness matrix and load vector are integrated symbolically in Maple V so that fully integrated plane stress and plane strain elements are constructed. The crack strain field equations are integrated numerically. The modeling of dynamic behavior of simple structures was demonstrated within acceptable engineering accuracy. In the model of axial and transverse vibration of a beam and the breathing mode of vibration of a thin ring, the dynamic characteristics were shown to be within expected limits. The models dominated by tensile forces (the axially loaded beam and the pressurized ring) were within 0.5% of the theoretical values while the shear dominated model (the transversely loaded beam) is within 5% of the calculated theoretical value. The constant strain field of the tensile problems can be modeled exactly by the numerical model. The numerical results should therefore, be exact. The discrepancies can be accounted for by errors in the calculation of frequency from the numerical results. The linear strain field of the transverse model must be modeled by a series of constant strain elements. This is an approximation to the true strain field, so some

  11. Numerical experiment on finite element method for matching data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Shinji; Kumakura, Toshimasa; Yoshimura, Koichi.

    1993-03-01

    Numerical experiments are presented on the finite element method by Pletzer-Dewar for matching data of an ordinary differential equation with regular singular points by using model equation. Matching data play an important role in nonideal MHD stability analysis of a magnetically confined plasma. In the Pletzer-Dewar method, the Frobenius series for the 'big solution', the fundamental solution which is not square-integrable at the regular singular point, is prescribed. The experiments include studies of the convergence rate of the matching data obtained by the finite element method and of the effect on the results of computation by truncating the Frobenius series at finite terms. It is shown from the present study that the finite element method is an effective method for obtaining the matching data with high accuracy. (author)

  12. Apparatus and method for assembling fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arya, S.P.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element assembling method and apparatus is preferably operable under programmed control unit to receive fuel rods from storage, arrange them into axially aligned stacks of closely monitored length, and transfer the stacks of fuel rods to a loading device for insertion into longitudinal passages in the fuel elements. In order to handle large numbers of one or more classifications of fuel rods or other cylindrical parts, the assembling apparatus includes at least two feed troughs each formed by a pair of screw members with a movable table having a plurality of stacking troughs for alignment with the feed troughs and with a conveyor for delivering the stacks to the loading device, the fuel rods being moved along the stacking troughs upon a fluid cushion. 23 claims, 6 figures

  13. Method of detecting a fuel element failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, P.

    1975-01-01

    A method is described for detecting a fuel element failure in a liquid-sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor consisting of equilibrating a sample of the coolant with a molten salt consisting of a mixture of barium iodide and strontium iodide (or other iodides) whereby a large fraction of any radioactive iodine present in the liquid sodium coolant exchanges with the iodine present in the salt; separating the molten salt and sodium; if necessary, equilibrating the molten salt with nonradioactive sodium and separating the molten salt and sodium; and monitoring the molten salt for the presence of iodine, the presence of iodine indicating that the cladding of a fuel element has failed. (U.S.)

  14. Precise magnetostatic field using the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Francisco Rogerio Teixeira do

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to simulate electromagnetic fields using the Finite Element Method. Even in the easiest case of electrostatic and magnetostatic numerical simulation some problems appear when the nodal finite element is used. It is difficult to model vector fields with scalar functions mainly in non-homogeneous materials. With the aim to solve these problems two types of techniques are tried: the adaptive remeshing using nodal elements and the edge finite element that ensure the continuity of tangential components. Some numerical analysis of simple electromagnetic problems with homogeneous and non-homogeneous materials are performed using first, the adaptive remeshing based in various error indicators and second, the numerical solution of waveguides using edge finite element. (author)

  15. Generalized multiscale finite element methods: Oversampling strategies

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.; Galvis, Juan; Li, Guanglian; Presho, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose oversampling strategies in the generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) framework. The GMsFEM, which has been recently introduced in Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], allows solving multiscale parameter-dependent problems at a reduced computational cost by constructing a reduced-order representation of the solution on a coarse grid. The main idea of the method consists of (1) the construction of snapshot space, (2) the construction of the offline space, and (3) construction of the online space (the latter for parameter-dependent problems). In Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], it was shown that the GMsFEM provides a flexible tool to solve multiscale problems with a complex input space by generating appropriate snapshot, offline, and online spaces. In this paper, we develop oversampling techniques to be used in this context (see Hou and Wu (1997) where oversampling is introduced for multiscale finite element methods). It is known (see Hou and Wu (1997)) that the oversampling can improve the accuracy of multiscale methods. In particular, the oversampling technique uses larger regions (larger than the target coarse block) in constructing local basis functions. Our motivation stems from the analysis presented in this paper, which shows that when using oversampling techniques in the construction of the snapshot space and offline space, GMsFEM will converge independent of small scales and high contrast under certain assumptions. We consider the use of a multiple eigenvalue problems to improve the convergence and discuss their relation to single spectral problems that use oversampled regions. The oversampling procedures proposed in this paper differ from those in Hou and Wu (1997). In particular, the oversampling domains are partially used in constructing local

  16. Verification of Orthogrid Finite Element Modeling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The stress analysis of orthogrid structures, specifically with I-beam sections, is regularly performed using finite elements. Various modeling techniques are often used to simplify the modeling process but still adequately capture the actual hardware behavior. The accuracy of such 'Oshort cutso' is sometimes in question. This report compares three modeling techniques to actual test results from a loaded orthogrid panel. The finite element models include a beam, shell, and mixed beam and shell element model. Results show that the shell element model performs the best, but that the simpler beam and beam and shell element models provide reasonable to conservative results for a stress analysis. When deflection and stiffness is critical, it is important to capture the effect of the orthogrid nodes in the model.

  17. Adaptive finite element methods for differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    These Lecture Notes discuss concepts of `self-adaptivity' in the numerical solution of differential equations, with emphasis on Galerkin finite element methods. The key issues are a posteriori error estimation and it automatic mesh adaptation. Besides the traditional approach of energy-norm error control, a new duality-based technique, the Dual Weighted Residual method for goal-oriented error estimation, is discussed in detail. This method aims at economical computation of arbitrary quantities of physical interest by properly adapting the computational mesh. This is typically required in the design cycles of technical applications. For example, the drag coefficient of a body immersed in a viscous flow is computed, then it is minimized by varying certain control parameters, and finally the stability of the resulting flow is investigated by solving an eigenvalue problem. `Goal-oriented' adaptivity is designed to achieve these tasks with minimal cost. At the end of each chapter some exercises are posed in order ...

  18. A finite element method for SSI time history calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, X.; Gantenbein, F.; Petit, M.

    1989-01-01

    The method which is proposed is based on a finite element modelization for the soil and the structure and a time history calculation. It has been developed for plane and axisymmetric geometries. The principle of this method is presented, then applications are given, first to a linear calculation for which results will be compared to those obtained by standard methods. Then results for a non linear behavior are described

  19. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meister, Daniel; Mohr, Niklas; Musella, Pasquale; Nägeli, Christoph; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Peruzzi, Marco; Quittnat, Milena; Rebane, Liis; Rossini, Marco; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Amsler, Claude; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Robmann, Peter; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Salerno, Daniel; Taroni, Silvia; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Ferro, Cristina; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wilken, Rachel; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Mehmet; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Gamsizkan, Halil; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Ocalan, Kadir; Sekmen, Sezen; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Taylan; Cankocak, Kerem; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Burton, Darren; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kenzie, Matthew; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Mathias, Bryn; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Kasmi, Azeddine; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Scarborough, Tara; Wu, Zhenbin; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Lawson, Philip; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; St John, Jason; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Berry, Edmund; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Christopher, Grant; Cutts, David; Demiragli, Zeynep; Dhingra, Nitish; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Heintz, Ulrich; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Sagir, Sinan; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Swanson, Joshua; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Rakness, Gregory; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wimpenny, Stephen; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Barge, Derek; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Danielson, Thomas; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Pierini, Maurizio; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Krohn, Michael; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Nauenberg, Uriel; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Skinnari, Louise; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Apollinari, Giorgio; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Kwan, Simon; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Martinez Outschoorn, Verena Ingrid; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitbeck, Andrew; Whitmore, Juliana; Yang, Fan; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Hugon, Justin; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Silkworth, Christopher; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sen, Sercan; Tan, Ping; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Martin, Christopher; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Bruner, Christopher; Gray, Julia; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Sekaric, Jadranka; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Klute, Markus; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zanetti, Marco; Zhukova, Victoria; Dahmes, Bryan; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Rusack, Roger; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Keller, Jason; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Meier, Frank; Ratnikov, Fedor; Snow, Gregory R; Zvada, Marian; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Chan, Kwok Ming; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Musienko, Yuri; Pearson, Tessa; Planer, Michael; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wolfe, Homer; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Brownson, Eric; Malik, Sudhir; Mendez, Hector; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Hu, Zhen; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Kurt; Kress, Matthew; Leonardo, Nuno; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Primavera, Federica; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Zablocki, Jakub; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Kunori, Shuichi; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger $\\mathrm{t \\bar{t}}$+jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, $\\mu$, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95% confidence level is $\\mu$ lower than 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value $\\hat{\\m...

  20. Microlocal methods in the analysis of the boundary element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael

    1993-01-01

    The application of the boundary element method in numerical analysis is based upon the use of boundary integral operators stemming from multiple layer potentials. The regularity properties of these operators are vital in the development of boundary integral equations and error estimates. We show...

  1. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF LINEAR ULTRASONIC MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana CHIVU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the main modeling elements as produced by means of thefinite element method of linear ultrasonic motors. Hence, first the model is designed and then a modaland harmonic analysis are carried out in view of outlining the main outcomes

  2. Final Report of the Project "From the finite element method to the virtual element method"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-20

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a powerful numerical tool that is being used in a large number of engineering applications. The FEM is constructed on triangular/tetrahedral and quadrilateral/hexahedral meshes. Extending the FEM to general polygonal/polyhedral meshes in straightforward way turns out to be extremely difficult and leads to very complex and computationally expensive schemes. The reason for this failure is that the construction of the basis functions on elements with a very general shape is a non-trivial and complex task. In this project we developed a new family of numerical methods, dubbed the Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations (PDE) of elliptic type suitable to polygonal and polyhedral unstructured meshes. We successfully formulated, implemented and tested these methods and studied both theoretically and numerically their stability, robustness and accuracy for diffusion problems, convection-reaction-diffusion problems, the Stokes equations and the biharmonic equations.

  3. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro; Nochetto, Ricardo H.; Pauletti, Miguel S.; Verani, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  4. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro

    2012-01-16

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  5. Finite element model for heat conduction in jointed rock masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartling, D.K.; Thomas, R.K.

    1981-01-01

    A computatonal procedure for simulating heat conduction in a fractured rock mass is proposed and illustrated in the present paper. The method makes use of a simple local model for conduction in the vicinity of a single open fracture. The distributions of fractures and fracture properties within the finite element model are based on a statistical representation of geologic field data. Fracture behavior is included in the finite element computation by locating local, discrete fractures at the element integration points

  6. Critically Important Object Security System Element Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Khomyackov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic model of critically important object security system element has been developed. The model includes mathematical description of the security system element properties and external influences. The state evolution of the security system element is described by the semi-Markov process with finite states number, the semi-Markov matrix and the initial semi-Markov process states probabilities distribution. External influences are set with the intensity of the Poisson thread.

  7. Finite element modeling of piezoelectric elements with complex electrode configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paradies, R; Schläpfer, B

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that the material properties of piezoelectric materials strongly depend on the state of polarization of the individual element. While an unpolarized material exhibits mechanically isotropic material properties in the absence of global piezoelectric capabilities, the piezoelectric material properties become transversally isotropic with respect to the polarization direction after polarization. Therefore, for evaluating piezoelectric elements the material properties, including the coupling between the mechanical and the electromechanical behavior, should be addressed correctly. This is of special importance for the micromechanical description of piezoelectric elements with interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). The best known representatives of this group are active fiber composites (AFCs), macro fiber composites (MFCs) and the radial field diaphragm (RFD), respectively. While the material properties are available for a piezoelectric wafer with a homogeneous polarization perpendicular to its plane as postulated in the so-called uniform field model (UFM), the same information is missing for piezoelectric elements with more complex electrode configurations like the above-mentioned ones with IDEs. This is due to the inhomogeneous field distribution which does not automatically allow for the correct assignment of the material, i.e. orientation and property. A variation of the material orientation as well as the material properties can be accomplished by including the polarization process of the piezoelectric transducer in the finite element (FE) simulation prior to the actual load case to be investigated. A corresponding procedure is presented which automatically assigns the piezoelectric material properties, e.g. elasticity matrix, permittivity, and charge vector, for finite element models (FEMs) describing piezoelectric transducers according to the electric field distribution (field orientation and strength) in the structure. A corresponding code has been

  8. Nonlinear finite element modeling of corrugated board

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C. Gilchrist; J. C. Suhling; T. J. Urbanik

    1999-01-01

    In this research, an investigation on the mechanical behavior of corrugated board has been performed using finite element analysis. Numerical finite element models for corrugated board geometries have been created and executed. Both geometric (large deformation) and material nonlinearities were included in the models. The analyses were performed using the commercial...

  9. A least-squares/finite element method for the numerical solution of the Navier–Stokes-Cahn–Hilliard system modeling the motion of the contact line

    KAUST Repository

    He, Qiaolin; Glowinski, Roland; Wang, Xiao Ping

    2011-01-01

    element space approximation with a time discretization by operator-splitting. To solve the Cahn-Hilliard part of the problem, we use a least-squares/conjugate gradient method. We also show that the scheme has the total energy decaying in time property

  10. New formulation of the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Madan, Nikhil; Nosewicz, Szymon

    2018-01-01

    A new original formulation of the discrete element method based on the soft contact approach is presented in this work. The standard DEM has heen enhanced by the introduction of the additional (global) deformation mode caused by the stresses in the particles induced by the contact forces. Uniform stresses and strains are assumed for each particle. The stresses are calculated from the contact forces. The strains are obtained using an inverse constitutive relationship. The strains allow us to obtain deformed particle shapes. The deformed shapes (ellipses) are taken into account in contact detection and evaluation of the contact forces. A simple example of a uniaxial compression of a rectangular specimen, discreti.zed with equal sized particles is simulated to verify the DDEM algorithm. The numerical example shows that a particle deformation changes the particle interaction and the distribution of forces in the discrete element assembly. A quantitative study of micro-macro elastic properties proves the enhanced capabilities of the DDEM as compared to standard DEM.

  11. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masao; Oguma, Masaomi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively prevent the bending of nuclear fuel elements in the reactor by grinding the end faces of pellets due to their mutual sliding. Method: In the manufacturing process of nuclear fuel elements, a plurality of pellets whose sides have been polished are fed one by one by way of a feeding mechanism through the central aperture in an electric motor into movable arms and retained horizontally with the central axis by being held on the side. Then, the pellet held by one of the arms is urged to another pellet held by the other of the arms by way of a pressing mechanism and the mating end faces of both of the pellets are polished by mutual sliding. Thereafter, the grinding dusts resulted are eliminated by drawing pressurized air and then the pellets are enforced into a cladding tube. Thus, the pellets are charged into the cladding tube with both polished end faces being contacted to each other, whereby the axial force is uniformly transmitted within the end faces to prevent the bending of the cladding tube. (Kawakami, Y.)

  12. Finite element analysis of three dimensional crack growth by the use of a boundary element sub model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucht, Tore

    2009-01-01

    A new automated method to model non-planar three dimensional crack growth is proposed which combines the advantages of both the boundary element method and the finite element method. The proposed method links the two methods by a submodelling strategy in which the solution of a global finite...... element model containing an approximation of the crack is interpolated to a much smaller boundary element model containing a fine discretization of the real crack. The method is validated through several numerical comparisons and by comparison to crack growth measured in a test specimen for an engineering...

  13. Engineering computation of structures the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Maria Augusta; Roseiro, Luis; Cirne, José; Leal, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    This book presents theories and the main useful techniques of the Finite Element Method (FEM), with an introduction to FEM and many case studies of its use in engineering practice. It supports engineers and students to solve primarily linear problems in mechanical engineering, with a main focus on static and dynamic structural problems. Readers of this text are encouraged to discover the proper relationship between theory and practice, within the finite element method: Practice without theory is blind, but theory without practice is sterile. Beginning with elasticity basic concepts and the classical theories of stressed materials, the work goes on to apply the relationship between forces, displacements, stresses and strains on the process of modeling, simulating and designing engineered technical systems. Chapters discuss the finite element equations for static, eigenvalue analysis, as well as transient analyses. Students and practitioners using commercial FEM software will find this book very helpful. It us...

  14. Analysis of Brick Masonry Wall using Applied Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincy Christy, D.; Madhavan Pillai, T. M.; Nagarajan, Praveen

    2018-03-01

    The Applied Element Method (AEM) is a versatile tool for structural analysis. Analysis is done by discretising the structure as in the case of Finite Element Method (FEM). In AEM, elements are connected by a set of normal and shear springs instead of nodes. AEM is extensively used for the analysis of brittle materials. Brick masonry wall can be effectively analyzed in the frame of AEM. The composite nature of masonry wall can be easily modelled using springs. The brick springs and mortar springs are assumed to be connected in series. The brick masonry wall is analyzed and failure load is determined for different loading cases. The results were used to find the best aspect ratio of brick to strengthen brick masonry wall.

  15. The finite element method and applications in engineering using ANSYS

    CERN Document Server

    Madenci, Erdogan

    2015-01-01

    This textbook offers theoretical and practical knowledge of the finite element method. The book equips readers with the skills required to analyze engineering problems using ANSYS®, a commercially available FEA program. Revised and updated, this new edition presents the most current ANSYS® commands and ANSYS® screen shots, as well as modeling steps for each example problem. This self-contained, introductory text minimizes the need for additional reference material by covering both the fundamental topics in finite element methods and advanced topics concerning modeling and analysis. It focuses on the use of ANSYS® through both the Graphics User Interface (GUI) and the ANSYS® Parametric Design Language (APDL). Extensive examples from a range of engineering disciplines are presented in a straightforward, step-by-step fashion. Key topics include: • An introduction to FEM • Fundamentals and analysis capabilities of ANSYS® • Fundamentals of discretization and approximation functions • Modeling techniq...

  16. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ghadyani, HR [SUNY Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN [Univeristy Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Hepel, JT [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  17. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, MJ; Ghadyani, HR; Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN; Hepel, JT

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  18. Nuclear analytical methods for platinum group elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-04-01

    Platinum group elements (PGE) are of special interest for analytical research due to their economic importance like chemical peculiarities as catalysts, medical applications as anticancer drugs, and possible environmental detrimental impact as exhaust from automobile catalyzers. Natural levels of PGE are so low in concentration that most of the current analytical techniques approach their limit of detection capacity. In addition, Ru, Rh, Pd, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt analyses still constitute a challenge in accuracy and precision of quantification in natural matrices. Nuclear analytical techniques, such as neutron activation analysis, X ray fluorescence, or proton-induced X ray emission (PIXE), which are generally considered as reference methods for many analytical problems, are useful as well. However, due to methodological restrictions, they can, in most cases, only be applied after pre-concentration and under special irradiation conditions. This report was prepared following a coordinated research project and a consultants meeting addressing the subject from different viewpoints. The experts involved suggested to discuss the issue according to the (1) application, hence, the concentration levels encountered, and (2) method applied for analysis. Each of the different fields of application needs special consideration for sample preparation, PGE pre-concentration, and determination. Additionally, each analytical method requires special attention regarding the sensitivity and sample type. Quality assurance/quality control aspects are considered towards the end of the report. It is intended to provide the reader of this publication with state-of-the-art information on the various aspects of PGE analysis and to advise which technique might be most suitable for a particular analytical problem related to platinum group elements. In particular, many case studies described in detail from the authors' laboratory experience might help to decide which way to go. As in many cases

  19. Development of polygon elements based on the scaled boundary finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiong, Irene; Song Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    We aim to extend the scaled boundary finite element method to construct conforming polygon elements. The development of the polygonal finite element is highly anticipated in computational mechanics as greater flexibility and accuracy can be achieved using these elements. The scaled boundary polygonal finite element will enable new developments in mesh generation, better accuracy from a higher order approximation and better transition elements in finite element meshes. Polygon elements of arbitrary number of edges and order have been developed successfully. The edges of an element are discretised with line elements. The displacement solution of the scaled boundary finite element method is used in the development of shape functions. They are shown to be smooth and continuous within the element, and satisfy compatibility and completeness requirements. Furthermore, eigenvalue decomposition has been used to depict element modes and outcomes indicate the ability of the scaled boundary polygonal element to express rigid body and constant strain modes. Numerical tests are presented; the patch test is passed and constant strain modes verified. Accuracy and convergence of the method are also presented and the performance of the scaled boundary polygonal finite element is verified on Cook's swept panel problem. Results show that the scaled boundary polygonal finite element method outperforms a traditional mesh and accuracy and convergence are achieved from fewer nodes. The proposed method is also shown to be truly flexible, and applies to arbitrary n-gons formed of irregular and non-convex polygons.

  20. Application of finite-element-methods in food processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of the possible use of finite-element-methods in food processing. Examples from diffusion studies are given.......Presentation of the possible use of finite-element-methods in food processing. Examples from diffusion studies are given....

  1. A Finite Element Removal Method for 3D Topology Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akif Kütük

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Topology optimization provides great convenience to designers during the designing stage in many industrial applications. With this method, designers can obtain a rough model of any part at the beginning of a designing stage by defining loading and boundary conditions. At the same time the optimization can be used for the modification of a product which is being used. Lengthy solution time is a disadvantage of this method. Therefore, the method cannot be widespread. In order to eliminate this disadvantage, an element removal algorithm has been developed for topology optimization. In this study, the element removal algorithm is applied on 3-dimensional parts, and the results are compared with the ones available in the related literature. In addition, the effects of the method on solution times are investigated.

