WorldWideScience

Sample records for element environmental simulator

  1. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2008-01-01

    To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts

  2. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2012-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities

  3. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  4. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past year the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) has been undergoing a significant upgrade beyond its initial configuration. The NTREES facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The first phase of the upgrade activities which was completed in 2012 in part consisted of an extensive modification to the hydrogen system to permit computer controlled operations outside the building through the use of pneumatically operated variable position valves. This setup also allows the hydrogen flow rate to be increased to over 200 g/sec and reduced the operation complexity of the system. The second stage of modifications to NTREES which has just been completed expands the capabilities of the facility significantly. In particular, the previous 50 kW induction power supply has been replaced with a 1.2 MW unit which should allow more prototypical fuel element temperatures to be reached. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during. This new setup required that the NTREES vessel be raised onto a platform along with most of its associated gas and vent lines. In this arrangement, the induction heater and water systems are now located underneath the platform. In this new configuration, the 1.2 MW NTREES induction heater will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials in flowing hydrogen at pressures up to 1000 psi at temperatures up to and beyond 3000 K and at near-prototypic reactor channel power densities. NTREES is also capable of testing potential fuel elements with a variety of propellants, including hydrogen with additives to inhibit

  5. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) Phase II Upgrade Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.; Moran, Robert P.; Pearson, J. Bose

    2013-01-01

    To support the on-going nuclear thermal propulsion effort, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The facility to perform this testing is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator (NTREES). This device can simulate the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components will be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner so as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes which would normally occur as a result of nuclear fission and would be exposed to flowing hydrogen. Initial testing of a somewhat prototypical fuel element has been successfully performed in NTREES and the facility has now been shutdown to allow for an extensive reconfiguration of the facility which will result in a significant upgrade in its capabilities. Keywords: Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, Simulator

  6. Environmental research on actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers

  7. Environmental research on actinide elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinder, J.E. III; Alberts, J.J.; McLeod, K.W.; Schreckhise, R.G. (eds.)

    1987-08-01

    The papers synthesize the results of research sponsored by DOE's Office of Health and Environmental Research on the behavior of transuranic and actinide elements in the environment. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the 21 individual papers. (ACR)

  8. Environmental chemistry of the actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Linfeng

    1986-01-01

    The environmental chemistry of the actinide elements is a new branch of science developing with the application of nuclear energy on a larger and larger scale. Various aspects of the environmental chemistry of the actinide elements are briefly reviewed in this paper, such as its significance in the nuclear waste disposal, its coverage of research fields and possible directions for future study

  9. Trace elements distribution in environmental compartments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Juliana C. de; Peres, Sueli da Silva; Godoy, Maria Luiza D.P.

    2017-01-01

    Trace elements term defines the presence of low concentrations metals at environment. Some of them are considered biologically essential, as Co, Cu and Mn. Others can cause detriment to environment and human health, as Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Ti and U. A large number of them have radioactive isotopes, implying the evaluation of risks for human health should be done considering the precepts of environmental radiological protection. The ecosystem pollution with trace elements generates changes at the geochemistry cycle of these elements and in environmental quality. Soils have single characteristics when compared with another components of biosphere (air, water and biota), cause they introduce themselves not only as a drain towards contaminants, but also as natural buffer that control the transport of chemical elements and other substances for atmosphere, hydrosphere and biota. The main purpose of environmental monitoring program is to evaluate the levels of contaminants in the various compartments of the environment: natural or anthropogenic, and to assess the contribution of a potential contaminant source on the environment. Elemental Composition for the collected samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the map baseline of concentration of interest trace elements in environmental samples of water, sediment and soil from Environmental Monitoring Program of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD). The samples were analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) at IRD. >From the knowledge of trace elements concentrations, could be evaluated the environmental quality parameters at the studied ecosystems. The data allowed evaluating some relevant aspects of the study of trace elements in soil and aquatic systems, with emphasis at the distribution, concentration and identification of main anthropic sources of contamination at environment. (author)

  10. Trace elements distribution in environmental compartments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroz, Juliana C. de; Peres, Sueli da Silva; Godoy, Maria Luiza D.P., E-mail: suelip@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Trace elements term defines the presence of low concentrations metals at environment. Some of them are considered biologically essential, as Co, Cu and Mn. Others can cause detriment to environment and human health, as Pb, Cd, Hg, As, Ti and U. A large number of them have radioactive isotopes, implying the evaluation of risks for human health should be done considering the precepts of environmental radiological protection. The ecosystem pollution with trace elements generates changes at the geochemistry cycle of these elements and in environmental quality. Soils have single characteristics when compared with another components of biosphere (air, water and biota), cause they introduce themselves not only as a drain towards contaminants, but also as natural buffer that control the transport of chemical elements and other substances for atmosphere, hydrosphere and biota. The main purpose of environmental monitoring program is to evaluate the levels of contaminants in the various compartments of the environment: natural or anthropogenic, and to assess the contribution of a potential contaminant source on the environment. Elemental Composition for the collected samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the map baseline of concentration of interest trace elements in environmental samples of water, sediment and soil from Environmental Monitoring Program of Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD). The samples were analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) at IRD. >From the knowledge of trace elements concentrations, could be evaluated the environmental quality parameters at the studied ecosystems. The data allowed evaluating some relevant aspects of the study of trace elements in soil and aquatic systems, with emphasis at the distribution, concentration and identification of main anthropic sources of contamination at environment. (author)

  11. Diving and Environmental Simulation Team

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Diving and Environmental Simulation Team focuses on ways to optimize the performance and safety of Navy divers. Our goal is to increase mission effectiveness by...

  12. Surgery simulation using fast finite elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes our recent work on real-time surgery simulation using fast finite element models of linear elasticity. In addition, we discuss various improvements in terms of speed and realism......This paper describes our recent work on real-time surgery simulation using fast finite element models of linear elasticity. In addition, we discuss various improvements in terms of speed and realism...

  13. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown Jr, G.E.; Calas, G.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment, which

  14. Thermochemical data for environmentally-relevant elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.; Brown, P.L.

    1999-01-01

    This study provides an extensive stability constant (log K) database suitable for calculating the speciation of selected environmentally-relevant elements (H, Na, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, U, Al Pb, Zn, Cu and cd) in an aqueous system, where a model fulvic acid (comprising aspartic, citric, malonic, salicylic and tricarballylic acids) is used to simulate metal binding by dissolved organic material Stability constants for inorganic metal complexes and minerals were selected primarily from critical literature complications and/or reviews. In contrast, few critically evaluated data were available for metal complexes with aspartic, citric, malonic, salicylic and tricarballylic acids. Consequently, data from original research articles were carefully evaluated and compiled as part of the study, following defined selection criteria. to meet the objective of compiling a comprehensive and reliable database of stability constants, all relevant equilibria and species, ranging from simple binary metal complexes to more complex ternary and even quaternary, metal complexes were included where possible in addition to the selection of stability constants from empirical sources, estimates of stability constants were performed when this could be done reliably, based on the unified theory of metal ion complexation and/or linear tree energy relationships The stability constants are given as common logarithms (logo) in the form required by the HARPHRQ geochemical code and refer to the standard state, i.e 298.15 K (25 deg C), 10 5 Pa (1 atm) and, for all species, infinite dilution (ionic strength = 0 mol L -1 ). In addition to the compilation of stability constant data, an overview is given of geochemical speciation modelling in aqueous systems and available conceptual models of metal binding by humic substances. (authors)

  15. Trace-element analysis in environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.; Moschini, G.

    1988-01-01

    The use of charged-particle accelerators in trace-element analysis in the field of environmental sciences is described in this article. Nuclear reactions, charged-particle-induced X-ray emission as well as other nuclear and atomic processes can be used individually, or combined, in developing adequate analytical systems. In addition to concentration levels, concentration levels, concentration profiles can be measured, resulting in unique information. Some examples of experiments performed are described together with the suggestions for future measurements [pt

  16. Fast finite elements for surgery simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses volumetric deformable models for modeling human body parts and organs in surgery simulation systems. These models are built using finite element models for linear elastic materials. To achieve real-time response condensation has been applied to the system stiffness matrix...

  17. Non Nuclear NTR Environmental Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emrich, William J. Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear Thermal Rockets or NTR's have been suggested as a propulsion system option for vehicles traveling to the moon or Mars. These engines are capable of providing high thrust at specific impulses at least twice that of today's best chemical engines. The performance constraints on these engines are mainly the result of temperature limitations on the fuel coupled with a limited ability to withstand chemical attack by the hot hydrogen propellant. To operate at maximum efficiency, fuel forms are desired which can withstand the extremely hot, hostile environment characteristic of NTR operation for at least several hours. The simulation of such an environment would require an experimental device which could simultaneously approximate the power, flow, and temperature conditions which a nuclear fuel element (or partial element) would encounter during NTR operation. Such a simulation would allow detailed studies of the fuel behavior and hydrogen flow characteristics under reactor like conditions to be performed. The goal of these simulations would be directed toward expanding the performance envelope of NTR engines over that which was demonstrated during the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs of the 1970's. Current planning calls for such a simulator to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center over the coming year, and it is anticipated that it will be used in the future to evaluate a wide variety of fuel element designs and the materials of which they are constructed. This present work addresses the initial experimental objectives of the NTR simulator with regard to reproducing the fuel degradation patterns previously observed during the NERVA testing

  18. Environmental factors and elements of Ljig municipality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljanović Dragana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some of the basic natural and social-geographic factors are analyzed, with the aim to identify their influence on the environmental status. Qualitative assessment are attempted about the various elements of the environment, and attention directed to the problems of noise, and problems of communal waste disposal. A synthetic presentation of the environmental status in the municipality of Ljig is given. The territory of Ljig has been spatially differentiated, namely, it has been categorized according to the degree of pollution. High concentration of the population, and activities, in the town Ljig itself has produced a degradation worse than in the other settlements. On the other hand, the settlements in which is situated the locationally non-flexible industry (quarrying and processing of stone are facing problems of other sort. In the villages, however, which are slowly becoming depopulated, the quality of the environment is satisfactory. In accordance with such facts, revealed about the environmental status, basic aims have been defined as to how to protect the environment in the future. For the realization of environmental aims, various measures and activities are being proposed, with the purpose to improve the situation in the threatened zones, and to safeguard the quality of the environment on the entire municipal territory of Ljig.

  19. Finite Element Simulation of Fracture Toughness Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Seok Jae; Liu, Cong Hao

    2013-01-01

    Finite element simulations of tensile tests were performed to determine the equivalent stress - equivalent plastic strain curves, critical equivalent stresses, and critical equivalent plastic strains. Then, the curves were used as inputs to finite element simulations of fracture toughness tests to determine the plane strain fracture toughness. The critical COD was taken as the COD when the equivalent plastic strain at the crack tip reached a critical value, and it was used as a crack growth criterion. The relationship between the critical COD and the critical equivalent plastic strain or the reduction of area was found. The relationship between the plane strain fracture toughness and the product of the critical equivalent stress and the critical equivalent plastic strain was also found

  20. Finite element simulations with ANSYS workbench 16

    CERN Document Server

    Lee , Huei-Huang

    2015-01-01

    Finite Element Simulations with ANSYS Workbench 16 is a comprehensive and easy to understand workbook. It utilizes step-by-step instructions to help guide readers to learn finite element simulations. Twenty seven real world case studies are used throughout the book. Many of these cases are industrial or research projects the reader builds from scratch. All the files readers may need if they have trouble are available for download on the publishers website. Companion videos that demonstrate exactly how to preform each tutorial are available to readers by redeeming the access code that comes in the book. Relevant background knowledge is reviewed whenever necessary. To be efficient, the review is conceptual rather than mathematical. Key concepts are inserted whenever appropriate and summarized at the end of each chapter. Additional exercises or extension research problems are provided as homework at the end of each chapter. A learning approach emphasizing hands-on experiences spreads through this entire book. A...

  1. Environmental aspects of coal trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swaine, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The increasing use of coal, especially for power production, means that more attention is being given to environmental aspects. Some matters, for example, acid mine drainage, acid deposition and the relevance of coal-derived carbon and nitrogen oxides to the greenhouse effect are still being investigated in order to find methods of mitigation. However, much less attention has been given to possible untoward effects from trace elements in coal during mining, preparation and use. Occasional emotional outbursts, based on insufficient evidence, focus attention on arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury and uranium. The best way to counter such claims is to provide proper information as a basis for more informed judgments. The comments contained in this article are mostly based on work done at the Commonwealth Science and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO)

  2. Finite element simulation of piezoelectric transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, T; Kagawa, Y; Wakatsuki, N; Okamura, H

    2001-07-01

    Piezoelectric transformers are nothing but ultrasonic resonators with two pairs of electrodes provided on the surface of a piezoelectric substrate in which electrical energy is carried in the mechanical form. The input and output electrodes are arranged to provide the impedance transformation, which results in the voltage transformation. As they are operated at a resonance, the electrical equivalent circuit approach has traditionally been developed in a rather empirical way and has been used for analysis and design. The present paper deals with the analysis of the piezoelectric transformers based on the three-dimensional finite element modelling. The PIEZO3D code that we have developed is modified to include the external loading conditions. The finite element approach is now available for a wide variety of the electrical boundary conditions. The equivalent circuit of lumped parameters can also be derived from the finite element method (FEM) solution if required. The simulation of the present transformers is made for the low intensity operation and compared with the experimental results. Demonstration is made for basic Rosen-type transformers in which the longitudinal mode of a plate plays an important role; in which the equivalent circuit of lumped constants has been used. However, there are many modes of vibration associated with the plate, the effect of which cannot always be ignored. In the experiment, the double resonances are sometimes observed in the vicinity of the operating frequency. The simulation demonstrates that this is due to the coupling of the longitudinal mode with the flexural mode. Thus, the simulation provides an invaluable guideline to the transformer design.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  4. Utilization of Large Cohesive Interface Elements for Delamination Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Brian Lau Verndal; Lund, Erik

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the difficulties of utilizing large interface elements in delamination simulation. Solutions to increase the size of applicable interface elements are described and cover numerical integration of the element and modifications of the cohesive law....

  5. Discrete element simulation of crushable rockfill materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shao

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A discrete element method was used to study the evolution of particle crushing in a rockfill sample subjected to triaxial shear. A simple procedure was developed to generate clusters with arbitrary shapes, which resembled real rockfill particles. A theoretical method was developed to define the failure criterion for an individual particle subjected to an arbitrary set of contact forces. Then, a series of numerical tests of large-scale drained triaxial tests were conducted to simulate the behaviors of the rockfill sample. Finally, we examined the development of micro-characteristics such as particle crushing, contact characteristics, porosity, deformation, movement, and energy dissipation. The simulation results were partially compared with the laboratory experiments, and good agreement was achieved, demonstrating that the particle crushing model proposed can be used to simulate the drained triaxial test of rockfill materials. Based on a comparison of macro behaviors of the rockfill sample and micro structures of the particles, the microscopic mechanism of the rockfill materials subjected to triaxial shear was determined qualitatively. It is shown that the crushing rate, rather than the number of crushed particles, can be used to reflect the relationship between macro- and micro-mechanical characteristics of rockfill materials. These research results further develop our understanding of the deformation mechanism of rockfill materials.

  6. Finite Element Simulation of Blanking Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzal Ahmed

    2012-10-01

    daya penembusan sebanyak 42%. Daya tebukan yang diukur melalui  eksperimen dan simulasi kekal pada kira-kira 90kN melepasi penembusan punch sebanyak 62%. Apabila ketebalan keputusan kunci ditambah, ketinggian retak dikurangkan dan ini meningkatkan kualiti pengosongan.KEYWORDS: simulation; finite element simulation; blanking; computer aided manufacturing

  7. Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    Significant improvement have been achieved on efficiency improvements of specific building elements like the building envelope and building equipment and services and whilst most building elements still offer opportunities for efficiency improvements, the greatest future potential lie with techno......Significant improvement have been achieved on efficiency improvements of specific building elements like the building envelope and building equipment and services and whilst most building elements still offer opportunities for efficiency improvements, the greatest future potential lie...

  8. Finite element simulation of asphalt fatigue testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullidtz, Per; Kieler, Thomas Lau; Kargo, Anders

    1997-01-01

    The traditional interpretation of fatigue tests on asphalt mixes has been in terms of a logarithmic linear relationship between the constant stress or strain amplitude and the number of load repetitions to cause failure, often defined as a decrease in modulus to half the initial value...... damage mechanics.The paper describes how continuum damage mechanics may be used with a finite element program to explain the progressive deterioration of asphalt mixes under laboratory fatigue testing. Both constant stress and constant strain testing are simulated, and compared to the actual results from...... three point and four point fatigue test on different mixes. It is shown that the same damage law, based on energy density, may be used to explain the gradual deterioration under constant stress as well as under constant strain testing.Some of the advantages of using this method for interpreting fatigue...

