WorldWideScience

Sample records for element method modeling

  1. Finite element modeling methods for photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Rahman, B M Azizur

    2013-01-01

    The term photonics can be used loosely to refer to a vast array of components, devices, and technologies that in some way involve manipulation of light. One of the most powerful numerical approaches available to engineers developing photonic components and devices is the Finite Element Method (FEM), which can be used to model and simulate such components/devices and analyze how they will behave in response to various outside influences. This resource provides a comprehensive description of the formulation and applications of FEM in photonics applications ranging from telecommunications, astron

  2. Element-by-element parallel spectral-element methods for 3-D teleseismic wave modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Shaolin

    2017-09-28

    The development of an efficient algorithm for teleseismic wave field modeling is valuable for calculating the gradients of the misfit function (termed misfit gradients) or Fréchet derivatives when the teleseismic waveform is used for adjoint tomography. Here, we introduce an element-by-element parallel spectral-element method (EBE-SEM) for the efficient modeling of teleseismic wave field propagation in a reduced geology model. Under the plane-wave assumption, the frequency-wavenumber (FK) technique is implemented to compute the boundary wave field used to construct the boundary condition of the teleseismic wave incidence. To reduce the memory required for the storage of the boundary wave field for the incidence boundary condition, a strategy is introduced to efficiently store the boundary wave field on the model boundary. The perfectly matched layers absorbing boundary condition (PML ABC) is formulated using the EBE-SEM to absorb the scattered wave field from the model interior. The misfit gradient can easily be constructed in each time step during the calculation of the adjoint wave field. Three synthetic examples demonstrate the validity of the EBE-SEM for use in teleseismic wave field modeling and the misfit gradient calculation.

  3. Modelling of fabric draping: Finite elements versus a geometrical method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.A.D.; Wijskamp, Sebastiaan; Akkerman, Remko

    2001-01-01

    Thermoplastic composite materials can be processed by Rubber Press Forming at elevated temperatures. Process specific boundary conditions are difficult to incorporate in the classical geometric drape simulation methods. Therefore, a fabric reinforced fluid model was implemented in the Finite Element

  4. Ground water modeling applications using the analytic element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Randall J

    2006-01-01

    Though powerful and easy to use, applications of the analytic element method are not as widespread as finite-difference or finite-element models due in part to their relative youth. Although reviews that focus primarily on the mathematical development of the method have appeared in the literature, a systematic review of applications of the method is not available. An overview of the general types of applications of analytic elements in ground water modeling is provided in this paper. While not fully encompassing, the applications described here cover areas where the method has been historically applied (regional, two-dimensional steady-state models, analyses of ground water-surface water interaction, quick analyses and screening models, wellhead protection studies) as well as more recent applications (grid sensitivity analyses, estimating effective conductivity and dispersion in highly heterogeneous systems). The review of applications also illustrates areas where more method development is needed (three-dimensional and transient simulations).

  5. Modelling of Granular Materials Using the Discrete Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per

    1997-01-01

    With the Discrete Element Method it is possible to model materials that consists of individual particles where a particle may role or slide on other particles. This is interesting because most of the deformation in granular materials is due to rolling or sliding rather that compression of the gra...

  6. Flexural Modeling of the Andean System Using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacek, V.; Ussami, N.

    2007-05-01

    The general equation of flexure of the lithosphere in cartesian coordinates is solved using a numerical Finite Element Method (FEM) with triangular elements in non-structured meshes. This alternative way to model bending of thin elastic plates lying over an inviscid fluid allows taking into account lateral variation of rigidity, plate discontinuities and full 3-D representation of loads. The numerical solution was initially compared with the analytical solution of bending of an elastic plate loaded by an uniformally distributed load. The method was applied to model flexure of a plate due to curved orogenic belts and the results were compared with solutions obtained if a 2-D approximation of plates and loads was considered. The proposed numerical method was applied to study flexural deformation of the western edge of the South American lithospheric plate due to the loads of the Andean mountains, using Te =75 km for both continuous and broken plates. The predicted forebulges agree with the observed distribution of positive gravity anomalies paralleling the negative gravity anomalies associated with the high topography of the Andes. Maximum amplitudes of forebulges correlate with Purus Arch in Solimões basin (W Brazil) and the Chaco Pampeana plain (Argentina), and between these two regions, a saddle point occurs over the Pantanal wetland (SW Brazil).

  7. The Blended Finite Element Method for Multi-fluid Plasma Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 07 June 2016 - 01 July 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Blended Finite Element Method for Multi-fluid Plasma...BLENDED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR MULTI-FLUID PLASMA MODELING Éder M. Sousa1, Uri Shumlak2 1ERC INC., IN-SPACE PROPULSION BRANCH (RQRS) AIR FORCE RESEARCH...MULTI-FLUID PLASMA MODEL 2 BLENDED FINITE ELEMENT METHOD Blended Finite Element Method Nodal Continuous Galerkin Modal Discontinuous Galerkin Model

  8. Modeling of coal stockpiles using a finite elements method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdeniz, A.H.; Sensogut, C. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In the case of coal stockpiles finding suitable environmental conditions, spontaneous combustion phenomenon will be unavoidable. In this study, an industrial-sized stockpile having a shape of triangle prism was constituted in a coal stockyard of Western Lignite Corporation (WLC), Turkey. The parameters of time, humidity and temperature of air, atmospheric pressure, velocity and direction of wind values that are effective on coal stockpile were measured in a continuous manner. These experimental works were transferred into a computer media in order to obtain similar outcomes by carrying out 2-dimensional analysis of the stockpile with Finite Elements Method (FEM). The performed experimental studies and obtained results were then compared.

  9. Modeling 3D PCMI using the Extended Finite Element Method with higher order elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spencer, Benjamin W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-03-31

    This report documents the recent development to enable XFEM to work with higher order elements. It also demonstrates the application of higher order (quadratic) elements to both 2D and 3D models of PCMI problems, where discrete fractures in the fuel are represented using XFEM. The modeling results demonstrate the ability of the higher order XFEM to accurately capture the effects of a crack on the response in the vicinity of the intersecting surfaces of cracked fuel and cladding, as well as represent smooth responses in the regions away from the crack.

  10. Numerical models for casting solidification: Part II. Application of the boundary element method to solidification problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, C. P.; Umeda, T.; Kimura, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A new numerical model, which is based on the boundary element method, was proposed for the simulation of solidification problems, and its application was demonstrated for solidification of metals in metal and sand molds. Comparisons were made between results from this model and those from the explicit finite difference method. Temperature recovery method was successfully adopted to estimate the liberation of latent heat of freezing in the boundary element method. A coupling method was proposed for problems in which the boundary condition of the interface consisting of inhomogeneous bodies is governed by Newton’s law of cooling in the boundary element method. It was concluded that the boundary element method which has several advantages, such as the wide variety of element shapes, simplicity of data preparation, and small CPU times, will find wide application as an alternative for finite difference or finite element methods, in the fields of solidification problems, especially for complex, three-dimensional geometries.

  11. A Kriging Model Based Finite Element Model Updating Method for Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuming Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Model updating is an effective means of damage identification and surrogate modeling has attracted considerable attention for saving computational cost in finite element (FE model updating, especially for large-scale structures. In this context, a surrogate model of frequency is normally constructed for damage identification, while the frequency response function (FRF is rarely used as it usually changes dramatically with updating parameters. This paper presents a new surrogate model based model updating method taking advantage of the measured FRFs. The Frequency Domain Assurance Criterion (FDAC is used to build the objective function, whose nonlinear response surface is constructed by the Kriging model. Then, the efficient global optimization (EGO algorithm is introduced to get the model updating results. The proposed method has good accuracy and robustness, which have been verified by a numerical simulation of a cantilever and experimental test data of a laboratory three-story structure.

  12. DISCRETE VOLUME-ELEMENT METHOD FOR NETWORK WATER- QUALITY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An explicit dynamic water-quality modeling algorithm is developed for tracking dissolved substances in water-distribution networks. The algorithm is based on a mass-balance relation within pipes that considers both advective transport and reaction kinetics. Complete mixing of m...

  13. An Automated Method for Landmark Identification and Finite-Element Modeling of the Lumbar Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Julius Quinn; Petrella, Anthony J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method for the automated creation of finite-element models of the lumbar spine. Custom scripts were written to extract bone landmarks of lumbar vertebrae and assemble L1-L5 finite-element models. End-plate borders, ligament attachment points, and facet surfaces were identified. Landmarks were identified to maintain mesh correspondence between meshes for later use in statistical shape modeling. 90 lumbar vertebrae were processed creating 18 subject-specific finite-element models. Finite-element model surfaces and ligament attachment points were reproduced within 1e-5 mm of the bone surface, including the critical contact surfaces of the facets. Element quality exceeded specifications in 97% of elements for the 18 models created. The current method is capable of producing subject-specific finite-element models of the lumbar spine with good accuracy, quality, and robustness. The automated methods developed represent advancement in the state of the art of subject-specific lumbar spine modeling to a scale not possible with prior manual and semiautomated methods.

  14. Quick Method for Aeroelastic and Finite Element Modeling of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, Jeffrey; Bitsche, Robert; Branner, Kim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a quick method for modeling composite wind turbine blades is developed for aeroelastic simulations and finite element analyses. The method reduces the time to model a wind turbine blade by automating the creation of a shell finite element model and running it through a cross...... the user has two models of the same blade, one for performing a structural finite element model analysis and one for aeroelastic simulations. Here, the method is implemented and applied to reverse engineer a structural layup for the NREL 5MW reference blade. The model is verified by comparing natural......-sectional analysis tool in order to obtain cross-sectional properties for the aeroelastic simulations. The method utilizes detailed user inputs of the structural layup and aerodynamic profile including ply thickness, orientation, material properties and airfoils to create the models. After the process is complete...

  15. Mathematical model of complex technical asymmetric system based on numerical-analytical boundary elements method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina V. Lazareva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mathematical model of asymmetric support structure frame type is built on the basis of numerical-analytical boundary elements method (BEM. To describe the design scheme used is the graph theory. Building the model taken into account is the effect of frame members restrained torsion, which presence is due to the fact that these elements are thin-walled. The built model represents a real object as a two-axle semi-trailer platform. To implement the BEM algorithm obtained are analytical expressions of the fundamental functions and vector load components. The effected calculations are based on the semi-trailer two different models, using finite elements and boundary elements methods. The analysis showed that the error between the results obtained on the basis of two numerical methods and experimental data is about 4%, that indicates the adequacy of the proposed mathematical model.

  16. Modeling the mechanics of axonal fiber tracts using the embedded finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Harsha T; Kraft, Reuben H

    2017-05-01

    A subject-specific human head finite element model with embedded axonal fiber tractography obtained from diffusion tensor imaging was developed. The axonal fiber tractography finite element model was coupled with the volumetric elements in the head model using the embedded element method. This technique enables the calculation of axonal strains and real-time tracking of the mechanical response of the axonal fiber tracts. The coupled model was then verified using pressure and relative displacement-based (between skull and brain) experimental studies and was employed to analyze a head impact, demonstrating the applicability of this method in studying axonal injury. Following this, a comparison study of different injury criteria was performed. This model was used to determine the influence of impact direction on the extent of the axonal injury. The results suggested that the lateral impact loading is more dangerous compared to loading in the sagittal plane, a finding in agreement with previous studies. Through this analysis, we demonstrated the viability of the embedded element method as an alternative numerical approach for studying axonal injury in patient-specific human head models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. The next step in coastal numerical models: spectral/hp element methods?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskilsson, Claes; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Sherwin, Spencer J.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we outline the application of spectral/hp element methods for modelling nonlinear and dispersive waves. We present one- and two-dimensional test cases for the shallow water equations and Boussinesqtype equations – including highly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations.......In this paper we outline the application of spectral/hp element methods for modelling nonlinear and dispersive waves. We present one- and two-dimensional test cases for the shallow water equations and Boussinesqtype equations – including highly dispersive Boussinesq-type equations....

  18. Implementation of the Modified Hoek-Brown Model into the Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Emil Smed; Clausen, Johan Christian; Merifield, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    The Hoek-Brown model for near-homogeneous rock masses will, in some cases, overpredict the tensile strength of the material. In some cases this can lead to unsafe design of structures. Therefore, a tension cut-off is introduced and the model is implemented into an elasto-plastic framework for use...... with the finite element method. The use of the model is illustrated with a computational example calculating the safety of mining tunnel roof....

  19. A Floating Node Method for the Modelling of Discontinuities Within a Finite Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Silvestre T.; Chen, B. Y.; DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Baiz, P. M.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the accurate numerical representation of complex networks of evolving discontinuities in solids, with particular emphasis on cracks. The limitation of the standard finite element method (FEM) in approximating discontinuous solutions has motivated the development of re-meshing, smeared crack models, the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the Phantom Node Method (PNM). We propose a new method which has some similarities to the PNM, but crucially: (i) does not introduce an error on the crack geometry when mapping to natural coordinates; (ii) does not require numerical integration over only part of a domain; (iii) can incorporate weak discontinuities and cohesive cracks more readily; (iv) is ideally suited for the representation of multiple and complex networks of (weak, strong and cohesive) discontinuities; (v) leads to the same solution as a finite element mesh where the discontinuity is represented explicitly; and (vi) is conceptually simpler than the PNM.

  20. Multiscale Model Reduction with Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods in Geomathematics

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-09-02

    In this chapter, we discuss multiscale model reduction using Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods (GMsFEM) in a number of geomathematical applications. GMsFEM has been recently introduced (Efendiev et al. 2012) and applied to various problems. In the current chapter, we consider some of these applications and outline the basic methodological concepts.

  1. Coupled Finite Volume Methods and Extended Finite Element Methods for the Dynamic Crack Propagation Modelling with the Pressurized Crack Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We model the fluid flow within the crack as one-dimensional flow and assume that the flow is laminar; the fluid is incompressible and accounts for the time-dependent rate of crack opening. Here, we discretise the flow equation by finite volume methods. The extended finite element methods are used for solving solid medium with crack under dynamic loads. Having constructed the approximation of dynamic extended finite element methods, the derivation of governing equation for dynamic extended finite element methods is presented. The implicit time algorithm is elaborated for the time descritisation of dominant equation. In addition, the interaction integral method is given for evaluating stress intensity factors. Then, the coupling model for modelling hydraulic fracture can be established by the extended finite element methods and the finite volume methods. We compare our present numerical results with our experimental results for verifying the proposed model. Finally, we investigate the water pressure distribution along crack surface and the effect of water pressure distribution on the fracture property.

  2. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xianfang; Wang, Li; Wang, Ruonan

    2013-01-01

    For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications. PMID:23476630

  3. Tissue Modeling and Analyzing with Finite Element Method: A Review for Cranium Brain Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfang Yue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For the structure mechanics of human body, it is almost impossible to conduct mechanical experiments. Then the finite element model to simulate mechanical experiments has become an effective tool. By introducing several common methods for constructing a 3D model of cranial cavity, this paper carries out systematically the research on the influence law of cranial cavity deformation. By introducing the new concepts and theory to develop the 3D cranial cavity model with the finite-element method, the cranial cavity deformation process with the changing ICP can be made the proper description and reasonable explanation. It can provide reference for getting cranium biomechanical model quickly and efficiently and lay the foundation for further biomechanical experiments and clinical applications.

  4. The finite element method in making up meshes in ANSYS Meshing for CFD models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віктор Іванович Троханяк

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Method of finite elements (FEM is used in calculating tasks of hydrodynamics and heat transfer tasks. The essence of the method consists in the approximate solution of a variational task. To formulate this task a functional concept is used. The type of a functional is different for different tasks and is selected through a special choice. Currently FEM is widely used in calculating the strength and in solving tasks of heat transfer in solids. However, it can be applied in calculating the flow of liquids and gases. There are also methods that combine elements of the finite volumes and finite elements methods. The combination of these methods make it possible to use a wide range of computational meshes ( tetragonal meshes, pyramidal meshes, prismatic meshes, polyhedral meshes what is necessary for solving tasks with complex geometry. This approach is used by CFD packages Ansys CFX, Ansys Fluent, Star-CD, Star-CCM +, Comsol and others. The method and the analysis of 2D mesh were carried out, using a method of final elements in ANSYS Meshing for heat exchangers with an inline arrangement of tubes in banks and with their curvilinear arrangement in compact banks of tubes of a new design. Particular features were considered and the algorithm of making up a mesh was developed for tasks of hydraulic and gas dynamics and thermal mass transfer. The most optimum and qualitative meshes for CFD models were chosen

  5. Vertical slice modelling of nonlinear Eady waves using a compatible finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroe; Shipton, Jemma; Cullen, Michael J. P.; Mitchell, Lawrence; Cotter, Colin J.

    2017-08-01

    A vertical slice model is developed for the Euler-Boussinesq equations with a constant temperature gradient in the direction normal to the slice (the Eady-Boussinesq model). The model is a solution of the full three-dimensional equations with no variation normal to the slice, which is an idealised problem used to study the formation and subsequent evolution of weather fronts. A compatible finite element method is used to discretise the governing equations. To extend the Charney-Phillips grid staggering in the compatible finite element framework, we use the same node locations for buoyancy as the vertical part of velocity and apply a transport scheme for a partially continuous finite element space. For the time discretisation, we solve the semi-implicit equations together with an explicit strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme to all of the advection terms. The model reproduces several quasi-periodic lifecycles of fronts despite the presence of strong discontinuities. An asymptotic limit analysis based on the semi-geostrophic theory shows that the model solutions are converging to a solution in cross-front geostrophic balance. The results are consistent with the previous results using finite difference methods, indicating that the compatible finite element method is performing as well as finite difference methods for this test problem. We observe dissipation of kinetic energy of the cross-front velocity in the model due to the lack of resolution at the fronts, even though the energy loss is not likely to account for the large gap on the strength of the fronts between the model result and the semi-geostrophic limit solution.

  6. A method for obtaining a three-dimensional geometric model of dental implants for analysis via the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Silva, Guilherme; Pereira Cornacchia, Tulimar Machado; Barbosa de Las Casas, Estevam; Silami de Magalhães, Cláudia; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the study was to present a methodology of development of a virtual 3-dimensional dental implant model for analyses via the finite element method. A set, consisting of a dental implant and abutment, was embedded in acrylic resin for subsequent metallographic grinding and polishing. After the evidentiation of the internal geometry of the implant, the specimen was treated in a sputter for observation using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM image was transported to computer-aided design software by which all details of the implant were measured. With the measures obtained, the geometry was reproduced with 3-dimensional modeling software. Finally, the model was imported into finite element method analysis software with which it was discretized, generating a mesh. A model with the accurate geometry of the implant was developed. A mesh of 297,600 elements and 490,045 nodes was generated. An aleatory acceleration simulation was performed to test the mesh, and no errors were identified. The developed methodology generated a precise dental implant model, which can be applied in different finite element method simulations.

  7. A 4-Mid-Node Plane Model of Base Force Element Method on Complementary Energy Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinghua Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the base forces as fundamental variables to describe the stress state and the displacement gradients that are the conjugate variables of the base forces to describe the deformation state for the two-dimensional elasticity problems, a 4-mid-node plane model of base force element method (BFEM based on complementary energy principle is proposed. In this paper, the complementary energy of an element of the BFEM is constructed by using the base forces. The equilibrium conditions are released by the Lagrange multiplier method, and a modified complementary energy principle described by the base forces is obtained. The formulation of the 4-mid-node plane element of the BFEM is derived by assuming that the stress is uniformly distributed on each edge of the plane elements. A procedure of the BFEM on complementary energy principle is developed using MATLAB language. The numerical results of examples show that this model of the BFEM has high precision and is free from mesh sensitivity. This model shows good performances.

  8. The finite element method for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeian, B; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative ultrasound for bone assessment is based on the correlations between ultrasonic parameters and the properties (mechanical and physical) of cancellous bone. To elucidate the correlations, understanding the physics of ultrasound in cancellous bone is demanded. Micro-scale modeling of ultrasound propagation in cancellous bone using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been so far utilized as one of the approaches in this regard. However, the FDTD method accompanies two disadvantages: staircase sampling of cancellous bone by finite difference grids leads to generation of wave artifacts at the solid-fluid interface inside the bone; additionally, this method cannot explicitly satisfy the needed perfect-slip conditions at the interface. To overcome these disadvantages, the finite element method (FEM) is proposed in this study. Three-dimensional finite element models of six water-saturated cancellous bone samples with different bone volume were created. The values of speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) were calculated through the finite element simulations of ultrasound propagation in each sample. Comparing the results with other experimental and simulation studies demonstrated the capabilities of the FEM for micro-scale modeling of ultrasound in water-saturated cancellous bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Combining existing numerical models with data assimilation using weighted least-squares finite element methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaraman, Prathish K; Manteuffel, T A; Belohlavek, M; Heys, Jeffrey J

    2017-01-01

    A new approach has been developed for combining and enhancing the results from an existing computational fluid dynamics model with experimental data using the weighted least-squares finite element method (WLSFEM). Development of the approach was motivated by the existence of both limited experimental blood velocity in the left ventricle and inexact numerical models of the same flow. Limitations of the experimental data include measurement noise and having data only along a two-dimensional plane. Most numerical modeling approaches do not provide the flexibility to assimilate noisy experimental data. We previously developed an approach that could assimilate experimental data into the process of numerically solving the Navier-Stokes equations, but the approach was limited because it required the use of specific finite element methods for solving all model equations and did not support alternative numerical approximation methods. The new approach presented here allows virtually any numerical method to be used for approximately solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and then the WLSFEM is used to combine the experimental data with the numerical solution of the model equations in a final step. The approach dynamically adjusts the influence of the experimental data on the numerical solution so that more accurate data are more closely matched by the final solution and less accurate data are not closely matched. The new approach is demonstrated on different test problems and provides significantly reduced computational costs compared with many previous methods for data assimilation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Hierarchical multiscale modeling for flows in fractured media using generalized multiscale finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2015-06-05

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale finite element method for solving flows in fractured media. Our approach is based on generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM), where we represent the fracture effects on a coarse grid via multiscale basis functions. These multiscale basis functions are constructed in the offline stage via local spectral problems following GMsFEM. To represent the fractures on the fine grid, we consider two approaches (1) discrete fracture model (DFM) (2) embedded fracture model (EFM) and their combination. In DFM, the fractures are resolved via the fine grid, while in EFM the fracture and the fine grid block interaction is represented as a source term. In the proposed multiscale method, additional multiscale basis functions are used to represent the long fractures, while short-size fractures are collectively represented by a single basis functions. The procedure is automatically done via local spectral problems. In this regard, our approach shares common concepts with several approaches proposed in the literature as we discuss. We would like to emphasize that our goal is not to compare DFM with EFM, but rather to develop GMsFEM framework which uses these (DFM or EFM) fine-grid discretization techniques. Numerical results are presented, where we demonstrate how one can adaptively add basis functions in the regions of interest based on error indicators. We also discuss the use of randomized snapshots (Calo et al. Randomized oversampling for generalized multiscale finite element methods, 2014), which reduces the offline computational cost.

  11. A comparison of numerical methods used for finite element modelling of soft tissue deformation

    KAUST Repository

    Pathmanathan, P

    2009-05-01

    Soft tissue deformation is often modelled using incompressible non-linear elasticity, with solutions computed using the finite element method. There are a range of options available when using the finite element method, in particular the polynomial degree of the basis functions used for interpolating position and pressure, and the type of element making up the mesh. The effect of these choices on the accuracy of the computed solution is investigated, using a selection of model problems motivated by typical deformations seen in soft tissue modelling. Model problems are set up with discontinuous material properties (as is the case for the breast), steeply changing gradients in the body force (as found in contracting cardiac tissue), and discontinuous first derivatives in the solution at the boundary, caused by a discontinuous applied force (as in the breast during mammography). It was found that the choice of pressure basis functions is vital in the presence of a material interface, higher-order schemes do not perform as well as may be expected when there are sharp gradients, and in general it is important to take the expected regularity of the solution into account when choosing a numerical scheme. © IMechE 2009.

  12. Static Aeroelastic Analysis of Transonic Wind Tunnel Models Using Finite Element Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, John R.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Valla, Robert

    1997-01-01

    A computational method for accurately predicting the static aeroelastic deformations of typical transonic transport wind tunnel models is described. The method utilizes a finite element method (FEM) for predicting the deformations. Extensive calibration/validation of this method was carried out using a novel wind-off wind tunnel model static loading experiment and wind-on optical wing twist measurements obtained during a recent wind tunnel test in the National Transonic Facility (NTF) at NASA LaRC. Further validations were carried out using a Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow solver to calculate wing pressure distributions about several aeroelastically deformed wings and comparing these predictions with NTF experimental data. Results from this aeroelastic deformation method are in good overall agreement with experimentally measured values. Including the predicted deformations significantly improves the correlation between CFD predicted and experimentally measured wing & pressures.

  13. Phononic dispersion of graphene using atomistic-continuum model and spectrally formulated finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sushovan; Gopalakrishnan, S.

    2017-04-01

    Grapahene is a two dimensional allotrope of carbon. Since the onset of current century, particularly, upon successful exfoliation of single layer graphene, it has received significant research attention because of some of the extreme mechanical, thermal, electromagnetic and optical properties it exhibits. As various applications of graphene have been envisioned and their realizations attempted, dynamic characteristics of graphene also became an extremely important field of study. Based on solid state physics and first principle analysis, dispersion relationship of graphene has been computed using various methods. Some of these methods rely on various inter atomic potentials and force-fields. An approximate technique of mechanical characterization involves atomisticcontinuum modeling of carbon carbon bonds in graphene and its rolled 1D form carbon nanotube. In this technique, the carbon-carbon bonds are modeled as 1D frame elements. The equivalence of energies in various modes of the actual structure and the equivalent mechanical system has led to specification of various model parameters. Here, based on atomistic continuum method, we attempt to compute the dispersion relationship accounting for the bonded interactions and the next nearest non-bonded interactions. For that purpose we use frequency domain spectral finite element method with pointed inertial components. It has been shown that it is possible to obtain the dispersion relationship close to the one computed using ab-initio method.

  14. Three Different Ways of Calibrating Burger's Contact Model for Viscoelastic Model of Asphalt Mixtures by Discrete Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was investigated by employing a three-dimensional discrete element method. Combined with Burger's model, three contact models were used for the construction of constitutive asphalt mixture model with viscoelastic properties in the commerc...... and the laboratory test values for the complex modulus shows that DEM can be used to reliably predict the viscoelastic properties of asphalt mixtures.......In this paper the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was investigated by employing a three-dimensional discrete element method. Combined with Burger's model, three contact models were used for the construction of constitutive asphalt mixture model with viscoelastic properties...... modulus. Three different approaches have been used and compared for calibrating the Burger's contact model. Values of the dynamic modulus and phase angle of asphalt mixtures were predicted by conducting DE simulation under dynamic strain control loading. The excellent agreement between the predicted...

  15. A finite-element method model for droplets moving down a hydrophobic surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind-Willassen, Øistein; Sørensen, Mads Peter

    2014-01-01

    We set up a 2D computational Finite-Element Method (FEM) model describing the initial descent of a droplet down an inclined hydrophobic substrate. We solve the full Navier-Stokes equations inside the drop domain, and use the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method to keep track of the droplet surface....... The contact angle is included by using the Frennet-Serret equations. We investigate the behaviour of the drop velocity as a function of the slip length and compare with experimental results. Furthermore, we quantify the energy associated with centre-of-mass translation and internal fluid motion, and we also...

  16. Hybrid Modeling and Optimization of Manufacturing Combining Artificial Intelligence and Finite Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    Quiza, Ramón; Davim, J Paulo

    2012-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) techniques and the finite element method (FEM) are both powerful computing tools, which are extensively used for modeling and optimizing manufacturing processes. The combination of these tools has resulted in a new flexible and robust approach as several recent studies have shown. This book aims to review the work already done in this field as well as to expose the new possibilities and foreseen trends. The book is expected to be useful for postgraduate students and researchers, working in the area of modeling and optimization of manufacturing processes.

  17. 2.5-D frequency-domain viscoelastic wave modelling using finite-element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-guo; Huang, Xing-xing; Liu, Wei-fang; Zhao, Wei-jun; Song, Jian-yong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Shang-xu

    2017-10-01

    2-D seismic modelling has notable dynamic information discrepancies with field data because of the implicit line-source assumption, whereas 3-D modelling suffers from a huge computational burden. The 2.5-D approach is able to overcome both of the aforementioned limitations. In general, the earth model is treated as an elastic material, but the real media is viscous. In this study, we develop an accurate and efficient frequency-domain finite-element method (FEM) for modelling 2.5-D viscoelastic wave propagation. To perform the 2.5-D approach, we assume that the 2-D viscoelastic media are based on the Kelvin-Voigt rheological model and a 3-D point source. The viscoelastic wave equation is temporally and spatially Fourier transformed into the frequency-wavenumber domain. Then, we systematically derive the weak form and its spatial discretization of 2.5-D viscoelastic wave equations in the frequency-wavenumber domain through the Galerkin weighted residual method for FEM. Fixing a frequency, the 2-D problem for each wavenumber is solved by FEM. Subsequently, a composite Simpson formula is adopted to estimate the inverse Fourier integration to obtain the 3-D wavefield. We implement the stiffness reduction method (SRM) to suppress artificial boundary reflections. The results show that this absorbing boundary condition is valid and efficient in the frequency-wavenumber domain. Finally, three numerical models, an unbounded homogeneous medium, a half-space layered medium and an undulating topography medium, are established. Numerical results validate the accuracy and stability of 2.5-D solutions and present the adaptability of finite-element method to complicated geographic conditions. The proposed 2.5-D modelling strategy has the potential to address modelling studies on wave propagation in real earth media in an accurate and efficient way.

  18. Dual reciprocity boundary element method for solving thermal wave model of bioheat transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Lu, W

    1997-12-01

    The newly developed dual reciprocity boundary element method (DRBEM) was extended to solve the thermal wave model of bioheat transfer (TWMBT) and a practical algorithm was established. A preliminary simulation of the temperature evolution in a two dimensional zone under certain boundary conditions and micro wave heating was conducted as a numerical illustration for the method and some meaningful conclusions were drawn. The validity of DRBEM was testified through a comparison with finite difference method (FDM) under one-dimensional calculation. Owing to its unique advantages like not confined by the complex shape of biological bodies, no need of discretization of the inner domain, save vast CPU time and easy to deal with different bioheat models, DRBEM may become an important approach for predicting and controlling the transient temperature field of biological bodies under hyperthermia or hypothermia.

  19. Three-dimensional magnetotelluric modeling in anisotropic media using edge-based finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Tiaojie; Liu, Yun; Wang, Yun; Fu, Li-Yun

    2018-02-01

    It is important to understand how magnetotelluric (MT) modeling can most effectively be performed in general anisotropic media. However, previous studies in this area have mainly focused on the use of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) algorithms. Thus, building on earlier work, it is important to study the performance of three-dimensional (3D) modeling in arbitrary conductivity media; therefore, an edge-based finite element (FE) method has been developed for 3D MT modeling in arbitrary conductivity media. This approach is based on the initial derivation of a series of equivalent variational equations that are based on Maxwell equations, generated using the weighted residual method. Specific values were then obtained for coefficient matrixes of this edge-based FE method using hexahedral meshes, and the algorithm was verified by comparing its results with finite difference (FD) solutions generated using a 2D anisotropic model. Finally, the results of a 3D anisotropic model were analyzed detailed for three conditions; another 3D anisotropic model was designed and its results were compared with two isotropic models'.

  20. On the modeling of narrow gaps using the standard boundary element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller; Jacobsen, Finn

    2001-01-01

    Numerical methods based on the Helmholtz integral equation are well suited for solving acoustic scattering and diffraction problems at relatively low frequencies. However, it is well known that the standard method becomes degenerate if the objects that disturb the sound field are very thin....... This paper makes use of a standard axisymmetric Helmholtz integral equation formulation and its boundary element method (BEM) implementation to study the behavior of the method on two test cases: a thin rigid disk of variable thickness and two rigid cylinders separated by a gap of variable width. Both...... with in the literature. A simple integration technique that can extend the range of thicknesses/widths tractable by the otherwise unmodified standard formulation is presented and tested. This technique is valid for both cases. The modeling of acoustic transducers Like sound intensity probes and condenser microphones has...

  1. Detailed finite element method modeling of evaporating multi-component droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diddens, Christian, E-mail: C.Diddens@tue.nl

    2017-07-01

    The evaporation of sessile multi-component droplets is modeled with an axisymmetic finite element method. The model comprises the coupled processes of mixture evaporation, multi-component flow with composition-dependent fluid properties and thermal effects. Based on representative examples of water–glycerol and water–ethanol droplets, regular and chaotic examples of solutal Marangoni flows are discussed. Furthermore, the relevance of the substrate thickness for the evaporative cooling of volatile binary mixture droplets is pointed out. It is shown how the evaporation of the more volatile component can drastically decrease the interface temperature, so that ambient vapor of the less volatile component condenses on the droplet. Finally, results of this model are compared with corresponding results of a lubrication theory model, showing that the application of lubrication theory can cause considerable errors even for moderate contact angles of 40°. - Graphical abstract:.

  2. On modelling three-dimensional piezoelectric smart structures with boundary spectral element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fangxin; Aliabadi, M. H.

    2017-05-01

    The computational efficiency of the boundary element method in elastodynamic analysis can be significantly improved by employing high-order spectral elements for boundary discretisation. In this work, for the first time, the so-called boundary spectral element method is utilised to formulate the piezoelectric smart structures that are widely used in structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The resultant boundary spectral element formulation has been validated by the finite element method (FEM) and physical experiments. The new formulation has demonstrated a lower demand on computational resources and a higher numerical stability than commercial FEM packages. Comparing to the conventional boundary element formulation, a significant reduction in computational expenses has been achieved. In summary, the boundary spectral element formulation presented in this paper provides a highly efficient and stable mathematical tool for the development of SHM applications.

  3. Modelling of tunnelling processes and rock cutting tool wear with the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Josep Maria; Oñate, Eugenio; Suárez, Benjamín

    2013-09-01

    Underground construction involves all sort of challenges in analysis, design, project and execution phases. The dimension of tunnels and their structural requirements are growing, and so safety and security demands do. New engineering tools are needed to perform a safer planning and design. This work presents the advances in the particle finite element method (PFEM) for the modelling and the analysis of tunneling processes including the wear of the cutting tools. The PFEM has its foundation on the Lagrangian description of the motion of a continuum built from a set of particles with known physical properties. The method uses a remeshing process combined with the alpha-shape technique to detect the contacting surfaces and a finite element method for the mechanical computations. A contact procedure has been developed for the PFEM which is combined with a constitutive model for predicting the excavation front and the wear of cutting tools. The material parameters govern the coupling of frictional contact and wear between the interacting domains at the excavation front. The PFEM allows predicting several parameters which are relevant for estimating the performance of a tunnelling boring machine such as wear in the cutting tools, the pressure distribution on the face of the boring machine and the vibrations produced in the machinery and the adjacent soil/rock. The final aim is to help in the design of the excavating tools and in the planning of the tunnelling operations. The applications presented show that the PFEM is a promising technique for the analysis of tunnelling problems.

  4. The Guidelines for Modelling the Preloading Bolts in the Structural Connection Using Finite Element Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Krolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the development of the two different numerical techniques for the preloading of bolts by the finite element method using the software Abaqus Standard. Furthermore, this paper gave detailed guidelines for modelling contact, method for solving the numerical error problems such as numerical singularity error and negative eigenvalues due to rigid body motion or the problem of the extensive elongation of bolts after pretension which is occurring during the analysis. The behaviour of bolted joints depending on the two different approaches of pretension was shown on the example of an extended end-plate bolted beam-to-column connection under the monotonic loading. The behaviour of beam-to-column connection was shown in the form and moment-rotation (M-ϕ curves and validated by experimental test. Advantages and disadvantages of pretension techniques, as well as the speed of numerical models, were also presented in this paper.

  5. Dynamic mortar finite element method for modeling of shear rupture on frictional rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Yuval; Hager, Bradford H.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a mortar-based finite element formulation for modeling the dynamics of shear rupture on rough interfaces governed by slip-weakening and rate and state (RS) friction laws, focusing on the dynamics of earthquakes. The method utilizes the dual Lagrange multipliers and the primal-dual active set strategy concepts, together with a consistent discretization and linearization of the contact forces and constraints, and the friction laws to obtain a semi-smooth Newton method. The discretization of the RS friction law involves a procedure to condense out the state variables, thus eliminating the addition of another set of unknowns into the system. Several numerical examples of shear rupture on frictional rough interfaces demonstrate the efficiency of the method and examine the effects of the different time discretization schemes on the convergence, energy conservation, and the time evolution of shear traction and slip rate.

  6. Modeling of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites using finite element method (FEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of the mechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC is presented by the example of Al2O3 fibers in an alumina based matrix. The starting point of the modeling is a substructure (elementary cell which includes on a micromechanical scale the statistical properties of the fiber, matrix and fiber-matrix interface and their interactions. The numerical evaluation of the model is accomplished by means of the finite element method. The numerical results of calculating the elastic modulus of the composite dependance on the quantity of the fibers added and porosity was compared to experimental values of specimens having the same composition. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON174004 i TVH to project III45012

  7. A Numerical Model of an Acoustic Metamaterial Using the Boundary Element Method Including Viscous and Thermal Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Andersen, Peter Risby; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, boundary element method (BEM) and finite element method (FEM) implementations of acoustics in fluids with viscous and thermal losses have been developed. They are based on the linearized Navier–Stokes equations with no flow. In this paper, such models with acoustic losses...

  8. A Numerical Model of an Acoustic Metamaterial Using the Boundary Element Method Including Viscous and Thermal Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Andersen, Peter Risby; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, boundary element method (BEM) and finite element method (FEM) implementations of acoustics in fluids with viscous and thermal losses have been developed. They are based on the linearized Navier–Stokes equations with no flow. In this paper, such models with acoustic losses are app...

  9. A hierarchical updating method for finite element model of airbag buffer system under landing impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Huan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose an impact finite element (FE model for an airbag landing buffer system. First, an impact FE model has been formulated for a typical airbag landing buffer system. We use the independence of the structure FE model from the full impact FE model to develop a hierarchical updating scheme for the recovery module FE model and the airbag system FE model. Second, we define impact responses at key points to compare the computational and experimental results to resolve the inconsistency between the experimental data sampling frequency and experimental triggering. To determine the typical characteristics of the impact dynamics response of the airbag landing buffer system, we present the impact response confidence factors (IRCFs to evaluate how consistent the computational and experiment results are. An error function is defined between the experimental and computational results at key points of the impact response (KPIR to serve as a modified objective function. A radial basis function (RBF is introduced to construct updating variables for a surrogate model for updating the objective function, thereby converting the FE model updating problem to a soluble optimization problem. Finally, the developed method has been validated using an experimental and computational study on the impact dynamics of a classic airbag landing buffer system.

  10. Modeling of thermoelectric module operation in inhomogeneous transient temperature field using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Radovan H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of research and operation modeling of the new systems for cooling of cutting tools based on thermoelectric module. A copper inlay with thermoelectric module on the back side was added to a standard turning tool for metal processing. For modeling and simulating the operation of thermoelectric module, finite element method was used as a method for successful solving the problems of inhomogeneous transient temperature field on the cutting tip of lathe knives. Developed mathematical model is implemented in the software package PAK-T through which numerical results are obtained. Experimental research was done in different conditions of thermoelectric module operation. Cooling of the hot module side was done by a heat exchanger based on fluid using automatic temperature regulator. After the calculation is done, numerical results are in good agreement with experimental. It can be concluded that developed mathematical model can be used successfully for modeling of cooling of cutting tools. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR32036

  11. Influence of heterogeneity on rock strength and stiffness using discrete element method and parallel bond model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Liakas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The particulate discrete element method (DEM can be employed to capture the response of rock, provided that appropriate bonding models are used to cement the particles to each other. Simulations of laboratory tests are important to establish the extent to which those models can capture realistic rock behaviors. Hitherto the focus in such comparison studies has either been on homogeneous specimens or use of two-dimensional (2D models. In situ rock formations are often heterogeneous, thus exploring the ability of this type of models to capture heterogeneous material behavior is important to facilitate their use in design analysis. In situ stress states are basically three-dimensional (3D, and therefore it is important to develop 3D models for this purpose. This paper revisits an earlier experimental study on heterogeneous specimens, of which the relative proportions of weaker material (siltstone and stronger, harder material (sandstone were varied in a controlled manner. Using a 3D DEM model with the parallel bond model, virtual heterogeneous specimens were created. The overall responses in terms of variations in strength and stiffness with different percentages of weaker material (siltstone were shown to agree with the experimental observations. There was also a good qualitative agreement in the failure patterns observed in the experiments and the simulations, suggesting that the DEM data enabled analysis of the initiation of localizations and micro fractures in the specimens.

  12. Discrete Element Method Modeling of the Rheological Properties of Coke/Pitch Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Majidi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties of pitch and pitch/coke mixtures at temperatures around 150 °C are of great interest for the carbon anode manufacturing process in the aluminum industry. In the present work, a cohesive viscoelastic contact model based on Burger’s model is developed using the discrete element method (DEM on the YADE, the open-source DEM software. A dynamic shear rheometer (DSR is used to measure the viscoelastic properties of pitch at 150 °C. The experimental data obtained is then used to estimate the Burger’s model parameters and calibrate the DEM model. The DSR tests were then simulated by a three-dimensional model. Very good agreement was observed between the experimental data and simulation results. Coke aggregates were modeled by overlapping spheres in the DEM model. Coke/pitch mixtures were numerically created by adding 5, 10, 20, and 30 percent of coke aggregates of the size range of 0.297–0.595 mm (−30 + 50 mesh to pitch. Adding up to 30% of coke aggregates to pitch can increase its complex shear modulus at 60 Hz from 273 Pa to 1557 Pa. Results also showed that adding coke particles increases both storage and loss moduli, while it does not have a meaningful effect on the phase angle of pitch.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Recycled Concrete Using Convex Aggregate Model and Base Force Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the Base Force Element Method (BFEM on potential energy principle, a new numerical concrete model, random convex aggregate model, is presented in this paper to simulate the experiment under uniaxial compression for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC which can also be referred to as recycled concrete. This model is considered as a heterogeneous composite which is composed of five mediums, including natural coarse aggregate, old mortar, new mortar, new interfacial transition zone (ITZ, and old ITZ. In order to simulate the damage processes of RAC, a curve damage model was adopted as the damage constitutive model and the strength theory of maximum tensile strain was used as the failure criterion in the BFEM on mesomechanics. The numerical results obtained in this paper which contained the uniaxial compressive strengths, size effects on strength, and damage processes of RAC are in agreement with experimental observations. The research works show that the random convex aggregate model and the BFEM with the curve damage model can be used for simulating the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of RAC.

  14. A finite element-analytical method for modeling a structure in an infinite fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarda, P. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described from which the interaction of an elastic structure with an infinite acoustic fluid is determined. The displacements of the structure and the pressure field of the immediate surrounding fluid are modeled by finite elements, and the remaining pressure field of the infinite fluid region is given by an analytical expression. This method yields a frequency dependent boundary condition for the outer fluid boundary when applied to the frequency response of an elastic beam in contact with an acoustic fluid. The frequency response of the beam is determined using NASTRAN, and compares favorably to the exact solution which is also presented. The effect of the fluid on the response of the structure at low and high frequencies is due to added mass and damping characteristics, respectively.

  15. Hydrodynamics of free surface flows modelling with the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Hervouet, Jean-Michel

    2007-01-01

    A definitive guide for accurate state-of-the-art modelling of free surface flows Understanding the dynamics of free surface flows is the starting point of many environmental studies, impact studies, and waterworks design. Typical applications, once the flows are known, are water quality, dam impact and safety, pollutant control, and sediment transport. These studies used to be done in the past with scale models, but these are now being replaced by numerical simulation performed by software suites called "hydro-informatic systems". The Telemac system is the leading software package worldwide, and has been developed by Electricité de France and Jean-Michel Hervouet, who is the head and main developer of the Telemac project. Written by a leading authority on Computational Fluid Dynamics, the book aims to provide environmentalists, hydrologists, and engineers using hydro-informatic systems such as Telemac and the finite element method, with the knowledge of the basic principles, capabilities, different hypothese...

  16. Compositional modeling of three-phase flow with gravity using higher-order finite element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Moortgat, Joachim

    2011-05-11

    A wide range of applications in subsurface flow involve water, a nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) or oil, and a gas phase, such as air or CO2. The numerical simulation of such processes is computationally challenging and requires accurate compositional modeling of three-phase flow in porous media. In this work, we simulate for the first time three-phase compositional flow using higher-order finite element methods. Gravity poses complications in modeling multiphase processes because it drives countercurrent flow among phases. To resolve this issue, we propose a new method for the upwinding of three-phase mobilities. Numerical examples, related to enhanced oil recovery and carbon sequestration, are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the proposed algorithm. We pay special attention to challenges associated with gravitational instabilities and take into account compressibility and various phase behavior effects, including swelling, viscosity changes, and vaporization. We find that the proposed higher-order method can capture sharp solution discontinuities, yielding accurate predictions of phase boundaries arising in computational three-phase flow. This work sets the stage for a broad extension of the higher-order methods for numerical simulation of three-phase flow for complex geometries and processes.

  17. Numerical solution of an elastic and viscoelastic gravitational models by the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona Almodóvar, A.; Chacón Rebollo, T.; Gómez Marmol, M.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic areas present a lower effective viscosity than usually in the Earth's crust. Both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models allow the computation of gravity, deformation, and gravitational potential changes in order to investigate crustal deformations of Earth (see for instance Battaglia & Segall, 2004; Fernández et al. 1999, 2001; Rundle 1980 and 1983). These models can be represented by a coupled system of linear parabolic (for the elastic deformations), hyperbolic (for the viscoelastic deformations) and elliptic partial differential equations (for gravitational potential changes) (see for instance Arjona et al. 2008 and 2010). The existence and uniqueness of weak solutions for both the elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational problem was demonstrated in Arjona et al. (2008 and 2014). The stabilization to solutions of the associated stationary system was proved in Arjona and Díaz (2007). Here we consider the internal source as response to the effect of a pressurized magma reservoir into a multilayered, elastic-gravitational and viscoelastic-gravitational earth model. We introduce the numerical analysis of a simplified steady elastic-gravitational model, solved by means of the finite element method. We also present some numerical tests in realistic situations that confirm the predictions of theoretical order of convergence. Finally, we describe the methodology for both the elastic-gravitational and the viscoelastic-gravitational models using 2D and 3D test examples performed with FreeFEM++.

  18. Modeling reservoir geomechanics using discrete element method : Application to reservoir monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alassi, Haitham Tayseer

    2008-09-15

    Understanding reservoir geomechanical behavior is becoming more and more important for the petroleum industry. Reservoir compaction, which may result in surface subsidence and fault reactivation, occurs during reservoir depletion. Stress changes and possible fracture development inside and outside a depleting reservoir can be monitored using time-lapse (so-called '4D') seismic and/or passive seismic, and this can give valuable information about the conditions of a given reservoir during production. In this study we will focus on using the (particle-based) Discrete Element Method (DEM) to model reservoir geomechanical behavior during depletion and fluid injection. We show in this study that DEM can be used in modeling reservoir geomechanical behavior by comparing results obtained from DEM to those obtained from analytical solutions. The match of the displacement field between DEM and the analytical solution is good, however there is mismatch of the stress field which is related to the way stress is measured in DEM. A good match is however obtained by measuring the stress field carefully. We also use DEM to model reservoir geomechanical behavior beyond the elasticity limit where fractures can develop and faults can reactivate. A general technique has been developed to relate DEM parameters to rock properties. This is necessary in order to use correct reservoir geomechanical properties during modeling. For any type of particle packing there is a limitation that the maximum ratio between P- and S-wave velocity Vp/Vs that can be modeled is 3 . The static behavior for a loose packing is different from the dynamic behavior. Empirical relations are needed for the static behavior based on numerical test observations. The dynamic behavior for both dense and loose packing can be given by analytical relations. Cosserat continuum theory is needed to derive relations for Vp and Vs. It is shown that by constraining the particle rotation, the S-wave velocity can be

  19. Discrete Element Method for Modeling the Mechanical Behavior of Unsaturated Granular Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tourani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although a significant portion of conditions encountered in geotechnical engineering, for investigating engineering behavior of soil, involves unsaturated soils; the traditional analysis and design approach has been to assume the limiting conditions of soils being either completely dry or completely saturated. In unsaturated soils the capillary force produce attractive forces between particles. Discrete Element Method (DEM is an appropriate tool to consider the capillary effects. The calculations performed in DEM is based on iterative application of Newton’s second law to the particles and force-displacement law at the contacts. In the present study, the behavior of unsaturated soils in pendular regime is simulated utilizing DEM. Triaxial  compression tests were modeled as two-dimensional, considering capillary force effects. Finally, capillary effects on Macro parameters of a simulated granular soil (stress, axial strain, volumetric strain and void ratio and Mohr Coulomb failure criteria parameters were studied.