  2. Method of measuring distance between fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Megumu.

    1991-01-01

    The distance between fuel elements contained in a pool is measured in a contactless manner even for a narrow distance less than 1 mm. That is, the equipment for measuring the distance between spent fuel elements of a spent fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor comprises a optical fiber scope, a lens, an industrial TV camera and a monitor TV. The top end of the optical fiber scope is inserted between fuel elements to be measured. The state thereof is displayed on the TV screen to measure the distance between the fuel elements. The measured results are compared with a previously formed calibration curve to determine the value between the fuel elements. Then, the distance between the fuel elements can be determined in the pool of a power plant without dismantling the fuel assembly, to investigate the state of the bending and estimate the fuel working life. (I.S.)

  3. Parallel Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for crustal dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quevedo, Leonardo; Morra, Gabriele; Mueller, R Dietmar

    2010-01-01

    Crustal faults and sharp material transitions in the crust are usually represented as triangulated surfaces in structural geological models. The complex range of volumes separating such surfaces is typically three-dimensionally meshed in order to solve equations that describe crustal deformation with the finite-difference (FD) or finite-element (FEM) methods. We show here how the Boundary Element Method, combined with the Multipole approach, can revolutionise the calculation of stress and strain, solving the problem of computational scalability from reservoir to basin scales. The Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method (Fast BEM) tackles the difficulty of handling the intricate volume meshes and high resolution of crustal data that has put classical Finite 3D approaches in a performance crisis. The two main performance enhancements of this method: the reduction of required mesh elements from cubic to quadratic with linear size and linear-logarithmic runtime; achieve a reduction of memory and runtime requirements allowing the treatment of a new scale of geodynamic models. This approach was recently tested and applied in a series of papers by [1, 2, 3] for regional and global geodynamics, using KD trees for fast identification of near and far-field interacting elements, and MPI parallelised code on distributed memory architectures, and is now in active development for crustal dynamics. As the method is based on a free-surface, it allows easy data transfer to geological visualisation tools where only changes in boundaries and material properties are required as input parameters. In addition, easy volume mesh sampling of physical quantities enables direct integration with existing FD/FEM code.

  4. Business model elements impacting cloud computing adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogataj, Kristina; Pucihar, Andreja; Sudzina, Frantisek

    The paper presents a proposed research framework for identification of business model elements impacting Cloud Computing Adoption. We provide a definition of main Cloud Computing characteristics, discuss previous findings on factors impacting Cloud Computing Adoption, and investigate technology a...

  5. Three-dimensional modeling in the electromagnetic/magnetotelluric methods. Accuracy of various finite-element and finite difference methods; Denjiho MT ho ni okeru sanjigen modeling. Shushu no yugen yosoho to sabunho no seido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Y [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-05-27

    To enhance the reliability of electromagnetic/magnetotelluric (MT) survey, calculation results of finite-element methods (FEMs) and finite difference methods (FDMs) were compared. Accuracy of individual methods and convergence of repitition solution were examined. As a result of the investigation, it was found that appropriate accuracy can be obtained from the edge FEM and FDM for the example of vertical magnetic dipole, and that the best accuracy can be obtained from the FDM among four methods for the example of MT survey. It was revealed that the ICBCG (incomplete Cholesky bi-conjugate gradient) method is an excellent method as a solution method of simultaneous equations from the viewpoint of accuracy and calculation time. For the joint FEM, solutions of SOR method converged for both the examples. It was concluded that the cause of error is not due to the error of numerical calculation, but due to the consideration without discontinuity of electric field. The conditions of coefficient matrix increased with decreasing the frequency, which resulted in the unstable numerical calculation. It would be required to incorporate the constraint in a certain form. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Modeling beams with elements in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional particle codes represent beams as a collection of macroparticles. An alternative is to represent the beam as a collection of current carrying elements in phase space. While such a representation has limitations, it may be less noisy than a macroparticle model, and it may provide insights about the transport of space charge dominated beams which would otherwise be difficult to gain from macroparticle simulations. The phase space element model of a beam is described, and progress toward an implementation and difficulties with this implementation are discussed. A simulation of an axisymmetric beam using 1d elements in phase space is demonstrated

  7. Element stacking method for topology optimization with material-dependent boundary and loading conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoon, Gil Ho; Park, Y.K.; Kim, Y.Y.

    2007-01-01

    A new topology optimization scheme, called the element stacking method, is developed to better handle design optimization involving material-dependent boundary conditions and selection of elements of different types. If these problems are solved by existing standard approaches, complicated finite...... element models or topology optimization reformulation may be necessary. The key idea of the proposed method is to stack multiple elements on the same discretization pixel and select a single or no element. In this method, stacked elements on the same pixel have the same coordinates but may have...... independent degrees of freedom. Some test problems are considered to check the effectiveness of the proposed stacking method....

  8. Sensitivity of Particle Size in Discrete Element Method to Particle Gas Method (DEM_PGM) Coupling in Underbody Blast Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-12

    Particle Size in Discrete Element Method to Particle Gas Method (DEM_PGM) Coupling in Underbody Blast Simulations Venkatesh Babu, Kumar Kulkarni, Sanjay...buried in soil viz., (1) coupled discrete element & particle gas methods (DEM-PGM) and (2) Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), are investigated. The...DEM_PGM and identify the limitations/strengths compared to the ALE method. Discrete Element Method (DEM) can model individual particle directly, and

  9. Magnetic materials and 3D finite element modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, Joao Pedro A

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Materials and 3D Finite Element Modeling explores material characterization and finite element modeling (FEM) applications. This book relates to electromagnetic analysis based on Maxwell’s equations and application of the finite element (FE) method to low frequency devices. A great source for senior undergraduate and graduate students in electromagnetics, it also supports industry professionals working in magnetics, electromagnetics, ferromagnetic materials science and electrical engineering. The authors present current concepts on ferromagnetic material characterizations and losses. They provide introductory material; highlight basic electromagnetics, present experimental and numerical modeling related to losses and focus on FEM applied to 3D applications. They also explain various formulations, and discuss numerical codes.

  10. Unstructured Spectral Element Model for Dispersive and Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Bigoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a new stabilized high-order and unstructured numerical model for modeling fully nonlinear and dispersive water waves. The model is based on a nodal spectral element method of arbitrary order in space and a -transformed formulation due to Cai, Langtangen, Nielsen and Tveito (1998). In...

  11. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    models may be created by assembling models of floor and wall structures into large models of complete buildings. When assembling the floor and wall models, the number of degrees of freedom quickly increases to exceed the limits of computer capacity, at least in a reasonable amount of computational time...... Hz. Three different methods of model reduction were investigated; Guyan reduction, component mode synthesis and a third approach where a new finite element model was created with structural elements. Eigenvalue and steady-state analyses were performed in order to compare the errors...

  12. Proposal for element size and time increment selection guideline by 3-D finite element method for elastic waves propagation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Hitoshi; Meshii, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a guideline for selection of element size and time increment by 3-D finite element method, which is applied to elastic wave propagation analysis for a long distance of a large structure. An element size and a time increment are determined by quantitative evaluation of strain, which must be 0 on the analysis model with a uniform motion, caused by spatial and time discretization. (author)

  13. An inverse method based on finite element model to derive the plastic flow properties from non-standard tensile specimens of Eurofer97 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Knitel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse method was developed to derive the plastic flow properties of non-standard disk tensile specimens, which were so designed to fit irradiation rods used for spallation irradiations in SINQ (Schweizer Spallations Neutronen Quelle target at Paul Scherrer Institute. The inverse method, which makes use of MATLAB and the finite element code ABAQUS, is based upon the reconstruction of the load-displacement curve by a succession of connected small linear segments. To do so, the experimental engineering stress/strain curve is divided into an elastic and a plastic section, and the plastic section is further divided into small segments. Each segment is then used to determine an associated pair of true stress/plastic strain values, representing the constitutive behavior. The main advantage of the method is that it does not rely on a hypothetic analytical expression of the constitutive behavior. To account for the stress/strain gradients that develop in the non-standard specimen, the stress and strain were weighted over the volume of the deforming elements. The method was validated with tensile tests carried out at room temperature on non-standard flat disk tensile specimens as well as on standard cylindrical specimens made of the reduced-activation tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97. While both specimen geometries presented a significant difference in terms of deformation localization during necking, the same true stress/strain curve was deduced from the inverse method. The potential and usefulness of the inverse method is outlined for irradiated materials that suffer from a large uniform elongation reduction.

  14. Generalization of mixed multiscale finite element methods with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C S [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Many science and engineering problems exhibit scale disparity and high contrast. The small scale features cannot be omitted in the physical models because they can affect the macroscopic behavior of the problems. However, resolving all the scales in these problems can be prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, some types of model reduction techniques are required to design efficient solution algorithms. For practical purpose, we are interested in mixed finite element problems as they produce solutions with certain conservative properties. Existing multiscale methods for such problems include the mixed multiscale finite element methods. We show that for complicated problems, the mixed multiscale finite element methods may not be able to produce reliable approximations. This motivates the need of enrichment for coarse spaces. Two enrichment approaches are proposed, one is based on generalized multiscale finte element metthods (GMsFEM), while the other is based on spectral element-based algebraic multigrid (rAMGe). The former one, which is called mixed GMsFEM, is developed for both Darcy’s flow and linear elasticity. Application of the algorithm in two-phase flow simulations are demonstrated. For linear elasticity, the algorithm is subtly modified due to the symmetry requirement of the stress tensor. The latter enrichment approach is based on rAMGe. The algorithm differs from GMsFEM in that both of the velocity and pressure spaces are coarsened. Due the multigrid nature of the algorithm, recursive application is available, which results in an efficient multilevel construction of the coarse spaces. Stability, convergence analysis, and exhaustive numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed enrichment approaches. iii

  15. The finite element method in engineering, 2nd edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This work provides a systematic introduction to the various aspects of the finite element method as applied to engineering problems. Contents include: introduction to finite element method; solution of finite element equations; solid and structural mechanics; static analysis; dynamic analysis; heat transfer; fluid mechanics and additional applications

  16. Method of generating a computer readable model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A method of generating a computer readable model of a geometrical object constructed from a plurality of interconnectable construction elements, wherein each construction element has a number of connection elements for connecting the construction element with another construction element. The met......A method of generating a computer readable model of a geometrical object constructed from a plurality of interconnectable construction elements, wherein each construction element has a number of connection elements for connecting the construction element with another construction element....... The method comprises encoding a first and a second one of the construction elements as corresponding data structures, each representing the connection elements of the corresponding construction element, and each of the connection elements having associated with it a predetermined connection type. The method...... further comprises determining a first connection element of the first construction element and a second connection element of the second construction element located in a predetermined proximity of each other; and retrieving connectivity information of the corresponding connection types of the first...

  17. Method for inspecting nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for disassembling a nuclear reactor fuel element without destroying the individual fuel pins and other structural components from which the element is assembled is described. A traveling bridge and trolley span a water-filled spent fuel storage pool and support a strongback. The strongback is under water and provides a working surface on which the spent fuel element is placed for inspection and for the manipulation that is associated with disassembly and assembly. To remove, in a non-destructive manner, the grids that hold the fuel pins in the proper relative positions within the element, bars are inserted through apertures in the grids with the aid of special tools. These bars are rotated to flex the adjacent grid walls and, in this way relax the physical engagement between protruding portions of the grid walls and the associated fuel pins. With the grid structure so flexed to relax the physical grip on the individual fuel pins, these pins can be withdrawn for inspection or replacement as necessary without imposing a need to destroy fuel element components

  18. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Xue, Guangri; Yotov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite

  19. The Finite Element Numerical Modelling of 3D Magnetotelluric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal numerical simulation of 3D magnetotelluric was restricted by the methodology complexity and the time-consuming calculation. Boundary values, the variation of weighted residual equation, and the hexahedral mesh generation method of finite element are three major causes. A finite element method for 3D magnetotelluric numerical modeling is presented in this paper as a solution for the problem mentioned above. In this algorithm, a hexahedral element coefficient matrix for magnetoelluric finite method is developed, which solves large-scale equations using preconditioned conjugate gradient of the first-type boundary conditions. This algorithm is verified using the homogeneous model, and the positive landform model, as well as the low resistance anomaly model.

  20. Modeling of Sensor Placement Strategy for Shape Sensing and Structural Health Monitoring of a Wing-Shaped Sandwich Panel Using Inverse Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Kefal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of sensor density and alignment for three-dimensional shape sensing of an airplane-wing-shaped thick panel subjected to three different loading conditions, i.e., bending, torsion, and membrane loads. For shape sensing analysis of the panel, the Inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM was used together with the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT, in order to enable accurate predictions for transverse deflection and through-the-thickness variation of interfacial displacements. In this study, the iFEM-RZT algorithm is implemented by utilizing a novel three-node C°-continuous inverse-shell element, known as i3-RZT. The discrete strain data is generated numerically through performing a high-fidelity finite element analysis on the wing-shaped panel. This numerical strain data represents experimental strain readings obtained from surface patched strain gauges or embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors. Three different sensor placement configurations with varying density and alignment of strain data were examined and their corresponding displacement contours were compared with those of reference solutions. The results indicate that a sparse distribution of FBG sensors (uniaxial strain measurements, aligned in only the longitudinal direction, is sufficient for predicting accurate full-field membrane and bending responses (deformed shapes of the panel, including a true zigzag representation of interfacial displacements. On the other hand, a sparse deployment of strain rosettes (triaxial strain measurements is essentially enough to produce torsion shapes that are as accurate as those of predicted by a dense sensor placement configuration. Hence, the potential applicability and practical aspects of i3-RZT/iFEM methodology is proven for three-dimensional shape-sensing of future aerospace structures.

  1. Calibration of discrete element model parameters: soybeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodki, Bhupendra M.; Patel, Manish; Namdeo, Rohit; Carpenter, Gopal

    2018-05-01

    Discrete element method (DEM) simulations are broadly used to get an insight of flow characteristics of granular materials in complex particulate systems. DEM input parameters for a model are the critical prerequisite for an efficient simulation. Thus, the present investigation aims to determine DEM input parameters for Hertz-Mindlin model using soybeans as a granular material. To achieve this aim, widely acceptable calibration approach was used having standard box-type apparatus. Further, qualitative and quantitative findings such as particle profile, height of kernels retaining the acrylic wall, and angle of repose of experiments and numerical simulations were compared to get the parameters. The calibrated set of DEM input parameters includes the following (a) material properties: particle geometric mean diameter (6.24 mm); spherical shape; particle density (1220 kg m^{-3} ), and (b) interaction parameters such as particle-particle: coefficient of restitution (0.17); coefficient of static friction (0.26); coefficient of rolling friction (0.08), and particle-wall: coefficient of restitution (0.35); coefficient of static friction (0.30); coefficient of rolling friction (0.08). The results may adequately be used to simulate particle scale mechanics (grain commingling, flow/motion, forces, etc) of soybeans in post-harvest machinery and devices.

  2. Hydraulic modelling of the CARA Fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasnarof, Daniel O.; Juanico, Luis; Giorgi, M.; Ghiselli, Alberto M.; Zampach, Ruben; Fiori, Jose M.; Yedros, Pablo A.

    2004-01-01

    The CARA fuel element is been developing by the National Atomic Energy Commission for both Argentinean PHWRs. In order to keep the hydraulic restriction in their fuel channels, one of CARA's goals is to keep its similarity with both present fuel elements. In this paper is presented pressure drop test performed at a low-pressure facility (Reynolds numbers between 5x10 4 and 1,5x10 5 ) and rational base models for their spacer grid and rod assembly. Using these models, we could estimate the CARA hydraulic performance in reactor conditions that have shown to be satisfactory. (author) [es

  3. Validation of High Displacement Piezoelectric Actuator Finite Element Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleghani, B. K.

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents the results obtained by using NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Regitered Trademark) finite element codes to predict doming of the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators during the manufacturing process and subsequent straining due to an applied input voltage. To effectively use such devices in engineering applications, modeling and characterization are essential. Length, width, dome height, and thickness are important parameters for users of such devices. Therefore, finite element models were used to assess the effects of these parameters. NASTRAN(Registered Trademark) and ANSYS(Registered Trademark) used different methods for modeling piezoelectric effects. In NASTRAN(Registered Trademark), a thermal analogy was used to represent voltage at nodes as equivalent temperatures, while ANSYS(Registered Trademark) processed the voltage directly using piezoelectric finite elements. The results of finite element models were validated by using the experimental results.

  4. The finite element method its basis and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, Olek C; Zhu, JZ

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method: Its Basis and Fundamentals offers a complete introduction to the basis of the finite element method, covering fundamental theory and worked examples in the detail required for readers to apply the knowledge to their own engineering problems and understand more advanced applications. This edition sees a significant rearrangement of the book's content to enable clearer development of the finite element method, with major new chapters and sections added to cover: Weak forms Variational forms Multi-dimensional field prob

  5. a finite element model for the analysis of bridge decks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    A FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR THE ANALYSIS OF BRIDGE DECKS. NIGERIAN JOURNAL OF TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 27 NO.1, MARCH 2008. 59. (a) Beam-plate system. (b) T-beam structural model. Fig. 1 Beam-plate structure idealisations. The matrix displacement method of analysis is used. The continuum structure is.

  6. Finite element modelling of fibre-reinforced brittle materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kullaa, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tensile constitutive behaviour of fibre-reinforced brittle materials can be extended to two or three dimensions by using the finite element method with crack models. The three approaches in this study include the smeared and discrete crack concepts and a multi-surface plasticity model. The

  7. A simple finite element method for linear hyperbolic problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Lin; Ye, Xiu

    2017-01-01

    Here, we introduce a simple finite element method for solving first order hyperbolic equations with easy implementation and analysis. Our new method, with a symmetric, positive definite system, is designed to use discontinuous approximations on finite element partitions consisting of arbitrary shape of polygons/polyhedra. Error estimate is established. Extensive numerical examples are tested that demonstrate the robustness and flexibility of the method.

  8. Spectral element method for wave propagation on irregular domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan Hui Geng

    2018-03-14

    Mar 14, 2018 ... Abstract. A spectral element approximation of acoustic propagation problems combined with a new mapping method on irregular domains is proposed. Following this method, the Gauss–Lobatto–Chebyshev nodes in the standard space are applied to the spectral element method (SEM). The nodes in the ...

  9. Different Element Methods in Engineering Practice | Onah | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Presented is the most common element methods used for analysis in engineering. The methods are discussed in an overall and general manner so that engineers and scientists who are increasingly, called upon to use element methods to support and check their analyses and/or designs can appreciate the essential ...

  10. Spectral element method for wave propagation on irregular domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A spectral element approximation of acoustic propagation problems combined with a new mapping method on irregular domains is proposed. Following this method, the Gauss–Lobatto–Chebyshev nodes in the standard space are applied to the spectral element method (SEM). The nodes in the physical space are ...

  11. The current matrix elements from HAL QCD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kai; Ishii, Noriyoshi

    2018-03-01

    HAL QCD method is a method to construct a potential (HAL QCD potential) that reproduces the NN scattering phase shift faithful to the QCD. The HAL QCD potential is obtained from QCD by eliminating the degrees of freedom of quarks and gluons and leaving only two particular hadrons. Therefor, in the effective quantum mechanics of two nucleons defined by HAL QCD potential, the conserved current consists not only of the nucleon current but also an extra current originating from the potential (two-body current). Though the form of the two-body current is closely related to the potential, it is not straight forward to extract the former from the latter. In this work, we derive the the current matrix element formula in the quantum mechanics defined by the HAL QCD potential. As a first step, we focus on the non-relativistic case. To give an explicit example, we consider a second quantized non-relativistic two-channel coupling model which we refer to as the original model. From the original model, the HAL QCD potential for the open channel is constructed by eliminating the closed channel in the elastic two-particle scattering region. The current matrix element formula is derived by demanding the effective quantum mechanics defined by the HAL QCD potential to respond to the external field in the same way as the original two-channel coupling model.

  12. A finite element solution method for quadrics parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, A.

    1996-08-01

    A distributed preconditioned conjugate gradient method for finite element analysis has been developed and implemented on a parallel SIMD Quadrics computer. The main characteristic of the method is that it does not require any actual assembling of all element equations in a global system. The physical domain of the problem is partitioned in cells of n p finite elements and each cell element is assigned to a different node of an n p -processors machine. Element stiffness matrices are stored in the data memory of the assigned processing node and the solution process is completely executed in parallel at element level. Inter-element and therefore inter-processor communications are required once per iteration to perform local sums of vector quantities between neighbouring elements. A prototype implementation has been tested on an 8-nodes Quadrics machine in a simple 2D benchmark problem

  13. Transuranium element recovering method for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todokoro, Akio; Kihara, Yoshiyuki; Okada, Hisashi

    1998-01-01

    Spent fuels are dissolved in nitric acid, the obtained dissolution liquid is oxidized by electrolysis, and nitric acid of transuranium elements are precipitated together with nitric acid of uranium elements from the dissolution solution and recovered. Namely, the transuranium elements are oxidized to an atomic value level at which nitric acid can be precipitated by an oxidizing catalyst, and cooled to precipitate nitric acid of transuranium elements together with nitric acid of transuranium elements, accordingly, it is not necessary to use a solvent which has been used so far upon recovering transuranium elements. Since no solvent waste is generated, a recovery method taking the circumstance into consideration can be provided. Further, nitric acid of uranium elements and nitric acid of transuranium elements precipitated and recovered together are dissolved in nitric acid again, cooled and only uranium elements are precipitated selectively, and recovered by filtration. The amount of wastes can be reduced to thereby enabling to mitigate control for processing. (N.H.)

  14. A Summary of the Space-Time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yen J.

    2015-01-01

    The space-time Conservation Element and Solution Element (CESE) method for solving conservation laws is examined for its development motivation and design requirements. The characteristics of the resulting scheme are discussed. The discretization of the Euler equations is presented to show readers how to construct a scheme based on the CESE method. The differences and similarities between the CESE method and other traditional methods are discussed. The strengths and weaknesses of the method are also addressed.