  9. Element Cycles: An Environmental Chemistry Board Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippins, Tracy; Anderson, Cody M.; Poindexter, Eric F.; Sultemeier, S. Whitney; Schultz, Linda D.

    2011-01-01

    "Element Cycles" is an activity designed to reinforce correlation of essential elements and their different forms in the ecosystem. Students are assigned essential elements to research as homework, then share results, and construct game boards with four ecosphere sections: geosphere (earth), hydrosphere (water), atmosphere (air), and biosphere…

  10. Finite element simulation for creep crack growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Noriyuki; Sasaki, Toru; Nakagaki, Michihiko; Brust, F.W.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element method was applied to a generation phase simulation of creep crack growth. Experimental data on creep crack growth in a 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V steel compact tension specimen were numerically simulated using a node-release technique and the variations of various fracture mechanics parameters such as CTOA, J, C * and T * during creep crack growth were calculated. The path-dependencies of the integral parameters J, C * and T * were also obtained to examine whether or not they could characterize the stress field near the tip of a crack propagating under creep condition. The following conclusions were obtained from the present analysis. (1) The J integral shows strong path-dependency during creep crack growth, so that it is does not characterize creep crack growth. (2) The C * integral shows path-dependency to some extent during creep crack growth even in the case of Norton type steady state creep law. Strictly speaking, we cannot use it as a fracture mechanics parameter characterizing creep crack growth. It is, however, useful from the practical viewpoint because it correlates well the rate of creep crack growth. (3) The T * integral shows good path-independency during creep crack growth. Therefore, it is a candidate for a fracture mechanics parameter characterizing creep crack growth. (author)

  11. Elements of quality assurance in environmental surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.J.

    1975-01-01

    Qualities of an environmental surveillance program requiring control or assurance are reviewed. Requirements of accuracy, reproducibility, sensitivity, acceptability, and time and cost effectiveness are qualities discussed. The controls applicable to sample collection, handling, chemical analysis, measurement and data presentation are identified and discussed as they pertain to environmental monitoring. Quality assurance program recommendations for developing and reporting environmental surveillance data are provided

  12. A study on the shielding element using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Jeong [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Goo [Dept. of Radiologic Technology, Daegu Health College, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this research, we simulated the elementary star shielding ability using Monte Carlo simulation to apply medical radiation shielding sheet which can replace existing lead. In the selection of elements, mainly elements and metal elements having a large atomic number, which are known to have high shielding performance, recently, various composite materials have improved shielding performance, so that weight reduction, processability, In consideration of activity etc., 21 elements were selected. The simulation tools were utilized Monte Carlo method. As a result of simulating the shielding performance by each element, it was estimated that the shielding ratio is the highest at 98.82% and 98.44% for tungsten and gold.

  13. Characterization of transuranic elements at environmental levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edgington, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes current understanding of transuranic speciation in natural waters. Several predictive models describing the behaviour of these elements in both marine and fresh-water systems illustrate the importance of this information. (author)

  14. Rainfall simulation for environmental application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shriner, D.S.; Abner, C.H.; Mann, L.K.

    1977-08-01

    Rain simulation systems have been designed for field and greenhouse studies which have the capability of reproducing the physical and chemical characteristics of natural rainfall. The systems permit the simulation of variations in rainfall and droplet size similar to that of natural precipitation. The systems are completely automatic and programmable, allowing unattended operation for periods of up to one week, and have been used to expose not only vegetation but also soils and engineering materials, making them versatile tools for studies involving simulated precipitation.

  15. Workshop on environmental research for actinide elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watters, R.L.

    1981-09-01

    The discussions in this fifth workshop were directed to the advances which have been made in the environmental chemistry of plutonium and to the feasibility and worth of developing environmental transport models which might serve as predictive tools for long term behavior and as guides for future research needs. Two plutonium models of the soil/plant pathway were presented for critique and as examples of possible approaches. Reports of the following four panels are presented in this proceedings: model development; marine; terrestrial and freshwater/groundwater

  16. Predicting environmental restoration activities through static simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, T.L.; King, D.A.; Wilkins, M.L.; Forward, M.F.

    1994-12-01

    This paper discusses a static simulation model that predicts several performance measures of environmental restoration activities over different remedial strategies. Basic model operation consists of manipulating and processing waste streams via selecting and applying remedial technologies according to the strategy. Performance measure prediction is possible for contaminated soil, solid waste, surface water, groundwater, storage tank, and facility sites. Simulations are performed for the U.S. Department of Energy in support of its Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

  17. A finite element simulation of biological conversion processes in landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, M; Ricken, T; Widmann, R

    2011-04-01

    Landfills are the most common way of waste disposal worldwide. Biological processes convert the organic material into an environmentally harmful landfill gas, which has an impact on the greenhouse effect. After the depositing of waste has been stopped, current conversion processes continue and emissions last for several decades and even up to 100years and longer. A good prediction of these processes is of high importance for landfill operators as well as for authorities, but suitable models for a realistic description of landfill processes are rather poor. In order to take the strong coupled conversion processes into account, a constitutive three-dimensional model based on the multiphase Theory of Porous Media (TPM) has been developed at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The theoretical formulations are implemented in the finite element code FEAP. With the presented calculation concept we are able to simulate the coupled processes that occur in an actual landfill. The model's theoretical background and the results of the simulations as well as the meantime successfully performed simulation of a real landfill body will be shown in the following. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A finite element simulation of biological conversion processes in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robeck, M.; Ricken, T.; Widmann, R.

    2011-01-01

    Landfills are the most common way of waste disposal worldwide. Biological processes convert the organic material into an environmentally harmful landfill gas, which has an impact on the greenhouse effect. After the depositing of waste has been stopped, current conversion processes continue and emissions last for several decades and even up to 100 years and longer. A good prediction of these processes is of high importance for landfill operators as well as for authorities, but suitable models for a realistic description of landfill processes are rather poor. In order to take the strong coupled conversion processes into account, a constitutive three-dimensional model based on the multiphase Theory of Porous Media (TPM) has been developed at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The theoretical formulations are implemented in the finite element code FEAP. With the presented calculation concept we are able to simulate the coupled processes that occur in an actual landfill. The model's theoretical background and the results of the simulations as well as the meantime successfully performed simulation of a real landfill body will be shown in the following.

  19. Environmental Effect on Egress Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Rodriguez, Samuel; Giese, Andrew; Amato, Nancy M.; Zarrinmehr, Saied; Al-Douri, Firas; Clayton, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Evacuation and egress simulations can be a useful tool for studying the effect of design decisions on the flow of agent movement. This type of simulation can be used to determine before hand the effect of design decisions and enable exploration of potential improvements. In this work, we study at how agent egress is affected by the environment in real world and large scale virtual environments and investigate metrics to analyze the flow. Our work differs from many evacuation systems in that we support grouping restrictions between agents (e.g., families or other social groups traveling together), and model scenarios with multiple modes of transportation with physically realistic dynamics (e.g., individuals walk from a building to their own cars and leave only when all people in the group arrive).

  20. Multivariant analyses of trace element patterns for environmental tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jervis, R.E.; Ko, M.M.C.; Junliang Tian; Puling Liu

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear-based analytical techniques: INAA, PIXE and photon activation permit simultaneous multielemental determination of concentrations in environmental materials, which data are often found sufficiently precise and free of uncontrolled, random errors among the various elements such that the data sets can yield valuable information on elemental communality through multi-variant statistical 'factor' analysis. Characteristic factor patterns obtained in this way can provide clues to the likely sources in the environment of various components. Recent studies in three different environmental situations: solid waste incinerators , Chinese soils, and iron and steel industry, involving measurements of 30-35 elements, have yielded distinct elemental patterns or, environmental signatures, with factor loading coefficients ranging mostly in the ranges: 0.7-0.96. (author) 10 refs.; 2 figs.; 9 tabs

  1. Fractal Landscape Algorithms for Environmental Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H.; Moran, S.

    2014-12-01

    Natural science and geographical research are now able to take advantage of environmental simulations that more accurately test experimental hypotheses, resulting in deeper understanding. Experiments affected by the natural environment can benefit from 3D landscape simulations capable of simulating a variety of terrains and environmental phenomena. Such simulations can employ random terrain generation algorithms that dynamically simulate environments to test specific models against a variety of factors. Through the use of noise functions such as Perlin noise, Simplex noise, and diamond square algorithms, computers can generate simulations that model a variety of landscapes and ecosystems. This study shows how these algorithms work together to create realistic landscapes. By seeding values into the diamond square algorithm, one can control the shape of landscape. Perlin noise and Simplex noise are also used to simulate moisture and temperature. The smooth gradient created by coherent noise allows more realistic landscapes to be simulated. Terrain generation algorithms can be used in environmental studies and physics simulations. Potential studies that would benefit from simulations include the geophysical impact of flash floods or drought on a particular region and regional impacts on low lying area due to global warming and rising sea levels. Furthermore, terrain generation algorithms also serve as aesthetic tools to display landscapes (Google Earth), and simulate planetary landscapes. Hence, it can be used as a tool to assist science education. Algorithms used to generate these natural phenomena provide scientists a different approach in analyzing our world. The random algorithms used in terrain generation not only contribute to the generating the terrains themselves, but are also capable of simulating weather patterns.

  2. Finite element simulation of heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Bergheau, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    This book introduces the finite element method applied to the resolution of industrial heat transfer problems. Starting from steady conduction, the method is gradually extended to transient regimes, to traditional non-linearities, and to convective phenomena. Coupled problems involving heat transfer are then presented. Three types of couplings are discussed: coupling through boundary conditions (such as radiative heat transfer in cavities), addition of state variables (such as metallurgical phase change), and coupling through partial differential equations (such as electrical phenomena).? A re

  3. Computer simulation of fuel element performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanov, G I

    1979-01-01

    The review presents reports made at the Conference on the Bahaviour and Production of Fuel for Water Reactors on March 13-17, 1979. Discussed at the Conference are the most developed and tested calculation models specially evolved to predict the behaviour of fuel elements of water reactors. The following five main aspects of the problem are discussed: general conceptions and programs; mechanical mock-ups and their applications; gas release, gap conductivity and fuel thermal conductivity; analysis of nonstationary processes; models of specific phenomena. The review briefly describes the physical principles of the following models and programs: the RESTR, providing calculation of the radii of zones of columnar and equiaxial grains as well as the radius of the internal cavity of the fuel core; programs for calculation of fuel-can interaction, based on the finite elements method; a model predicting the behaviour of the CANDU-PHW fuel elements in transient conditions. General results are presented of investigations of heat transfer through a can-fuel gap and thermal conductivity of UO/sub 2/ with regard for cracking and gas release of the fuel. Many programs already suit the accepted standards and are intensively tested at present.

  4. Finite Element Crash Simulations and Impact-Induced Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mackerle

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography lists references to papers, conference proceedings and theses/dissertations dealing with finite element simulations of crashes, impact-induced injuries and their protection that were published in 1980–1998. 390 citations are listed.

  5. Finite element simulation of laser transmission welding of dissimilar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    materials between polyvinylidene fluoride and titanium ... finite element (FE) thermal model is developed to simulate the laser ... Keywords: Laser transmission welding, Temperature field, Weld dimension, Finite element analysis, Thermal modeling. 1. .... 4) The heating phenomena due to the phase changes are neglected.

  6. Elements Explaining Learning Clinical Reasoning Using Simulation Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaana-Maija Koivisto

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the findings on which elements in a game-based simulation affect learning clinical reasoning in nursing education. By using engaging gaming elements in virtual simulations and integrating the clinical reasoning process into game mechanics, games can enhance learning clinical reasoning and offer meaningful learning experiences. The study was designed to explore how nursing students experience gaming and learning when playing a simulation game, as well as which gaming elements explain learning clinical reasoning. The data was collected by questionnaire from nursing students (N = 166 in autumn 2014 over thirteen gaming sessions. The findings showed that usability, application of nursing knowledge, and exploration have the most impact on learning clinical reasoning when playing simulation games. Findings also revealed that authentic patient-related experiences, feedback, and reflection have an indirect effect on learning clinical reasoning. Based on these results, more efficient simulation games to improve clinical reasoning may be developed.   

  7. Finite element simulation and testing of ISW CFRP anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Goltermann, Per; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2013-01-01

    is modelled in the 3D finite Element program ABAQUS, just as digital image correlation (DIC) testing was performed to verify the finite element simulation. Also a new optimized design was produced to ensure that the finite element simulation and anchorage behaviour correlated well. It is seen....... This paper presents a novel mechanical integrated sleeve wedge anchorage which seem very promising when perusing the scope of ultimate utilization of CFRP 8mm rods (with a tension capacity of approximately 140kN). Compression transverse to the CFRP is evaluated to prevent premature failure. The anchorage...

  8. The relative contributions of climatic elements and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper was to determine the relative contributions of climatic elements and environmental factors to urban flooding in Awka urban area of Anambra State. Towards achieving this aim, 10 year (2000-2009) meteorological data of temperature and rainfall of the study area were collected from synoptic ...

  9. Speciation of trace elements in the environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    Elements present at trace levels, often referred as trace elements, play an important role in the environment and in the functioning of life on our planet. Trace elements in environment present as free metal ions or incorporated into colloids or attached to particulate matter or exist in different physical and chemical forms. It is well established that some elements are highly toxic and some are essential, but can become toxic at higher doses. It is also now known that the forms of elements (speciation) and their amounts are more important than the chemical dose of the elements as their interaction depends on different species. For example, Cr(VI) ions are considered far more toxic than Cr(III), whereas As(III) is more toxic than As(V). Similarly, in the case of mercury, both methylmercury and inorganic mercury are toxic but they show different levels of toxicity. Thus the adverse effects depend on the nature of species of the elements and therefore speciation studies are of paramount importance in many areas like toxicology, environmental chemistry and geochemisty. In view of this, speciation studies is a challenge to analytical chemists as the measurement methodologies have to be carefully developed, validated and applied. The grand challenge is to obtain quality data ensuring traceability, as the data obtained will be used in modeling for predicting the environmental impacts. In this talk importance of speciation and challenges to environmental analytical chemists will be discussed along with the following three speciation studies on Cr, U and Hg which were carried out in our laboratories

  10. (Environmental and geophysical modeling, fracture mechanics, and boundary element methods)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L.J.

    1990-11-09

    Technical discussions at the various sites visited centered on application of boundary integral methods for environmental modeling, seismic analysis, and computational fracture mechanics in composite and smart'' materials. The traveler also attended the International Association for Boundary Element Methods Conference at Rome, Italy. While many aspects of boundary element theory and applications were discussed in the papers, the dominant topic was the analysis and application of hypersingular equations. This has been the focus of recent work by the author, and thus the conference was highly relevant to research at ORNL.