  20. A finite element method model to simulate laser interstitial thermo therapy in anatomical inhomogeneous regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yassene

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Laser Interstitial ThermoTherapy (LITT is a well established surgical method. The use of LITT is so far limited to homogeneous tissues, e.g. the liver. One of the reasons is the limited capability of existing treatment planning models to calculate accurately the damage zone. The treatment planning in inhomogeneous tissues, especially of regions near main vessels, poses still a challenge. In order to extend the application of LITT to a wider range of anatomical regions new simulation methods are needed. The model described with this article enables efficient simulation for predicting damaged tissue as a basis for a future laser-surgical planning system. Previously we described the dependency of the model on geometry. With the presented paper including two video files we focus on the methodological, physical and mathematical background of the model. Methods In contrast to previous simulation attempts, our model is based on finite element method (FEM. We propose the use of LITT, in sensitive areas such as the neck region to treat tumours in lymph node with dimensions of 0.5 cm – 2 cm in diameter near the carotid artery. Our model is based on calculations describing the light distribution using the diffusion approximation of the transport theory; the temperature rise using the bioheat equation, including the effect of microperfusion in tissue to determine the extent of thermal damage; and the dependency of thermal and optical properties on the temperature and the injury. Injury is estimated using a damage integral. To check our model we performed a first in vitro experiment on porcine muscle tissue. Results We performed the derivation of the geometry from 3D ultrasound data and show for this proposed geometry the energy distribution, the heat elevation, and the damage zone. Further on, we perform a comparison with the in-vitro experiment. The calculation shows an error of 5% in the x-axis parallel to the blood vessel

  1. Comparison Study for Whitney (Raviart-Thomas)-Type Source Models in Finite-Element-Method-Based EEG Forward Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Martin; Pursiainen, Sampsa; Vorwerk, Johannes; Kostler, Harald; Wolters, Carsten H

    2015-11-01

    This study concentrates on finite-element-method (FEM)-based electroencephalography (EEG) forward simulation in which the electric potential evoked by neural activity in the brain is to be calculated at the surface of the head. The main advantage of the FEM is that it allows realistic modeling of tissue conductivity inhomogeneity. However, it is not straightforward to apply the classical model of a dipolar source with the FEM, due to its strong singularity and the resulting irregularity. The focus of this study is on comparing different methods to cope with this problem. In particular, we evaluate the accuracy of Whitney (Raviart-Thomas)-type dipole-like source currents compared to two reference dipole modeling methods: the St. Venant and partial integration approach. Common to all these methods is that they enable direct approximation of the potential field utilizing linear basis functions. In the present context, Whitney elements are particularly interesting, as they provide a simple means to model a divergence-conforming primary current vector field satisfying the square integrability condition. Our results show that a Whitney-type source model can provide simulation accuracy comparable to the present reference methods. It can lead to superior accuracy under optimized conditions with respect to both source location and orientation in a tetrahedral mesh. For random source orientations, the St. Venant approach turns out to be the method of choice over the interpolated version of the Whitney model. The overall moderate differences obtained suggest that practical aspects, such as the focality, should be prioritized when choosing a source model.

  2. Transversally enriched pipe element method (TEPEM): An effective numerical approach for blood flow modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla Alvarez, Luis; Blanco, Pablo; Bulant, Carlos; Dari, Enzo; Veneziani, Alessandro; Feijóo, Raúl

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach tailored to approximate the Navier-Stokes equations to simulate fluid flow in three-dimensional tubular domains of arbitrary cross-sectional shape. The proposed methodology is aimed at filling the gap between (cheap) one-dimensional and (expensive) three-dimensional models, featuring descriptive capabilities comparable with the full and accurate 3D description of the problem at a low computational cost. In addition, this methodology can easily be tuned or even adapted to address local features demanding more accuracy. The numerical strategy employs finite (pipe-type) elements that take advantage of the pipe structure of the spatial domain under analysis. While low order approximation is used for the longitudinal description of the physical fields, transverse approximation is enriched using high order polynomials. Although our application of interest is computational hemodynamics and its relevance to pathological dynamics like atherosclerosis, the approach is quite general and can be applied in any internal fluid dynamics problem in pipe-like domains. Numerical examples covering academic cases as well as patient-specific coronary arterial geometries demonstrate the potentialities of the developed methodology and its performance when compared against traditional finite element methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A parallel Discrete Element Method to model collisions between non-convex particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonirina, Andriarimina Daniel; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Wachs, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    In many dry granular and suspension flow configurations, particles can be highly non-spherical. It is now well established in the literature that particle shape affects the flow dynamics or the microstructure of the particles assembly in assorted ways as e.g. compacity of packed bed or heap, dilation under shear, resistance to shear, momentum transfer between translational and angular motions, ability to form arches and block the flow. In this talk, we suggest an accurate and efficient way to model collisions between particles of (almost) arbitrary shape. For that purpose, we develop a Discrete Element Method (DEM) combined with a soft particle contact model. The collision detection algorithm handles contacts between bodies of various shape and size. For nonconvex bodies, our strategy is based on decomposing a non-convex body into a set of convex ones. Therefore, our novel method can be called "glued-convex method" (in the sense clumping convex bodies together), as an extension of the popular "glued-spheres" method, and is implemented in our own granular dynamics code Grains3D. Since the whole problem is solved explicitly, our fully-MPI parallelized code Grains3D exhibits a very high scalability when dynamic load balancing is not required. In particular, simulations on up to a few thousands cores in configurations involving up to a few tens of millions of particles can readily be performed. We apply our enhanced numerical model to (i) the collapse of a granular column made of convex particles and (i) the microstructure of a heap of non-convex particles in a cylindrical reactor.

  4. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youshan; Teng, Jiwen; Xu, Tao; Badal, José

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  5. Higher-order triangular spectral element method with optimized cubature points for seismic wavefield modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Youshan, E-mail: ysliu@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Teng, Jiwen, E-mail: jwteng@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); Xu, Tao, E-mail: xutao@mail.iggcas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Lithospheric Evolution, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100029 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Beijing, 100101 (China); Badal, José, E-mail: badal@unizar.es [Physics of the Earth, Sciences B, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    The mass-lumped method avoids the cost of inverting the mass matrix and simultaneously maintains spatial accuracy by adopting additional interior integration points, known as cubature points. To date, such points are only known analytically in tensor domains, such as quadrilateral or hexahedral elements. Thus, the diagonal-mass-matrix spectral element method (SEM) in non-tensor domains always relies on numerically computed interpolation points or quadrature points. However, only the cubature points for degrees 1 to 6 are known, which is the reason that we have developed a p-norm-based optimization algorithm to obtain higher-order cubature points. In this way, we obtain and tabulate new cubature points with all positive integration weights for degrees 7 to 9. The dispersion analysis illustrates that the dispersion relation determined from the new optimized cubature points is comparable to that of the mass and stiffness matrices obtained by exact integration. Simultaneously, the Lebesgue constant for the new optimized cubature points indicates its surprisingly good interpolation properties. As a result, such points provide both good interpolation properties and integration accuracy. The Courant–Friedrichs–Lewy (CFL) numbers are tabulated for the conventional Fekete-based triangular spectral element (TSEM), the TSEM with exact integration, and the optimized cubature-based TSEM (OTSEM). A complementary study demonstrates the spectral convergence of the OTSEM. A numerical example conducted on a half-space model demonstrates that the OTSEM improves the accuracy by approximately one order of magnitude compared to the conventional Fekete-based TSEM. In particular, the accuracy of the 7th-order OTSEM is even higher than that of the 14th-order Fekete-based TSEM. Furthermore, the OTSEM produces a result that can compete in accuracy with the quadrilateral SEM (QSEM). The high accuracy of the OTSEM is also tested with a non-flat topography model. In terms of computational

  6. Rayleigh's, Stoneley's, and Scholte's Interface Waves in Elastic Models Using a Boundary Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Flores-Mendez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on studying interface waves for three canonical models, that is, interfaces formed by vacuum-solid, solid-solid, and liquid-solid. These interfaces excited by dynamic loads cause the emergence of Rayleigh's, Stoneley's, and Scholte's waves, respectively. To perform the study, the indirect boundary element method is used, which has proved to be a powerful tool for numerical modeling of problems in elastodynamics. In essence, the method expresses the diffracted wave field of stresses, pressures, and displacements by a boundary integral, also known as single-layer representation, whose shape can be regarded as a Fredholm's integral representation of second kind and zero order. This representation can be considered as an exemplification of Huygens' principle, which is equivalent to Somigliana's representation theorem. Results in frequency domain for the three types of interfaces are presented; then, using the fourier discrete transform, we derive the results in time domain, where the emergence of interface waves is highlighted.

  7. A parallel Discrete Element Method to model collisions between non-convex particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakotonirina Andriarimina Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In many dry granular and suspension flow configurations, particles can be highly non-spherical. It is now well established in the literature that particle shape affects the flow dynamics or the microstructure of the particles assembly in assorted ways as e.g. compacity of packed bed or heap, dilation under shear, resistance to shear, momentum transfer between translational and angular motions, ability to form arches and block the flow. In this talk, we suggest an accurate and efficient way to model collisions between particles of (almost arbitrary shape. For that purpose, we develop a Discrete Element Method (DEM combined with a soft particle contact model. The collision detection algorithm handles contacts between bodies of various shape and size. For nonconvex bodies, our strategy is based on decomposing a non-convex body into a set of convex ones. Therefore, our novel method can be called “glued-convex method” (in the sense clumping convex bodies together, as an extension of the popular “glued-spheres” method, and is implemented in our own granular dynamics code Grains3D. Since the whole problem is solved explicitly, our fully-MPI parallelized code Grains3D exhibits a very high scalability when dynamic load balancing is not required. In particular, simulations on up to a few thousands cores in configurations involving up to a few tens of millions of particles can readily be performed. We apply our enhanced numerical model to (i the collapse of a granular column made of convex particles and (i the microstructure of a heap of non-convex particles in a cylindrical reactor.

  8. Modeling mixed boundary conditions in a Hilbert space with the complex variable boundary element method (CVBEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Anthony N; Hromadka, T V

    2015-01-01

    The Laplace equation that results from specifying either the normal or tangential force equilibrium equation in terms of the warping functions or its conjugate can be modeled as a complex variable boundary element method or CVBEM mixed boundary problem. The CVBEM is a well-known numerical technique that can provide solutions to potential value problems in two or more dimensions by the use of an approximation function that is derived from the Cauchy Integral in complex analysis. This paper highlights three customizations to the technique.•A least squares approach to modeling the complex-valued approximation function will be compared and analyzed to determine if modeling error on the boundary can be reduced without the need to find and evaluated additional linearly independent complex functions.•The nodal point locations will be moved outside the problem domain.•Contour and streamline plots representing the warping function and its complementary conjugate are generated simultaneously from the complex-valued approximating function.

  9. Peridynamic Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bond, Stephen D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, Stan Gerald [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The problem of computing quantum-accurate design-scale solutions to mechanics problems is rich with applications and serves as the background to modern multiscale science research. The prob- lem can be broken into component problems comprised of communicating across adjacent scales, which when strung together create a pipeline for information to travel from quantum scales to design scales. Traditionally, this involves connections between a) quantum electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics and between b) molecular dynamics and local partial differ- ential equation models at the design scale. The second step, b), is particularly challenging since the appropriate scales of molecular dynamic and local partial differential equation models do not overlap. The peridynamic model for continuum mechanics provides an advantage in this endeavor, as the basic equations of peridynamics are valid at a wide range of scales limiting from the classical partial differential equation models valid at the design scale to the scale of molecular dynamics. In this work we focus on the development of multiscale finite element methods for the peridynamic model, in an effort to create a mathematically consistent channel for microscale information to travel from the upper limits of the molecular dynamics scale to the design scale. In particular, we first develop a Nonlocal Multiscale Finite Element Method which solves the peridynamic model at multiple scales to include microscale information at the coarse-scale. We then consider a method that solves a fine-scale peridynamic model to build element-support basis functions for a coarse- scale local partial differential equation model, called the Mixed Locality Multiscale Finite Element Method. Given decades of research and development into finite element codes for the local partial differential equation models of continuum mechanics there is a strong desire to couple local and nonlocal models to leverage the speed and state of the

  10. Numerical Modeling of Stokes Flow in a Circular Cavity by Variational Multiscale Element Free Galerkin Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The variational multiscale element free Galerkin method is extended to simulate the Stokes flow problems in a circular cavity as an irregular geometry. The method is combined with Hughes’s variational multiscale formulation and element free Galerkin method; thus it inherits the advantages of variational multiscale and meshless methods. Meanwhile, a simple technique is adopted to impose the essential boundary conditions which makes it easy to solve problems with complex area. Finally, two examples are solved and good results are obtained as compared with solutions of analytical and numerical methods, which demonstrates that the proposed method is an attractive approach for solving incompressible fluid flow problems in terms of accuracy and stability, even for complex irregular boundaries.

  11. Application of Finite Element Modeling Methods in Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Research and Clinical Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fwu, Peter Tramyeon

    The medical image is very complex by its nature. Modeling built upon the medical image is challenging due to the lack of analytical solution. Finite element method (FEM) is a numerical technique which can be used to solve the partial differential equations. It utilized the transformation from a continuous domain into solvable discrete sub-domains. In three-dimensional space, FEM has the capability dealing with complicated structure and heterogeneous interior. That makes FEM an ideal tool to approach the medical-image based modeling problems. In this study, I will address the three modeling in (1) photon transport inside the human breast by implanting the radiative transfer equation to simulate the diffuse optical spectroscopy imaging (DOSI) in order to measurement the percent density (PD), which has been proven as a cancer risk factor in mammography. Our goal is to use MRI as the ground truth to optimize the DOSI scanning protocol to get a consistent measurement of PD. Our result shows DOSI measurement is position and depth dependent and proper scanning scheme and body configuration are needed; (2) heat flow in the prostate by implementing the Penne's bioheat equation to evaluate the cooling performance of regional hypothermia during the robot assisted radical prostatectomy for the individual patient in order to achieve the optimal cooling setting. Four factors are taken into account during the simulation: blood abundance, artery perfusion, cooling balloon temperature, and the anatomical distance. The result shows that blood abundance, prostate size, and anatomical distance are significant factors to the equilibrium temperature of neurovascular bundle; (3) shape analysis in hippocampus by using the radial distance mapping, and two registration methods to find the correlation between sub-regional change to the age and cognition performance, which might not reveal in the volumetric analysis. The result gives a fundamental knowledge of normal distribution in young

  12. Bending stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints applied with a use of finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Šimek

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented work focuses on bending moment stress modeling of dismountable furniture joints with a use of Finite Element Method. The joints are created from Minifix and Rondorfix cams combined with non-glued wooden dowels. Laminated particleboard 18 mm of thickness is used as a connected material. The connectors were chosen such as the most applied kind in furniture industry for the case furniture. All gained results were reciprocally compared to each other and also in comparison to experimental testing by the mean of stiffness. The non-linear numerical model of chosen joints was successfully created using the software Ansys Workbench. The detailed analysis of stress distribution in the joint was achieved with non-linear numerical simulation. A relationship between numerical si­mu­la­tion and experimental testing was showed by comparison stiffness tangents. A numerical simulation of RTA joint loads also demonstrated the important role of non-glued dowels in the tested joints. The low strength of particleboard in the tension parallel to surface (internal bond is the most likely the cause of the joint failure. Results are applicable for strength designing of furniture with the aid of Computer Aided Engineering.

  13. Evaluation of Test Methods for Triaxially Braided Composites using a Meso-Scale Finite Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chao

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of triaxially braided composite is complicate due to the nonuniformity of deformation within the unit cell as well as the possibility of the freeedge effect related to the large size of the unit cell. Extensive experimental investigation has been conducted to develop more accurate test approaches in characterizing the actual mechanical properties of the material we are studying. In this work, a meso-scale finite element model is utilized to simulate two complex specimens: notched tensile specimen and tube tensile specimen, which are designed to avoid the free-edge effect and free-edge effect induced premature edge damage. The full field strain data is predicted numerically and compared with experimental data obtained by Digit Image Correlation. The numerically predicted tensile strength values are compared with experimentally measured results. The discrepancy between numerically predicted and experimentally measured data, the capability of different test approaches are analyzed and discussed. The presented numerical model could serve as assistance to the evaluation of different test methods, and is especially useful in identifying potential local damage events.

  14. A multiscale modelling of bone ultrastructure elastic proprieties using finite elements simulation and neural network method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Tlili, Brahim; Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Hambli, Ridha

    2016-10-01

    Bone is a living material with a complex hierarchical structure which entails exceptional mechanical properties, including high fracture toughness, specific stiffness and strength. Bone tissue is essentially composed by two phases distributed in approximately 30-70%: an organic phase (mainly type I collagen and cells) and an inorganic phase (hydroxyapatite-HA-and water). The nanostructure of bone can be represented throughout three scale levels where different repetitive structural units or building blocks are found: at the first level, collagen molecules are arranged in a pentameric structure where mineral crystals grow in specific sites. This primary bone structure constitutes the mineralized collagen microfibril. A structural organization of inter-digitating microfibrils forms the mineralized collagen fibril which represents the second scale level. The third scale level corresponds to the mineralized collagen fibre which is composed by the binding of fibrils. The hierarchical nature of the bone tissue is largely responsible of their significant mechanical properties; consequently, this is a current outstanding research topic. Scarce works in literature correlates the elastic properties in the three scale levels at the bone nanoscale. The main goal of this work is to estimate the elastic properties of the bone tissue in a multiscale approach including a sensitivity analysis of the elastic behaviour at each length scale. This proposal is achieved by means of a novel hybrid multiscale modelling that involves neural network (NN) computations and finite elements method (FEM) analysis. The elastic properties are estimated using a neural network simulation that previously has been trained with the database results of the finite element models. In the results of this work, parametric analysis and averaged elastic constants for each length scale are provided. Likewise, the influence of the elastic constants of the tissue constituents is also depicted. Results highlight

  15. Stress Wave Propagation in Soils Modelled by the Boundary Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, K. M.

    This thesis deals with different aspects of the boundary element method (BEM) applied to stress wave propagation problems in soils. Among other things BEM formulations for coupled FEM and BEM, moving loads, direct BEM and indirect BEM are presented. For all the formulations both analytical...

  16. A nonconforming finite element method for the Biot’s consolidation model in poroelasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Hu (Xiaozhe); C. Rodrigo (Carmen); F.J. Gaspar Lorenz (Franscisco); C.W. Oosterlee (Cornelis)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractA stable finite element scheme that avoids pressure oscillations for a three-field Biot’s model in poroelasticity is considered. The involved variables are the displacements, fluid flux (Darcy velocity), and the pore pressure, and they are discretized by using the lowest possible

  17. The nonconforming virtual element method

    OpenAIRE

    de Dios, B. Ayuso; Lipnikov, K.; Manzini, G

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the nonconforming Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the approximation of second order elliptic problems. We present the construction of the new element in two and three dimensions, highlighting the main differences with the conforming VEM and the classical nonconforming finite element methods. We provide the error analysis and establish the equivalence with a family of mimetic finite difference methods.

  18. A multiscale finite element method for modeling fully coupled thermomechanical problems in solids

    KAUST Repository

    Sengupta, Arkaprabha

    2012-05-18

    This article proposes a two-scale formulation of fully coupled continuum thermomechanics using the finite element method at both scales. A monolithic approach is adopted in the solution of the momentum and energy equations. An efficient implementation of the resulting algorithm is derived that is suitable for multicore processing. The proposed method is applied with success to a strongly coupled problem involving shape-memory alloys. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. COMPARISON OF VIRTUAL FIELDS METHOD, PARALLEL NETWORK MATERIAL MODEL AND FINITE ELEMENT UPDATING FOR MATERIAL PARAMETER DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Dirisamer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracting material parameters from test specimens is very intensive in terms of cost and time, especially for viscoelastic material models, where the parameters are dependent of time (frequency, temperature and environmental conditions. Therefore, three different methods for extracting these parameters were tested. Firstly, digital image correlation combined with virtual fields method, secondly, a parallel network material model and thirdly, finite element updating. These three methods are shown and the results are compared in terms of accuracy and experimental effort.

  20. Modelling of interaction between a snow mantle and a flexible structure using a discrete element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nicot

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of improvement of protective techniques against natural phenomena such as snow avalanches continues to use classic methods for calculating flexible structures. This paper deals with a new method to design avalanche protection nets. This method is based on a coupled analysis of both net structure and snow mantle by using a Discrete Element Method. This has led to the development of computational software so that avalanche nets can be easily designed. This tool gives the evolution of the forces acting in several parts of the work as a function of the snow situation.

  1. A finite element method based microwave heat transfer modeling of frozen multi-component foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchai, Krishnamoorthy

    Microwave heating is fast and convenient, but is highly non-uniform. Non-uniform heating in microwave cooking affects not only food quality but also food safety. Most food industries develop microwavable food products based on "cook-and-look" approach. This approach is time-consuming, labor intensive and expensive and may not result in optimal food product design that assures food safety and quality. Design of microwavable food can be realized through a simulation model which describes the physical mechanisms of microwave heating in mathematical expressions. The objective of this study was to develop a microwave heat transfer model to predict spatial and temporal profiles of various heterogeneous foods such as multi-component meal (chicken nuggets and mashed potato), multi-component and multi-layered meal (lasagna), and multi-layered food with active packages (pizza) during microwave heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed by solving electromagnetic and heat transfer equations using finite element method in commercially available COMSOL Multiphysics v4.4 software. The microwave heat transfer model included detailed geometry of the cavity, phase change, and rotation of the food on the turntable. The predicted spatial surface temperature patterns and temporal profiles were validated against the experimental temperature profiles obtained using a thermal imaging camera and fiber-optic sensors. The predicted spatial surface temperature profile of different multi-component foods was in good agreement with the corresponding experimental profiles in terms of hot and cold spot patterns. The root mean square error values of temporal profiles ranged from 5.8 °C to 26.2 °C in chicken nuggets as compared 4.3 °C to 4.7 °C in mashed potatoes. In frozen lasagna, root mean square error values at six locations ranged from 6.6 °C to 20.0 °C for 6 min of heating. A microwave heat transfer model was developed to include susceptor assisted microwave heating of a

  2. iBem3D, a three-dimensional iterative boundary element method using angular dislocations for modeling geologic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerten, F.; Maerten, L.; Pollard, D. D.

    2014-11-01

    Most analytical solutions to engineering or geological problems are limited to simple geometries. For example, analytical solutions have been found to solve for stresses around a circular hole in a plate. To solve more complex problems, mathematicians and engineers have developed powerful computer-aided numerical methods, which can be categorized into two main types: differential methods and integral methods. The finite element method (FEM) is a differential method that was developed in the 1950s and is one of the most commonly used numerical methods today. Since its development, other differential methods, including the boundary element method (BEM), have been developed to solve different types of problems. The purpose of this paper is to describe iBem3D, formally called Poly3D, a C++ and modular 3D boundary element computer program based on the theory of angular dislocations for modeling three-dimensional (3D) discontinuities in an elastic, heterogeneous, isotropic whole- or half-space. After 20 years and more than 150 scientific publications, we present in detail the formulation behind this method, its enhancements over the years as well as some important applications in several domains of the geosciences. The main advantage of using this formulation, for describing geological objects such as faults, resides in the possibility of modeling complex geometries without gaps and overlaps between adjacent triangular dislocation elements, which is a significant shortcoming for models using rectangular dislocation elements. Reliability, speed, simplicity, and accuracy are enhanced in the latest version of the computer code. Industrial applications include subseismic fault modeling, fractured reservoir modeling, interpretation and validation of fault connectivity and reservoir compartmentalization, depleted area and fault reactivation, and pressurized wellbore stability. Academic applications include earthquake and volcano monitoring, hazard mitigation, and slope

  3. The role of lithological contrasts in the formation of sinkholes: a Distinct Element Method modelling perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Halbouni, Djamil; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    Sinkhole formation is a geological phenomenon resulting from dissolution and subrosion of rocks or sediments at depth, where large secondary pore space and cavities may develop, and from the eventual subsidence of the overburden. Although sinkholes may develop slowly as a natural process, their formation is often intensified by human activities. For instance, sinkhole hazard has intensified at the Dead Sea shoreline in the Middle East since the beginning of the recession of the Dead Sea level. Another example concerns sinkhole formation induced by solution mining of salt rock in the Lorraine district, France. Signs of precursors to collapse sinkholes have sometimes been indicated by monitoring studies, but are not well understood in terms of quantitative models. Here we report on a general, simplified approach to simulating sinkhole formation by using 2D Distinct Element Method (PFC2D) models comprising elastically bonded particles. The presence of bonds leads to elastic rock deformation under loading conditions and bond breakage may result in spontaneous formation of faults and cracks. Using different rheological parameters like Young's modulus, density, cohesion and friction coefficients, this method is able to simulate realistic rock layering contrasts. The dissolution or subrosion process leading to the formation of underground cavities is simulated via simple incremental particle deletion, whereby an arbitrary dissolution rate can be determined. Model structures preceding a sinkhole collapse, as well as precursory changes in density or porosity, are explicitly simulated and may be linked to measured geophysical parameters such as microseismicity, seismic velocity and electric conductivity. As well as examining precursory phenomena, we study the effect of lithological contrasts on (1) the geometry of sinkholes (diameter to depth ratio) and (2) the onset of collapse. Beside the formulation of general relations, we compare our simulations to well documented case

  4. A progress report on estuary modeling by the finite-element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, William G.

    1978-01-01

    Various schemes are investigated for finite-element modeling of two-dimensional surface-water flows. The first schemes investigated combine finite-element spatial discretization with split-step time stepping schemes that have been found useful in finite-difference computations. Because of the large number of numerical integrations performed in space and the large sparse matrices solved, these finite-element schemes were found to be economically uncompetitive with finite-difference schemes. A very promising leapfrog scheme is proposed which, when combined with a novel very fast spatial integration procedure, eliminates the need to solve any matrices at all. Additional problems attacked included proper propagation of waves and proper specification of the normal flow-boundary condition. This report indicates work in progress and does not come to a definitive conclusion as to the best approach for finite-element modeling of surface-water problems. The results presented represent findings obtained between September 1973 and July 1976. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Role of the Analytic Element Method in regional-scale GIS-based modeling of groundwater flow and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, I.

    2003-12-01

    The basic principle of the Analytic Element Method (AEM) is the superposition: complex regional-scale flows are simulated by adding the influences of individual analytic elements. Each analytic element contains geographic information and mathematical functions that describe its influence on regional groundwater flow. The main AEM advantage, relevant to GIS-based modeling, is a direct correspondence of analytic elements and hydrologic aquifer features (such as lakes, rivers, water-supply wells). The flow solution (water table elevation and fluxes) is created without discretization by including all relevant elements (or features). Several regional-scale groundwater models have been developed using the AEM include NAGROM (the National Groundwater Model of The Netherlands) and the Twin Cities Metropolitan Area Groundwater Model (Metro Model). The one-to-one correspondence of elements to hydrologic features allows for elegant integration of groundwater modeling and GIS software. This simplifies both model development and management. In contrast to finite-difference and finite-element based methods, the AEM does not require any grid-based data; all input data are vector-based. This representational style coincides well with the strengths of Geographic Information Systems. This presentation will focus on both the practical aspects of the AEM relevant to GIS-based modeling and the development of a new GIS-based user interface for AEM modeling. Recent computational advances related to regional-scale modeling using AEM will be discussed and demonstrated. These advances include (1) development of solution algorithms designed for massively parallel supercomputers where the same advantage (one-to-one correspondence of analytic elements and hydrologic features) is responsible for efficient implementation in parallel environments, and (2) algorithm enhancements designed for single-processor machines. Groundwater models with thousands of elements can hence be solved. A public

  6. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  7. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Wieding

    Full Text Available The use of finite element analysis (FEA has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with

  8. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, J.; van Herwijnen, A.; Chambon, G.; Birkeland, K. W.; Schweizer, J.

    2015-10-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e., to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST) experiments applying the discrete element (DE) method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, in order to compare the numerical and experimental results, the slab mechanical properties (Young's modulus and strength) which are not measured in the field were derived from density. The simulations nicely reproduced the process of crack propagation observed in field PSTs. Finally, the mechanical processes at play were analyzed in depth which led to suggestions for minimum column length in field PSTs.

  9. A three-dimensional finite element model of human atrial anatomy: new methods for cubic Hermite meshes with extraordinary vertices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Matthew J; Sturgeon, Gregory; Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Hake, Johan; Jonas, René; Stark, Paul; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Zhang, Yongjie; Segars, W Paul; McCulloch, Andrew D

    2013-07-01

    High-order cubic Hermite finite elements have been valuable in modeling cardiac geometry, fiber orientations, biomechanics, and electrophysiology, but their use in solving three-dimensional problems has been limited to ventricular models with simple topologies. Here, we utilized a subdivision surface scheme and derived a generalization of the "local-to-global" derivative mapping scheme of cubic Hermite finite elements to construct bicubic and tricubic Hermite models of the human atria with extraordinary vertices from computed tomography images of a patient with atrial fibrillation. To an accuracy of 0.6 mm, we were able to capture the left atrial geometry with only 142 bicubic Hermite finite elements, and the right atrial geometry with only 90. The left and right atrial bicubic Hermite meshes were G1 continuous everywhere except in the one-neighborhood of extraordinary vertices, where the mean dot products of normals at adjacent elements were 0.928 and 0.925. We also constructed two biatrial tricubic Hermite models and defined fiber orientation fields in agreement with diagrammatic data from the literature using only 42 angle parameters. The meshes all have good quality metrics, uniform element sizes, and elements with aspect ratios near unity, and are shared with the public. These new methods will allow for more compact and efficient patient-specific models of human atrial and whole heart physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Simplified Qualitative Discrete Numerical Model to Determine Cracking Pattern in Brittle Materials by Means of Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ochoa-Avendaño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the formulation, implementation, and validation of a simplified qualitative model to determine the crack path of solids considering static loads, infinitesimal strain, and plane stress condition. This model is based on finite element method with a special meshing technique, where nonlinear link elements are included between the faces of the linear triangular elements. The stiffness loss of some link elements represents the crack opening. Three experimental tests of bending beams are simulated, where the cracking pattern calculated with the proposed numerical model is similar to experimental result. The advantages of the proposed model compared to discrete crack approaches with interface elements can be the implementation simplicity, the numerical stability, and the very low computational cost. The simulation with greater values of the initial stiffness of the link elements does not affect the discontinuity path and the stability of the numerical solution. The exploded mesh procedure presented in this model avoids a complex nonlinear analysis and regenerative or adaptive meshes.

  11. A combined registration and finite element analysis method for fast estimation of intraoperative brain shift; phantom and animal model study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Amrollah; Ahmadian, Alireza; Rabbani, Shahram; Fattahi, Ehsan; Shirani, Shapour

    2017-12-01

    Finite element models for estimation of intraoperative brain shift suffer from huge computational cost. In these models, image registration and finite element analysis are two time-consuming processes. The proposed method is an improved version of our previously developed Finite Element Drift (FED) registration algorithm. In this work the registration process is combined with the finite element analysis. In the Combined FED (CFED), the deformation of whole brain mesh is iteratively calculated by geometrical extension of a local load vector which is computed by FED. While the processing time of the FED-based method including registration and finite element analysis was about 70 s, the computation time of the CFED was about 3.2 s. The computational cost of CFED is almost 50% less than similar state of the art brain shift estimators based on finite element models. The proposed combination of registration and structural analysis can make the calculation of brain deformation much faster. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Finite Element Modeling of Thermo Creep Processes Using Runge-Kutta Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Dimitrienko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo creep deformations for most heat-resistant alloys, as a rule, nonlinearly depend on stresses and are practically non- reversible. Therefore, to calculate the properties of these materials the theory of plastic flow is most widely used. Finite-element computations of a stress-strain state of structures with account of thermo creep deformations up to now are performed using main commercial software, including ANSYS package. However, in most cases to solve nonlinear creep equations, one should apply explicit or implicit methods based on the Euler method of approximation of time-derivatives. The Euler method is sufficiently efficient in terms of random access memory in computations, however this method is cumbersome in computation time and does not always provide a required accuracy for creep deformation computations.The paper offers a finite-element algorithm to solve a three-dimensional problem of thermo creep based on the Runge-Kutta finite-difference schemes of different orders with respect to time. It shows a numerical test example to solve the problem on the thermo creep of a beam under tensile loading. The computed results demonstrate that using the Runge-Kutta method with increasing accuracy order allows us to obtain a more accurate solution (with increasing accuracy order by 1 a relative error decreases, approximately, by an order too. The developed algorithm proves to be efficient enough and can be recommended for solving the more complicated problems of thermo creep of structures.

  13. Thermal Effects on Vibration and Control of Piezocomposite Kirchhoff Plate Modeled by Finite Elements Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sanbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and numerical results of the modeling of a smart plate are presented for optimal active vibration control. The smart plate consists of a rectangular aluminum piezocomposite plate modeled in cantilever configuration with surface bonded thermopiezoelectric patches. The patches are symmetrically bonded on top and bottom surfaces. A generic thermopiezoelastic theory for piezocomposite plate is derived, using linear thermopiezoelastic theory and Kirchhoff assumptions. Finite element equations for the thermopiezoelastic medium are obtained by using the linear constitutive equations in Hamilton’s principle together with the finite element approximations. The structure is modelled analytically and then numerically and the results of simulations are presented in order to visualize the states of their dynamics and the state of control. The optimal control LQG-Kalman filter is applied. By using this model, the study first gives the influences of the actuator/sensor pair placement and size on the response of the smart plate. Second, the effects of thermoelastic and pyroelectric couplings on the dynamics of the structure and on the control procedure are studied and discussed. It is shown that the effectiveness of the control is not affected by the applied thermal gradient and can be applied with or without this gradient at any time of plate vibrations.

  14. Analysis and modeling of different topologies for linear switched reluctance motor using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Ganji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, an electromagnetic simulation model is introduced for the conventional type of linear switched reluctance motor (LSRM in which the dynamic characteristics of the motor are predicted precisely by carrying out 2D finite element (FE transient analysis using ANSYS FE package. The simulation model is created totally in ANSYS parametric design language (APDL as a parametric model and it can be used easily for different designs of the conventional LSRMs. Introducing linear switched reluctance motor with segmental translator as a new type of LSRM, performance principles and design criteria are presented for two various topologies of this motor. Carrying out 2D FE transient analysis, dynamic characteristics of these two motors are predicted and compared to those obtained for the conventional LSRM.

  15. Methods for validation of the mass distribution of a full body finite element model - biomed 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A Bradley; Rhyne, Ashley C; Moreno, Daniel P; Gayzik, F Scott; Stitzel, Joel D

    2011-01-01

    Accurate mass distribution in computational human body models is essential for kinematic and kinetic validation. The purpose of this study was to validate the mass distribution of the 50th percentile male model (M50) developed as part of the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) project. The body segment centers of gravity (CG) of M50 were compared against published data in two ways: using a homogeneous body surface CAD model, and a Finite Element Model (FEM). Both the CAD and FEM models were generated from image data collected from the same 50th percentile male subject. Each model was partitioned into 11 segments, using segment planes constructed from bony landmarks acquired from the subject. CG’s of the CAD and FEA models were computed using commercially available software packages. Deviation between the literature data CG’s and CG’s of the FEM and CAD were 5.8% and 5.6% respectively when normalized by a regional characteristic length. Deviation between the FEM and CAD CG’s averaged 2.4% when normalized in the same fashion. Unlike the CAD and literature which both assume homogenous mass distribution, the FEM CG data account for varying densities of anatomical structures by virtue of the assigned material properties. This analysis validates the CG’s determined from each model by comparing them directly to well-known literature studies that rely only on anthropometric landmarks to determine the CG’s measurements. The results of this study will help enhance the biofidelity of the GHBMC M50 model.

  16. Analyzing the Mixing Dynamics of an Industrial Batch Bin Blender via Discrete Element Modeling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitraye Sen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A discrete element model (DEM has been developed for an industrial batch bin blender in which three different types of materials are mixed. The mixing dynamics have been evaluated from a model-based study with respect to the blend critical quality attributes (CQAs which are relative standard deviation (RSD and segregation intensity. In the actual industrial setup, a sensor mounted on the blender lid is used to determine the blend composition in this region. A model-based analysis has been used to understand the mixing efficiency in the other zones inside the blender and to determine if the data obtained near the blender-lid region are able to provide a good representation of the overall blend quality. Sub-optimal mixing zones have been identified and other potential sampling locations have been investigated in order to obtain a good approximation of the blend variability. The model has been used to study how the mixing efficiency can be improved by varying the key processing parameters, i.e., blender RPM/speed, fill level/volume and loading order. Both segregation intensity and RSD reduce at a lower fill level and higher blender RPM and are a function of the mixing time. This work demonstrates the use of a model-based approach to improve process knowledge regarding a pharmaceutical mixing process. The model can be used to acquire qualitative information about the influence of different critical process parameters and equipment geometry on the mixing dynamics.

  17. Numerical modeling of contaminant transport in fractured porous media using mixed finite-element and finitevolume methods

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods; i.e., the mixed finite-element (MFE) method and the finite-volume method. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocity fields for both the fractures and matrix, which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite-volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms, respectively. The temporary evolution for the pressure distributions, streamline fields, and concentration profiles are obtained for six different arrangements of fractures. The results clearly show the distorted concentration effects caused by the ordered and disordered (random) patterns of the fractures and illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model. © 2011 by Begell House Inc.

  18. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  19. Model of the saltation transport by Discrete Element Method coupled with wind interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oger, Luc; Valance, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    We study the Aeolian saltation transport problem by analysing the collision of incident energetic beads with granular packing. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyse the features of the consecutive collision process. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method) with 20000 particles (2D). The grains were displayed randomly in a box (250X60). A few incident disks are launched with a constant velocity and angle with high random position to initiate the flow. A wind velocity profile is applied on the flowing zone of the saltation. The velocity profile is obtained by the calculi of the counter-flow due to the local packing fraction induced by the granular flow. We analyse the evolution of the upper surface of the disk packing. In the beginning, the saltation process can be seen as the classical "splash function" in which one bead hits a fully static dense packing. Then, the quasi-fluidized upper layer of the packing creates a completely different behaviour of the "animated splash function". The dilation of the upper surface due to the previous collisions is responsible for a need of less input energy for launching new ejected disks. This phenomenon permits to maintain a constant granular flow with a "small" wind velocity on the surface of the disk bed.

  20. Model of the saltation transport by Discrete Element Method coupled with wind interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oger Luc

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the Aeolian saltation transport problem by analysing the collision of incident energetic beads with granular packing. We investigate the collision process for the case where the incident bead and those from the packing have identical mechanical properties. We analyse the features of the consecutive collision process. We used a molecular dynamics method known as DEM (soft Discrete Element Method with 20000 particles (2D. The grains were displayed randomly in a box (250X60. A few incident disks are launched with a constant velocity and angle with high random position to initiate the flow. A wind velocity profile is applied on the flowing zone of the saltation. The velocity profile is obtained by the calculi of the counter-flow due to the local packing fraction induced by the granular flow. We analyse the evolution of the upper surface of the disk packing. In the beginning, the saltation process can be seen as the classical “splash function” in which one bead hits a fully static dense packing. Then, the quasi-fluidized upper layer of the packing creates a completely different behaviour of the “animated splash function”. The dilation of the upper surface due to the previous collisions is responsible for a need of less input energy for launching new ejected disks. This phenomenon permits to maintain a constant granular flow with a “small” wind velocity on the surface of the disk bed.

  1. Finite Element Method (FEM) Modeling of Freeze-drying: Monitoring Pharmaceutical Product Robustness During Lyophilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Sadineni, Vikram; Maity, Mita; Quan, Yong; Enterline, Matthew; Mantri, Rao V

    2015-12-01

    Lyophilization is an approach commonly undertaken to formulate drugs that are unstable to be commercialized as ready to use (RTU) solutions. One of the important aspects of commercializing a lyophilized product is to transfer the process parameters that are developed in lab scale lyophilizer to commercial scale without a loss in product quality. This process is often accomplished by costly engineering runs or through an iterative process at the commercial scale. Here, we are highlighting a combination of computational and experimental approach to predict commercial process parameters for the primary drying phase of lyophilization. Heat and mass transfer coefficients are determined experimentally either by manometric temperature measurement (MTM) or sublimation tests and used as inputs for the finite element model (FEM)-based software called PASSAGE, which computes various primary drying parameters such as primary drying time and product temperature. The heat and mass transfer coefficients will vary at different lyophilization scales; hence, we present an approach to use appropriate factors while scaling-up from lab scale to commercial scale. As a result, one can predict commercial scale primary drying time based on these parameters. Additionally, the model-based approach presented in this study provides a process to monitor pharmaceutical product robustness and accidental process deviations during Lyophilization to support commercial supply chain continuity. The approach presented here provides a robust lyophilization scale-up strategy; and because of the simple and minimalistic approach, it will also be less capital intensive path with minimal use of expensive drug substance/active material.

  2. Study of normal and shear material properties for viscoelastic model of asphalt mixture by discrete element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Stang, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was studied by using discrete element method. The dynamic properties of asphalt mixture were captured by implementing Burger’s contact model. Different ways of taking into account of the normal and shear material properties of asphalt...... mixtures have been reviewed. Two models, Model I and Model II, with different design parameters were developed and compared. For Model I, Burger’s model parameters in normal and shear direction were calibrated by using laboratory test results from Frequency Sweep Test performed in both normal and shear...... direction, respectively; while for Model II, the same calibrated parameters in the normal direction were used, but the values for the shear direction were chosen to be equal with the normal direction. The complex modulus of asphalt mixtures were predicted for both optimized models by conducting DE...

  3. quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Bahadir

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  4. Stochastic finite element method with simple random elements

    OpenAIRE

    Starkloff, Hans-Jörg

    2008-01-01

    We propose a variant of the stochastic finite element method, where the random elements occuring in the problem formulation are approximated by simple random elements, i.e. random elements with only a finite number of possible values.

  5. Numerical modelling of effective thermal conductivity for modified geomaterial using lattice element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Zarghaam Haider; Shrestha, Dinesh; Sattari, Amir S.; Wuttke, Frank

    2018-02-01

    Macroscopic parameters such as effective thermal conductivity (ETC) is an important parameter which is affected by micro and meso level behaviour of particulate materials, and has been extensively examined in the past decades. In this paper, a new lattice based numerical model is developed to predict the ETC of sand and modified high thermal backfill material for energy transportation used for underground power cables. 2D and 3D simulations are performed to analyse and detect differences resulting from model simplification. The thermal conductivity of the granular mixture is determined numerically considering the volume and the shape of the each constituting portion. The new numerical method is validated with transient needle measurements and the existing theoretical and semi empirical models for thermal conductivity prediction sand and the modified backfill material for dry condition. The numerical prediction and the measured values are in agreement to a large extent.

  6. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  7. Programming the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, I M; Margetts, L

    2013-01-01

    Many students, engineers, scientists and researchers have benefited from the practical, programming-oriented style of the previous editions of Programming the Finite Element Method, learning how to develop computer programs to solve specific engineering problems using the finite element method. This new fifth edition offers timely revisions that include programs and subroutine libraries fully updated to Fortran 2003, which are freely available online, and provides updated material on advances in parallel computing, thermal stress analysis, plasticity return algorithms, convection boundary c

  8. Modeling of γ field around irradiated TRIGA fuel elements by R2S method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemen, Ambrožič; Luka, Snoj

    2017-09-01

    The JSI TRIGA reactor has several irradiation facilities with well characterized neutron fields. The characterization was performed by measurements and by utilizing Monte Carlo particle transport computational methods. Because of this, JSI TRIGA has become a reference center for neutron irradiation of detectors for ATLAS experiment (CERN). Thorough γ characterization of the reactor is however yet to be performed. Current Monte Carlo particle transport code only account for the prompt generation of neutron induced γ rays, which have been characterized, but are neglecting the time dependent delayed part, which may in some cases amount to more then 30% of total γ flux in an operation reactor, and is the only source of γ-rays after reactor shutdown. Several common approaches of modeling delayed -rays , namely D1S and R2S exist. In this paper an in-house developed R2S method code is described, coupling a Monte Carlo particle transport code MCNP6 and neutron activation code FISPACT-II, with intermediate steps performed by custom Python scripts. An example of its capabilities is presented in terms of evaluation of utilization of JSI TRIGA nuclear fuel as a viable γ-ray source. In the model, fresh nuclear fuel is considered and a silicon pipe sample is modeled in. Fuel activities, dose and kerma rates on the sample, as well as emitted γ-ray spectra and isotopic contribution to the contact dose are calculated and presented.

  9. Corrosive wear forecasting of steel elements on the basis of mathematical modeling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soloviev Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Life Extension and resistance increase of metal materials and constructions to the corrosion destruction processes is the most important scientific and technical problem. To solve this problem it is necessary to develop complex scientific research to study the corrosion phenomena, along with practical actions against corrosion directed to selecting new corrosion resistant metal materials and methods of their protection. This research is carried out for searching mathematical model which could predict corrosive wear in metal constructions with a certain accuracy taking into account design and the type of corrosion process.

  10. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; McGugan, Malcolm; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    2016-01-01

    FBG SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG) sensors into any kind of structure or application. The software removes the need of an fibre optic expert user, becoming more obvious the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using F...... sensors. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation....

  11. FBG_SiMul V1.0: Fibre Bragg grating signal simulation tool for finite element method models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FBG_SiMul V1.0 is a tool to study and design the implementation of fibre Bragg grating (FBG sensors solutions in any arbitrary loaded structure or application. The software removes the need for a fibre optic expert user and makes the sensor response of a structural health monitoring solution using FBG sensors more simple and fast. The software uses a modified T-Matrix method to simulate the FBG reflected spectrum based on the stress and strain from a finite element method model. The article describes the theory and algorithm implementation, followed by an empirical validation.

  12. Modelling the clamping force distribution among chips in press-pack IGBTs using the finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasmasan, Adrian Augustin; Busca, Christian; Teodorescu, Remus

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a FEM (finite element method) based mechanical model for PP (press-pack) IGBTs (insulated gate bipolar transistors) is presented, which can be used to calculate the clamping force distribution among chips under various clamping conditions. The clamping force is an important parameter...... for the chip, because it influences contact electrical resistance, contact thermal resistance and power cycling capability. Ideally, the clamping force should be equally distributed among chips, in order to maximize the reliability of the PP IGBT. The model is built around a hypothetical PP IGBT with 9 chips...

  13. Influence of the mineral bond between associations of crystallites on bone matrix mechanical properties. modeling by the finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avrunin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time on the basis of computer modeling using the finite element method the mechanical role of mineral compounds, binding all of the bone minerals in the whole monolith was evaluated. By multivariate computational experiments the authors established the qualitative features and obtained the quantitative assessment of the influence of the bridges on the stiffness and stress-strain state of the representative volume element (RVE. The effective elastic moduli of the nanocomposite bone RVE were estimated by the of finite element homogenization method taking into account the availability of bridges. The presence of the bridge enhances bone stiffness regardless of the direction of acting loads. Consequently, bridge plays an important biological role in increasing the strength properties of the skeleton at nonstandard directions of the load. Data presented in this paper show an extremely complex mechanical phenomena developing in the mineral matrix, which can be adequately assessed only by using a computer modeling based on the morphologically correct structural relationships of its components.

  14. The Assessment of Comprehensive Vulnerability of Chemical Industrial Park Based on Entropy Method and Matter-element Extension Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jingyi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on studying connotative meaning, evaluation methods and models for chemical industry park based on in-depth analysis of relevant research results in China and abroad, it summarizes and states the feature of menacing vulnerability and structural vulnerability and submits detailed influence factors such as personnel vulnerability, infrastructural vulnerability, environmental vulnerability and the vulnerability of safety managerial defeat. Using vulnerability scoping diagram establishes 21 evaluation indexes and an index system for the vulnerability evaluation of chemical industrial park. The comprehensive weights are calculated with entropy method, combining matter-element extension model to make the quantitative evaluation, then apply to evaluate some chemical industrial park successfully. This method provides a new ideas and ways for enhancing overall safety of the chemical industrial park.