  15. Methods for high-resolution anisotropic finite element modeling of the human head: automatic MR white matter anisotropy-adaptive mesh generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2012-01-01

    This study proposes an advanced finite element (FE) head modeling technique through which high-resolution FE meshes adaptive to the degree of tissue anisotropy can be generated. Our adaptive meshing scheme (called wMesh) uses MRI structural information and fractional anisotropy maps derived from diffusion tensors in the FE mesh generation process, optimally reflecting electrical properties of the human brain. We examined the characteristics of the wMeshes through various qualitative and quantitative comparisons to the conventional FE regular-sized meshes that are non-adaptive to the degree of white matter anisotropy. We investigated numerical differences in the FE forward solutions that include the electrical potential and current density generated by current sources in the brain. The quantitative difference was calculated by two statistical measures of relative difference measure (RDM) and magnification factor (MAG). The results show that the wMeshes are adaptive to the anisotropic density of the WM anisotropy, and they better reflect the density and directionality of tissue conductivity anisotropy. Our comparison results between various anisotropic regular mesh and wMesh models show that there are substantial differences in the EEG forward solutions in the brain (up to RDM=0.48 and MAG=0.63 in the electrical potential, and RDM=0.65 and MAG=0.52 in the current density). Our analysis results indicate that the wMeshes produce different forward solutions that are different from the conventional regular meshes. We present some results that the wMesh head modeling approach enhances the sensitivity and accuracy of the FE solutions at the interfaces or in the regions where the anisotropic conductivities change sharply or their directional changes are complex. The fully automatic wMesh generation technique should be useful for modeling an individual-specific and high-resolution anisotropic FE head model incorporating realistic anisotropic conductivity distributions

  16. Finite element method for computational fluid dynamics with any type of elements; Finite Element Methode zur numerischen Stroemungsberechnung mit beliebigen Elementen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steibler, P.

    2000-07-01

    The unsteady, turbulent flow is to be calculated in a complex geometry. For this purpose a stabilized finite element formulation in which the same functions for velocity and pressure are used is developed. Thus the process remains independent of the type of elements. This simplifies the application. Above all, it is easier to deal with the boundary conditions. The independency from the elements is also achieved by the extended uzawa-algorithm which uses quadratic functions for velocity and an element-constant pressure. This method is also programmed. In order to produce the unstructured grids, an algorithm is implemented which produces meshes consisting of triangular and tetrahedral elements with flow-dependent adaptation. With standard geometries both calculation methods are compared with results. Finally the flow in a draft tube of a Kaplan turbine is calculated and compared with results from model tests. (orig.) [German] Die instationaere, turbulente Stroemung in einer komplexen Geometrie soll berechnet werden. Dazu wird eine Stabilisierte Finite Element Formulierung entwickelt, bei der die gleichen Ansatzfunktionen fuer Geschwindigkeiten und Druck verwendet werden. Das Verfahren wird damit unabhaengig von der Form der Elemente. Dies vereinfacht die Anwendung. Vor allem wird der Umgang mit den Randbedingungen erleichert. Die Elementunabhaengigkeit erreicht man auch mit dem erweiterten Uzawa-Algorithmus, welcher quadratische Ansatzfunktionen fuer die Geschwindigkeiten und elementweisen konstanten Druck verwendet. Dieses Verfahren wird ebenso implementiert. Zur Erstellung der unstrukturierten Gitter wird ein Algorithmus erzeugt, der Netze aus Dreiecks- und Tetraederelementen erstellt, welche stroemungsabhaengige Groessen besitzen koennen. Anhand einiger Standardgeometrien werden die beiden Berechnungsmethoden mit Ergebnissen aus der Literatur verglichen. Als praxisrelevantes Beispiel wird abschliessend die Stroemung in einem Saugrohr einer Kaplanturbine berechnet

  17. A finite-elements method for turbulent flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autret, A.

    1986-03-01

    The work discussed here covers turbulent flow calculations using GALERKIN's finite-element method. Turbulence effects on the mean field are taken into account by the k-epsilon model with two evolution equations: one for the kinetic energy of the turbulence, and one for the energy dissipation rate. The wall zone is covered by wall laws, and by REICHARDT's law in particular. A law is advanced for the epsilon input profile, and a numerical solution is proposed for the physically aberrant values of k and epsilon generated by the model. Single-equation models are reviewed comparatively with the k-epsilon model. A comparison between calculated and analytical solutions or calculated and experimental results is presented for decreasing turbulence behind a grid, for the flow between parallel flat plates with three REYNOLDS numbers, and for backward facing step. This part contains graphs and curves corresponding to results of the calculations presented in part one [fr

  18. Research of flaw assessment methods for beryllium reflector elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Akira; Ito, Masayasu; Takemoto, Noriyuki; Tanimoto, Masataka; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ohara, Hiroshi; Kodama, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Reflector elements made from metal beryllium is widely used as neutron reflectors to increase neutron flux in test reactors. When beryllium reflector elements are irradiated by neutron, bending of reflector elements caused by swelling occurs, and beryllium reflector elements must be replaced in several years. In this report, literature search and investigation for non-destructive inspection of Beryllium and experiments for Preliminary inspection to establish post irradiation examination method for research of characteristics of metal beryllium under neutron irradiation were reported. (author)

  19. Simulation of galvanic corrosion using boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamaruddin; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Saari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2011-01-01

    Boundary element method (BEM) is a numerical technique that used for modeling infinite domain as is the case for galvanic corrosion analysis. The use of boundary element analysis system (BEASY) has allowed cathodic protection (CP) interference to be assessed in terms of the normal current density, which is directly proportional to the corrosion rate. This paper was present the analysis of the galvanic corrosion between Aluminium and Carbon Steel in natural sea water. The result of experimental was validated with computer simulation like BEASY program. Finally, it can conclude that the BEASY software is a very helpful tool for future planning before installing any structure, where it gives the possible CP interference on any nearby unprotected metallic structure. (Author)

  20. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used in this study to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. Complementary to analog experiments, the numerical approach allows a detailed analysis...

  1. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. In the DEM, the material is simulated on a grain-by-grain basis, and defining the micromechanical properties...

  2. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation ...

  3. On constitutive modelling in finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathe, K.J.; Snyder, M.D.; Cleary, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    This compact contains a brief introduction to the problems involved in constitutive modeling as well as an outline of the final paper to be submitted. Attention is focussed on three important areas: (1) the need for using theoretically sound material models and the importance of recognizing the limitations of the models, (2) the problem of developing stable and effective numerical representations of the models, and (3) the necessity for selection of an appropriate finite element mesh that can capture the actual physical response of the complete structure. In the final paper, we will be presenting our recent research results pertaining to each of these problem areas. (orig.)

  4. New Computational Model Based on Finite Element Method to Quantify Damage Evolution Due to External Sulfate Attack on Self-Compacting Concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Khelifa, Mohammed Rissel; Guessasma, Sofiane

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This work combines experimental and numerical investigations to study the mechanical degradation of self-compacting concrete under accelerated aging conditions. Four different experimental treatments are tested among them constant immersion and immersion-drying protocols allow an efficient external sulfate attack of the material. Significant damage is observed due to interfacial ettringite. A predictive analysis is then adopted to quantify the relationship between ettringite growth and mechanical damage evolution during aging. Typical 3D microstructures representing the cement paste-aggregate structures are generated using Monte Carlo scheme. These images are converted into a finite element model to predict the mechanical performance under different criteria of damage kinetics. The effect of ettringite is then associated to the development of an interphase of lower mechanical properties. Our results show that the observed time evolution of Young's modulus is best described by a linear increase of the interphase content. Our model results indicate also that the interphase regions grow at maximum stress regions rather than exclusively at interfaces. Finally, constant immersion predicts a rate of damage growth five times lower than that of immersion-drying protocol. © 2012 Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

  5. New Computational Model Based on Finite Element Method to Quantify Damage Evolution Due to External Sulfate Attack on Self-Compacting Concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Khelifa, Mohammed Rissel

    2012-12-27

    Abstract: This work combines experimental and numerical investigations to study the mechanical degradation of self-compacting concrete under accelerated aging conditions. Four different experimental treatments are tested among them constant immersion and immersion-drying protocols allow an efficient external sulfate attack of the material. Significant damage is observed due to interfacial ettringite. A predictive analysis is then adopted to quantify the relationship between ettringite growth and mechanical damage evolution during aging. Typical 3D microstructures representing the cement paste-aggregate structures are generated using Monte Carlo scheme. These images are converted into a finite element model to predict the mechanical performance under different criteria of damage kinetics. The effect of ettringite is then associated to the development of an interphase of lower mechanical properties. Our results show that the observed time evolution of Young\\'s modulus is best described by a linear increase of the interphase content. Our model results indicate also that the interphase regions grow at maximum stress regions rather than exclusively at interfaces. Finally, constant immersion predicts a rate of damage growth five times lower than that of immersion-drying protocol. © 2012 Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

  6. Piezoelectric Analysis of Saw Sensor Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír KUTIŠ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution modeling and simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW sensor using finite element method will be presented. SAW sensor is made from piezoelectric GaN layer and SiC substrate. Two different analysis types are investigated - modal and transient. Both analyses are only 2D. The goal of modal analysis, is to determine the eigenfrequency of SAW, which is used in following transient analysis. In transient analysis, wave propagation in SAW sensor is investigated. Both analyses were performed using FEM code ANSYS.

  7. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  8. Convergence analysis of spectral element method for electromechanical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curti, M.; Jansen, J.W.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper concerns the comparison of the performance of the Spectral Element Method (SEM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM) for a magnetostatic problem. The convergence of the vector magnetic potential, the magnetic flux density, and the total stored energy in the system is compared with the

  9. FINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF THIN CIRCULAR SANDWICH PLATES DEFLECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kurachka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of a thin circular sandwich plate being under the vertical load is proposed. The model employs the finite element method and takes advantage of an axisymmetric finite element that leads to the small dimension of the resulting stiffness matrix and sufficient accuracy for practical calculations. The analytical expressions for computing local stiffness matrices are found, which can significantly speed up the process of forming the global stiffness matrix and increase the accuracy of calculations. A software is under development and verification. The discrepancy between the results of the mathematical model and those of analytical formulas for homogeneous thin circularsandwich plates does not exceed 7%.

  10. Galerkin finite element methods for wave problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    basis functions (called G1FEM here) and quadratic basis functions (called G2FEM) ... mulation of Brookes & Hughes (1982) that implicitly incorporates numerical ..... functions and (c) SUPG method in the (kh − ω t)-plane for explicit Euler.

  11. Ecosystem element transport model for Lake Eckarfjaerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, L.; Bradshaw, C. [The Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University (Sweden); Andersson, E.; Kautsky, U. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. - SKB (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The ecosystem transport model of elements was developed for Lake Eckarfjaerden located in the Forsmark area in Sweden. Forsmark has currently a low level repository (SFR) and a repository for spent fuel is planned. A large number of data collected during site-investigation program 2002-2009 for planning the repository were available for the creation of the compartment model based on carbon circulation, physical and biological processes (e.g. primary production, consumption, respiration). The model is site-specific in the sense that the food web model is adapted to the actual food web at the site, and most estimates of biomass and metabolic rates for the organisms and meteorological data originate from site data. The functional organism groups of Lake Eckarfjaerden were considered as separate compartments: bacterio-plankton, benthic bacteria, macro-algae, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, benthic fauna. Two functional groups of bacteria were taken into account for the reason that they have the highest biomass of all functional groups during the winter, comprising 36% of the total biomass. Effects of ecological parameters, such as bacteria and algae biomass, on redistribution of a hypothetical radionuclide release in the lake were examined. The ecosystem model was used to estimate the environmental transfer of several elements (U, Th, Ra) and their isotopes (U-238, U-234,Th-232, Ra-226) to various aquatic organisms in the lake, using element-specific distribution coefficients for suspended particle and sediment. Results of chemical analyses of the water, sediment and biota were used for model validation. The model gives estimates of concentration factors for fish based on modelling rather on in situ measurement, which reduces the uncertainties for many radionuclides with scarce of data. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  12. Three dimensional mathematical model of tooth for finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškar Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mathematical model of the abutment tooth is the starting point of the finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The simplest and easiest way is to form a model according to the literature data of dimensions and morphological characteristics of teeth. Our method is based on forming 3D models using standard geometrical forms (objects in programmes for solid modeling. Objective. Forming the mathematical model of abutment of the second upper premolar for finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. Methods. The abutment tooth has a form of a complex geometric object. It is suitable for modeling in programs for solid modeling SolidWorks. After analyzing the literature data about the morphological characteristics of teeth, we started the modeling dividing the tooth (complex geometric body into simple geometric bodies (cylinder, cone, pyramid,.... Connecting simple geometric bodies together or substricting bodies from the basic body, we formed complex geometric body, tooth. The model is then transferred into Abaqus, a computational programme for finite element analysis. Transferring the data was done by standard file format for transferring 3D models ACIS SAT. Results. Using the programme for solid modeling SolidWorks, we developed three models of abutment of the second maxillary premolar: the model of the intact abutment, the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining cavity walls and the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining walls and inserted post. Conclusion Mathematical models of the abutment made according to the literature data are very similar with the real abutment and the simplifications are minimal. These models enable calculations of stress and deformation of the dental structures. The finite element analysis provides useful information in understanding biomechanical problems and gives guidance for clinical research.

  13. Applications of the discrete element method in mechanical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleissner, Florian; Gaugele, Timo; Eberhard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Compared to other fields of engineering, in mechanical engineering, the Discrete Element Method (DEM) is not yet a well known method. Nevertheless, there is a variety of simulation problems where the method has obvious advantages due to its meshless nature. For problems where several free bodies can collide and break after having been largely deformed, the DEM is the method of choice. Neighborhood search and collision detection between bodies as well as the separation of large solids into smaller particles are naturally incorporated in the method. The main DEM algorithm consists of a relatively simple loop that basically contains the three substeps contact detection, force computation and integration. However, there exists a large variety of different algorithms to choose the substeps to compose the optimal method for a given problem. In this contribution, we describe the dynamics of particle systems together with appropriate numerical integration schemes and give an overview over different types of particle interactions that can be composed to adapt the method to fit to a given simulation problem. Surface triangulations are used to model complicated, non-convex bodies in contact with particle systems. The capabilities of the method are finally demonstrated by means of application examples

  14. Consistent biokinetic models for the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    The biokinetic models for Th, Np, Pu, Am and Cm currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were developed within a generic framework that depicts gradual burial of skeletal activity in bone volume, depicts recycling of activity released to blood and links excretion to retention and translocation of activity. For other actinide elements such as Ac, Pa, Bk, Cf and Es, the ICRP still uses simplistic retention models that assign all skeletal activity to bone surface and depicts one-directional flow of activity from blood to long-term depositories to excreta. This mixture of updated and older models in ICRP documents has led to inconsistencies in dose estimates and interpretation of bioassay for radionuclides with reasonably similar biokinetics. This paper proposes new biokinetic models for Ac, Pa, Bk, Cf and Es that are consistent with the updated models for Th, Np, Pu, Am and Cm. The proposed models are developed within the ICRP's generic model framework for bone-surface-seeking radionuclides, and an effort has been made to develop parameter values that are consistent with results of comparative biokinetic data on the different actinide elements. (author)

  15. Modelling optimization involving different types of elements in finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C M; Rivai, Ahmad; Bapokutty, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Finite elements are used to express the mechanical behaviour of a structure in finite element analysis. Therefore, the selection of the elements determines the quality of the analysis. The aim of this paper is to compare and contrast 1D element, 2D element, and 3D element used in finite element analysis. A simple case study was carried out on a standard W460x74 I-beam. The I-beam was modelled and analyzed statically with 1D elements, 2D elements and 3D elements. The results for the three separate finite element models were compared in terms of stresses, deformation and displacement of the I-beam. All three finite element models yield satisfactory results with acceptable errors. The advantages and limitations of these elements are discussed. 1D elements offer simplicity although lacking in their ability to model complicated geometry. 2D elements and 3D elements provide more detail yet sophisticated results which require more time and computer memory in the modelling process. It is also found that the choice of element in finite element analysis is influence by a few factors such as the geometry of the structure, desired analysis results, and the capability of the computer

  16. Biomechanical Evaluations of Hip Fracture Using Finite Element Model that Models Individual Differences of Femur

    OpenAIRE

    田中, 英一; TANAKA, Eiichi; 山本, 創太; YAMAMOTO, Sota; 坂本, 誠二; SAKAMOTO, Seiji; 中西, 孝文; NAKANISHI, Takafumi; 原田, 敦; HARADA, Atsushi; 水野, 雅士; MIZUNO, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    This paper is concerned with an individual finite element modeling system for femur and biomechanical evaluations of the influences of loading conditions, bone shape and bone density on risks of hip fracture. Firstly, a method to construct an individual finite element model by morphological parameters that represent femoral shapes was developed. Using the models with different shapes constructed by this method, the effects of fall direction, posture of upper body, femur shape and bone density...

  17. Finite element method for solving neutron transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.; Greenbaum, A.

    1984-01-01

    A finite element method is introduced for solving the neutron transport equations. Our method falls into the category of Petrov-Galerkin solution, since the trial space differs from the test space. The close relationship between this method and the discrete ordinate method is discussed, and the methods are compared for simple test problems

  18. Hualien forced vibration calculation with a finite element model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Gantenbein, F.; Nedelec, M.; Duretz, Ch.

    1995-01-01

    The forced vibration tests of the Hualien mock-up were useful to validate finite element models developed for soil-structure interaction. In this paper the two sets of tests with and without backfill were analysed. the methods used are based on finite element modeling for the soil. Two approaches were considered: calculation of soil impedance followed by the calculation of the transfer functions with a model taking into account the superstructure and the impedance; direct calculation of the soil-structure transfer functions, with the soil and the structure being represented in the same model by finite elements. Blind predictions and post-test calculations are presented and compared with the test results. (author). 4 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  19. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W. [Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  20. Numerical simulation of cracks and interfaces with cohesive zone models in the extended finite element method, with EDF R and D software Code Aster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferte, Guilhem

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the harmfulness of detected defects in some nuclear power plants, EDF Group is led to develop advanced simulation tools. Among the targeted mechanisms are 3D non-planar quasi-static crack propagation, but also dynamic transients during unstable phases. In the present thesis, quasi-brittle crack growth is simulated based on the combination of the XFEM and cohesive zone models. These are inserted over large potential crack surfaces, so that the cohesive law will naturally separate adherent and de-bonding zones, resulting in an implicit update of the crack front, which makes the originality of the approach. This requires a robust insertion of non-smooth interface laws in the XFEM, which is achieved in quasi-statics with the use of XFEM-suited multiplier spaces in a consistent formulation, block-wise diagonal interface operators and an augmented Lagrangian formalism to write the cohesive law. Based on this concept and a novel directional criterion appealing to cohesive integrals, a propagation procedure over non-planar crack paths is proposed and compared with literature benchmarks. As for dynamics, an initially perfectly adherent cohesive law is implicitly treated within an explicit time-stepping scheme, resulting in an analytical determination of interface tractions if appropriate discrete spaces are used. Implementation is validated on a tapered DCB test. Extension to quadratic elements is then investigated. For stress-free cracks, it was found that a subdivision into quadratic sub-cells is needed for optimality. Theory expects enriched quadrature to be necessary for distorted sub-cells, but this could not be observed in practice. For adherent interfaces, a novel discrete multiplier space was proposed which has both numerical stability and produces quadratic convergence if used along with quadratic sub-cells. (author)

  1. Mean-field models and superheavy elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhard, P.G.; Bender, M.; Maruhn, J.A.; Frankfurt Univ.

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the performance of two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field theory (RMF) and the non-relativistic Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach (SHF), with particular emphasis on the description of superheavy elements (SHE). We provide a short introduction to the SHF and RMF, the relations between these two approaches and the relations to other nuclear structure models, briefly review the basic properties with respect to normal nuclear observables, and finally present and discuss recent results on the binding properties of SHE computed with a broad selection of SHF and RMF parametrisations. (orig.)

  2. Two-dimensional isostatic meshes in the finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez Marín, Rubén; Samartín, Avelino

    2002-01-01

    In a Finite Element (FE) analysis of elastic solids several items are usually considered, namely, type and shape of the elements, number of nodes per element, node positions, FE mesh, total number of degrees of freedom (dot) among others. In this paper a method to improve a given FE mesh used for a particular analysis is described. For the improvement criterion different objective functions have been chosen (Total potential energy and Average quadratic error) and the number of nodes and dof's...

  3. An exponentiation method for XML element retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichaiwong, Tanakorn

    2014-01-01

    XML document is now widely used for modelling and storing structured documents. The structure is very rich and carries important information about contents and their relationships, for example, e-Commerce. XML data-centric collections require query terms allowing users to specify constraints on the document structure; mapping structure queries and assigning the weight are significant for the set of possibly relevant documents with respect to structural conditions. In this paper, we present an extension to the MEXIR search system that supports the combination of structural and content queries in the form of content-and-structure queries, which we call the Exponentiation function. It has been shown the structural information improve the effectiveness of the search system up to 52.60% over the baseline BM25 at MAP.