  11. Loess as an environmental archive of atmospheric trace element deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazina, T.; Winkel, L. H.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental archives such as ice cores, lake sediment cores, and peat cores have been used extensively to reconstruct past atmospheric deposition of trace elements. These records have provided information about how anthropogenic activities such as mining and fossil fuel combustion have disturbed the natural cycles of various atmospherically transported trace elements (e.g. Pb, Hg and Se). While these records are invaluable for tracing human impacts on such trace elements, they often provide limited information about the long term natural cycles of these elements. An assumption of these records is that the observed variations in trace element input, prior to any assumed anthropogenic perturbations, represent the full range of natural variations. However, records such as those mentioned above which extend back to a maximum of ~400kyr may not capture the potentially large variations of trace element input occurring over millions of years. Windblown loess sediments, often representing atmospheric deposition over time scales >1Ma, are the most widely distributed terrestrial sediments on Earth. These deposits have been used extensively to reconstruct continental climate variability throughout the Quaternary and late Neogene periods. In addition to being a valuable record of continental climate change, loess deposits may represent a long term environmental archive of atmospheric trace element deposition and may be combined with paleoclimate records to elucidate how fluctuations in climate have impacted the natural cycle of such elements. Our research uses the loess-paleosol deposits on the Chinese Loess Plateau (CLP) to quantify how atmospheric deposition of trace elements has fluctuated in central China over the past 6.8Ma. The CLP has been used extensively to reconstruct past changes of East Asian monsoon system (EAM). We present a suite of trace element concentration records (e.g. Pb, Hg, and Se) from the CLP which exemplifies how loess deposits can be used as an

  12. Assessment of elements in coal related to environmental concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diah Dwiana Lestiani; Muhayatun Santoso; Natalia Adventini

    2010-01-01

    National energy consumption increases rapidly in line with the economic growth and population. Indonesian government plans to develop electrical power plant 10 000 MW program to anticipate this matter, first step of which is focused on coal power plant. In this study, coal combustion was assessed on its environmental impact. Determination of trace and toxic elements was applied by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Samples were irradiated in Rabbit System at GA Siwabessy, Serpong, in reactor with neutron flux ~10 13 n.cm -2 .s -1 , then counted using HPGe detector. The method was validated by analysis of standard reference material NIST SRM 1633b coal fly ash. The results showed that Al and Cr concentrations were 2.1 0±0.80 and 7.63±1.45 mg/kg, respectively, and other elements such as Al, Co, Cs, Ce, Fe, K, La, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti, and V were still in the range of those in other world coals. Comparison the elements in coal with the elements in fly ash and bottom ash for relative enrichment index, mass balance calculation and mass flow estimation using assumption was also carried out to estimate the total emission estimation related the environmental concerned elements. The total emission of As, Co and Cr were in the range of 0.84-2.28 kg/day or equivalent to 0.49-1.23 % of total elemental mass content in coal. This also indicated that these elements were captured 98-99 % before released to the environment. (author)

  13. Finite element simulations of two rock mechanics tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Lott, S.A.

    1986-04-01

    Rock mechanics tests are performed to determine in situ stress conditions and material properties of an underground rock mass. To design stable underground facilities for the permanent storage of high-level nuclear waste, determination of these properties and conditions is a necessary first step. However, before a test and its associated equipment can be designed, the engineer needs to know the range of expected values to be measured by the instruments. Sensitivity studies by means of finite element simulations are employed in this preliminary design phase to evaluate the pertinent parameters and their effects on the proposed measurements. The simulations, of two typical rock mechanics tests, the plate bearing test and the flat-jack test, by means of the finite element analysis, are described. The plate bearing test is used to determine the rock mass deformation modulus. The flat-jack test is used to determine the in situ stress conditions of the host rock. For the plate bearing test, two finite element models are used to simulate the classic problem of a load on an elastic half space and the actual problem of a plate bearing test in an underground tunnel of circular cross section. For the flat-jack simulation, a single finite element model is used to simulate both horizontal and vertical slots. Results will be compared to closed-form solutions available in the literature

  14. Free elements resonator: design and simulation, application to NMR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fakri-Bouchet, L.; Lapray, Ch.; Briquet, A.

    1999-01-01

    The free elements resonator, has a bird cage structure. It is made with purely inductively coupled circuits which are individually pre-tuned. The resonance frequency is adjusted by a simultaneous rotation of elements that preserves the coil symmetry. The radiofrequency functioning can be analysis by the usual set of coupled differential equations leading to the resonant modes. In the work presented here the formal analysis is completed by a simulation based on software (Pspice). The characteristics of each element (resistance, self-inductance, capacitance) are Firstly measured, as well as the mutual inductance between each couple of elements. Then the resonant modes and the corresponding current and voltage distribution are obtained to evaluate the radiofrequency field. Using this approach, a free elements bird-cage for efficient operation at 2 Tesla is designed. (authors)

  15. Advanced solid elements for sheet metal forming simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix, Vicente; Rossi, Riccardo; Oñate, Eugenio; Flores, Fernando G.

    2016-08-01

    The solid-shells are an attractive kind of element for the simulation of forming processes, due to the fact that any kind of generic 3D constitutive law can be employed without any additional hypothesis. The present work consists in the improvement of a triangular prism solid-shell originally developed by Flores[2, 3]. The solid-shell can be used in the analysis of thin/thick shell, undergoing large deformations. The element is formulated in total Lagrangian formulation, and employs the neighbour (adjacent) elements to perform a local patch to enrich the displacement field. In the original formulation a modified right Cauchy-Green deformation tensor (C) is obtained; in the present work a modified deformation gradient (F) is obtained, which allows to generalise the methodology and allows to employ the Pull-Back and Push-Forwards operations. The element is based in three modifications: (a) a classical assumed strain approach for transverse shear strains (b) an assumed strain approach for the in-plane components using information from neighbour elements and (c) an averaging of the volumetric strain over the element. The objective is to use this type of elements for the simulation of shells avoiding transverse shear locking, improving the membrane behaviour of the in-plane triangle and to handle quasi-incompressible materials or materials with isochoric plastic flow.

  16. Instrumental neutron activation analysis in environmental studies of trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, L.

    1975-06-01

    The application of a routine instrumental nuclear method is described in relation to environmental surveys and studies. A working rather than formal review is made of the techniques applied with particular reference to the data processing methods involved. The elements measured by instrumental activation analysis were: Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, In, La, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Th, Ti, U, V, W, Zn. (author)

  17. Annual Report 1999 Environmental Dynamics and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NS Foster-Mills

    2000-06-28

    This annual report describes selected 1999 research accomplishments for the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation (ED and S) directorate, one of six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). These accomplishments are representative of the different lines of research underway in the ED and S directorate. EMSL is one of US Department of Energy's (DOE) national scientific user facilities and is the centerpiece of DOE's commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems. Capabilities in the EMSL include over 100 major instrument systems for use by the resident research staff, their collaborators, and users of the EMSL. These capabilities are used to address the fundamental science that will be the basis for finding solutions to national environmental issues such as cleaning up contamianted areas at DOE sites across the country and developing green technologies that will reduce or eliminate future pollution production. The capabilities are also used to further the understanding of global climate change and environmental issues relevant to energy production and use and health effects resulting from exposure to contaminated environments.

  18. Optimization of forging processes using finite element simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonte, M.H.A.; Fourment, Lionel; Do, Tien-tho; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Huetink, Han

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, simulation software based on the Finite Element Method (FEM) has significantly contributed to the design of feasible forming processes. Coupling FEM to mathematical optimization algorithms offers a promising opportunity to design optimal metal forming processes rather than

  19. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-03-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  20. 3D finite element simulation of optical modes in VCSELs

    OpenAIRE

    Rozova, M.; Pomplun, J.; Zschiedrich, L.; Schmidt, F.; Burger, S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a finite element method (FEM) solver for computation of optical resonance modes in VCSELs. We perform a convergence study and demonstrate that high accuracies for 3D setups can be attained on standard computers. We also demonstrate simulations of thermo-optical effects in VCSELs.

  1. A mixed finite element method for particle simulation in Lasertron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.

    1987-01-01

    A particle simulation code is being developed with the aim to treat the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic devices, such as Lasertron. The paper describes the use of mixed finite element methods in computing the field components, without derivating them from scalar or vector potentials. Graphical results are shown

  2. Chemical elements in invertebrate orders for environmental quality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Franca, Elvis J.; Paiva, Jose D.S.; Hazin, Clovis A.; Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio A.

    2013-01-01

    Among the biomonitors of environmental quality, there is a lack of studies on using invertebrates to evaluate quantitatively chemical elements in ecosystems. This group of animals is quite numerous, widely distributed and adaptable to the most diverse environmental conditions. These features are very useful for the environmental quality assessment, as well as the several occurring insect-plant interactions performing essential functions in ecosystems. The objective of this work is to study the variability of chemical composition of invertebrate orders for using in environmental quality monitoring studies. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - INAA was applied to determine some nutrients and trace elements in invertebrate samples. Sampling by pitfall traps was carried out in riverine ecosystems from the urban area from the Piracicaba Municipality, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Invertebrate and reference material samples were irradiated in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN. Fragments of a Ni-Cr alloy were irradiated for monitoring the thermal neutron flux. Hymenoptera order was considered the most representative according to the total number of sampled species (about 60%). Significant amounts of Ba, Br, Fe and Sc were found in invertebrates of the order Opiliones. Potassium, rubidium and zinc were highly accumulated in species from Blattodea order, indicating a consistent pattern of accumulation for this invertebrate order. Taking into account the abundance of Hymenoptera order, the chemical composition of its species was significant different at the 95% confidence level for Br and Na in the sampled locals. (author)

  3. Chemical elements in invertebrate orders for environmental quality studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magalhaes, Marcelo R.L.; Franca, Elvis J.; Paiva, Jose D.S.; Hazin, Clovis A., E-mail: marcelo_rlm@hotmail.com, E-mail: ejfranca@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: dan-paiva@hotmail.com, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fonseca, Felipe Y.; Fernandes, Elisabete A. de Nadai; Bacchi, Marcio A., E-mail: felipe-yamada@hotmail.com, E-mail: lis@cena.usp.br, E-mail: mabacchi@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Among the biomonitors of environmental quality, there is a lack of studies on using invertebrates to evaluate quantitatively chemical elements in ecosystems. This group of animals is quite numerous, widely distributed and adaptable to the most diverse environmental conditions. These features are very useful for the environmental quality assessment, as well as the several occurring insect-plant interactions performing essential functions in ecosystems. The objective of this work is to study the variability of chemical composition of invertebrate orders for using in environmental quality monitoring studies. Instrumental neutron activation analysis - INAA was applied to determine some nutrients and trace elements in invertebrate samples. Sampling by pitfall traps was carried out in riverine ecosystems from the urban area from the Piracicaba Municipality, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Invertebrate and reference material samples were irradiated in the nuclear research reactor IEA-R1, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN/CNEN. Fragments of a Ni-Cr alloy were irradiated for monitoring the thermal neutron flux. Hymenoptera order was considered the most representative according to the total number of sampled species (about 60%). Significant amounts of Ba, Br, Fe and Sc were found in invertebrates of the order Opiliones. Potassium, rubidium and zinc were highly accumulated in species from Blattodea order, indicating a consistent pattern of accumulation for this invertebrate order. Taking into account the abundance of Hymenoptera order, the chemical composition of its species was significant different at the 95% confidence level for Br and Na in the sampled locals. (author)

  4. Finite element simulation of ironing process under warm conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadesh Kumar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal forming is one of the most important steps in manufacturing of a large variety of products. Ironing in deep drawing is done by adjusting the clearance between the punch and the die and allow the material flow over the punch. In the present investigation effect of extent of ironing behavior on the characteristics of the product like thickness distribution with respect to temperature was studied. With the help of finite element simulation using explicit finite element code LS-DYNA the stress in the drawn cup were predicted in the drawn cup. To increase the accuracy in the simulation process, numbers of integration points were increased in the thickness direction and it was found that there is very close prediction of finite element results to that of experimental ones.

  5. Simulation Analysis of Tilted Polyhedron-Shaped Thermoelectric Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangning; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2015-06-01

    The generation of thermoelectricity is considered a promising approach to harness the waste heat generated in industries, automobiles, gas fields, and other man-made processes. The waste heat can be converted to electricity via a thermoelectric (TE) generator. In this light, the generator performance depends on the geometric configuration of its constituent elements as well as their material properties. Our previous work reported TE behaviors for modules consisting of parallelogram-shaped elements, because elements with tilted laminate structures provide increased mechanical stability and efficient heat-transferring ability from the hot surface to the cold surface. Here, we study TE elements in the shape of a polyhedron that is obtained by mechanically truncating the edges of a parallelogram element in order to further enhance the generator performance and reduce TE material usage. The TE performance of the modules consisting of these polyhedron elements is numerically simulated by using the finite-volume method. The output power, voltage, and current of the polyhedral TE module are greater than those of the parallelogram-element module. The polyhedron shape positively affects heat transfer and the flow of electric charges in the light of increasing the efficiency of conversion from heat to electricity. By varying the shape of the truncated portions, we determine the optimal shape that enables homogeneous heat flux distribution and slow diffusion of thermal energy to obtain the better efficiency of conversion of heat into electricity. We believe that the findings of our study can significantly contribute to the design policy in TE generation.

  6. Sustainability as an element of environmental management in companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Ingaldi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The concept of sustainable development involves a properly and consciously shaped relationship between economic growth, care for the environment and life quality. The aim of this concept is to ensure the ability to provide the basic needs of both the present generation and also future generations. This concept introduced the need of environmental protection and most of all the change of environmental man-agement strategies. One of the elements this strategy is waste minimisation that involves reducing the amount of waste produced in society and helps eliminate the generation of harmful and persistent wastes, supporting the efforts to promote a more sustainable society. The aim of the article is to introduce the definition of the concept of susainability with regard to the environment. Waste minimisation in companies, which is connected with this concept, will be also presented.

  7. Development of environmental education system using online element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niizeki, T.; Yoshihara, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Kawasaki, K.; Komiya, K.

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed a network system which enables one to access and analyze environmental data obtained at different and distant laboratories. As a preliminary feasibility test of the system, we studied the elements in the water of the Tesio River using PIXE and ion chromatography. Students used the data online to carry out analysis via internet. We found two factors with different features in calcium from the factor analysis. The comparison of the specific result and relevant geology information has revealed a remarkable presence of Ca 2+ which might come from dissolution of limestone in the upper Tesio River. PIXE data gave crucial information to draw such a conclusion. The present system has been found useful in environmental education in universities, online sharing of PIXE data in particular. (author)

  8. Finite element method for simulation of the semiconductor devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikatanov, L.T.; Kaschiev, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    An iterative method for solving the system of nonlinear equations of the drift-diffusion representation for the simulation of the semiconductor devices is worked out. The Petrov-Galerkin method is taken for the discretization of these equations using the bilinear finite elements. It is shown that the numerical scheme is a monotonous one and there are no oscillations of the solutions in the region of p-n transition. The numerical calculations of the simulation of one semiconductor device are presented. 13 refs.; 3 figs

  9. 3D-finite element impact simulation on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, N.

    1989-12-15

    The analysis of impact processes is an interesting application of full 3D Finite Element calculations. This work presents a simulation of the penetration process of a Kinetic Energy projectile into a concrete target. Such a calculation requires an adequate FE model, especially a proper description of the crack opening process in front of the projectile. The aim is the prediction of the structural survival of the penetrator case with the help of an appropriate failure criterion. Also, the computer simulation allows a detailed analysis of the physical phenomena during impact. (orig.) With 4 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Induction Heating Model of Cermet Fuel Element Environmental Test (CFEET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Carlos F.; Bradley, D. E.; Cavender, D. P.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Trent, D.; Stewart, E.

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR) are capable of producing a high specific impulse by employing heat produced by a fission reactor to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements due to large thermal gradients; therefore, high-melting-point ceramics-metallic matrix composites (cermets) are one of the fuels under consideration as part of the Nuclear Cryogenic Propulsion Stage (NCPS) Advance Exploration System (AES) technology project at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The purpose of testing and analytical modeling is to determine their ability to survive and maintain thermal performance in a prototypical NTR reactor environment of exposure to hydrogen at very high temperatures and obtain data to assess the properties of the non-nuclear support materials. The fission process and the resulting heating performance are well known and do not require that active fissile material to be integrated in this testing. A small-scale test bed; Compact Fuel Element Environmental Tester (CFEET), designed to heat fuel element samples via induction heating and expose samples to hydrogen is being developed at MSFC to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without utilizing fissile material. This paper details the analytical approach to help design and optimize the test bed using COMSOL Multiphysics for predicting thermal gradients induced by electromagnetic heating (Induction heating) and Thermal Desktop for radiation calculations.

  11. A particle finite element method for machining simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Matthias; Sator, Christian; Müller, Ralf

    2014-07-01

    The particle finite element method (PFEM) appears to be a convenient technique for machining simulations, since the geometry and topology of the problem can undergo severe changes. In this work, a short outline of the PFEM-algorithm is given, which is followed by a detailed description of the involved operations. The -shape method, which is used to track the topology, is explained and tested by a simple example. Also the kinematics and a suitable finite element formulation are introduced. To validate the method simple settings without topological changes are considered and compared to the standard finite element method for large deformations. To examine the performance of the method, when dealing with separating material, a tensile loading is applied to a notched plate. This investigation includes a numerical analysis of the different meshing parameters, and the numerical convergence is studied. With regard to the cutting simulation it is found that only a sufficiently large number of particles (and thus a rather fine finite element discretisation) leads to converged results of process parameters, such as the cutting force.

  12. Finite element simulation of impact response of wire mesh screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Caizheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the response of wire mesh screens to low velocity impact with blunt objects is investigated using finite element (FE simulation. The woven wire mesh is modelled with homogeneous shell elements with equivalent smeared mechanical properties. The mechanical behaviour of the woven wire mesh was determined experimentally with tensile tests on steel wire mesh coupons to generate the data for the smeared shell material used in the FE. The effects of impacts with a low mass (4 kg and a large mass (40 kg providing the same impact energy are studied. The joint between the wire mesh screen and the aluminium frame surrounding it is modelled using contact elements with friction between the corresponding elements. Damage to the screen of different types compromising its structural integrity, such as mesh separation and pulling out from the surrounding frame is modelled. The FE simulation is validated with results of impact tests conducted on woven steel wire screen meshes.