  15. A Completely Discrete Heterogeneous Multiscale Finite Element Method for Multiscale Richards’ Equation of van Genuchten-Mualem Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fully discrete method for the multiscale Richards’ equation of van Genuchten-Mualem model which describes the flow transport in unsaturated heterogenous porous media. Under the framework of heterogeneous multiscale method (HMM, a fully discrete scheme combined with a regularized procedure is proposed. Including the numerical integration, the discretization is given by C0 piecewise finite element in space and an implicit scheme in time. Error estimates between the numerical solution and the solution of homogenized problem are derived under the assumption that the permeability is periodic. Numerical experiments with periodic and random permeability are carried out for the van Genuchten-Mualem model of Richards’ equation to show the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method.

  16. Digital image correlation and finite element modelling as a method to determine mechanical properties of human soft tissue in vivo

    CERN Document Server

    Moerman, Kevin M; Evans, Sam L; Simms, Ciaran K

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of human soft tissue are crucial for impact biomechanics, rehabilitation engineering and surgical simulation. Validation of these constitutive models using human data remains challenging and often requires the use of non-invasive imaging and inverse finite element (FE) analysis. Post processing data from imaging methods such as tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be challenging. Digital Image Correlation (DIC) however is a relatively straightforward imaging method and thus the goal of this study was to assess the use of DIC in combination with FE modelling to determine the bulk material properties of human soft tissue. Indentation experiments were performed on a silicone gel soft tissue phantom. A two camera DIC setup was then used to record the 3D surface deformation. The experiment was then simulated using a FE model.

  17. Thermal imbalance force modelling for a GPS satellite using the finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigue, Yvonne; Schutz, Bob E.

    1991-01-01

    Methods of analyzing the perturbation due to thermal radiation and determining its effects on the orbits of GPS satellites are presented, with emphasis on the FEM technique to calculate satellite solar panel temperatures which are used to determine the magnitude and direction of the thermal imbalance force. Although this force may not be responsible for all of the force mismodeling, conditions may work in combination with the thermal imbalance force to produce such accelerations on the order of 1.e-9 m/sq s. If submeter accurate orbits and centimeter-level accuracy for geophysical applications are desired, a time-dependent model of the thermal imbalance force should be used, especially when satellites are eclipsing, where the observed errors are larger than for satellites in noneclipsing orbits.

  18. Simulation-aided constitutive law development - Assessment of low triaxiality void nucleation models via extended finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jifeng; Kontsevoi, Oleg Y.; Xiong, Wei; Smith, Jacob

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a multi-scale computational framework has been established in order to investigate, refine and validate constitutive behaviors in the context of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) void mechanics model. The eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) has been implemented in order to (1) develop statistical volume elements (SVE) of a matrix material with subscale inclusions and (2) to simulate the multi-void nucleation process due to interface debonding between the matrix and particle phases. Our analyses strongly suggest that under low stress triaxiality the nucleation rate of the voids f˙ can be well described by a normal distribution function with respect to the matrix equivalent stress (σe), as opposed to that proposed (σbar + 1 / 3σkk) in the original form of the single void GTN model. The modified form of the multi-void nucleation model has been validated based on a series of numerical experiments with different loading conditions, material properties, particle shape/size and spatial distributions. The utilization of XFEM allows for an invariant finite element mesh to represent varying microstructures, which implies suitability for drastically reducing complexity in generating the finite element discretizations for large stochastic arrays of microstructure configurations. The modified form of the multi-void nucleation model is further applied to study high strength steels by incorporating first principles calculations. The necessity of using a phenomenological interface separation law has been fully eliminated and replaced by the physics-based cohesive relationship obtained from Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in order to provide an accurate macroscopic material response.

  19. Geometry reconstruction method for patient-specific finite element models for the assessment of tibia fracture risk in osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caouette, Christiane; Ikin, Nicole; Villemure, Isabelle; Arnoux, Pierre-Jean; Rauch, Frank; Aubin, Carl-Éric

    2017-04-01

    Lower limb deformation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) impairs ambulation and may lead to fracture. Corrective surgery is based on empirical assessment criteria. The objective was to develop a reconstruction method of the tibia for OI patients that could be used as input of a comprehensive finite element model to assess fracture risks. Data were obtained from three children with OI and tibia deformities. Four pQCT scans were registered to biplanar radiographs, and a template mesh was deformed to fit the bone outline. Cortical bone thickness was computed. Sensitivity of the model to missing slices of pQCT was assessed by calculating maximal von Mises stress for a vertical hopping load case. Sensitivity of the model to ±5 % of cortical thickness measurements was assessed by calculating loads at fracture. Difference between the mesh contour and bone outline on the radiographs was below 1 mm. Removal of one pQCT slice increased maximal von Mises stress by up to 10 %. Simulated ±5 % variation of cortical bone thickness leads to variations of up to 4.1 % on predicted fracture loads. Using clinically available tibia imaging from children with OI, the developed reconstruction method allowed the building of patient-specific finite element models.

  20. Numerical Simulation of Fluid-Solid Coupling in Fractured Porous Media with Discrete Fracture Model and Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingdong Zeng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-solid coupling is ubiquitous in the process of fluid flow underground and has a significant influence on the development of oil and gas reservoirs. To investigate these phenomena, the coupled mathematical model of solid deformation and fluid flow in fractured porous media is established. In this study, the discrete fracture model (DFM is applied to capture fluid flow in the fractured porous media, which represents fractures explicitly and avoids calculating shape factor for cross flow. In addition, the extended finite element method (XFEM is applied to capture solid deformation due to the discontinuity caused by fractures. More importantly, this model captures the change of fractures aperture during the simulation, and then adjusts fluid flow in the fractures. The final linear equation set is derived and solved for a 2D plane strain problem. Results show that the combination of discrete fracture model and extended finite element method is suited for simulating coupled deformation and fluid flow in fractured porous media.

  1. 3D adaptive finite element method for a phase field model for the moving contact line problems

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yi

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an adaptive finite element method for simulating the moving contact line problems in three dimensions. The model that we used is the coupled Cahn-Hilliard Navier-Stokes equations with the generalized Navier boundary condition(GNBC) proposed in [18]. In our algorithm, to improve the efficiency of the simulation, we use the residual type adaptive finite element algorithm. It is well known that the phase variable decays much faster away from the interface than the velocity variables. There- fore we use an adaptive strategy that will take into account of such difference. Numerical experiments show that our algorithm is both efficient and reliable. © 2013 American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  2. Finite element methods for engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Roger T

    2013-01-01

    This book is intended as a textbook providing a deliberately simple introduction to finite element methods in a way that should be readily understandable to engineers, both students and practising professionals. Only the very simplest elements are considered, mainly two dimensional three-noded “constant strain triangles”, with simple linear variation of the relevant variables. Chapters of the book deal with structural problems (beams), classification of a broad range of engineering into harmonic and biharmonic types, finite element analysis of harmonic problems, and finite element analysis of biharmonic problems (plane stress and plane strain). Full Fortran programs are listed and explained in detail, and a range of practical problems solved in the text. Despite being somewhat unfashionable for general programming purposes, the Fortran language remains very widely used in engineering. The programs listed, which were originally developed for use on mainframe computers, have been thoroughly updated for use ...

  3. Finite Element Modeling of Thermo Creep Processes Using Runge-Kutta Method

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. I. Dimitrienko; E. A. Gubareva; Yu. V. Yurin

    2015-01-01

    Thermo creep deformations for most heat-resistant alloys, as a rule, nonlinearly depend on stresses and are practically non- reversible. Therefore, to calculate the properties of these materials the theory of plastic flow is most widely used. Finite-element computations of a stress-strain state of structures with account of thermo creep deformations up to now are performed using main commercial software, including ANSYS package. However, in most cases to solve nonlinear creep equations, one s...

  4. Model sensitivity and use of the comparative finite element method in mammalian jaw mechanics: mandible performance in the gray wolf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijie Jack Tseng

    Full Text Available Finite Element Analysis (FEA is a powerful tool gaining use in studies of biological form and function. This method is particularly conducive to studies of extinct and fossilized organisms, as models can be assigned properties that approximate living tissues. In disciplines where model validation is difficult or impossible, the choice of model parameters and their effects on the results become increasingly important, especially in comparing outputs to infer function. To evaluate the extent to which performance measures are affected by initial model input, we tested the sensitivity of bite force, strain energy, and stress to changes in seven parameters that are required in testing craniodental function with FEA. Simulations were performed on FE models of a Gray Wolf (Canis lupus mandible. Results showed that unilateral bite force outputs are least affected by the relative ratios of the balancing and working muscles, but only ratios above 0.5 provided balancing-working side joint reaction force relationships that are consistent with experimental data. The constraints modeled at the bite point had the greatest effect on bite force output, but the most appropriate constraint may depend on the study question. Strain energy is least affected by variation in bite point constraint, but larger variations in strain energy values are observed in models with different number of tetrahedral elements, masticatory muscle ratios and muscle subgroups present, and number of material properties. These findings indicate that performance measures are differentially affected by variation in initial model parameters. In the absence of validated input values, FE models can nevertheless provide robust comparisons if these parameters are standardized within a given study to minimize variation that arise during the model-building process. Sensitivity tests incorporated into the study design not only aid in the interpretation of simulation results, but can also provide

  5. Analysis of blood cell particles in axial blood pump by using computational fluid dynamics/discrete element method model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizhi, Cheng; Jianping, Tan; ZHong, Yun; Yan, Xu

    2017-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics/discrete element method (CFD-DEM) model was used to investigate the microscopic motion law of blood cells in a blood pump. The macro-hydrostatic performance indexes of the blood pump, as well as the characteristics of motion, collision. Result showed that collision among the blood cells mainly occurred at the front guide and the back guide, and the collision rate between the blood cells and the wall surface was 2.3 times the collision rate among the blood cells at the front guide vane area of the vane rotor.

  6. 3D controlled-source electromagnetic modeling in anisotropic medium using edge-based finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Hongzhu; Xiong, Bin; Han, Muran

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a linear edge-based finite element method for numerical modeling of 3D controlled-source electromagnetic data in an anisotropic conductive medium. We use a nonuniform rectangular mesh in order to capture the rapid change of diffusive electromagnetic field within the regions...... of anomalous conductivity and close to the location of the source. In order to avoid the source singularity, we solve Maxwell's equation with respect to anomalous electric field. The nonuniform rectangular mesh can be transformed to hexahedral mesh in order to simulate the bathymetry effect. The sparse system...

  7. A multiscale finite element model validation method of composite cable-stayed bridge based on Probability Box theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rumian; Zong, Zhouhong; Niu, Jie; Liu, Qiqi; Zheng, Peijuan

    2016-05-01

    Modeling and simulation are routinely implemented to predict the behavior of complex structures. These tools powerfully unite theoretical foundations, numerical models and experimental data which include associated uncertainties and errors. A new methodology for multi-scale finite element (FE) model validation is proposed in this paper. The method is based on two-step updating method, a novel approach to obtain coupling parameters in the gluing sub-regions of a multi-scale FE model, and upon Probability Box (P-box) theory that can provide a lower and upper bound for the purpose of quantifying and transmitting the uncertainty of structural parameters. The structural health monitoring data of Guanhe Bridge, a composite cable-stayed bridge with large span, and Monte Carlo simulation were used to verify the proposed method. The results show satisfactory accuracy, as the overlap ratio index of each modal frequency is over 89% without the average absolute value of relative errors, and the CDF of normal distribution has a good coincidence with measured frequencies of Guanhe Bridge. The validated multiscale FE model may be further used in structural damage prognosis and safety prognosis.

  8. An improved method for upscaling borehole thermal energy storage using inverse finite element modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tordrup, Karl Woldum; Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Bjørn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Dimensioning of large-scale borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) is inherently uncertain due to the natural variability of thermal conductivity and heat capacity in the storage volume. We present an improved method for upscaling a pilot BTES to full scale and apply the method to an operational...

  9. 3-D direct current resistivity anisotropic modelling by goal-oriented adaptive finite element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhengyong; Qiu, Lewen; Tang, Jingtian; Wu, Xiaoping; Xiao, Xiao; Zhou, Zilong

    2018-01-01

    Although accurate numerical solvers for 3-D direct current (DC) isotropic resistivity models are current available even for complicated models with topography, reliable numerical solvers for the anisotropic case are still an open question. This study aims to develop a novel and optimal numerical solver for accurately calculating the DC potentials for complicated models with arbitrary anisotropic conductivity structures in the Earth. First, a secondary potential boundary value problem is derived by considering the topography and the anisotropic conductivity. Then, two a posteriori error estimators with one using the gradient-recovery technique and one measuring the discontinuity of the normal component of current density are developed for the anisotropic cases. Combing the goal-oriented and non-goal-oriented mesh refinements and these two error estimators, four different solving strategies are developed for complicated DC anisotropic forward modelling problems. A synthetic anisotropic two-layer model with analytic solutions verified the accuracy of our algorithms. A half-space model with a buried anisotropic cube and a mountain-valley model are adopted to test the convergence rates of these four solving strategies. We found that the error estimator based on the discontinuity of current density shows better performance than the gradient-recovery based a posteriori error estimator for anisotropic models with conductivity contrasts. Both error estimators working together with goal-oriented concepts can offer optimal mesh density distributions and highly accurate solutions.

  10. Modeling of the inhomogeneity of grain refinement during combined metal forming process by finite element and cellular automata methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majta, Janusz; Madej, Łukasz; Svyetlichnyy, Dmytro S.; Perzyński, Konrad; Kwiecień, Marcin, E-mail: mkwiecie@agh.edu.pl; Muszka, Krzysztof

    2016-08-01

    The potential of discrete cellular automata technique to predict the grain refinement in wires produced using combined metal forming process is presented and discussed within the paper. The developed combined metal forming process can be treated as one of the Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) techniques that consists of three different modes of deformation: asymmetric drawing with bending, namely accumulated angular drawing (AAD), wire drawing (WD) and wire flattening (WF). To accurately replicate complex stress state both at macro and micro scales during subsequent deformations two stage modeling approach was used. First, the Finite Element Method (FEM), implemented in commercial ABAQUS software, was applied to simulate entire combined forming process at the macro scale level. Then, based on FEM results, the Cellular Automata (CA) method was applied for simulation of grain refinement at the microstructure level. Data transferred between FEM and CA methods included set of files with strain tensor components obtained from selected integration points in the macro scale model. As a result of CA simulation, detailed information on microstructure evolution during severe plastic deformation conditions was obtained, namely: changes of shape and sizes of modeled representative volume with imposed microstructure, changes of the number of grains, subgrains and dislocation cells, development of grain boundaries angle distribution as well as changes in the pole figures. To evaluate CA model predictive capabilities, results of computer simulation were compared with scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction images (SEM/EBSD) studies of samples after AAD+WD+WF process.

  11. Modeling of γ field around irradiated TRIGA fuel elements by R2S method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Ambrožič

    2017-01-01

    An example of its capabilities is presented in terms of evaluation of utilization of JSI TRIGA nuclear fuel as a viable γ-ray source. In the model, fresh nuclear fuel is considered and a silicon pipe sample is modeled in. Fuel activities, dose and kerma rates on the sample, as well as emitted γ-ray spectra and isotopic contribution to the contact dose are calculated and presented.

  12. A fully implicit finite element method for bidomain models of cardiac electromechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal, Hüsnü; Göktepe, Serdar; Kaliske, Michael; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel, monolithic, and unconditionally stable finite element algorithm for the bidomain-based approach to cardiac electromechanics. We introduce the transmembrane potential, the extracellular potential, and the displacement field as independent variables, and extend the common two-field bidomain formulation of electrophysiology to a three-field formulation of electromechanics. The intrinsic coupling arises from both excitation-induced contraction of cardiac cells and the deformation-induced generation of intra-cellular currents. The coupled reaction-diffusion equations of the electrical problem and the momentum balance of the mechanical problem are recast into their weak forms through a conventional isoparametric Galerkin approach. As a novel aspect, we propose a monolithic approach to solve the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling in a fully coupled, implicit sense. We demonstrate the consistent linearization of the resulting set of non-linear residual equations. To assess the algorithmic performance, we illustrate characteristic features by means of representative three-dimensional initial-boundary value problems. The proposed algorithm may open new avenues to patient specific therapy design by circumventing stability and convergence issues inherent to conventional staggered solution schemes.

  13. Finite Element Methods for real-time Haptic Feedback of Soft-Tissue Models in Virtual Reality Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andreas O.; Twombly, I. Alexander; Barth, Timothy J.; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have applied the linear elastic finite element method to compute haptic force feedback and domain deformations of soft tissue models for use in virtual reality simulators. Our results show that, for virtual object models of high-resolution 3D data (>10,000 nodes), haptic real time computations (>500 Hz) are not currently possible using traditional methods. Current research efforts are focused in the following areas: 1) efficient implementation of fully adaptive multi-resolution methods and 2) multi-resolution methods with specialized basis functions to capture the singularity at the haptic interface (point loading). To achieve real time computations, we propose parallel processing of a Jacobi preconditioned conjugate gradient method applied to a reduced system of equations resulting from surface domain decomposition. This can effectively be achieved using reconfigurable computing systems such as field programmable gate arrays (FPGA), thereby providing a flexible solution that allows for new FPGA implementations as improved algorithms become available. The resulting soft tissue simulation system would meet NASA Virtual Glovebox requirements and, at the same time, provide a generalized simulation engine for any immersive environment application, such as biomedical/surgical procedures or interactive scientific applications.

  14. The NASA/industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) program: Boeing Helicopters airframe finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, R.; Lang, P.; Reed, D.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models based on the finite element method of structural analysis, as embodied in the NASTRAN computer code, are routinely used by the helicopter industry to calculate airframe static internal loads used for sizing structural members. Historically, less reliance has been placed on the vibration predictions based on these models. Beginning in the early 1980's NASA's Langley Research Center initiated an industry wide program with the objective of engendering the needed trust in vibration predictions using these models and establishing a body of modeling guides which would enable confident future prediction of airframe vibration as part of the regular design process. Emphasis in this paper is placed on the successful modeling of the Army/Boeing CH-47D which showed reasonable correlation with test data. A principal finding indicates that improved dynamic analysis requires greater attention to detail and perhaps a finer mesh, especially the mass distribution, than the usual stress model. Post program modeling efforts show improved correlation placing key modal frequencies in the b/rev range with 4 percent of the test frequencies.

  15. Lagrangian Finite Element Method for 3D Time-Dependent Viscoelastic Flow Computations using Integral Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2000-01-01

    The 3D-LIM has as yet been used to simulate the following two three-dimensional problems. First, the method has been used to simulete for viscoelastic end-plate instability that occurs under certain conditions in the transient filament stretching apparatus for pressure sensitive adhesives...

  16. Transient Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractured Aquifer of Sechahoon Iron Mine Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Darabi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the fact that a large volume of iron reserve in the Sechahoon Iron Mine in Yazd Province has located under the water table, it is necessary to conduct a comprehensive study on water flow within the pit and its surroundings. The conceptual model of the aquifer was created using surface and underground geological information compared with water table data of the area of interest. In the data preparation stages, in order to create the numerical model, Logan and Lufran tests were studied to determine the hydrodynamic coefficients of the layers, precipitation and evaporation were investigated, and fractures and faults of the region, as a medium for flow channels in the hard formation, were also studied. The model was created in a transient state between 2000 and 2014. To validate its results, the water table was measured 4 times in the last 4 months of 2014. Considering the complexities in the heterogeneous fractured aquifer of the study area, numerical modeling results for the basin in a transient state present 90 percent correlation with field studies. Having investigated the water balance in the region, the boundary condition of the model was determined as the input water from the eastern south and the runoff water in the western north of the region. Since the general trend of faults in the area is north-south, variation in the water table is slight on north-south and intense on the east-west direction. On the other hand, due to the fact that the maximum flow is along the faults and fractures, the water table contour lines in different locations over the region are closed.

  17. Finite elements methods in mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Eslami, M Reza

    2014-01-01

    This book covers all basic areas of mechanical engineering, such as fluid mechanics, heat conduction, beams, and elasticity with detailed derivations for the mass, stiffness, and force matrices. It is especially designed to give physical feeling to the reader for finite element approximation by the introduction of finite elements to the elevation of elastic membrane. A detailed treatment of computer methods with numerical examples are provided. In the fluid mechanics chapter, the conventional and vorticity transport formulations for viscous incompressible fluid flow with discussion on the method of solution are presented. The variational and Galerkin formulations of the heat conduction, beams, and elasticity problems are also discussed in detail. Three computer codes are provided to solve the elastic membrane problem. One of them solves the Poisson’s equation. The second computer program handles the two dimensional elasticity problems, and the third one presents the three dimensional transient heat conducti...

  18. A Full-wave Model for Wave Propagation and Dissipation in the Inner Magnetosphere Using the Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest Valeo, Jay R. Johnson, Eun-Hwa and Cynthia Phillips

    2012-03-13

    A wide variety of plasma waves play an important role in the energization and loss of particles in the inner magnetosphere. Our ability to understand and model wave-particle interactions in this region requires improved knowledge of the spatial distribution and properties of these waves as well as improved understanding of how the waves depend on changes in solar wind forcing and/or geomagnetic activity. To this end, we have developed a two-dimensional, finite element code that solves the full wave equations in global magnetospheric geometry. The code describes three-dimensional wave structure including mode conversion when ULF, EMIC, and whistler waves are launched in a two-dimensional axisymmetric background plasma with general magnetic field topology. We illustrate the capabilities of the code by examining the role of plasmaspheric plumes on magnetosonic wave propagation; mode conversion at the ion-ion and Alfven resonances resulting from external, solar wind compressions; and wave structure and mode conversion of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves launched in the equatorial magnetosphere, which propagate along the magnetic field lines toward the ionosphere. We also discuss advantages of the finite element method for resolving resonant structures, and how the model may be adapted to include nonlocal kinetic effects.

  19. Implementation of VPSC polycrystal model into rigid plastic finite element method and its application to Erichsen test of Mg alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Gyeong Pil; Lee, Kyounghoon; Kim, Yong Hwan; Park, Sang Jun; Shin, Kwang Seon

    2017-09-01

    A methodology on the multiscale simulation of metal forming processes is presented, which fully integrates the visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal model into rigid plastic finite element method (FEM). To accurately predict the material behavior of a magnesium alloy from the microstructural level, the VPSC crystal plasticity model was used as a constitutive equation in this methodology. An optimization program VPSC-GA was developed in order to calculate the hardening parameters for each slip and twin mode of a single crystal from a couple of simple tension/compression tests. The existing constitutive equation for rigid plastic FEM is modified using the deviatoric stress components and the derivatives of them with respect to strain rate components. The stiffness matrix and the load vector were derived based on a new approach and implemented into DEFORMTM-3D via a user subroutine which handles stiffness matrix in elemental level. An application to the Erichsen tests of magnesium alloys was done and the stretch formability of two different Mg alloy sheets was analyzed using the results of both experiment and simulation.

  20. Geodetic Inversion Analysis Method of Coseismic Slip Distribution Using a Three-dimensional Finite Element High-fidelity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hirahara, K.; Hori, T.; Hyodo, M.; Hori, M.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have focused on geodetic inversion analysis method of coseismic slip distribution with combination of observation data of coseismic crustal deformation on the ground and simplified crustal models such like analytical solution in elastic half-space (Okada, 1985). On the other hand, displacements on the seafloor or near trench axes due to actual earthquakes has been observed by seafloor observatories (e.g. the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake (Tohoku Earthquake) (Sato et. al. 2011) (Kido et. al. 2011)). Also, some studies on tsunamis due to the Tohoku Earthquake indicate that large fault slips near the trench axis may have occurred. Those facts suggest that crustal models considering complex geometry and heterogeneity of the material property near the trench axis should be used for geodetic inversion analysis. Therefore, our group has developed a mesh generation method for finite element models of the Japanese Islands of higher fidelity and a fast crustal deformation analysis method for the models. Degree-of-freedom of the models generated by this method is about 150 million. In this research, the method is extended for inversion analyses of coseismic slip distribution. Since inversion analyses need computation of hundreds of slip response functions due to a unit fault slip assigned for respective divided cells on the fault, parallel computing environment is used. Plural crustal deformation analyses are simultaneously run in a Message Passing Interface (MPI) job. In the job, dynamic load balancing is implemented so that a better parallel efficiency is obtained. Submitting the necessary number of serial job of our previous method is also possible, but the proposed method needs less computation time, places less stress on file systems, and allows simpler job management. A method for considering the fault slip right near the trench axis is also developed. As the displacement distribution of unit fault slip for computing response function, 3rd order B

  1. Modeling Simultaneous Multiple Fracturing Using the Combined Finite-Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quansheng Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous multiple fracturing is a key technology to facilitate the production of shale oil/gas. When multiple hydraulic fractures propagate simultaneously, there is an interaction effect among these propagating hydraulic fractures, known as the stress-shadow effect, which has a significant impact on the fracture geometry. Understanding and controlling the propagation of simultaneous multiple hydraulic fractures and the interaction effects between multiple fractures are critical to optimizing oil/gas production. In this paper, the FDEM simulator and a fluid simulator are linked, named FDEM-Fluid, to handle hydromechanical-fracture coupling problems and investigate the simultaneous multiple hydraulic fracturing mechanism. The fractures propagation and the deformation of solid phase are solved by FDEM; meanwhile the fluid flow in the fractures is modeled using the principle of parallel-plate flow model. Several tests are carried out to validate the application of FDEM-Fluid in hydraulic fracturing simulation. Then, this FDEM-Fluid is used to investigate simultaneous multiple fractures treatment. Fractures repel each other when multiple fractures propagate from a single horizontal well, while the nearby fractures in different horizontal wells attract each other when multiple fractures propagate from multiple parallel horizontal wells. The in situ stress also has a significant impact on the fracture geometry.

  2. A Dynamic Eddy Viscosity Model for the Shallow Water Equations Solved by Spectral Element and Discontinuous Galerkin Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Simone; Suckale, Jenny; Giraldo, Francis X.; Constantinescu, Emil

    2016-04-01

    We present the solution of the viscous shallow water equations where viscosity is built as a residual-based subgrid scale model originally designed for large eddy simulation of compressible [1] and stratified flows [2]. The necessity of viscosity for a shallow water model not only finds motivation from mathematical analysis [3], but is supported by physical reasoning as can be seen by an analysis of the energetics of the solution. We simulated the flow of an idealized wave as it hits a set of obstacles. The kinetic energy spectrum of this flow shows that, although the inviscid Galerkin solutions -by spectral elements and discontinuous Galerkin [4]- preserve numerical stability in spite of the spurious oscillations in the proximity of the wave fronts, the slope of the energy cascade deviates from the theoretically expected values. We show that only a sufficiently small amount of dynamically adaptive viscosity removes the unwanted high-frequency modes while preserving the overall sharpness of the solution. In addition, it yields a physically plausible energy decay. This work is motivated by a larger interest in the application of a shallow water model to the solution of tsunami triggered coastal flows. In particular, coastal flows in regions around the world where coastal parks made of mitigation hills of different sizes and configurations are considered as a means to deviate the power of the incoming wave. References [1] M. Nazarov and J. Hoffman (2013) "Residual-based artificial viscosity for simulation of turbulent compressible flow using adaptive finite element methods" Int. J. Numer. Methods Fluids, 71:339-357 [2] S. Marras, M. Nazarov, F. X. Giraldo (2015) "Stabilized high-order Galerkin methods based on a parameter-free dynamic SGS model for LES" J. Comput. Phys. 301:77-101 [3] J. F. Gerbeau and B. Perthame (2001) "Derivation of the viscous Saint-Venant system for laminar shallow water; numerical validation" Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. Ser. B, 1:89?102 [4] F

  3. Method to Rapidly Collect Thousands of Velocity Observations to Validate Million-Element 2D Hydrodynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. R.; Pasternack, G. B.; Bratovich, P.; Massa, D.; Reedy, G.; Johnson, T.

    2010-12-01

    Two-dimensional (depth-averaged) hydrodynamic models have existed for decades and are used to study a variety of hydrogeomorphic processes as well as to design river rehabilitation projects. Rapid computer and coding advances are revolutionizing the size and detail of 2D models. Meanwhile, advances in topo mapping and environmental informatics are providing the data inputs to drive large, detailed simulations. Million-element computational meshes are in hand. With simulations of this size and detail, the primary challenge has shifted to finding rapid and inexpensive means for testing model predictions against observations. Standard methods for collecting velocity data include boat-mounted ADCP and point-based sensors on boats or wading rods. These methods are labor intensive and often limited to a narrow flow range. Also, they generate small datasets at a few cross-sections, which is inadequate to characterize the statistical structure of the relation between predictions and observations. Drawing on the long-standing oceanographic method of using drogues to track water currents, previous studies have demonstrated the potential of small dGPS units to obtain surface velocity in rivers. However, dGPS is too inaccurate to test 2D models. Also, there is financial risk in losing drogues in rough currents. In this study, an RTK GPS unit was mounted onto a manned whitewater kayak. The boater positioned himself into the current and used floating debris to maintain a speed and heading consistent with the ambient surface flow field. RTK GPS measurements were taken ever 5 sec. From these positions, a 2D velocity vector was obtained. The method was tested over ~20 km of the lower Yuba River in California in flows ranging from 500-5000 cfs, yielding 5816 observations. To compare velocity magnitude against the 2D model-predicted depth-averaged value, kayak-based surface values were scaled down by an optimized constant (0.72), which had no negative effect on regression analysis

  4. Simulation of Two-Fluid Flows by the Least-Squares Finite Element Method Using a Continuum Surface Tension Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Yu, Sheng-Tao; Jiang, Bo-nan

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a numerical procedure for simulating two-fluid flows is presented. This procedure is based on the Volume of Fluid (VOF) method proposed by Hirt and Nichols and the continuum surface force (CSF) model developed by Brackbill, et al. In the VOF method fluids of different properties are identified through the use of a continuous field variable (color function). The color function assigns a unique constant (color) to each fluid. The interfaces between different fluids are distinct due to sharp gradients of the color function. The evolution of the interfaces is captured by solving the convective equation of the color function. The CSF model is used as a means to treat surface tension effect at the interfaces. Here a modified version of the CSF model, proposed by Jacqmin, is used to calculate the tension force. In the modified version, the force term is obtained by calculating the divergence of a stress tensor defined by the gradient of the color function. In its analytical form, this stress formulation is equivalent to the original CSF model. Numerically, however, the use of the stress formulation has some advantages over the original CSF model, as it bypasses the difficulty in approximating the curvatures of the interfaces. The least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) is used to discretize the governing equation systems. The LSFEM has proven to be effective in solving incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and pure convection equations, making it an ideal candidate for the present applications. The LSFEM handles all the equations in a unified manner without any additional special treatment such as upwinding or artificial dissipation. Various bench mark tests have been carried out for both two dimensional planar and axisymmetric flows, including a dam breaking, oscillating and stationary bubbles and a conical liquid sheet in a pressure swirl atomizer.

  5. Modeling and analysis of the electromechanical behavior of surface-bonded piezoelectric actuators using finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Huangchao

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric actuators have been widely used to form a self-monitoring smart system to do Structural health monitoring (SHM). One of the most fundamental issues in using actuators is to determine the actuation effects being transferred from the actuators to the host structure. This report summaries the state of the art of modeling techniques for piezoelectric actuators and provides a numerical analysis of the static and dynamic electromechanical behavior of piezoelectric actuators surface-bonded to an elastic medium under in-plane mechanical and electric loads using finite element method. Also case study is conducted to study the effect of material properties, bonding layer and loading frequency using static and harmonic analysis of ANSYS. Finally, stresses and displacements are determined, and singularity behavior at the tips of the actuator is proved. The results indicate that material properties, bonding layers and frequency have a significant influence on the stresses transferred to the host structure.

  6. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T [Research Imaging Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-06-21

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  7. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, F S; Lancaster, J L; Fox, P T

    2009-06-21

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  8. Dual-mixed finite elements for the three-field Stokes model as a finite volume method on staggered grids

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2017-06-09

    In this paper, a new three-field weak formulation for Stokes problems is developed, and from this, a dual-mixed finite element method is proposed on a rectangular mesh. In the proposed mixed methods, the components of stress tensor are approximated by piecewise constant functions or Q1 functions, while the velocity and pressure are discretized by the lowest-order Raviart-Thomas element and the piecewise constant functions, respectively. Using quadrature rules, we demonstrate that this scheme can be reduced into a finite volume method on staggered grid, which is extensively used in computational fluid mechanics and engineering.

  9. A Multiscale Finite Element Model Validation Method of Composite Cable-Stayed Bridge Based on Structural Health Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumian Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-step response surface method for multiscale finite element model (FEM updating and validation is presented with respect to Guanhe Bridge, a composite cable-stayed bridge in the National Highway number G15, in China. Firstly, the state equations of both multiscale and single-scale FEM are established based on the basic equation in structural dynamic mechanics to update the multiscale coupling parameters and structural parameters. Secondly, based on the measured data from the structural health monitoring (SHM system, a Monte Carlo simulation is employed to analyze the uncertainty quantification and transmission, where the uncertainties of the multiscale FEM and measured data were considered. The results indicate that the relative errors between the calculated and measured frequencies are less than 2%, and the overlap ratio indexes of each modal frequency are larger than 80% without the average absolute value of relative errors. These demonstrate that the proposed method can be applied to validate the multiscale FEM, and the validated FEM can reflect the current conditions of the real bridge; thus it can be used as the basis for bridge health monitoring, damage prognosis (DP, and safety prognosis (SP.

  10. Application of the boundary elements method for modeling of the fracture of cylindrical bodies by hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legan, M. A.; Blinov, V. A.; Larichkin, A. Yu; Novoselov, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    Experimental study of hydraulic fracturing of thick-walled cylinders with a central circular hole was carried out using the machine that creates a high oil pressure. Experiments on the compression fracture of the solid cylinders by diameter and rectangular parallelepipeds perpendicular to the ends were carried out with a multipurpose test machine Zwick / Roell Z100. Samples were made of GF-177 material based on cement. Ultimate stresses in the material under study were determined for three types of stress state: under compression, with a pure shear on the surface of the hole under frecking conditions and under a compound stress state under conditions of diametral compression of a solid cylinder. The value of the critical stress intensity factor of GF-177 material was obtained. The modeling of the fracturing process taking into account the inhomogeneity of the stress state near the hole was carried out using the boundary elements method (in the variant of the fictitious load method) and the gradient fracture criterion. Calculation results of the ultimate pressure were compared with values obtained analytically on the basis of the Lame solution and with experimental data.

  11. Modeling of light dynamic cone penetration test - Panda 3 ® in granular material by using 3D Discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quoc Anh; Chevalier, Bastien; Benz, Miguel; Breul, Pierre; Gourvès, Roland

    2017-06-01

    The recent technological developments made on the light dynamic penetration test Panda 3 ® provide a dynamic load-penetration curve σp - sp for each impact. This curve is influenced by the mechanical and physical properties of the investigated granular media. In order to analyze and exploit the load-penetration curve, a numerical model of penetration test using 3D Discrete Element Method is proposed for reproducing tests in dynamic conditions in granular media. All parameters of impact used in this model have at first been calibrated by respecting mechanical and geometrical properties of the hammer and the rod. There is a good agreement between experimental results and the ones obtained from simulations in 2D or 3D. After creating a sample, we will simulate the Panda 3 ®. It is possible to measure directly the dynamic load-penetration curve occurring at the tip for each impact. Using the force and acceleration measured in the top part of the rod, it is possible to separate the incident and reflected waves and then calculate the tip's load-penetration curve. The load-penetration curve obtained is qualitatively similar with that obtained by experimental tests. In addition, the frequency analysis of the measured signals present also a good compliance with that measured in reality when the tip resistance is qualitatively similar.

  12. Thermal Modeling and Design of On-board DC-DC Power Converter using Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Zygimantas; Zhang, Zhe; Pittini, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    , and also the potential of such analysis was demonstrated by real - world measurements and comparison of obtained results . Thermal modeling was accomplishe d using finite element anal ysis software COMSOL and thermo - imaging camera was used to measure the thermal field distribution. Also, the improved...

  13. Thermal Modelling and Design of On-board DC-DC Power Converter using Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staliulionis, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Pittini, R.

    2014-01-01

    the potential of such analysis was demonstrated by real-world measurements and comparison of obtained results. Thermal modelling was accomplished using finite element analysis software COMSOL and thermo-imaging camera was used to measure the thermal field distribution. Also, the improved configuration of power...

  14. Two-Dimensional Boundary Element Method Application for Surface Deformation Modeling around Lembang and Cimandiri Fault, West Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahya, M. J.; Sanny, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    Lembang and Cimandiri fault are active faults in West Java that thread people near the faults with earthquake and surface deformation risk. To determine the deformation, GPS measurements around Lembang and Cimandiri fault was conducted then the data was processed to get the horizontal velocity at each GPS stations by Graduate Research of Earthquake and Active Tectonics (GREAT) Department of Geodesy and Geomatics Engineering Study Program, ITB. The purpose of this study is to model the displacement distribution as deformation parameter in the area along Lembang and Cimandiri fault using 2-dimensional boundary element method (BEM) using the horizontal velocity that has been corrected by the effect of Sunda plate horizontal movement as the input. The assumptions that used at the modeling stage are the deformation occurs in homogeneous and isotropic medium, and the stresses that acted on faults are in elastostatic condition. The results of modeling show that Lembang fault had left-lateral slip component and divided into two segments. A lineament oriented in southwest-northeast direction is observed near Tangkuban Perahu Mountain separating the eastern and the western segments of Lembang fault. The displacement pattern of Cimandiri fault shows that Cimandiri fault is divided into the eastern segment with right-lateral slip component and the western segment with left-lateral slip component separated by a northwest-southeast oriented lineament at the western part of Gede Pangrango Mountain. The displacement value between Lembang and Cimandiri fault is nearly zero indicating that Lembang and Cimandiri fault are not connected each other and this area is relatively safe for infrastructure development.

  15. Some observations concerning blade-element-momentum (BEM) methods and vortex wake methods, including numerical experiments with a simple vortex model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snel, H. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy (Netherlands)

    1997-08-01

    Recently the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) method has been made more versatile. Inclusion of rotational effects on time averaged profile coefficients have improved its achievements for performance calculations in stalled flow. Time dependence as a result of turbulent inflow, pitching actions and yawed operation is now treated more correctly (although more improvement is needed) than before. It is of interest to note that adaptations in modelling of unsteady or periodic induction stem from qualitative and quantitative insights obtained from free vortex models. Free vortex methods and further into the future Navier Stokes (NS) calculations, together with wind tunnel and field experiments, can be very useful in enhancing the potential of BEM for aero-elastic response calculations. It must be kept in mind however that extreme caution must be used with free vortex methods, as will be discussed in the following chapters. A discussion of the shortcomings and the strength of BEM and of vortex wake models is given. Some ideas are presented on how BEM might be improved without too much loss of efficiency. (EG)

  16. Application of Finite Element Method of Numerical Modelling to Understand Toe Buckling Deformation in the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridl, Romy; Bell, David; Villeneuve, Marlene

    2017-04-01

    Toe buckling deformation is a temporal product of induced stresses concentrated at the base of a slope. Prolonged induced stresses may lead to yielding of an anisotropic rock mass, either through rheological creep deformation (flexural toe buckling) or brittle failure (hinge buckling). Progressive deformation can lead to the breakout at the buckled toe and ultimately result in deep seated displacements on a mountain range scale, referred to as deep seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD). DSGSD can have a considerable impact on civil infrastructure and should be well understood for hazard identification, to inform civil engineering design and for resource management purposes. Toe buckling deformation was identified beneath the basal sliding zone of three large (≥50 Mm3) landslides in the Cromwell Gorge, New Zealand. This area was subjected to extensive geotechnical investigations for the Clyde Hydropower Scheme. During these investigations seventeen major landslides were identified in the Cromwell Gorge and subsequently stabilised. The data from the landslide stabilisation project, including 26.7 km of boreholes and 9 km of tunnels, for the three landslides exhibiting toe buckling was made available for this study. This comprehensive database has enabled comparison and validation of numerical simulations carried out for the Cromwell Gorge. The application of numerical modelling has demonstrated that toe buckling within the Cromwell Gorge is a result of the combination of induced stresses acting on an anisotropic schistose rock mass. The induced stresses comprise: i) topographically-induced gravitational stresses parallel to the slope, associated with the evolution of the Cromwell Gorge from a relatively low relief surface to present day topography (1400 m deep valley), and ii) active far-field tectonic stresses associated with the obliquely convergent stress regime of the Australian-Pacific continent plate boundary. Finite Element Method (FEM) numerical

  17. Viscoelastic modeling of apples under quasi-static loading using finite element method to investigate the causes of bruising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Ghasemi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Apple is one of the most important horticultural crops of Iran. Its production in the country stands in the second place after citrus. Iran holds the fourth place in the world production of apples and gains a major share in the export of this product. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the quantity and quality of the fruit in order to maintain and promote its position among the countries importing this product from Iran. Most of the mechanical damages to fruits and vegetables occur due to contact stresses under static, quasi-static and impact loading. To obtain stress distribution inside the fruit we can use finite element analysis. The aim of this study was to simulate the behavior of the apple as a viscoelastic body subjected to quasi-static loading and also to determine the failure criteria (maximum normal stress or shear stress of apple flesh to estimate its susceptibility to mechanical bruising. Materials and methods: In this study, Golab kohanz apple was used. Two samples were removed from each apple using a core sampler, one was used for uniaxial compression and the other was used for confined compression test using Instron universal tension and compression machine. Spherical indenter and parallel plate tests were performed in order to study apple susceptibility to bruising at four deformation levels (1, 2, 3 and 4 mm and the bruise volume was then measured after 24 hours. Stress-strain curves were plotted and then, the elastic and viscoelastic properties were obtained. Then, by using the data obtained from apple properties, the apple was modeled in Abaqus software as spherical and cylindrical shapes with viscoelastic behavior subjected to quasi-static loadings. Results and Discussion: The normal stress distribution of the modeled apple in the shape of a cylindrical sample is shown in Fig. 4. The value of maximum normal stress was obtained (0.51 MPa at the contact point of the loading plate with the sample. Experimental

  18. Discrete element method modeling of the triboelectric charging of polyethylene particles: Can particle size distribution and segregation reduce the charging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Ladislav; Kosek, Juraj

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene particles of various sizes are present in industrial gas-dispersion reactors and downstream processing units. The contact of the particles with a device wall as well as the mutual particle collisions cause electrons on the particle surface to redistribute in the system. The undesirable triboelectric charging results in several operational problems and safety risks in industrial systems, for example in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor. We studied the charging of polyethylene particles caused by the particle-particle interactions in gas. Our model employs the Discrete Element Method (DEM) describing the particle dynamics and incorporates the ‘Trapped Electron Approach’ as the physical basis for the considered charging mechanism. The model predicts the particle charge distribution for systems with various particle size distributions and various level of segregation. Simulation results are in a qualitative agreement with experimental observations of similar particulate systems specifically in two aspects: 1) Big particles tend to gain positive charge and small particles the negative one. 2) The wider the particle size distribution is, the more pronounced is the charging process. Our results suggest that not only the size distribution, but also the effect of the spatial segregation of the polyethylene particles significantly influence the resulting charge distribution ‘generated’ in the system. The level of particle segregation as well as the particle size distribution of polyethylene particles can be in practice adjusted by the choice of supported catalysts, by the conditions in the fluidized-bed polymerization reactor and by the fluid dynamics. We also attempt to predict how the reactor temperature affects the triboelectric charging of particles.

  19. Finite Element Methods and Their Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhangxin

    2005-01-01

    This book serves as a text for one- or two-semester courses for upper-level undergraduates and beginning graduate students and as a professional reference for people who want to solve partial differential equations (PDEs) using finite element methods. The author has attempted to introduce every concept in the simplest possible setting and maintain a level of treatment that is as rigorous as possible without being unnecessarily abstract. Quite a lot of attention is given to discontinuous finite elements, characteristic finite elements, and to the applications in fluid and solid mechanics including applications to porous media flow, and applications to semiconductor modeling. An extensive set of exercises and references in each chapter are provided.

  20. Non-linear finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    The note is written for courses in "Non-linear finite element method". The note has been used by the author teaching non-linear finite element modeling at Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, Computational Mechanics at Aalborg University Esbjerg, Structural Engineering at the University...

  1. Computation of the flash-temperature at the wheel-rail contact using a 3D finite element model and its comparison with analytical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeimi, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.P.B.J.; Wu, J.; Petrov, R.H.; Sietsma, J.

    2015-01-01

    The coupled mechanical–thermal behaviour of wheel and rail materials under rolling contact is studied to determine the temperature rise due to the frictional heat. The wheel–rail frictional rolling contact problem is solved using the three–dimensional finite element (FE) method. The FE model

  2. Finite Element Modeling of Cracks and Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Čížik

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of finite element method to the analysis of discontinuous structural systems has received a considerable interest in recent years. Examples of problems in which discontinuities play a prominent role in the physical behaviour of a system are numerous and include various types of contact problems and layered or jointed systems. This paper gives a state-of-the-art report on the different methods developed to date for the finite element modelling of cracks and joints in discontinuous systems. Particular attention, however, has been given to the use of joint/interface elements, since their application is considered to be most appropriate for modelling of all kinds of discontinuities that may present in a structural system. A chronology of development of the main types of joint elements, including their pertinent characteristics, is also given. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual methods and types of joint elements presented are briefly discussed, together with various applications of interest.

  3. Mixed Finite Element Method for Melt Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taicher, A. L.; Hesse, M. A.; Arbogast, T.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium. Therefore, a numerical method must also carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. The finite element framework provides support for additional analysis of error and convergence. Moreover, both mesh refinement and anisotropy are naturally incorporated into finite elements. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. Mixed methods also produce discretely conservative fluxes that are required for the transport problem to remains stable without violating conservation of mass. Based preliminary investigations in 1D and derived energy estimates, we present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, using novel elements of lowest order and

  4. Elemental matrices for the finite element method in electromagnetics with quadratic triangular elements

    OpenAIRE

    Cojocaru, E.

    2009-01-01

    The finite element method has become a preeminent simulation technique in electromagnetics. For problems involving anisotropic media and metamaterials, proper algorithms should be developed. It has been proved that discretizing in quadratic triangular elements may lead to an improved accuracy. Here we present a collection of elemental matrices evaluated analytically for quadratic triangular elements. They could be useful for the finite element method in advanced electromagnetics.

  5. Automation of finite element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Korelc, Jože

    2016-01-01

    New finite elements are needed as well in research as in industry environments for the development of virtual prediction techniques. The design and implementation of novel finite elements for specific purposes is a tedious and time consuming task, especially for nonlinear formulations. The automation of this process can help to speed up this process considerably since the generation of the final computer code can be accelerated by order of several magnitudes. This book provides the reader with the required knowledge needed to employ modern automatic tools like AceGen within solid mechanics in a successful way. It covers the range from the theoretical background, algorithmic treatments to many different applications. The book is written for advanced students in the engineering field and for researchers in educational and industrial environments.

  6. Combining the Finite Element Method with Structural Connectome-based Analysis for Modeling Neurotrauma: Connectome Neurotrauma Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Reuben H.; Mckee, Phillip Justin; Dagro, Amy M.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the integration of brain injury biomechanics and graph theoretical analysis of neuronal connections, or connectomics, to form a neurocomputational model that captures spatiotemporal characteristics of trauma. We relate localized mechanical brain damage predicted from biofidelic finite element simulations of the human head subjected to impact with degradation in the structural connectome for a single individual. The finite element model incorporates various length scales into the full head simulations by including anisotropic constitutive laws informed by diffusion tensor imaging. Coupling between the finite element analysis and network-based tools is established through experimentally-based cellular injury thresholds for white matter regions. Once edges are degraded, graph theoretical measures are computed on the “damaged” network. For a frontal impact, the simulations predict that the temporal and occipital regions undergo the most axonal strain and strain rate at short times (less than 24 hrs), which leads to cellular death initiation, which results in damage that shows dependence on angle of impact and underlying microstructure of brain tissue. The monotonic cellular death relationships predict a spatiotemporal change of structural damage. Interestingly, at 96 hrs post-impact, computations predict no network nodes were completely disconnected from the network, despite significant damage to network edges. At early times () network measures of global and local efficiency were degraded little; however, as time increased to 96 hrs the network properties were significantly reduced. In the future, this computational framework could help inform functional networks from physics-based structural brain biomechanics to obtain not only a biomechanics-based understanding of injury, but also neurophysiological insight. PMID:22915997

  7. Domain decomposition methods for mortar finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widlund, O.

    1996-12-31

    In the last few years, domain decomposition methods, previously developed and tested for standard finite element methods and elliptic problems, have been extended and modified to work for mortar and other nonconforming finite element methods. A survey will be given of work carried out jointly with Yves Achdou, Mario Casarin, Maksymilian Dryja and Yvon Maday. Results on the p- and h-p-version finite elements will also be discussed.