  4. An Exponentiation Method for XML Element Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    XML document is now widely used for modelling and storing structured documents. The structure is very rich and carries important information about contents and their relationships, for example, e-Commerce. XML data-centric collections require query terms allowing users to specify constraints on the document structure; mapping structure queries and assigning the weight are significant for the set of possibly relevant documents with respect to structural conditions. In this paper, we present an extension to the MEXIR search system that supports the combination of structural and content queries in the form of content-and-structure queries, which we call the Exponentiation function. It has been shown the structural information improve the effectiveness of the search system up to 52.60% over the baseline BM25 at MAP. PMID:24696643

  5. Element Free Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid-Flow Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jhung; Kwon, Young Kwon

    2007-01-01

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been developed for application to thermal-fluid problems. Most of the those studies considered a regular shape of lattice or mesh like square and cubic grids. In order to apply the LBM to more practical cases, it is necessary to be able to solve complex or irregular shapes of problem domains. Some techniques were based on the finite element method. Generally, the finite element method is very powerful for solving two or three-dimensional complex or irregular shapes of domains using the iso-parametric element formulation which is based on a mathematical mapping from a regular shape of element in an imaginary domain to a more general and irregular shape of element in the physical domain. In addition, the element free technique is also quite useful to analyze a complex shape of domain because there is no need to divide a domain by a compatible finite element mesh. This paper presents a new finite element and element free formulations for the lattice Boltzmann equation using the general weighted residual technique. Then, a series of validation examples are presented

  6. Element Free Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid-Flow Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jhung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young Kwon [US Naval Postgraduate School, New York (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been developed for application to thermal-fluid problems. Most of the those studies considered a regular shape of lattice or mesh like square and cubic grids. In order to apply the LBM to more practical cases, it is necessary to be able to solve complex or irregular shapes of problem domains. Some techniques were based on the finite element method. Generally, the finite element method is very powerful for solving two or three-dimensional complex or irregular shapes of domains using the iso-parametric element formulation which is based on a mathematical mapping from a regular shape of element in an imaginary domain to a more general and irregular shape of element in the physical domain. In addition, the element free technique is also quite useful to analyze a complex shape of domain because there is no need to divide a domain by a compatible finite element mesh. This paper presents a new finite element and element free formulations for the lattice Boltzmann equation using the general weighted residual technique. Then, a series of validation examples are presented.

  7. Analytical and finite element modeling of grounding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, Mauricio Valencia Ferreira da [University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: mauricio@grucad.ufsc.br; Dular, Patrick [University of Liege (Belgium). Institut Montefiore], E-mail: Patrick.Dular@ulg.ac.be

    2007-07-01

    Grounding is the art of making an electrical connection to the earth. This paper deals with the analytical and finite element modeling of grounding systems. An electrokinetic formulation using a scalar potential can benefit from floating potentials to define global quantities such as electric voltages and currents. The application concerns a single vertical grounding with one, two and three-layer soil, where the superior extremity stays in the surface of the soil. This problem has been modeled using a 2D axi-symmetric electrokinetic formulation. The grounding resistance obtained by finite element method is compared with the analytical one for one-layer soil. With the results of this paper it is possible to show that finite element method is a powerful tool in the analysis of the grounding systems in low frequencies. (author)

  8. Finite element formulation for a digital image correlation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yaofeng; Pang, John H. L.; Wong, Chee Khuen; Su Fei

    2005-01-01

    A finite element formulation for a digital image correlation method is presented that will determine directly the complete, two-dimensional displacement field during the image correlation process on digital images. The entire interested image area is discretized into finite elements that are involved in the common image correlation process by use of our algorithms. This image correlation method with finite element formulation has an advantage over subset-based image correlation methods because it satisfies the requirements of displacement continuity and derivative continuity among elements on images. Numerical studies and a real experiment are used to verify the proposed formulation. Results have shown that the image correlation with the finite element formulation is computationally efficient, accurate, and robust

  9. A Method of Assembling Wall or Floor Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of constructing, at the site of use, a building wall (1) or a building floor (1) using a plurality of prefabricated concrete or lightweight concrete plate-shaped wall of floor elements (10), in particular cast elements, which have a front side and a rear side...

  10. Stability estimates for hp spectral element methods for general ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We establish basic stability estimates for a non-conforming ℎ- spectral element method which allows for simultaneous mesh refinement and variable polynomial degree. The spectral element functions are non-conforming if the boundary conditions are Dirichlet. For problems with mixed boundary conditions they are ...

  11. A Note on Symplectic, Multisymplectic Scheme in Finite Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Han-Ying; JI Xiao-Mei; LI Yu-Qi; WU Ke

    2001-01-01

    We find that with uniform mesh, the numerical schemes derived from finite element method can keep a preserved symplectic structure in one-dimensional case and a preserved multisymplectic structure in two-dimensional case respectively. These results are in fact the intrinsic reason why the numerical experiments show that such finite element algorithms are accurate in practice.``

  12. THE PRACTICAL ANALYSIS OF FINITE ELEMENTS METHOD ERRORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bakhova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The most important in the practical plan questions of reliable estimations of finite elementsmethod errors are considered. Definition rules of necessary calculations accuracy are developed. Methodsand ways of the calculations allowing receiving at economical expenditures of computing work the best finalresults are offered.Keywords: error, given the accuracy, finite element method, lagrangian and hermitian elements.

  13. A novel hybrid stress-function finite element method immune to severe mesh distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cen Song; Zhou Mingjue; Fu Xiangrong

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a hybrid stress-function finite element method proposed recently for developing 2D finite element models immune to element shapes. Deferent from the first version of the hybrid-stress element constructed by Pian, the stress function φ of 2D elastic or fracture problem is regarded as the functional variable of the complementary energy functional. Then, the basic analytical solutions of φ are taken as the trial functions for finite element models, and meanwhile, the corresponding unknown stress-function constants are introduced. By using the principle of minimum complementary energy, these unknown stress-function constants can be expressed in terms of the displacements along element edges. Finally, the complementary energy functional can be rewritten in terms of element nodal displacement vector, and thus, the element stiffness matrix of such hybrid-function element can be obtained. As examples, two (8- and 12-node) quadrilateral plane elements and an arbitrary polygonal crack element are constructed by employing different basic analytical solutions of different stress functions. Numerical results show that, the 8- and 12-node plane models can produce the exact solutions for pure bending and linear bending problems, respectively, even the element shape degenerates into triangle and concave quadrangle; and the crack element can also predict accurate results with very low computational cost in analysis of stress-singularity problems.

  14. Developpement d'un modele analytique pour l'analyse en elasticite lineaire de champs de deformation et contrainte au sein d'un polycristal. comparaison avec la methode des elements finis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretin, Remy

    L'endommagement par fatigue des materiaux est un probleme courant dans de nombreux domaines, dont celui de l'aeronautique. Afin de prevenir la rupture par fatigue des materiaux il est necessaire de determiner leur duree de vie en fatigue. Malheureusement, dues aux nombreuses heterogeneites presentes, la duree de vie en fatigue peut fortement varier entre deux pieces identiques faites dans le meme materiau ayant subi les memes traitements. Il est donc necessaire de considerer ces heterogeneites dans nos modeles afin d'avoir une meilleure estimation de la duree de vie des materiaux. Comme premiere etape vers une meilleure consideration des heterogeneites dans nos modeles, une etude en elasticite lineaire de l'influence des orientations cristallographiques sur les champs de deformations et de contraintes dans un polycristal a ete realisee a l'aide de la methode des elements finis. Des correlations ont pu etre etablies a partir des resultats obtenus, et un modele analytique en elasticite lineaire prenant en compte les distributions d'orientations cristallographiques et les effets de voisinage a pu etre developpe. Ce modele repose sur les bases des modeles d'homogeneisation classique, comme le schema auto-coherent, et reprend aussi les principes de voisinage des automates cellulaires. En prenant pour reference les resultats des analyses elements finis, le modele analytique ici developpe a montre avoir une precision deux fois plus grande que le modele auto-coherent, quel que soit le materiau etudie.

  15. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  16. Modelling bucket excavation by finite element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecingina, O. M.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in geological components of the layers from lignite pits have an impact on the sustainability of the cup path elements and under the action of excavation force appear efforts leading to deformation of the entire assembly. Application of finite element method in the optimization of components leads to economic growth, to increase the reliability and durability of the studied machine parts thus the machine. It is obvious usefulness of knowledge the state of mechanical tensions that the designed piece or the assembly not to break under the action of tensions that must cope during operation. In the course of excavation work on all bucket cutting force components, the first coming into contact with the material being excavated cutting edge. Therefore in the study with finite element analysis is retained only cutting edge. To study the field of stress and strain on the cutting edge will be created geometric patterns for each type of cup this will be subject to static analysis. The geometric design retains the cutting edge shape and on this on the tooth cassette location will apply an areal force on the abutment tooth. The cutting edge real pattern is subjected to finite element study for the worst case of rock cutting by symmetrical and asymmetrical cups whose profile is different. The purpose of this paper is to determine the displacement and tensions field for both profiles considering the maximum force applied on the cutting edge and the depth of the cutting is equal with the width of the cutting edge of the tooth. It will consider the worst case when on the structure will act both the tangential force and radial force on the bucket profile. For determination of stress and strain field on the form design of cutting edge profile will apply maximum force assuming uniform distribution and on the edge surface force will apply a radial force. After geometric patterns discretization on the cutting knives and determining stress field, can be seen that at the

  17. Review of Tomographic Imaging using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fua’ad RAHMAT

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Many types of techniques for process tomography were proposed and developed during the past 20 years. This paper review the techniques and the current state of knowledge and experience on the subject, aimed at highlighting the problems associated with the non finite element methods, such as the ill posed, ill conditioned which relates to the accuracy and sensitivity of measurements. In this paper, considerations for choice of sensors and its applications were outlined and descriptions of non finite element tomography systems were presented. The finite element method tomography system as obtained from recent works, suitable for process control and measurement were also presented.

  18. Spectral/ hp element methods: Recent developments, applications, and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Cantwell, Chris D.; Monteserin, Carlos; Eskilsson, Claes; Engsig-Karup, Allan P.; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2018-02-01

    The spectral/ hp element method combines the geometric flexibility of the classical h-type finite element technique with the desirable numerical properties of spectral methods, employing high-degree piecewise polynomial basis functions on coarse finite element-type meshes. The spatial approximation is based upon orthogonal polynomials, such as Legendre or Chebychev polynomials, modified to accommodate a C 0 - continuous expansion. Computationally and theoretically, by increasing the polynomial order p, high-precision solutions and fast convergence can be obtained and, in particular, under certain regularity assumptions an exponential reduction in approximation error between numerical and exact solutions can be achieved. This method has now been applied in many simulation studies of both fundamental and practical engineering flows. This paper briefly describes the formulation of the spectral/ hp element method and provides an overview of its application to computational fluid dynamics. In particular, it focuses on the use of the spectral/ hp element method in transitional flows and ocean engineering. Finally, some of the major challenges to be overcome in order to use the spectral/ hp element method in more complex science and engineering applications are discussed.

  19. Model order reduction techniques with applications in finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Zu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Despite the continued rapid advance in computing speed and memory the increase in the complexity of models used by engineers persists in outpacing them. Even where there is access to the latest hardware, simulations are often extremely computationally intensive and time-consuming when full-blown models are under consideration. The need to reduce the computational cost involved when dealing with high-order/many-degree-of-freedom models can be offset by adroit computation. In this light, model-reduction methods have become a major goal of simulation and modeling research. Model reduction can also ameliorate problems in the correlation of widely used finite-element analyses and test analysis models produced by excessive system complexity. Model Order Reduction Techniques explains and compares such methods focusing mainly on recent work in dynamic condensation techniques: - Compares the effectiveness of static, exact, dynamic, SEREP and iterative-dynamic condensation techniques in producing valid reduced-order mo...

  20. Rigid finite element method in analysis of dynamics of offshore structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittbrodt, Edmund [Gdansk Univ. of Technology (Poland); Szczotka, Marek; Maczynski, Andrzej; Wojciech, Stanislaw [Bielsko-Biala Univ. (Poland)

    2013-07-01

    This book describes new methods developed for modelling dynamics of machines commonly used in the offshore industry. These methods are based both on the rigid finite element method, used for the description of link deformations, and on homogeneous transformations and joint coordinates, which is applied to the modelling of multibody system dynamics. In this monograph, the bases of the rigid finite element method and homogeneous transformations are introduced. Selected models for modelling dynamics of offshore devices are then verified both by using commercial software, based on the finite element method, as well as by using additional methods. Examples of mathematical models of offshore machines, such as a gantry crane for Blowout-Preventer (BOP) valve block transportation, a pedestal crane with shock absorber, and pipe laying machinery are presented. Selected problems of control in offshore machinery as well as dynamic optimization in device control are also discussed. Additionally, numerical simulations of pipe-laying operations taking active reel drive into account are shown.

  1. Rigid Finite Element Method in Analysis of Dynamics of Offshore Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wittbrodt, Edmund; Maczyński, Andrzej; Wojciech, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    This book describes new methods developed for modelling dynamics of machines commonly used in the offshore industry. These methods are based both on the rigid finite element method, used for the description of link deformations, and on homogeneous transformations and joint coordinates, which is applied to the modelling of multibody system dynamics. In this monograph, the bases of the rigid finite element method  and homogeneous transformations are introduced. Selected models for modelling dynamics of offshore devices are then verified both by using commercial software, based on the finite element method, as well as by using additional methods. Examples of mathematical models of offshore machines, such as a gantry crane for Blowout-Preventer (BOP) valve block transportation, a pedestal crane with shock absorber, and pipe laying machinery are presented. Selected problems of control in offshore machinery as well as dynamic optimization in device control are also discussed. Additionally, numerical simulations of...

  2. induction motor, unbalance, electrical loss, finite element method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Andrés Cortés

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the pattern of a 7.5 kW squirrel-cage induction motor’s electrical loss in balanced and unbalanced conditions, modelling the motor using the finite element method and comparing the results with experimental data obtained in the laboratory for the selected motor. Magnetic flux density variation was analysed at four places in the machine. The results so obtained sho- wed that the undervoltage unbalanced condition was the most critical from the motor’s total loss point of view. Regarding varia- tion of loss in parts of the motor, a constant iron loss pattern was found when the load was changed for each type of voltage supply and that the place where the loss had the largest rise was in the machine’s rotor.

  3. Application of distinct element method to toppling failure of slopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Hibino, Satoshi; Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Asai, Yoshiyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, the stability of slopes during earthquakes has become to be an important engineering problem, especially in case of the earthquake-proof design of nuclear power plants. But, for fissured rock slopes, some problems are remained unresolved, because they can not be treated as continua. The authors have been investigating toppling failure of slopes, from a point of view which regards a fissured rock mass as an assemblage of rigid blocks. DEM (Distinct Element Method) proposed by Cundall (1974) seems to be very helpful to such a investigation. So, in this paper, the applicability of DEM to toppling failure of slopes is examined through the comparison between DEM results and theoretical or experimental results using 3 simple models. (author)

  4. A mixed finite element method for nonlinear diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin; Carrillo, José ; Wolfram, Marie-Therese

    2010-01-01

    We propose a mixed finite element method for a class of nonlinear diffusion equations, which is based on their interpretation as gradient flows in optimal transportation metrics. We introduce an appropriate linearization of the optimal transport problem, which leads to a mixed symmetric formulation. This formulation preserves the maximum principle in case of the semi-discrete scheme as well as the fully discrete scheme for a certain class of problems. In addition solutions of the mixed formulation maintain exponential convergence in the relative entropy towards the steady state in case of a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation with uniformly convex potential. We demonstrate the behavior of the proposed scheme with 2D simulations of the porous medium equations and blow-up questions in the Patlak-Keller-Segel model. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  5. Modeling the element cycle of aquatic plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaeda, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Aquatic plants play an important role in element cycles in wetlands and the efficiency of the process is extremely related to their proportional biomass allocation to above- and belowground organs. Therefore, the framework of most macrophyte productivity models is usually similar with a mass-balance approach consisting of gross production, respiration and mortality losses and the translocation between organs. These growth models are incorporated with decomposition models to evaluate the annual cycle of elements. Perennial emergent macrophytes with a relatively large biomass have a particularly important role in element cycles. Their phenological stages, such as the beginning of hibernation of belowground rhizome systems, emergence of new shoots in spring with resources stocked in the rhizomes, flowering, downward translocation of photosynthetic products later on and then the mortality of the aboveground system in late autumn, depend on the environmental conditions, basically the nutrients, water depth, climatic variations, etc. Although some species retain standing dead shoots for a long time, dead shoots easily fall into water, starting to decompose in the immediate aftermath. However, their decomposition rates in the water are relatively low, causing to accumulate large amounts of organic sediments on the bottom. Together with the deposition of allochthonous suspended matters in the stand, this process decreases the water depth, transforming wetlands gradually into land. The depth of penetration of roots into the sediments to uptake nutrients and water is extremely site specific, however, in water-logged areas, the maximum penetrable depth may be approximately estimated by considering the ability of oxygen transport into the rhizome system. The growth of perennial submerged plants is also estimated by a process similar to that of emergent macrophytes. However, compared with emergent macrophytes, the root system of submerged macrophytes is weaker, and the nutrient

  6. Finite element modeling of nanotube structures linear and non-linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar; Muhammad, Ibrahim Dauda

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to modeling carbon structures such as graphene and carbon nanotubes using finite element methods, and addresses the latest advances in numerical studies for these materials. Based on the available findings, the book develops an effective finite element approach for modeling the structure and the deformation of grapheme-based materials. Further, modeling processing for single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated in detail.

  7. Discontinuous Galerkin Subgrid Finite Element Method for Heterogeneous Brinkman’s Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Iliev, Oleg P.; Lazarov, Raytcho D.; Willems, Joerg

    2010-01-01

    We present a two-scale finite element method for solving Brinkman's equations with piece-wise constant coefficients. This system of equations model fluid flows in highly porous, heterogeneous media with complex topology of the heterogeneities. We

  8. Analysis of concrete beams using applied element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincy Christy, D.; Madhavan Pillai, T. M.; Nagarajan, Praveen

    2018-03-01

    The Applied Element Method (AEM) is a displacement based method of structural analysis. Some of its features are similar to that of Finite Element Method (FEM). In AEM, the structure is analysed by dividing it into several elements similar to FEM. But, in AEM, elements are connected by springs instead of nodes as in the case of FEM. In this paper, background to AEM is discussed and necessary equations are derived. For illustrating the application of AEM, it has been used to analyse plain concrete beam of fixed support condition. The analysis is limited to the analysis of 2-dimensional structures. It was found that the number of springs has no much influence on the results. AEM could predict deflection and reactions with reasonable degree of accuracy.

  9. A finite-elements method for turbulent flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autret, A.

    1986-03-01

    The work discussed here covers turbulent flow calculations using GALERKIN's finite-element method. In our specific case, we have to deal with monophasic incompressible flow in Boussinesq approximation in the normal operating conditions of a primary circuit of nuclear power plant. Turbulence effects on the mean field are taken into account by the k-epsilon model with two evolution equations: one for the kinetic energy of the turbulence, and one for the energy dissipation rate. The wall zone is covered by wall laws, and by REICHARDT's law in particular. A Law is advanced for the epsilon input profile, and a numerical solution is proposed for the physically aberrant values of k and epsilon generated by the model. Single-equation models are reviewed comparatively with the k-epsilon model. A comparison between calculated and analytical solutions or calculated and experimental results is presented for decreasing turbulence behind a grid, for the flow between parallel flat plates with three REYNOLDS numbers, and for backward facing step [fr

  10. The Matrix Element Method at Next-to-Leading Order

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John M.; Giele, Walter T.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of the matrix element method to next-to-leading order in perturbation theory. To accomplish this we have developed a method to calculate next-to-leading order weights on an event-by-event basis. This allows for the definition of next-to-leading order likelihoods in exactly the same fashion as at leading order, thus extending the matrix element method to next-to-leading order. A welcome by-product of the method is the straightforward and efficient generation of...

  11. Hybrid finite difference/finite element immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Griffith, Boyce; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-01

    The immersed boundary method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses a Lagrangian description of the structural deformations, stresses, and forces along with an Eulerian description of the momentum, viscosity, and incompressibility of the fluid-structure system. The original immersed boundary methods described immersed elastic structures using systems of flexible fibers, and even now, most immersed boundary methods still require Lagrangian meshes that are finer than the Eulerian grid. This work introduces a coupling scheme for the immersed boundary method to link the Lagrangian and Eulerian variables that facilitates independent spatial discretizations for the structure and background grid. This approach uses a finite element discretization of the structure while retaining a finite difference scheme for the Eulerian variables. We apply this method to benchmark problems involving elastic, rigid, and actively contracting structures, including an idealized model of the left ventricle of the heart. Our tests include cases in which, for a fixed Eulerian grid spacing, coarser Lagrangian structural meshes yield discretization errors that are as much as several orders of magnitude smaller than errors obtained using finer structural meshes. The Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling approach developed in this work enables the effective use of these coarse structural meshes with the immersed boundary method. This work also contrasts two different weak forms of the equations, one of which is demonstrated to be more effective for the coarse structural discretizations facilitated by our coupling approach. © 2017 The Authors International  Journal  for  Numerical  Methods  in  Biomedical  Engineering Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Self-supporting method; an alternative method for steel truss bridge element replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsyad, Muhammad; Sangadji, Senot; As'ad, Sholihin

    2017-11-01

    Steel truss bridge often requires replacement of its element due to serious damage caused by traffic accidents. This replacement is carried out using temporary supporting structure. It would be difficult when the available space for the temporary structure is quite limited and or the position of work is at a high elevation. The self-supporting method is proposed instead of temporary supporting structure. This paper will discuss an innovative method of bridge rehabilitation by utilizing the existing bridge structure. It requires such temporary connecting structure that installed on the existing bridge element, therefore, the forces during replacement process could be transferred to the bridge foundation directly. By taking the case on a steel truss bridge Jetis Salatiga which requires element replacement due to its damages on two main diagonals, a modeling is carried out to get a proper repair method. Structural analysis is conducted for three temporary connecting structure models: “I,” “V,” and triangular model. Stresses and translations that occur in the structure are used as constraints. Bridge bearings are modeled in two different modes: fixed-fixed system and fixed-free one. Temperature load is given in each condition to obtain the appropriate time for execution. The triangular model is chosen as the best one. In the fixed-fixed mode, this method can be carried out in a temperature range 27-28.8° C, while in fixed-free one, the temperature it is allowed between 27-43.4 °C. The D4 is dismantled first by cutting the D4 leaving an area of 1140.2 mm2 or 127 mm web length to enable plastic condition until the D4 collapses. At the beginning of elongation occurs, immediately performed a slowly jacking on a temporary connecting structure so that the force on D4 is gradually transferred to the temporary connecting structure then the D4 and D5 are set in their place.