  13. Computational simulation in architectural and environmental acoustics methods and applications of wave-based computation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Shinichi; Otsuru, Toru

    2014-01-01

    This book reviews a variety of methods for wave-based acoustic simulation and recent applications to architectural and environmental acoustic problems. Following an introduction providing an overview of computational simulation of sound environment, the book is in two parts: four chapters on methods and four chapters on applications. The first part explains the fundamentals and advanced techniques for three popular methods, namely, the finite-difference time-domain method, the finite element method, and the boundary element method, as well as alternative time-domain methods. The second part demonstrates various applications to room acoustics simulation, noise propagation simulation, acoustic property simulation for building components, and auralization. This book is a valuable reference that covers the state of the art in computational simulation for architectural and environmental acoustics.  

  14. A holistic 3D finite element simulation model for thermoelectric power generator element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Guangxi; Yu, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a holistic simulation model for the thermoelectric energy harvester. • Account for delta Seebeck coefficient and carrier charge densities variations. • Solution of thermo-electric coupling problem with finite element method. • Model capable of predicting phenomena not captured by traditional models. • A simulation tool for design of innovative TEM materials and structures. - Abstract: Harvesting the thermal energy stored in the ambient environment provides a potential sustainable energy source. Thermoelectric power generators have advantages of having no moving parts, being durable, and light-weighted. These unique features are advantageous for many applications (i.e., carry-on medical devices, embedded infrastructure sensors, aerospace, transportation, etc.). To ensure the efficient applications of thermoelectric energy harvesting system, the behaviors of such systems need to be fully understood. Finite element simulations provide important tools for such purpose. Although modeling the performance of thermoelectric modules has been conducted by many researchers, due to the complexity in solving the coupled problem, the influences of the effective Seebeck coefficient and carrier density variations on the performance of thermoelectric system are generally neglected. This results in an overestimation of the power generator performance under strong-ionization temperature region. This paper presents an advanced simulation model for thermoelectric elements that considers the effects of both factors. The mathematical basis of this model is firstly presented. Finite element simulations are then implemented on a thermoelectric power generator unit. The characteristics of the thermoelectric power generator and their relationship to its performance are discussed under different working temperature regions. The internal physics processes of the TEM harvester are analyzed from the results of computational simulations. The new model

  15. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, F.; Schmidt, R.

    2000-08-01

    The design of the protection system for the superconducting elements in an accelerator such as the large Hadron collider (LHC), now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the thermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic processes during a quench. A numerical program (SPQR - simulation program for quench research) has been developed to evaluate temperature and voltage distributions during a quench as a function of space and time. The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite difference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions. The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable, forced quenching with heaters, impact of eddy currents induced by a magnetic field change, and heat transfer through an insulation layer into helium, an adjacent conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequate dimensioning and protection of the highly stabilised superconducting cables for connecting magnets (busbars), optimising the quench heater strip layout for the main magnets, and studying quench back by induced eddy currents in the superconductor. After the introduction of the theoretical approach, some applications of the simulation model for the LHC dipole and corrector magnets are presented and the outcome of the studies is compared with experimental data.

  16. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohanty, Subhasish, E-mail: smohanty@anl.gov; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  17. Steam generator tube rupture simulation using extended finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Extended finite element method used for modeling the steam generator tube rupture. • Crack propagation is modeled in an arbitrary solution dependent path. • The FE model is used for estimating the rupture pressure of steam generator tubes. • Crack coalescence modeling is also demonstrated. • The method can be used for crack modeling of tubes under severe accident condition. - Abstract: A steam generator (SG) is an important component of any pressurized water reactor. Steam generator tubes represent a primary pressure boundary whose integrity is vital to the safe operation of the reactor. SG tubes may rupture due to propagation of a crack created by mechanisms such as stress corrosion cracking, fatigue, etc. It is thus important to estimate the rupture pressures of cracked tubes for structural integrity evaluation of SGs. The objective of the present paper is to demonstrate the use of extended finite element method capability of commercially available ABAQUS software, to model SG tubes with preexisting flaws and to estimate their rupture pressures. For the purpose, elastic–plastic finite element models were developed for different SG tubes made from Alloy 600 material. The simulation results were compared with experimental results available from the steam generator tube integrity program (SGTIP) sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). A reasonable correlation was found between extended finite element model results and experimental results.

  18. Simulation of galvanic corrosion using boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaifol Samsu; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamaruddin; Nur Ubaidah Saidin; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Mohd Saari Ripin; Rusni Rejab; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2011-01-01

    Boundary element method (BEM) is a numerical technique that used for modeling infinite domain as is the case for galvanic corrosion analysis. The use of boundary element analysis system (BEASY) has allowed cathodic protection (CP) interference to be assessed in terms of the normal current density, which is directly proportional to the corrosion rate. This paper was present the analysis of the galvanic corrosion between Aluminium and Carbon Steel in natural sea water. The result of experimental was validated with computer simulation like BEASY program. Finally, it can conclude that the BEASY software is a very helpful tool for future planning before installing any structure, where it gives the possible CP interference on any nearby unprotected metallic structure. (Author)

  19. Hybrid Discrete Element - Finite Element Simulation for Railway Bridge-Track Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Mirza, O.

    2017-10-01

    At the transition zone or sometimes called ‘bridge end’ or ‘bridge approach’, the stiffness difference between plain track and track over bridge often causes aggravated impact loading due to uneven train movement onto the area. The differential track settlement over the transition has been a classical problem in railway networks, especially for the aging rail infrastructures around the world. This problem is also additionally worsened by the fact that the construction practice over the area is difficult, resulting in a poor compaction of formation and subgrade. This paper presents an advanced hybrid simulation using coupled discrete elements and finite elements to investigate dynamic interaction at the transition zone. The goal is to evaluate the dynamic stresses and to better understand the impact dynamics redistribution at the bridge end. An existing bridge ‘Salt Pan Creek Railway Bridge’, located between Revesby and Kingsgrove, has been chosen for detailed investigation. The Salt Pan Bridge currently demonstrates crushing of the ballast causing significant deformation and damage. Thus, it’s imperative to assess the behaviours of the ballast under dynamic loads. This can be achieved by modelling the nonlinear interactions between the steel rail and sleeper, and sleeper to ballast. The continuum solid elements of track components have been modelled using finite element approach, while the granular media (i.e. ballast) have been simulated by discrete element method. The hybrid DE/FE model demonstrates that ballast experiences significant stresses at the contacts between the sleeper and concrete section. These overburden stress exists in the regions below the outer rails, identify fouling and permanent deformation of the ballast.

  20. Boundary element simulation of petroleum reservoirs with hydraulically fractured wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecher, Radek

    The boundary element method is applied to solve the linear pressure-diffusion equation of fluid-flow in porous media. The governing parabolic partial differential equation is transformed into the Laplace space to obtain the elliptic modified-Helmholtz equation including the homogeneous initial condition. The free- space Green's functions, satisfying this equation for anisotropic media in two and three dimensions, are combined with the generalized form of the Green's second identity. The resulting boundary integral equation is solved by following the collocation technique and applying the given time-dependent boundary conditions of the Dirichlet or Neumann type. The boundary integrals are approximated by the Gaussian quadrature along each element of the discretized domain boundary. Heterogeneous regions are represented by the sectionally-homogeneous zones of different rock and fluid properties. The final values of the interior pressure and velocity fields and of their time-derivatives are found by numerically inverting the solutions from the Laplace space by using the Stehfest's algorithm. The main extension of the mostly standard BEM-procedure is achieved in the modelling of the production and injection wells represented by internal sources and sinks. They are treated as part of the boundary by means of special single-node and both-sided elements, corresponding to the line and plane sources respectively. The wellbore skin and storage effects are considered for the line and cylindrical sources. Hydraulically fractured wells of infinite conductivity are handled directly according to the specified constraint type, out of the four alternatives. Fractures of finite conductivity are simulated by coupling the finite element model of their 1D-interior with the boundary element model of their 2D- exterior. Variable fracture width, fractures crossing zone boundaries, ``networking'' of fractures, fracture-tip singularity handling, or the 3D-description are additional advanced

  1. Finite Element Simulation of Diametral Strength Test of Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan; Evis, Zafer

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the diametral strength test of sintered hydroxyapatite was simulated by the finite element software, ABAQUS/Standard. Stress distributions on diametral test sample were determined. The effect of sintering temperature on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite was studied. It was concluded that high sintering temperatures did not reduce the stress on hydroxyapatite. It had a negative effect on stress distribution of hydroxyapatite after 1300 deg. C. In addition to the porosity, other factors (sintering temperature, presence of phases and the degree of crystallinity) affect the diametral strength of the hydroxyapatite.

  2. Assessing performance and validating finite element simulations using probabilistic knowledge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolin, Ronald M.; Rodriguez, E. A. (Edward A.)

    2002-01-01

    Two probabilistic approaches for assessing performance are presented. The first approach assesses probability of failure by simultaneously modeling all likely events. The probability each event causes failure along with the event's likelihood of occurrence contribute to the overall probability of failure. The second assessment method is based on stochastic sampling using an influence diagram. Latin-hypercube sampling is used to stochastically assess events. The overall probability of failure is taken as the maximum probability of failure of all the events. The Likelihood of Occurrence simulation suggests failure does not occur while the Stochastic Sampling approach predicts failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence results are used to validate finite element predictions.

  3. Quench simulations for superconducting elements in the LHC accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnemann, F

    2000-01-01

    The design of he protection system for he superconducting elements in an accel- erator such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC),now under construction at CERN, requires a detailed understanding of the hermo-hydraulic and electrodynamic pro- cesses during a quench.A numerical program (SPQR -Simulation Program for Quench Research)has been developed o evaluate temperature and voltage dis ri- butions during a quench as a func ion of space and ime.The quench process is simulated by approximating the heat balance equation with the finite di fference method in presence of variable cooling and powering conditions.The simulation predicts quench propagation along a superconducting cable,forced quenching with heaters,impact of eddy curren s induced by a magnetic field change,and heat trans- fer hrough an insulation layer in o helium,an adjacen conductor or other material. The simulation studies allowed a better understanding of experimental quench data and were used for determining the adequ...

  4. Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics simulation using high-order finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plimpton, Steven James; Schnack, D.D.; Tarditi, A.; Chu, M.S.; Gianakon, T.A.; Kruger, S.E.; Nebel, R.A.; Barnes, D.C.; Sovinec, C.R.; Glasser, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    A conforming representation composed of 2D finite elements and finite Fourier series is applied to 3D nonlinear non-ideal magnetohydrodynamics using a semi-implicit time-advance. The self-adjoint semi-implicit operator and variational approach to spatial discretization are synergistic and enable simulation in the extremely stiff conditions found in high temperature plasmas without sacrificing the geometric flexibility needed for modeling laboratory experiments. Growth rates for resistive tearing modes with experimentally relevant Lundquist number are computed accurately with time-steps that are large with respect to the global Alfven time and moderate spatial resolution when the finite elements have basis functions of polynomial degree (p) two or larger. An error diffusion method controls the generation of magnetic divergence error. Convergence studies show that this approach is effective for continuous basis functions with p (ge) 2, where the number of test functions for the divergence control terms is less than the number of degrees of freedom in the expansion for vector fields. Anisotropic thermal conduction at realistic ratios of parallel to perpendicular conductivity (x(parallel)/x(perpendicular)) is computed accurately with p (ge) 3 without mesh alignment. A simulation of tearing-mode evolution for a shaped toroidal tokamak equilibrium demonstrates the effectiveness of the algorithm in nonlinear conditions, and its results are used to verify the accuracy of the numerical anisotropic thermal conduction in 3D magnetic topologies.

  5. Tube Bulge Process : Theoretical Analysis and Finite Element Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco, Raphael; Boudeau, Nathalie

    2007-01-01

    This paper is focused on the determination of mechanics characteristics for tubular materials, using tube bulge process. A comparative study is made between two different models: theoretical model and finite element analysis. The theoretical model is completely developed, based first on a geometrical analysis of the tube profile during bulging, which is assumed to strain in arc of circles. Strain and stress analysis complete the theoretical model, which allows to evaluate tube thickness and state of stress, at any point of the free bulge region. Free bulging of a 304L stainless steel is simulated using Ls-Dyna 970. To validate FE simulations approach, a comparison between theoretical and finite elements models is led on several parameters such as: thickness variation at the free bulge region pole with bulge height, tube thickness variation with z axial coordinate, and von Mises stress variation with plastic strain. Finally, the influence of geometrical parameters deviations on flow stress curve is observed using analytical model: deviations of the tube outer diameter, its initial thickness and the bulge height measurement are taken into account to obtain a resulting error on plastic strain and von Mises stress

  6. Finite Element Analysis of Osteocytes Mechanosensitivity Under Simulated Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Sun, Lian-Wen; Du, Cheng-Fei; Wu, Xin-Tong; Fan, Yu-Bo

    2018-04-01

    It was found that the mechanosensitivity of osteocytes could be altered under simulated microgravity. However, how the mechanical stimuli as the biomechanical origins cause the bioresponse in osteocytes under microgravity is unclear yet. Computational studies may help us to explore the mechanical deformation changes of osteocytes under microgravity. Here in this paper, we intend to use the computational simulation to investigate the mechanical behavior of osteocytes under simulated microgravity. In order to obtain the shape information of osteocytes, the biological experiment was conducted under simulated microgravity prior to the numerical simulation The cells were rotated by a clinostat for 6 hours or 5 days and fixed, the cytoskeleton and the nucleus were immunofluorescence stained and scanned, and the cell shape and the fluorescent intensity were measured from fluorescent images to get the dimension information of osteocytes The 3D finite element (FE) cell models were then established based on the scanned image stacks. Several components such as the actin cortex, the cytoplasm, the nucleus, the cytoskeleton of F-actin and microtubules were considered in the model. The cell models in both 6 hours and 5 days groups were then imposed by three magnitudes (0.5, 10 and 15 Pa) of simulating fluid shear stress, with cell total displacement and the internal discrete components deformation calculated. The results showed that under the simulated microgravity: (1) the nuclear area and height statistically significantly increased, which made the ratio of membrane-cortex height to nucleus height statistically significantly decreased; (2) the fluid shear stress-induced maximum displacements and average displacements in the whole cell decreased, with the deformation decreasing amplitude was largest when exposed to 1.5Pa of fluid shear stress; (3) the fluid shear stress-induced deformation of cell membrane-cortex and cytoskeleton decreased, while the fluid shear stress

  7. Three-dimensional discrete element method simulation of core disking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shunchuan; Wu, Haoyan; Kemeny, John

    2018-04-01

    The phenomenon of core disking is commonly seen in deep drilling of highly stressed regions in the Earth's crust. Given its close relationship with the in situ stress state, the presence and features of core disking can be used to interpret the stresses when traditional in situ stress measuring techniques are not available. The core disking process was simulated in this paper using the three-dimensional discrete element method software PFC3D (particle flow code). In particular, PFC3D is used to examine the evolution of fracture initiation, propagation and coalescence associated with core disking under various stress states. In this paper, four unresolved problems concerning core disking are investigated with a series of numerical simulations. These simulations also provide some verification of existing results by other researchers: (1) Core disking occurs when the maximum principal stress is about 6.5 times the tensile strength. (2) For most stress situations, core disking occurs from the outer surface, except for the thrust faulting stress regime, where the fractures were found to initiate from the inner part. (3) The anisotropy of the two horizontal principal stresses has an effect on the core disking morphology. (4) The thickness of core disk has a positive relationship with radial stress and a negative relationship with axial stresses.