  8. Galerkin finite element methods for wave problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Galerkin finite element methods for wave problems ... hp-Finite element method; continuous Galerkin methods; wave solutions; Gibbs' phenomenon. ... Department of Aerospace Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India; Institute of High Performance Computing, 1, Science Park Road, Singapore ...

  9. Improvement of the dual-heat-flux method for deep body temperature measurement based on a finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ming; Chen, Wenxi; Kitamura, Kei-ichiro; Nemoto, Tetsu; Tamura, Toshiyo

    2013-01-01

    Based on finite element method, this study was dedicated to improve the performance of the newly proposed dual-heat-flux method (DHF) for noninvasive deep body temperature (DBT) measurement. This study focused mainly on the dimensions, e.g., the height and radius, of the probe of DHF to improve its performance, in terms of the measurement depth beneath the skin. This paper was also engaged in confirmation of the improved probe's performance on a physiological significant temperature range, 35 to 40 °C. The results showed that a probe with lower in height and larger in radius would have better performance. It suggests that we should reduce the height of the probe to half of the original and keep the radius unchanged for a better performance.

  10. Mixed Finite Element Methods for Melt Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taicher, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    Multi-phase flow arises during partial melting in the earth mantle, where the porosity is small and material has the characteristics of a compacting porous medium. The equations governing multi-phase flow have been specialized to partially molten materials by McKenzie and Fowler. Their model, also called a Darcy-Stokes system, is highly coupled and non-linear. Melt flow is governed by Darcy's Law while the high temperature, ductile creep of the solid matrix is modeled using viscous non-Newtonian Stokes rheology. In addition, the melt and solid pressures are related through a compaction relation. This nearly elliptic mechanical problem is then coupled with both solute transport and thermal evolution according to the enthalpy method developed by Katz. A suitable numerical method must solve the Darcy-Stokes problem in a manner compatible with the transport problem. Moreover, unlike most porous media problems, partially molten materials transition dynamically from non-porous solid to porous medium so must carefully account for the limit of zero porosity. The Darcy-Stokes system for modeling partial melting in the mantle is a novel problem. As far as we know, there currently does not exist a finite element solution in the literature solving these coupled equations. In particular, the mixed finite element method presents a good candidate because it works in both limiting cases: Darcy and incompressible Stokes flow. We present a mixed formulation for the Darcy-Stokes system. Next, we present novel elements of lowest order and compatible with both Darcy and Stokes flow Finally, we present our 2D mixed FEM code result for solving Stokes and Darcy flow as well as the coupled Darcy-Stokes system the mid-ocean ridge or corner flow problem.

  11. Interdigitated-electrode-based MEMS-scale piezoelectric energy harvester modeling and optimization using finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Alperen; Tigli, Onur

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a novel optimization method for interdigitated electrode (IDE)-based, cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters at microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scale. A new two-stage approach based on the finite element method is proposed to examine the performance of such devices. First, detailed electrostatic poling simulations are presented. The results of these poling orientation simulations are used while calculating electrical energy and conversion efficiency in response to a constant external force. The proposed approach is used to find the optimum piezoelectric material thickness and IDE geometry for a cantilever beam which is constructed on top of a 4-μm Si structural layer and a 1-μm SiO2 isolation layer. Cantilever and IDE lengths are fixed at 320 μm and 240 μm, respectively, whereas the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thickness, IDE finger widths, and number of finger pairs are varied. Maximum output energy of 0.37 pJ for a 15-μN force is obtained at a PZT thickness of 0.6 μm and an IDE consisting of 12 finger pairs. This energy is reduced to 1.5 fJ for 5 μm PZT thickness with 2 electrode finger pairs, which shows that device geometry has a significant impact on device performance. The proposed method presents an accurate framework for the rapid design and performance prediction of novel piezoelectric energy harvester structures.

  12. Time-dependent finite-element method for the simulation of three-dimensional viscoelastic flow with integral models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2000-01-01

    convected Maxwell fluid to a fluid described by an integral constitutive equation of the Rivlin-Sawyers type. This includes the K-BKZ model. The convergence of the method is demonstrated on the axisymmetric problem of the inflation of a polymeric membrane only restricted by a clamping ring....

  13. A high-order 3-D spectral-element method for the forward modelling and inversion of gravimetric data—Application to the western Pyrenees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roland; Chevrot, Sébastien; Komatitsch, Dimitri; Seoane, Lucia; Spangenberg, Hannah; Wang, Yi; Dufréchou, Grégory; Bonvalot, Sylvain; Bruinsma, Sean

    2017-04-01

    We image the internal density structure of the Pyrenees by inverting gravity data using an a priori density model derived by scaling a Vp model obtained by full waveform inversion of teleseismic P-waves. Gravity anomalies are computed via a 3-D high-order finite-element integration in the same high-order spectral-element grid as the one used to solve the wave equation and thus to obtain the velocity model. The curvature of the Earth and surface topography are taken into account in order to obtain a density model as accurate as possible. The method is validated through comparisons with exact semi-analytical solutions. We show that the spectral-element method drastically accelerates the computations when compared to other more classical methods. Different scaling relations between compressional velocity and density are tested, and the Nafe-Drake relation is the one that leads to the best agreement between computed and observed gravity anomalies. Gravity data inversion is then performed and the results allow us to put more constraints on the density structure of the shallow crust and on the deep architecture of the mountain range.

  14. Influence of three-dimensional reconstruction method for building a model of the cervical spine on its biomechanical responses: A finite element analysis study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Zafarparandeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In some finite element analysis studies of models of sections of the spine, the three-dimensional solid model is built by assuming symmetry about the mid-sagittal plane of the section, whereas in other studies, the model is built from the exact geometry of the section. The influence of the method used to build the solid model on model parameters, in the case of the cervical spine, has not been reported in the literature. This issue is the subject of this study, with the section being C2–C7, the applied loadings being extension, flexion, left lateral bending, and right axial rotation (each of magnitude 1 Nm, and the model parameters determined being rotation, intradiskal pressure, and facet load at each of the segments. When all the parameter results were considered, it was found that, by and large, the influence of solid model construction method used (exact geometry vs assumption of symmetry about the mid-sagittal plane of the section was marginal. As construction of a symmetric finite element model requires less time and effort, construction of an asymmetric model may be justified in special cases only.

  15. Finite element modeling for materials engineers using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Oluwole, Oluleke

    2014-01-01

    Finite Element Modeling for Materials Engineers Using MATLAB® combines the finite element method with MATLAB to offer materials engineers a fast and code-free way of modeling for many materials processes.

  16. A least-squares/finite element method for the numerical solution of the Navier–Stokes-Cahn–Hilliard system modeling the motion of the contact line

    KAUST Repository

    He, Qiaolin

    2011-06-01

    In this article we discuss the numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes-Cahn-Hilliard system modeling the motion of the contact line separating two immiscible incompressible viscous fluids near a solid wall. The method we employ combines a finite element space approximation with a time discretization by operator-splitting. To solve the Cahn-Hilliard part of the problem, we use a least-squares/conjugate gradient method. We also show that the scheme has the total energy decaying in time property under certain conditions. Our numerical experiments indicate that the method discussed here is accurate, stable and efficient. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopacz, Adrian M.; Liu, Wing K.

    2013-07-01

    A unique simulation technique has been developed capable of modeling electric field induced detection of biomolecules such as viruses, at room temperatures where thermal fluctuations must be considered. The proposed immersed molecular electrokinetic finite element method couples electrokinetics with fluctuating hydrodynamics to study the motion and deformation of flexible objects immersed in a suspending medium under an applied electric field. The force induced on an arbitrary object due to an electric field is calculated based on the continuum electromechanics and the Maxwell stress tensor. The thermal fluctuations are included in the Navier-Stokes fluid equations via the stochastic stress tensor. Dielectrophoretic and fluctuating forces acting on the particle are coupled through the fluid-structure interaction force calculated within the surrounding environment. This method was used to perform concentration and retention efficacy analysis of nanoscale biosensors using gold particles of various sizes. The analysis was also applied to a human papillomavirus.

  18. The Assessment of Comprehensive Vulnerability of Chemical Industrial Park Based on Entropy Method and Matter-element Extension Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Jingyi; Zhang Lijing; Tao Gang; Jiang Shu; Guo Hanyu

    2016-01-01

    The paper focuses on studying connotative meaning, evaluation methods and models for chemical industry park based on in-depth analysis of relevant research results in China and abroad, it summarizes and states the feature of menacing vulnerability and structural vulnerability and submits detailed influence factors such as personnel vulnerability, infrastructural vulnerability, environmental vulnerability and the vulnerability of safety managerial defeat. Using vulnerability scoping diagram es...

  19. Quantum algorithms and the finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    Montanaro, Ashley; Pallister, Sam

    2015-01-01

    The finite element method is used to approximately solve boundary value problems for differential equations. The method discretises the parameter space and finds an approximate solution by solving a large system of linear equations. Here we investigate the extent to which the finite element method can be accelerated using an efficient quantum algorithm for solving linear equations. We consider the representative general question of approximately computing a linear functional of the solution t...

  20. DIFFERENT ELEMENT METHODS IN ENGINEERING PRACTICE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... (or system) in the sense that the behavior at discrete number of ... squares method can be used in deriving the element equation. Whichever formulation approach is used, the result- ing element equation are solved using appropriate ma- trix solvers .... symmetric stiffness matrix, but also the non-essential.

  1. Spectral analysis method for detecting an element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Larry G [Idaho Falls, ID; Edwards, Andrew J [Idaho Falls, ID; Jewell, James K [Idaho Falls, ID; Reber, Edward L [Idaho Falls, ID; Seabury, Edward H [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-02-12

    A method for detecting an element is described and which includes the steps of providing a gamma-ray spectrum which has a region of interest which corresponds with a small amount of an element to be detected; providing nonparametric assumptions about a shape of the gamma-ray spectrum in the region of interest, and which would indicate the presence of the element to be detected; and applying a statistical test to the shape of the gamma-ray spectrum based upon the nonparametric assumptions to detect the small amount of the element to be detected.

  2. Advanced finite element method in structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Long, Yu-Qiu; Long, Zhi-Fei

    2009-01-01

    This book systematically introduces the research work on the Finite Element Method completed over the past 25 years. Original theoretical achievements and their applications in the fields of structural engineering and computational mechanics are discussed.

  3. Integrating complementarity into the 2D displacement discontinuity boundary element method to model faults and fractures with frictional contact properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Elizabeth; Mutlu, Ovunc; Pollard, David D.

    2012-08-01

    We present a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity method (DDM) in combination with a complementarity solver to simulate quasi-static slip on cracks as models for faults and fractures in an otherwise homogeneous, isotropic, linear elastic material. A complementarity algorithm enforces appropriate contact boundary conditions along the cracks so that variable friction and frictional strength can be included. This method accurately computes slip and opening distributions along the cracks, displacement and stress fields within the surrounding material, and stress intensity factors at the crack tips. The DDM with complementarity is a simple yet powerful tool to investigate many aspects of the mechanical behavior of faults and fractures in Earth's brittle crust. Implementation in Excel and Matlab enables easy saving, organization, and sharing.

  4. Primal Domain Decomposition Method with Direct and Iterative Solver for Circuit-Field-Torque Coupled Parallel Finite Element Method to Electric Machine Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Marcsa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and design of electromechanical devices involve the solution of large sparse linear systems, and require therefore high performance algorithms. In this paper, the primal Domain Decomposition Method (DDM with parallel forward-backward and with parallel Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG solvers are introduced in two-dimensional parallel time-stepping finite element formulation to analyze rotating machine considering the electromagnetic field, external circuit and rotor movement. The proposed parallel direct and the iterative solver with two preconditioners are analyzed concerning its computational efficiency and number of iterations of the solver with different preconditioners. Simulation results of a rotating machine is also presented.

  5. The finite element method in electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    A new edition of the leading textbook on the finite element method, incorporating major advancements and further applications in the field of electromagnetics The finite element method (FEM) is a powerful simulation technique used to solve boundary-value problems in a variety of engineering circumstances. It has been widely used for analysis of electromagnetic fields in antennas, radar scattering, RF and microwave engineering, high-speed/high-frequency circuits, wireless communication, electromagnetic compatibility, photonics, remote sensing, biomedical engineering, and space exploration. The

  6. Introducing the Boundary Element Method with MATLAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Keng-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The boundary element method provides an excellent platform for learning and teaching a computational method for solving problems in physical and engineering science. However, it is often left out in many undergraduate courses as its implementation is deemed to be difficult. This is partly due to the perception that coding the method requires…

  7. Recent advances in boundary element methods

    CERN Document Server

    Manolis, GD

    2009-01-01

    Addresses the needs of the computational mechanics research community in terms of information on boundary integral equation-based methods and techniques applied to a variety of fields. This book collects both original and review articles on contemporary Boundary Element Methods (BEM) as well as on the Mesh Reduction Methods (MRM).

  8. Improving the Process of Adjusting the Parameters of Finite Element Models of Healthy Human Intervertebral Discs by the Multi-Response Surface Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Fátima Somovilla; Lorza, Rubén Lostado; Bobadilla, Marina Corral; García, Rubén Escribano

    2017-09-21

    The kinematic behavior of models that are based on the finite element method (FEM) for modeling the human body depends greatly on an accurate estimate of the parameters that define such models. This task is complex, and any small difference between the actual biomaterial model and the simulation model based on FEM can be amplified enormously in the presence of nonlinearities. The current paper attempts to demonstrate how a combination of the FEM and the MRS methods with desirability functions can be used to obtain the material parameters that are most appropriate for use in defining the behavior of Finite Element (FE) models of the healthy human lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD). The FE model parameters were adjusted on the basis of experimental data from selected standard tests (compression, flexion, extension, shear, lateral bending, and torsion) and were developed as follows: First, three-dimensional parameterized FE models were generated on the basis of the mentioned standard tests. Then, 11 parameters were selected to define the proposed parameterized FE models. For each of the standard tests, regression models were generated using MRS to model the six stiffness and nine bulges of the healthy IVD models that were created by changing the parameters of the FE models. The optimal combination of the 11 parameters was based on three different adjustment criteria. The latter, in turn, were based on the combination of stiffness and bulges that were obtained from the standard test FE simulations. The first adjustment criteria considered stiffness and bulges to be equally important in the adjustment of FE model parameters. The second adjustment criteria considered stiffness as most important, whereas the third considered the bulges to be most important. The proposed adjustment methods were applied to a medium-sized human IVD that corresponded to the L3-L4 lumbar level with standard dimensions of width = 50 mm, depth = 35 mm, and height = 10 mm. Agreement between the

  9. Improving the Process of Adjusting the Parameters of Finite Element Models of Healthy Human Intervertebral Discs by the Multi-Response Surface Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Somovilla Gómez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The kinematic behavior of models that are based on the finite element method (FEM for modeling the human body depends greatly on an accurate estimate of the parameters that define such models. This task is complex, and any small difference between the actual biomaterial model and the simulation model based on FEM can be amplified enormously in the presence of nonlinearities. The current paper attempts to demonstrate how a combination of the FEM and the MRS methods with desirability functions can be used to obtain the material parameters that are most appropriate for use in defining the behavior of Finite Element (FE models of the healthy human lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD. The FE model parameters were adjusted on the basis of experimental data from selected standard tests (compression, flexion, extension, shear, lateral bending, and torsion and were developed as follows: First, three-dimensional parameterized FE models were generated on the basis of the mentioned standard tests. Then, 11 parameters were selected to define the proposed parameterized FE models. For each of the standard tests, regression models were generated using MRS to model the six stiffness and nine bulges of the healthy IVD models that were created by changing the parameters of the FE models. The optimal combination of the 11 parameters was based on three different adjustment criteria. The latter, in turn, were based on the combination of stiffness and bulges that were obtained from the standard test FE simulations. The first adjustment criteria considered stiffness and bulges to be equally important in the adjustment of FE model parameters. The second adjustment criteria considered stiffness as most important, whereas the third considered the bulges to be most important. The proposed adjustment methods were applied to a medium-sized human IVD that corresponded to the L3–L4 lumbar level with standard dimensions of width = 50 mm, depth = 35 mm, and height = 10 mm

  10. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  11. Finite element methods a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Whiteley, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents practical applications of the finite element method to general differential equations. The underlying strategy of deriving the finite element solution is introduced using linear ordinary differential equations, thus allowing the basic concepts of the finite element solution to be introduced without being obscured by the additional mathematical detail required when applying this technique to partial differential equations. The author generalizes the presented approach to partial differential equations which include nonlinearities. The book also includes variations of the finite element method such as different classes of meshes and basic functions. Practical application of the theory is emphasised, with development of all concepts leading ultimately to a description of their computational implementation illustrated using Matlab functions. The target audience primarily comprises applied researchers and practitioners in engineering, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students.

  12. Spectral/hp element methods for CFD

    CERN Document Server

    Karniadakis, George Em

    1999-01-01

    Traditionally spectral methods in fluid dynamics were used in direct and large eddy simulations of turbulent flow in simply connected computational domains. The methods are now being applied to more complex geometries, and the spectral/hp element method, which incorporates both multi-domain spectral methods and high-order finite element methods, has been particularly successful. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to these methods. Written by leaders in the field, the book begins with a full explanation of fundamental concepts and implementation issues. It then illustrates how these methods can be applied to advection-diffusion and to incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Drawing on both published and unpublished material, the book is an important resource for experienced researchers and for those new to the field.

  13. Finite-element-method (FEM model generation of time-resolved 3D echocardiographic geometry data for mitral-valve volumetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikinis Ron

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mitral Valve (MV 3D structural data can be easily obtained using standard transesophageal echocardiography (TEE devices but quantitative pre- and intraoperative volume analysis of the MV is presently not feasible in the cardiac operation room (OR. Finite element method (FEM modelling is necessary to carry out precise and individual volume analysis and in the future will form the basis for simulation of cardiac interventions. Method With the present retrospective pilot study we describe a method to transfer MV geometric data to 3D Slicer 2 software, an open-source medical visualization and analysis software package. A newly developed software program (ROIExtract allowed selection of a region-of-interest (ROI from the TEE data and data transformation for use in 3D Slicer. FEM models for quantitative volumetric studies were generated. Results ROI selection permitted the visualization and calculations required to create a sequence of volume rendered models of the MV allowing time-based visualization of regional deformation. Quantitation of tissue volume, especially important in myxomatous degeneration can be carried out. Rendered volumes are shown in 3D as well as in time-resolved 4D animations. Conclusion The visualization of the segmented MV may significantly enhance clinical interpretation. This method provides an infrastructure for the study of image guided assessment of clinical findings and surgical planning. For complete pre- and intraoperative 3D MV FEM analysis, three input elements are necessary: 1. time-gated, reality-based structural information, 2. continuous MV pressure and 3. instantaneous tissue elastance. The present process makes the first of these elements available. Volume defect analysis is essential to fully understand functional and geometrical dysfunction of but not limited to the valve. 3D Slicer was used for semi-automatic valve border detection and volume-rendering of clinical 3D echocardiographic

  14. FEM (finite element method) thermal modeling and thermal hydraulic performance of an enhanced thermal conductivity UO2/BeO composite fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenzhong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2011-03-24

    An enhanced thermal conductivity UO2-BeO composite nuclear fuel was studied. A methodology to generate ANSYS (an engineering simulation software) FEM (Finite Element Method) thermal models of enhanced thermal conductivity oxide nuclear fuels was developed. The results showed significant increase in the fuel thermal conductivities and have good agreement with the measured ones. The reactor performance analysis showed that the decrease in centerline temperature was 250-350K for the UO2-BeO composite fuel, and thus we can improve nuclear reactors' performance and safety, and high-level radioactive waste generation.

  15. Finite element model of needle electrode sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høyum, P.; Kalvøy, H.; Martinsen, Ø. G.; Grimnes, S.

    2010-04-01

    We used the Finite Element (FE) Method to estimate the sensitivity of a needle electrode for bioimpedance measurement. This current conducting needle with insulated shaft was inserted in a saline solution and current was measured at the neutral electrode. FE model resistance and reactance were calculated and successfully compared with measurements on a laboratory model. The sensitivity field was described graphically based on these FE simulations.

  16. Modelling of the material flow of Nd-Fe-B magnets under high temperature deformation via finite element simulation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Ju; Lee, Yen-I; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Hsiao, Po-Jen; You, Jr-Shian; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Wei, Chia-Min

    2017-01-01

    Hot deformation of Nd-Fe-B magnets has been studied for more than three decades. With a good combination of forming processing parameters, the remanence and (BH)max values of Nd-Fe-B magnets could be greatly increased due to the formation of anisotropic microstructures during hot deformation. In this work, a methodology is proposed for visualizing the material flow in hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets via finite element simulation. Material flow in hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnets could be predicted by simulation, which fitted with experimental results. By utilizing this methodology, the correlation between strain distribution and magnetic properties enhancement could be better understood.

  17. Analysis of Finite Element Methods for Vector Laplacians on Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hansbo, Peter; Larson, Mats G.; Larsson, Karl

    2016-01-01

    We develop a finite element method for the vector Laplacian based on the covariant derivative of tangential vector fields on surfaces embedded in $\\mathbb{R}^3$. Closely related operators arise in models of flow on surfaces as well as elastic membranes and shells. The method is based on standard continuous parametric Lagrange elements with one order higher polynomial degree for the mapping. The tangent condition is weakly enforced using a penalization term. We derive error estimates that take...

  18. Method for gesture based modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    A computer program based method is described for creating models using gestures. On an input device, such as an electronic whiteboard, a user draws a gesture which is recognized by a computer program and interpreted relative to a predetermined meta-model. Based on the interpretation, an algorithm...... is assigned to the gesture drawn by the user. The executed algorithm may, for example, consist in creating a new model element, modifying an existing model element, or deleting an existing model element....

  19. Galerkin finite element methods for wave problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One-dimensional wave equation. First, we briefly discuss the Galerkin method that employs piecewise quadratic polynomials for the basis or interpolating functions. We will call this as G2FEM for ease of reference. Here, one would have three quadratic functions for each element (see Reddy 2001, for details). In figure 1, we ...

  20. Image segmentation with a finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourdin, Blaise

    1999-01-01

    regularization results, make possible to imagine a finite element resolution method.In a first time, the Mumford-Shah functional is introduced and some existing results are quoted. Then, a discrete formulation for the Mumford-Shah problem is proposed and its $\\Gamma$-convergence is proved. Finally, some...

  1. Hydraulic fracturing with distinct element method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruiksma, J.P.; Bezuijen, A.

    2002-01-01

    In this report, hydraulic fracturing is investigated using the distinct element code PFC2D from Itasca. Special routines were written to be able to model hydraulic fracturing. These include adding fluid flow to PFC2D and updating the fluid flow domains when fractures appear. A brief description of

  2. Time-dependent finite-element method for the simulation of three-dimensional viscoelastic flow with integral models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    1999-01-01

    A new technique for the numerical simulation of 3D time dependent flow of viscoelastic fluid is presented. The technique is based on a Lagrangian kinematic description of the fluid flow and represent a further development of the 2D Lagrangian integral method (LIM). The convergence of the method...... is demonstrated on the problem of a sphere moving in a cylinder filled with an upper convected Maxwell fluid....

  3. Unbalanced Magnetic Pull Effect on Stiffness Models of Active Magnetic Bearing due to Rotor Eccentricity in Brushless DC Motor Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangcheng Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We firstly report on an investigation into the unbalanced magnetic pull (UMP effect on the static stiffness models of radial active magnetic bearing (RAMB in brushless DC motor (BDCM in no-loaded and loaded conditions using the finite element method (FEM. The influences of the UMP on the force-control current, force-position, current stiffness, and position stiffness of RAMB are clarified in BDCM with 100 kW rated power. We found the position stiffness to be more susceptible to UMP. The primary source of UMP is the permanent magnets of BDCM. In addition, the performance of RAMB is affected by the UMP ripples during motor commutation and also periodically affected by the angular position of rotor. The characteristic curves of RAMB force versus control current (or rotor position and angular position of rotor affected by the UMP are given. The method is useful in design and optimization of RAMB in magnetically suspended BDCMs.

  4. Lagrangian Finite Element Method for 3D time-dependent viscoelastic flow computation using integral constitutive models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2000-01-01

    A new technique for the numerical 3D simulation of time dependent flow of viscoelastic fluid is presented. The technique is based on a Lagrangian kinematics description of the fluid flow. The fluid is described by the Rivlin Sawyer integral constitutive equation. The method (referred to as the 3D...

  5. Finite-element method for above-core structures. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J.M.; Belytschko, T.B.

    1979-12-01

    Three-dimensional finite-element models for the treatment of the nonlinear, transient response of a fast breeder reactor's above-core structures are described. For purposes of treating arbitrarily large rotations, node orientations are described by unit vectors and the deformable elements are treated by a corotational formulation in which the coordinate system is embedded in the elements. Deformable elements may be connected either to nodes directly or through rigid bodies. The time integration is carried out by the Newmark ..beta.. method. These features have been incorporated to form the finite-element program SAFE/RAS (Safety Analysis by Finite Elements/Reactor Analysis and Safety Division). Computations are presented for semianalytical comparisons, simple scoping studies, and Stanford Research Institute (SRI) test comparisons.

  6. Meshless element-free Galerkin method in NDT applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, L.; Zeng, Z.; Shanker, B.; Udpa, L.

    2002-05-01

    Finite element methods (FEM) are widely used for modeling a variety of problems in Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE). For example, in the modeling of multilayer aircraft geometry with third layer cracks under fasteners, the reliance of FEM on a mesh leads to several problems, particularly when tight cracks have to be introduced into the sample. Furthermore remeshing is often required in handling probe motion can be time consuming. This paper presents a meshless element-free Galerkin method (EFG), where the approximation is entirely constructed in terms of a set of nodes. The model is validated and applied to two dimensional magneto-static and eddy current NDT problems.

  7. FINITE-ELEMENT MODELING OF SALT TECTONICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bakhova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available  The two-dimensional thermal model of graben structure in the presence of salt tectonics on the basis of a finite elements method is constructed. The analysis of the thermal field is based on the solution of stationary equation of heat conductivity with variable boundary conditions. The high precision of temperatures distribution and heat flows is received. The decision accuracy is no more than 0,6 %.

  8. Finite element method (FEM) model of the mechanical stress on phospholipid membranes from shock waves produced in nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ronald; Roth, Caleb C.; Shadaram, Mehdi; Beier, Hope; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2015-03-01

    The underlying mechanism(s) responsible for nanoporation of phospholipid membranes by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsEP) remains unknown. The passage of a high electric field through a conductive medium creates two primary contributing factors that may induce poration: the electric field interaction at the membrane and the shockwave produced from electrostriction of a polar submersion medium exposed to an electric field. Previous work has focused on the electric field interaction at the cell membrane, through such models as the transport lattice method. Our objective is to model the shock wave cell membrane interaction induced from the density perturbation formed at the rising edge of a high voltage pulse in a polar liquid resulting in a shock wave propagating away from the electrode toward the cell membrane. Utilizing previous data from cell membrane mechanical parameters, and nsEP generated shockwave parameters, an acoustic shock wave model based on the Helmholtz equation for sound pressure was developed and coupled to a cell membrane model with finite-element modeling in COMSOL. The acoustic structure interaction model was developed to illustrate the harmonic membrane displacements and stresses resulting from shockwave and membrane interaction based on Hooke's law. Poration is predicted by utilizing membrane mechanical breakdown parameters including cortical stress limits and hydrostatic pressure gradients.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Two Proposed Models of Connecting rods for Crank-rocker Engines Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Salah Eldin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, static load analysis was performed on two proposed models of connecting rods (conventional and Y-shape con-rod intended for use in the crank-rocker engine. The analysis was done by modeling the model using CATIA V5 software which was then analyzed using ANSYS Workbench 14.0 software. A static analysis was done to determine the von-misses stresses under tensile and compressive loading conditions. Two cases were studied, firstly, the load was applied at the rocker pin end and fixed at the crank end as a compressive load, and secondly, the load was applied at the same position as a tensile load with both cases under the same constant load. It was found from the analysis that the conventional connecting rod has yielded lower stress values for both cases as compared to the Y-shaped connecting rod. Based on the results, it was concluded that the normal connecting rod is better to be used for the crank-rocker engine.

  10. Generalized multiscale finite element method. Symmetric interior penalty coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by applications to numerical simulations of flows in highly heterogeneous porous media, we develop multiscale finite element methods for second order elliptic equations. We discuss a multiscale model reduction technique in the framework of the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. We propose two different finite element spaces on the coarse mesh. The first space is based on a local eigenvalue problem that uses an interior weighted L2-norm and a boundary weighted L2-norm for computing the "mass" matrix. The second choice is based on generation of a snapshot space and subsequent selection of a subspace of a reduced dimension. The approximation with these multiscale spaces is based on the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method framework. We investigate the stability and derive error estimates for the methods and further experimentally study their performance on a representative number of numerical examples. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Modeling of cross-talk phenomena in thin film ferroelectric nanocapacitor arrays by finite element method combined with Monte Carlo calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padurariu, Leontin; Mitoseriu, Liliana

    2017-10-01

    In the last few years, the interest in developing ferroelectric systems with high recording density close to 1Tb/in.2 has strongly increased. The ferroelectric thin films are subjected to the electric field applied by using nanocapacitors (diameters of ˜70 nm) containing a ferroelectric active material. In order to increase the memory density, the nanocapacitor dimensions and the distance between them have to be strongly decreased. However, if the lateral distance between the nanoelectrodes is reduced too much, a domain wall propagation from the nanocapacitor subjected to the voltage to the neighboring capacitors (so-called "cross talk") is observed. This phenomenon is undesired because the memory spatial resolution is affected. In the present paper, the role of the geometrical characteristics (electrode radius, lateral distance between the electrodes and the film thickness) is investigated, by using a combined Finite Element Method with the Monte Carlo model to describe the local switching properties. The distributions of the electrical potential and local fields were computed by using the Finite Element Method. After describing the conditions for the appearance of the "cross-talk" phenomenon in ferroelectric nanocapacitor systems, some valuable solutions to avoid it are presented.

  12. The spectral-element method, Beowulf computing, and global seismology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatitsch, Dimitri; Ritsema, Jeroen; Tromp, Jeroen

    2002-11-29

    The propagation of seismic waves through Earth can now be modeled accurately with the recently developed spectral-element method. This method takes into account heterogeneity in Earth models, such as three-dimensional variations of seismic wave velocity, density, and crustal thickness. The method is implemented on relatively inexpensive clusters of personal computers, so-called Beowulf machines. This combination of hardware and software enables us to simulate broadband seismograms without intrinsic restrictions on the level of heterogeneity or the frequency content.

  13. Experimental and Finite Element Modeling of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth for the K-Decreasing Test Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; Newman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental methods to determine near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate data are prescribed in ASTM standard E647. To produce near-threshold data at a constant stress ratio (R), the applied stress-intensity factor (K) is decreased as the crack grows based on a specified K-gradient. Consequently, as the fatigue crack growth rate threshold is approached and the crack tip opening displacement decreases, remote crack wake contact may occur due to the plastically deformed crack wake surfaces and shield the growing crack tip resulting in a reduced crack tip driving force and non-representative crack growth rate data. If such data are used to life a component, the evaluation could yield highly non-conservative predictions. Although this anomalous behavior has been shown to be affected by K-gradient, starting K level, residual stresses, environmental assisted cracking, specimen geometry, and material type, the specifications within the standard to avoid this effect are limited to a maximum fatigue crack growth rate and a suggestion for the K-gradient value. This paper provides parallel experimental and computational simulations for the K-decreasing method for two materials (an aluminum alloy, AA 2024-T3 and a titanium alloy, Ti 6-2-2-2-2) to aid in establishing clear understanding of appropriate testing requirements. These simulations investigate the effect of K-gradient, the maximum value of stress-intensity factor applied, and material type. A material independent term is developed to guide in the selection of appropriate test conditions for most engineering alloys. With the use of such a term, near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate tests can be performed at accelerated rates, near-threshold data can be acquired in days instead of weeks without having to establish testing criteria through trial and error, and these data can be acquired for most engineering materials, even those that are produced in relatively small product forms.

  14. Finite element and discontinuous Galerkin methods for transient wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Gary

    2017-01-01

    This monograph presents numerical methods for solving transient wave equations (i.e. in time domain). More precisely, it provides an overview of continuous and discontinuous finite element methods for these equations, including their implementation in physical models, an extensive description of 2D and 3D elements with different shapes, such as prisms or pyramids, an analysis of the accuracy of the methods and the study of the Maxwell’s system and the important problem of its spurious free approximations. After recalling the classical models, i.e. acoustics, linear elastodynamics and electromagnetism and their variational formulations, the authors present a wide variety of finite elements of different shapes useful for the numerical resolution of wave equations. Then, they focus on the construction of efficient continuous and discontinuous Galerkin methods and study their accuracy by plane wave techniques and a priori error estimates. A chapter is devoted to the Maxwell’s system and the important problem ...

  15. Introduction to finite and spectral element methods using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    The Finite Element Method in One Dimension. Further Applications in One Dimension. High-Order and Spectral Elements in One Dimension. The Finite Element Method in Two Dimensions. Quadratic and Spectral Elements in Two Dimensions. Applications in Mechanics. Viscous Flow. Finite and Spectral Element Methods in Three Dimensions. Appendices. References. Index.

  16. Tissue-fluid interface analysis using biphasic finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, G U; Unnikrishnan, V U; Reddy, J N

    2009-04-01

    Numerical studies on fluid-structure interaction have primarily relied on decoupling the solid and fluid sub-domains with the interactions treated as external boundary conditions on the individual sub-domains. The finite element applications for the fluid-structure interactions can be divided into iterative algorithms and sequential algorithms. In this paper, a new computational methodology for the analysis of tissue-fluid interaction problems is presented. The whole computational domain is treated as a single biphasic continuum, and the same space and time discretisation is carried out for the sub-domains using a penalty-based finite element model. This procedure does not require the explicit modelling of additional boundary conditions or interface elements. The developed biphasic interface finite element model is used in analysing blood flow through normal and stenotic arteries. The increase in fluid flow velocity when passing through a stenosed artery and the drop in pressure at the region are captured using this method.

  17. Multimodal transportation best practices and model element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report provides guidance in developing a multimodal transportation element of a local government comprehensive : plan. Two model elements were developed to address differences in statutory requirements for communities of different : sizes and pl...

  18. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  19. Boundary element method for internal axisymmetric flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhman Alexander

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an accurate fast method for the computation of potential internal axisymmetric flow based on the boundary element technique. We prove that the computed velocity field asymptotically satisfies reasonable boundary conditions at infinity for various types of inlet/exit. Computation of internal axisymmetric potential flow is an essential ingredient in the three-dimensional problem of computation of velocity fields in turbomachines. We include the results of a practical application of the method to the computation of flow in turbomachines of Kaplan and Francis types.

  20. Boundary element methods for electrical engineers

    CERN Document Server

    POLJAK, D

    2005-01-01

    In the last couple of decades the Boundary Element Method (BEM) has become a well-established technique that is widely used for solving various problems in electrical engineering and electromagnetics. Although there are many excellent research papers published in the relevant literature that describe various BEM applications in electrical engineering and electromagnetics, there has been a lack of suitable textbooks and monographs on the subject. This book presents BEM in a simple fashion in order to help the beginner to understand the very basic principles of the method. It initially derives B

  1. Automated discrete element method calibration using genetic and optimization algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Huy Q.; Aragón, Alejandro M.; Schott, Dingena L.

    2017-06-01

    This research aims at developing a universal methodology for automated calibration of microscopic properties of modelled granular materials. The proposed calibrator can be applied for different experimental set-ups. Two optimization approaches: (1) a genetic algorithm and (2) DIRECT optimization, are used to identify discrete element method input model parameters, e.g., coefficients of sliding and rolling friction. The algorithms are used to minimize the objective function characterized by the discrepancy between the experimental macroscopic properties and the associated numerical results. Two test cases highlight the robustness, stability, and reliability of the two algorithms used for automated discrete element method calibration with different set-ups.

  2. Modeling Fatigue Damage Onset and Progression in Composites Using an Element-Based Virtual Crack Closure Technique Combined With the Floating Node Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Nelson V.; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to model the onset and propagation of matrix cracks and delaminations in carbon-epoxy composites subject to fatigue loading. An extended interface element, based on the Floating Node Method, is developed to represent delaminations and matrix cracks explicitly in a mesh independent fashion. Crack propagation is determined using an element-based Virtual Crack Closure Technique approach to determine mixed-mode energy release rates, and the Paris-Law relationship to obtain crack growth rate. Crack onset is determined using a stressbased onset criterion coupled with a stress vs. cycle curve and Palmgren-Miner rule to account for fatigue damage accumulation. The approach is implemented in Abaqus/Standard® via the user subroutine functionality. Verification exercises are performed to assess the accuracy and correct implementation of the approach. Finally, it was demonstrated that this approach captured the differences in failure morphology in fatigue for two laminates of identical stiffness, but with layups containing ?deg plies that were either stacked in a single group, or distributed through the laminate thickness.

  3. Probabilistic Model Updating for Sizing of Hole-Edge Crack Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors and the High-Order Extended Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel framework for probabilistic crack size quantification using fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors. The key idea is to use a high-order extended finite element method (XFEM together with a transfer (T-matrix method to analyze the reflection intensity spectra of FBG sensors, for various crack sizes. Compared with the standard FEM, the XFEM offers two superior capabilities: (i a more accurate representation of fields in the vicinity of the crack tip singularity and (ii alleviation of the need for costly re-meshing as the crack size changes. Apart from the classical four-term asymptotic enrichment functions in XFEM, we also propose to incorporate higher-order functions, aiming to further improve the accuracy of strain fields upon which the reflection intensity spectra are based. The wavelength of the reflection intensity spectra is extracted as a damage sensitive quantity, and a baseline model with five parameters is established to quantify its correlation with the crack size. In order to test the feasibility of the predictive model, we design FBG sensor-based experiments to detect fatigue crack growth in structures. Furthermore, a Bayesian method is proposed to update the parameters of the baseline model using only a few available experimental data points (wavelength versus crack size measured by one of the FBG sensors and an optical microscope, respectively. Given the remaining data points of wavelengths, even measured by FBG sensors at different positions, the updated model is shown to give crack size predictions that match well with the experimental observations.

  4. FINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF DELAMINATION PROCESS ON COMPOSITE LAMINATE USING COHESIVE ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Huzn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of cohesive elements for studying the delamination process in composite laminates is presented in this paper. The commercially available finite element software ABAQUS provides the cohesive element model used in this study. Cohesive elements with traction-separation laws consist of an initial linear elastic phase, followed by a linear softening that simulates the debonding of the interface after damage initiation is inserted at the interfaces between the laminas. Simulation results from two types of composite laminate specimen, i.e., a double cantilever beam and an L-shape, show that the delamination process on laminated composites begin with debonding phenomena. These results indicate that the implementation of cohesive elements in modeling the process of delamination in laminated composite materials, using the finite element method, has been successful. Cohesive elements are able to model the phenomenon of delamination in the specimens used in this study.

  5. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for gradient plasticity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garikipati, Krishna. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI); Ostien, Jakob T.

    2010-10-01

    In this report we apply discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods to the equations of an incompatibility based formulation of gradient plasticity. The presentation is motivated with a brief overview of the description of dislocations within a crystal lattice. A tensor representing a measure of the incompatibility with the lattice is used in the formulation of a gradient plasticity model. This model is cast in a variational formulation, and discontinuous Galerkin machinery is employed to implement the formulation into a finite element code. Finally numerical examples of the model are shown.

  6. Generalized multiscale finite element methods: Oversampling strategies

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose oversampling strategies in the generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) framework. The GMsFEM, which has been recently introduced in Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], allows solving multiscale parameter-dependent problems at a reduced computational cost by constructing a reduced-order representation of the solution on a coarse grid. The main idea of the method consists of (1) the construction of snapshot space, (2) the construction of the offline space, and (3) construction of the online space (the latter for parameter-dependent problems). In Efendiev et al. (2013b) [Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods, J. Comput. Phys., vol. 251, pp. 116-135, 2013], it was shown that the GMsFEM provides a flexible tool to solve multiscale problems with a complex input space by generating appropriate snapshot, offline, and online spaces. In this paper, we develop oversampling techniques to be used in this context (see Hou and Wu (1997) where oversampling is introduced for multiscale finite element methods). It is known (see Hou and Wu (1997)) that the oversampling can improve the accuracy of multiscale methods. In particular, the oversampling technique uses larger regions (larger than the target coarse block) in constructing local basis functions. Our motivation stems from the analysis presented in this paper, which shows that when using oversampling techniques in the construction of the snapshot space and offline space, GMsFEM will converge independent of small scales and high contrast under certain assumptions. We consider the use of a multiple eigenvalue problems to improve the convergence and discuss their relation to single spectral problems that use oversampled regions. The oversampling procedures proposed in this paper differ from those in Hou and Wu (1997). In particular, the oversampling domains are partially used in constructing local

  7. Method of generating a computer readable model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A method of generating a computer readable model of a geometrical object constructed from a plurality of interconnectable construction elements, wherein each construction element has a number of connection elements for connecting the construction element with another construction element. The met......A method of generating a computer readable model of a geometrical object constructed from a plurality of interconnectable construction elements, wherein each construction element has a number of connection elements for connecting the construction element with another construction element....... The method comprises encoding a first and a second one of the construction elements as corresponding data structures, each representing the connection elements of the corresponding construction element, and each of the connection elements having associated with it a predetermined connection type. The method...

  8. [Application of finite element method in spinal biomechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Jun; Sun, Shu-Chun; Wang, Fei

    2017-02-25

    The finite element model is one of the most important methods in study of modern spinal biomechanics, according to the needs to simulate the various states of the spine, calculate the stress force and strain distribution of the different groups in the state, and explore its principle of mechanics, mechanism of injury, and treatment effectiveness. In addition, in the study of the pathological state of the spine, the finite element is mainly used in the understanding the mechanism of lesion location, evaluating the effects of different therapeutic tool, assisting and completing the selection and improvement of therapeutic tool, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the rehabilitation of spinal lesions. Finite element method can be more provide the service for the patients suffering from spinal correction, operation and individual implant design. Among the design and performance evaluation of the implant need to pay attention to the individual difference and perfect the evaluation system. At present, how to establish a model which is more close to the real situation has been the focus and difficulty of the study of human body's finite element.Although finite element method can better simulate complex working condition, it is necessary to improve the authenticity of the model and the sharing of the group by using many kinds of methods, such as image science, statistics, kinematics and so on. Copyright© 2017 by the China Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology Press.

  9. Modeling Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    Simulation models are widely used in all types of hydrologic studies, and many of these models can be used to estimate recharge. Models can provide important insight into the functioning of hydrologic systems by identifying factors that influence recharge. The predictive capability of models can be used to evaluate how changes in climate, water use, land use, and other factors may affect recharge rates. Most hydrological simulation models, including watershed models and groundwater-flow models, are based on some form of water-budget equation, so the material in this chapter is closely linked to that in Chapter 2. Empirical models that are not based on a water-budget equation have also been used for estimating recharge; these models generally take the form of simple estimation equations that define annual recharge as a function of precipitation and possibly other climatic data or watershed characteristics.Model complexity varies greatly. Some models are simple accounting models; others attempt to accurately represent the physics of water movement through each compartment of the hydrologic system. Some models provide estimates of recharge explicitly; for example, a model based on the Richards equation can simulate water movement from the soil surface through the unsaturated zone to the water table. Recharge estimates can be obtained indirectly from other models. For example, recharge is a parameter in groundwater-flow models that solve for hydraulic head (i.e. groundwater level). Recharge estimates can be obtained through a model calibration process in which recharge and other model parameter values are adjusted so that simulated water levels agree with measured water levels. The simulation that provides the closest agreement is called the best fit, and the recharge value used in that simulation is the model-generated estimate of recharge.

  10. Supervised learning method for predicting chromatin boundary associated insulator elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Paweł; Wilczyński, Bartek

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the DNA material is densely packed inside the nucleus in the form of a DNA-protein complex structure called chromatin. Since the actual conformation of the chromatin fiber defines the possible regulatory interactions between genes and their regulatory elements, it is very important to understand the mechanisms governing folding of chromatin. In this paper, we show that supervised methods for predicting chromatin boundary elements are much more effective than the currently popular unsupervised methods. Using boundary locations from published Hi-C experiments and modEncode tracks as features, we can tell the insulator elements from randomly selected background sequences with great accuracy. In addition to accurate predictions of the training boundary elements, our classifiers make new predictions. Many of them correspond to the locations of known insulator elements. The key features used for predicting boundary elements do not depend on the prediction method. Because of its miniscule size, chromatin state cannot be measured directly, we need to rely on indirect measurements, such as ChIP-Seq and fill in the gaps with computational models. Our results show that currently, at least in the model organisms, where we have many measurements including ChIP-Seq and Hi-C, we can make accurate predictions of insulator positions.

  11. Spectral element method implementation on GPU for Lamb wave simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudela, Pawel; Wandowski, Tomasz; Radzienski, Maciej; Ostachowicz, Wieslaw

    2017-04-01

    Parallel implementation of the time domain spectral element method on GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) is presented. The proposed spectral element method implementation is based on sparse matrix storage of local shape function derivatives calculated at Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre points. The algorithm utilizes two basic operations: multiplication of sparse matrix by vector and element-by-element vectors multiplication. Parallel processing is performed on the degree of freedom level. The assembly of resultant force is done by the aid of a mesh coloring algorithm. The implementation enables considerable computation speedup as well as a simulation of complex structural health monitoring systems based on anomalies of propagating Lamb waves. Hence, the complexity of various models can be tested and compared in order to be as close to reality as possible by using modern computers. A comparative example of a composite laminate modeling by using homogenization of material properties in one layer of 3D brick spectral elements with composite in which each ply is simulated by separate layer of 3D brick spectral elements is described. Consequences of application of each technique are explained. Further analysis is performed for composite laminate with delamination. In each case piezoelectric transducer as well as glue layer between actuator and host structure is modeled.

  12. Structural analysis with the finite element method linear statics

    CERN Document Server

    Oñate, Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS WITH THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD Linear Statics Volume 1 : The Basis and Solids Eugenio Oñate The two volumes of this book cover most of the theoretical and computational aspects of the linear static analysis of structures with the Finite Element Method (FEM). The content of the book is based on the lecture notes of a basic course on Structural Analysis with the FEM taught by the author at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Barcelona, Spain for the last 30 years. Volume1 presents the basis of the FEM for structural analysis and a detailed description of the finite element formulation for axially loaded bars, plane elasticity problems, axisymmetric solids and general three dimensional solids. Each chapter describes the background theory for each structural model considered, details of the finite element formulation and guidelines for the application to structural engineering problems. The book includes a chapter on miscellaneous topics such as treatment of inclined supports, elas...

  13. Adaptive finite element methods for differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Bangerth, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    These Lecture Notes discuss concepts of `self-adaptivity' in the numerical solution of differential equations, with emphasis on Galerkin finite element methods. The key issues are a posteriori error estimation and it automatic mesh adaptation. Besides the traditional approach of energy-norm error control, a new duality-based technique, the Dual Weighted Residual method for goal-oriented error estimation, is discussed in detail. This method aims at economical computation of arbitrary quantities of physical interest by properly adapting the computational mesh. This is typically required in the design cycles of technical applications. For example, the drag coefficient of a body immersed in a viscous flow is computed, then it is minimized by varying certain control parameters, and finally the stability of the resulting flow is investigated by solving an eigenvalue problem. `Goal-oriented' adaptivity is designed to achieve these tasks with minimal cost. At the end of each chapter some exercises are posed in order ...

  14. Application of the integral method to modelling the oxidation of defected fuel elements; Utilisation de la methode integrale pour la modelisation de l`oxydation d`elements combustibles defecteux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolar, M.

    1995-06-01

    Because interim dry storage is an alternative to storage in water pools, it is very important to be able to predict the long-term behaviour of used nuclear fuel in air, especially of fuel elements possibly defected in reactor or during subsequent handling. Extensive oxidation may lead to fuel disintegration and thus to substantially increased costs of interim handling and preparation for final disposal. The ability to predict the extent and rate of oxidation of defected fuel elements under conditions of limited or unlimited oxygen supply would be instrumental in determining the optimum operating conditions of a dry-storage facility. The starting point for the discrepancy reported in previous work between the reaction-diffusion calculations and the CEX-1 experiment, which involves storage of defected fuel elements in air at 150 deg. C.