  13. A comparison of the lattice discrete particle method to the finite-element method and the K&C material model for simulating the static and dynamic response of concrete.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jovanca J.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2013-11-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by the graduate student Jovanca Smith during a summer internship in the summer of 2012 with the aid of mentor Joe Bishop. The projects were a two-part endeavor that focused on the use of the numerical model called the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM). The LDPM is a discrete meso-scale model currently used at Northwestern University and the ERDC to model the heterogeneous quasi-brittle material, concrete. In the first part of the project, LDPM was compared to the Karagozian and Case Concrete Model (K&C) used in Presto, an explicit dynamics finite-element code, developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In order to make this comparison, a series of quasi-static numerical experiments were performed, namely unconfined uniaxial compression tests on four varied cube specimen sizes, three-point bending notched experiments on three proportional specimen sizes, and six triaxial compression tests on a cylindrical specimen. The second part of this project focused on the application of LDPM to simulate projectile perforation on an ultra high performance concrete called CORTUF. This application illustrates the strengths of LDPM over traditional continuum models.

  14. Elasto-viscoplastic finite element model for prestressed concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prates Junior, N.P.; Silva, C.S.B.; Campos Filho, A.; Gastal, F.P.S.L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model, based on the finite element method, for the study of reinforced and prestressed concrete structures under plane stress states. It comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete and steel relaxation are considered. Elasto-viscoplastic constitutive models are used to describe the behavior of the materials. The model includes prestressing and no prestressing reinforcement, on situation with pre- and post-tension with and without bond. A set of prestressed concrete slab elements were tested under instantaneous and long-term loading. The experimental data for deflections, deformations and ultimate strength are used to compare and validate the results obtained through the proposed model. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs

  15. Complex finite element sensitivity method for creep analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Farias, Armando; Montoya, Arturo; Millwater, Harry

    2015-01-01

    The complex finite element method (ZFEM) has been extended to perform sensitivity analysis for mechanical and structural systems undergoing creep deformation. ZFEM uses a complex finite element formulation to provide shape, material, and loading derivatives of the system response, providing an insight into the essential factors which control the behavior of the system as a function of time. A complex variable-based quadrilateral user element (UEL) subroutine implementing the power law creep constitutive formulation was incorporated within the Abaqus commercial finite element software. The results of the complex finite element computations were verified by comparing them to the reference solution for the steady-state creep problem of a thick-walled cylinder in the power law creep range. A practical application of the ZFEM implementation to creep deformation analysis is the calculation of the skeletal point of a notched bar test from a single ZFEM run. In contrast, the standard finite element procedure requires multiple runs. The value of the skeletal point is that it identifies the location where the stress state is accurate, regardless of the certainty of the creep material properties. - Highlights: • A novel finite element sensitivity method (ZFEM) for creep was introduced. • ZFEM has the capability to calculate accurate partial derivatives. • ZFEM can be used for identification of the skeletal point of creep structures. • ZFEM can be easily implemented in a commercial software, e.g. Abaqus. • ZFEM results were shown to be in excellent agreement with analytical solutions

  16. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II: Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO2 laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  17. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II : Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae Woong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO₂laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  18. Method of removing crud deposited on fuel element clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Tokunobu; Yashima, Akira; Tajima, Jun-ichiro.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable easy elimination of claddings deposited on the surface of fuel element. Method: An operator manipulates a pole from above a platform, engages the longitudinal flange of the cover to the opening at the upper end of a channel box and starts up a suction pump. The suction amount of the pump is set such that water flow becomes within the channel box at greater flow rate than the operational flow rate in the channel box of the fuel element clusters during reactor operation. This enables to remove crud deposited on the surface of individual fuel elements with ease and rapidly without detaching the channel box. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  20. Scalable fast multipole methods for vortex element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Qi; Gumerov, Nail A.; Yokota, Rio; Barba, Lorena A.; Duraiswami, Ramani

    2012-01-01

    work for a scalar heterogeneous FMM algorithm, we develop a new FMM-based vortex method capable of simulating general flows including turbulence on heterogeneous architectures, which distributes the work between multi-core CPUs and GPUs to best utilize

  1. Analysis of Piezoelectric Solids using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Mohammed; Nagarajan, Praveen; Remanan, Mini

    2018-03-01

    Piezoelectric materials are extensively used in smart structures as sensors and actuators. In this paper, static analysis of three piezoelectric solids is done using general-purpose finite element software, Abaqus. The simulation results from Abaqus are compared with the results obtained using numerical methods like Boundary Element Method (BEM) and meshless point collocation method (PCM). The BEM and PCM are cumbersome for complex shape and complicated boundary conditions. This paper shows that the software Abaqus can be used to solve the governing equations of piezoelectric solids in a much simpler and faster way than the BEM and PCM.

  2. Navier-Stokes equations by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portella, P.E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program to solve the Navier-Stokes equations by using the Finite Element Method is implemented. The solutions variables investigated are stream-function/vorticity in the steady case and velocity/pressure in the steady state and transient cases. For steady state flow the equations are solved simultaneously by the Newton-Raphson method. For the time dependent formulation, a fractional step method is employed to discretize in time and artificial viscosity is used to preclude spurious oscilations in the solution. The element used is the three node triangle. Some numerical examples are presented and comparisons are made with applications already existent. (Author) [pt

  3. Nucleon matrix elements using the variational method in lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragos, J.; Kamleh, W.; Leinweber, D.B.; Zanotti, J.M.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Young, R.D.; Adelaide Univ., SA

    2016-06-01

    The extraction of hadron matrix elements in lattice QCD using the standard two- and threepoint correlator functions demands careful attention to systematic uncertainties. One of the most commonly studied sources of systematic error is contamination from excited states. We apply the variational method to calculate the axial vector current g_A, the scalar current g_S and the quark momentum fraction left angle x right angle of the nucleon and we compare the results to the more commonly used summation and two-exponential fit methods. The results demonstrate that the variational approach offers a more efficient and robust method for the determination of nucleon matrix elements.

  4. Energy flow in plate assembles by hierarchical version of finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachulec, Marcin; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    method has been proposed. In this paper a modified hierarchical version of finite element method is used for modelling of energy flow in plate assembles. The formulation includes description of in-plane forces so that planes lying in different planes can be modelled. Two examples considered are: L......The dynamic analysis of structures in medium and high frequencies are usually focused on frequency and spatial averages of energy of components, and not the displacement/velocity fields. This is especially true for structure-borne noise modelling. For the analysis of complicated structures...... the finite element method has been used to study the energy flow. The finite element method proved its usefulness despite the computational expense. Therefore studies have been conducted in order to simplify and reduce the computations required. Among others, the use of hierarchical version of finite element...

  5. Mathematical aspects of finite element methods for incompressible viscous flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzburger, M. D.

    1986-01-01

    Mathematical aspects of finite element methods are surveyed for incompressible viscous flows, concentrating on the steady primitive variable formulation. The discretization of a weak formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations are addressed, then the stability condition is considered, the satisfaction of which insures the stability of the approximation. Specific choices of finite element spaces for the velocity and pressure are then discussed. Finally, the connection between different weak formulations and a variety of boundary conditions is explored.

  6. Method for fuel element leak detection in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, U.

    1983-01-01

    The method is aimed at detecting fuel element leaks during reactor operation. It is based on neutron flux measurements at many points in the core, using at least two detectors at a time. The detectors must be arranged in the direction of the coolant flow. Values obtained from periodic measurements are compared with threshold values. The location of fuel element leaks is determined from those values exceeding the threshold of individual detectors

  7. Nonlinear nonstationary analysis with the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, L.E.

    1981-01-01

    In this paper, after some introductory remarks on numerical methods for the integration of initial value problems, the applicability of the finite element method for transient diffusion analysis as well as dynamic and inelastic analysis is discussed, and some examples are presented. (RW) [de

  8. The future of the finite element method in geotechnics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkgreve, R.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation a vision is given on tlie fiiture of the finite element method (FEM) for geotechnical engineering and design. In the past 20 years the FEM has proven to be a powerful method for estimating deformation, stability and groundwater flow in geoteclmical stmctures. Much has been

  9. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for hyperbolic differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vegt, Jacobus J.W.; van der Ven, H.; Boelens, O.J.; Boelens, O.J.; Toro, E.F.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a suryey is given of the important steps in the development of discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for hyperbolic partial differential equations. Special attention is paid to the application of the discontinuous Galerkin method to the solution of the Euler equations of gas

  10. Instrumental methods for analysis of some elements in flour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zagrodzki, P.; Dutkiewicz, E.M.; Malec, P.; Krosniak, M.; Knap, W.

    1993-10-01

    For ten various brands of flour contents of chosen (heavy) elements were determined by means of ICP, GF-AAS, PIXE and ASV/CSV methods. General performance of participating laboratories as well as pros and cons of different analytical methods were compared and discussed. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs, 7 tabs

  11. Finite elements volumes methods: applications to the Navier-Stokes equations and convergence results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emonot, P.

    1992-01-01

    In the first chapter are described the equations modeling incompressible fluid flow and a quick presentation of finite volumes method. The second chapter is an introduction to the finite elements volumes method. The box model is described and a method adapted to Navier-Stokes problems is proposed. The third chapter shows a fault analysis of the finite elements volumes method for the Laplacian problem and some examples in one, two, three dimensional calculations. The fourth chapter is an extension of the error analysis of the method for the Navier-Stokes problem

  12. Selenopeptides and elemental selenium in Thunbergia alata after exposure to selenite: quantification method for elemental selenium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aborode, Fatai Adigun; Raab, Andrea; Foster, Simon; Lombi, Enzo; Maher, William; Krupp, Eva M; Feldmann, Joerg

    2015-07-01

    Three month old Thunbergia alata were exposed for 13 days to 10 μM selenite to determine the biotransformation of selenite in their roots. Selenium in formic acid extracts (80 ± 3%) was present as selenopeptides with Se-S bonds and selenium-PC complexes (selenocysteinyl-2-3-dihydroxypropionyl-glutathione, seleno-phytochelatin2, seleno-di-glutathione). An analytical method using HPLC-ICPMS to detect and quantify elemental selenium in roots of T. alata plants using sodium sulfite to quantitatively transform elemental selenium to selenosulfate was also developed. Elemental selenium was determined as 18 ± 4% of the total selenium in the roots which was equivalent to the selenium not extracted using formic acid extraction. The results are in an agreement with the XAS measurements of the exposed roots which showed no occurrence of selenite or selenate but a mixture of selenocysteine and elemental selenium.

  13. Scalable fast multipole methods for vortex element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Qi

    2012-11-01

    We use a particle-based method to simulate incompressible flows, where the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) is used to accelerate the calculation of particle interactions. The most time-consuming kernelsâ\\'the Biot-Savart equation and stretching term of the vorticity equationâ\\'are mathematically reformulated so that only two Laplace scalar potentials are used instead of six, while automatically ensuring divergence-free far-field computation. Based on this formulation, and on our previous work for a scalar heterogeneous FMM algorithm, we develop a new FMM-based vortex method capable of simulating general flows including turbulence on heterogeneous architectures, which distributes the work between multi-core CPUs and GPUs to best utilize the hardware resources and achieve excellent scalability. The algorithm also uses new data structures which can dynamically manage inter-node communication and load balance efficiently but with only a small parallel construction overhead. This algorithm can scale to large-sized clusters showing both strong and weak scalability. Careful error and timing trade-off analysis are also performed for the cutoff functions induced by the vortex particle method. Our implementation can perform one time step of the velocity+stretching for one billion particles on 32 nodes in 55.9 seconds, which yields 49.12 Tflop/s. © 2012 IEEE.

  14. Finite element approximation to a model problem of transonic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tangmanee, S.

    1986-12-01

    A model problem of transonic flow ''the Tricomi equation'' in Ω is contained in IR 2 bounded by the rectangular-curve boundary is posed in the form of symmetric positive differential equations. The finite element method is then applied. When the triangulation of Ω-bar is made of quadrilaterals and the approximation space is the Lagrange polynomial, we get the error estimates. 14 refs, 1 fig

  15. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandrou, Constantia [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus). Computational-based Science and Technology Research Center; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Jansen, Karl [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Renner, Dru B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-02-15

    We present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon three-point functions that is more versatile compared to the typically used sequential method. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated three-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal-to-noise ratio suggesting that our stochastic method can be used efficiently at large volumes to compute hadronic matrix elements.

  16. Thermohydraulic analysis in pipelines using the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, L.E.; Idelsohn, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is employed for the numerical solution of fluid flow problems with combined heat transfer mechanisms. Boussinesq approximations are used for the solution of the governing equations. The application of the FEM leads to a set of simultaneous nonlinear equations. The development of the method, for the solution of bidimensional and axisymmetric problems, is presented. Examples of fluid flow in pipes, including natural and forced convection, are solved with the proposed method and discussed in the paper. (Author) [pt

  17. A finite element method for SSI time history calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni, X.M.; Gantenbein, F.; Petit, M.

    1989-01-01

    The method which is proposed is based on a finite element modelisation for the soil and the structure and a time history calculation. It has been developed for plane and axisymmetric geometries. The principle of this method will be presented, then applications will be given, first to a linear calculation for which results will be compared to those obtained by standard methods. Then results for a non linear behavior will be described

  18. Discrete element modelling of bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyer, A.; Frey, P.

    2011-12-01

    Discrete element modelling (DEM) has been widely used in solid mechanics and in granular physics. In this type of modelling, each individual particle is taken into account and intergranular interactions are modelled with simple laws (e.g. Coulomb friction). Gravity and contact forces permit to solve the dynamical behaviour of the system. DEM is interesting to model configurations and access to parameters not directly available in laboratory experimentation, hence the term "numerical experimentations" sometimes used to describe DEM. DEM was used to model bedload transport experiments performed at the particle scale with spherical glass beads in a steep and narrow flume. Bedload is the larger material that is transported on the bed on stream channels. It has a great geomorphic impact. Physical processes ruling bedload transport and more generally coarse-particle/fluid systems are poorly known, arguably because granular interactions have been somewhat neglected. An existing DEM code (PFC3D) already computing granular interactions was used. We implemented basic hydrodynamic forces to model the fluid interactions (buoyancy, drag, lift). The idea was to use the minimum number of ingredients to match the experimental results. Experiments were performed with one-size and two-size mixtures of coarse spherical glass beads entrained by a shallow turbulent and supercritical water flow down a steep channel with a mobile bed. The particle diameters were 4 and 6mm, the channel width 6.5mm (about the same width as the coarser particles) and the channel inclination was typically 10%. The water flow rate and the particle rate were kept constant at the upstream entrance and adjusted to obtain bedload transport equilibrium. Flows were filmed from the side by a high-speed camera. Using image processing algorithms made it possible to determine the position, velocity and trajectory of both smaller and coarser particles. Modelled and experimental particle velocity and concentration depth

  19. Nuclear analytical methods for trace element studies in calcified tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, M.A.; Chaudhry, M.N.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Various nuclear analytical methods have been developed and applied to determine the elemental composition of calcified tissues (teeth and bones). Fluorine was determined by prompt gamma activation analysis through the 19 F(p,ag) 16 O reaction. Carbon was measured by activation analysis with He-3 ions, and the technique of Proton-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) was applied to simultaneously determine Ca, P, and trace elements in well-documented teeth. Dental hard tissues, enamel, dentine, cement, and their junctions, as well as different parts of the same tissue, were examined separately. Furthermore, using a Proton Microprobe, we measured the surface distribution of F and other elements on and around carious lesions on the enamel. The depth profiles of F, and other elements, were also measured right up to the amelodentin junction

  20. Randomized Oversampling for Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2016-03-23

    In this paper, we develop efficient multiscale methods for flows in heterogeneous media. We use the generalized multiscale finite element (GMsFEM) framework. GMsFEM approximates the solution space locally using a few multiscale basis functions. This approximation selects an appropriate snapshot space and a local spectral decomposition, e.g., the use of oversampled regions, in order to achieve an efficient model reduction. However, the successful construction of snapshot spaces may be costly if too many local problems need to be solved in order to obtain these spaces. We use a moderate quantity of local solutions (or snapshot vectors) with random boundary conditions on oversampled regions with zero forcing to deliver an efficient methodology. Motivated by the randomized algorithm presented in [P. G. Martinsson, V. Rokhlin, and M. Tygert, A Randomized Algorithm for the approximation of Matrices, YALEU/DCS/TR-1361, Yale University, 2006], we consider a snapshot space which consists of harmonic extensions of random boundary conditions defined in a domain larger than the target region. Furthermore, we perform an eigenvalue decomposition in this small space. We study the application of randomized sampling for GMsFEM in conjunction with adaptivity, where local multiscale spaces are adaptively enriched. Convergence analysis is provided. We present representative numerical results to validate the method proposed.

  1. Matlab and C programming for Trefftz finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Qing-Hua

    2008-01-01

    Although the Trefftz finite element method (FEM) has become a powerful computational tool in the analysis of plane elasticity, thin and thick plate bending, Poisson's equation, heat conduction, and piezoelectric materials, there are few books that offer a comprehensive computer programming treatment of the subject. Collecting results scattered in the literature, MATLAB® and C Programming for Trefftz Finite Element Methods provides the detailed MATLAB® and C programming processes in applications of the Trefftz FEM to potential and elastic problems. The book begins with an introduction to th

  2. Design of horizontal-axis wind turbine using blade element momentum method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonea, Andreea; Pricop, Mihai Victor

    2013-10-01

    The study of mathematical models applied to wind turbine design in recent years, principally in electrical energy generation, has become significant due to the increasing use of renewable energy sources with low environmental impact. Thus, this paper shows an alternative mathematical scheme for the wind turbine design, based on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) Theory. The results from the BEM method are greatly dependent on the precision of the lift and drag coefficients. The basic of BEM method assumes the blade can be analyzed as a number of independent element in spanwise direction. The induced velocity at each element is determined by performing the momentum balance for a control volume containing the blade element. The aerodynamic forces on the element are calculated using the lift and drag coefficient from the empirical two-dimensional wind tunnel test data at the geometric angle of attack (AOA) of the blade element relative to the local flow velocity.

  3. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  4. Two-point method uncertainty during control and measurement of cylindrical element diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhov, V. I.; Shalay, V. V.; Radev, H.

    2018-04-01

    The topic of the article is devoted to the urgent problem of the reliability of technical products geometric specifications measurements. The purpose of the article is to improve the quality of parts linear sizes control by the two-point measurement method. The article task is to investigate methodical extended uncertainties in measuring cylindrical element linear sizes. The investigation method is a geometric modeling of the element surfaces shape and location deviations in a rectangular coordinate system. The studies were carried out for elements of various service use, taking into account their informativeness, corresponding to the kinematic pairs classes in theoretical mechanics and the number of constrained degrees of freedom in the datum element function. Cylindrical elements with informativity of 4, 2, 1 and θ (zero) were investigated. The uncertainties estimation of in two-point measurements was made by comparing the results of of linear dimensions measurements with the functional diameters maximum and minimum of the element material. Methodical uncertainty is formed when cylindrical elements with maximum informativeness have shape deviations of the cut and the curvature types. Methodical uncertainty is formed by measuring the element average size for all types of shape deviations. The two-point measurement method cannot take into account the location deviations of a dimensional element, so its use for elements with informativeness less than the maximum creates unacceptable methodical uncertainties in measurements of the maximum, minimum and medium linear dimensions. Similar methodical uncertainties also exist in the arbitration control of the linear dimensions of the cylindrical elements by limiting two-point gauges.

  5. Some properties for modeling of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    Two areas key to the materials modeling of fuel element behavior are discussed. The relative importance of atomic diffusion vs. bubble migration is first surveyed and the interplay of bubble mobility and re-solution parameter is highlighted. It is concluded that biased bubble migration at higher temperatures is required to explain available gas-release data, especially during transients. At intermediate temperatures, random bubble migration is required to explain both gas-release rates and the observation of large (approx. 700A) intragranular bubbles following in-pile and post-irradiation transients. Different fuel models employ different values of re-solution parameter, both below and above an experimentally determined value. Bubble mobilities are deduced to approach theoretical, surface diffusion-controlled values during transients, but they may be somewhat less mobile during steady-state operation. Next, the present understanding of radiation-induced hardening and creep is discussed, highlighting the interplay of these two phenomena. An overall constitutive scheme is presented and predictions of failure limits are deduced therefrom employing instability analysis

  6. Finite element modelling of composite castellated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Richard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, castellated beam becomes popular in building structural as beam members. This is due to several advantages of castellated beam such as increased depth without any additional mass, passing the underfloor service ducts without changing of story elevation. However, the presence of holes can develop various local effects such as local buckling, lateral torsional buckling caused by compression force at the flange section of the steel beam. Many studies have investigated the failure mechanism of castellated beam and one technique which can prevent the beam fall into local failure is the use of reinforced concrete slab as lateral support on castellated beam, so called composite castellated beam. Besides of preventing the local failure of castellated beam, the concrete slab can increase the plasticity moment of the composite castellated beam section which can deliver into increasing the ultimate load of the beam. The aim of this numerical studies of composite castellated beam on certain loading condition (monotonic quasi-static loading. ABAQUS was used for finite element modelling purpose and compared with the experimental test for checking the reliability of the model. The result shows that the ultimate load of the composite castellated beam reached 6.24 times than the ultimate load of the solid I beam and 1.2 times compared the composite beam.