  8. Montecarlo simulation for a new high resolution elemental analysis methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa S, Rodolfo; Brusa, Daniel; Riveros, Alberto [Universidad de La Frontera, Temuco (Chile). Facultad de Ingenieria y Administracion

    1996-12-31

    Full text. Spectra generated by binary, ternary and multielement matrixes when irradiated by a variable energy photon beam are simulated by means of a Monte Carlo code. Significative jumps in the counting rate are shown when the photon energy is just over the edge associated to each element, because of the emission of characteristic X rays. For a given associated energy, the net height of these jumps depends mainly on the concentration and of the sample absorption coefficient. The spectra were obtained by a monochromatic energy scan considering all the emitted radiation by the sample in a 2{pi} solid angle, associating a single multichannel spectrometer channel to each incident energy (Multichannel Scaling (MCS) mode). The simulated spectra were made with Monte Carlo simulation software adaptation of the package called PENELOPE (Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons in matter). The results show that it is possible to implement a new high resolution spectroscopy methodology, where a synchrotron would be an ideal source, due to the high intensity and ability to control the energy of the incident beam. The high energy resolution would be determined by the monochromating system and not by the detection system and not by the detection system, which would basicalbe a photon counter. (author)

  9. Montecarlo simulation for a new high resolution elemental analysis methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueroa S, Rodolfo; Brusa, Daniel; Riveros, Alberto

    1996-01-01

    Full text. Spectra generated by binary, ternary and multielement matrixes when irradiated by a variable energy photon beam are simulated by means of a Monte Carlo code. Significative jumps in the counting rate are shown when the photon energy is just over the edge associated to each element, because of the emission of characteristic X rays. For a given associated energy, the net height of these jumps depends mainly on the concentration and of the sample absorption coefficient. The spectra were obtained by a monochromatic energy scan considering all the emitted radiation by the sample in a 2π solid angle, associating a single multichannel spectrometer channel to each incident energy (Multichannel Scaling (MCS) mode). The simulated spectra were made with Monte Carlo simulation software adaptation of the package called PENELOPE (Penetration and Energy Loss of Positrons and Electrons in matter). The results show that it is possible to implement a new high resolution spectroscopy methodology, where a synchrotron would be an ideal source, due to the high intensity and ability to control the energy of the incident beam. The high energy resolution would be determined by the monochromating system and not by the detection system and not by the detection system, which would basicalbe a photon counter. (author)

  10. Iron: a versatile element to produce materials for environmental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Ana Paula C.; Araujo, Maria H.; Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; Moura, Flavia C.C.; Lago, Rochel M., E-mail: rochel@ufmg.br, E-mail: anapct@ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Tristao, Juliana C. [Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Florestal, MG (Brazil); Ardisson, Jose D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Fisica Aplicada; Amorim, Camila C., E-mail: juliana@ufv.br [Departamento de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Iron is a versatile element forming several phases with different oxidation states and {sup s}tructures, such as Fe{sup 0}, FeO, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and FeOOH. All these phases have unique physicochemical properties which can be used for different applications. In this work, it is described the use of different iron compounds, synthetic and also from natural and waste sources, in environmental and technological applications. Two main research areas are described. The first one is related to strategies to increase the reactivity of Fe phases, mainly by the formation of Fe{sup 0}/iron oxide composites and by the introduction of new metals in the iron oxide structure to promote new surface reactions. The second area is the use of the magnetic properties of some iron phases to produce versatile magnetic materials with focus in adsorption, catalysis and emulsions. (author)

  11. Modeling bistable behaviors in morphing structures through finite element simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe; Chen, Zi

    2014-01-01

    Bistable structures, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelets, can transit between different configurations upon certain external stimulation. Here we study, through three-dimensional finite element simulations, the bistable behaviors in elastic plates in the absence of terminate loads, but with pre-strains in one (or both) of the two composite layers. Both the scenarios with and without a given geometric mis-orientation angle are investigated, the results of which are consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. This work can open ample venues for programmable designs of plant/shell structures with large deformations, with applications in designing bio-inspired robotics for biomedical research and morphing/deployable structures in aerospace engineering.

  12. High speed finite element simulations on the graphics card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S.

    2014-01-01

    A software package is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of ultrasonic propagation on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia’s CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The technique is compared to a commercial CPU equivalent, demonstrating an overall speedup of at least 100 for a non-destructive testing weld model

  13. High speed finite element simulations on the graphics card

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huthwaite, P.; Lowe, M. J. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18

    A software package is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of ultrasonic propagation on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia’s CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The technique is compared to a commercial CPU equivalent, demonstrating an overall speedup of at least 100 for a non-destructive testing weld model.

  14. A Finite Element Method for Simulation of Compressible Cavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Ehsan; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yu; Sahni, Onkar; Shephard, Mark; Oberai, Assad

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on a novel approach for finite element simulations of multi-phase flows which involve evolving interface with phase change. Modeling problems, such as cavitation, requires addressing multiple challenges, including compressibility of the vapor phase, interface physics caused by mass, momentum and energy fluxes. We have developed a mathematically consistent and robust computational approach to address these problems. We use stabilized finite element methods on unstructured meshes to solve for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is used to handle the interface motions. Our method uses a mesh adaptation strategy to preserve the quality of the volumetric mesh, while the interface mesh moves along with the interface. The interface jump conditions are accurately represented using a discontinuous Galerkin method on the conservation laws. Condensation and evaporation rates at the interface are thermodynamically modeled to determine the interface velocity. We will present initial results on bubble cavitation the behavior of an attached cavitation zone in a separated boundary layer. We acknowledge the support from Army Research Office (ARO) under ARO Grant W911NF-14-1-0301.

  15. Accelerated finite element elastodynamic simulations using the GPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huthwaite, Peter, E-mail: p.huthwaite@imperial.ac.uk

    2014-01-15

    An approach is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of elastodynamic problems on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia's CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The software is applied to three models from the fields of non-destructive testing, vibrations and geophysics, demonstrating a memory bandwidth of very close to the card's maximum, reflecting the bandwidth-limited nature of the algorithm. Comparison with Abaqus, a widely used commercial CPU equivalent, validated the accuracy of the results and demonstrated a speed improvement of around two orders of magnitude. A software package, Pogo, incorporating these developments, is released open source, downloadable from (http://www.pogo-fea.com/) to benefit the community. -- Highlights: •A novel memory arrangement approach is discussed for finite elements on the GPU. •The mesh is partitioned then nodes are arranged efficiently within each partition. •Models from ultrasonics, vibrations and geophysics are run. •The code is significantly faster than an equivalent commercial CPU package. •Pogo, the new software package, is released open source.

  16. Accelerated finite element elastodynamic simulations using the GPU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huthwaite, Peter

    2014-01-01

    An approach is developed to perform explicit time domain finite element simulations of elastodynamic problems on the graphical processing unit, using Nvidia's CUDA. Of critical importance for this problem is the arrangement of nodes in memory, allowing data to be loaded efficiently and minimising communication between the independently executed blocks of threads. The initial stage of memory arrangement is partitioning the mesh; both a well established ‘greedy’ partitioner and a new, more efficient ‘aligned’ partitioner are investigated. A method is then developed to efficiently arrange the memory within each partition. The software is applied to three models from the fields of non-destructive testing, vibrations and geophysics, demonstrating a memory bandwidth of very close to the card's maximum, reflecting the bandwidth-limited nature of the algorithm. Comparison with Abaqus, a widely used commercial CPU equivalent, validated the accuracy of the results and demonstrated a speed improvement of around two orders of magnitude. A software package, Pogo, incorporating these developments, is released open source, downloadable from (http://www.pogo-fea.com/) to benefit the community. -- Highlights: •A novel memory arrangement approach is discussed for finite elements on the GPU. •The mesh is partitioned then nodes are arranged efficiently within each partition. •Models from ultrasonics, vibrations and geophysics are run. •The code is significantly faster than an equivalent commercial CPU package. •Pogo, the new software package, is released open source

  17. Granulation of snow: From tumbler experiments to discrete element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkogler, Walter; Gaume, Johan; Löwe, Henning; Sovilla, Betty; Lehning, Michael

    2015-06-01

    It is well known that snow avalanches exhibit granulation phenomena, i.e., the formation of large and apparently stable snow granules during the flow. The size distribution of the granules has an influence on flow behavior which, in turn, affects runout distances and avalanche velocities. The underlying mechanisms of granule formation are notoriously difficult to investigate within large-scale field experiments, due to limitations in the scope for measuring temperatures, velocities, and size distributions. To address this issue we present experiments with a concrete tumbler, which provide an appropriate means to investigate granule formation of snow. In a set of experiments at constant rotation velocity with varying temperatures and water content, we demonstrate that temperature has a major impact on the formation of granules. The experiments showed that granules only formed when the snow temperature exceeded -1∘C. No evolution in the granule size was observed at colder temperatures. Depending on the conditions, different granulation regimes are obtained, which are qualitatively classified according to their persistence and size distribution. The potential of granulation of snow in a tumbler is further demonstrated by showing that generic features of the experiments can be reproduced by cohesive discrete element simulations. The proposed discrete element model mimics the competition between cohesive forces, which promote aggregation, and impact forces, which induce fragmentation, and supports the interpretation of the granule regime classification obtained from the tumbler experiments. Generalizations, implications for flow dynamics, and experimental and model limitations as well as suggestions for future work are discussed.

  18. SimulaTE: simulating complex landscapes of transposable elements of populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Robert

    2018-04-15

    Estimating the abundance of transposable elements (TEs) in populations (or tissues) promises to answer many open research questions. However, progress is hampered by the lack of concordance between different approaches for TE identification and thus potentially unreliable results. To address this problem, we developed SimulaTE a tool that generates TE landscapes for populations using a newly developed domain specific language (DSL). The simple syntax of our DSL allows for easily building even complex TE landscapes that have, for example, nested, truncated and highly diverged TE insertions. Reads may be simulated for the populations using different sequencing technologies (PacBio, Illumina paired-ends) and strategies (sequencing individuals and pooled populations). The comparison between the expected (i.e. simulated) and the observed results will guide researchers in finding the most suitable approach for a particular research question. SimulaTE is implemented in Python and available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/simulates/. Manual https://sourceforge.net/p/simulates/wiki/Home/#manual; Test data and tutorials https://sourceforge.net/p/simulates/wiki/Home/#walkthrough; Validation https://sourceforge.net/p/simulates/wiki/Home/#validation. robert.kofler@vetmeduni.ac.at.

  19. Development of Laboratory Model Ecosystems as Early Warning Elements of Environmental Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-12-01

    AD-AOll 851 DEVELOPMENT OF LABORATORY MODEL ECOSYSTEMS AS EARLY WARNING ELEMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION Robert L. Metcalf... ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION Robert L. Metcalf, Ph. D. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois INTRODUCTION Problems of environmental pollution with...house dust is unsafe to breathe (Ewing and Pearson, 1974). Most of the source of our concern about environmental pollution by trace substances relates

  20. Computer simulation of multi-elemental fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voertler, K.

    2011-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion is a sustainable energy solution, in which energy is produced using similar processes as in the sun. In this technology hydrogen isotopes are fused to gain energy and consequently to produce electricity. In a fusion reactor hydrogen isotopes are confined by magnetic fields as ionized gas, the plasma. Since the core plasma is millions of degrees hot, there are special needs for the plasma-facing materials. Moreover, in the plasma the fusion of hydrogen isotopes leads to the production of high energetic neutrons which sets demanding abilities for the structural materials of the reactor. This thesis investigates the irradiation response of materials to be used in future fusion reactors. Interactions of the plasma with the reactor wall leads to the removal of surface atoms, migration of them, and formation of co-deposited layers such as tungsten carbide. Sputtering of tungsten carbide and deuterium trapping in tungsten carbide was investigated in this thesis. As the second topic the primary interaction of the neutrons in the structural material steel was examined. As model materials for steel iron chromium and iron nickel were used. This study was performed theoretically by the means of computer simulations on the atomic level. In contrast to previous studies in the field, in which simulations were limited to pure elements, in this work more complex materials were used, i.e. they were multi-elemental including two or more atom species. The results of this thesis are in the microscale. One of the results is a catalogue of atom species, which were removed from tungsten carbide by the plasma. Another result is e.g. the atomic distributions of defects in iron chromium caused by the energetic neutrons. These microscopic results are used in data bases for multiscale modelling of fusion reactor materials, which has the aim to explain the macroscopic degradation in the materials. This thesis is therefore a relevant contribution to investigate the

  1. Environmental simulation testing of solar cell contamination by hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Test results for thermal vacuum and radiation environment simulation of hydrazine contamination are discussed. Solar cell performance degradation, measured by short circuit current, is presented in correlation with the variations used in environmental parameters.

  2. Study of elemental mercury re-emission through a lab-scale simulated scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng-Li Wu; Yan Cao; Cheng-Chun He; Zhong-Bing Dong; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

    2010-08-15

    This paper describes a lab-scale simulated scrubber that was designed and built in the laboratory at Western Kentucky University's Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology. A series of tests on slurries of CaO, CaSO{sub 3}, CaSO{sub 4}/CaSO{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3} were carried out to simulate recirculating slurries in different oxidation modes. Elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) re-emission was replicated through the simulated scrubber. The relationship between the oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of the slurries and the Hg0 re-emissions was evaluated. Elemental mercury re-emission occurred when Hg{sup 2+} that was absorbed in the simulated scrubber was converted to Hg{sup 0}; then, Hg{sup 0} was emitted from the slurry together with the carrier gas. The effects of both the reagents and the operational conditions (including the temperature, pH, and oxygen concentrations in the carrier gas) on the Hg{sup 0} re-emission rates in the simulated scrubber were investigated. The results indicated that as the operational temperature of the scrubber and the pH value of the slurry increased, the Hg{sup 0} concentrations that were emitted from the simulated scrubber increased. The Hg{sup 0} re-emission rates decreased as the O{sub 2} concentration in the carrier gas increased. In addition, the effects of additives to suppress Hg{sup 0} re-emission were evaluated in this paper. Sodium tetrasulfide, TMT 15, NaHS and HI were added to the slurry, while Hg{sup 2+}, which was absorbed in the slurry, was retained in the slurry as mercury precipitates. Therefore, there was a significant capacity for the additives to suppress Hg{sup 0} re-emission. 11 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, D.A.; Perfect, S.A.

    1996-03-01

    A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

  4. Numerical simulation for cracks detection using the finite elements method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Bennoud

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The means of detection must ensure controls either during initial construction, or at the time of exploitation of all parts. The Non destructive testing (NDT gathers the most widespread methods for detecting defects of a part or review the integrity of a structure. In the areas of advanced industry (aeronautics, aerospace, nuclear …, assessing the damage of materials is a key point to control durability and reliability of parts and materials in service. In this context, it is necessary to quantify the damage and identify the different mechanisms responsible for the progress of this damage. It is therefore essential to characterize materials and identify the most sensitive indicators attached to damage to prevent their destruction and use them optimally. In this work, simulation by finite elements method is realized with aim to calculate the electromagnetic energy of interaction: probe and piece (with/without defect. From calculated energy, we deduce the real and imaginary components of the impedance which enables to determine the characteristic parameters of a crack in various metallic parts.

  5. Microstructural evolution during nitriding, finite element simulation and experimental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassani-Gangaraj, S.M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Meccanica, Via La Masa, 1, 20156 Milano (Italy); Guagliano, M., E-mail: mario.guagliano@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Meccanica, Via La Masa, 1, 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    A finite element simulation of nitriding is proposed in this paper, using the analogy between diffusion and heat conduction, to overcome the shortcomings of the classical internal oxidation model in predicting the kinetics of layer growth and nitrogen distribution during nitriding. To verify the model, a typical gas nitriding has been carried out on an axisymmetric specimen. Treated specimen has been characterized using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and X-Ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. It was found that the so-called diffusion zone can be divided into two parts with different influence on the mechanical characteristics including residual stress and hardening. First layer which is a two phase region of ferritic matrix and γ′ (Fe{sub 4}N) makes further improvement with respect to the second layer which is a solid solution of nitrogen in ferrite. The formation of that two phase region, which is not predicted by classical model, can be efficiently recognized by the proposed model. It is also proved that the model has the ability to consider the geometry dependency of layer growth and formation in nitriding.

  6. 3D finite element simulation of TIG weld pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X.; Asserin, O.; Gounand, S.; Gilles, P.; Bergheau, J. M.; Medale, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a three-dimensional weld pool model for the moving gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process, in order to understand the main factors that limit the weld quality and improve the productivity, especially with respect to the welding speed. Simulation is a very powerful tool to help in understanding the physical phenomena in the weld process. A 3D finite element model of heat and fluid flow in weld pool considering free surface of the pool and traveling speed has been developed for the GTAW process. Cast3M software is used to compute all the governing equations. The free surface of the weld pool is calculated by minimizing the total surface energy. The combined effects of surface tension gradient, buoyancy force, arc pressure, arc drag force to drive the fluid flow is included in our model. The deformation of the weld pool surface and the welding speed affect fluid flow, heat flow and thus temperature gradients and molten pool dimensions. Welding trials study is presented to compare our numerical results with macrograph of the molten pool.

  7. The Analysis on the Integration and Embodiment of Traditional Cultural Element in Environmental Artistic Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bao

    2018-03-01

    For this phase of environmental artistic design, the traditional culture element is one very precious design element, but it has difficulty in breaking out of its shell, and that looks too outdated, however, the traditional culture element would be more peculiar if ponderously adding some elements. This paper will further analyse the integration and manifestation of traditional culture element which from the environmental artistic design, it aims to integrate the tradition and modernity perfectly and give the spectators a refreshing and unconventional sense of design.