  15. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  16. Patient-specific finite element modeling of bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelert, Sander; Valstar, Edward; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2013-04-01

    Finite element modeling is an engineering tool for structural analysis that has been used for many years to assess the relationship between load transfer and bone morphology and to optimize the design and fixation of orthopedic implants. Due to recent developments in finite element model generation, for example, improved computed tomography imaging quality, improved segmentation algorithms, and faster computers, the accuracy of finite element modeling has increased vastly and finite element models simulating the anatomy and properties of an individual patient can be constructed. Such so-called patient-specific finite element models are potentially valuable tools for orthopedic surgeons in fracture risk assessment or pre- and intraoperative planning of implant placement. The aim of this article is to provide a critical overview of current themes in patient-specific finite element modeling of bones. In addition, the state-of-the-art in patient-specific modeling of bones is compared with the requirements for a clinically applicable patient-specific finite element method, and judgment is passed on the feasibility of application of patient-specific finite element modeling as a part of clinical orthopedic routine. It is concluded that further development in certain aspects of patient-specific finite element modeling are needed before finite element modeling can be used as a routine clinical tool.

  17. An advanced finite element model of IPMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugal, D.; Kasemägi, H.; Kruusmaa, M.; Aabloo, A.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an electro-mechanical Finite Element Model of an ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) material. Mobile counter ions inside the polymer are drifted by an applied electric field, causing mass imbalance inside the material. This is the main cause of the bending motion of this kind of materials. All foregoing physical effects have been considered as time dependent and modeled with FEM. Time dependent mechanics is modeled with continuum mechanics equations. The model also considers the fact that there is a surface of platinum on both sides of the polymer backbone. The described basic model has been under developement for a while and has been improved over the time. Simulation comparisons with experimental data have shown good harmony. Our previous paper described most of the basic model. Additionally, the model was coupled with equations, which described self-oscillatory behavior of the IPMC material. It included describing electrochemical processes with additional four differential equations. The Finite Element Method turned out to be very reasonable for coupling together and solving all equations as a single package. We were able to achieve reasonably precise model to describe this complicated phenomenon. Our most recent goal has been improving the basic model. Studies have shown that some electrical parameters of an IPMC, such as surface resistance and voltage drop are dependent on the curvature of the IPMC. Therefore the new model takes surface resistance into account to some extent. It has added an extra level of complexity to the model, because now all simulations are done in three dimensional domain. However, the result is advanced visual and numerical behavior of an IPMC with different surface characteristics.

  18. A Monte Carlo adapted finite element method for dislocation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 126; Issue 7. A Monte Carlo adapted finite element method for dislocation ... However, geological features of a fault cannot be measured exactly, and therefore these features and data involve uncertainties. This paper presents a Monte Carlo based random model of ...

  19. Final Report of the Project "From the finite element method to the virtual element method"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-12-20

    The Finite Element Method (FEM) is a powerful numerical tool that is being used in a large number of engineering applications. The FEM is constructed on triangular/tetrahedral and quadrilateral/hexahedral meshes. Extending the FEM to general polygonal/polyhedral meshes in straightforward way turns out to be extremely difficult and leads to very complex and computationally expensive schemes. The reason for this failure is that the construction of the basis functions on elements with a very general shape is a non-trivial and complex task. In this project we developed a new family of numerical methods, dubbed the Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the numerical approximation of partial differential equations (PDE) of elliptic type suitable to polygonal and polyhedral unstructured meshes. We successfully formulated, implemented and tested these methods and studied both theoretically and numerically their stability, robustness and accuracy for diffusion problems, convection-reaction-diffusion problems, the Stokes equations and the biharmonic equations.

  20. The Mimetic Finite Element Method and the Virtual Element Method for elliptic problems with arbitrary regularity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13

    We develop and analyze a new family of virtual element methods on unstructured polygonal meshes for the diffusion problem in primal form, that use arbitrarily regular discrete spaces V{sub h} {contained_in} C{sup {alpha}} {element_of} N. The degrees of freedom are (a) solution and derivative values of various degree at suitable nodes and (b) solution moments inside polygons. The convergence of the method is proven theoretically and an optimal error estimate is derived. The connection with the Mimetic Finite Difference method is also discussed. Numerical experiments confirm the convergence rate that is expected from the theory.

  1. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Filipovic, Nicolas; Florent, Alice; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Brochet, Sébastien; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Xiao, Hong; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Bontenackels, Michael; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behr, Joerg; Behrens, Ulf; Bell, Alan James; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Choudhury, Somnath; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Roland, Benoit; Ron, Elias; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schröder, Matthias; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Vargas Trevino, Andrea Del Rocio; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Pöhlsen, Thomas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Frensch, Felix; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Nürnberg, Andreas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Tziaferi, Eirini; Aslanoglou, Xenofon; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mittal, Monika; Nishu, Nishu; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ajay; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Modak, Atanu; Mukherjee, Swagata; Roy, Debarati; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Goldouzian, Reza; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferretti, Roberta; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Moon, Chang-Seong; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Vernieri, Caterina; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Soffi, Livia; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Casasso, Stefano; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Tamponi, Umberto; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Umer, Tomo; Zanetti, Anna; Chang, Sunghyun; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Park, Hyangkyu; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Ryu, Min Sang; Kim, Jae Yool; Moon, Dong Ho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kyong Sei; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Reucroft, Steve; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michał; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Konoplyanikov, Viktor; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Ekmedzic, Marko; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Graziano, Alberto; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Benitez, Jose F; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Bondu, Olivier; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Colafranceschi, Stefano; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Marrouche, Jad; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Plagge, Michael; Racz, Attila; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Wollny, Heiner; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eller, Philipp; 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Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Korjenevski, Sergey; Petrillo, Gianluca; Verzetti, Mauro; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; York, Andrew; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; 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Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Friis, Evan; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Levine, Aaron; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ross, Ian; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Vuosalo, Carl; Woods, Nathaniel

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger $\\mathrm{t \\bar{t}}$+jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, $\\mu$, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95% confidence level is $\\mu$ lower than 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value $\\hat{\\m...

  2. Implementation of a multisource model for gold nanoparticle-mediated plasmonic heating with near-infrared laser by the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso, Francisco J; Lee, Chae-Deok; Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2013-07-01

    The use of optically tunable gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in conjunction with near-infrared (NIR) laser has emerged as an attractive option for laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT), as it capitalizes on plasmonic heating of GNPs tuned to absorb light strongly in the NIR region. Previously, the authors developed a multisource model to predict the temperature change in a GNP-laden tissue-like medium illuminated by NIR laser and implemented it by a linear superposition (LS) method combining analytic and finite element method (FEM) solutions. While it is intuitive and straightforward, the LS approach might be somewhat cumbersome to implement for realistic LITT cases because it requires separate calculations of the temperature change due to individual GNP heat sources and the laser heat source. Therefore, the current investigation aimed to develop a simpler yet mathematically more elegant and computationally more efficient method solely based on FEM to implement the authors' multisource model. A multisource FEM model was developed to calculate the full spatiotemporal temperature distribution due to all heat sources (i.e., individual GNPs and the laser heat source) by solving the heat diffusion equation with multiple heat sources using FEM. This model was tested for its validity using two computational phantoms, a two-layer GNP-laden cylindrical phantom and a breast phantom with a GNP-laden microcavity. For comparison, the results for the two phantom cases were also obtained from the LS method. For the two-layer phantom case, the FEM approach resulted in a maximum temperature increase of 16.4 °C at a depth of 1.35 cm, 2.5 mm below the interface between the two layers, while the LS method produced a maximum temperature increase of 16.7 °C at a depth of 1.3 cm, 2 mm below the interface between the two layers. A comparison of the depth versus temperature changes obtained from the two approaches showed reasonably good agreement within 6%. In the breast phantom case, the LS

  3. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE FINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF LINEAR ULTRASONIC MOTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana CHIVU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the main modeling elements as produced by means of thefinite element method of linear ultrasonic motors. Hence, first the model is designed and then a modaland harmonic analysis are carried out in view of outlining the main outcomes

  4. Adaptive finite element method for shape optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Morin, Pedro

    2012-01-16

    We examine shape optimization problems in the context of inexact sequential quadratic programming. Inexactness is a consequence of using adaptive finite element methods (AFEM) to approximate the state and adjoint equations (via the dual weighted residual method), update the boundary, and compute the geometric functional. We present a novel algorithm that equidistributes the errors due to shape optimization and discretization, thereby leading to coarse resolution in the early stages and fine resolution upon convergence, and thus optimizing the computational effort. We discuss the ability of the algorithm to detect whether or not geometric singularities such as corners are genuine to the problem or simply due to lack of resolution - a new paradigm in adaptivity. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  5. Application of the boundary element method to transient heat conduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargush, G. F.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    An advanced boundary element method (BEM) is presented for the transient heat conduction analysis of engineering components. The numerical implementation necessarily includes higher-order conforming elements, self-adaptive integration and a multiregion capability. Planar, three-dimensional and axisymmetric analyses are all addressed with a consistent time-domain convolution approach, which completely eliminates the need for volume discretization for most practical analyses. The resulting general purpose algorithm establishes BEM as an attractive alternative to the more familiar finite difference and finite element methods for this class of problems. Several detailed numerical examples are included to emphasize the accuracy, stability and generality of the present BEM. Furthermore, a new efficient treatment is introduced for bodies with embedded holes. This development provides a powerful analytical tool for transient solutions of components, such as casting moulds and turbine blades, which are cumbersome to model when employing the conventional domain-based methods.

  6. New formulation of the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Jerzy; Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Madan, Nikhil; Nosewicz, Szymon

    2018-01-01

    A new original formulation of the discrete element method based on the soft contact approach is presented in this work. The standard DEM has heen enhanced by the introduction of the additional (global) deformation mode caused by the stresses in the particles induced by the contact forces. Uniform stresses and strains are assumed for each particle. The stresses are calculated from the contact forces. The strains are obtained using an inverse constitutive relationship. The strains allow us to obtain deformed particle shapes. The deformed shapes (ellipses) are taken into account in contact detection and evaluation of the contact forces. A simple example of a uniaxial compression of a rectangular specimen, discreti.zed with equal sized particles is simulated to verify the DDEM algorithm. The numerical example shows that a particle deformation changes the particle interaction and the distribution of forces in the discrete element assembly. A quantitative study of micro-macro elastic properties proves the enhanced capabilities of the DDEM as compared to standard DEM.

  7. Simulating Space Capsule Water Landing with Explicit Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2007-01-01

    A study of using an explicit nonlinear dynamic finite element code for simulating the water landing of a space capsule was performed. The finite element model contains Lagrangian shell elements for the space capsule and Eulerian solid elements for the water and air. An Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) solver and a penalty coupling method were used for predicting the fluid and structure interaction forces. The space capsule was first assumed to be rigid, so the numerical results could be correlated with closed form solutions. The water and air meshes were continuously refined until the solution was converged. The converged maximum deceleration predicted is bounded by the classical von Karman and Wagner solutions and is considered to be an adequate solution. The refined water and air meshes were then used in the models for simulating the water landing of a capsule model that has a flexible bottom. For small pitch angle cases, the maximum deceleration from the flexible capsule model was found to be significantly greater than the maximum deceleration obtained from the corresponding rigid model. For large pitch angle cases, the difference between the maximum deceleration of the flexible model and that of its corresponding rigid model is smaller. Test data of Apollo space capsules with a flexible heat shield qualitatively support the findings presented in this paper.

  8. Finite element modeling of the human pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, B.

    1995-11-01

    A finite element model of the human pelvis was created using a commercial wire frame image as a template. To test the final mesh, the model`s mechanical behavior was analyzed through finite element analysis and the results were displayed graphically as stress concentrations. In the future, this grid of the pelvis will be integrated with a full leg model and used in side-impact car collision simulations.

  9. Engineering computation of structures the finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, Maria Augusta; Roseiro, Luis; Cirne, José; Leal, Rogério

    2015-01-01

    This book presents theories and the main useful techniques of the Finite Element Method (FEM), with an introduction to FEM and many case studies of its use in engineering practice. It supports engineers and students to solve primarily linear problems in mechanical engineering, with a main focus on static and dynamic structural problems. Readers of this text are encouraged to discover the proper relationship between theory and practice, within the finite element method: Practice without theory is blind, but theory without practice is sterile. Beginning with elasticity basic concepts and the classical theories of stressed materials, the work goes on to apply the relationship between forces, displacements, stresses and strains on the process of modeling, simulating and designing engineered technical systems. Chapters discuss the finite element equations for static, eigenvalue analysis, as well as transient analyses. Students and practitioners using commercial FEM software will find this book very helpful. It us...

  10. Finite element analysis of three dimensional crack growth by the use of a boundary element sub model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lucht, Tore

    2009-01-01

    A new automated method to model non-planar three dimensional crack growth is proposed which combines the advantages of both the boundary element method and the finite element method. The proposed method links the two methods by a submodelling strategy in which the solution of a global finite...... element model containing an approximation of the crack is interpolated to a much smaller boundary element model containing a fine discretization of the real crack. The method is validated through several numerical comparisons and by comparison to crack growth measured in a test specimen for an engineering...

  11. The finite element method and applications in engineering using ANSYS

    CERN Document Server

    Madenci, Erdogan

    2015-01-01

    This textbook offers theoretical and practical knowledge of the finite element method. The book equips readers with the skills required to analyze engineering problems using ANSYS®, a commercially available FEA program. Revised and updated, this new edition presents the most current ANSYS® commands and ANSYS® screen shots, as well as modeling steps for each example problem. This self-contained, introductory text minimizes the need for additional reference material by covering both the fundamental topics in finite element methods and advanced topics concerning modeling and analysis. It focuses on the use of ANSYS® through both the Graphics User Interface (GUI) and the ANSYS® Parametric Design Language (APDL). Extensive examples from a range of engineering disciplines are presented in a straightforward, step-by-step fashion. Key topics include: • An introduction to FEM • Fundamentals and analysis capabilities of ANSYS® • Fundamentals of discretization and approximation functions • Modeling techniq...

  12. Extended Finite Element Method for Fracture Analysis of Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Mohammadi, Soheil

    2008-01-01

    This important textbook provides an introduction to the concepts of the newly developed extended finite element method (XFEM) for fracture analysis of structures, as well as for other related engineering applications.One of the main advantages of the method is that it avoids any need for remeshing or geometric crack modelling in numerical simulation, while generating discontinuous fields along a crack and around its tip. The second major advantage of the method is that by a small increase in number of degrees of freedom, far more accurate solutions can be obtained. The method has recently been

  13. Efficient partial element calculation and the extension to cylindrical elements for the PEEC method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muesing, A.; Kolar, J. W.

    2008-07-01

    For various electrical interconnect and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) problems, the Partial Element Equivalent Circuit (PEEC) method has proven to be a valid and fast solution method of the electrical field integral equation in the time as well as the frequency domain. Therefore, PEEC has become a multipurpose full-wave simulation method, especially suited for the solution of combined circuit and EM problems, as found on printed circuit board layouts, power electronics devices or EMC filters. Recent research introduced various extensions to the basic PEEC approach, for example a non-orthogonal cell geometry formulation. This work presents a fast, flexible and accurate computational method for determining the matrix entries of partial inductances and the coefficients of potential for general non-orthogonal PEEC cell geometries. The presented computation method utilizes analytical filament formulas to reduce the integration order and therefore to reduce computation time. The validity, accuracy and speed of the proposed method is compared with a standard integration routine on example cell geometries where the numeric results of the new method show improved accuracy, coming along with reduced computation time. Furthermore, this work shows an extension to cylindrical elements which is consistent with classical PEEC models, using the proposed integration routines for the partial element calculations. (author)

  14. Structured Extended Finite Element Methods of Solids Defined by Implicit Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belytschko, T; Mish, K; Moes, N; Parimi, C

    2002-11-17

    A paradigm is developed for generating structured finite element models from solid models by means of implicit surface definitions. The implicit surfaces are defined by radial basis functions. Internal features, such as material interfaces, sliding interfaces and cracks are treated by enrichment techniques developed in the extended finite element method (X-FEM). Methods for integrating the weak form for such models are proposed. These methods simplify the generation of finite element models. Results presented for several examples show that the accuracy of this method is comparable to standard unstructured finite element methods.

  15. Application of finite-element-methods in food processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of the possible use of finite-element-methods in food processing. Examples from diffusion studies are given.......Presentation of the possible use of finite-element-methods in food processing. Examples from diffusion studies are given....

  16. A Finite Element Removal Method for 3D Topology Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Akif Kütük

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Topology optimization provides great convenience to designers during the designing stage in many industrial applications. With this method, designers can obtain a rough model of any part at the beginning of a designing stage by defining loading and boundary conditions. At the same time the optimization can be used for the modification of a product which is being used. Lengthy solution time is a disadvantage of this method. Therefore, the method cannot be widespread. In order to eliminate this disadvantage, an element removal algorithm has been developed for topology optimization. In this study, the element removal algorithm is applied on 3-dimensional parts, and the results are compared with the ones available in the related literature. In addition, the effects of the method on solution times are investigated.

  17. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, MJ [Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Ghadyani, HR [SUNY Farmingdale State College, Farmingdale, NY (United States); Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN [Univeristy Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Hepel, JT [Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  18. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin P Vincent

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori.

  19. High-order finite element methods for cardiac monodomain simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kevin P.; Gonzales, Matthew J.; Gillette, Andrew K.; Villongco, Christopher T.; Pezzuto, Simone; Omens, Jeffrey H.; Holst, Michael J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling of tissue-scale cardiac electrophysiology requires numerically converged solutions to avoid spurious artifacts. The steep gradients inherent to cardiac action potential propagation necessitate fine spatial scales and therefore a substantial computational burden. The use of high-order interpolation methods has previously been proposed for these simulations due to their theoretical convergence advantage. In this study, we compare the convergence behavior of linear Lagrange, cubic Hermite, and the newly proposed cubic Hermite-style serendipity interpolation methods for finite element simulations of the cardiac monodomain equation. The high-order methods reach converged solutions with fewer degrees of freedom and longer element edge lengths than traditional linear elements. Additionally, we propose a dimensionless number, the cell Thiele modulus, as a more useful metric for determining solution convergence than element size alone. Finally, we use the cell Thiele modulus to examine convergence criteria for obtaining clinically useful activation patterns for applications such as patient-specific modeling where the total activation time is known a priori. PMID:26300783

  20. Nonconforming finite element methods on quadrilateral meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jun; Zhang, ShangYou

    2013-12-01

    It is well-known that it is comparatively difficult to design nonconforming finite elements on quadrilateral meshes by using Gauss-Legendre points on each edge of triangulations. One reason lies in that these degrees of freedom associated to these Gauss-Legendre points are not all linearly independent for usual expected polynomial spaces, which explains why only several lower order nonconforming quadrilateral finite elements can be found in literature. The present paper proposes two families of nonconforming finite elements of any odd order and one family of nonconforming finite elements of any even order on quadrilateral meshes. Degrees of freedom are given for these elements, which are proved to be well-defined for their corresponding shape function spaces in a unifying way. These elements generalize three lower order nonconforming finite elements on quadrilaterals to any order. In addition, these nonconforming finite element spaces are shown to be full spaces which is somehow not discussed for nonconforming finite elements in literature before.

  1. Finite elements modeling of delaminations in composite laminates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaiotti, m.; Rizzo, C.M.; Branner, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The application of composite materials in many structures poses to engineers the problem to create reliable and relatively simple methods, able to estimate the strength of multilayer composite structures. Multilayer composites, like other laminated materials, suffer from layer separation, i.e., d...... by finite elements using different techniques. Results obtained with different finite element models are compared and discussed....

  2. Finite Element Modeling on Scalable Parallel Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwik, T.; Zuffada, C.; Jamnejad, V.; Katz, D.

    1995-01-01

    A coupled finite element-integral equation was developed to model fields scattered from inhomogenous, three-dimensional objects of arbitrary shape. This paper outlines how to implement the software on a scalable parallel processor.

  3. The Iris biometric feature segmentation using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ibitayo LANLEGE

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript presents a method for segmentation of iris images based on a deformable contour (active contour paradigm. The deformable contour is a novel approach in image segmentation. A type of active contour is the Snake. Snake is a parametric curve defined within the domain of the image. Snake properties are specified through a function called energy functional. This means they consist of packets of energy which expressed as partial Differential Equations. The partial Differential Equation is the controlling engine of the active contour since this project, the Finite Element Method (Standard Galerkin Method implementation for deformable model is presented.

  4. The Matrix Element Method in the LHC era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Sébastien

    2017-03-01

    The Matrix Element Method (MEM) is a powerful multivariate method allowing to maximally exploit the experimental and theoretical information available to an analysis. The method is reviewed in depth, and several recent applications of the MEM at LHC experiments are discussed, such as searches for rare processes and measurements of Standard Model observables in Higgs and Top physics. Finally, a new implementation of the MEM is presented. This project builds on established phase-space parametrisations known to greatly improve the speed of the calculations, and aims at a much improved modularity and maintainability compared to previous software, easing the use of the MEM for high-statistics data analyses.

  5. Stochastic Finite Element Method in Geotechnical Engineering. Spectral Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auvinet-Guichard G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the mathematical tools in which the formulation of Spectral Stochastic Finite Element Method is based. The usefulness of this method to model the spatial variability of heterogeneous materials, and in particular of soils, is illustrated by a practical example in which the propagation of the uncertainty on the deformation modulus to the computed displacement field is assessed. The influence of the correlation length on the distribution of uncertainty is set forth. Finally, the advantages of the method in geotechnical engineering are evaluated and some conclusions are presented.

  6. Problems and methods for determining reserves of renewable elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalkowski, T.; Dabrowska, I.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of spare parts on reliability of mining equipment used in coal surface mining are discussed. The optimum number of spare parts and elements used in equipment repair depends on reliability and service life of each element and on failure rates, which are influenced by local conditions. A method for determining the optimum number of spare parts for mining equipment which treats a machine failure as an event of random character is analyzed. Problems associated with replacing elements removed due to wear or failures as well as problems of repair are investigated. A model of spare part management and repair shop management in a coal surface mine is evaluated. Spare part management in the Belchatow brown coal surface mine is discussed with the example of maintenance and repair of belt conveyors. 10 references.

  7. Foundations of the complex variable boundary element method

    CERN Document Server

    Hromadka, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    This book explains and examines the theoretical underpinnings of the Complex Variable Boundary Element Method (CVBEM) as applied to higher dimensions, providing the reader with the tools for extending and using the CVBEM in various applications. Relevant mathematics and principles are assembled and the reader is guided through the key topics necessary for an understanding of the development of the CVBEM in both the usual two- as well as three- or higher dimensions. In addition to this, problems are provided that build upon the material presented. The Complex Variable Boundary Element Method (CVBEM) is an approximation method useful for solving problems involving the Laplace equation in two dimensions. It has been shown to be a useful modelling technique for solving two-dimensional problems involving the Laplace or Poisson equations on arbitrary domains. The CVBEM has recently been extended to 3 or higher spatial dimensions, which enables the precision of the CVBEM in solving the Laplace equation to be now ava...

  8. Three-dimensional modeling in the electromagnetic/magnetotelluric methods. Accuracy of various finite-element and finite difference methods; Denjiho MT ho ni okeru sanjigen modeling. Shushu no yugen yosoho to sabunho no seido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Y. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-05-27

    To enhance the reliability of electromagnetic/magnetotelluric (MT) survey, calculation results of finite-element methods (FEMs) and finite difference methods (FDMs) were compared. Accuracy of individual methods and convergence of repitition solution were examined. As a result of the investigation, it was found that appropriate accuracy can be obtained from the edge FEM and FDM for the example of vertical magnetic dipole, and that the best accuracy can be obtained from the FDM among four methods for the example of MT survey. It was revealed that the ICBCG (incomplete Cholesky bi-conjugate gradient) method is an excellent method as a solution method of simultaneous equations from the viewpoint of accuracy and calculation time. For the joint FEM, solutions of SOR method converged for both the examples. It was concluded that the cause of error is not due to the error of numerical calculation, but due to the consideration without discontinuity of electric field. The conditions of coefficient matrix increased with decreasing the frequency, which resulted in the unstable numerical calculation. It would be required to incorporate the constraint in a certain form. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  9. Sensitivity study of a method for updating a finite element model of a nuclear power station cooling tower; Recalage d`un modele de refrigerant atmospherique: etude de sensibilite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, L.

    1994-12-31

    The Research and Development Division of Electricite de France is developing a surveillance method of cooling towers involving on-site wind-induced measurements. The method is supposed to detect structural damage in the tower. The damage is identified by tuning a finite element model of the tower on experimental mode shapes and eigenfrequencies. The sensitivity of the method was evaluated through numerical tests. First, the dynamic response of a damaged tower was simulated by varying the stiffness of some area of the model shell (from 1 % to 24 % of the total shell area). Second, the structural parameters of the undamaged cooling tower model were updated in order to make the output of the undamaged model as close as possible to the synthetic experimental data. The updating method, based on the minimization of the differences between experimental modal energies and modal energies calculated by the model, did not detect a stiffness change over less than 3 % of the shell area. Such a sensitivity is thought to be insufficient to detect tower cracks which behave like highly localized defaults. (author). 8 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Vibration Analysis of Collecting Electrodes by means of the Hybrid Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Adamiec-Wójcik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a hybrid finite element method of shell modeling in order to model collecting electrodes of electrostatic precipitators. The method uses the finite element method to reflect elastic features and the rigid finite element method in order to model mass features of the body. A model of dust removal systems of an electrostatic precipitator is presented. The system consists of two beams which are modeled by means of the rigid finite element method and a system of collecting shells modeled by means of the hybrid finite element method. The paper discusses both the procedure of deriving the equations of motion and the results of numerical simulations carried out in order to analyze vibrations of the whole system. Experimental verification of the model is also presented.

  11. Functional Element Test Tool and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-03

    functional element 6 involved in the run test case step 8 6 of a test. SAFE test tool 7 10 preferably operates in several selectable modes of...options 9 (e.g., data initiation buttons) are displayed as dictated by 10 each test case. The run test case step 86 is then performed 11 under...19 object functional element being tested during run test case step 20 8 6 would be maintained via SAFE test tool 10 for later 21 comparison or

  12. Business model elements impacting cloud computing adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogataj, Kristina; Pucihar, Andreja; Sudzina, Frantisek

    The paper presents a proposed research framework for identification of business model elements impacting Cloud Computing Adoption. We provide a definition of main Cloud Computing characteristics, discuss previous findings on factors impacting Cloud Computing Adoption, and investigate technology...... adoption theories, such as Diffusion of Innovations, Technology Acceptance Model, Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology. Further on, at research model for identification of Cloud Computing Adoption factors from a business model perspective is presented. The following business model building...

  13. Discrete Element Modeling for Mobility and Excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, M. A.; Hopkins, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    The planning and completion of mobility and excavation efforts on the moon requires a thorough understanding of the planetary regolith. In this work, a discrete element method (DEM) model is created to replicate those activities in the laboratory and for planning mission activities in the future. The crux of this work is developing a particle bed that best replicates the regolith tool/wheel interaction seen in the laboratory. To do this, a DEM geotechnical triaxial strength cell was created allowing for comparison of laboratory JSC-1a triaxial tests to DEM simulated soils. This model relies on a triangular lattice membrane covered triaxial cell for determining the macroscopic properties of the modeled granular material as well as a fast and efficient contact detection algorithm for a variety of grain shapes. Multiple grain shapes with increasing complexity (ellipsoid, poly-ellipsoid and polyhedra) have been developed and tested. This comparison gives us a basis to begin scaling DEM grain size and shape to practical values for mobility and excavation modeling. Next steps include development of a DEM scoop for percussive excavation testing as well as continued analysis of rover wheel interactions using a wide assortment of grain shape and size distributions.

  14. A stabilised nonconforming finite element method for steady incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pengzhan; Feng, Xinlong; Liu, Demin

    2012-02-01

    A stabilised nonconforming finite element method for the steady incompressible flow problem with damping based on local Gauss integration is considered in this article. The method combines the nonconforming finite element method with the stabilised strategy. Moreover, the stability and error estimates are analysed. Finally, numerical results are shown to support the developed theory analysis. Compared with some classical, closely related mixed finite element methods, the results of the present method show its better performance than others.

  15. Generalization of mixed multiscale finite element methods with applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C S [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Many science and engineering problems exhibit scale disparity and high contrast. The small scale features cannot be omitted in the physical models because they can affect the macroscopic behavior of the problems. However, resolving all the scales in these problems can be prohibitively expensive. As a consequence, some types of model reduction techniques are required to design efficient solution algorithms. For practical purpose, we are interested in mixed finite element problems as they produce solutions with certain conservative properties. Existing multiscale methods for such problems include the mixed multiscale finite element methods. We show that for complicated problems, the mixed multiscale finite element methods may not be able to produce reliable approximations. This motivates the need of enrichment for coarse spaces. Two enrichment approaches are proposed, one is based on generalized multiscale finte element metthods (GMsFEM), while the other is based on spectral element-based algebraic multigrid (rAMGe). The former one, which is called mixed GMsFEM, is developed for both Darcy’s flow and linear elasticity. Application of the algorithm in two-phase flow simulations are demonstrated. For linear elasticity, the algorithm is subtly modified due to the symmetry requirement of the stress tensor. The latter enrichment approach is based on rAMGe. The algorithm differs from GMsFEM in that both of the velocity and pressure spaces are coarsened. Due the multigrid nature of the algorithm, recursive application is available, which results in an efficient multilevel construction of the coarse spaces. Stability, convergence analysis, and exhaustive numerical experiments are carried out to validate the proposed enrichment approaches. iii

  16. The Matrix Element Method and Vector-Like Quark Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Morrison, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    In my time at the CERN summer student program, I worked on applying the matrix element method to vector-like quark identification. I worked in the ATLAS University of Geneva group under Dr. Olaf Nackenhorst. I developed automated plotting tools with ROOT, a script for implementing and optimizing generated matrix element calculation code, and kinematic transforms for the matrix element method.

  17. Practical Aspects of Finite Element Method Applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbović Aleksandar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of numerical methods, such as finite element method (FEM, has been widely adopted in solving structural problems with complex geometry under external loads when analytical solutions are unachievable. Basic idea behind FEM is to divide the complex body geometry into smaller and simpler domains, called finite elements, and then to formulate solution for each element instead of seeking a solution for the entire domain. After finding the solutions for all elements they can be combined to obtain a solution for the whole domain. This numerical method is mostly used in engineering, but it is also useful for studying the biomechanical properties of materials used in medicine and the influence of mechanical forces on the biological systems. Since its introduction in dentistry four decades ago, FEM became powerful tool for the predictions of stress and strain distribution on teeth, dentures, implants and surrounding bone. FEM can indicate aspects of biomaterials and human tissues that can hardly be measured in vivo and can predict the stress distribution in the contact areas which are not accessible, such as areas between the implant and cortical bone, denture and gingiva, or around the apex of the implant in trabecular bone. Aim of this paper is to present - using results of several successful FEM studies - the usefulness of this method in solving dentistry problems, as well as discussing practical aspects of FEM applications in dentistry. Some of the method limitations, such as impossibility of complete replication of clinical conditions and need for simplified assumptions regarding loads and materials modeling, are also presented. However, the emphasis is on FE modelling of teeth, bone, dentures and implants and their modifications according to the requirements. All presented studies have been carried out in commercial software for FE analysis ANSYS Workbench.

  18. Mixing Formal and Informal Model Elements for Tracing Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jastram, Michael; Hallerstede, Stefan; Ladenberger, Lukas

    2011-01-01

    Tracing between informal requirements and formal models is challenging. A method for such tracing should permit to deal efficiently with changes to both the requirements and the model. A particular challenge is posed by the persisting interplay of formal and informal elements. In this paper, we...... a system for traceability with a state-based formal method that supports refinement. We do not require all specification elements to be modelled formally and support incremental incorporation of new specification elements into the formal model. Refinement is used to deal with larger amounts of requirements...... describe an incremental approach to requirements validation and systems modelling. Formal modelling facilitates a high degree of automation: it serves for validation and traceability. The foundation for our approach are requirements that are structured according to the WRSPM reference model. We provide...

  19. An inverse method based on finite element model to derive the plastic flow properties from non-standard tensile specimens of Eurofer97 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Knitel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A new inverse method was developed to derive the plastic flow properties of non-standard disk tensile specimens, which were so designed to fit irradiation rods used for spallation irradiations in SINQ (Schweizer Spallations Neutronen Quelle target at Paul Scherrer Institute. The inverse method, which makes use of MATLAB and the finite element code ABAQUS, is based upon the reconstruction of the load-displacement curve by a succession of connected small linear segments. To do so, the experimental engineering stress/strain curve is divided into an elastic and a plastic section, and the plastic section is further divided into small segments. Each segment is then used to determine an associated pair of true stress/plastic strain values, representing the constitutive behavior. The main advantage of the method is that it does not rely on a hypothetic analytical expression of the constitutive behavior. To account for the stress/strain gradients that develop in the non-standard specimen, the stress and strain were weighted over the volume of the deforming elements. The method was validated with tensile tests carried out at room temperature on non-standard flat disk tensile specimens as well as on standard cylindrical specimens made of the reduced-activation tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97. While both specimen geometries presented a significant difference in terms of deformation localization during necking, the same true stress/strain curve was deduced from the inverse method. The potential and usefulness of the inverse method is outlined for irradiated materials that suffer from a large uniform elongation reduction.

  20. Multiscale finite-element method for linear elastic geomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletto, Nicola; Hajibeygi, Hadi; Tchelepi, Hamdi A.

    2017-02-01

    The demand for accurate and efficient simulation of geomechanical effects is widely increasing in the geoscience community. High resolution characterizations of the mechanical properties of subsurface formations are essential for improving modeling predictions. Such detailed descriptions impose severe computational challenges and motivate the development of multiscale solution strategies. We propose a multiscale solution framework for the geomechanical equilibrium problem of heterogeneous porous media based on the finite-element method. After imposing a coarse-scale grid on the given fine-scale problem, the coarse-scale basis functions are obtained by solving local equilibrium problems within coarse elements. These basis functions form the restriction and prolongation operators used to obtain the coarse-scale system for the displacement-vector. Then, a two-stage preconditioner that couples the multiscale system with a smoother is derived for the iterative solution of the fine-scale linear system. Various numerical experiments are presented to demonstrate accuracy and robustness of the method.

  1. Finite element micro-modelling of a human ankle bone reveals the importance of the trabecular network to mechanical performance: new methods for the generation and comparison of 3D models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, W C H; Chamoli, U; Jones, A; Walsh, W R; Wroe, S

    2013-01-04

    Most modelling of whole bones does not incorporate trabecular geometry and treats bone as a solid non-porous structure. Some studies have modelled trabecular networks in isolation. One study has modelled the performance of whole human bones incorporating trabeculae, although this required considerable computer resources and purpose-written code. The difference between mechanical behaviour in models that incorporate trabecular geometry and non-porous models has not been explored. The ability to easily model trabecular networks may shed light on the mechanical consequences of bone loss in osteoporosis and remodelling after implant insertion. Here we present a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) of a human ankle bone that includes trabecular network geometry. We compare results from this model with results from non-porous models and introduce protocols achievable on desktop computers using widely available softwares. Our findings show that models including trabecular geometry are considerably stiffer than non-porous whole bone models wherein the non-cortical component has the same mass as the trabecular network, suggesting inclusion of trabecular geometry is desirable. We further present new methods for the construction and analysis of 3D models permitting: (1) construction of multi-property, non-porous models wherein cortical layer thickness can be manipulated; (2) maintenance of the same triangle network for the outer cortical bone surface in both 3D reconstruction and non-porous models allowing exact replication of load and restraint cases; and (3) creation of an internal landmark point grid allowing direct comparison between 3D FE Models (FEMs). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Finite Element Numerical Modelling of 3D Magnetotelluric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ligang Cao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal numerical simulation of 3D magnetotelluric was restricted by the methodology complexity and the time-consuming calculation. Boundary values, the variation of weighted residual equation, and the hexahedral mesh generation method of finite element are three major causes. A finite element method for 3D magnetotelluric numerical modeling is presented in this paper as a solution for the problem mentioned above. In this algorithm, a hexahedral element coefficient matrix for magnetoelluric finite method is developed, which solves large-scale equations using preconditioned conjugate gradient of the first-type boundary conditions. This algorithm is verified using the homogeneous model, and the positive landform model, as well as the low resistance anomaly model.

  3. Modeling of Sensor Placement Strategy for Shape Sensing and Structural Health Monitoring of a Wing-Shaped Sandwich Panel Using Inverse Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Kefal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigated the effect of sensor density and alignment for three-dimensional shape sensing of an airplane-wing-shaped thick panel subjected to three different loading conditions, i.e., bending, torsion, and membrane loads. For shape sensing analysis of the panel, the Inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM was used together with the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT, in order to enable accurate predictions for transverse deflection and through-the-thickness variation of interfacial displacements. In this study, the iFEM-RZT algorithm is implemented by utilizing a novel three-node C°-continuous inverse-shell element, known as i3-RZT. The discrete strain data is generated numerically through performing a high-fidelity finite element analysis on the wing-shaped panel. This numerical strain data represents experimental strain readings obtained from surface patched strain gauges or embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors. Three different sensor placement configurations with varying density and alignment of strain data were examined and their corresponding displacement contours were compared with those of reference solutions. The results indicate that a sparse distribution of FBG sensors (uniaxial strain measurements, aligned in only the longitudinal direction, is sufficient for predicting accurate full-field membrane and bending responses (deformed shapes of the panel, including a true zigzag representation of interfacial displacements. On the other hand, a sparse deployment of strain rosettes (triaxial strain measurements is essentially enough to produce torsion shapes that are as accurate as those of predicted by a dense sensor placement configuration. Hence, the potential applicability and practical aspects of i3-RZT/iFEM methodology is proven for three-dimensional shape-sensing of future aerospace structures.

  4. Modeling of Sensor Placement Strategy for Shape Sensing and Structural Health Monitoring of a Wing-Shaped Sandwich Panel Using Inverse Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefal, Adnan; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2017-11-30

    This paper investigated the effect of sensor density and alignment for three-dimensional shape sensing of an airplane-wing-shaped thick panel subjected to three different loading conditions, i.e., bending, torsion, and membrane loads. For shape sensing analysis of the panel, the Inverse Finite Element Method (iFEM) was used together with the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT), in order to enable accurate predictions for transverse deflection and through-the-thickness variation of interfacial displacements. In this study, the iFEM-RZT algorithm is implemented by utilizing a novel three-node C°-continuous inverse-shell element, known as i3-RZT. The discrete strain data is generated numerically through performing a high-fidelity finite element analysis on the wing-shaped panel. This numerical strain data represents experimental strain readings obtained from surface patched strain gauges or embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. Three different sensor placement configurations with varying density and alignment of strain data were examined and their corresponding displacement contours were compared with those of reference solutions. The results indicate that a sparse distribution of FBG sensors (uniaxial strain measurements), aligned in only the longitudinal direction, is sufficient for predicting accurate full-field membrane and bending responses (deformed shapes) of the panel, including a true zigzag representation of interfacial displacements. On the other hand, a sparse deployment of strain rosettes (triaxial strain measurements) is essentially enough to produce torsion shapes that are as accurate as those of predicted by a dense sensor placement configuration. Hence, the potential applicability and practical aspects of i3-RZT/iFEM methodology is proven for three-dimensional shape-sensing of future aerospace structures.

  5. The finite element method its basis and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Zienkiewicz, Olek C; Zhu, JZ

    2013-01-01

    The Finite Element Method: Its Basis and Fundamentals offers a complete introduction to the basis of the finite element method, covering fundamental theory and worked examples in the detail required for readers to apply the knowledge to their own engineering problems and understand more advanced applications. This edition sees a significant rearrangement of the book's content to enable clearer development of the finite element method, with major new chapters and sections added to cover: Weak forms Variational forms Multi-dimensional field prob

  6. The blade element momentum (BEM) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    . The dynamic effects discussed are the dynamic wake/inflow model, the yaw and tilt model, the dynamic stall model, and models for the interference of the tower and nacelle. Some examples of steady and unsteady BEM simulations are given in a last section. The source code of a steady and unsteady BEM algorithm...

  7. Simulation of dry granular flows using discrete element methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hugo; Lefebvre, Aline; Maday, Yvon; Mangeney, Anne; Maury, Bertrand; Sainte-Marie, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Granular flows are composed of interacting particles (for instance sand grains). While natural flow simulations at the field scale are generally based on continuum models, discrete element methods are very useful to get insight into the detailed contact interactions between the particles involved. We shall consider here both well known molecular dynamics (MD) and contact dynamics (CD) methods to simulate granular particle interaction. The difference between these methods is the linearisation of contact forces in MD. We are interested to compare these methods, and especially the effects of the linearisation in simulations. In the present work, we introduce a new rigid bodies model at the scale of the particles and its resolution by contact dynamics. The interesting aspect of our CD method is to treat the contacts in all the material system in one step without any iterative process required when the contacts are dealt with one after the other. All contacts are calculated here at the same time in just one iteration and the normal and tangential constraints are treated simultaneously. The present model follows from a convex optimization problem presented in [1] by B. Maury in which we add a frictional behaviour to the contact law between the particles. To analyse the behaviour of this model, we compare our results to analytical solutions when we can compute them and otherwise to simulations with molecular dynamics method. [1] A time-stepping scheme for inelastic collisions. Numerical handling of the nonoverlapping constraint, B. Maury, Numerische Mathematik, 17 january 2006.

  8. An optimal adaptive finite element method for the Stokes problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kondratyuk, Y.; Stevenson, R.

    2008-01-01

    A new adaptive finite element method for solving the Stokes equations is developed, which is shown to converge with the best possible rate. The method consists of 3 nested loops. The outermost loop consists of an adaptive finite element method for solving the pressure from the (elliptic) Schur

  9. Lumped Mass Modeling for Local-Mode-Suppressed Element Connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joung, Young Soo; Yoon, Gil Ho; Kim, Yoon Young

    2005-01-01

    For successful topology design optimization of crashworthy “continuum” structures, unstable element-free and local vibration mode-free transient analyses should be ensured. Among these two issues, element instability was shown to be overcome if a recently-developed formulation, the element...... for the standard element density method. Local modes are artificial, numerical modes resulting from the intrinsic modeling technique of the topology optimization method. Even with existing local mode controlling techniques, the convergence of the topology optimization of vibrating structures, especially...... experiencing large structural changes, appears to be still poor. In ECP, the nodes of the domain-discretizing elements are connected by zero-length one-dimensional elastic links having varying stiffness. For computational efficiency, every elastic link is now assumed to have two lumped masses at its ends...

  10. Discrete element analysis methods of generic differential quadratures

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chang-New

    2008-01-01

    Presents generic differential quadrature, the extended differential quadrature and the related discrete element analysis methods. This book demonstrated their ability for solving generic scientific and engineering problems.

  11. h-p Spectral element methods for three dimensional elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Spectral element method; non-smooth domains; geometric mesh; vertex singularity; edge singularity; vertex-edge singularity; differentiability estimates; stability estimates; exponential accuracy.

  12. Simulation of a soil loosening process by means of the modified distinct element method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Momuzu, M.; Oida, A.; Yamazaki, M.; Koolen, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    We apply the Distinct Element Method (DEM) to analyze the dynamic behavior of soil. However, the conventional DEM model for calculation of contact forces between elements has some problems; for example, the movement of elements is too discrete to simulate real soil particle movement. Therefore, we

  13. Finite Element Method for Analysis of Material Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauhe, Jens Christian

    The use of cellular and composite materials have in recent years become more and more common in all kinds of structural components and accurate knowledge of the effective properties is therefore essential. In this wok the effective properties are determined using the real material microstructure...... theoretical models. Besides the determination of the effective properties, viscoelastic and damage analysis have been performed on a number of material microstructures....... description of the material microstructure the finite element models must contain a large number of elements and this problem is solved by using the preconditioned conjugated gradient solver with an Element-By-Element preconditioner. Finite element analysis provides the volume averaged stresses and strains...

  14. Spectral/hp element methods: Recent developments, applications, and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Hui; Cantwell, Chris; Monteserin, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    The spectral/hp element method combines the geometric flexibility of the classical h-type finite element technique with the desirable numerical properties of spectral methods, employing high-degree piecewise polynomial basis functions on coarse finite element-type meshes. The spatial approximation...... regularity assumptions an exponential reduction in approximation error between numerical and exact solutions can be achieved. This method has now been applied in many simulation studies of both fundamental and practical engineering flows. This paper briefly describes the formulation of the spectral/hp...... element method and provides an overview of its application to computational fluid dynamics. In particular, it focuses on the use of the spectral/hp element method in transitional flows and ocean engineering. Finally, some of the major challenges to be overcome in order to use the spectral/hp element...

  15. Modelling of Hybrid Materials and Interface Defects through Homogenization Approach for the Prediction of Effective Thermal Conductivity of FRP Composites Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element method is effectively used to homogenize the thermal conductivity of FRP composites consisting of hybrid materials and fibre-matrix debonds at some of the fibres. The homogenized result at microlevel is used to determine the property of the layer using macromechanics principles; thereby, it is possible to minimize the computational efforts required to solve the problem as in state through only micromechanics approach. The working of the proposed procedure is verified for three different problems: (i hybrid composite having two different fibres in alternate layers, (ii fibre-matrix interface debond in alternate layers, and (iii fibre-matrix interface debond at one fibre in a group of four fibres in one unit cell. It is observed that the results are in good agreement with those obtained through pure micro-mechanics approach.

  16. Finite element modelling of fibre-reinforced brittle materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kullaa, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tensile constitutive behaviour of fibre-reinforced brittle materials can be extended to two or three dimensions by using the finite element method with crack models. The three approaches in this study include the smeared and discrete crack concepts and a multi-surface plasticity model. The

  17. Finite Element Modelling Of Solidification Of Zinc Alloy | Osinkolu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The solidification process of Zinc alloy is modelled by solving heat transfer equations with the aid of finite element method (FEM) using appropriate boundary conditions at the mould walls. The commercial software, Matlab, has been used to model the solidification process. The temperature profiles for each casting condition ...

  18. Unstructured Spectral Element Model for Dispersive and Nonlinear Wave Propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Eskilsson, Claes; Bigoni, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    ). In the present paper we use a single layer of quadratic (in 2D) and prismatic (in 3D) elements. The model has been stabilized through a combination of over-integration of the Galerkin projections and a mild modal filter. We present numerical tests of nonlinear waves serving as a proof-of-concept validation......We introduce a new stabilized high-order and unstructured numerical model for modeling fully nonlinear and dispersive water waves. The model is based on a nodal spectral element method of arbitrary order in space and a -transformed formulation due to Cai, Langtangen, Nielsen and Tveito (1998...

  19. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method (DEM) is used in this study to explore the highly nonlinear dynamics of a granular bed when exposed to stress conditions comparable to those at the bed of warm-based glaciers. Complementary to analog experiments, the numerical approach allows a detailed analysis...

  20. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELLING OF THE COMPRESSIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Having developed and validated a code based on the Discrete Element Method principle with physical experiments the code was used to study and predict the behaviour (parametric changes) during compression of four bulk systems of particulates with the properties of canola seed, palm kernel and soyabean. The porosity ...

  1. Finite element modelling of solidification phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The process of solidification process is complex in nature and the simulation of such process is required in industry before it is actually undertaken. Finite element method is used to simulate the heat transfer process accompanying the solidification process. The metal and the mould along with the air gap formation is ...

  2. Piezoelectric Analysis of Saw Sensor Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír KUTIŠ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution modeling and simulation of surface acoustic waves (SAW sensor using finite element method will be presented. SAW sensor is made from piezoelectric GaN layer and SiC substrate. Two different analysis types are investigated - modal and transient. Both analyses are only 2D. The goal of modal analysis, is to determine the eigenfrequency of SAW, which is used in following transient analysis. In transient analysis, wave propagation in SAW sensor is investigated. Both analyses were performed using FEM code ANSYS.

  3. Stress Reduction of Pickup Truck Chassis Using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi, O.; Yob, M. S.; Dasson, S. R.; Barrathi, S.; Altayeb, A. A.; Yulianti, I.

    2017-04-01

    This paper performed stress reduction of the chassis of single cab pick truck using Finite Element Method (FEM). The first step was to evaluate and identify the critical area or maximum values of the static stress and its locations. The second stage of this project was dealing with designing a new chassis based on the Tata model, and then the final stage was a validation of numerical results with both experiments and analytical calculation to get the desired chassis that have strong and high-quality design.