  7. Stress and Deformation Analysis in Base Isolation Elements Using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Iavornic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Modern tools as Finite Element Method can be used to study the behavior of elastomeric isolation systems. The simulation results obtained in this way provide a large series of data about the behavior of elastomeric isolation bearings under different types of loads and help in taking right decisions regarding geometrical optimizations needed for improve such kind of devices.

  8. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite element method that reduces to cell-centered finite differences on irregular grids. The subdomain grids do not have to match across the interfaces. Continuity of flux between coarse elements is imposed via a mortar finite element space on a coarse grid scale. With an appropriate choice of polynomial degree of the mortar space, we derive optimal order convergence on the fine scale for both the multiscale pressure and velocity, as well as the coarse scale mortar pressure. Some superconvergence results are also derived. The algebraic system is reduced via a non-overlapping domain decomposition to a coarse scale mortar interface problem that is solved using a multiscale flux basis. Numerical experiments are presented to confirm the theory and illustrate the efficiency and flexibility of the method. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  9. A mechanical-electrical finite element method model for predicting contact resistance between bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Xinmin; Liu, Dong' an; Peng, Linfa [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ni, Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

    2008-07-15

    Contact resistance between the bipolar plate (BPP) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays a significant role on the power loss in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. There are two types of contact behavior at the interface of the BPP and GDL, which are the mechanical one and the electrical one. Furthermore, the electrical contact behavior is dependent on the mechanical one. Thus, prediction of the contact resistance is a coupled mechanical-electrical problem. The current FEM models for contact resistance estimation can only simulate the mechanical contact behavior and moreover they are based on the assumption that the contact surface is equipotential, which is not the case in a real BPP/GDL assembly due to the round corner and margin of the BPP. In this study, a mechanical-electrical FEM model was developed to predict the contact resistance between the BPP and GDL based on the experimental interfacial contact resistivity. At first, the interfacial contact resistivity was obtained by experimentally measuring the contact resistance between the GDL and a flat graphite plate of the same material and processing conditions as the BPP. Then, with the interfacial contact resistivity, the mechanical and electrical contact behaviors were defined and the potential distribution of the BPP/GDL assembly was analyzed using the mechanical-electrical FEM model. At last, the contact resistance was calculated according to the potential drop and the current of the contact surface. The numerical results were validated by comparing with those of the model reported previously. The influence of the round corner of the BPP on the contact resistance was also studied and it is found that there exists an optimal round corner that can minimize the contact resistance. This model is beneficial in understanding the mechanical and electrical contact behaviors between the BPP and GDL, and can be used to predict the contact resistance in a new BPP/GDL assembly. (author)

  10. A holistic 3D finite element simulation model for thermoelectric power generator element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guangxi; Yu, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a holistic simulation model for the thermoelectric energy harvester. • Account for delta Seebeck coefficient and carrier charge densities variations. • Solution of thermo-electric coupling problem with finite element method. • Model capable of predicting phenomena not captured by traditional models. • A simulation tool for design of innovative TEM materials and structures. - Abstract: Harvesting the thermal energy stored in the ambient environment provides a potential sustainable energy source. Thermoelectric power generators have advantages of having no moving parts, being durable, and light-weighted. These unique features are advantageous for many applications (i.e., carry-on medical devices, embedded infrastructure sensors, aerospace, transportation, etc.). To ensure the efficient applications of thermoelectric energy harvesting system, the behaviors of such systems need to be fully understood. Finite element simulations provide important tools for such purpose. Although modeling the performance of thermoelectric modules has been conducted by many researchers, due to the complexity in solving the coupled problem, the influences of the effective Seebeck coefficient and carrier density variations on the performance of thermoelectric system are generally neglected. This results in an overestimation of the power generator performance under strong-ionization temperature region. This paper presents an advanced simulation model for thermoelectric elements that considers the effects of both factors. The mathematical basis of this model is firstly presented. Finite element simulations are then implemented on a thermoelectric power generator unit. The characteristics of the thermoelectric power generator and their relationship to its performance are discussed under different working temperature regions. The internal physics processes of the TEM harvester are analyzed from the results of computational simulations. The new model

  11. A particle finite element method for machining simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Matthias; Sator, Christian; Müller, Ralf

    2014-07-01

    The particle finite element method (PFEM) appears to be a convenient technique for machining simulations, since the geometry and topology of the problem can undergo severe changes. In this work, a short outline of the PFEM-algorithm is given, which is followed by a detailed description of the involved operations. The -shape method, which is used to track the topology, is explained and tested by a simple example. Also the kinematics and a suitable finite element formulation are introduced. To validate the method simple settings without topological changes are considered and compared to the standard finite element method for large deformations. To examine the performance of the method, when dealing with separating material, a tensile loading is applied to a notched plate. This investigation includes a numerical analysis of the different meshing parameters, and the numerical convergence is studied. With regard to the cutting simulation it is found that only a sufficiently large number of particles (and thus a rather fine finite element discretisation) leads to converged results of process parameters, such as the cutting force.

  12. PHARMACOPOEIA METHODS FOR ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS OF MEDICINES: A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana M. Derkach

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of quality assurance of medicinal products, namely the determination of elemental impurity concentration compared to permitted daily exposures for and the correct choice analytical methods that are adequate to the formulated tasks. The paper goal is to compare characteristics of four analytical methods recommended by the Pharmacopoeia of various countries to control the content of elemental impurities in medicines, including medicinal plant raw materials and herbal medicines. Both advantages and disadvantages were described for atomic absorption spectroscopy with various atomising techniques, as well as atomic emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma. The choice of the most rational analysis method depends on a research task and is reasoned from the viewpoint of analytical objectives, possible complications, performance attributes, and economic considerations. The methods of ICP-MS and GFAAS were shown to provide the greatest potential for determining the low and ultra-low concentrations of chemical elements in medicinal plants and herbal medicinal products. The other two methods, FAAS and ICP-AES, are limited to the analysis of the main essential elements and the largest impurities. The ICP-MS is the most efficient method for determining ultra-low concentrations. However, the interference of mass peaks is typical for ICP-MS. It is formed not only by impurities but also by polyatomic ions with the participation of argon, as well as atoms of gases from the air (C, N and O or matrices (O, N, H, P, S and Cl. Therefore, a correct sample preparation, which guarantees minimisation of impurity contamination and loss of analytes becomes the most crucial stage of analytical applications of ICP-MS. The detections limits for some chemical elements, which content is regulated in modern Pharmacopoeia, were estimated for each method and analysis conditions of medicinal plant raw

  13. Ethnomathematics elements in Batik Bali using backpropagation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestari, Mei; Irawan, Ari; Rahayu, Wanti; Wayan Parwati, Ni

    2018-05-01

    Batik is one of traditional arts that has been established by the UNESCO as Indonesia’s cultural heritage. Batik has varieties and motifs, and each motifs has its own uniqueness but seems similar, that makes it difficult to identify. This study aims to develop an application that can identify typical batik Bali with etnomatematics elements on it. Etnomatematics is a study that shows relation between culture and mathematics concepts. Etnomatematics in Batik Bali is more to geometrical concept in line of strong Balinese culture element. The identification process is use backpropagation method. Steps of backpropagation methods are image processing (including scalling and tresholding image process). Next step is insert the processed image to an artificial neural network. This study resulted an accuracy of identification of batik Bali that has Etnomatematics elements on it.

  14. Finite element method for one-dimensional rill erosion simulation on a curved slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rill erosion models are important to hillslope soil erosion prediction and to land use planning. The development of rill erosion models and their use has become increasingly of great concern. The purpose of this research was to develop mathematic models with computer simulation procedures to simulate and predict rill erosion. The finite element method is known as an efficient tool in many other applications than in rill soil erosion. In this study, the hydrodynamic and sediment continuity model equations for a rill erosion system were solved by the Galerkin finite element method and Visual C++ procedures. The simulated results are compared with the data for spatially and temporally measured processes for rill erosion under different conditions. The results indicate that the one-dimensional linear finite element method produced excellent predictions of rill erosion processes. Therefore, this study supplies a tool for further development of a dynamic soil erosion prediction model.

  15. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This

  16. Hermitian Mindlin Plate Wavelet Finite Element Method for Load Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new Hermitian Mindlin plate wavelet element is proposed. The two-dimensional Hermitian cubic spline interpolation wavelet is substituted into finite element functions to construct frequency response function (FRF. It uses a system’s FRF and response spectrums to calculate load spectrums and then derives loads in the time domain via the inverse fast Fourier transform. By simulating different excitation cases, Hermitian cubic spline wavelets on the interval (HCSWI finite elements are used to reverse load identification in the Mindlin plate. The singular value decomposition (SVD method is adopted to solve the ill-posed inverse problem. Compared with ANSYS results, HCSWI Mindlin plate element can accurately identify the applied load. Numerical results show that the algorithm of HCSWI Mindlin plate element is effective. The accuracy of HCSWI can be verified by comparing the FRF of HCSWI and ANSYS elements with the experiment data. The experiment proves that the load identification of HCSWI Mindlin plate is effective and precise by using the FRF and response spectrums to calculate the loads.

  17. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with $t\\bar{t}$ and decaying into $b\\bar{b}$ at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV with the ATLAS detector using the Matrix Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)683657; Quadt, Arnulf; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Kröninger, Kevin

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a pair of top quarks ($t\\bar{t}H$) is presented. The analysis uses 20.3 fb$^{−1}$ of $pp$ collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2012. The search is designed for the $H \\to b\\bar{b}$ decay mode and is performed in the single lepton (electrons or muons) decay channel of the top quark pair. In order to improve the sensitivity of the search, events are categorised according to their jet and $b$-tagged jet multiplicities into nine different analysis regions. A matrix element method is developed and applied to regions with six jets to obtain discriminants separating $t\\bar{t}H$ events from the irreducible $t\\bar{t} + b\\bar{b}$ background. In signal-enriched regions, a neural network is employed combining kinematic variables and variables obtained from the matrix element method to maximise the separation between signal and background events. The nine analysis regions are st...

  18. Local Refinement of the Super Element Model of Oil Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Mazo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a two-stage method for petroleum reservoir simulation. The method uses two models with different degrees of detailing to describe hydrodynamic processes of different space-time scales. At the first stage, the global dynamics of the energy state of the deposit and reserves is modeled (characteristic scale of such changes is km / year. The two-phase flow equations in the model of global dynamics operate with smooth averaged pressure and saturation fields, and they are solved numerically on a large computational grid of super-elements with a characteristic cell size of 200-500 m. The tensor coefficients of the super-element model are calculated using special procedures of upscaling of absolute and relative phase permeabilities. At the second stage, a local refinement of the super-element model is constructed for calculating small-scale processes (with a scale of m / day, which take place, for example, during various geological and technical measures aimed at increasing the oil recovery of a reservoir. Then we solve the two-phase flow problem in the selected area of the measure exposure on a detailed three-dimensional grid, which resolves the geological structure of the reservoir, and with a time step sufficient for describing fast-flowing processes. The initial and boundary conditions of the local problem are formulated on the basis of the super-element solution. This approach allows us to reduce the computational costs in order to solve the problems of designing and monitoring the oil reservoir. To demonstrate the proposed approach, we give an example of the two-stage modeling of the development of a layered reservoir with a local refinement of the model during the isolation of a water-saturated high-permeability interlayer. We show a good compliance between the locally refined solution of the super-element model in the area of measure exposure and the results of numerical modeling of the whole history of reservoir

  19. Piezoelectric Accelerometers Modification Based on the Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bin; Kriegbaum, B.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the modification of piezoelectric accelerometers using a Finite Element (FE) method. Brüel & Kjær Accelerometer Type 8325 is chosen as an example to illustrate the advanced accelerometer development procedure. The deviation between the measurement and FE simulation results...

  20. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-03-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  1. Possibilities of Particle Finite Element Methods in Industrial Forming Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J.; Cante, J. C.; Weyler, R.; Hernandez, J.

    2007-04-01

    The work investigates the possibilities offered by the particle finite element method (PFEM) in the simulation of forming problems involving large deformations, multiple contacts, and new boundaries generation. The description of the most distinguishing aspects of the PFEM, and its application to simulation of representative forming processes, illustrate the proposed methodology.

  2. Method to fabricate block fuel elements for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovat, M.; Rachor, L.

    1977-01-01

    The fabrication of block fuel elements for gas-cooled high temperature reactors can be improved upon by adding 0.2 to 2 wt.% of a hydrocarbon compound to the lubricating mixture prior to pressing. Hexanol or octanol are named as substances. The dimensional accuracy of the block is thus improved. 2 examples illustrate the method. (RW) [de

  3. Nonconforming h-p spectral element methods for elliptic problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In [6,7,13,14] h-p spectral element methods for solving elliptic boundary value problems on polygonal ... Let M denote the number of corner layers and W denote the number of degrees of .... β is given by Theorem 2.2 of [3] which can be stated.

  4. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in Lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-01-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  5. Three-dimensional wake field analysis by boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, K.

    1987-01-01

    A computer code HERTPIA was developed for the calculation of electromagnetic wake fields excited by charged particles travelling through arbitrarily shaped accelerating cavities. This code solves transient wave problems for a Hertz vector. The numerical analysis is based on the boundary element method. This program is validated by comparing its results with analytical solutions in a pill-box cavity

  6. Deflation in preconditioned conjugate gradient methods for Finite Element Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermolen, F.J.; Vuik, C.; Segal, A.

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the value of deflation vectors at interfaces on the rate of convergence of preconditioned conjugate gradient methods applied to a Finite Element discretization for an elliptic equation. Our set-up is a Poisson problem in two dimensions with continuous or discontinuous

  7. Method to fabricate block fuel elements for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrovat, M.; Rachor, L.

    1978-01-01

    The fabrication of block fuel elements for gas-cooled high temperature reactors can be improved upon by adding 0.2 to 2 wt.% of a hydrocarbon compound to the lubricating mixture prior to pressing. Hexanol or octanol are named as substances. The dimensional accuracy of the block is thus improved. 2 examples illustrate the method. (orig./PW)

  8. Discrete element weld model, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, C.; Samonds, M.; Singhal, A. K.

    1987-01-01

    A numerical method was developed for analyzing the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process. The phenomena being modeled include melting under the arc and the flow in the melt under the action of buoyancy, surface tension, and electromagnetic forces. The latter entails the calculation of the electric potential and the computation of electric current and magnetic field therefrom. Melting may occur at a single temperature or over a temperature range, and the electrical and thermal conductivities can be a function of temperature. Results of sample calculations are presented and discussed at length. A major research contribution has been the development of numerical methodology for the calculation of phase change problems in a fixed grid framework. The model has been implemented on CHAM's general purpose computer code PHOENICS. The inputs to the computer model include: geometric parameters, material properties, and weld process parameters.

  9. Counting addressing method: Command addressable element and extinguishing module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Jovan D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific requirements that appear in addressable fire detection and alarm systems and the shortcomings of the existing addressing methods were discussed. A new method of addressing of detectors was proposed. The basic principles of addressing and responding of a called element are stated. Extinguishing module is specific subsystem in classic fire detection and alarm systems. Appearing of addressable fire detection and alarm systems didn't caused essential change in the concept of extinguishing module because of long calling period of such systems. Addressable fire security system based on counting addressing method reaches high calling rates and enables integrating of the extinguishing module in addressable system. Solutions for command addressable element and integrated extinguishing module are given in this paper. The counting addressing method was developed for specific requirements in fire detection and alarm systems, yet its speed and reliability justifies its use in the acquisition of data on slowly variable parameters under industrial conditions. .

  10. Finite-element modeling and micromagnetic modeling of perpendicular writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Olle; Bozeman, Steven P.

    2006-04-01

    We compare finite-element modeling (FEM) and fully micromagnetic modeling results of four prototypical writers for perpendicular recording. In general, the agreement between the two models is quite good in the vicinity of saturated or near-saturated magnetic material, such as the pole tip, for quantities such as the magnetic field, the gradient of the magnetic field and the write width. However, in the vicinity of magnetic material far from saturation, e.g., return pole or trailing edge write shield, there can be large qualitative and quantitative differences.

  11. Analysis of Tire Tractive Performance on Deformable Terrain by Finite Element-Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Takatsu, Yuzuru

    The goal of this study is to develop a practical and fast simulation tool for soil-tire interaction analysis, where finite element method (FEM) and discrete element method (DEM) are coupled together, and which can be realized on a desktop PC. We have extended our formerly proposed dynamic FE-DE method (FE-DEM) to include practical soil-tire system interaction, where not only the vertical sinkage of a tire, but also the travel of a driven tire was considered. Numerical simulation by FE-DEM is stable, and the relationships between variables, such as load-sinkage and sinkage-travel distance, and the gross tractive effort and running resistance characteristics, are obtained. Moreover, the simulation result is accurate enough to predict the maximum drawbar pull for a given tire, once the appropriate parameter values are provided. Therefore, the developed FE-DEM program can be applied with sufficient accuracy to interaction problems in soil-tire systems.

  12. Stochastic Finite Element Analysis of Non-Linear Structures Modelled by Plasticity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2003-01-01

    A Finite Element Reliability Method (FERM) is introduced to perform reliability analyses on two-dimensional structures in plane stress, modeled by non-linear plasticity theory. FERM is a coupling between the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM). FERM can be us...

  13. Modelling drawbeads with finite elements and verification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleer, B.D.; Carleer, B.D.; Vreede, P.T.; Vreede, P.T.; Louwes, M.F.M.; Louwes, M.F.M.; Huetink, Han

    1994-01-01

    Drawbeads are commonly used in deep drawing processes to control the flow of the blank during the forming operation. In finite element simulations of deep drawing the drawbead geometries are seldom included because of the small radii; because of these small radii a very large number of elements is

  14. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-02-01

    We present a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method to solve conservation laws. The Galerkin approximation is stabilized by only residual based artificial viscosity, without any least-squares, SUPG, or streamline diffusion terms. We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A code for obtaining temperature distribution by finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, M.

    1984-01-01

    The ELEFIB Fortran language computer code using finite element method for calculating temperature distribution of linear and two dimensional problems, in permanent region or in the transient phase of heat transfer, is presented. The formulation of equations uses the Galerkin method. Some examples are shown and the results are compared with other papers. The comparative evaluation shows that the elaborated code gives good values. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Finite element modeling of ultrasonic inspection of weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, B.R.; Adler, L.; Oliver, B.F.; Pickard, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    High performance weldments for critical service applications require 100% inspection. Balanced against the adaptability of the ultrasonic method for automated inspection are the difficulties encountered with nonhomogeneous and anisotropic materials. This research utilizes crystals and bicrystals of nickel to model austenitic weld metal, where the anisotropy produces scattering and mode conversion, making detection and measurement of actual defects difficult. Well characterized samples of Ni are produced in a levitation zone melting facility. Crystals in excess of 25 mm diameter and length are large enough to permit ultrasonic measurements of attenuation, wave speed, and spectral content. At the same time, the experiments are duplicated as finite element models for comparison purposes

  17. A finite element model for the quench front evolution problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folescu, J.; Galeao, A.C.N.R.; Carmo, E.G.D. do.

    1985-01-01

    A model for the rewetting problem associated with the loss of coolant accident in a PWR reactor is proposed. A variational formulation for the time-dependent heat conduction problem on fuel rod cladding is used, and appropriate boundary conditions are assumed in order to simulate the thermal interaction between the fuel rod cladding and the fluid. A numerical procedure which uses the finite element method for the spatial discretization and a Crank-Nicolson-like method for the step-by-step integration is developed. Some numerical results are presented showing the quench front evolution and its stationary profile. (Author) [pt

  18. Determination of heterogeneous medium parameters by single fuel element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veloso, M.A.F.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron pulse propagation technique was employed to study an heterogeneous system consisting of a single fuel element placed at the symmetry axis of a large cylindrical D 2 O tank. The response of system for the pulse propagation technique is related to the inverse complex relaxation length of the neutron waves also known as the system dispersion law ρ (ω). Experimental values of ρ (ω) were compared with the ones derived from Fermi age - Diffusion theory. The main purpose of the experiment was to obtain the Feinberg-Galanin thermal constant (γ), which is the logaritmic derivative of the neutron flux at the fuel-moderator interface and a such a main input data for heterogeneous reactor theory calculations. The γ thermal constant was determined as the number giving the best agreement between the theoretical and experimental values of ρ (ω). The simultaneous determination of two among four parameters η,ρ,τ and L s is possible through the intersection of dispersion laws of the pure moderator system and the fuel moderator system. The parameters τ and η were termined by this method. It was shown that the thermal constant γ and the product η ρ can be computed from the real and imaginary parts of the fuel-moderator dispersion law. The results for this evaluation scheme showns a not stable behavior of γ as a function of frequency, a result not foreseen by the theoretical model. (Author) [pt

  19. Finite element analysis of CFRP reinforced silo structure design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Long; Xu, Xinsheng

    2017-11-01

    Because of poor construction, there is a serious problem of concrete quality in the silo project, which seriously affects the safe use of the structure. Concrete quality problems are mainly seen in three aspects: concrete strength cannot meet the design requirements, concrete cracking phenomenon is serious, and the unreasonable concrete vibration leads to a lot of honeycombs and surface voids. Silos are usually reinforced by carbon fiber cloth in order to ensure the safe use of silos. By the example of an alumina silo in a fly ash plant in Binzhou, Shandong Province, the alumina silo project was tested and examined on site. According to filed test results, the actual concrete strength was determined, and the damage causes of the silo was analysed. Then, a finite element analysis model of this silo was established, the CFRP cloth reinforcement method was adopted to strengthen the silo, and other technology like additional reinforcement, rebar planting, carbon fiber bonding technology was also expounded. The research of this paper is of great significance to the design and construction of silo structure.