  8. Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory: Development and Implementation of a Longitudinal Simulation Educator Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Michelle; Posner, Glenn; Humphrey-Murto, Susan

    2017-01-27

    Simulation-based education has gained popularity, yet many faculty members feel inadequately prepared to teach using this technique. Fellowship training in medical education exists, but there is little information regarding simulation or formal educational programs therein. In our institution, simulation fellowships were offered by individual clinical departments. We recognized the need for a formal curriculum in educational theory. Kern's approach to curriculum development was used to develop, implement, and evaluate the Foundational Elements of Applied Simulation Theory (FEAST) curriculum. Needs assessments resulted in a 26-topic curriculum; each biweekly session built upon the previous. Components essential to success included setting goals and objectives for each interactive session and having dedicated faculty, collaborative leadership and administrative support for the curriculum. Evaluation data was collated and analyzed annually via anonymous feedback surveys, focus groups, and retrospective pre-post self-assessment questionnaires. Data collected from 32 fellows over five years of implementation showed that the curriculum improved knowledge, challenged thinking, and was excellent preparation for a career in simulation-based medical education. Themes arising from focus groups demonstrated that participants valued faculty expertise and the structure, practicality, and content of the curriculum. We present a longitudinal simulation educator curriculum that adheres to a well-described framework of curriculum development. Program evaluation shows that FEAST has increased participant knowledge in key areas relevant to simulation-based education and that the curriculum has been successful in meeting the needs of novice simulation educators. Insights and practice points are offered for educators wishing to implement a similar curriculum in their institution.

  9. Peculiarities of rare-earth-element distribution in environmental objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunov, A.V.; Onischenko, T.L.; Gundorina, S.F.; Frontasyeva, M.V.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of the production of phosphorus fertilizers on the pollution of the environment by rare-earth elements is reviewed. The main sources of rare-earth element pollution in the environment are described. The levels of REEs in components of the environment - atmosphere, snow, different types of soil, native and agricultural types of vegetation - that provide evidence for their participation in the biological cycle of plants are considered. The high values of the correlation coefficients lead one to think that the REE distribution in vegetation occurs under specific laws true for this family of elements. (author) 9 refs.; 6 figs.; 5 tabs

  10. Solving optimisation problems in metal forming using Finite Element simulation and metamodelling techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonte, M.H.A.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Huetink, Han

    2005-01-01

    During the last decades, Finite Element (FEM) simulations of metal forming processes have become important tools for designing feasible production processes. In more recent years, several authors recognised the potential of coupling FEM simulations to mathematical optimisation algorithms to design

  11. Acute ecological toxicity and environmental persistence of simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, D.A.; Ligotke, M.W.; McVeety, B.D.; Fellows, R.J.; Bolton, H. Jr.; Li, S.W.; Van Voris, P.; Wentsel, R.S.

    1988-06-01

    The objectives of these studies are to establish the comparative environmental behavior and chemical fate of chemical simulants. Laboratory studies were undertaken to establish: (1) deposition efficiency (deposition velocities, Vd) for receptor surfaces including plant foliage and soils; (2) dose/response relationships for important environmental components including plants and soil microflora; and (3) the environmental persistence of the simulants. Chemical agent simulants are employed for a range of testing and training activities where use of chemical agents is less than suitable from a safety and environmental standpoint. A variety of chemical simulant materials are used to simulate either nerve agents or blister agents. The following research describes the environmental effects and persistence of four simulants. These are the nerve agent stimulants diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP), and bis (2-ethylhexyl) phosphonate (BIS), and the mustard stimulant 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The vapor pressures for DIMP, DFP, and CEES are relatively high, reported to be 0.17, 0.58 and 3.4 mm Hg, respectively; while that of BIS is substantially less at 5.8 /times/ 10/sup /minus/5/ mm Hg at 25/degree/C. The chemical characteristics of DFP and CEES are very similar to G/VX-agents and mustard, respectively, and are employed for materials evaluation under controlled conditions. However, their toxicity precludes their use in the environment. DIMP and BIS are currently used for testing in the open air. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Environmental mineralogy - Understanding element behavior in ecosystems; Mineralogie environnementale: comprendre le comportement des elements dans les ecosystemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown Jr, G.E. [Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-2115 (United States); Department of Photon Science and Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Calas, G. [Institut de mineralogie et de physique des milieux condenses (IMPMC), universite Paris-6 - universite Paris-7, IPGP, CNRS, case 115, 75252 Paris (France)

    2011-02-15

    Environmental Mineralogy has developed over the past decade in response to the recognition that minerals are linked in many important ways with the global ecosystem. Minerals are the main repositories of the chemical elements in Earth's crust and thus are the main sources of elements needed for the development of civilization, contaminant and pollutant elements that impact global and local ecosystems, and elements that are essential plant nutrients. These elements are released from minerals through natural processes, such as chemical weathering, and anthropogenic activities, such as mining and energy production, agriculture and industrial activities, and careless waste disposal. Minerals also play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of the elements, sequestering elements and releasing them as the primary minerals in crustal rocks undergo various structural and compositional transformations in response to physical, chemical, and biological processes that produce secondary minerals and soils. These processes have resulted in the release of toxic elements such as arsenic in groundwater aquifers, which is having a major impact on the health of millions of people in South and Southeast Asia. The interfaces between mineral surfaces and aqueous solutions are the locations of most chemical reactions that control the composition of the natural environment, including the composition of natural waters. The nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to the disposition of high-level nuclear waste, is also intimately related to minerals. A fundamental understanding of these processes requires molecular-scale information about minerals, their bulk structures and properties such as solubility, their surfaces, and their interactions with aqueous solutions, atmospheric and soil gases, natural organic matter, and biological organisms. Gaining this understanding is further complicated by the presence of natural, incidental, and manufactured nano-particles in the environment

  13. The relative contributions of climatic elements and environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SEJUP

    2013-08-01

    Aug 1, 2013 ... environmental factors to urban flooding in Awka urban area of Anambra State. Towards ... city, while Geoffrey (2001) employed time series analysis ..... Street Flooding in Calabar Municipality, Cross River State in Bisong.

  14. Lichens (Parmelia sulcata) time response model to environmental elemental availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reis, M.A.; Alves, L.C.; Freitas, M.C.; Os, B. van; Wolterbeek, H.T.

    1999-01-01

    Parmelia sulcata transplants, collected in a non-polluted area, were exposed to new atmospheric conditions at six stations, of which five were located near power plants and one at an unpolluted area. Data were collected for a 1-year period, on rainfall, airborne particulates, elemental deposition

  15. Environmental lichenology: Biomonitoring of trace element air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhodub, L.S.; Sulkio-Cleff, B.

    2001-01-01

    The review of application of lichens and mosses as biomonitors of air pollution have been presented. The neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy have been used for trace element content determination in lichens and mosses taken from different regions of Europe

  16. Environmental lichenology: Biomonitoring trace-element air pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloof, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Chapter 1 describes the possibilities to study trace-element air pollution in order to get insight in the character and element levels of such pollution. Chapter 2 describes two monitoring surveys using Parmelia sulcata Taylor on a national scale, in which spatial and temporal patterns of heavy metals were investigated. The surveys were carried out in 1982-1983 at 110 sampling sites and in 1986-1987 at 210 sampling sites. From these studies it was concluded that lichens are at least good qualitative biomonitors for atmospheric trace-element levels. Chapter 3 describes the response of lichens to the cesium-137 activity as a result of the Chernobyl accident, deposited by rainfall in the Netherlands. From this study it was concluded that lichens are good biomonitors for atmospheric cesium-137 activity too. Chapter 4 describes the application of factor analysis to a lichen data set from a monitoring survey on a national scale (1986-1987), for source apportionment. In Chapter 5 a field study is described on the contribution of a possible influence from the soil to element concentrations in Parmelia sulcata Taylor growing on trees in a an area with polluted soil. Chapter 6 describes a field study on the interchangeability of two tolerant lichen species (Parmelia sulcata Taylor and Lecanora conizaeoides Nyl.) in a polluted area. In Chapter 7 a field study is described in which the quantitative relationships between concentrations of cobalt, scandium and zinc in lichens and concentrations in air particulate matter and total deposition (wet and dry) were investigated. Chapter 8 describes a laboratory study on the kinetics of the uptake-and release of cadmium in a green algae species (Selenastrum capricornutum Printz), which is regarded to be representative for the algal symboint in the lichens used in this thesis. Chapter 9 presents the central conclusions of this thesis for the lichen species, elements and conditions under study. (orig./MG)

  17. Environmental lichenology: Biomonitoring trace-element air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloof, J E

    1993-09-27

    Chapter 1 describes the possibilities to study trace-element air pollution in order to get insight in the character and element levels of such pollution. Chapter 2 describes two monitoring surveys using Parmelia sulcata Taylor on a national scale, in which spatial and temporal patterns of heavy metals were investigated. The surveys were carried out in 1982-1983 at 110 sampling sites and in 1986-1987 at 210 sampling sites. From these studies it was concluded that lichens are at least good qualitative biomonitors for atmospheric trace-element levels. Chapter 3 describes the response of lichens to the cesium-137 activity as a result of the Chernobyl accident, deposited by rainfall in the Netherlands. From this study it was concluded that lichens are good biomonitors for atmospheric cesium-137 activity too. Chapter 4 describes the application of factor analysis to a lichen data set from a monitoring survey on a national scale (1986-1987), for source apportionment. In Chapter 5 a field study is described on the contribution of a possible influence from the soil to element concentrations in Parmelia sulcata Taylor growing on trees in a an area with polluted soil. Chapter 6 describes a field study on the interchangeability of two tolerant lichen species (Parmelia sulcata Taylor and Lecanora conizaeoides Nyl.) in a polluted area. In Chapter 7 a field study is described in which the quantitative relationships between concentrations of cobalt, scandium and zinc in lichens and concentrations in air particulate matter and total deposition (wet and dry) were investigated. Chapter 8 describes a laboratory study on the kinetics of the uptake-and release of cadmium in a green algae species (Selenastrum capricornutum Printz), which is regarded to be representative for the algal symboint in the lichens used in this thesis. Chapter 9 presents the central conclusions of this thesis for the lichen species, elements and conditions under study. (orig./MG).

  18. Quantitative analysis of soluble elements in environmental waters by PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niizeki, T.; Kawasaki, K.; Adachi, M.; Tsuji, M.; Hattori, T.

    1999-01-01

    We have started PIXE research for environmental science at Van de Graaff accelerator facility in Tokyo Institute of Technology. Quantitative measurements of soluble fractions in river waters have been carried out using the preconcentrate method developed in Tohoku University. We reveal that this PIXE target preparation can be also applied to waste water samples. (author)

  19. POLICY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH USING SIMULATION TO ASSESS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchitel, Kirsten; Tanana, Heather

    2014-11-01

    This report examines the relationship between simulation-based science and judicial assessments of simulations or models supporting evaluations of environmental harms or risks, considering both how it exists currently and how it might be shaped in the future. This report considers the legal standards relevant to judicial assessments of simulation-based science and provides examples of the judicial application of those legal standards. Next, this report discusses the factors that inform whether there is a correlation between the sophistication of a challenged simulation and judicial support for that simulation. Finally, this report examines legal analysis of the broader issues that must be addressed for simulation-based science to be better understood and utilized in the context of judicial challenge and evaluation. !

  20. Multi-element analysis for environmental characterization and its future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansoni, B.

    1987-04-01

    Before starting to characterize the environment by its elemental composition, it may be useful to ask about the objective of these efforts. This includes questions about the scope of environmental protection, the definition of the environment and the limitations of its characterization by elemental composition alone. In the second part of this lecture, examples are given of the elemental composition of well analysed samples from the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. The third part introduces the principle of multi-element analysis and the fourth part gives examples. Finally, future aspects of modern chemical analysis are outlined with respect to the multi-element principle. (orig.)

  1. Finite element modeling and simulation with ANSYS workbench

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiaolin

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionSome Basic ConceptsAn Example in FEA: Spring SystemOverview of ANSYS WorkbenchSummaryProblemsBars and TrussesIntroductionReview of the 1-D Elasticity TheoryModeling of TrussesFormulation of the Bar ElementExamples with Bar ElementsCase Study with ANSYS WorkbenchSummaryProblemsBeams and FramesIntroductionReview of the Beam TheoryModeling of Beams and FramesFormulation of the Beam ElementExamples with Beam ElementsCase Study with ANSYS WorkbenchSummaryProblemsTwo-Dimensional ElasticityIntroductionReview of 2-D Elasticity TheoryModeling of 2-D Elasticity ProblemsFormulation of the Pla

  2. A fully coupled finite element framework for thermal fracturing simulation in subsurface cold CO2 injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunde Yin

    2018-03-01

    Simulation of thermal fracturing during cold CO2 injection involves the coupled processes of heat transfer, mass transport, rock deforming as well as fracture propagation. To model such a complex coupled system, a fully coupled finite element framework for thermal fracturing simulation is presented. This framework is based on the theory of non-isothermal multiphase flow in fracturing porous media. It takes advantage of recent advances in stabilized finite element and extended finite element methods. The stabilized finite element method overcomes the numerical instability encountered when the traditional finite element method is used to solve the convection dominated heat transfer equation, while the extended finite element method overcomes the limitation with traditional finite element method that a model has to be remeshed when a fracture is initiated or propagating and fracturing paths have to be aligned with element boundaries.

  3. Survey of reference materials. V. 2: Environmentally related reference materials for trace elements, nuclides and microcontaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    The present report presently contains over 250 reference materials with trace element and organic contaminant information on fuel, geological and mineral, anthropogenic disposal, soil reference and miscellaneous reference materials. Not included in the current report is information on most biological and environmental reference materials with trace element, stable isotope, radioisotope and organic contaminant information. 8 refs, tabs

  4. Element determination of fine particles in environmental aerosols using PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia O, B.; Aldape U, F.

    2007-01-01

    The Mexico city is classified as one of the more populated cities of the world which presents a decrease in the air quality and that gives place to a severe problematic in atmospheric pollution. To cooperate in the solution of this problem it is necessary to carry out studies that allow a better knowledge of the atmosphere of the city. This study presents the results of a monitoring campaign of fine particle carried out from September 21 to December 12, 2001 in three sites of the Mexico City center area. The samples were collected every third day with a collector type unit of heaped filters (Gent). The analysis of these samples was carried out in the 2 MV accelerator of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) applying the PIXE technique and with this analysis its were identified in the samples approximately 15 elements in each one of the 3 sites and was calculated the concentration in that its were present. With these results a database was created and by means of it mathematical treatment the Enrichment factor (FE), the time series of each element and the multiple correlation matrix were evaluated. The obtained results showed that the Civil Registration site (Salto del Agua) it was the more polluted coinciding that to a bigger concentration of activities a bigger increase in the pollution is generated. (Author)

  5. Adsorption and migration of transplutonium elements in environmental systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balukova, V.D.; Kaymin, E.P.; Ushakov, S.I.

    Behavior of long decay-time transuranium and transplutonium elements in natural systems was addressed. The most dangerous among them are /sup 238/Np, /sup 241/ /sup 243/Am, /sup 244/ /sup 245/ /sup 246/Cm, and /sup 239/ /sup 240/ /sup 242/ /sup 244/Pu. Their transportation through natural deposits is tightly connected with ground water movements. The principal parameters determining behavior of these radionuclides in ground formations are coefficients of isotope distribution between various phases, adsorption capacities of component minerals, effective porosity, filtration coefficients of the liquid, etc. These data are presented in tabular and graphic forms. In carbonate-bicarbonate ground waters containing silicate minerals, the content of radionuclides could be quickly decreased by hydrolysis and formation of insoluble precipitates. 2 references, 3 figures.

  6. Qualitative analysis of the rare earth element by simulation of inductively coupled plasma emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, M.S.; Tobishima, Taeko; Kamitake, Seigo; Yasuda, Kazuo.

    1985-01-01

    The emission lines for qualitative analysis of rare earth elements by a simulation technique of ICP spectra were proposed. The spectra were simulated by employing a Gaussian (or a Lorentzian at high concentrations) profile. The simulated spectra corresponded quite well with the observed ones. The emission lines were selected so that the interference was as small as possible. The present qualitative analysis is based on a pattern recognition method where observed intensity ratios of the emission lines in each element are compared with those of a single analyte element. The qualitative analysis was performed for twelve standard solutions containing a single rare earth element and for eight standard solutions containing an element other than rare earth elements. The selection of the emission lines and the algorithm of the present qualitative analysis were justified. (author)

  7. Finite element simulation of thermal, elastic and plastic phenomena in fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia C.

    1999-01-01

    Taking as starting point an irradiation experiment of the first Argentine MOX fuel prototype, performed at the HFR reactor of Petten, Holland, the deformation suffered by the fuel element materials during burning has been numerically studied. Analysis of the pellet-cladding interaction is made by the finite element method. The code determines the temperature distribution and analyzes elastic and creep deformations, taking into account the dependency of the physical parameters of the problem on temperature. (author)

  8. Determination of elemental concentrations in environmental plant samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, J.; Chowdhury, D.P.; Verma, R.; Reddy, A.V.R.