  4. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR PREDICTING RESIDUAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the prediction of residual stresses developed in shielded manual metal arc welding of mild steel plates through Finite Element Model simulation and experiments. The existence of residual stresses that cause fatigue and distortion in welded structures has been responsible for failure of machine parts ...

  5. Finite element modeling of corneal strip extensometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, N

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available symmetric conicoid [19]: (x xo) 2+(y yo) 2+(1+Q)(z zo) 2 2R(z zo) 2 = 0; (2) c SACAM 2012 25 Top view Isometric view Initial corneal curvature z y x x y z Fig. 3: Finite element model of the vertical corneal strip, including the orthogonal...

  6. The Elements: A Model of Mindful Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Deborah C.; Presbury, Jack; Echterling, Lennis G.

    2012-01-01

    Mindfulness, based on an ancient spiritual practice, is a core quality and way of being that can deepen and enrich the supervision of counselors. This model of mindful supervision incorporates Buddhist and Hindu conceptualizations of the roles of the five elements--space, earth, water, fire, air--as they relate to adhikara or studentship, the…

  7. Wave Scattering in Heterogeneous Media using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-21

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2016-0086 Wave Scattering in Heterogeneous Media using the Finite Element Method Chiruvai Vendhan INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY...Scattering in Heterogeneous Media using the Finite Element Method 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b.  GRANT NUMBER FA2386-12-1-4026 5c.  PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6...heterogeneous ocean acoustic waveguide. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Acoustics, Finite Element Methods , Wave propagation 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17

  8. Ablative Thermal Response Analysis Using the Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dec John A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    A review of the classic techniques used to solve ablative thermal response problems is presented. The advantages and disadvantages of both the finite element and finite difference methods are described. As a first step in developing a three dimensional finite element based ablative thermal response capability, a one dimensional computer tool has been developed. The finite element method is used to discretize the governing differential equations and Galerkin's method of weighted residuals is used to derive the element equations. A code to code comparison between the current 1-D tool and the 1-D Fully Implicit Ablation and Thermal Response Program (FIAT) has been performed.

  9. Multi-axis dose accumulation of noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy through biomechanical modeling of tissue deformation using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mark J; Ghadyani, Hamid R; Bastien, Adam D; Lutz, Nicholas N; Hepel, Jaroslaw T

    2015-02-01

    Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young's modulus and 0.3 for Poisson's ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results within 2% and clinical observations over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over a range of clinical circumstances. These

  10. Determination a static limiting load curves for slewing bearing with application of the finite element methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Krynke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In slewing bearings, a great number of contact pairs are present on the contact surfaces between the rolling elements and raceways of the bearing. Computations to determine the load of the individual rolling elements, taking into account the flexibility of the bearing ring, are most often carried out using the finite element method. Construction of a FEM full model of the bearing, taking into account the shape of the rolling elements and the determination of the contact problem for every rolling element, leads to a singularity of stiffness matrix, which in turn makes the problem impossible to solve. In FEM models the rolling elements are replaced by one-dimensional finite elements (linear elements to simplify the computation procedure and to obtain an optimal time for computations. replaced by truss elements with a material non-linear characteristic located between the raceway centres of the curvatures in their axial section, are presented in the paper

  11. Coupled finite element modeling of piezothermoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senousy, M. S.; Rajapakse, R. K. N. D.; Gadala, M.

    2007-04-01

    The governing equations of piezo-thermoelastic materials show full coupling between mechanical, electric, and temperature fields. It is often assumed in the literature that in high-frequency oscillations, the coupling between the temperature and mechanical displacement and electric field is small and, therefore, can be neglected. A solution for the temperature field is then determined from an uncoupled equation. A finite element (FE) model that accounts for full coupling between the mechanical, electric, and thermal fields, nonlinear constitutive behavior and heat generation resulting from dielectric losses under alternating driving fields is under development. This paper presents a linear fully coupled model as an early development of the fully coupled nonlinear FE model. In the linear model, a solution for all field variables is obtained simultaneously and compared with the uncoupled solution. The finite element model is based on the weighted-residual principle and uses 2-D four-node isoparametric finite elements with four degrees of freedom per node. A thin piezoelectric square disk is modeled to obtain some preliminary understanding of the coupled fields in a piezoelectric stack actuator.

  12. New Computational Model Based on Finite Element Method to Quantify Damage Evolution Due to External Sulfate Attack on Self-Compacting Concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Khelifa, Mohammed Rissel

    2012-12-27

    Abstract: This work combines experimental and numerical investigations to study the mechanical degradation of self-compacting concrete under accelerated aging conditions. Four different experimental treatments are tested among them constant immersion and immersion-drying protocols allow an efficient external sulfate attack of the material. Significant damage is observed due to interfacial ettringite. A predictive analysis is then adopted to quantify the relationship between ettringite growth and mechanical damage evolution during aging. Typical 3D microstructures representing the cement paste-aggregate structures are generated using Monte Carlo scheme. These images are converted into a finite element model to predict the mechanical performance under different criteria of damage kinetics. The effect of ettringite is then associated to the development of an interphase of lower mechanical properties. Our results show that the observed time evolution of Young\\'s modulus is best described by a linear increase of the interphase content. Our model results indicate also that the interphase regions grow at maximum stress regions rather than exclusively at interfaces. Finally, constant immersion predicts a rate of damage growth five times lower than that of immersion-drying protocol. © 2012 Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

  13. 7th International Conference on Discrete Element Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Yuntian; Mustoe, Graham

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the latest advances in Discrete Element Methods (DEM) and technology. It is the proceeding of 7th International Conference on DEM which was held at Dalian University of Technology on August 1 - 4, 2016. The subject of this book are the DEM and related computational techniques such as DDA, FEM/DEM, molecular dynamics, SPH, Meshless methods, etc., which are the main computational methods for modeling discontinua. In comparison to continua which have been already studied for a long time, the research of discontinua is relatively new, but increases dramatically in recent years and has already become an important field. This book will benefit researchers and scientists from the academic fields of physics, engineering and applied mathematics, as well as from industry and national laboratories who are interested in the DEM. .

  14. Finite element method application for turbulent and transitional flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sváček Petr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is interested in numerical simulations of the interaction of the fluid flow with an airfoil. Particularly, the problem of the turbulent flow around the airfoil with elastic support is considered. The main attention is paid to the numerical approximation of the flow problem using the finite element approximations. The laminar - turbulence transition of the flow on the surface airfoil is considered. The chois of the transition model is discussed. The transition model based on the two equation k−ω turbulence model is used. The structure motion is described with the aid of two degrees of freedom. The motion of the computational domain is treated with the aid of the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. Numerical results are shown.

  15. FINITE ELEMENT MODELING OF THIN CIRCULAR SANDWICH PLATES DEFLECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Kurachka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of a thin circular sandwich plate being under the vertical load is proposed. The model employs the finite element method and takes advantage of an axisymmetric finite element that leads to the small dimension of the resulting stiffness matrix and sufficient accuracy for practical calculations. The analytical expressions for computing local stiffness matrices are found, which can significantly speed up the process of forming the global stiffness matrix and increase the accuracy of calculations. A software is under development and verification. The discrepancy between the results of the mathematical model and those of analytical formulas for homogeneous thin circularsandwich plates does not exceed 7%.

  16. Membrane finite element method for simulating fluid flow in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-li Zhan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new membrane finite element method for modeling fluid flow in a porous medium is presented in order to quickly and accurately simulate the geo-membrane fabric used in civil engineering. It is based on discontinuous finite element theory, and can be easily coupled with the normal Galerkin finite element method. Based on the saturated seepage equation, the element coefficient matrix of the membrane element method is derived, and a geometric transform relation for the membrane element between a global coordinate system and a local coordinate system is obtained. A method for the determination of the fluid flux conductivity of the membrane element is presented. This method provides a basis for determining discontinuous parameters in discontinuous finite element theory. An anti-seepage problem regarding the foundation of a building is analyzed by coupling the membrane finite element method with the normal Galerkin finite element method. The analysis results demonstrate the utility and superiority of the membrane finite element method in fluid flow analysis of a porous medium.

  17. Leapfrog/finite element method for fractional diffusion equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhengang; Zheng, Yunying

    2014-01-01

    We analyze a fully discrete leapfrog/Galerkin finite element method for the numerical solution of the space fractional order (fractional for simplicity) diffusion equation. The generalized fractional derivative spaces are defined in a bounded interval. And some related properties are further discussed for the following finite element analysis. Then the fractional diffusion equation is discretized in space by the finite element method and in time by the explicit leapfrog scheme. For the resulting fully discrete, conditionally stable scheme, we prove an L (2)-error bound of finite element accuracy and of second order in time. Numerical examples are included to confirm our theoretical analysis.

  18. Review on Finite Element Method * ERHUNMWUN, ID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Again, 3D printing is a complex process that involves phase changes, thermal interactions etc. It's again a coupled problem. There have been many alternative methods proposed in the recent decades. But their commercial applicability is yet to be proved. A recent trend has also been application of cloud-computing for FEM.

  19. Equivariant preconditioners for boundary element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tausch, J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the author proposes and discusses two preconditioners for boundary integral equations on domains which are nearly symmetric. The preconditioners under consideration are equivariant, that is, they commute with a group of permutation matrices. Numerical experiments demonstrate their efficiency for the GMRES method.

  20. Three dimensional mathematical model of tooth for finite element analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puškar Tatjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The mathematical model of the abutment tooth is the starting point of the finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The simplest and easiest way is to form a model according to the literature data of dimensions and morphological characteristics of teeth. Our method is based on forming 3D models using standard geometrical forms (objects in programmes for solid modeling. Objective. Forming the mathematical model of abutment of the second upper premolar for finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. Methods. The abutment tooth has a form of a complex geometric object. It is suitable for modeling in programs for solid modeling SolidWorks. After analyzing the literature data about the morphological characteristics of teeth, we started the modeling dividing the tooth (complex geometric body into simple geometric bodies (cylinder, cone, pyramid,.... Connecting simple geometric bodies together or substricting bodies from the basic body, we formed complex geometric body, tooth. The model is then transferred into Abaqus, a computational programme for finite element analysis. Transferring the data was done by standard file format for transferring 3D models ACIS SAT. Results. Using the programme for solid modeling SolidWorks, we developed three models of abutment of the second maxillary premolar: the model of the intact abutment, the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining cavity walls and the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining walls and inserted post. Conclusion Mathematical models of the abutment made according to the literature data are very similar with the real abutment and the simplifications are minimal. These models enable calculations of stress and deformation of the dental structures. The finite element analysis provides useful information in understanding biomechanical problems and gives guidance for clinical research.

  1. Ecosystem element transport model for Lake Eckarfjaerden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konovalenko, L.; Bradshaw, C. [The Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University (Sweden); Andersson, E.; Kautsky, U. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. - SKB (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    The ecosystem transport model of elements was developed for Lake Eckarfjaerden located in the Forsmark area in Sweden. Forsmark has currently a low level repository (SFR) and a repository for spent fuel is planned. A large number of data collected during site-investigation program 2002-2009 for planning the repository were available for the creation of the compartment model based on carbon circulation, physical and biological processes (e.g. primary production, consumption, respiration). The model is site-specific in the sense that the food web model is adapted to the actual food web at the site, and most estimates of biomass and metabolic rates for the organisms and meteorological data originate from site data. The functional organism groups of Lake Eckarfjaerden were considered as separate compartments: bacterio-plankton, benthic bacteria, macro-algae, phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, benthic fauna. Two functional groups of bacteria were taken into account for the reason that they have the highest biomass of all functional groups during the winter, comprising 36% of the total biomass. Effects of ecological parameters, such as bacteria and algae biomass, on redistribution of a hypothetical radionuclide release in the lake were examined. The ecosystem model was used to estimate the environmental transfer of several elements (U, Th, Ra) and their isotopes (U-238, U-234,Th-232, Ra-226) to various aquatic organisms in the lake, using element-specific distribution coefficients for suspended particle and sediment. Results of chemical analyses of the water, sediment and biota were used for model validation. The model gives estimates of concentration factors for fish based on modelling rather on in situ measurement, which reduces the uncertainties for many radionuclides with scarce of data. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  2. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    models may be created by assembling models of floor and wall structures into large models of complete buildings. When assembling the floor and wall models, the number of degrees of freedom quickly increases to exceed the limits of computer capacity, at least in a reasonable amount of computational time....... The objective of the analyses presented in this paper is to evaluate methods for model reduction of detailed finite element models of floor and wall structures and to investigate the influence of reducing the number of degrees of freedom and computational cost on the dynamic response of the models in terms....... The drawback of component mode synthesis compared to modelling with structural elements is the increased computational cost, although the number of degrees of freedom is small in comparison, as a result of the large bandwidth of the system matrices....

  3. A multigrid solution method for mixed hybrid finite elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, W. [Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    We consider the multigrid solution of linear equations arising within the discretization of elliptic second order boundary value problems of the form by mixed hybrid finite elements. Using the equivalence of mixed hybrid finite elements and non-conforming nodal finite elements, we construct a multigrid scheme for the corresponding non-conforming finite elements, and, by this equivalence, for the mixed hybrid finite elements, following guidelines from Arbogast/Chen. For a rectangular triangulation of the computational domain, this non-conforming schemes are the so-called nodal finite elements. We explicitly construct prolongation and restriction operators for this type of non-conforming finite elements. We discuss the use of plain multigrid and the multilevel-preconditioned cg-method and compare their efficiency in numerical tests.

  4. Transforming Mean and Osculating Elements Using Numerical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Todd A.

    2010-01-01

    Mean element propagation of perturbed two body orbits has as its mathematical basis averaging theory of nonlinear dynamical systems. Averaged mean elements define the long-term evolution characteristics of an orbit. Using averaging theory, a near identity transformation can be found that transforms the mean elements back to the osculating elements that contain short period terms in addition to the secular and long period mean elements. The ability to perform the conversion is necessary so that orbit design conducted in mean elements can be converted back into osculating results. In the present work, this near identity transformation is found using the Fast Fourier Transform. An efficient method is found that is capable of recovering the osculating elements to first order

  5. Application of the Tangent-Stiffness Method in the Finite Element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To simulate the behaviour of an interface formed between two contacting bodies using the finite element method, a review of previous approaches employed by other authors who worked with the same finite element method is carried out; their models and experimental data evaluated. A third-degree polynomial ...

  6. System and Method for Finite Element Simulation of Helicopter Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, R. E. (Inventor); Dulsenberg, Ken (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention provides a turbulence model that has been developed for blade-element helicopter simulation. This model uses an innovative temporal and geometrical distribution algorithm that preserves the statistical characteristics of the turbulence spectra over the rotor disc, while providing velocity components in real time to each of five blade-element stations along each of four blades. for a total of twenty blade-element stations. The simulator system includes a software implementation of flight dynamics that adheres to the guidelines for turbulence set forth in military specifications. One of the features of the present simulator system is that it applies simulated turbulence to the rotor blades of the helicopter, rather than to its center of gravity. The simulator system accurately models the rotor penetration into a gust field. It includes time correlation between the front and rear of the main rotor, as well as between the side forces felt at the center of gravity and at the tail rotor. It also includes features for added realism, such as patchy turbulence and vertical gusts in to which the rotor disc penetrates. These features are realized by a unique real time implementation of the turbulence filters. The new simulator system uses two arrays one on either side of the main rotor to record the turbulence field and to produce time-correlation from the front to the rear of the rotor disc. The use of Gaussian Interpolation between the two arrays maintains the statistical properties of the turbulence across the rotor disc. The present simulator system and method may be used in future and existing real-time helicopter simulations with minimal increase in computational workload.

  7. Boundary element method for surface nonlinear optics of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkitalo, Jouni; Suuriniemi, Saku; Kauranen, Martti

    2011-11-07

    We present the frequency-domain boundary element formulation for solving surface second-harmonic generation from nanoparticles of virtually arbitrary shape and material. We use the Rao-Wilton-Glisson basis functions and Galerkin's testing, which leads to very accurate solutions for both near and far fields. This is verified by a comparison to a solution obtained via multipole expansion for the case of a spherical particle. The frequency-domain formulation allows the use of experimentally measured linear and nonlinear material parameters or the use of parameters obtained using ab-initio principles. As an example, the method is applied to a non-centrosymmetric L-shaped gold nanoparticle to illustrate the formation of surface nonlinear polarization and the second-harmonic radiation properties of the particle. This method provides a theoretically well-founded approach for modelling nonlinear optical phenomena in nanoparticles.

  8. The Distinct Element Method - Application to Structures in Jointed Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.P.; Glen, L.; Blair, S.; Heuze, F.

    2001-11-30

    The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is a meshfree method with applications to rock mechanics, mining sciences, simulations of nuclear repositories, and the stability of underground structures. Continuum mesh-based methods have been applied successfully to many problems in geophysics. Even if the geology includes fractures and faults, when sufficiently large length scales are considered a continuum approximation may be sufficient. However, a large class of problems exist where individual rock joints must be taken into account. This includes problems where the structures of interest have sizes comparable with the block size. In addition, it is possible that while the structure may experience loads which do no measurable damage to individual blocks, some joints may fail. This may launch smaller blocks as dangerous projectiles or even cause total failure of a tunnel. Traditional grid-based continuum approaches are wholly unsuited to this class of problem. It is possible to introduce discontinuities or slide lines into existing grid-based methods, however, such limited approaches can break down when new contacts form between blocks. The distinct element method (DEM) is an alternative, meshfree approach. The DEM can directly approximate the block structure of the jointed rock using arbitrary polyhedra. Using this approach, preexisting joints are readily incorporated into the DEM model. In addition, the method detects all new contacts between blocks resulting from relative block motion. We will describe the background of the DEM and review previous application of the DEM to geophysical problems. Finally we present preliminary results from a investigation into the stability of underground structures subjected to dynamic loading.

  9. Hybrid Finite Element and Volume Integral Methods for Scattering Using Parametric Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volakis, John L.; Sertel, Kubilay; Jørgensen, Erik

    2004-01-01

    n this paper we address several topics relating to the development and implementation of volume integral and hybrid finite element methods for electromagnetic modeling. Comparisons of volume integral equation formulations with the finite element-boundary integral method are given in terms...... of vanishing divergence within the element but non-zero curl. In addition, a new domain decomposition is introduced for solving array problems involving several million degrees of freedom. Three orders of magnitude CPU reduction is demonstrated for such applications....

  10. Vibration analysis of composite pipes using the finite element method with B-spline wavelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oke, Wasiu A.; Khulief, Yehia A. [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-02-15

    A finite element formulation using the B-spline wavelets on the interval is developed for modeling the free vibrations of composite pipes. The composite FRP pipe element is treated as a beam element. The finite pipe element is constructed in the wavelet space and then transformed to the physical space. Detailed expressions of the mass and stiffness matrices are derived for the composite pipe using the Bspline scaling and wavelet functions. Both Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam theories are considered. The generalized eigenvalue problem is formulated and solved to obtain the modal characteristics of the composite pipe. The developed wavelet-based finite element discretization scheme utilizes significantly less elements compared to the conventional finite element method for modeling composite pipes. Numerical solutions are obtained to demonstrate the accuracy of the developed element, which is verified by comparisons with some available results in the literature.

  11. Element Free Lattice Boltzmann Method for Fluid-Flow Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Roh, Kyung Wan; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Hho Jhung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young Kwon [US Naval Postgraduate School, New York (United States)

    2007-10-15

    The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been developed for application to thermal-fluid problems. Most of the those studies considered a regular shape of lattice or mesh like square and cubic grids. In order to apply the LBM to more practical cases, it is necessary to be able to solve complex or irregular shapes of problem domains. Some techniques were based on the finite element method. Generally, the finite element method is very powerful for solving two or three-dimensional complex or irregular shapes of domains using the iso-parametric element formulation which is based on a mathematical mapping from a regular shape of element in an imaginary domain to a more general and irregular shape of element in the physical domain. In addition, the element free technique is also quite useful to analyze a complex shape of domain because there is no need to divide a domain by a compatible finite element mesh. This paper presents a new finite element and element free formulations for the lattice Boltzmann equation using the general weighted residual technique. Then, a series of validation examples are presented.

  12. An exponentiation method for XML element retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichaiwong, Tanakorn

    2014-01-01

    XML document is now widely used for modelling and storing structured documents. The structure is very rich and carries important information about contents and their relationships, for example, e-Commerce. XML data-centric collections require query terms allowing users to specify constraints on the document structure; mapping structure queries and assigning the weight are significant for the set of possibly relevant documents with respect to structural conditions. In this paper, we present an extension to the MEXIR search system that supports the combination of structural and content queries in the form of content-and-structure queries, which we call the Exponentiation function. It has been shown the structural information improve the effectiveness of the search system up to 52.60% over the baseline BM25 at MAP.

  13. A coupling procedure for modeling acoustic problems using finite elements and boundary elements

    OpenAIRE

    Coyette, J.; Vanderborck, G.; Steichen, W.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element (FEM) and boundary element (BEM) methods have been used for a long time for the numerical simulation of acoustic problems. The development presented in this paper deals with a general procedure for coupling acoustic finite elements with acoustic boundary elements in order to solve efficiently acoustic problems involving non homogeneous fluids. Emphasis is made on problems where finite elements are used for a confined (bounded) fluid while boundary elements are selected for an e...

  14. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  15. A Method of Assembling Wall or Floor Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of constructing, at the site of use, a building wall (1) or a building floor (1) using a plurality of prefabricated concrete or lightweight concrete plate-shaped wall of floor elements (10), in particular cast elements, which have a front side and a rear side...

  16. Nonconforming hp spectral element methods for elliptic problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we show that we can use a modified version of the ℎ- spectral element method proposed in [6,7,13,14] to solve elliptic problems with general boundary conditions to exponential accuracy on polygonal domains using nonconforming spectral element functions. A geometrical mesh is used in a neighbourhood ...

  17. Stability estimates for hp spectral element methods for general ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4. Stability Estimates for ℎ- Spectral ... We establish basic stability estimates for a non-conforming ℎ- spectral element method which allows for simultaneous mesh refinement and variable polynomial degree. The spectral element functions are ...

  18. THE PRACTICAL ANALYSIS OF FINITE ELEMENTS METHOD ERRORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Bakhova

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The most important in the practical plan questions of reliable estimations of finite elementsmethod errors are considered. Definition rules of necessary calculations accuracy are developed. Methodsand ways of the calculations allowing receiving at economical expenditures of computing work the best finalresults are offered.Keywords: error, given the accuracy, finite element method, lagrangian and hermitian elements.

  19. About the Finite Element Method Applied to Thick Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Ibănescu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches of plates subjected to transverse loads, when the shear force and the actual boundary conditions are considered, by using the Finite Element Method. The isoparametric finite elements create real facilities in formulating the problems and great possibilities in creating adequate computer programs.

  20. Analytical and finite element modeling of grounding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luz, Mauricio Valencia Ferreira da [University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)], E-mail: mauricio@grucad.ufsc.br; Dular, Patrick [University of Liege (Belgium). Institut Montefiore], E-mail: Patrick.Dular@ulg.ac.be

    2007-07-01

    Grounding is the art of making an electrical connection to the earth. This paper deals with the analytical and finite element modeling of grounding systems. An electrokinetic formulation using a scalar potential can benefit from floating potentials to define global quantities such as electric voltages and currents. The application concerns a single vertical grounding with one, two and three-layer soil, where the superior extremity stays in the surface of the soil. This problem has been modeled using a 2D axi-symmetric electrokinetic formulation. The grounding resistance obtained by finite element method is compared with the analytical one for one-layer soil. With the results of this paper it is possible to show that finite element method is a powerful tool in the analysis of the grounding systems in low frequencies. (author)

  1. A novel hybrid stress-function finite element method immune to severe mesh distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Song; Fu, Xiang-Rong; Zhou, Ming-Jue

    2010-06-01

    This paper introduces a hybrid stress-function finite element method proposed recently for developing 2D finite element models immune to element shapes. Deferent from the first version of the hybrid-stress element constructed by Pian, the stress function phi of 2D elastic or fracture problem is regarded as the functional variable of the complementary energy functional. Then, the basic analytical solutions of phi are taken as the trial functions for finite element models, and meanwhile, the corresponding unknown stress-function constants are introduced. By using the principle of minimum complementary energy, these unknown stress-function constants can be expressed in terms of the displacements along element edges. Finally, the complementary energy functional can be rewritten in terms of element nodal displacement vector, and thus, the element stiffness matrix of such hybrid-function element can be obtained. As examples, two (8- and 12-node) quadrilateral plane elements and an arbitrary polygonal crack element are constructed by employing different basic analytical solutions of different stress functions. Numerical results show that, the 8- and 12-node plane models can produce the exact solutions for pure bending and linear bending problems, respectively, even the element shape degenerates into triangle and concave quadrangle; and the crack element can also predict accurate results with very low computational cost in analysis of stress-singularity problems.

  2. Methods to prevent turbogenerators design elements defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Валентина Володимирівна Шевченко

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows that the determination of a failure probability due to the design, technological and operational drawbacks, as well as due to the turbogenerators working time exceeding from statistics data is inaccurate. Machine park of turbogenerators being rather limited in number, the classification and the distribution of generators into groups is random. It can not be used in practice to identify the pre-emergency state of turbogenerators and their timely stop. Analysis and classification of most frequent defects of turbogenerators has been performed. Methods for assessing such defects and reduction of their development have been offered. The article notes that expenses should be taken into account when setting up a monitoring system to assess the state and to identify defects. Reduction of expenditures on both operating and new turbogenerators must be justified. Rapid return of investments must be ensured. The list of additional tests has been proposed: measurement of infrared radiation outside the body of the turbogenerator for the estimation of the thermal field distribution and the defects of gas coolers identification; vibroacoustic inspection of the stator core and casing to find out the defects in the suspension of the core in the stator casing; analysis of the impurities in the cooling gas and in the dry remains of the drainage products to detect the products of the steel core and the winding insulation wear; value measurement and establishment of the partial discharges formation position; research of vibrations to reveal the cracks in the shaft, circuiting in the rotor windings and defects in the bearings. The paper notes that at upgrading as power grows overall and mounting dimensions must be preserved so that the existing foundation could be used as well as the existing security systems. Therefore, when designing or upgrading turbogenerators with an increase in power it is necessary to introduce new design decisions

  3. Numerical modeling of the strain of elastic rubber elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvichev, E. N.; Porokhin, A. V.; Shcherbakov, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    A comparative analysis of the results of experimental investigation of mechanical behavior of the rubber sample during biaxial compression testing and numerical simulation results obtained by the finite element method was carried out to determine the correctness of the model applied in the engineering calculations of elastic structural elements made of the rubber. The governing equation represents the five-parameter Mooney-Rivlin model with the constants determined from experimental data. The investigation results showed that these constants reliably describe the mechanical behavior of the material under consideration. The divergence of experimental and numerical results does not exceed 15%.

  4. [Three dimensional mathematical model of tooth for finite element analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puskar, Tatjana; Vasiljević, Darko; Marković, Dubravka; Jevremović, Danimir; Pantelić, Dejan; Savić-Sević, Svetlana; Murić, Branka

    2010-01-01

    The mathematical model of the abutment tooth is the starting point of the finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The simplest and easiest way is to form a model according to the literature data of dimensions and morphological characteristics of teeth. Our method is based on forming 3D models using standard geometrical forms (objects) in programmes for solid modeling. Forming the mathematical model of abutment of the second upper premolar for finite element analysis of stress and deformation of dental structures. The abutment tooth has a form of a complex geometric object. It is suitable for modeling in programs for solid modeling SolidWorks. After analysing the literature data about the morphological characteristics of teeth, we started the modeling dividing the tooth (complex geometric body) into simple geometric bodies (cylinder, cone, pyramid,...). Connecting simple geometric bodies together or substricting bodies from the basic body, we formed complex geometric body, tooth. The model is then transferred into Abaqus, a computational programme for finite element analysis. Transferring the data was done by standard file format for transferring 3D models ACIS SAT. Using the programme for solid modeling SolidWorks, we developed three models of abutment of the second maxillary premolar: the model of the intact abutment, the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining cavity walls and the model of the endodontically treated tooth with two remaining walls and inserted post. Mathematical models of the abutment made according to the literature data are very similar with the real abutment and the simplifications are minimal. These models enable calculations of stress and deformation of the dental structures. The finite element analysis provides useful information in understanding biomechanical problems and gives guidance for clinical research.

  5. Developpement d'un modele analytique pour l'analyse en elasticite lineaire de champs de deformation et contrainte au sein d'un polycristal. comparaison avec la methode des elements finis =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretin, Remy

    L'endommagement par fatigue des materiaux est un probleme courant dans de nombreux domaines, dont celui de l'aeronautique. Afin de prevenir la rupture par fatigue des materiaux il est necessaire de determiner leur duree de vie en fatigue. Malheureusement, dues aux nombreuses heterogeneites presentes, la duree de vie en fatigue peut fortement varier entre deux pieces identiques faites dans le meme materiau ayant subi les memes traitements. Il est donc necessaire de considerer ces heterogeneites dans nos modeles afin d'avoir une meilleure estimation de la duree de vie des materiaux. Comme premiere etape vers une meilleure consideration des heterogeneites dans nos modeles, une etude en elasticite lineaire de l'influence des orientations cristallographiques sur les champs de deformations et de contraintes dans un polycristal a ete realisee a l'aide de la methode des elements finis. Des correlations ont pu etre etablies a partir des resultats obtenus, et un modele analytique en elasticite lineaire prenant en compte les distributions d'orientations cristallographiques et les effets de voisinage a pu etre developpe. Ce modele repose sur les bases des modeles d'homogeneisation classique, comme le schema auto-coherent, et reprend aussi les principes de voisinage des automates cellulaires. En prenant pour reference les resultats des analyses elements finis, le modele analytique ici developpe a montre avoir une precision deux fois plus grande que le modele auto-coherent, quel que soit le materiau etudie.

  6. Comparison of different precondtioners for nonsymmtric finite volume element methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishev, I.D.

    1996-12-31

    We consider a few different preconditioners for the linear systems arising from the discretization of 3-D convection-diffusion problems with the finite volume element method. Their theoretical and computational convergence rates are compared and discussed.

  7. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2017-09-19

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  8. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  9. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2017-09-12

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  10. Customized finite element modelling of the human cornea

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Simonini; Anna Pandolfi

    2015-01-01

    Aim To construct patient-specific solid models of human cornea from ocular topographer data, to increase the accuracy of the biomechanical and optical estimate of the changes in refractive power and stress caused by photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Method Corneal elevation maps of five human eyes were taken with a rotating Scheimpflug camera combined with a Placido disk before and after refractive surgery. Patient-specific solid models were created and discretized in finite elements to esti...

  11. Rigid Finite Element Method in Analysis of Dynamics of Offshore Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wittbrodt, Edmund; Maczyński, Andrzej; Wojciech, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    This book describes new methods developed for modelling dynamics of machines commonly used in the offshore industry. These methods are based both on the rigid finite element method, used for the description of link deformations, and on homogeneous transformations and joint coordinates, which is applied to the modelling of multibody system dynamics. In this monograph, the bases of the rigid finite element method  and homogeneous transformations are introduced. Selected models for modelling dynamics of offshore devices are then verified both by using commercial software, based on the finite element method, as well as by using additional methods. Examples of mathematical models of offshore machines, such as a gantry crane for Blowout-Preventer (BOP) valve block transportation, a pedestal crane with shock absorber, and pipe laying machinery are presented. Selected problems of control in offshore machinery as well as dynamic optimization in device control are also discussed. Additionally, numerical simulations of...

  12. A mixed finite element method for nonlinear diffusion equations

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We propose a mixed finite element method for a class of nonlinear diffusion equations, which is based on their interpretation as gradient flows in optimal transportation metrics. We introduce an appropriate linearization of the optimal transport problem, which leads to a mixed symmetric formulation. This formulation preserves the maximum principle in case of the semi-discrete scheme as well as the fully discrete scheme for a certain class of problems. In addition solutions of the mixed formulation maintain exponential convergence in the relative entropy towards the steady state in case of a nonlinear Fokker-Planck equation with uniformly convex potential. We demonstrate the behavior of the proposed scheme with 2D simulations of the porous medium equations and blow-up questions in the Patlak-Keller-Segel model. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  13. Mixed finite elements for global tide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Colin J; Kirby, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    We study mixed finite element methods for the linearized rotating shallow water equations with linear drag and forcing terms. By means of a strong energy estimate for an equivalent second-order formulation for the linearized momentum, we prove long-time stability of the system without energy accumulation-the geotryptic state. A priori error estimates for the linearized momentum and free surface elevation are given in [Formula: see text] as well as for the time derivative and divergence of the linearized momentum. Numerical results confirm the theoretical results regarding both energy damping and convergence rates.

  14. Energy flow in plate assembles by hierarchical version of finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachulec, Marcin; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    the finite element method has been used to study the energy flow. The finite element method proved its usefulness despite the computational expense. Therefore studies have been conducted in order to simplify and reduce the computations required. Among others, the use of hierarchical version of finite element...... method has been proposed. In this paper a modified hierarchical version of finite element method is used for modelling of energy flow in plate assembles. The formulation includes description of in-plane forces so that planes lying in different planes can be modelled. Two examples considered are: L......-corner of two rectangular plates an a I-shaped plate girder made of five plates. Energy distribution among plates due to harmonic load is studied and the comparison of performance between the hierarchical and standard finite element formulation is presented....

  15. Model order reduction techniques with applications in finite element analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Zu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    Despite the continued rapid advance in computing speed and memory the increase in the complexity of models used by engineers persists in outpacing them. Even where there is access to the latest hardware, simulations are often extremely computationally intensive and time-consuming when full-blown models are under consideration. The need to reduce the computational cost involved when dealing with high-order/many-degree-of-freedom models can be offset by adroit computation. In this light, model-reduction methods have become a major goal of simulation and modeling research. Model reduction can also ameliorate problems in the correlation of widely used finite-element analyses and test analysis models produced by excessive system complexity. Model Order Reduction Techniques explains and compares such methods focusing mainly on recent work in dynamic condensation techniques: - Compares the effectiveness of static, exact, dynamic, SEREP and iterative-dynamic condensation techniques in producing valid reduced-order mo...

  16. The Matrix Element Method at Next-to-Leading Order

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, John M.; Giele, Walter T.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of the matrix element method to next-to-leading order in perturbation theory. To accomplish this we have developed a method to calculate next-to-leading order weights on an event-by-event basis. This allows for the definition of next-to-leading order likelihoods in exactly the same fashion as at leading order, thus extending the matrix element method to next-to-leading order. A welcome by-product of the method is the straightforward and efficient generation of...

  17. Finite element modeling of nanotube structures linear and non-linear models

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar; Muhammad, Ibrahim Dauda

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a new approach to modeling carbon structures such as graphene and carbon nanotubes using finite element methods, and addresses the latest advances in numerical studies for these materials. Based on the available findings, the book develops an effective finite element approach for modeling the structure and the deformation of grapheme-based materials. Further, modeling processing for single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is demonstrated in detail.

  18. Nonconforming mortar element methods: Application to spectral discretizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maday, Yvon; Mavriplis, Cathy; Patera, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Spectral element methods are p-type weighted residual techniques for partial differential equations that combine the generality of finite element methods with the accuracy of spectral methods. Presented here is a new nonconforming discretization which greatly improves the flexibility of the spectral element approach as regards automatic mesh generation and non-propagating local mesh refinement. The method is based on the introduction of an auxiliary mortar trace space, and constitutes a new approach to discretization-driven domain decomposition characterized by a clean decoupling of the local, structure-preserving residual evaluations and the transmission of boundary and continuity conditions. The flexibility of the mortar method is illustrated by several nonconforming adaptive Navier-Stokes calculations in complex geometry.

  19. The matrix element method at next-to-leading order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John M.; Giele, Walter T.; Williams, Ciaran

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents an extension of the matrix element method to next-to-leading order in perturbation theory, for electro-weak final states. To accomplish this we have developed a method to calculate next-to-leading order weights on an event-by-event basis. This allows for the definition of next-to-leading order likelihoods in exactly the same fashion as at leading order, thus extending the matrix element method to next-to-leading order. A welcome by-product of the method is the straightforward and efficient generation of unweighted next-to-leading order events. As examples of the application of our next-to-leading order matrix element method we consider the measurement of the mass of the Z boson and also the search for the Higgs boson in the four lepton channel.

  20. Finite element modelling of X-band RF flanges

    CERN Document Server

    Kortelainen, Laurie; Riddone, Germana

    A finite element model of different versions of RF flange used in Compact Linear Collider modules was created in ANSYS Workbench software. A 2D idealisation of the assembly was modelled using both plane stress and plane strain elements. Three of the versions were also modelled using 3D elements. A detailed description of finite element models and theoretical background accompanying the models are presented in this thesis.

  1. Hybrid finite difference/finite element immersed boundary method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Griffith, Boyce; Luo, Xiaoyu

    2017-12-01

    The immersed boundary method is an approach to fluid-structure interaction that uses a Lagrangian description of the structural deformations, stresses, and forces along with an Eulerian description of the momentum, viscosity, and incompressibility of the fluid-structure system. The original immersed boundary methods described immersed elastic structures using systems of flexible fibers, and even now, most immersed boundary methods still require Lagrangian meshes that are finer than the Eulerian grid. This work introduces a coupling scheme for the immersed boundary method to link the Lagrangian and Eulerian variables that facilitates independent spatial discretizations for the structure and background grid. This approach uses a finite element discretization of the structure while retaining a finite difference scheme for the Eulerian variables. We apply this method to benchmark problems involving elastic, rigid, and actively contracting structures, including an idealized model of the left ventricle of the heart. Our tests include cases in which, for a fixed Eulerian grid spacing, coarser Lagrangian structural meshes yield discretization errors that are as much as several orders of magnitude smaller than errors obtained using finer structural meshes. The Lagrangian-Eulerian coupling approach developed in this work enables the effective use of these coarse structural meshes with the immersed boundary method. This work also contrasts two different weak forms of the equations, one of which is demonstrated to be more effective for the coarse structural discretizations facilitated by our coupling approach. © 2017 The Authors International  Journal  for  Numerical  Methods  in  Biomedical  Engineering Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Finite-Element Modelling of Biotransistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaganapathy PR

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current research efforts in biosensor design attempt to integrate biochemical assays with semiconductor substrates and microfluidic assemblies to realize fully integrated lab-on-chip devices. The DNA biotransistor (BioFET is an example of such a device. The process of chemical modification of the FET and attachment of linker and probe molecules is a statistical process that can result in variations in the sensed signal between different BioFET cells in an array. In order to quantify these and other variations and assess their importance in the design, complete physical simulation of the device is necessary. Here, we perform a mean-field finite-element modelling of a short channel, two-dimensional BioFET device. We compare the results of this model with one-dimensional calculation results to show important differences, illustrating the importance of the molecular structure, placement and conformation of DNA in determining the output signal.

  3. Self-supporting method; an alternative method for steel truss bridge element replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsyad, Muhammad; Sangadji, Senot; As’ad, Sholihin

    2017-11-01

    Steel truss bridge often requires replacement of its element due to serious damage caused by traffic accidents. This replacement is carried out using temporary supporting structure. It would be difficult when the available space for the temporary structure is quite limited and or the position of work is at a high elevation. The self-supporting method is proposed instead of temporary supporting structure. This paper will discuss an innovative method of bridge rehabilitation by utilizing the existing bridge structure. It requires such temporary connecting structure that installed on the existing bridge element, therefore, the forces during replacement process could be transferred to the bridge foundation directly. By taking the case on a steel truss bridge Jetis Salatiga which requires element replacement due to its damages on two main diagonals, a modeling is carried out to get a proper repair method. Structural analysis is conducted for three temporary connecting structure models: “I,” “V,” and triangular model. Stresses and translations that occur in the structure are used as constraints. Bridge bearings are modeled in two different modes: fixed-fixed system and fixed-free one. Temperature load is given in each condition to obtain the appropriate time for execution. The triangular model is chosen as the best one. In the fixed-fixed mode, this method can be carried out in a temperature range 27-28.8° C, while in fixed-free one, the temperature it is allowed between 27-43.4 °C. The D4 is dismantled first by cutting the D4 leaving an area of 1140.2 mm2 or 127 mm web length to enable plastic condition until the D4 collapses. At the beginning of elongation occurs, immediately performed a slowly jacking on a temporary connecting structure so that the force on D4 is gradually transferred to the temporary connecting structure then the D4 and D5 are set in their place.

  4. Modelling interfacial cracking with non-matching cohesive interface elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh Phu; Nguyen, Chi Thanh; Bordas, Stéphane; Heidarpour, Amin

    2016-11-01

    Interfacial cracking occurs in many engineering problems such as delamination in composite laminates, matrix/interface debonding in fibre reinforced composites etc. Computational modelling of these interfacial cracks usually employs compatible or matching cohesive interface elements. In this paper, incompatible or non-matching cohesive interface elements are proposed for interfacial fracture mechanics problems. They allow non-matching finite element discretisations of the opposite crack faces thus lifting the constraint on the compatible discretisation of the domains sharing the interface. The formulation is based on a discontinuous Galerkin method and works with both initially elastic and rigid cohesive laws. The proposed formulation has the following advantages compared to classical interface elements: (i) non-matching discretisations of the domains and (ii) no high dummy stiffness. Two and three dimensional quasi-static fracture simulations are conducted to demonstrate the method. Our method not only simplifies the meshing process but also it requires less computational demands, compared with standard interface elements, for problems that involve materials/solids having a large mismatch in stiffnesses.

  5. Multibody Finite Element Method and Application in Hydraulic Structure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multibody finite element method is proposed for analysis of contact problems in hydraulic structure. This method is based on the block theory of discontinuous deformation analysis (DDA method and combines advantages of finite element method (FEM and the displacement compatibility equation in classical elastic mechanics. Each single block is analyzed using FEM in corresponding local coordinate system and all contacting blocks need to satisfy the displacement compatibility requirement between any two blocks in a blocky system. It is proved that this method is very efficient and practical to overcome the limitations in DDA method when tackling contact problems, such as the overlap problem and the equal strain assumption. In this paper, detailed theoretical basis and formulations are given. Two numerical examples are performed to verify the proposed method successfully. Furthermore, this method is adopted to study the stability issues of underground houses of a large hydropower station.

  6. Elements of effective palliative care models: a rapid review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Population ageing, changes to the profiles of life-limiting illnesses and evolving societal attitudes prompt a critical evaluation of models of palliative care. We set out to identify evidence-based models of palliative care to inform policy reform in Australia. Method A rapid review of electronic databases and the grey literature was undertaken over an eight week period in April-June 2012. We included policy documents and comparative studies from countries within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) published in English since 2001. Meta-analysis was planned where >1 study met criteria; otherwise, synthesis was narrative using methods described by Popay et al. (2006). Results Of 1,959 peer-reviewed articles, 23 reported systematic reviews, 9 additional RCTs and 34 non-randomised comparative studies. Variation in the content of models, contexts in which these were implemented and lack of detailed reporting meant that elements of models constituted a more meaningful unit of analysis than models themselves. Case management was the element most consistently reported in models for which comparative studies provided evidence for effectiveness. Essential attributes of population-based palliative care models identified by policy and addressed by more than one element were communication and coordination between providers (including primary care), skill enhancement, and capacity to respond rapidly to individuals’ changing needs and preferences over time. Conclusion Models of palliative care should integrate specialist expertise with primary and community care services and enable transitions across settings, including residential aged care. The increasing complexity of care needs, services, interventions and contextual drivers warrants future research aimed at elucidating the interactions between different components and the roles played by patient, provider and health system factors. The findings of this review are limited by its

  7. A finite element conjugate gradient FFT method for scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jeffery D.; Ross, Dan; Jin, J.-M.; Chatterjee, A.; Volakis, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Validated results are presented for the new 3D body of revolution finite element boundary integral code. A Fourier series expansion of the vector electric and mangnetic fields is employed to reduce the dimensionality of the system, and the exact boundary condition is employed to terminate the finite element mesh. The mesh termination boundary is chosen such that is leads to convolutional boundary operatores of low O(n) memory demand. Improvements of this code are discussed along with the proposed formulation for a full 3D implementation of the finite element boundary integral method in conjunction with a conjugate gradiant fast Fourier transformation (CGFFT) solution.

  8. Symmetric Matrix Fields in the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Awanou

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The theory of elasticity is used to predict the response of a material body subject to applied forces. In the linear theory, where the displacement is small, the stress tensor which measures the internal forces is the variable of primal importance. However the symmetry of the stress tensor which expresses the conservation of angular momentum had been a challenge for finite element computations. We review in this paper approaches based on mixed finite element methods.

  9. Clinical element models in the SHARPn consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oniki, Thomas A; Zhuo, Ning; Beebe, Calvin E; Liu, Hongfang; Coyle, Joseph F; Parker, Craig G; Solbrig, Harold R; Marchant, Kyle; Kaggal, Vinod C; Chute, Christopher G; Huff, Stanley M

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Project area four (SHARPn) was to develop open-source tools that could be used for the normalization of electronic health record (EHR) data for secondary use--specifically, for high throughput phenotyping. We describe the role of Intermountain Healthcare's Clinical Element Models ([CEMs] Intermountain Healthcare Health Services, Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah) as normalization "targets" within the project. Intermountain's CEMs were either repurposed or created for the SHARPn project. A CEM describes "valid" structure and semantics for a particular kind of clinical data. CEMs are expressed in a computable syntax that can be compiled into implementation artifacts. The modeling team and SHARPn colleagues agilely gathered requirements and developed and refined models. Twenty-eight "statement" models (analogous to "classes") and numerous "component" CEMs and their associated terminology were repurposed or developed to satisfy SHARPn high throughput phenotyping requirements. Model (structural) mappings and terminology (semantic) mappings were also created. Source data instances were normalized to CEM-conformant data and stored in CEM instance databases. A model browser and request site were built to facilitate the development. The modeling efforts demonstrated the need to address context differences and granularity choices and highlighted the inevitability of iso-semantic models. The need for content expertise and "intelligent" content tooling was also underscored. We discuss scalability and sustainability expectations for a CEM-based approach and describe the place of CEMs relative to other current efforts. The SHARPn effort demonstrated the normalization and secondary use of EHR data. CEMs proved capable of capturing data originating from a variety of sources within the normalization pipeline and serving as suitable normalization targets. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  10. Orthotropic node-separation finite element method for composite laminate in hypervelocity impact simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaotian; Liu, Tao; Qiu, Xinming

    2017-11-01

    This paper reports a finite element modeling approach to simulate the hypervelocity impact (HVI) response of composite laminate. Node-separation finite element (NSFE) method based on scalar-element-fracture technique for isotropic material in HVI simulation has been presented in the previous study. To extend NSFE to composite materials, an orthotropic node-separation finite element (ONSFE) method is developed. This approach employs an orthotropic continuum material model and a corresponding orthotropic-element-fracture technique to represent the HVI behavior/damage of composite laminate. A series of HVI simulations are conducted and the developed ONSFE method is validated by comparing with the experimental data. The simulation results show that ONSFE can successfully capture the HVI phenomena of composite laminate, such as the orthotropic property, nonlinear shock response, perforation, fiber breakage and delamination. Finally, a HVI event of Whipple shield is simulated and the computational capability of ONSFE for predicting the damage state of the composite bumper is further evaluated.

  11. Model Reduction in Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of Lightweight Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flodén, Ola; Persson, Kent; Sjöström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    . The objective of the analyses presented in this paper is to evaluate methods for model reduction of detailed finite element models of floor and wall structures and to investigate the influence of reducing the number of degrees of freedom and computational cost on the dynamic response of the models in terms....... The drawback of component mode synthesis compared to modelling with structural elements is the increased computational cost, although the number of degrees of freedom is small in comparison, as a result of the large bandwidth of the system matrices.......The application of wood as a construction material when building multi-storey buildings has many advantages, e.g., light weight, sustainability and low energy consumption during the construction and lifecycle of the building. However, compared to heavy structures, it is a greater challenge to build...

  12. On angle conditions in the finite element method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.; Hannukainen, A.; Korotov, S.; Krizek, M.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Angle conditions play an important role in the analysis of the finite element method. They enable us to derive the optimal interpolation order and prove convergence of this method, to derive various a posteriori error estimates, to perform regular mesh refinements, etc. In 1968, Miloˇs

  13. Different Element Methods in Engineering Practice | Onah | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... general manner so that engineers and scientists who are increasingly, called upon to use element methods to support and check their analyses and/or designs can appreciate the essential dierences and similarities in the various methods and their possible advantages and disadvantages.