  20. Analysis of gear reducer housing using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklos, I. Zs; Miklos, C. C.; Alic, C. I.; Raţiu, S.

    2018-01-01

    The housing is an important component in the construction of gear reducers, having the role of fixing the relative position of the shafts and toothed wheels. At the same time, the housing takes over, via the bearings, the shaft loads resulting when the toothed wheel is engaging another toothed mechanism (i.e. power transmission through belts or chains), and conveys them to the foundation on which it is anchored. In this regard, in order to ensure the most accurate gearing, a high stiffness of the housing is required. In this paper, we present the computer-aided 3D modelling of the housing (in cast version) of a single stage cylindrical gear reducer, using the Autodesk Inventor Professional software, on the principle of constructive sizing. For the housing resistance calculation, we carried out an analysis using the Autodesk Simulation Mechanical software to apply the finite element method, based on the actual loads, as well as a comparative study of the stress and strain distribution, for several tightening values of the retaining bolts that secure the cover and the foundation housing.

  1. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.; Dean, D.J.; Langanke, K.

    1997-01-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; the resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo (SMMC) methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, the thermal and rotational behavior of rare-earth and γ-soft nuclei, and the calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. (orig.)

  2. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koonin, S.E.

    1996-01-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of γ-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs

  3. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Gary A., E-mail: ghuber@ucsd.edu; Miao, Yinglong [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Zhou, Shenggao [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Suzhou, 215006 Jiangsu (China); Li, Bo [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  4. On the finite element modeling of the asymmetric cracked rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Shudeifat, Mohammad A.

    2013-05-01

    The advanced phase of the breathing crack in the heavy duty horizontal rotor system is expected to be dominated by the open crack state rather than the breathing state after a short period of operation. The reason for this scenario is the expected plastic deformation in crack location due to a large compression stress field appears during the continuous shaft rotation. Based on that, the finite element modeling of a cracked rotor system with a transverse open crack is addressed here. The cracked rotor with the open crack model behaves as an asymmetric shaft due to the presence of the transverse edge crack. Hence, the time-varying area moments of inertia of the cracked section are employed in formulating the periodic finite element stiffness matrix which yields a linear time-periodic system. The harmonic balance method (HB) is used for solving the finite element (FE) equations of motion for studying the dynamic behavior of the system. The behavior of the whirl orbits during the passage through the subcritical rotational speeds of the open crack model is compared to that for the breathing crack model. The presence of the open crack with the unbalance force was found only to excite the 1/2 and 1/3 of the backward critical whirling speed. The whirl orbits in the neighborhood of these subcritical speeds were found to have nearly similar behavior for both open and breathing crack models. While unlike the breathing crack model, the subcritical forward whirling speeds have not been observed for the open crack model in the response to the unbalance force. As a result, the behavior of the whirl orbits during the passage through the forward subcritical rotational speeds is found to be enough to distinguish the breathing crack from the open crack model. These whirl orbits with inner loops that appear in the neighborhood of the forward subcritical speeds are then a unique property for the breathing crack model.

  5. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms of accu...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  6. Electromagnetic modeling method for eddy current signal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D. H.; Jung, H. K.; Cheong, Y. M.; Lee, Y. S.; Huh, H.; Yang, D. J.

    2004-10-01

    An electromagnetic modeling method for eddy current signal analysis is necessary before an experiment is performed. Electromagnetic modeling methods consists of the analytical method and the numerical method. Also, the numerical methods can be divided by Finite Element Method(FEM), Boundary Element Method(BEM) and Volume Integral Method(VIM). Each modeling method has some merits and demerits. Therefore, the suitable modeling method can be chosen by considering the characteristics of each modeling. This report explains the principle and application of each modeling method and shows the comparison modeling programs

  7. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  8. Finite cover method with mortar elements for elastoplasticity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurumatani, M.; Terada, K.

    2005-06-01

    Finite cover method (FCM) is extended to elastoplasticity problems. The FCM, which was originally developed under the name of manifold method, has recently been recognized as one of the generalized versions of finite element methods (FEM). Since the mesh for the FCM can be regular and squared regardless of the geometry of structures to be analyzed, structural analysts are released from a burdensome task of generating meshes conforming to physical boundaries. Numerical experiments are carried out to assess the performance of the FCM with such discretization in elastoplasticity problems. Particularly to achieve this accurately, the so-called mortar elements are introduced to impose displacement boundary conditions on the essential boundaries, and displacement compatibility conditions on material interfaces of two-phase materials or on joint surfaces between mutually incompatible meshes. The validity of the mortar approximation is also demonstrated in the elastic-plastic FCM.

  9. Nonlinear dynamic analysis using Petrov-Galerkin natural element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Cho, Jin Rae

    2004-01-01

    According to our previous study, it is confirmed that the Petrov-Galerkin Natural Element Method (PG-NEM) completely resolves the numerical integration inaccuracy in the conventional Bubnov-Galerkin Natural Element Method (BG-NEM). This paper is an extension of PG-NEM to two-dimensional nonlinear dynamic problem. For the analysis, a constant average acceleration method and a linearized total Lagrangian formulation is introduced with the PG-NEM. At every time step, the grid points are updated and the shape functions are reproduced from the relocated nodal distribution. This process enables the PG-NEM to provide more accurate and robust approximations. The representative numerical experiments performed by the test Fortran program, and the numerical results confirmed that the PG-NEM effectively and accurately approximates the nonlinear dynamic problem

  10. Simulation of three-dimensional, time-dependent, incompressible flows by a finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.T.; Gresho, P.M.; Lee, R.L.; Upson, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element model has been developed for simulating the dynamics of problems encountered in atmospheric pollution and safety assessment studies. The model is based on solving the set of three-dimensional, time-dependent, conservation equations governing incompressible flows. Spatial discretization is performed via a modified Galerkin finite element method, and time integration is carried out via the forward Euler method (pressure is computed implicitly, however). Several cost-effective techniques (including subcycling, mass lumping, and reduced Gauss-Legendre quadrature) which have been implemented are discussed. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the model

  11. Modelling of Rotational Capacity in Reinforced Linear Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Lars; Hagsten, Lars German; Fisker, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    on the rotational capacity of the plastic hinges. The documentation of ductility can be a difficult task as modelling of rotational capacity in plastic hinges of frames is not fully developed. On the basis of the Theory of Plasticity a model is developed to determine rotational capacity in plastic hinges in linear......The Capacity Design Method forms the basis of several seismic design codes. This design philosophy allows plastic deformations in order to decrease seismic demands in structures. However, these plastic deformations must be localized in certain zones where ductility requirements can be documented...... reinforced concrete elements. The model is taking several important parameters into account. Empirical values is avoided which is considered an advantage compared to previous models. Furthermore, the model includes force variations in the reinforcement due to moment distributions and shear as well...

  12. Quantitative Modelling of Trace Elements in Hard Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliński, Adam; Howaniec, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The significance of coal in the world economy remains unquestionable for decades. It is also expected to be the dominant fossil fuel in the foreseeable future. The increased awareness of sustainable development reflected in the relevant regulations implies, however, the need for the development and implementation of clean coal technologies on the one hand, and adequate analytical tools on the other. The paper presents the application of the quantitative Partial Least Squares method in modeling the concentrations of trace elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, V and Zn) in hard coal based on the physical and chemical parameters of coal, and coal ash components. The study was focused on trace elements potentially hazardous to the environment when emitted from coal processing systems. The studied data included 24 parameters determined for 132 coal samples provided by 17 coal mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland. Since the data set contained outliers, the construction of robust Partial Least Squares models for contaminated data set and the correct identification of outlying objects based on the robust scales were required. These enabled the development of the correct Partial Least Squares models, characterized by good fit and prediction abilities. The root mean square error was below 10% for all except for one the final Partial Least Squares models constructed, and the prediction error (root mean square error of cross-validation) exceeded 10% only for three models constructed. The study is of both cognitive and applicative importance. It presents the unique application of the chemometric methods of data exploration in modeling the content of trace elements in coal. In this way it contributes to the development of useful tools of coal quality assessment.

  13. A simple nodal force distribution method in refined finite element meshes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jai Hak [Chungbuk National University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyu In [Gentec Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    In finite element analyses, mesh refinement is frequently performed to obtain accurate stress or strain values or to accurately define the geometry. After mesh refinement, equivalent nodal forces should be calculated at the nodes in the refined mesh. If field variables and material properties are available at the integration points in each element, then the accurate equivalent nodal forces can be calculated using an adequate numerical integration. However, in certain circumstances, equivalent nodal forces cannot be calculated because field variable data are not available. In this study, a very simple nodal force distribution method was proposed. Nodal forces of the original finite element mesh are distributed to the nodes of refined meshes to satisfy the equilibrium conditions. The effect of element size should also be considered in determining the magnitude of the distributing nodal forces. A program was developed based on the proposed method, and several example problems were solved to verify the accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method. From the results, accurate stress field can be recognized to be obtained from refined meshes using the proposed nodal force distribution method. In example problems, the difference between the obtained maximum stress and target stress value was less than 6 % in models with 8-node hexahedral elements and less than 1 % in models with 20-node hexahedral elements or 10-node tetrahedral elements.

  14. Application of finite-element method to three-dimensional nuclear reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, K.Y.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the finite element method to solve a realistic one-or-two energy group, multiregion, three-dimensional static neutron diffusion problem is studied. Linear, quadratic, and cubic serendipity box-shape elements are used. The resulting sets of simultaneous algebraic equations with thousands of unknowns are solved by the conjugate gradient method, without forming the large coefficient matrix explicitly. This avoids the complicated data management schemes to store such a large coefficient matrix. Three finite-element computer programs: FEM-LINEAR, FEM-QUADRATIC and FEM-CUBIC were developed, using the linear, quadratic, and cubic box-shape elements respectively. They are self-contained, using simple nodal labeling schemes, without the need for separate finite element mesh generating routines. The efficiency and accuracy of these computer programs are then compared among themselves, and with other computer codes. The cubic element model is not recommended for practical usage because it gives almost identical results as the quadratic model, but it requires considerably longer computation time. The linear model is less accurate than the quadratic model, but it requires much shorter computation time. For a large 3-D problem, the linear model is to be preferred since it gives acceptable accuracy. The quadratic model may be used if improved accuracy is desired

  15. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit...... of the model correction factor method, is that in simpler form not using gradient information on the original limit state function or only using this information once, a drastic reduction of the number of limit state evaluation is obtained together with good approximations on the reliability. Methods...

  16. Matrix Elements in Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Guang-Zhou; LIU Wei

    2002-01-01

    In a neutron-proton system, the matrix elements of the generators for SO(8) × SO(8) symmetry areconstructed explicitly, and with these matrix elements the low-lying excitation spectra obtained by diagonalization arepresented. The excitation spectra for SO(7) nuclei Pd and Ru isotopes and SO(6) r-soft rotational nuclei Xe, Ba, andCe isotopes are calculated, and comparison with the experimental results is carried out.

  17. Matrix Elements in Fermion Dynamical Symmetry Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUGuang-Zhou; LIUWei

    2002-01-01

    In a neutron-proton system,the matrix elements of the generators for SO(8)×SO(8) symmetry are constructed exp;icitly,and with these matrix elements the low-lying excitation spsectra obtained by diagonalization are presented.The excitation spectra for SO(7) nuclei Pd and Ru isotopes and SO(6) r-soft rotational nuclei Xe,Ba,and Ce isotopes are calculated,and comparison with the experimental results is carried out.

  18. Extended finite element method and its application in heterogeneous materials with inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Chengbin; Jiang Shouyan; Ying Zongquan

    2010-01-01

    To simplify the technology of finite element mesh generation for particle reinforced material, enrichment techniques is used to account for the material interfaces in the framework of extended finite element method (XFEM). The geometry of material distribution is described by level set function, which allows one to model the internal boundaries of the microstructure without the adaptation of the mesh. The enrichment function is used to improve the shape function of classical finite element method (FEM) for the nodes supporting the elements cut by the interface. The key issue of XFEM including constructing displacement pattern, establishment of the governing equation and scheme of numerical integration is also presented. It is not necessarily matching the internal features of the inclusions using XFEM, so the generation of finite element mesh can be performed easily. Finally, a plate with multi-circular inclusions under uniaxial tension is simulated by XFEM and FEM, respectively. The results show that XFEM is highly effective and efficient.

  19. Surface photovoltage measurements and finite element modeling of SAW devices.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, Christine

    2012-03-01

    Over the course of a Summer 2011 internship with the MEMS department of Sandia National Laboratories, work was completed on two major projects. The first and main project of the summer involved taking surface photovoltage measurements for silicon samples, and using these measurements to determine surface recombination velocities and minority carrier diffusion lengths of the materials. The SPV method was used to fill gaps in the knowledge of material parameters that had not been determined successfully by other characterization methods. The second project involved creating a 2D finite element model of a surface acoustic wave device. A basic form of the model with the expected impedance response curve was completed, and the model is ready to be further developed for analysis of MEMS photonic resonator devices.

  20. Finite element method for time-space-fractional Schrodinger equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we develop a fully discrete finite element method for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS with time- and space-fractional derivatives. The time-fractional derivative is described in Caputo's sense and the space-fractional derivative in Riesz's sense. Its stability is well derived; the convergent estimate is discussed by an orthogonal operator. We also extend the method to the two-dimensional time-space-fractional NLS and to avoid the iterative solvers at each time step, a linearized scheme is further conducted. Several numerical examples are implemented finally, which confirm the theoretical results as well as illustrate the accuracy of our methods.

  1. Eddy current analysis by the finite element circuit method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameari, A.; Suzuki, Y.

    1977-01-01

    The analysis of the transient eddy current in the conductors by ''Finite Element Circuit Method'' is developed. This method can be easily applied to various geometrical shapes of thin conductors. The eddy currents on the vacuum vessel and the upper and lower support plates of JT-60 machine (which is now being constructed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) are calculated by this method. The magnetic field induced by the eddy current is estimated in the domain occupied by the plasma. And the force exerted to the vacuum vessel is also estimated

  2. Improved determination of hadron matrix elements using the variational method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragos, J.; Kamleh, W.; Leinweber, D.B.; Zanotti, J.M.; Rakow, P.E.L.; Young, R.D.; Adelaide Univ.

    2015-11-01

    The extraction of hadron form factors in lattice QCD using the standard two- and three-point correlator functions has its limitations. One of the most commonly studied sources of systematic error is excited state contamination, which occurs when correlators are contaminated with results from higher energy excitations. We apply the variational method to calculate the axial vector current g A and compare the results to the more commonly used summation and two-exponential fit methods. The results demonstrate that the variational approach offers a more efficient and robust method for the determination of nucleon matrix elements.

  3. A 3D analysis of reinforced concrete structures by the finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claure, J.D.; Campos Filho, A.

    1995-01-01

    Fundamental features of a computational model, based on the finite element methods, for the analysis of concrete structure are presented. The study comprehends short and long-term loading situations, where creep and shrinkage in concrete are considered. The reinforcement is inserted in the finite element model using an embedded model. A smeared crack model is used for the concrete cracking, which considers the contribution of concrete between cracks and allows the closing the cracks closing. The computational code MPGS (Multi-Purpose Graphic System) is used, to make easy the analysis and interpretation of the numeric results. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  4. A parallel finite element method for the analysis of crystalline solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N.J.; Andersen, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    A parallel finite element method suitable for the analysis of 3D quasi-static crystal plasticity problems has been developed. The method is based on substructuring of the original mesh into a number of substructures which are treated as isolated finite element models related via the interface...... conditions. The resulting interface equations are solved using a direct solution method. The method shows a good speedup when increasing the number of processors from 1 to 8 and the effective solution of 3D crystal plasticity problems whose size is much too large for a single work station becomes possible....

  5. Hybrid Fundamental Solution Based Finite Element Method: Theory and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on the development of hybrid fundamental solution based finite element method (HFS-FEM and its application in engineering problems is presented in this paper. The framework and formulations of HFS-FEM for potential problem, plane elasticity, three-dimensional elasticity, thermoelasticity, anisotropic elasticity, and plane piezoelectricity are presented. In this method, two independent assumed fields (intraelement filed and auxiliary frame field are employed. The formulations for all cases are derived from the modified variational functionals and the fundamental solutions to a given problem. Generation of elemental stiffness equations from the modified variational principle is also described. Typical numerical examples are given to demonstrate the validity and performance of the HFS-FEM. Finally, a brief summary of the approach is provided and future trends in this field are identified.

  6. Introduction to assembly of finite element methods on graphics processors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecka, Cristopher; Lew, Adrian; Darve, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have had great success in accelerating numerical computations. We present their application to computations on unstructured meshes such as those in finite element methods. Multiple approaches in assembling and solving sparse linear systems with NVIDIA GPUs and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) are presented and discussed. Multiple strategies for efficient use of global, shared, and local memory, methods to achieve memory coalescing, and optimal choice of parameters are introduced. We find that with appropriate preprocessing and arrangement of support data, the GPU coprocessor achieves speedups of 30x or more in comparison to a well optimized serial implementation on the CPU. We also find that the optimal assembly strategy depends on the order of polynomials used in the finite-element discretization.

  7. A collocation finite element method with prior matrix condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutcliffe, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    For thin shells with general loading, sixteen degrees of freedom have been used for a previous finite element solution procedure using a Collocation method instead of the usual variational based procedures. Although the number of elements required was relatively small, nevertheless the final matrix for the simultaneous solution of all unknowns could become large for a complex compound structure. The purpose of the present paper is to demonstrate a method of reducing the final matrix size, so allowing solution for large structures with comparatively small computer storage requirements while retaining the accuracy given by high order displacement functions. Collocation points, a number are equilibrium conditions which must be satisfied independently of the overall compatibility of forces and deflections for a complete structure. (Auth.)

  8. Assembly of finite element methods on graphics processors

    KAUST Repository

    Cecka, Cris

    2010-08-23

    Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have had great success in accelerating many numerical computations. We present their application to computations on unstructured meshes such as those in finite element methods. Multiple approaches in assembling and solving sparse linear systems with NVIDIA GPUs and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) are created and analyzed. Multiple strategies for efficient use of global, shared, and local memory, methods to achieve memory coalescing, and optimal choice of parameters are introduced. We find that with appropriate preprocessing and arrangement of support data, the GPU coprocessor using single-precision arithmetic achieves speedups of 30 or more in comparison to a well optimized double-precision single core implementation. We also find that the optimal assembly strategy depends on the order of polynomials used in the finite element discretization. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Material Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauhe, Jens Christian

    and the finite element method. The material microstructure of the heterogeneous material is non-destructively determined using X-ray microtomography. A software program has been generated which uses the X-ray tomographic data as an input for the mesh generation of the material microstructure. To obtain a proper...... which are used for the determination of the effective properties of the heterogeneous material. Generally, the properties determined using the finite element method coupled with X-ray microtomography are in good agreement with both experimentally determined properties and properties determined using......The use of cellular and composite materials have in recent years become more and more common in all kinds of structural components and accurate knowledge of the effective properties is therefore essential. In this wok the effective properties are determined using the real material microstructure...

  10. [Research Progress and Prospect of Applications of Finite Element Method in Lumbar Spine Biomechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenjun; Li, Yang; Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Based on the application of finite element analysis in spine biomechanics,the research progress of finite element method applied in lumbar spine mechanics is reviewed and the prospect is forecasted.The related works,including lumbar ontology modeling,clinical application research,and occupational injury and protection,are summarized.The main research areas of finite element method are as follows:new accurate modeling process,the optimized simulation method,diversified clinical effect evaluation,and the clinical application of artificial lumbar disc.According to the recent research progress,the application prospects of finite element method,such as automation and individuation of modeling process,evaluation and analysis of new operation methods and simulation of mechanical damage and dynamic response,are discussed.The purpose of this paper is to provide the theoretical reference and practical guidance for the clinical lumbar problems by reviewing the application of finite element method in the field of the lumbar spine biomechanics.

  11. Overlapping Schwarz for Nonlinear Problems. An Element Agglomeration Nonlinear Additive Schwarz Preconditioned Newton Method for Unstructured Finite Element Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, X C; Marcinkowski, L; Vassilevski, P S

    2005-02-10

    This paper extends previous results on nonlinear Schwarz preconditioning ([4]) to unstructured finite element elliptic problems exploiting now nonlocal (but small) subspaces. The non-local finite element subspaces are associated with subdomains obtained from a non-overlapping element partitioning of the original set of elements and are coarse outside the prescribed element subdomain. The coarsening is based on a modification of the agglomeration based AMGe method proposed in [8]. Then, the algebraic construction from [9] of the corresponding non-linear finite element subproblems is applied to generate the subspace based nonlinear preconditioner. The overall nonlinearly preconditioned problem is solved by an inexact Newton method. Numerical illustration is also provided.

  12. Elements of a collaborative systems model within the aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, Bailee R.

    2000-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to determine the components of current aerospace collaborative efforts. There were 44 participants from two selected groups surveyed for this study. Nineteen were from the Oklahoma Air National Guard based in Oklahoma City representing the aviation group. Twenty-five participants were from the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston representing the aerospace group. The surveys for the aviation group were completed in reference to planning missions necessary to their operations. The surveys for the aerospace group were completed in reference to a well-defined and focused goal from a current mission. A questionnaire was developed to survey active participants of collaborative systems in order to consider various components found within the literature. Results were analyzed and aggregated through a database along with content analysis of open-ended question comments from respondents. Findings and conclusions. This study found and determined elements of a collaborative systems model in the aerospace industry. The elements were (1) purpose or mission for the group or team; (2) commitment or dedication to the challenge; (3) group or team meetings and discussions; (4) constraints of deadlines and budgets; (5) tools and resources for project and simulations; (6) significant contributors to the collaboration; (7) decision-making formats; (8) reviews of project; (9) participants education and employment longevity; (10) cross functionality of team or group members; (11) training on the job plus teambuilding; (12) other key elements identified relevant by the respondents but not included in the model such as communication and teamwork; (13) individual and group accountability; (14) conflict, learning, and performance; along with (15) intraorganizational coordination. These elements supported and allowed multiple individuals working together to solve a common problem or to develop innovation that could not have been

  13. Adaptive mixed finite element methods for Darcy flow in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin; Salama, Amgad; Sun, Shuyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose adaptive mixed finite element methods for simulating the single-phase Darcy flow in two-dimensional fractured porous media. The reduced model that we use for the simulation is a discrete fracture model coupling Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures, and the fractures are modeled by one-dimensional entities. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are utilized for the solution of the coupled Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures. In order to improve the efficiency of the simulation, we use adaptive mixed finite element methods based on novel residual-based a posteriori error estimators. In addition, we develop an efficient upscaling algorithm to compute the effective permeability of the fractured porous media. Several interesting examples of Darcy flow in the fractured porous media are presented to demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm.