    2012-01-01

    The intake of leafy vegetables in daily diet is very important to meet our nutritional needs. Vegetables provide the essential elements which are necessary and recommended for human growth. However, due to rapid industrialization and urbanization our environment becomes polluted and this affects the normal growth of agricultural products and composition of environmental species. The elemental concentrations present in the environmental samples are good indicators to assess the toxicological levels due to pollution affects. In the present work we have analysed several vegetable plant samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis to determine the elemental concentrations at major, minor and trace levels. The leafy vegetables like spinach, red leafy vegetable, pui, gourd leaf, lettuce and katoua were chosen as these are extensively consumed by local people in eastern part of India. We have determined 15 elements in the above mentioned vegetable samples and some of these are essential elements and some are toxic elements. It was found that Na and K were present as major elements, Fe and Zn as minor elements and As, Ce, Cr, Co, La, Mo, Rb, Sc, Sm, Sr as trace elements. The concentration level of Cr was found to be higher than that of recommended value certified by WHO and National environment quality control for human consumption. The validation of our analytical results have been performed by the Z-score tests through the determination of concentrations of the elements of interest in certified reference materials. (author)

  9. Lichen Parmelia sulcata time response model to environmental elemental availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, M.A.; Alves, L.C.; Freitas, M.C.; Os, B. van; Wolterbeek, H.Th.

    2000-01-01

    Transplants of lichen Parmelia sulcata collected in an area previously identified as non polluted, were placed at six stations, five of which were near Power Plants and the other in an area expected to be a remote station. Together with the lichen transplants, two total deposition collection buckets and an aerosol sampler were installed. Lichens were recollected two every month from each station. At the same time the water collection buckets were replaced by new ones. The aerosol sampler filter was replaced every week, collection being effective only for 10 minutes out of every two hours; in the remote station aerosol filters were replaced only once a month, the collection rate being kept. Each station was run for a period of one year. Both lichens and aerosol filters were analysed by PIXE and INAA at ITN. Total deposition samples were dried under an infrared lamp, and afterwards acid digested and analysed by ICP-MS at the National Geological Survey of The Netherlands. Data for the three types of samples were then produced for a total of 16 elements. In this work we used the data set thus obtained to test a model for the time response of lichen Parmelia sulcata to a new environment. (author)

  10. Trace-element speciation and partitioning in environmental geochemistry and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J.G.; Gibson, M.J.; Lovell, M.A.

    1983-09-01

    Establishment of the chemical form and associations of trace elements is important in the scientifc and medical fields related to environmental geochemistry and health. Fundamental understanding of trace-element behavior, the realistic formulation of historical perspectives of trace-element contamination, an assessment of environmental transformation processes and a thorough appraisal of environment-related ill health and disease all depend on knowledge of the chemical speciation and partitioning of trace elements. These topics and the development of analytical speciation techniques and procedures are discussed with reference to trace-element studies in the Department of Forensic Medicine and Science, University of Glasgow, on lacustrine sediments and water, the atmosphere, soil and street dirt of an urban environment, and human biological fluids. 206 references, 4 figures.

  11. Adaptive Multiscale Finite Element Method for Subsurface Flow Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Esch, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural geological formations generally show multiscale structural and functional heterogeneity evolving over many orders of magnitude in space and time. In subsurface hydrological simulations the geological model focuses on the structural hierarchy of physical sub units and the flow model addresses

  12. Simulated degradation of biochar and its potential environmental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zhaoyun; Demisie, Walelign; Zhang, Mingkui

    2013-01-01

    A simulated oxidation technique was used to examine the impacts of degradation on the surface properties of biochar and the potential implications of the changes in biochar properties were discussed. To simulate the short- and long-term environmental degradation, mild and harsh degradation were employed. Results showed that after mild degradation, the biochar samples showed significant reductions in surface area and pore volumes. After harsh degradation, the biochar samples revealed dramatic variations in their surface chemistry, surface area, pore volumes, morphology and adsorption properties. The results clearly indicate that changes of biochar surface properties were affected by biochar types and oxidative conditions. It is suggested that biochar surface properties are likely to be gradually altered during environmental exposure. This implies that these changes have potential effects for altering the physicochemical properties of biochar amended soils. -- Highlights: •Mild and harsh degradation were employed to simulate natural degradation of biochar. •Mild degradation could reduce the surface area and micropore volumes of biochar. •Harsh degradation caused severe changes of all of the biochar surface properties. •Biochar types and oxidative conditions may dominate the changes of its properties. -- The simulated degradation of biochar in this study could provide a mechanism for forecasting short- or long-term environmental degradation of biochar

  13. Environmental controls on the elemental composition of a Southern Hemisphere strain of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Roleda, Michael Y.; Armstrong, Evelyn; Law, Cliff S.; Boyd, Philip W.; Hurd, Catriona L.

    2018-01-01

    A series of semi-continuous incubation experiments were conducted with the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain NIWA1108 (Southern Ocean isolate) to examine the effects of five environmental drivers (nitrate and phosphate concentrations, irradiance, temperature, and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)) on both the physiological rates and elemental composition of the coccolithophore. Here, we report the alteration of the elemental composition of E. huxleyi in response to the changes in these environmental drivers. A series of dose-response curves for the cellular elemental composition of E. huxleyi were fitted for each of the five drivers across an environmentally representative gradient. The importance of each driver in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi was ranked using a semi-quantitative approach. The percentage variations in elemental composition arising from the change in each driver between present-day and model-projected conditions for the year 2100 were calculated. Temperature was the most important driver controlling both cellular particulate organic and inorganic carbon content, whereas nutrient concentrations were the most important regulator of cellular particulate nitrogen and phosphorus of E. huxleyi. In contrast, elevated pCO2 had the greatest influence on cellular particulate inorganic carbon to organic carbon ratio, resulting in a decrease in the ratio. Our results indicate that the different environmental drivers play specific roles in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi with wide-reaching implications for coccolithophore-related marine biogeochemical cycles, as a consequence of the regulation of E. huxleyi physiological processes.

  14. Computer simulation of radiation damage in HTGR elements and structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Shilyaev, B.A.; Yamnitskij, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of mathematical simulation of radiation damages in material and items of HTGR is considered. A system-program complex IMITATOR, intended for imitation of neutron damages by means of charged particle beams, is used. Account of material composite structure and certain geometry of items permits to calculate fields of primary radiation damages and introductions of reaction products in composite fuel elements, microfuel elements, their shells, composite absorbing elements on the base of boron carbide, structural steels and alloys. A good correspondence of calculation and experimental burn-out of absorbing elements is obtained, application of absorbing element as medium for imitation experiments is grounded [ru

  15. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    KAUST Repository

    Mukherjee, Debanjan; Zohdi, Tarek I.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface

  16. Environmental implications of element emissions from phosphate-processing operations in southeastern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    In order to assess the contribution to plants and soils of certain elements emitted by phosphate processing, we sampled sagebrush, grasses, and A- and C-horizon soils along upwind and downwind transects at Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho. Analyses for 70 elements in plants showed that, statistically, the concentration of 7 environmentally important elements, cadmium, chromium, fluorine, selenium, uranium, vanadium, and zinc, were related to emissions from phosphate-processing operations. Two additional elements, lithium and nickel, show probable relationships. The literature on the effects of these elements on plant and animal health is briefly surveyed. Relations between element content in plants and distance from the phosphate-processing operations were stronger at Soda Springs than at Pocatello and, in general, stronger in sagebrush than in the grasses. Analyses for 58 elements in soils showed that, statistically, beryllium, fluorine, iron, lead, lithium, potassium, rubidium, thorium, and zinc were related to emissions only at Pocatello and only in the A horizon. Moreover, six additional elements, copper, mercury, nickel, titanium, uranium, and vanadium, probably are similarly related along the same transect. The approximate amounts of elements added to the soils by the emissions are estimated. In C-horizon soils, no statistically significant relations were observed between element concentrations and distance from the processing sites. At Soda Springs, the nonuniformity of soils at the sampling locations may have obscured the relationship between soil-element content and emissions from phosphate processing.

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking behaviour of copper in simulated ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietanen, S.; Ehrnsten, U.; Saario, T.

    1996-05-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) behaviour of pure oxygen free copper in simulated ground water with additions of sodium nitrite was studied. Low frequency corrosion fatigue tests with high positive load ratio values under crosshead speed control were performed using precracked diskshaped compact specimens C(T). The load ratio values were about 0.9 and the frequencies were between 0.0008 and 0.0017 Hz. Tests were performed under electrochemical potential control in an autoclave at room temperature and at 80 deg C. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of repository environment on environmentally assisted cracking susceptibility of pure copper. (5 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.)

  18. Stress analysis and deformation prediction of sheet metal workpieces based on finite element simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Penghao; Wang Aimin; Wang Xiaolong; Zhang Yanlin

    2017-01-01

    After aluminum alloy sheet metal parts machining, the residual stress release will cause a large deformation. To solve this problem, this paper takes a aluminum alloy sheet aerospace workpiece as an example, establishes the theoretical model of elastic deformation and the finite element model, and places quantitative initial stress in each element of machining area, analyses stress release simulation and deformation. Through different initial stress release simulative analysis of deformation ...

  19. Spectral Element Method for the Simulation of Unsteady Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor; Murman, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    This work uses a discontinuous-Galerkin spectral-element method (DGSEM) to solve the compressible Navier-Stokes equations [1{3]. The inviscid ux is computed using the approximate Riemann solver of Roe [4]. The viscous fluxes are computed using the second form of Bassi and Rebay (BR2) [5] in a manner consistent with the spectral-element approximation. The method of lines with the classical 4th-order explicit Runge-Kutta scheme is used for time integration. Results for polynomial orders up to p = 15 (16th order) are presented. The code is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The computations presented in this work are performed using the Sandy Bridge nodes of the NASA Pleiades supercomputer at NASA Ames Research Center. Each Sandy Bridge node consists of 2 eight-core Intel Xeon E5-2670 processors with a clock speed of 2.6Ghz and 2GB per core memory. On a Sandy Bridge node the Tau Benchmark [6] runs in a time of 7.6s.

  20. An adaptative finite element method for turbulent flow simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnoux-Guisse, F.; Bonnin, O.; Leal de Sousa, L.; Nicolas, G.

    1995-05-01

    After outlining the space and time discretization methods used in the N3S thermal hydraulic code developed at EDF/NHL, we describe the possibilities of the peripheral version, the Adaptative Mesh, which comprises two separate parts: the error indicator computation and the development of a module subdividing elements usable by the solid dynamics code ASTER and the electromagnetism code TRIFOU also developed by R and DD. The error indicators implemented in N3S are described. They consist of a projection indicator quantifying the space error in laminar or turbulent flow calculations and a Navier-Stokes residue indicator calculated on each element. The method for subdivision of triangles into four sub-triangles and tetrahedra into eight sub-tetrahedra is then presented with its advantages and drawbacks. It is illustrated by examples showing the efficiency of the module. The last concerns the 2 D case of flow behind a backward-facing step. (authors). 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Finite element simulation of internal flows with heat transfer using a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Velocity correction method; finite element simulation; turbulent .... CFD, developments in turbulence modeling have been only evolutionary and ...... variables are made dimensionless using appropriate combinations of Uav, H, ...... Srinivas M 1994 Finite element analysis of internal flows with heat transfer Ph D thesis, Indian.

  2. SIMULATION OF THE BEHAVIOR OF THE WATER TABLE IN A COASTAL AQUIFER SYSTEM FINITE ELEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Lara Romero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of Galerkin method to discretize the model equation of groundwater ow in a conned aquifer semipermeable with tidal boundary conditions on one of its borders, the other borders remain constant. For the simulations was generated a numerical program, Ground Water Finite Element Method, which implements the method of nite elements with triangular elements with three nodes and a degree of freedom per node.

  3. Study of element uptake in plants from the soil to assess environmental contamination by toxic elements

    CERN Document Server

    En, Z; Tsipin, V V; Tillaev, T; Jumaniyazova, G I

    2003-01-01

    Uptake of various elements by plants through the root system from the soil was studied. Vegetation experiments with cotton and white beet were carried out in the control and test fields. The test fields were enriched with phyto-bacterial strains capable of dissolving insoluble phosphate compounds. Analytical work involved analysis of blank, control and test soil samples and analysis of plants sampled in different growing periods: periods of first sprouts, florescence and ripening of the plants. Multielement analyses of soil and plant samples were carried out by instrumental neutron activation techniques using our WWR-SM research reactor. Results of the measurements have shown that macro- and microelement composition of the analyzed soil samples were consistent to clark contents except for copper. Our experiments have resulted that the concentration levels of copper in the soils were within 300-450 mg/kg, and its average concentration in cotton leaves was about similar to 35 mg/kg while in beet leaves it reach...

  4. Magnetic transmission gear finite element simulation with iron pole hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippini, Mattia; Alotto, Piergiorgio; Glehn, Gregor; Hameyer, Kay

    2018-04-01

    Ferromagnetic poles in a magnetic transmission gear require particular attention during their design process. Usually, during the numerical simulation of these devices the effects of hysteresis for loss estimation are neglected and considered only during post-processing calculations. Since the literature lacks hysteresis models, this paper adopts a homogenized hysteretic model able to include eddy current and hysteresis losses in 2D laminated materials for iron poles. In this article the results related to the hysteresis in a magnetic gear are presented and compared to the non-hysteretic approach.

  5. Finite element simulation of the micromagnetic behaviour of nanoelements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridley, P.H.W.

    2000-06-01

    Over recent years the investigation into the magnetic behaviour of nanostructured permalloy has become more advanced due to improvements in numerical micromagnetic methods on the theoretical side and high accuracy electron-beam lithography methods experimentally. The interest in such structures of magnetic material is increasing mainly due to the possible potential use in future high-density magnetic storage media applications. When the material is discretized into a nanoelement structure at the sub micron level theoretical micromagnetic techniques may be employed in order to investigate the magnetization behaviour. This thesis describes a theoretical study of the hysteresis and domain behaviour in thin film permalloy nanoelements. To carry out our investigations we have developed a dynamical micromagnetic model based on the use of the finite element method. The results presented in this thesis begin with a test of the performance of our model. We then proceed with an investigation into the effect of size, elongation and geometry on the transition states for single nanoelements. The investigation is then extended to look at the magnetization behaviour of arrays of interacting nanoelements in relation to their separation and material properties. The reversal mechanism of the arrays is very sensitive to the degree of disorder. In the case of an aligned uniaxial anisotropy a highly symmetric cooperative switching mechanism is observed. A large anisotropy has the effect of stabilizing states during the reversal process leading to distinctive switching. A random anisotropy breaks this high symmetry sufficiently to reduce the cooperative switching leading to a relatively random reversal of individual elements. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations. (author)

  6. Determination of artificial and natural radionuclides and others trace elements in environmental samples form Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuch, L.A.; Godoy, J.M.; Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of the radioactive elements concentrations, determined by gamma spectrometry and the others trace elements determined by neutron activation analysis of several environmental samples (soils, marine sediments, algae mosses and lichens) in Comandante Ferraz Antartica Station are presented. The high concentrations of Cs-137 were found in lichens and mosses samples and the soils and sediments showed concentrations of natural radionuclides. (C.G.C.). 8 refs, 1 fig, 3 tabs

  7. ISSEBETS 2009. 7. International Symposium on Speciation of Elements in Biological, Environmental and Toxicological Sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The 7th ISSEBETS was held in August 2009 in city of Eger, Hungary. The main topics were: speciation of essential and toxic elements in food, in traditional drugs, designing functional foods through applied speciation, metallomics and metalloproteomics, metal species in health and disease, cycling of elemental species in the environment, speciation related regulations and legislation, metal environmental, bioremediation, quality assurance of speciation analysis. (S.I.)

  8. Characterizing high-temperature deformation of internally heated nuclear fuel element simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, A.I.; Fong, R.W.L.; Leitch, B.W.; Nitheanandan, T.; Williams, A., E-mail: alexander.belov@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    The sag behaviour of a simulated nuclear fuel element during high-temperature transients has been investigated in an experiment utilizing an internal indirect heating method. The major motivation of the experiment was to improve understanding of the dominant mechanisms underlying the element thermo-mechanical response under loss-of-coolant accident conditions and to obtain accurate experimental data to support development of 3-D computational fuel element models. The experiment was conducted using an electrically heated CANDU fuel element simulator. Three consecutive thermal cycles with peak temperatures up to ≈1000 {sup o}C were applied to the element. The element sag deflections and sheath temperatures were measured. On heating up to 600 {sup o}C, only minor lateral deflections of the element were observed. Further heating to above 700 {sup o}C resulted in an element multi-rate creep and significant permanent bow. Post-test visual and X-ray examinations revealed a pronounced necking of the sheath at the pellet-to-pellet interface locations. A wall thickness reduction was detected in the necked region that is interpreted as a sheath longitudinal strain localization effect. The sheath cross-sectioning showed signs of a 'hard' pellet-cladding interaction due to the applied cycles. A 3-D model of the experiment was generated using the ANSYS finite element code. As a fully coupled thermal mechanical simulation is computationally expensive, it was deemed sufficient to use the measured sheath temperatures as a boundary condition, and thus an uncoupled mechanical simulation only was conducted. The ANSYS simulation results match the experiment sag observations well up to the point at which the fuel element started cooling down. (author)

  9. Finite element simulation of cracks formation in parabolic flume above fixed service live

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurin, M. A.; Volosukhin, V. A.; Mikheev, A. V.; Volosukhin, Y. V.; Bandurina, I. P.