  14. The future of the finite element method in geotechnics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkgreve, R.B.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this presentation a vision is given on tlie fiiture of the finite element method (FEM) for geotechnical engineering and design. In the past 20 years the FEM has proven to be a powerful method for estimating deformation, stability and groundwater flow in geoteclmical stmctures. Much has been

  15. A comparison of the lattice discrete particle method to the finite-element method and the K&C material model for simulating the static and dynamic response of concrete.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jovanca J.; Bishop, Joseph E.

    2013-11-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by the graduate student Jovanca Smith during a summer internship in the summer of 2012 with the aid of mentor Joe Bishop. The projects were a two-part endeavor that focused on the use of the numerical model called the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM). The LDPM is a discrete meso-scale model currently used at Northwestern University and the ERDC to model the heterogeneous quasi-brittle material, concrete. In the first part of the project, LDPM was compared to the Karagozian and Case Concrete Model (K&C) used in Presto, an explicit dynamics finite-element code, developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In order to make this comparison, a series of quasi-static numerical experiments were performed, namely unconfined uniaxial compression tests on four varied cube specimen sizes, three-point bending notched experiments on three proportional specimen sizes, and six triaxial compression tests on a cylindrical specimen. The second part of this project focused on the application of LDPM to simulate projectile perforation on an ultra high performance concrete called CORTUF. This application illustrates the strengths of LDPM over traditional continuum models.

  16. Convergence of multigrid method for edge-based finite-element method

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, K.; Igarashi, H.; Honma, T.

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses robustness of the multigrid (MG) method against distortion of finite elements. The convergence of MG method becomes considerably worse as the finite elements become flat. It is shown that the smoother used in the MG method cannot effectively eliminate the high-frequency component of the residue for flat elements, and this gives rise to deterioration in the convergence. Moreover, the multigrid method with conjugate gradient (CG) smoother is shown to be more robust against ...

  17. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II: Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Woong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO2 laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  18. A study on an efficient prediction of welding deformation for T-joint laser welding of sandwich panel Part II : Proposal of a method to use shell element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jae Woong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available I-core sandwich panel that has been used more widely is assembled using high power CO₂laser welding. Kim et al. (2013 proposed a circular cone type heat source model for the T-joint laser welding between face plate and core. It can cover the negative defocus which is commonly adopted in T-joint laser welding to provide deeper penetration. In part I, a volumetric heat source model is proposed and it is verified thorough a comparison of melting zone on the cross section with experiment results. The proposed model can be used for heat transfer analysis and thermal elasto-plastic analysis to predict welding deformation that occurs during laser welding. In terms of computational time, since the thermal elasto-plastic analysis using 3D solid elements is quite time consuming, shell element model with multi-layers have been employed instead. However, the conventional layered approach is not appropriate for the application of heat load at T-Joint. This paper, Part II, suggests a new method to arrange different number of layers for face plate and core in order to impose heat load only to the face plate.

  19. Patient-specific modeling of human cardiovascular system elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossovich, Leonid Yu.; Kirillova, Irina V.; Golyadkina, Anastasiya A.; Polienko, Asel V.; Chelnokova, Natalia O.; Ivanov, Dmitriy V.; Murylev, Vladimir V.

    2016-03-01

    Object of study: The research is aimed at development of personalized medical treatment. Algorithm was developed for patient-specific surgical interventions of the cardiovascular system pathologies. Methods: Geometrical models of the biological objects and initial and boundary conditions were realized by medical diagnostic data of the specific patient. Mechanical and histomorphological parameters were obtained with the help mechanical experiments on universal testing machine. Computer modeling of the studied processes was conducted with the help of the finite element method. Results: Results of the numerical simulation allowed evaluating the physiological processes in the studied object in normal state, in presence of different pathologies and after different types of surgical procedures.

  20. Finite element modelling of helmeted head impact under frontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Finite element models of the head and helmet were used to study contact forces during frontal impact of the head with a rigid surface. The finite element model of the head consists of skin, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), brain, tentorium and falx. The finite element model of the helmet consists of shell and foam.

  1. finite element model for predicting residual stresses in shielded

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    steel plates through Finite Element Model simulation and experiments. The existence of residual stresses that cause ... From the Finite Element Model Simulation, the transverse residual stress in the x. From the Finite Element Model ... cracking (SCC) and hydrogen initiated cracking (HIC). Nigerian Journal of Technology ...

  2. Finite element modelling of helmeted head impact under frontal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Finite element models of the head and helmet were used to study contact forces during frontal impact of the head with a rigid surface. The finite element model of the head consists of skin, skull, cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF), brain, tentorium and falx. The finite element model of the helmet consists of shell and foam liner.

  3. Simulation of 3D tumor cell growth using nonlinear finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shoubing; Yan, Yannan; Tang, Liqun; Meng, Junping; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel parallel computing framework for a nonlinear finite element method (FEM)-based cell model and apply it to simulate avascular tumor growth. We derive computation formulas to simplify the simulation and design the basic algorithms. With the increment of the proliferation generations of tumor cells, the FEM elements may become larger and more distorted. Then, we describe a remesh and refinement processing of the distorted or over large finite elements and the parallel implementation based on Message Passing Interface to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the simulation. We demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the FEM model and the parallelization methods in simulations of early tumor growth.

  4. Scalable fast multipole methods for vortex element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Qi

    2012-11-01

    We use a particle-based method to simulate incompressible flows, where the Fast Multipole Method (FMM) is used to accelerate the calculation of particle interactions. The most time-consuming kernelsâ\\'the Biot-Savart equation and stretching term of the vorticity equationâ\\'are mathematically reformulated so that only two Laplace scalar potentials are used instead of six, while automatically ensuring divergence-free far-field computation. Based on this formulation, and on our previous work for a scalar heterogeneous FMM algorithm, we develop a new FMM-based vortex method capable of simulating general flows including turbulence on heterogeneous architectures, which distributes the work between multi-core CPUs and GPUs to best utilize the hardware resources and achieve excellent scalability. The algorithm also uses new data structures which can dynamically manage inter-node communication and load balance efficiently but with only a small parallel construction overhead. This algorithm can scale to large-sized clusters showing both strong and weak scalability. Careful error and timing trade-off analysis are also performed for the cutoff functions induced by the vortex particle method. Our implementation can perform one time step of the velocity+stretching for one billion particles on 32 nodes in 55.9 seconds, which yields 49.12 Tflop/s. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. The simulation of Lamb waves in a cracked plate using the scaled boundary finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenkamp, Hauke; Prager, Jens; Saputra, Albert A; Song, Chongmin

    2012-09-01

    The scaled boundary finite element method is applied to the simulation of Lamb waves for ultrasonic testing applications. With this method, the general elastodynamic problem is solved, while only the boundary of the domain under consideration has to be discretized. The reflection of the fundamental Lamb wave modes from cracks of different geometry in a steel plate is modeled. A test problem is compared with commercial finite element software, showing the efficiency and convergence of the scaled boundary finite element method. A special formulation of this method is utilized to calculate dispersion relations for plate structures. For the discretization of the boundary, higher-order elements are employed to improve the efficiency of the simulations. The simplicity of mesh generation of a cracked plate for a scaled boundary finite element analysis is illustrated.

  6. Finite element method for eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, C. J.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.; Beck, Fred B.

    1994-01-01

    Finite element method (FEM) has been a very powerful tool to solve many complex problems in electromagnetics. The goal of the current research at the Langley Research Center is to develop a combined FEM/method of moments approach to three-dimensional scattering/radiation problem for objects with arbitrary shape and filled with complex materials. As a first step toward that goal, an exercise is taken to establish the power of FEM, through closed boundary problems. This paper demonstrates the developed of FEM tools for two- and three-dimensional eigenvalue problems in electromagnetics. In section 2, both the scalar and vector finite elements have been used for various waveguide problems to demonstrate the flexibility of FEM. In section 3, vector finite element method has been extended to three-dimensional eigenvalue problems.

  7. Finite Element Method for Capturing Ultra-relativistic Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, G. A.; Chung, T. J.

    2003-01-01

    While finite element methods are used extensively by researchers solving computational fluid dynamics in fields other than astrophysics, their use in astrophysical fluid simulations has been predominantly overlooked. Current simulations using other methods such as finite difference and finite volume (based on finite difference) have shown remarkable results, but these methods are limited by their fundamental properties in aspects that are important for simulations with complex geometries and widely varying spatial and temporal scale differences. We have explored the use of finite element methods for astrophysical fluids in order to establish the validity of using such methods in astrophysical environments. We present our numerical technique applied to solving ultra-relativistic (Lorentz Factor Gamma >> 1) shocks which are prevalent in astrophysical studies including relativistic jets and gamma-ray burst studies. We show our finite element formulation applied to simulations where the Lorentz factor ranges up to 2236 and demonstrate its stability in solving ultra-relativistic flows. Our numerical method is based on the Flowfield Dependent Variation (FDV) Method, unique in that numerical diffusion is derived from physical parameters rather than traditional artificial viscosity methods. Numerical instabilities account for most of the difficulties when capturing shocks in this regime. Our method results in stable solutions and accurate results as compared with other methods.

  8. Randomized Oversampling for Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2016-03-23

    In this paper, we develop efficient multiscale methods for flows in heterogeneous media. We use the generalized multiscale finite element (GMsFEM) framework. GMsFEM approximates the solution space locally using a few multiscale basis functions. This approximation selects an appropriate snapshot space and a local spectral decomposition, e.g., the use of oversampled regions, in order to achieve an efficient model reduction. However, the successful construction of snapshot spaces may be costly if too many local problems need to be solved in order to obtain these spaces. We use a moderate quantity of local solutions (or snapshot vectors) with random boundary conditions on oversampled regions with zero forcing to deliver an efficient methodology. Motivated by the randomized algorithm presented in [P. G. Martinsson, V. Rokhlin, and M. Tygert, A Randomized Algorithm for the approximation of Matrices, YALEU/DCS/TR-1361, Yale University, 2006], we consider a snapshot space which consists of harmonic extensions of random boundary conditions defined in a domain larger than the target region. Furthermore, we perform an eigenvalue decomposition in this small space. We study the application of randomized sampling for GMsFEM in conjunction with adaptivity, where local multiscale spaces are adaptively enriched. Convergence analysis is provided. We present representative numerical results to validate the method proposed.

  9. Fast Stiffness Matrix Calculation for Nonlinear Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Gülümser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fast stiffness matrix calculation technique for nonlinear finite element method (FEM. Nonlinear stiffness matrices are constructed using Green-Lagrange strains, which are derived from infinitesimal strains by adding the nonlinear terms discarded from small deformations. We implemented a linear and a nonlinear finite element method with the same material properties to examine the differences between them. We verified our nonlinear formulation with different applications and achieved considerable speedups in solving the system of equations using our nonlinear FEM compared to a state-of-the-art nonlinear FEM.

  10. Parallel computing for the finite element method in MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurimas Šimkus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, parallel computing capabilities of MATLAB and the capabilities for the finite element method were analyzed. A program for solving a heat transfer problem by the finite element method was implemented. Three different parallel algorithms using CPU and GPU for solving steady state and transient heat transfer problems were proposed and implemented. A maximal speedup of around 2.3 times for steady state and 2 times for transient problem solving time was achieved by using a quad-core CPU.

  11. Rapid simulation of electromagnetic telemetry using an axisymmetric semianalytical finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiefu; Zeng, Shubin; Dong, Qiuzhao; Huang, Yueqin

    2017-02-01

    An axisymmetric semianalytical finite element method is proposed and employed for rapid simulations of electromagnetic telemetry in layered underground formation. In this method, the layered media is decomposed into several subdomains and the interfaces between subdomains are discretized by conventional finite elements. Then a Riccati equation based high precision integration scheme is applied to exploit the homogeneity along the vertical direction in each layer. This semianalytical finite element scheme is very efficient in modeling electromagnetic telemetry in layered formation. Numerical examples as well as a field case with water based mud as drilling fluid are given to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of this method.

  12. A multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Mary Fanett

    2012-02-03

    In this paper, we develop a multiscale mortar multipoint flux mixed finite element method for second order elliptic problems. The equations in the coarse elements (or subdomains) are discretized on a fine grid scale by a multipoint flux mixed finite element method that reduces to cell-centered finite differences on irregular grids. The subdomain grids do not have to match across the interfaces. Continuity of flux between coarse elements is imposed via a mortar finite element space on a coarse grid scale. With an appropriate choice of polynomial degree of the mortar space, we derive optimal order convergence on the fine scale for both the multiscale pressure and velocity, as well as the coarse scale mortar pressure. Some superconvergence results are also derived. The algebraic system is reduced via a non-overlapping domain decomposition to a coarse scale mortar interface problem that is solved using a multiscale flux basis. Numerical experiments are presented to confirm the theory and illustrate the efficiency and flexibility of the method. © EDP Sciences, SMAI, 2012.

  13. Finite Element Modeling of the Skew Rolling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Sawamiphakdi, Krich; Perez, Anthony J.; Daiger, Kevin P.

    2004-06-01

    A helical skew rolling process is a continuous hot forming process that produces near net-shape parts from tubing for hard turning or machining to the finished parts. The process can challenge forging processes in a number of applications by its high production rate and ability of forming intricate geometry. Because of its technical complexity, a number of tests have to be performed to improve and validate the design before a part can be put into production. To reduce the design lead-time and cost as well as improving the production quality, developing and implementing the finite element analysis procedures in design is an inevitable step. In literature, it has not been seen that the numerical simulation is applied to the skew rolling process so far. Simulation of the skew rolling is in a complicated three-dimensional metal large-deformation category, characterized by its severe mesh distortion and consistent contact and separation between the workpiece and dies. This paper describes the new development in finite element modeling of the skew rolling process and demonstrates the application of finite element modeling to aid the design of tooling and process parameters. By the use of the DEFORM-3D finite element program, the simulations can predict the geometry and some defects in parts reasonably well agreed with the actual products. However, one of the key issues is simulation time due to the nature of the nonlinear finite element method and the Lagrangian formulation adopted in the DEFORM-3D program. Solving nonlinear algebraic equations in each time step combined with iterative procedures is very computationally demanding and time consuming. Repeatedly reduction in time step size to satisfy the contact criterion prolongs the simulation significantly. Therefore, the improvement in the finite element theories and solving methods is necessary before the simulation can achieve reasonable timing.

  14. Ultrasonic Method for Deployment Mechanism Bolt Element Preload Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric C.; Kim, Yong M.; Morris, Fred A.; Mitchell, Joel; Pan, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    Deployment mechanisms play a pivotal role in mission success. These mechanisms often incorporate bolt elements for which a preload within a specified range is essential for proper operation. A common practice is to torque these bolt elements to a specified value during installation. The resulting preload, however, can vary significantly with applied torque for a number of reasons. The goal of this effort was to investigate ultrasonic methods as an alternative for bolt preload verification in such deployment mechanisms. A family of non-explosive release mechanisms widely used by satellite manufacturers was chosen for the work. A willing contractor permitted measurements on a sampling of bolt elements for these release mechanisms that were installed by a technician following a standard practice. A variation of approximately 50% (+/- 25%) in the resultant preloads was observed. An alternative ultrasonic method to set the preloads was then developed and calibration data was accumulated. The method was demonstrated on bolt elements installed in a fixture instrumented with a calibrated load cell and designed to mimic production practice. The ultrasonic method yielded results within +/- 3% of the load cell reading. The contractor has since adopted the alternative method for its future production. Introduction

  15. Mixed finite element - discontinuous finite volume element discretization of a general class of multicontinuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Baier, Ricardo; Lunati, Ivan

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel discretization scheme tailored to a class of multiphase models that regard the physical system as consisting of multiple interacting continua. In the framework of mixture theory, we consider a general mathematical model that entails solving a system of mass and momentum equations for both the mixture and one of the phases. The model results in a strongly coupled and nonlinear system of partial differential equations that are written in terms of phase and mixture (barycentric) velocities, phase pressure, and saturation. We construct an accurate, robust and reliable hybrid method that combines a mixed finite element discretization of the momentum equations with a primal discontinuous finite volume-element discretization of the mass (or transport) equations. The scheme is devised for unstructured meshes and relies on mixed Brezzi-Douglas-Marini approximations of phase and total velocities, on piecewise constant elements for the approximation of phase or total pressures, as well as on a primal formulation that employs discontinuous finite volume elements defined on a dual diamond mesh to approximate scalar fields of interest (such as volume fraction, total density, saturation, etc.). As the discretization scheme is derived for a general formulation of multicontinuum physical systems, it can be readily applied to a large class of simplified multiphase models; on the other, the approach can be seen as a generalization of these models that are commonly encountered in the literature and employed when the latter are not sufficiently accurate. An extensive set of numerical test cases involving two- and three-dimensional porous media are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of the method (displaying an optimal convergence rate), the physics-preserving properties of the mixed-primal scheme, as well as the robustness of the method (which is successfully used to simulate diverse physical phenomena such as density fingering, Terzaghi's consolidation

  16. A quantitative method for clustering size distributions of elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, Ann M.; Schauer, James J.; Christensen, William F.; Cass, Glen R.

    A quantitative method was developed to group similarly shaped size distributions of particle-phase elements in order to ascertain sources of the elements. This method was developed and applied using data from two sites in Houston, TX; one site surrounded by refineries, chemical plants and vehicular and commercial shipping traffic, and the other site, 25 miles inland surrounded by residences, light industrial facilities and vehicular traffic. Twenty-four hour size-segregated (0.056fluid catalytic cracking unit catalysts, fuel oil burning, a coal-fired power plant, and high-temperature metal working. The clustered elements were generally attributed to different sources at the two sites during each sampling day indicating the diversity of local sources that impact heavy metals concentrations in the region.

  17. A stable cutting method for finite elements based virtual surgery simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerábková, Lenka; Jerábek, Jakub; Chudoba, Rostislav; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach for stable interactive cutting of deformable objects in virtual environments. Our method is based on the extended finite elements method, allowing for a modeling of discontinuities without remeshing. As no new elements are created, the impact on simulation performance is minimized. We also propose an appropriate mass lumping technique to guarantee for the stability of the simulation regardless of the position of the cut.

  18. Review of a Method for Local Damping Identification in the Low- and Mid-Frequency Range Based on a Finite Element Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Passenger demand for enhanced cabin comfort have made cabin noise to an important factor. The damping behaviour of the cabin must be understood in order to predict noise emission. Due to the high modal density and overlap, state-of-the-art methods are not able to accurately identify damping in the mid- and high-frequency range. However, these frequency ranges are relevant in the field of acoustics. 2016 a method was proposed for local damping identification, which was applied to an aircra...

  19. Finite element method for one-dimensional rill erosion simulation on a curved slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rill erosion models are important to hillslope soil erosion prediction and to land use planning. The development of rill erosion models and their use has become increasingly of great concern. The purpose of this research was to develop mathematic models with computer simulation procedures to simulate and predict rill erosion. The finite element method is known as an efficient tool in many other applications than in rill soil erosion. In this study, the hydrodynamic and sediment continuity model equations for a rill erosion system were solved by the Galerkin finite element method and Visual C++ procedures. The simulated results are compared with the data for spatially and temporally measured processes for rill erosion under different conditions. The results indicate that the one-dimensional linear finite element method produced excellent predictions of rill erosion processes. Therefore, this study supplies a tool for further development of a dynamic soil erosion prediction model.

  20. Finite element modelling of composite castellated beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans Richard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, castellated beam becomes popular in building structural as beam members. This is due to several advantages of castellated beam such as increased depth without any additional mass, passing the underfloor service ducts without changing of story elevation. However, the presence of holes can develop various local effects such as local buckling, lateral torsional buckling caused by compression force at the flange section of the steel beam. Many studies have investigated the failure mechanism of castellated beam and one technique which can prevent the beam fall into local failure is the use of reinforced concrete slab as lateral support on castellated beam, so called composite castellated beam. Besides of preventing the local failure of castellated beam, the concrete slab can increase the plasticity moment of the composite castellated beam section which can deliver into increasing the ultimate load of the beam. The aim of this numerical studies of composite castellated beam on certain loading condition (monotonic quasi-static loading. ABAQUS was used for finite element modelling purpose and compared with the experimental test for checking the reliability of the model. The result shows that the ultimate load of the composite castellated beam reached 6.24 times than the ultimate load of the solid I beam and 1.2 times compared the composite beam.

  1. Development of Efficient Trace Element Quantification Methods in Carbonate Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, K. W.; Lonero, A.; Liddell, D.

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of using a faster handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) method with little to no sample preparation to facilitate the analysis of several important trace elements in carbonate rocks when dealing with large sample quantities. The use of handheld energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) has become popular because it offers nondestructive quantifiable elemental analyses of samples. ED-XRF has been used by geologists in rock core analyses, and has been shown to be capable of producing robust quantifiable results when compared with wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (WD-XRF) for many elements in pelitic rocks. However, there has been little to no published studies on the use of XRF on carbonate rocks, which may be partly due to the scarcity of internationally accepted trace element reference standards. Trace element abundances of several marine carbonate and carbonatite rocks are presented which have been determined in this study by multiple XRF and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) methods. Four carbonate standards in development, provided by the USGS, have been characterized with the use of ICP-MS and WD-XRF. Analyses of all samples were performed using different methods by two independent labs at Utah State University and Washington State University. These standards offer the wide elemental ranges necessary to properly quantify geochemical data within the unique matrix of carbonate rocks. A comparison of pressed powder pellets was made between ED-XRF and WD-XRF on carbonate rock samples from the Ordovician Garden City Formation and Pogonip Group of northern and west-central Utah respectively, to determine differences in results between the two methods. Additionally, slabbed hand samples as well as loose powdered samples prepared from the same rock samples were also analyzed and compared with the pressed powder pellets with ED-XRF, to determine if sample preparation had significant effects on sample

  2. hp Spectral element methods for three dimensional elliptic problems ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This is the first of a series of papers devoted to the study of h-p spec- tral element methods for solving three dimensional elliptic boundary value problems on non-smooth domains using parallel computers. In three dimensions there are three different types of singularities namely; the vertex, the edge and the ...

  3. Piezoelectric Accelerometers Modification Based on the Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bin; Kriegbaum, B.

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the modification of piezoelectric accelerometers using a Finite Element (FE) method. Brüel & Kjær Accelerometer Type 8325 is chosen as an example to illustrate the advanced accelerometer development procedure. The deviation between the measurement and FE simulation results...

  4. h-p Spectral element methods for three dimensional elliptic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The h-p version of the finite element method for solving three dimensional elliptic problems on non-smooth domains with exponential accuracy was proposed by Guo in [9,. 12]. To overcome the singularities which arise along vertices and edges they used geo- metric meshes which are defined in neighbourhoods of vertices, ...

  5. Review on finite element method | Erhunmwun | Journal of Applied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, we have discussed what Finite Element Method (FEM) is, its historical development, advantages and its future. The eventual intension of using FEM is to determine the nodal solution of a particular problem under study. The power of FEM is its ability to discretize complex problems and analyse it part by part.

  6. Reliable finite element methods for self-adjoint singular perturbation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is well known that the standard finite element method based on the space Vh of continuous piecewise linear functions is not reliable in solving singular perturbation problems. It is also known that the solution of a two-point boundaryvalue singular perturbation problem admits a decomposition into a regular part and a finite ...

  7. Surface processing methods for point sets using finite elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarenz, Ulrich; Rumpf, Martin; Telea, Alexandru

    2004-01-01

    We present a framework for processing point-based surfaces via partial differential equations (PDEs). Our framework efficiently and effectively brings well-known PDE-based processing techniques to the field of point-based surfaces. At the core of our method is a finite element discretization of PDEs

  8. Nonconforming h-p spectral element methods for elliptic problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of the corners, modified polar coordinates are used and a global coordinate system elsewhere. ... applies to elliptic systems too. A method ... Schur complement. Let M denote the number of corner layers and W denote the number of degrees of freedom in each independent variable of the spectral element functions, which.

  9. Validating Finite Element Models of Assembled Shell Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The validation of finite element models of assembled shell elements is presented. The topics include: 1) Problems with membrane rotations in assembled shell models; 2) Penalty stiffness for membrane rotations; 3) Physical stiffness for membrane rotations using shell elements with 6 dof per node; and 4) Connections avoiding rotations.

  10. Parallel direct solver for finite element modeling of manufacturing processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P.A.F.

    2017-01-01

    The central processing unit (CPU) time is of paramount importance in finite element modeling of manufacturing processes. Because the most significant part of the CPU time is consumed in solving the main system of equations resulting from finite element assemblies, different approaches have been...... developed to optimize solutions and reduce the overall computational costs of large finite element models....

  11. Superconvergence for tetrahedral quadratic finite element methods for elliptic equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.H.; Krizek, M.

    2005-01-01

    For a model elliptic boundary value problem we will prove that on strongly regular families of uniform tetrahedral partitions of the domain, the gradient of the quadratic finite element approximation is superclose to the gradient of the quadratic Lagrange interpolant of the exact solution. This

  12. Synthetic Study of 2.5-D ATEM Based on Finite Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiang, Jianke; Zhou, Junjie; Cai, Hongzhu

    2013-01-01

    Based on the regular triangular dissection for finite element method, we implemented the forward modeling of 2.5-D airborne transient electromagnetic method. The 3-D EM field was firstly transformed into Laplace domain and after that we will apply Fourier transform to reduce the dimension from 3-D...... study shows that our numerical solution fits well with the analytical solution for homogeneous and layered earth model. The study also demonstrated the effectiveness of our numerical method....... to 2.5-D. We can obtain the EM field solution in Laplace domain by applying finite element method. The inverse Laplace transform is applied to our solution which finally leads to the airborne EM response in time domain. In compared to the traditional method, we apply our finite element method...

  13. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with tt and decaying into bb at 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector using the Matrix Element Method

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)683657; Quadt, Arnulf; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Kröninger, Kevin

    A search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a pair of top quarks (ttH) is presented. The analysis uses 20.3 fb−1 of pp collision data at √s = 8 TeV, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2012. The search is designed for the H → bb decay mode and is performed in the single lepton (electrons or muons) decay channel of the top quark pair. In order to improve the sensitivity of the search, events are categorised according to their jet and b-tagged jet multiplicities into nine different analysis regions. A matrix element method is developed and applied to regions with six jets to obtain discriminants separating ttH events from the irreducible tt+ bb background. In signal-enriched regions, a neural network is employed combining kinematic variables and variables obtained from the matrix element method to maximise the separation between signal and background events. The nine analysis regions are statistically combined using a profile likelihood fit to...

  14. Method for recovering elemental silicon from cutting remains.

    OpenAIRE

    Ulset, Torgeir; Julrud, Stein; Cassayre, Laurent; Chamelot, Pierre; Massot, Laurent; Taxil, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for recovering elemental silicon cutting remains containing silicon particles, wherein the method comprises manufacturing solid anodes from the cutting remains, arranging one or more manufactured anode (s) in an electrolytic cell with a molten salt electrolyte and one or more cathode (s), and applying a potential difference between the one or more anode (s) and cathode (s) to obtain an oxidation of metallic silicon in the one or more anode (s), tran...

  15. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method for Parabolic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideaki; Bey, Kim S.; Hou, Gene J. W.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a time and its corresponding spatial discretization scheme, based upon the assumption of a certain weak singularity of parallel ut(t) parallel Lz(omega) = parallel ut parallel2, for the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for one-dimensional parabolic problems. Optimal convergence rates in both time and spatial variables are obtained. A discussion of automatic time-step control method is also included.

  16. Convergence of a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method

    KAUST Repository

    Nazarov, Murtazo

    2013-02-01

    We present a residual based artificial viscosity finite element method to solve conservation laws. The Galerkin approximation is stabilized by only residual based artificial viscosity, without any least-squares, SUPG, or streamline diffusion terms. We prove convergence of the method, applied to a scalar conservation law in two space dimensions, toward an unique entropy solution for implicit time stepping schemes. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Local Refinement of the Super Element Model of Oil Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Mazo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a two-stage method for petroleum reservoir simulation. The method uses two models with different degrees of detailing to describe hydrodynamic processes of different space-time scales. At the first stage, the global dynamics of the energy state of the deposit and reserves is modeled (characteristic scale of such changes is km / year. The two-phase flow equations in the model of global dynamics operate with smooth averaged pressure and saturation fields, and they are solved numerically on a large computational grid of super-elements with a characteristic cell size of 200-500 m. The tensor coefficients of the super-element model are calculated using special procedures of upscaling of absolute and relative phase permeabilities. At the second stage, a local refinement of the super-element model is constructed for calculating small-scale processes (with a scale of m / day, which take place, for example, during various geological and technical measures aimed at increasing the oil recovery of a reservoir. Then we solve the two-phase flow problem in the selected area of the measure exposure on a detailed three-dimensional grid, which resolves the geological structure of the reservoir, and with a time step sufficient for describing fast-flowing processes. The initial and boundary conditions of the local problem are formulated on the basis of the super-element solution. This approach allows us to reduce the computational costs in order to solve the problems of designing and monitoring the oil reservoir. To demonstrate the proposed approach, we give an example of the two-stage modeling of the development of a layered reservoir with a local refinement of the model during the isolation of a water-saturated high-permeability interlayer. We show a good compliance between the locally refined solution of the super-element model in the area of measure exposure and the results of numerical modeling of the whole history of reservoir

  18. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This

  19. Finite element analysis of CFRP reinforced silo structure design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Long; Xu, Xinsheng

    2017-11-01

    Because of poor construction, there is a serious problem of concrete quality in the silo project, which seriously affects the safe use of the structure. Concrete quality problems are mainly seen in three aspects: concrete strength cannot meet the design requirements, concrete cracking phenomenon is serious, and the unreasonable concrete vibration leads to a lot of honeycombs and surface voids. Silos are usually reinforced by carbon fiber cloth in order to ensure the safe use of silos. By the example of an alumina silo in a fly ash plant in Binzhou, Shandong Province, the alumina silo project was tested and examined on site. According to filed test results, the actual concrete strength was determined, and the damage causes of the silo was analysed. Then, a finite element analysis model of this silo was established, the CFRP cloth reinforcement method was adopted to strengthen the silo, and other technology like additional reinforcement, rebar planting, carbon fiber bonding technology was also expounded. The research of this paper is of great significance to the design and construction of silo structure.

  20. Thermal analysis of disc brakes using finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenudin, Jamari, J.; Tauviqirrahman, M.

    2017-01-01

    Disc brakes are components of a vehicle that serve to slow or stop the rotation of the wheel. This paper discusses the phenomenon of heat distribution on the brake disc during braking. Heat distribution on the brake disc is caused by kinetic energy changing into mechanical energy. Energy changes occur during the braking process due to friction between the surface of the disc and a disc pad. The temperature resulting from this friction rises high. This thermal analysis on brake discs is aimed to evaluate the performance of an electric car in the braking process. The aim of this study is to analyze the thermal behavior of the brake discs using the Finite Element Method (FEM) through examining the heat distribution on the brake disc using 3-D modeling. Results obtained from the FEM reflect the effects of high heat due to the friction between the disc pad with the disc rotor. Results of the simulation study are used to identify the effect of the heat distribution that occurred during the braking process.

  1. Unconstrained paving and plastering method for generating finite element meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staten, Matthew L.; Owen, Steven J.; Blacker, Teddy D.; Kerr, Robert

    2010-03-02

    Computer software for and a method of generating a conformal all quadrilateral or hexahedral mesh comprising selecting an object with unmeshed boundaries and performing the following while unmeshed voids are larger than twice a desired element size and unrecognizable as either a midpoint subdividable or pave-and-sweepable polyhedra: selecting a front to advance; based on sizes of fronts and angles with adjacent fronts, determining which adjacent fronts should be advanced with the selected front; advancing the fronts; detecting proximities with other nearby fronts; resolving any found proximities; forming quadrilaterals or unconstrained columns of hexahedra where two layers cross; and establishing hexahedral elements where three layers cross.

  2. Hybrid finite element and Brownian dynamics method for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Gary A., E-mail: ghuber@ucsd.edu; Miao, Yinglong [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Zhou, Shenggao [Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Center for Interdiscipline Research, Soochow University, 1 Shizi Street, Suzhou, 215006 Jiangsu (China); Li, Bo [Department of Mathematics and Quantitative Biology Graduate Program, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0112 (United States); McCammon, J. Andrew [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0365 (United States); Department of Pharmacology, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    Diffusion is often the rate-determining step in many biological processes. Currently, the two main computational methods for studying diffusion are stochastic methods, such as Brownian dynamics, and continuum methods, such as the finite element method. A previous study introduced a new hybrid diffusion method that couples the strengths of each of these two methods, but was limited by the lack of interactions among the particles; the force on each particle had to be from an external field. This study further develops the method to allow charged particles. The method is derived for a general multidimensional system and is presented using a basic test case for a one-dimensional linear system with one charged species and a radially symmetric system with three charged species.

  3. A parallel implementation of an EBE solver for the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.P.; Las Casas, E.B.; Carvalho, M.L.B. [Federal Univ. of Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    A parallel implementation using PVM on a cluster of workstations of an Element By Element (EBE) solver using the Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) method is described, along with an application in the solution of the linear systems generated from finite element analysis of a problem in three dimensional linear elasticity. The PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) system, developed at the Oak Ridge Laboratory, allows the construction of a parallel MIMD machine by connecting heterogeneous computers linked through a network. In this implementation, version 3.1 of PVM is used, and 11 SLC Sun workstations and a Sun SPARC-2 model are connected through Ethernet. The finite element program is based on SDP, System for Finite Element Based Software Development, developed at the Brazilian National Laboratory for Scientific Computation (LNCC). SDP provides the basic routines for a finite element application program, as well as a standard for programming and documentation, intended to allow exchanges between research groups in different centers.

  4. Interpolation functions in control volume finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbassi, H.; Turki, S.; Nasrallah, S. Ben

    The main contribution of this paper is the study of interpolation functions in control volume finite element method used in equal order and applied to an incompressible two-dimensional fluid flow. Especially, the exponential interpolation function expressed in the elemental local coordinate system is compared to the classic linear interpolation function expressed in the global coordinate system. A quantitative comparison is achieved by the application of these two schemes to four flows that we know the analytical solutions. These flows are classified in two groups: flows with privileged direction and flows without. The two interpolation functions are applied to a triangular element of the domain then; a direct comparison of the results given by each interpolation function to the exact value is easily realized. The two functions are also compared when used to solve the discretized equations over the entire domain. Stability of the numerical process and accuracy of solutions are compared.

  5. Flow Applications of the Least Squares Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan

    1998-01-01

    The main thrust of the effort has been towards the development, analysis and implementation of the least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) for fluid dynamics and electromagnetics applications. In the past year, there were four major accomplishments: 1) special treatments in computational fluid dynamics and computational electromagnetics, such as upwinding, numerical dissipation, staggered grid, non-equal order elements, operator splitting and preconditioning, edge elements, and vector potential are unnecessary; 2) the analysis of the LSFEM for most partial differential equations can be based on the bounded inverse theorem; 3) the finite difference and finite volume algorithms solve only two Maxwell equations and ignore the divergence equations; and 4) the first numerical simulation of three-dimensional Marangoni-Benard convection was performed using the LSFEM.

  6. An Ellipsoidal Particle-Finite Element Method for Hypervelocity Impact Simulation. Chapter 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivarama, Ravishankar; Fahrenthold, Eric P.

    2004-01-01

    A number of coupled particle-element and hybrid particle-element methods have been developed for the simulation of hypervelocity impact problems, to avoid certain disadvantages associated with the use of pure continuum based or pure particle based methods. To date these methods have employed spherical particles. In recent work a hybrid formulation has been extended to the ellipsoidal particle case. A model formulation approach based on Lagrange's equations, with particles entropies serving as generalized coordinates, avoids the angular momentum conservation problems which have been reported with ellipsoidal smooth particle hydrodynamics models.

  7. Finite element modeling of reinforced concrete structures strengthened with FRP laminates : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Linear and non-linear finite element method models were developed for a reinforced concrete bridge that had been strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer composites. ANSYS and SAP2000 modeling software were used; however, most of the development ef...

  8. Evaluation of coupled finite element/meshfree method for a robust full-scale crashworthiness simulation of railway vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The crashworthiness of a railway vehicle relates to its passive safety performance. Due to mesh distortion and difficulty in controlling the hourglass energy, conventional finite element methods face great challenges in crashworthiness simulation of large-scale complex railway vehicle models. Meshfree methods such as element-free Galerkin method offer an alternative approach to overcome those limitations but have proved time-consuming. In this article, a coupled finite element/meshfree method is proposed to study the crashworthiness of railway vehicles. A representative scenario, in which the leading vehicle of a high-speed train impacts to a rigid wall, is simulated with the coupled finite element/element-free Galerkin method in LS-DYNA. We have compared the conventional finite element method and the coupled finite element/element-free Galerkin method with the simulation results of different levels of discretization. Our work showed that coupled finite element/element-free Galerkin method is a suitable alternative of finite element method to handle the nonlinear deformation in full-size railway vehicle crashworthiness simulation. The coupled method can reduce the hourglass energy in finite element simulation, to produce robust simulation.

  9. Modelling the prestress transfer in pre-tensioned concrete elements

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelatif, A.O.; Owen, J.S.; Hussein, M.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Three models were developed to simulate the transfer of prestress force from steel to concrete in pre-tensioned concrete elements. The first is an analytical model based on the thick-walled cylinder theory and considers linear material properties for both steel and concrete. The second is an axi-symmetric finite element (FE) model with linear material properties; it is used to verify the analytical model. The third model is a three dimensional nonlinear FE model. This model considers the post...

  10. Implicit extrapolation methods for multilevel finite element computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, M.; Ruede, U. [Technische Universitaet Chemnitz-Zwickau (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    The finite element package FEMGP has been developed to solve elliptic and parabolic problems arising in the computation of magnetic and thermomechanical fields. FEMGP implements various methods for the construction of hierarchical finite element meshes, a variety of efficient multilevel solvers, including multigrid and preconditioned conjugate gradient iterations, as well as pre- and post-processing software. Within FEMGP, multigrid {tau}-extrapolation can be employed to improve the finite element solution iteratively to higher order. This algorithm is based on an implicit extrapolation, so that the algorithm differs from a regular multigrid algorithm only by a slightly modified computation of the residuals on the finest mesh. Another advantage of this technique is, that in contrast to explicit extrapolation methods, it does not rely on the existence of global error expansions, and therefore neither requires uniform meshes nor global regularity assumptions. In the paper the authors will analyse the {tau}-extrapolation algorithm and present experimental results in the context of the FEMGP package. Furthermore, the {tau}-extrapolation results will be compared to higher order finite element solutions.

  11. Finite element method for time-space-fractional Schrodinger equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaogang Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we develop a fully discrete finite element method for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS with time- and space-fractional derivatives. The time-fractional derivative is described in Caputo's sense and the space-fractional derivative in Riesz's sense. Its stability is well derived; the convergent estimate is discussed by an orthogonal operator. We also extend the method to the two-dimensional time-space-fractional NLS and to avoid the iterative solvers at each time step, a linearized scheme is further conducted. Several numerical examples are implemented finally, which confirm the theoretical results as well as illustrate the accuracy of our methods.

  12. Analysis of Waveguide Junction Discontinuities Using Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Manohar D.

    1997-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine reflection and transmission coefficients of rectangular waveguide junction discontinuities. An H-plane discontinuity, an E-plane ridge discontinuity, and a step discontinuity in a concentric rectangular waveguide junction are analyzed using the FEM procedure. Also, reflection and transmission coefficients due to presence of a gap between two sections of a rectangular waveguide are determined using the FEM. The numerical results obtained by the present method are in excellent agreement with the earlier published results. The numerical results obtained by the FEM are compared with the numerical results obtained using the Mode Matching Method (MMM) and also with the measured data.

  13. Free vibration analysis of dragonfly wings using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Darvizeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, investigations on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of the dragonfly wing are carried out and numerical modelingbased on Finite Element Method (FEM is developed to predict Flightcharacteristics of dragonfly wings. Vibrational behavior of wings typestructures is immensely important in analysis, design and manufacturing ofsimilar engineering structures. For this purpose natural frequencies andmode shapes are calculated. In addition, the kind of deformation in eachmode shape evaluated and the ratio between numerical natural frequencyand experimental natural frequency presented as damping ratio. Theresults obtain from present method are in good agreement with sameexperimental methods.

  14. Quantitative Modelling of Trace Elements in Hard Coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoliński, Adam; Howaniec, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The significance of coal in the world economy remains unquestionable for decades. It is also expected to be the dominant fossil fuel in the foreseeable future. The increased awareness of sustainable development reflected in the relevant regulations implies, however, the need for the development and implementation of clean coal technologies on the one hand, and adequate analytical tools on the other. The paper presents the application of the quantitative Partial Least Squares method in modeling the concentrations of trace elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, V and Zn) in hard coal based on the physical and chemical parameters of coal, and coal ash components. The study was focused on trace elements potentially hazardous to the environment when emitted from coal processing systems. The studied data included 24 parameters determined for 132 coal samples provided by 17 coal mines of the Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland. Since the data set contained outliers, the construction of robust Partial Least Squares models for contaminated data set and the correct identification of outlying objects based on the robust scales were required. These enabled the development of the correct Partial Least Squares models, characterized by good fit and prediction abilities. The root mean square error was below 10% for all except for one the final Partial Least Squares models constructed, and the prediction error (root mean square error of cross-validation) exceeded 10% only for three models constructed. The study is of both cognitive and applicative importance. It presents the unique application of the chemometric methods of data exploration in modeling the content of trace elements in coal. In this way it contributes to the development of useful tools of coal quality assessment.

  15. Unstructured spectral element methods of simulation of turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.D. [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Karniadakis, G.E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In this paper we present a spectral element-Fourier algorithm for simulating incompressible turbulent flows in complex geometries using unstructured quadrilateral meshes. To this end, we compare two different interface formulations for extending the conforming spectral element method in order to allow for surgical mesh refinement and still retain spectral accuracy: the Zanolli iterative procedure and variational patching based on auxiliary {open_quotes}mortar{close_quotes} functions. We present an interpretation of the original mortar element method as a patching scheme and develop direct and iterative solution techniques that make the method efficient for simulations of turbulent flows. The properties of the new method are analyzed in detail by studying the eigenspectra of the advection and diffusion operators. We then present numerical results that illustrate the flexibility as well as the exponential convergence of the new algorithm for nonconforming discretizations. We conclude with simulation studies of the turbulent cylinder wake at Re = 1000 (external flow) and turbulent flow over riblets at Re = 3280 (internal flow). 36 refs., 29 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Shell model Monte Carlo methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonin, S.E. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). W.K. Kellogg Radiation Lab.; Dean, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    We review quantum Monte Carlo methods for dealing with large shell model problems. These methods reduce the imaginary-time many-body evolution operator to a coherent superposition of one-body evolutions in fluctuating one-body fields; resultant path integral is evaluated stochastically. We first discuss the motivation, formalism, and implementation of such Shell Model Monte Carlo methods. There then follows a sampler of results and insights obtained from a number of applications. These include the ground state and thermal properties of pf-shell nuclei, thermal behavior of {gamma}-soft nuclei, and calculation of double beta-decay matrix elements. Finally, prospects for further progress in such calculations are discussed. 87 refs.

  17. Integrated Stiffness Analysis of Redundant Parallel Manipulator Based on Finite Element Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; Cheng, G.; Pang, Y.; Lodewijks, G.

    2015-01-01

    An integrated stiffness model is established for a Planar Parallel Manipulator (PPM) with actuation redundancy based on Finite Element Method (FEM), and the static stiffness, dynamitic stiffness and moving stiffness of the PPM are analyzed according to the integrated stiffness model. Firstly, a

  18. Stochastic Finite Element Analysis of Non-Linear Structures Modelled by Plasticity Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frier, Christian; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2003-01-01

    A Finite Element Reliability Method (FERM) is introduced to perform reliability analyses on two-dimensional structures in plane stress, modeled by non-linear plasticity theory. FERM is a coupling between the First Order Reliability Method (FORM) and the Finite Element Method (FEM). FERM can be used...... Method (DDM), here adapted to work with a generally formulated plasticity based constitutive model. The approach is exemplified with a steel plate with a hole in bending subjected to a displacement based limit state function....

  19. Mesh considerations for finite element blast modelling in biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, Matthew B; Myers, Barry S; Bass, Cameron R

    2013-01-01

    Finite element (FE) modelling is a popular tool for studying human body response to blast exposure. However, blast modelling is a complex problem owing to more numerous fluid-structure interactions (FSIs) and the high-frequency loading that accompanies blast exposures. This study investigates FE mesh design for blast modelling using a sphere in a closed-ended shock tube meshed with varying element sizes using both tetrahedral and hexahedral elements. FSI was consistent for sphere-to-fluid element ratios between 0.25 and 4, and acceleration response was similar for both element types (R(2) = 0.997). Tetrahedral elements were found to become increasingly volatile following shock loading, causing higher pressures and stresses than predicted with the hexahedral elements. Deviatoric stress response was dependent on the sphere mesh size (p tube mesh size (p blast models.

  20. A parallel finite element method for the analysis of crystalline solids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, N.J.; Andersen, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    A parallel finite element method suitable for the analysis of 3D quasi-static crystal plasticity problems has been developed. The method is based on substructuring of the original mesh into a number of substructures which are treated as isolated finite element models related via the interface...... conditions. The resulting interface equations are solved using a direct solution method. The method shows a good speedup when increasing the number of processors from 1 to 8 and the effective solution of 3D crystal plasticity problems whose size is much too large for a single work station becomes possible....

  1. Introduction to assembly of finite element methods on graphics processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecka, Cristopher; Lew, Adrian; Darve, Eric

    2010-06-01

    Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have had great success in accelerating numerical computations. We present their application to computations on unstructured meshes such as those in finite element methods. Multiple approaches in assembling and solving sparse linear systems with NVIDIA GPUs and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) are presented and discussed. Multiple strategies for efficient use of global, shared, and local memory, methods to achieve memory coalescing, and optimal choice of parameters are introduced. We find that with appropriate preprocessing and arrangement of support data, the GPU coprocessor achieves speedups of 30x or more in comparison to a well optimized serial implementation on the CPU. We also find that the optimal assembly strategy depends on the order of polynomials used in the finite-element discretization.

  2. Assembly of finite element methods on graphics processors

    KAUST Repository

    Cecka, Cris

    2010-08-23

    Recently, graphics processing units (GPUs) have had great success in accelerating many numerical computations. We present their application to computations on unstructured meshes such as those in finite element methods. Multiple approaches in assembling and solving sparse linear systems with NVIDIA GPUs and the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) are created and analyzed. Multiple strategies for efficient use of global, shared, and local memory, methods to achieve memory coalescing, and optimal choice of parameters are introduced. We find that with appropriate preprocessing and arrangement of support data, the GPU coprocessor using single-precision arithmetic achieves speedups of 30 or more in comparison to a well optimized double-precision single core implementation. We also find that the optimal assembly strategy depends on the order of polynomials used in the finite element discretization. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Application of Energy Finite Element Method in Active Vibration Control of Piezoelectric Intelligent Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Xie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the transmission and equilibrium relationship of vibration energy in beam-like structures, the Galerkin weighted residual method was applied to equation discretization. An equivalent transformation of feedback element was suggested to develop the Energy Finite Element model of a composite piezoelectric cantilever beam driven by harmonic excitation on lateral direction, with both systems with and without time delay being studied and the power input estimation of harmonic excitation was discussed for the resolution of Energy Finite Element function. Then the energy density solutions of the piezoelectric coupling beam through Energy Finite Element Method (EFEM and classical wave theory were compared to verify the EFEM model, which presented a good accordance. Further investigation was undertaken about the influence of control parameters including the feedback gain and arrangement of piezoelectric patches on characteristics of system energy density distribution.

  4. Adaptive mixed finite element methods for Darcy flow in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Huangxin

    2016-09-21

    In this paper, we propose adaptive mixed finite element methods for simulating the single-phase Darcy flow in two-dimensional fractured porous media. The reduced model that we use for the simulation is a discrete fracture model coupling Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures, and the fractures are modeled by one-dimensional entities. The Raviart-Thomas mixed finite element methods are utilized for the solution of the coupled Darcy flows in the matrix and the fractures. In order to improve the efficiency of the simulation, we use adaptive mixed finite element methods based on novel residual-based a posteriori error estimators. In addition, we develop an efficient upscaling algorithm to compute the effective permeability of the fractured porous media. Several interesting examples of Darcy flow in the fractured porous media are presented to demonstrate the robustness of the algorithm.