  14. Adaptive mixed finite element methods for Darcy flow in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we propose adaptive mixed finite element methods for simulating the single-phase Darcy flow in two-dimensional fractured porous media. The reduced model that we use for the simulation is a discrete fracture model coupling Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures, and the fractures are modeled by one-dimensional entities. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are utilized for the solution of the coupled Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures. In order to improve the efficiency of the simulation, we use adaptive mixed finite element methods based on novel residual-based a posteriori error estimators. In addition, we develop an efficient upscaling algorithm to compute the effective permeability of the fractured porous media. Several interesting examples of Darcy flow in the fractured porous media are presented to demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm.

  15. [Application of Finite Element Method in Thoracolumbar Spine Traumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Qiu, Yong-gui; Shao, Yu; Gu, Xiao-feng; Zeng, Ming-wei

    2015-04-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a mathematical technique using modern computer technology for stress analysis, and has been gradually used in simulating human body structures in the biomechanical field, especially more widely used in the research of thoracolumbar spine traumatology. This paper reviews the establishment of the thoracolumbar spine FEM, the verification of the FEM, and the thoracolumbar spine FEM research status in different fields, and discusses its prospects and values in forensic thoracolumbar traumatology.

  16. A finite element method for flow problems in blast loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestier, A.; Lepareux, M.

    1984-06-01

    This paper presents a numerical method which describes fast dynamic problems in flow transient situations as in nuclear plants. A finite element formulation has been chosen; it is described by a preprocessor in CASTEM system: GIBI code. For these typical flow problems, an A.L.E. formulation for physical equations is used. So, some applications are presented: the well known problem of shock tube, the same one in 2D case and a last application to hydrogen detonation

  17. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  18. Modelación por el Método de los Elementos Finitos del proceso de infiltración de líquido en material poroso. // Modelling by Finite Element Method of liquid infiltration process in porous material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García de la Figal Costales

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se modela el proceso de infiltración de un liquido en un medio sólido poroso, asumiendo un cierto patrón de los poros(tamaño, forma, % de porosidad, distribución. Se tienen en cuenta las propiedades del líquido, incluidas las propiedades detensión superficial de su superficie libre. El material poroso es hidroxiapatita, semejante al tejido trabecular de los huesos.Todo se resuelve empleando el Método de los Elementos Finitos.Palabras claves: Infiltración, modelación matemática, elemento finito, MEF.________________________________________________________________________________Abstract:The infiltration process of a liquid in a solid porous medium is modeled, assuming a certain pattern of the pores (size, forms,porosity%, distribution. The liquid properties, included the properties of superficial tension of their free surface, are considered. Theporous material is hidroxiapatita, similar to trabecular tissue of bones. Everything is solved using the Finite Elements Method (FEM.Key Words: Mathematical modelation, infiltration, bone model, FEM, hidroxiapatite.

  19. Parallel algorithms for solving the diffusion equation by finite elements methods and by nodal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulomb, F.

    1989-06-01

    The aim of this work is to study methods for solving the diffusion equation, based on a primal or mixed-dual finite elements discretization and well suited for use on multiprocessors computers; domain decomposition methods are the subject of the main part of this study, the linear systems being solved by the block-Jacobi method. The origin of the diffusion equation is explained in short, and various variational formulations are reminded. A survey of iterative methods is given. The elemination of the flux or current is treated in the case of a mixed method. Numerical tests are performed on two examples of reactors, in order to compare mixed elements and Lagrange elements. A theoretical study of domain decomposition is led in the case of Lagrange finite elements, and convergence conditions for the block-Jacobi method are derived; the dissection decomposition is previously the purpose of a particular numerical analysis. In the case of mixed-dual finite elements, a study is led on examples and is confirmed by numerical tests performed for the dissection decomposition; furthermore, after being justified, decompositions along axes of symmetry are numerically tested. In the case of a decomposition into two subdomains, the dissection decomposition and the decomposition with an integrated interface are compared. Alternative directions methods are defined; the convergence of those relative to Lagrange elements is shown; in the case of mixed elements, convergence conditions are found [fr

  20. Prediction of residual stress using explicit finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.A. Siswanto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the residual stress behaviour under various values of friction coefficients and scratching displacement amplitudes. The investigation is based on numerical solution using explicit finite element method in quasi-static condition. Two different aeroengine materials, i.e. Super CMV (Cr-Mo-V and Titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-4V, are examined. The usage of FEM analysis in plate under normal contact is validated with Hertzian theoretical solution in terms of contact pressure distributions. The residual stress distributions along with normal and shear stresses on elastic and plastic regimes of the materials are studied for a simple cylinder-on-flat contact configuration model subjected to normal loading, scratching and followed by unloading. The investigated friction coefficients are 0.3, 0.6 and 0.9, while scratching displacement amplitudes are 0.05 mm, 0.10 mm and 0.20 mm respectively. It is found that friction coefficient of 0.6 results in higher residual stress for both materials. Meanwhile, the predicted residual stress is proportional to the scratching displacement amplitude, higher displacement amplitude, resulting in higher residual stress. It is found that less residual stress is predicted on Super CMV material compared to Ti-6Al-4V material because of its high yield stress and ultimate strength. Super CMV material with friction coefficient of 0.3 and scratching displacement amplitude of 0.10 mm is recommended to be used in contact engineering applications due to its minimum possibility of fatigue.

  1. Residual-driven online generalized multiscale finite element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Eric T.

    2015-09-08

    The construction of local reduced-order models via multiscale basis functions has been an area of active research. In this paper, we propose online multiscale basis functions which are constructed using the offline space and the current residual. Online multiscale basis functions are constructed adaptively in some selected regions based on our error indicators. We derive an error estimator which shows that one needs to have an offline space with certain properties to guarantee that additional online multiscale basis function will decrease the error. This error decrease is independent of physical parameters, such as the contrast and multiple scales in the problem. The offline spaces are constructed using Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods (GMsFEM). We show that if one chooses a sufficient number of offline basis functions, one can guarantee that additional online multiscale basis functions will reduce the error independent of contrast. We note that the construction of online basis functions is motivated by the fact that the offline space construction does not take into account distant effects. Using the residual information, we can incorporate the distant information provided the offline approximation satisfies certain properties. In the paper, theoretical and numerical results are presented. Our numerical results show that if the offline space is sufficiently large (in terms of the dimension) such that the coarse space contains all multiscale spectral basis functions that correspond to small eigenvalues, then the error reduction by adding online multiscale basis function is independent of the contrast. We discuss various ways computing online multiscale basis functions which include a use of small dimensional offline spaces.

  2. Finite element and analytical models for twisted and coiled actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xintian; Liu, Yingxiang; Li, Kai; Chen, Weishan; Zhao, Jianguo

    2018-01-01

    Twisted and coiled actuator (TCA) is a class of recently discovered artificial muscle, which is usually made by twisting and coiling polymer fibers into spring-like structures. It has been widely studied since discovery due to its impressive output characteristics and bright prospects. However, its mathematical models describing the actuation in response to the temperature are still not fully developed. It is known that the large tensile stroke is resulted from the untwisting of the twisted fiber when heated. Thus, the recovered torque during untwisting is a key parameter in the mathematical model. This paper presents a simplified model for the recovered torque of TCA. Finite element method is used for evaluating the thermal stress of the twisted fiber. Based on the results of the finite element analyses, the constitutive equations of twisted fibers are simplified to develop an analytic model of the recovered torque. Finally, the model of the recovered torque is used to predict the deformation of TCA under varying temperatures and validated against experimental results. This work will enhance our understanding of the deformation mechanism of TCAs, which will pave the way for the closed-loop position control.

  3. Development of a finite element model of the human abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Yang, K H

    2001-11-01

    Currently, three-dimensional finite element models of the human body have been developed for frequently injured anatomical regions such as the brain, chest, extremities and pelvis. While a few models of the human body include the abdomen, these models have tended to oversimplify the complexity of the abdominal region. As the first step in understanding abdominal injuries via numerical methods, a 3D finite element model of a 50(th) percentile male human abdomen (WSUHAM) has been developed and validated against experimental data obtained from two sets of side impact tests and a series of frontal impact tests. The model includes a detailed representation of the liver, spleen, kidneys, spine, skin and major blood vessels. Hollow organs, such as the esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, gallbladder, bile ducts, ureters, rectum and adrenal glands are grouped into three bodybags in order to provide realistic inertial properties and to maintain the position of the solid organs in their appropriate locations. Using direct connections, the model was joined superiorly to a partial model of the human thorax, and inferiorly to models of the human pelvis and the lower extremities that have been previously developed. Material properties for various tissues of the abdomen were derived from the literature. Data obtained in a series of cadaveric pendulum impact tests conducted at Wayne State University (WSU), a series of lateral drop tests conducted at Association Peugeot-Renault (APR) and a series of cadaveric lower abdomen frontal impact tests conducted at WSU were used to validate the model. Results predicted by the model match these experimental data for various impact speeds, impactor masses and drop heights. Further study is still needed in order to fully validate WSUHAM before it can be used to assess various impact loading conditions associated with vehicular crashes.

  4. On the trial functions in nested element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altiparmakov, D.V.

    1985-01-01

    The R-function method is applied to the multidimensional steady-state neutron diffusion equation. Using a variational principle the nested element approximation is formulated. Trial functions taking into account the geometrical shape of material regions are constructed. The influence of both the surrounding regions and the corner singularities at the external boundary is incorporated into the approximate solution. Benchmark calculations show that such an approximation can yield satisfactory results. Moreover, in the case of complex geometry, the presented approach would result in a significant reduction of the number of unknowns compared to other methods

  5. Improved fixed point iterative method for blade element momentum computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Zhenye; Shen, Wen Zhong; Chen, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The blade element momentum (BEM) theory is widely used in aerodynamic performance calculations and optimization applications for wind turbines. The fixed point iterative method is the most commonly utilized technique to solve the BEM equations. However, this method sometimes does not converge...... are addressed through both theoretical analysis and numerical tests. A term from the BEM equations equals to zero at a critical inflow angle is the source of the convergence problems. When the initial inflow angle is set larger than the critical inflow angle and the relaxation methodology is adopted...

  6. Finite element method for simulation of the semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikatanov, L.T.; Kaschiev, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative method for solving the system of nonlinear equations of the drift-diffusion representation for the simulation of the semiconductor devices is worked out. The Petrov-Galerkin method is taken for the discretization of these equations using the bilinear finite elements. It is shown that the numerical scheme is a monotonous one and there are no oscillations of the solutions in the region of p-n transition. The numerical calculations of the simulation of one semiconductor device are presented. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  7. Multilayer Finite-Element Model Application to Define the Bearing Structure Element Stress State of Launch Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zverev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article objective is to justify the rationale for selecting the multilayer finite element model parameters of the bearing structure of a general-purpose launch complex unit.A typical design element of the launch complex unit, i.e. a mount of the hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, block, etc. is under consideration. The mount represents a set of the cantilevered axis and external structural cage. The most loaded element of the cage is disk to which a moment is transferred from the cantilevered axis due to actuator effort acting on it.To calculate the stress-strain state of disk was used a finite element method. Five models of disk mount were created. The only difference in models was the number of layers of the finite elements through the thickness of disk. There were models, which had one, three, five, eight, and fourteen layers of finite elements through the thickness of disk. For each model, we calculated the equivalent stresses arising from the action of the test load. Disk models were formed and calculated using the MSC Nastran complex software.The article presents results in the table to show data of equivalent stresses in each of the multi-layered models and graphically to illustrate the changing equivalent stresses through the thickness of disk.Based on these results we have given advice on selecting the proper number of layers in the model allowing a desirable accuracy of results with the lowest run time. In addition, it is concluded that there is a need to use the multi-layer models in assessing the performance of structural elements in case the stress exceeds the allowable one in their surface layers.

  8. Thermal model of the whole element furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, E.R.

    1998-01-01

    A detailed thermal analysis was performed to calculate temperatures in the whole element test furnace that is used to conduct drying studies of N-Reactor fuel. The purpose of this analysis was to establish the thermal characteristics of the test system and to provide a basis for post-test analysis

  9. Performance Modelling of Timber Facade Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surmeli-Anac, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Windows and doors are essential elements of buildings. These seemingly simple components have become increasingly complex over the last decades. They have to fulfil an increased number of functions which ask for contradictory solutions and need to comply with more and more severe requirements.

  10. Scientific use of the finite element method in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Luegya; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Marcia Regina Elisa Aparecida Schiavon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The finite element method (FEM) is an engineering resource applied to calculate the stress and deformation of complex structures, and has been widely used in orthodontic research. With the advantage of being a non-invasive and accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data on the physiological reactions possible to occur in tissues, applying the FEM can anticipate the visualization of these tissue responses through the observation of areas of stress created from applied orthodontic mechanics. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing and discussing the stages of the finite element method application and its applicability in Orthodontics. RESULTS: FEM is able to evaluate the stress distribution at the interface between periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and the shifting trend in various types of tooth movement when using different types of orthodontic devices. Therefore, it is necessary to know specific software for this purpose. CONCLUSIONS: FEM is an important experimental method to answer questions about tooth movement, overcoming the disadvantages of other experimental methods. PMID:25992996

  11. Discrete element modeling of calcium-silicate-hydrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Peters, John F; Pelessone, Daniele

    2013-01-01

    The discrete element method (DEM) was used to model calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H) at the nanoscale. The C-S-H nanoparticles were modeled as spherical particles with diameters of approximately 5 nm. Interparticle forces included traditional mechanical contact forces, van der Waals forces and ionic correlation forces due to negatively charged C-S-H nanoparticles and ion species in the nanopores. Previous work by the authors demonstrated the DEM method was feasible in studying the properties of the C-S-H nanostructures. In this work, the simulations were performed to look into the effects of nanoparticle packing, nanoparticle morphology, interparticle forces and nanoparticle properties on the deformation mechanisms and mechanical properties of the C-S-H matrix. This work will provide insights into possible ways to improve the properties of the C-S-H matrix. (paper)

  12. Adaptive Smoothed Finite Elements (ASFEM) for history dependent material models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quak, W.; Boogaard, A. H. van den

    2011-01-01

    A successful simulation of a bulk forming process with finite elements can be difficult due to distortion of the finite elements. Nodal smoothed Finite Elements (NSFEM) are an interesting option for such a process since they show good distortion insensitivity and moreover have locking-free behavior and good computational efficiency. In this paper a method is proposed which takes advantage of the nodally smoothed field. This method, named adaptive smoothed finite elements (ASFEM), revises the mesh for every step of a simulation without mapping the history dependent material parameters. In this paper an updated-Lagrangian implementation is presented. Several examples are given to illustrate the method and to show its properties.

  13. 8th International Conference on Boundary Element Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Brebbia, C

    1986-01-01

    The International Conference on Boundary Element Methods in Engineering was started in 1978 with the following objectives: i) To act as a focus for BE research at a time when the technique wasjust emerging as a powerful tool for engineering analysis. ii) To attract new as weIl as established researchers on Boundary Elements, in order to maintain its vitality and originality. iii) To try to relate the Boundary Element Method to other engineering techniques in an effort to help unify the field of engineering analysis, rather than to contribute to its fragmentation. These objectives were achieved during the last 7 conferences and this meeting - the eighth - has continued to be as innovative and dynamic as any ofthe previous conferences. Another important aim ofthe conference is to encourage the participation of researchers from as many different countries as possible and in this regard it is a policy of the organizers to hold the conference in different locations. It is easy to forget when working on scientific ...

  14. Mathematical model of thermal and mechanical steady state fuel element behaviour TEDEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinic, N.; Kostic, Z.; Josipovic, M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper a numerical model of thermal and thermomechanical behaviour of a cylindrical metal uranium fuel element is described. Presented are numerical method and computer program for solving the stationary temperature field and thermal stresses of a fuel element. The model development is a second phase of analysis of these phenomena, and may as well be used for analysing power nuclear reactor fuel elements behaviour. (author)

  15. TRAC methods and models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaffy, J.H.; Liles, D.R.; Bott, T.F.

    1981-01-01

    The numerical methods and physical models used in the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) versions PD2 and PF1 are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on TRAC-PF1, the version specifically designed to analyze small-break loss-of-coolant accidents

  16. Application of distinct element method of toppling failure of slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Tsuyoshi; Hibino, Satoshi; Kitahara, Yoshihiro; Ito, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    The authors have pointed out, in the latest report, that DEM (Distinct Element Method) seems to be a very helpful numerical method to examine the stability of fissured rock slopes, in which toppling failure would occur during earthquakes. In this report, the applicability of DEM for such rock slopes is examined through the following comparisons between theoretical results and DEM results, referring Voegele's works (1982): (1) Stability of one block on a slope. (2) Failure of a rock block column composed of 10 same size rectangular blocks. (3) Cable force required to make a slope stable. Through above 3 comparisons, it seems that DEM give the reasonable results. Considering that these problems may not be treated by the other numerical methods such as FEM and so on, so DEM seems to be a very useful method for fissured rock slope analysis. (author)

  17. The nonconforming virtual element method for eigenvalue problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardini, Francesca [Univ. of Pavia (Italy). Dept. of Mathematics; Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vacca, Giuseppe [Univ. of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Mathematics and Applications

    2018-02-05

    We analyse the nonconforming Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the approximation of elliptic eigenvalue problems. The nonconforming VEM allow to treat in the same formulation the two- and three-dimensional case.We present two possible formulations of the discrete problem, derived respectively by the nonstabilized and stabilized approximation of the L2-inner product, and we study the convergence properties of the corresponding discrete eigenvalue problems. The proposed schemes provide a correct approximation of the spectrum and we prove optimal-order error estimates for the eigenfunctions and the usual double order of convergence of the eigenvalues. Finally we show a large set of numerical tests supporting the theoretical results, including a comparison with the conforming Virtual Element choice.

  18. An adaptive finite element method for steady and transient problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benner, R.E. Jr.; Davis, H.T.; Scriven, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Distributing integral error uniformly over variable subdomains, or finite elements, is an attractive criterion by which to subdivide a domain for the Galerkin/finite element method when localized steep gradients and high curvatures are to be resolved. Examples are fluid interfaces, shock fronts and other internal layers, as well as fluid mechanical and other boundary layers, e.g. thin-film states at solid walls. The uniform distribution criterion is developed into an adaptive technique for one-dimensional problems. Nodal positions can be updated simultaneously with nodal values during Newton iteration, but it is usually better to adopt nearly optimal nodal positions during Newton iteration upon nodal values. Three illustrative problems are solved: steady convection with diffusion, gradient theory of fluid wetting on a solid surface and Buckley-Leverett theory of two phase Darcy flow in porous media

  19. Failure analysis of pebble bed reactors during earthquake by discrete element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the load acting on the central reflector beam of a pebble bed reactor. ► The load acting on the reflector beam highly depends on fuel element distribution. ► The contact force values do not show high dependence on fuel element distribution. ► Earthquake increases the load of the reflector, not the contact forces. -- Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) are graphite-moderated, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. PBR reactors use a large number of spherical fuel elements called pebbles. From mechanical point of view, the arrangement of “small” spherical fuel elements in a container poses the same problem, as the so-called silo problem in powder technology and agricultural engineering. To get more exact information about the contact forces arising between the fuel elements in static and dynamic case, we simulated the static case and the effects of an earthquake on a model reactor by using discrete element method. We determined the maximal contact forces acting between the individual fuel elements. We found that the value of the maximal bending moment in the central reflector beam has a high deviation from the average value even in static case, and it can significantly increase in case of an earthquake. Our results can help the engineers working on the design of such types of reactors to get information about the contact forces, to determine the dust production and the crush probability of fuel elements within the reactor, and to model different accident scenarios

  20. Failure analysis of pebble bed reactors during earthquake by discrete element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppler, Istvan, E-mail: keppler.istvan@gek.szie.hu [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Design, Szent István University, Páter K.u.1., Gödöllő H-2103 (Hungary)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We evaluated the load acting on the central reflector beam of a pebble bed reactor. ► The load acting on the reflector beam highly depends on fuel element distribution. ► The contact force values do not show high dependence on fuel element distribution. ► Earthquake increases the load of the reflector, not the contact forces. -- Abstract: Pebble bed reactors (PBR) are graphite-moderated, gas-cooled nuclear reactors. PBR reactors use a large number of spherical fuel elements called pebbles. From mechanical point of view, the arrangement of “small” spherical fuel elements in a container poses the same problem, as the so-called silo problem in powder technology and agricultural engineering. To get more exact information about the contact forces arising between the fuel elements in static and dynamic case, we simulated the static case and the effects of an earthquake on a model reactor by using discrete element method. We determined the maximal contact forces acting between the individual fuel elements. We found that the value of the maximal bending moment in the central reflector beam has a high deviation from the average value even in static case, and it can significantly increase in case of an earthquake. Our results can help the engineers working on the design of such types of reactors to get information about the contact forces, to determine the dust production and the crush probability of fuel elements within the reactor, and to model different accident scenarios.