  5. Least-squares finite element method for fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo-Nan; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1989-01-01

    An overview is given of new developments of the least squares finite element method (LSFEM) in fluid dynamics. Special emphasis is placed on the universality of LSFEM; the symmetry and positiveness of the algebraic systems obtained from LSFEM; the accommodation of LSFEM to equal order interpolations for incompressible viscous flows; and the natural numerical dissipation of LSFEM for convective transport problems and high speed compressible flows. The performance of LSFEM is illustrated by numerical examples.

  6. Application of Finite Element Method to Analyze Inflatable Waveguide Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, M. D.

    1998-01-01

    A Finite Element Method (FEM) is presented to determine propagation characteristics of deformed inflatable rectangular waveguide. Various deformations that might be present in an inflatable waveguide are analyzed using the FEM. The FEM procedure and the code developed here are so general that they can be used for any other deformations that are not considered in this report. The code is validated by applying the present code to rectangular waveguide without any deformations and comparing the numerical results with earlier published results.

  7. Method for detection of antibodies for metallic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Charles W.; Clarke, Sara M.; Nordin, Carl W.

    1993-11-30

    An apparatus and method for detecting antibodies specific to non-protein antigens. The apparatus is an immunological plate containing a plurality of plastic projections coated with a non-protein material. Assays utilizing the plate are capable of stabilizing the non-protein antigens with detection levels for antibodies specific to the antigens on a nanogram level. A screening assay with the apparatus allows for early detection of exposure to non-protein materials. Specifically metallic elements are detected.

  8. Free vibration analysis of dragonfly wings using finite element method

    OpenAIRE

    M Darvizeh; A Darvizeh; H Rajabi; A Rezaei

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, investigations on the microstructure and mechanicalproperties of the dragonfly wing are carried out and numerical modelingbased on Finite Element Method (FEM) is developed to predict Flightcharacteristics of dragonfly wings. Vibrational behavior of wings typestructures is immensely important in analysis, design and manufacturing ofsimilar engineering structures. For this purpose natural frequencies andmode shapes are calculated. In addition, the kind of deformation in eac...

  9. A tephrochronologic method based on apatite trace-element chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Bryan Keith; Samson, Scott Douglas

    Geochemical correlation of ash-fall beds with conventional tephrochronologic methods is not feasible when original glass composition is altered. Thus, alternative correlation methods may be required. Initial studies of heavily altered Paleozoic tephra (K-bentonites) have suggested the potential for employing trace-element concentrations in apatite as ash-fall bed discriminators. To further test the utility of apatite trace-element tephrochronology, we analyzed apatite phenocrysts from unaltered volcanic rocks with an electron microprobe: nine samples from rocks erupted during the Quaternary and one sample from a rock erupted during the Paleogene. The resulting apatite trace-element data provide unique bed discriminators despite within-crystal variability. Each of the volcanic rocks studied possesses unique trends in Mg, Cl, Mn, Fe, Ce and Y concentrations in apatite. The results from this study establish an important tephrochronologic method that can be applied to nearly all portions of the Phanerozoic stratigraphic record and greatly assist development of an advanced timescale. In addition to establishing a fingerprint for a particular eruption, apatite chemistry provides useful information about the source magma.

  10. Parallel 3D Mortar Element Method for Adaptive Nonconforming Meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huiyu; Mavriplis, Catherine; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak

    2004-01-01

    High order methods are frequently used in computational simulation for their high accuracy. An efficient way to avoid unnecessary computation in smooth regions of the solution is to use adaptive meshes which employ fine grids only in areas where they are needed. Nonconforming spectral elements allow the grid to be flexibly adjusted to satisfy the computational accuracy requirements. The method is suitable for computational simulations of unsteady problems with very disparate length scales or unsteady moving features, such as heat transfer, fluid dynamics or flame combustion. In this work, we select the Mark Element Method (MEM) to handle the non-conforming interfaces between elements. A new technique is introduced to efficiently implement MEM in 3-D nonconforming meshes. By introducing an "intermediate mortar", the proposed method decomposes the projection between 3-D elements and mortars into two steps. In each step, projection matrices derived in 2-D are used. The two-step method avoids explicitly forming/deriving large projection matrices for 3-D meshes, and also helps to simplify the implementation. This new technique can be used for both h- and p-type adaptation. This method is applied to an unsteady 3-D moving heat source problem. With our new MEM implementation, mesh adaptation is able to efficiently refine the grid near the heat source and coarsen the grid once the heat source passes. The savings in computational work resulting from the dynamic mesh adaptation is demonstrated by the reduction of the the number of elements used and CPU time spent. MEM and mesh adaptation, respectively, bring irregularity and dynamics to the computer memory access pattern. Hence, they provide a good way to gauge the performance of computer systems when running scientific applications whose memory access patterns are irregular and unpredictable. We select a 3-D moving heat source problem as the Unstructured Adaptive (UA) grid benchmark, a new component of the NAS Parallel

  11. Elements of a collaborative systems model within the aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphalen, Bailee R.

    2000-10-01

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to determine the components of current aerospace collaborative efforts. There were 44 participants from two selected groups surveyed for this study. Nineteen were from the Oklahoma Air National Guard based in Oklahoma City representing the aviation group. Twenty-five participants were from the NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston representing the aerospace group. The surveys for the aviation group were completed in reference to planning missions necessary to their operations. The surveys for the aerospace group were completed in reference to a well-defined and focused goal from a current mission. A questionnaire was developed to survey active participants of collaborative systems in order to consider various components found within the literature. Results were analyzed and aggregated through a database along with content analysis of open-ended question comments from respondents. Findings and conclusions. This study found and determined elements of a collaborative systems model in the aerospace industry. The elements were (1) purpose or mission for the group or team; (2) commitment or dedication to the challenge; (3) group or team meetings and discussions; (4) constraints of deadlines and budgets; (5) tools and resources for project and simulations; (6) significant contributors to the collaboration; (7) decision-making formats; (8) reviews of project; (9) participants education and employment longevity; (10) cross functionality of team or group members; (11) training on the job plus teambuilding; (12) other key elements identified relevant by the respondents but not included in the model such as communication and teamwork; (13) individual and group accountability; (14) conflict, learning, and performance; along with (15) intraorganizational coordination. These elements supported and allowed multiple individuals working together to solve a common problem or to develop innovation that could not have been

  12. A mesoscopic bridging scale method for fluids and coupling dissipative particle dynamics with continuum finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, Milos; Filipovic, Nenad; Tsuda, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A multiscale procedure to couple a mesoscale discrete particle model and a macroscale continuum model of incompressible fluid flow is proposed in this study. We call this procedure the mesoscopic bridging scale (MBS) method since it is developed on the basis of the bridging scale method for coupling molecular dynamics and finite element models [G.J. Wagner, W.K. Liu, Coupling of atomistic and continuum simulations using a bridging scale decomposition, J. Comput. Phys. 190 (2003) 249–274]. We derive the governing equations of the MBS method and show that the differential equations of motion of the mesoscale discrete particle model and finite element (FE) model are only coupled through the force terms. Based on this coupling, we express the finite element equations which rely on the Navier–Stokes and continuity equations, in a way that the internal nodal FE forces are evaluated using viscous stresses from the mesoscale model. The dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method for the discrete particle mesoscale model is employed. The entire fluid domain is divided into a local domain and a global domain. Fluid flow in the local domain is modeled with both DPD and FE method, while fluid flow in the global domain is modeled by the FE method only. The MBS method is suitable for modeling complex (colloidal) fluid flows, where continuum methods are sufficiently accurate only in the large fluid domain, while small, local regions of particular interest require detailed modeling by mesoscopic discrete particles. Solved examples – simple Poiseuille and driven cavity flows illustrate the applicability of the proposed MBS method. PMID:23814322

  13. A nonlinear dynamic corotational finite element model for submerged pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, F. H.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.; Huisman, A.

    2017-12-01

    A three dimensional finite element model is built to compute the motions of a pipe that is being laid on the seabed. This process is geometrically nonlinear, therefore co-rotational beam elements are used. The pipe is subject to static and dynamic forces. Static forces are due to gravity, current and buoyancy. The dynamic forces exerted by the water are incorporated using Morison’s equation. The dynamic motions are computed using implicit time integration. For this the Hilber-Hughes-Taylor method is selected. The Newton-Raphson iteration scheme is used to solve the equations in every time step. During laying, the pipe is connected to the pipe laying vessel, which is subject to wave motion. Response amplitude operators are used to determine the motions of the ship and thus the motions of the top end of the pipe.

  14. Application of least-squares spectral element solver methods to incompressible flow problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. Proot; M.I. Gerritsma; M. Nool (Margreet)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractLeast-squares spectral element methods are based on two important and successful numerical methods: spectral /hp element methods and least-squares finite element methods. In this respect, least-squares spectral element methods are very powerfull since they combine the generality of

  15. Residual-driven online generalized multiscale finite element methods

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Eric T.

    2015-09-08

    The construction of local reduced-order models via multiscale basis functions has been an area of active research. In this paper, we propose online multiscale basis functions which are constructed using the offline space and the current residual. Online multiscale basis functions are constructed adaptively in some selected regions based on our error indicators. We derive an error estimator which shows that one needs to have an offline space with certain properties to guarantee that additional online multiscale basis function will decrease the error. This error decrease is independent of physical parameters, such as the contrast and multiple scales in the problem. The offline spaces are constructed using Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods (GMsFEM). We show that if one chooses a sufficient number of offline basis functions, one can guarantee that additional online multiscale basis functions will reduce the error independent of contrast. We note that the construction of online basis functions is motivated by the fact that the offline space construction does not take into account distant effects. Using the residual information, we can incorporate the distant information provided the offline approximation satisfies certain properties. In the paper, theoretical and numerical results are presented. Our numerical results show that if the offline space is sufficiently large (in terms of the dimension) such that the coarse space contains all multiscale spectral basis functions that correspond to small eigenvalues, then the error reduction by adding online multiscale basis function is independent of the contrast. We discuss various ways computing online multiscale basis functions which include a use of small dimensional offline spaces.

  16. Computational methods for the analysis of primate mobile elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordaux, Richard; Sen, Shurjo K.; Konkel, Miriam K.; Batzer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Transposable elements (TE), defined as discrete pieces of DNA that can move from site to another site in genomes, represent significant components of eukaryotic genomes, including primates. Comparative genome-wide analyses have revealed the considerable structural and functional impact of TE families on primate genomes. Insights into these questions have come in part from the development of computational methods that allow detailed and reliable identification, annotation and evolutionary analyses of the many TE families that populate primate genomes. Here, we present an overview of these computational methods, and describe efficient data mining strategies for providing a comprehensive picture of TE biology in newly available genome sequences. PMID:20238080

  17. Modelación por el Método de los Elementos Finitos del proceso de infiltración de líquido en material poroso. // Modelling by Finite Element Method of liquid infiltration process in porous material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. García de la Figal Costales

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se modela el proceso de infiltración de un liquido en un medio sólido poroso, asumiendo un cierto patrón de los poros(tamaño, forma, % de porosidad, distribución. Se tienen en cuenta las propiedades del líquido, incluidas las propiedades detensión superficial de su superficie libre. El material poroso es hidroxiapatita, semejante al tejido trabecular de los huesos.Todo se resuelve empleando el Método de los Elementos Finitos.Palabras claves: Infiltración, modelación matemática, elemento finito, MEF.________________________________________________________________________________Abstract:The infiltration process of a liquid in a solid porous medium is modeled, assuming a certain pattern of the pores (size, forms,porosity%, distribution. The liquid properties, included the properties of superficial tension of their free surface, are considered. Theporous material is hidroxiapatita, similar to trabecular tissue of bones. Everything is solved using the Finite Elements Method (FEM.Key Words: Mathematical modelation, infiltration, bone model, FEM, hidroxiapatite.

  18. A circular finite-element model reconstruction in electrical impedance tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møsner, Lars Nordahl; Andersen, Ole Trier; Dawids, Steen

    1989-01-01

    A circular finite-element model utilizing triangular picture elements is constructed using a previously published reconstruction method. The model is applied to examples of simulated reconstructed pictures to illustrate its properties with regard to sensitivity, contrast and shape of the object...

  19. Multilayer Finite-Element Model Application to Define the Bearing Structure Element Stress State of Launch Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Zverev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article objective is to justify the rationale for selecting the multilayer finite element model parameters of the bearing structure of a general-purpose launch complex unit.A typical design element of the launch complex unit, i.e. a mount of the hydraulic or pneumatic cylinder, block, etc. is under consideration. The mount represents a set of the cantilevered axis and external structural cage. The most loaded element of the cage is disk to which a moment is transferred from the cantilevered axis due to actuator effort acting on it.To calculate the stress-strain state of disk was used a finite element method. Five models of disk mount were created. The only difference in models was the number of layers of the finite elements through the thickness of disk. There were models, which had one, three, five, eight, and fourteen layers of finite elements through the thickness of disk. For each model, we calculated the equivalent stresses arising from the action of the test load. Disk models were formed and calculated using the MSC Nastran complex software.The article presents results in the table to show data of equivalent stresses in each of the multi-layered models and graphically to illustrate the changing equivalent stresses through the thickness of disk.Based on these results we have given advice on selecting the proper number of layers in the model allowing a desirable accuracy of results with the lowest run time. In addition, it is concluded that there is a need to use the multi-layer models in assessing the performance of structural elements in case the stress exceeds the allowable one in their surface layers.

  20. Scientific use of the finite element method in Orthodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knop, Luegya; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Marcia Regina Elisa Aparecida Schiavon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The finite element method (FEM) is an engineering resource applied to calculate the stress and deformation of complex structures, and has been widely used in orthodontic research. With the advantage of being a non-invasive and accurate method that provides quantitative and detailed data on the physiological reactions possible to occur in tissues, applying the FEM can anticipate the visualization of these tissue responses through the observation of areas of stress created from applied orthodontic mechanics. OBJECTIVE: This article aims at reviewing and discussing the stages of the finite element method application and its applicability in Orthodontics. RESULTS: FEM is able to evaluate the stress distribution at the interface between periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, and the shifting trend in various types of tooth movement when using different types of orthodontic devices. Therefore, it is necessary to know specific software for this purpose. CONCLUSIONS: FEM is an important experimental method to answer questions about tooth movement, overcoming the disadvantages of other experimental methods. PMID:25992996

  1. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  2. Finite element and analytical models for twisted and coiled actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xintian; Liu, Yingxiang; Li, Kai; Chen, Weishan; Zhao, Jianguo

    2018-01-01

    Twisted and coiled actuator (TCA) is a class of recently discovered artificial muscle, which is usually made by twisting and coiling polymer fibers into spring-like structures. It has been widely studied since discovery due to its impressive output characteristics and bright prospects. However, its mathematical models describing the actuation in response to the temperature are still not fully developed. It is known that the large tensile stroke is resulted from the untwisting of the twisted fiber when heated. Thus, the recovered torque during untwisting is a key parameter in the mathematical model. This paper presents a simplified model for the recovered torque of TCA. Finite element method is used for evaluating the thermal stress of the twisted fiber. Based on the results of the finite element analyses, the constitutive equations of twisted fibers are simplified to develop an analytic model of the recovered torque. Finally, the model of the recovered torque is used to predict the deformation of TCA under varying temperatures and validated against experimental results. This work will enhance our understanding of the deformation mechanism of TCAs, which will pave the way for the closed-loop position control.

  3. 8th International Conference on Boundary Element Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Brebbia, C

    1986-01-01

    The International Conference on Boundary Element Methods in Engineering was started in 1978 with the following objectives: i) To act as a focus for BE research at a time when the technique wasjust emerging as a powerful tool for engineering analysis. ii) To attract new as weIl as established researchers on Boundary Elements, in order to maintain its vitality and originality. iii) To try to relate the Boundary Element Method to other engineering techniques in an effort to help unify the field of engineering analysis, rather than to contribute to its fragmentation. These objectives were achieved during the last 7 conferences and this meeting - the eighth - has continued to be as innovative and dynamic as any ofthe previous conferences. Another important aim ofthe conference is to encourage the participation of researchers from as many different countries as possible and in this regard it is a policy of the organizers to hold the conference in different locations. It is easy to forget when working on scientific ...

  4. Solving the ECG forward problem by means of a meshless finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z S [College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Zhu, S A [College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); He Bin [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 7-105 NHH, Church Street, SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2007-07-07

    The conventional numerical computational techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) and the boundary element method (BEM) require laborious and time-consuming model meshing. The new meshless FEM only uses the boundary description and the node distribution and no meshing of the model is required. This paper presents the fundamentals and implementation of meshless FEM and the meshless FEM method is adapted to solve the electrocardiography (ECG) forward problem. The method is evaluated on a single-layer torso model, in which the analytical solution exists, and tested in a realistic geometry homogeneous torso model, with satisfactory results being obtained. The present results suggest that the meshless FEM may provide an alternative for ECG forward solutions. (note)

  5. Rigorous joining of advanced reduced-dimensional beam models to three-dimensional finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huimin

    In the aerospace and automotive industries, many finite element analyses use lower-dimensional finite elements such as beams, plates and shells, to simplify the modeling. These simplified models can greatly reduce the computation time and cost; however, reduced-dimensional models may introduce inaccuracies, particularly near boundaries and near portions of the structure where reduced-dimensional models may not apply. Another factor in creation of such models is that beam-like structures frequently have complex geometry, boundaries and loading conditions, which may make them unsuitable for modeling with single type of element. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a method that can accurately and efficiently capture the response of a structure by rigorous combination of a reduced-dimensional beam finite element model with a model based on full two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) finite elements. The first chapter of the thesis gives the background of the present work and some related previous work. The second chapter is focused on formulating a system of equations that govern the joining of a 2D model with a beam model for planar deformation. The essential aspect of this formulation is to find the transformation matrices to achieve deflection and load continuity on the interface. Three approaches are provided to obtain the transformation matrices. An example based on joining a beam to a 2D finite element model is examined, and the accuracy of the analysis is studied by comparing joint results with the full 2D analysis. The third chapter is focused on formulating the system of equations for joining a beam to a 3D finite element model for static and free-vibration problems. The transition between the 3D elements and beam elements is achieved by use of the stress recovery technique of the variational-asymptotic method as implemented in VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis). The formulations for an interface transformation matrix and

  6. Performance Modelling of Timber Facade Elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surmeli-Anac, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Windows and doors are essential elements of buildings. These seemingly simple components have become increasingly complex over the last decades. They have to fulfil an increased number of functions which ask for contradictory solutions and need to comply with more and more severe requirements.

  7. Reliability-Based Shape Optimization using Stochastic Finite Element Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevoldsen, Ib; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Sigurdsson, G.

    1991-01-01

    (7). In this paper a reliability-based shape optimization problem is formulated with the total expected cost as objective function and some requirements for the reliability measures (element or systems reliability measures) as constraints, see section 2. As design variables sizing variables......Application of first-order reliability methods FORM (see Madsen, Krenk & Lind [8)) in structural design problems has attracted growing interest in recent years, see e.g. Frangopol [4), Murotsu, Kishi, Okada, Yonezawa & Taguchi [9) and Sørensen [14). In probabilistically based optimal design...... stochastic fields (e.g. loads and material parameters such as Young's modulus and the Poisson ratio). In this case stochastic finite element techniques combined with FORM analysis can be used to obtain measures of the reliability of the structural systems, see Der Kiureghian & Ke (6) and Liu & Der Kiureghian...

  8. The nonconforming virtual element method for eigenvalue problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardini, Francesca [Univ. of Pavia (Italy). Dept. of Mathematics; Manzini, Gianmarco [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vacca, Giuseppe [Univ. of Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy). Dept. of Mathematics and Applications

    2018-02-05

    We analyse the nonconforming Virtual Element Method (VEM) for the approximation of elliptic eigenvalue problems. The nonconforming VEM allow to treat in the same formulation the two- and three-dimensional case.We present two possible formulations of the discrete problem, derived respectively by the nonstabilized and stabilized approximation of the L2-inner product, and we study the convergence properties of the corresponding discrete eigenvalue problems. The proposed schemes provide a correct approximation of the spectrum and we prove optimal-order error estimates for the eigenfunctions and the usual double order of convergence of the eigenvalues. Finally we show a large set of numerical tests supporting the theoretical results, including a comparison with the conforming Virtual Element choice.

  9. Fast Gravitational Field Model Using Adaptive Orthogonal Finite Element Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, A.; Macomber, B.; Woollands, R.; Probe, A.; Bai, X.; Junkins, J.

    2013-09-01

    Recent research has addressed the issue that high degree and order gravity expansions involve tens of thousands of terms in a theoretically infinite order spherical harmonic expansion (some gravity models extend to degree and order 200 with over 30,000 terms) which in principle must be computed at every integration step to obtain the acceleration consistent with the gravity model. We propose to evaluate these gravity model interpolation models and use them in conjunction with the modified Picard path approximation methods. It was decided to consider analogous orthogonal approximation methods to interpolate, an FEM model, high (degree, order) gravity fields, by replacing the global spherical harmonic series by a family of locally precise orthogonal polynomial approximations for efficient computation. Our preliminary results showed that time to compute the state of the art (degree and order 200) spherical harmonic gravity is reduced by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude while maintaining > 9 digits of accuracy. Most of the gain is due to adopting the orthogonal FEM approach, but radial adaptation of the approximation degree gains an additional order of magnitude speedup. The efficient data base storage/access of the local coefficients is studied, which utilizes porting the algorithm to the NVIDIA GPU. This paper will address the accuracy and efficiency in both a C++ serial PC architecture as well as a PC/GPU architecture. The Adaptive Orthogonal Finite Element Gravity Model (AOFEGM) is expected to have broad potential for speeding the trajectory propagation algorithms; for example, used in conjunction with orthogonal Finite Element Model (FEM) gravity approximations, the Chebyshev-Picard path approximation enables truly revolutionary speedups in orbit propagation without accuracy loss.

  10. The mixed finite element multigrid method for stokes equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzhinji, K; Shateyi, S; Motsa, S S

    2015-01-01

    The stable finite element discretization of the Stokes problem produces a symmetric indefinite system of linear algebraic equations. A variety of iterative solvers have been proposed for such systems in an attempt to construct efficient, fast, and robust solution techniques. This paper investigates one of such iterative solvers, the geometric multigrid solver, to find the approximate solution of the indefinite systems. The main ingredient of the multigrid method is the choice of an appropriate smoothing strategy. This study considers the application of different smoothers and compares their effects in the overall performance of the multigrid solver. We study the multigrid method with the following smoothers: distributed Gauss Seidel, inexact Uzawa, preconditioned MINRES, and Braess-Sarazin type smoothers. A comparative study of the smoothers shows that the Braess-Sarazin smoothers enhance good performance of the multigrid method. We study the problem in a two-dimensional domain using stable Hood-Taylor Q2-Q1 pair of finite rectangular elements. We also give the main theoretical convergence results. We present the numerical results to demonstrate the efficiency and robustness of the multigrid method and confirm the theoretical results.

  11. Architecting the Finite Element Method Pipeline for the GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhisong; Lewis, T James; Kirby, Robert M; Whitaker, Ross T

    2014-02-01

    The finite element method (FEM) is a widely employed numerical technique for approximating the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) in various science and engineering applications. Many of these applications benefit from fast execution of the FEM pipeline. One way to accelerate the FEM pipeline is by exploiting advances in modern computational hardware, such as the many-core streaming processors like the graphical processing unit (GPU). In this paper, we present the algorithms and data-structures necessary to move the entire FEM pipeline to the GPU. First we propose an efficient GPU-based algorithm to generate local element information and to assemble the global linear system associated with the FEM discretization of an elliptic PDE. To solve the corresponding linear system efficiently on the GPU, we implement a conjugate gradient method preconditioned with a geometry-informed algebraic multi-grid (AMG) method preconditioner. We propose a new fine-grained parallelism strategy, a corresponding multigrid cycling stage and efficient data mapping to the many-core architecture of GPU. Comparison of our on-GPU assembly versus a traditional serial implementation on the CPU achieves up to an 87 × speedup. Focusing on the linear system solver alone, we achieve a speedup of up to 51 × versus use of a comparable state-of-the-art serial CPU linear system solver. Furthermore, the method compares favorably with other GPU-based, sparse, linear solvers.

  12. Establishing the 3-D finite element solid model of femurs in partial by volume rendering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinwang; Zhong, Wuxue; Zhu, Haibo; Chen, Yun; Xu, Lingjun; Zhu, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    It remains rare to report three-dimensional (3-D) finite element solid model of femurs in partial by volume rendering method, though several methods of femoral 3-D finite element modeling are already available. We aim to analyze the advantages of the modeling method by establishing the 3-D finite element solid model of femurs in partial by volume rendering. A 3-D finite element model of the normal human femurs, made up of three anatomic structures: cortical bone, cancellous bone and pulp cavity, was constructed followed by pretreatment of the CT original image. Moreover, the finite-element analysis was carried on different material properties, three types of materials given for cortical bone, six assigned for cancellous bone, and single for pulp cavity. The established 3-D finite element of femurs contains three anatomical structures: cortical bone, cancellous bone, and pulp cavity. The compressive stress primarily concentrated in the medial surfaces of femur, especially in the calcar femorale. Compared with whole modeling by volume rendering method, the 3-D finite element solid model created in partial is more real and fit for finite element analysis. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Finite Element and Plate Theory Modeling of Acoustic Emission Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, W. H.; Hamstad, M. A.; Gary, J.; OGallagher, A.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison was made between two approaches to predict acoustic emission waveforms in thin plates. A normal mode solution method for Mindlin plate theory was used to predict the response of the flexural plate mode to a point source, step-function load, applied on the plate surface. The second approach used a dynamic finite element method to model the problem using equations of motion based on exact linear elasticity. Calculations were made using properties for both isotropic (aluminum) and anisotropic (unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite) materials. For simulations of anisotropic plates, propagation along multiple directions was evaluated. In general, agreement between the two theoretical approaches was good. Discrepancies in the waveforms at longer times were caused by differences in reflections from the lateral plate boundaries. These differences resulted from the fact that the two methods used different boundary conditions. At shorter times in the signals, before reflections, the slight discrepancies in the waveforms were attributed to limitations of Mindlin plate theory, which is an approximate plate theory. The advantages of the finite element method are that it used the exact linear elasticity solutions, and that it can be used to model real source conditions and complicated, finite specimen geometries as well as thick plates. These advantages come at a cost of increased computational difficulty, requiring lengthy calculations on workstations or supercomputers. The Mindlin plate theory solutions, meanwhile, can be quickly generated on personal computers. Specimens with finite geometry can also be modeled. However, only limited simple geometries such as circular or rectangular plates can easily be accommodated with the normal mode solution technique. Likewise, very limited source configurations can be modeled and plate theory is applicable only to thin plates.

  14. Development of Finite Elements for Two-Dimensional Structural Analysis Using the Integrated Force Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaljevic, Igor; Patnaik, Surya N.; Hopkins, Dale A.

    1996-01-01

    The Integrated Force Method has been developed in recent years for the analysis of structural mechanics problems. This method treats all independent internal forces as unknown variables that can be calculated by simultaneously imposing equations of equilibrium and compatibility conditions. In this paper a finite element library for analyzing two-dimensional problems by the Integrated Force Method is presented. Triangular- and quadrilateral-shaped elements capable of modeling arbitrary domain configurations are presented. The element equilibrium and flexibility matrices are derived by discretizing the expressions for potential and complementary energies, respectively. The displacement and stress fields within the finite elements are independently approximated. The displacement field is interpolated as it is in the standard displacement method, and the stress field is approximated by using complete polynomials of the correct order. A procedure that uses the definitions of stress components in terms of an Airy stress function is developed to derive the stress interpolation polynomials. Such derived stress fields identically satisfy the equations of equilibrium. Moreover, the resulting element matrices are insensitive to the orientation of local coordinate systems. A method is devised to calculate the number of rigid body modes, and the present elements are shown to be free of spurious zero-energy modes. A number of example problems are solved by using the present library, and the results are compared with corresponding analytical solutions and with results from the standard displacement finite element method. The Integrated Force Method not only gives results that agree well with analytical and displacement method results but also outperforms the displacement method in stress calculations.

  15. Methods and framework for visualizing higher-order finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, William J; Bertel, François; Malaterre, Mathieu; Thompson, David; Pébay, Philippe P; O'Bara, Robert; Tendulkar, Saurabh

    2006-01-01

    The finite element method is an important, widely used numerical technique for solving partial differential equations. This technique utilizes basis functions for approximating the geometry and the variation of the solution field over finite regions, or elements, of the domain. These basis functions are generally formed by combinations of polynomials. In the past, the polynomial order of the basis has been low-typically of linear and quadratic order. However, in recent years so-called p and hp methods have been developed, which may elevate the order of the basis to arbitrary levels with the aim of accelerating the convergence of the numerical solution. The increasing complexity of numerical basis functions poses a significant challenge to visualization systems. In the past, such systems have been loosely coupled to simulation packages, exchanging data via file transfer, and internally reimplementing the basis functions in order to perform interpolation and implement visualization algorithms. However, as the basis functions become more complex and, in some cases, proprietary in nature, it becomes increasingly difficult if not impossible to reimplement them within the visualization system. Further, most visualization systems typically process linear primitives, in part to take advantage of graphics hardware and, in part, due to the inherent simplicity of the resulting algorithms. Thus, visualization of higher-order finite elements requires tessellating the basis to produce data compatible with existing visualization systems. In this paper, we describe adaptive methods that automatically tessellate complex finite element basis functions using a flexible and extensible software framework. These methods employ a recursive, edge-based subdivision algorithm driven by a set of error metrics including geometric error, solution error, and error in image space. Further, we describe advanced pretessellation techniques that guarantees capture of the critical points of the

  16. A cohesive finite element formulation for modelling fracture and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In recent years, cohesive zone models have been employed to simulate fracture and delamination in solids. This paper presents in detail the formulation for incorporating cohesive zone models within the framework of a large deformation finite element procedure. A special Ritz-finite element technique is employed ...

  17. A cohesive finite element formulation for modelling fracture and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In recent years, cohesive zone models have been employed to simulate fracture and delamination in solids. This paper presents in detail the formulation for incorporating cohesive zone models within the framework of a large deformation finite element procedure. A special Ritz-finite element technique is employed to control ...

  18. Evaluation of a bridge using simplified element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duffey, T.A. [New Mexico Highlands Univ., Las Vegas, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    An experimental-numerical comparison of the forced and ambient vibrations Of a multi-span composite plate-girder bridge was performed. The bridge was modeled using a finite element program at three levels of complexity, including a simple 250 DOF model that utilizes a single beam element to represent the entire bridge cross section. Difficulties encountered in the development of the simple model are discussed. The dynamic properties predicted by the simple model were consistent with these measured on the bridge and computed using more detailed finite element models.

  19. An Automatic Detection Method of Nanocomposite Film Element Based on GLCM and Adaboost M1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic detection model adopting pattern recognition technology is proposed in this paper; it can realize the measurement to the element of nanocomposite film. The features of gray level cooccurrence matrix (GLCM can be extracted from different types of surface morphology images of film; after that, the dimension reduction of film can be handled by principal component analysis (PCA. So it is possible to identify the element of film according to the Adaboost M1 algorithm of a strong classifier with ten decision tree classifiers. The experimental result shows that this model is superior to the ones of SVM (support vector machine, NN and BayesNet. The method proposed can be widely applied to the automatic detection of not only nanocomposite film element but also other nanocomposite material elements.

  20. Finite element model updating using bayesian framework and modal properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Marwala, T

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element (FE) models are widely used to predict the dynamic characteristics of aerospace structures. These models often give results that differ from measured results and therefore need to be updated to match measured results. Some...

  1. Simulation of Outer Rotor Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motor Using Finite Element Method for Torque Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Devi Kumaravelu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of simulation and modeling outer rotor permanent magnet brushless DC (ORPMBLDC motor under dynamic conditions using finite element method by FEMM 4.2 software package is presented. In the proposed simulation, the torque developed at various positions of the rotor, under a complete cycle of excitation of the stator, is analysed. A novel method of sinusoidal excitation is proposed to enhance the overall torque development of ORPMBLDC motor.

  2. Simulation of Outer Rotor Permanent Magnet Brushless DC Motor Using Finite Element Method for Torque Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Uma Devi Kumaravelu; Sanavullah Mohamed Yakub

    2012-01-01

    A method of simulation and modeling outer rotor permanent magnet brushless DC (ORPMBLDC) motor under dynamic conditions using finite element method by FEMM 4.2 software package is presented. In the proposed simulation, the torque developed at various positions of the rotor, under a complete cycle of excitation of the stator, is analysed. A novel method of sinusoidal excitation is proposed to enhance the overall torque development of ORPMBLDC motor.

  3. Generalized multiscale finite element methods. nonlinear elliptic equations

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we use the Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Method (GMsFEM) framework, introduced in [26], in order to solve nonlinear elliptic equations with high-contrast coefficients. The proposed solution method involves linearizing the equation so that coarse-grid quantities of previous solution iterates can be regarded as auxiliary parameters within the problem formulation. With this convention, we systematically construct respective coarse solution spaces that lend themselves to either continuous Galerkin (CG) or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) global formulations. Here, we use Symmetric Interior Penalty Discontinuous Galerkin approach. Both methods yield a predictable error decline that depends on the respective coarse space dimension, and we illustrate the effectiveness of the CG and DG formulations by offering a variety of numerical examples. © 2014 Global-Science Press.

  4. A nonconforming finite element method for the Stokes equations using the Crouzeix-Raviart element for the velocity and the standard linear element for the pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamichhane, Bishnu P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a finite element method for Stokes equations using the Crouzeix-Raviart element for the velocity and the continuous linear element for the pressure. We show that the inf-sup condition is satisfied for this pair. Two numerical experiments are presented to support the theoretical results.

  5. Boundary element method solution for large scale cathodic protection problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodopoulos, D. C.; Gortsas, T. V.; Tsinopoulos, S. V.; Polyzos, D.

    2017-12-01

    Cathodic protection techniques are widely used for avoiding corrosion sequences in offshore structures. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is an ideal method for solving such problems because requires only the meshing of the boundary and not the whole domain of the electrolyte as the Finite Element Method does. This advantage becomes more pronounced in cathodic protection systems since electrochemical reactions occur mainly on the surface of the metallic structure. The present work aims to solve numerically a sacrificial cathodic protection problem for a large offshore platform. The solution of that large-scale problem is accomplished by means of “PITHIA Software” a BEM package enhanced by Hierarchical Matrices (HM) and Adaptive Cross Approximation (ACA) techniques that accelerate drastically the computations and reduce memory requirements. The nonlinear polarization curves for steel and aluminium in seawater are employed as boundary condition for the under protection metallic surfaces and aluminium anodes, respectively. The potential as well as the current density at all the surface of the platform are effectively evaluated and presented.

  6. Models and Computational Methods for Dynamic Friction Phenomena. 1. Physical Aspects of Dynamic Friction. 2. Continuum Models and Variational Principles for Dynamic Friction. 3. Finite Element Models and Numerical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-25

    trying to use the theories of BOWDEN and TABOR [1964] or of MICHALOWSKI and MROZ [1978] in continuum models for quantitative purposes (and BOWDEN and... MICHALOWSKI , R. and MROZ, Z. [1978], "Associated and Non-Associated Sliding Rules in Contact Friction Problems", Archives of Mechanics, 30, pp. 259-276

  7. Model Correction Factor Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus; Randrup-Thomsen, Søren; Morsing Johannesen, Johannes

    1997-01-01

    The model correction factor method is proposed as an alternative to traditional polynomial based response surface techniques in structural reliability considering a computationally time consuming limit state procedure as a 'black box'. The class of polynomial functions is replaced by a limit stat...

  8. UNIFIED MODELS OF ELEMENTS OF POWER SUPPLY SYSTEMS BASED ON EQUATIONS IN PHASE COORDINATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.N. Vepryk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The models of electrical machines in the phase coordinates, the universal algorithm for the simulation of separate elements in a d-q coordinates system and in a phase-coordinates system are proposed. Methodology. Computer methods of investigation of transients in electrical systems are based on a compilation of systems of differential equations and their numerical integration solution methods. To solve differential equations an implicit method of numerical integration was chosen. Because it provides to complete structural simulation possibility: firstly developing models of separate elements and then forming a model of the complex system. For the mathematical simulation of electromagnetic transients in the elements of the electrical systems has been accepted the implicit Euler-Cauchy method, because it provides a higher precision and stability of the computing processes. Results. In developing the model elements identified two groups of elements: - Static elements and electrical machines in the d-q coordinates; - Rotating electrical machines in phase coordinates. As an example, the paper provides a model of synchronous and asynchronous electric machines in the d-q coordinates system and the phase coordinate system. The generalization algorithm and the unified notation form of equations of elements of an electrical system are obtained. It provides the possibility of using structural methods to develop a mathematical model of power systems under transient conditions. Practical value. In addition, the using of a computer model allows to implement multivariant calculations for research and study of factors affecting the quantitative characteristics of the transients.

  9. Techniques for modeling muscle-induced forces in finite element models of skeletal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosse, Ian R; Dumont, Elizabeth R; Coletta, Chris; Tolleson, Alex

    2007-09-01

    This work introduces two mechanics-based approaches to modeling muscle forces exerted on curvilinear bone structures and compares the results with two traditional ad hoc methods of muscle loading. These new models use a combination of tensile, tangential, and normal traction loads to account for muscle fibers wrapped around curved bone surfaces. A computer program was written to interface with a commercial finite element analysis tool to automatically apply traction loads to surface faces of elements in muscle attachment regions according to the various muscle modeling methods. We modeled a highly complex skeletal structure, the skull of a Jamaican fruit bat (Artibeus jamaicensis), to compare the four muscle-loading methods. While reasonable qualitative agreement was found in the states of stress of the skull between the four muscle load modeling methods, there were substantial quantitative differences predicted in the stress states in some high stressed regions of the skull. Furthermore, our mechanics-based models required significantly less total applied muscle force to generate a bite-point reaction force identical to those produced by the ad hoc muscle loading models. Although the methods are not validated by in vivo data, we submit that muscle-load modeling methods that account for the underlying physics of muscle wrapping on curved bone surfaces are likely to provide more realistic results than ad hoc approaches that do not. We also note that, due to the geometric complexity of many bone structures--such as the skull analyzed here--load transmission paths are difficult to conceptualize a priori. Consequently, it is difficult to predict spatially where the results of finite element analyses are likely to be compromised by using ad hoc muscle modeling methods. For these reasons, it is recommended that a mechanics-based method be adopted for determination of the proper traction loads to be applied to skeletal structures due to muscular activity. Copyright 2007

  10. A comprehensive model combining Laplace-transform finite-difference and boundary-element method for the flow behavior of a two-zone system with discrete fracture network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Xu, Zhongyi; Xue, Yongchao; Cao, Renyi; Ding, Guanyang

    2017-08-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive model for the flow behavior of a two-zone system with discrete fracture network. The discrete fracture network within the inner zone is represented explicitly by fracture segments. The Laplace-transform finite-difference method is used to numerically model discrete fracture network flow, with sufficient flexibility to consider arbitrary fracture geometries and conductivity distributions. Boundary-element method and line-source functions in the Laplace domain are employed to derive a semi-analytical flow solution for the two-zone system. By imposing the continuity of flux and pressure on discrete fracture surfaces, the semi-analytical two-zone system flow model and the numerical fracture flow model are coupled dynamically. The main advantage of the approach occurring in the Laplace domain is that simulation can be done with nodes only for discrete fractures and elements for boundaries and at predetermined, discrete times. Thus, stability and convergence problems caused by time discretization are avoided and the burden of gridding and computation is decreased without loss of important fracture characteristics. The model is validated by comparison with the results from an analytical solution and a fully numerical solution. Flow regime analysis shows that a two-zone system with discrete fracture network may develop six flow regimes: fracture linear flow, bilinear flow, inner zone linear flow, inner zone pseudosteady-state flow, outer zone pseudoradial flow and outer zone boundary-dominated flow. Especially, local solutions for the inner-zone linear flow have the same form with that of a finite conductivity planar fracture and can be correlated with the total length of discrete fractures and an intercept term. In the inner zone pseudosteady-state flow period, the discrete fractures, along with the boundary of the inner zone, will act as virtual closed boundaries, due to the pressure interference caused by fracture network and the

  11. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods for (non)conservative partial differential equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, Sander

    2010-01-01

    The first research topic in this thesis is the development of discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element methods for partial differential equations containing nonconservative products, which are present in many two-phase flow models. For this, we combine the theory of Dal Maso, LeFloch and Murat, in

  12. Developments of the indirect method for measuring the high frequency dynamic stiffness of resilient elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, D.J.; Vliet, W.J. van; Verheij, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    The complex stiffness of resilient elements is an important parameter required in order to model vibration isolation for many applications. Measurement methods are being standardized which allow such a stiffness to be measured as a function of excitation frequency for known loading conditions. This

  13. Generalized Potential Energy Finite Elements for Modeling Molecular Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzieleftheriou, Stavros; Adendorff, Matthew R; Lagaros, Nikos D

    2016-10-24

    The potential energy of molecules and nanostructures is commonly calculated in the molecular mechanics formalism by superimposing bonded and nonbonded atomic energy terms, i.e. bonds between two atoms, bond angles involving three atoms, dihedral angles involving four atoms, nonbonded terms expressing the Coulomb and Lennard-Jones interactions, etc. In this work a new, generalized numerical simulation is presented for studying the mechanical behavior of three-dimensional nanostructures at the atomic scale. The energy gradient and Hessian matrix of such assemblies are usually computed numerically; a potential energy finite element model is proposed herein where these two components are expressed analytically. In particular, generalized finite elements are developed that express the interactions among atoms in a manner equivalent to that invoked in simulations performed based on the molecular dynamics method. Thus, the global tangent stiffness matrix for any nanostructure is formed as an assembly of the generalized finite elements and is directly equivalent to the Hessian matrix of the potential energy. The advantages of the proposed model are identified in terms of both accuracy and computational efficiency. In the case of popular force fields (e.g., CHARMM), the computation of the Hessian matrix by implementing the proposed method is of the same order as that of the gradient. This analysis can be used to minimize the potential energy of molecular systems under nodal loads in order to derive constitutive laws for molecular systems where the entropy and solvent effects are neglected and can be approximated as solids, such as double stranded DNA nanostructures. In this context, the sequence dependent stretch modulus for some typical base pairs step is calculated.

  14. Discrete element modeling of subglacial sediment deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David L.; Piotrowski, Jan A.

    arithmetic potential of modern general-purpose GPUs. Using the Nvidia CUDA C toolkit, the algorithm is formulated for spherical particles in three dimensions with a linear-elastic soft-body contact model. We have coupled the DEM model to a model for porewater flow, and we present early results of particle...

  15. Mixed Generalized Multiscale Finite Element Methods and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Chung, Eric T.

    2015-03-03

    In this paper, we present a mixed generalized multiscale finite element method (GMsFEM) for solving flow in heterogeneous media. Our approach constructs multiscale basis functions following a GMsFEM framework and couples these basis functions using a mixed finite element method, which allows us to obtain a mass conservative velocity field. To construct multiscale basis functions for each coarse edge, we design a snapshot space that consists of fine-scale velocity fields supported in a union of two coarse regions that share the common interface. The snapshot vectors have zero Neumann boundary conditions on the outer boundaries, and we prescribe their values on the common interface. We describe several spectral decompositions in the snapshot space motivated by the analysis. In the paper, we also study oversampling approaches that enhance the accuracy of mixed GMsFEM. A main idea of oversampling techniques is to introduce a small dimensional snapshot space. We present numerical results for two-phase flow and transport, without updating basis functions in time. Our numerical results show that one can achieve good accuracy with a few basis functions per coarse edge if one selects appropriate offline spaces. © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  16. Adaptive Finite Element Methods for Elliptic Problems with Discontinuous Coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Bonito, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Elliptic PDEs with discontinuous diffusion coefficients occur in application domains such as diffusions through porous media, electromagnetic field propagation on heterogeneous media, and diffusion processes on rough surfaces. The standard approach to numerically treating such problems using finite element methods is to assume that the discontinuities lie on the boundaries of the cells in the initial triangulation. However, this does not match applications where discontinuities occur on curves, surfaces, or manifolds, and could even be unknown beforehand. One of the obstacles to treating such discontinuity problems is that the usual perturbation theory for elliptic PDEs assumes bounds for the distortion of the coefficients in the L∞ norm and this in turn requires that the discontinuities are matched exactly when the coefficients are approximated. We present a new approach based on distortion of the coefficients in an Lq norm with q < ∞ which therefore does not require the exact matching of the discontinuities. We then use this new distortion theory to formulate new adaptive finite element methods (AFEMs) for such discontinuity problems. We show that such AFEMs are optimal in the sense of distortion versus number of computations, and report insightful numerical results supporting our analysis. © 2013 Societ y for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  17. Utilization of Advanced Methods in the Control of a Mechatronic System with Flexible Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhás Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the negative impact of a mechatronic system with the flexible elements parameter error and the possibilities of impact reduction are presented in this contribution. Two advanced methods – the Model Predictive Control method and the inclusion of an LMS filter into the control process are proposed for the reduction of the insufficient effect of a double notch filter, which was initially integrated into the system for elimination of two-mass flexible joint parasitic frequencies. Simulation experiments results – response of system angular velocity and control process quality analysis confirmed the correctness of the proposition for the usage of these progressive control elements.

  18. Finite Elements Modeling in Diagnostics of Small Closed Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorkowski, J; Mrzygłód, M; Grzegorowska, O

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic pneumothorax still remains to be a serious clinical problem and requires a comprehensive diagnostic and monitoring during treatment. The aim of this paper is to present a computer method of modeling of small closed pneumothorax. Radiological images of 34 patients of both sexes with small closed pneumothorax were taken into consideration. The control group consisted of X-rays of 22 patients treated because of tension pneumothorax. In every single case the model was correlated with the clinical manifestations. The procedure of computational rapid analysis (CRA) for in silico analysis of surgical intervention was introduced. It included implementation of computerize tomography images and their automatic conversion into 3D finite elements model (FEM). In order to segmentize the 3D model, an intelligent procedure of domain recognition was used. In the final step, a computer simulation project of fluid-structure interaction was built, using the ANSYS\\Workbench environment of multi-physics analysis. The FEM model and computer simulation project were employed in the analysis in order to optimize surgical intervention. The model worked out well and was compatible with the clinical manifestations of pneumothorax. We conclude that the created FEM model is a promising tool for facilitation of diagnostic procedures and prognosis of treatment in the case of small closed pneumothorax.

  19. FEWA: a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1983-11-01

    This report documents the implementation and demonstration of a Finite Element model of Water flow through Aquifers (FEWA). The particular features of FEWA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Point as well as distributed sources/sinks are included to represent recharges/pumpings and rainfall infiltrations. All sources/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed hydraulic head on the Dirichlet boundaries and fluxes on Neumann or Cauchy boundaries can be time-dependent or constant. Source/sink strength over each element and node, hydraulic head at each Dirichlet boundary node, and flux at each boundary segment can vary independently of each other. Either completely confined or completely unconfined aquifers, or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. Discretization of a compound region with very irregular curved boundaries is made easy by including both quadrilateral and triangular elements in the formulation. Large-field problems can be solved efficiently by including a pointwise iterative solution strategy as an optional alternative to the direct elimination solution method for the matrix equation approximating the partial differential equation of groundwater flow. FEWA also includes transient flow through confining leaky aquifers lying above and/or below the aquifer of interest. The model is verified against three simple cases to which analytical solutions are available. It is then demonstrated by two examples of how the model can be applied to heterogeneous and anisotropic aquifers with transient boundary conditions, time-dependent sources/sinks, and confining aquitards for a confined aquifer of variable thickness and for a free surface problem in an unconfined aquifer, respectively. 20 references, 25 figures, 8 tables.

  20. Finite element modelling of cornea mechanics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejad, Talisa Mohammad; Foster, Craig; Gongal, Dipika

    2014-01-01

    The cornea is a transparent tissue in front of the eye that refracts light and facilitates vision. A slight change in the geometry of the cornea remarkably affects the optical power. Because of this sensitivity, biomechanical study of the cornea can reveal much about its performance and function. In vivo and in vitro studies have been conducted to investigate the mechanics of the cornea and determine its characteristics. Numerical techniques such as the finite element method (FEM) have been extensively implemented as effective and noninvasive methods for analyzing corneal mechanics and possible disorders. This article reviews the use of FEM for assessing the mechanical behavior of the cornea. Different applications of FEM in corneal disease studies, surgical predictions, impact simulations, and clinical applications have been reviewed. Some suggestions for the future of this type of modeling in the area of corneal mechanics are also discussed.