    2018-03-01

    In the article, digital simulation data on influence of defect different characteristics on cracks formation in a parabolic flume are presented. The finite element method is based on general hypotheses of the theory of elasticity. The studies showed that the values of absolute movements satisfy the standards of design. The results of the digital simulation of stresses and strains for cracks formation in concrete parabolic flumes after long-term service above the fixed service life are described. Stressed and strained state of reinforced concrete bearing elements under different load combinations is considered. Intensive threshold of danger to form longitudinal cracks in reinforced concrete elements is determined.

  10. Real-time volumetric deformable models for surgery simulation using finite elements and condensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bro-Nielsen, Morten; Cotin, S.

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of SD solid volumetric Finite Element models to surgery simulation. In particular it introduces three new ideas for solving the problem of achieving real-time performance for these models. The simulation system we have developed is described and we demonstrate...

  11. Development of a convex polyhedral discrete element simulation framework for NVIDIA Kepler based GPUs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, Nicolin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available in nature and cannot be described by a closed form solution for more than a few particles. A popular and successful approach in simulating the underlying dynamics of GM is by using the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Computational viable simulations...

  12. The Development and Evaluation of a Computer-Simulated Science Inquiry Environment Using Gamified Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Fu-Hsing

    2018-01-01

    This study developed a computer-simulated science inquiry environment, called the Science Detective Squad, to engage students in investigating an electricity problem that may happen in daily life. The environment combined the simulation of scientific instruments and a virtual environment, including gamified elements, such as points and a story for…

  13. Advance simulation capability for environmental management (ASCEM) - 59065

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, Paul; Keating, Elizabeth; Moulton, David; Williamson, Mark; Collazo, Yvette; Gerdes, Kurt; Freshley, Mark; Gorton, Ian; Meza, Juan

    2012-01-01

    The United States Department Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) determined that uniform application of advanced modeling in the subsurface could help reduce the cost and risks associated with its environmental cleanup mission. In response to this determination, the EM Office of Technology Innovation and Development (OTID), Groundwater and Soil Remediation (GW and S) began the program Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for integrating data and scientific understanding to enable prediction of contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. This initiative supports the reduction of uncertainties and risks associated with EM?s environmental cleanup and closure programs through better understanding and quantifying the subsurface flow and contaminant transport behavior in complex geological systems. This involves the long-term performance of engineered components, including cementitious materials in nuclear waste disposal facilities that may be sources for future contamination of the subsurface. This paper describes the ASCEM tools and approach and the ASCEM programmatic accomplishments completed in 2010 including recent advances and technology transfer. The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management has begun development of an Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management, (ASCEM). This program will provide predictions of the end states of contaminated areas allowing for cost and risk reduction of EM remedial activities. ASCEM will provide the tools and approaches necessary to standardize risk and performance assessments across the DOE complex. Through its Phase One demonstration, the ASCEM team has shown value to the EM community in the areas of High Performance Computing, Data Management, Visualization, and Uncertainty Quantification. In 2012, ASCEM will provide an initial limited release of a community code for

  14. Elemental markers in elasmobranchs: effects of environmental history and growth on vertebral chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade D; Miller, Jessica A; Heppell, Selina S

    2013-01-01

    Differences in the chemical composition of calcified skeletal structures (e.g. shells, otoliths) have proven useful for reconstructing the environmental history of many marine species. However, the extent to which ambient environmental conditions can be inferred from the elemental signatures within the vertebrae of elasmobranchs (sharks, skates, rays) has not been evaluated. To assess the relationship between water and vertebral elemental composition, we conducted two laboratory studies using round stingrays, Urobatis halleri, as a model species. First, we examined the effects of temperature (16°, 18°, 24°C) on vertebral elemental incorporation (Li/Ca, Mg/Ca, Mn/Ca, Zn/Ca, Sr/Ca, Ba/Ca). Second, we tested the relationship between water and subsequent vertebral elemental composition by manipulating dissolved barium concentrations (1x, 3x, 6x). We also evaluated the influence of natural variation in growth rate on elemental incorporation for both experiments. Finally, we examined the accuracy of classifying individuals to known environmental histories (temperature and barium treatments) using vertebral elemental composition. Temperature had strong, negative effects on the uptake of magnesium (DMg) and barium (DBa) and positively influenced manganese (DMn) incorporation. Temperature-dependent responses were not observed for lithium and strontium. Vertebral Ba/Ca was positively correlated with ambient Ba/Ca. Partition coefficients (DBa) revealed increased discrimination of barium in response to increased dissolved barium concentrations. There were no significant relationships between elemental incorporation and somatic growth or vertebral precipitation rates for any elements except Zn. Relationships between somatic growth rate and DZn were, however, inconsistent and inconclusive. Variation in the vertebral elemental signatures of U. halleri reliably distinguished individual rays from each treatment based on temperature (85%) and Ba exposure (96%) history. These

  15. Finite element simulation of texture evolution and Swift effect in NiAl under torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, Thomas; Glüge, Rainer; Klöden, Burghardt; Skrotzki, Werner; Bertram, Albrecht

    2007-09-01

    The texture evolution and the Swift effect in NiAl under torsion at 727 °C are studied by finite element simulations for two different initial textures. The material behaviour is modelled by an elastic-viscoplastic Taylor model. In order to overcome the well-known shortcomings of Taylor's approach, the texture evolution is also investigated by a representative volume element (RVE) with periodic boundary conditions and a compatible microstructure at the opposite faces of the RVE. Such a representative volume element takes into account the grain morphology and the grain interaction. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the modelling of a finite element based RVE leads to a better prediction of the final textures. However, the texture evolution path is not accounted for correctly. The simulated Swift effect depends much more on the initial orientation distribution than observed in experiment. Deviations between simulation and experiment may be due to continuous dynamic recrystallization.

  16. The simulation of electrostatic coupling intra-body communication based on the finite-element method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Yong; Zhang Kai; Yang Guang; Zhu Kang; Hao Qun

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, investigation has been done in the computer simulation of the electrostatic coupling IBC by using the developed finite-element models, in which a. the incidence and reflection of electronic signal in the upper arm model were analyzed by using the theory of electromagnetic wave; b. the finite-element models of electrostatic coupling IBC were developed by using the electromagnetic analysis package of ANSYS software; c. the signal attenuation of electrostatic coupling IBC were simulated under the conditions of different signal frequencies, electrodes directions, electrodes sizes and transmission distances. Finally, some important conclusions are deduced on the basis of simulation results.

  17. Multidisciplinary Simulation of Graphite-Composite and Cermet Fuel Elements for NTP Point of Departure Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Mark E.; Schnitzler, Bruce G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares the expected performance of two Nuclear Thermal Propulsion fuel types. High fidelity, fluid/thermal/structural + neutronic simulations help predict the performance of graphite-composite and cermet fuel types from point of departure engine designs from the Nuclear Thermal Propulsion project. Materials and nuclear reactivity issues are reviewed for each fuel type. Thermal/structural simulations predict thermal stresses in the fuel and thermal expansion mis-match stresses in the coatings. Fluid/thermal/structural/neutronic simulations provide predictions for full fuel elements. Although NTP engines will utilize many existing chemical engine components and technologies, nuclear fuel elements are a less developed engine component and introduce design uncertainty. Consequently, these fuel element simulations provide important insights into NTP engine performance.

  18. Environmental regulation in a network of simulated microbial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Hywel T P; Lenton, Timothy M

    2008-07-29

    The Earth possesses a number of regulatory feedback mechanisms involving life. In the absence of a population of competing biospheres, it has proved hard to find a robust evolutionary mechanism that would generate environmental regulation. It has been suggested that regulation must require altruistic environmental alterations by organisms and, therefore, would be evolutionarily unstable. This need not be the case if organisms alter the environment as a selectively neutral by-product of their metabolism, as in the majority of biogeochemical reactions, but a question then arises: Why should the combined by-product effects of the biota have a stabilizing, rather than destabilizing, influence on the environment? Under certain conditions, selection acting above the level of the individual can be an effective adaptive force. Here we present an evolutionary simulation model in which environmental regulation involving higher-level selection robustly emerges in a network of interconnected microbial ecosystems. Spatial structure creates conditions for a limited form of higher-level selection to act on the collective environment-altering properties of local communities. Local communities that improve their environmental conditions achieve larger populations and are better colonizers of available space, whereas local communities that degrade their environment shrink and become susceptible to invasion. The spread of environment-improving communities alters the global environment toward the optimal conditions for growth and tends to regulate against external perturbations. This work suggests a mechanism for environmental regulation that is consistent with evolutionary theory.

  19. A review of electro analytical determinations of some important elements (Zn, Se, As) in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichiang; James, B.D.; Magee, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    This review covers electro analytical methods reported in the literature for the determination of zinc, cadmium, selenium and arsenic in environmental and biological samples. A comprehensive survey of electro analytical techniques used for the determination of four important elements, i.e. zinc, cadmium, selenium and arsenic is reported herein with 322 references up to 1990. (Orig./A.B.)

  20. Experimental characterization and numerical simulation of riveted lap-shear joints using Rivet Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivio, Francesco; Fanelli, Pierluigi; Ferracci, Michele

    2018-03-01

    In aeronautical and automotive industries the use of rivets for applications requiring several joining points is now very common. In spite of a very simple shape, a riveted junction has many contact surfaces and stress concentrations that make the local stiffness very difficult to be calculated. To overcome this difficulty, commonly finite element models with very dense meshes are performed for single joint analysis because the accuracy is crucial for a correct structural analysis. Anyhow, when several riveted joints are present, the simulation becomes computationally too heavy and usually significant restrictions to joint modelling are introduced, sacrificing the accuracy of local stiffness evaluation. In this paper, we tested the accuracy of a rivet finite element presented in previous works by the authors. The structural behaviour of a lap joint specimen with a rivet joining is simulated numerically and compared to experimental measurements. The Rivet Element, based on a closed-form solution of a reference theoretical model of the rivet joint, simulates local and overall stiffness of the junction combining high accuracy with low degrees of freedom contribution. In this paper the Rivet Element performances are compared to that of a FE non-linear model of the rivet, built with solid elements and dense mesh, and to experimental data. The promising results reported allow to consider the Rivet Element able to simulate, with a great accuracy, actual structures with several rivet connections.

  1. Determination of 22 elements in Marine Environmental Samples in special areas at the South of Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ngoc Tuan; Nguyen Giang; Nguyen Thanh Tam; Truong Phuong Mai

    2007-01-01

    In 2007 year, we continued to determine the contents of 22 elements in marine environmental samples such as marine sediment, seawater and marine creature. The methods for the determination of elements in these objects are Neutron Activation Analysis and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The obtained analytical results are a database to monitor marine environmental pollution and to evaluate the impact of exploitation of rare earth- radioactive ores near by the sea coast; exploitation of crude oil in offshore and technology activities at the south of Vietnam in the future. The analytical results of toxic and trace element contents are also to attend the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation of Asia (FNCA) in which Vietnam is one of nine member counties. The analytical results have been presented in the FNCA 2007 workshop on utilization of the research reactor from 28 September-02 October in Serpong, Indonesia. (author)

  2. Effectiveness of Rotation-free Triangular and Quadrilateral Shell Elements in Sheet-metal Forming Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunet, M.; Sabourin, F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the effectiveness of triangular 3-node shell element without rotational d.o.f. and the extension to a new 4-node quadrilateral shell element called S4 with only 3 translational degrees of freedom per node and one-point integration. The curvatures are computed resorting to the surrounding elements. Extension from rotation-free triangular element to a quadrilateral element requires internal curvatures in order to avoid singular bending stiffness. Two numerical examples with regular and irregular meshes are performed to show the convergence and accuracy. Deep-drawing of a box, spring-back analysis of a U-shape strip sheet and the crash simulation of a beam-box complete the demonstration of the bending capabilities of the proposed rotation-free triangular and quadrilateral elements

  3. Evaluation of element migration from food plastic packagings into simulated solutions using radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Eufemia Paez; Saiki, Mitiko; Wiebeck, Helio

    2005-01-01

    In the present study a radiometric method was established to determine the migration of elements from food plastic packagings to a simulated acetic acid solution. This radiometric method consisted of irradiating plastic samples with neutrons at IEA-R1 nuclear reactor for a period of 16 hours under a neutron flux of 10 12 n cm -2 s -1 and, then to expose them to the element migration into a simulated solution. The radioactivity of the activated elements transferred to the solutions was measured to evaluate the migration. The experimental conditions were: time of exposure of 10 days at 40 deg C and 3% acetic acid solution was used as simulated solution, according to the procedure established by the National Agency of Sanitary Monitoring (ANVISA). The migration study was applied for plastic samples from soft drink and juice packagings. The results obtained indicated the migration of elements Co, Cr and Sb. The advantage of this methodology was no need to analyse the blank of simulantes, as well as the use of high purity simulated solutions. Besides, the method allows to evaluate the migration of the elements into the food content instead of simulated solution. The detention limits indicated high sensitivity of the radiometric method. (author)

  4. Geochemistry of environmentally sensitive trace elements in Permian coals from the Huainan coalfield, Anhui, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.; Liu, Gaisheng; Jiang, M.; Chou, C.-L.; Li, H.; Wu, B.; Zheng, Lingyun; Jiang, D.

    2011-01-01

    To study the geochemical characteristics of 11 environmentally sensitive trace elements in the coals of the Permian Period from the Huainan coalfield, Anhui province, China, borehole samples of 336 coals, two partings, and four roof and floor mudstones were collected from mineable coal seams. Major elements and selected trace elements were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HAAS). The depositional environment, abundances, distribution, and modes of occurrence of trace elements were investigated. Results show that clay and carbonate minerals are the principal inorganic constituents in the coals. A lower deltaic plain, where fluvial channel systems developed successively, was the likely depositional environment of the Permian coals in the Huainan coalfield. All major elements have wider variation ranges than those of Chinese coals except for Mg and Fe. The contents of Cr, Co, Ni, and Se are higher than their averages for Chinese coals and world coals. Vertical variations of trace elements in different formations are not significant except for B and Ba. Certain roof and partings are distinctly higher in trace elements than underlying coal bench samples. The modes of occurrence of trace elements vary in different coal seams as a result of different coal-forming environments. Vanadium, Cr, and Th are associated with aluminosilicate minerals, Ba with carbonate minerals, and Cu, Zn, As, Se, and Pb mainly with sulfide minerals. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  5. Environmental controls on the elemental composition of a Southern Hemisphere strain of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Feng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of semi-continuous incubation experiments were conducted with the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi strain NIWA1108 (Southern Ocean isolate to examine the effects of five environmental drivers (nitrate and phosphate concentrations, irradiance, temperature, and partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 on both the physiological rates and elemental composition of the coccolithophore. Here, we report the alteration of the elemental composition of E. huxleyi in response to the changes in these environmental drivers. A series of dose–response curves for the cellular elemental composition of E. huxleyi were fitted for each of the five drivers across an environmentally representative gradient. The importance of each driver in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi was ranked using a semi-quantitative approach. The percentage variations in elemental composition arising from the change in each driver between present-day and model-projected conditions for the year 2100 were calculated. Temperature was the most important driver controlling both cellular particulate organic and inorganic carbon content, whereas nutrient concentrations were the most important regulator of cellular particulate nitrogen and phosphorus of E. huxleyi. In contrast, elevated pCO2 had the greatest influence on cellular particulate inorganic carbon to organic carbon ratio, resulting in a decrease in the ratio. Our results indicate that the different environmental drivers play specific roles in regulating the elemental composition of E. huxleyi with wide-reaching implications for coccolithophore-related marine biogeochemical cycles, as a consequence of the regulation of E. huxleyi physiological processes.

  6. Neurosurgery simulation using non-linear finite element modeling and haptic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Huai-Ping; Audette, Michel; Joldes, Grand R.; Enquobahrie, Andinet

    2012-02-01

    Real-time surgical simulation is becoming an important component of surgical training. To meet the realtime requirement, however, the accuracy of the biomechancial modeling of soft tissue is often compromised due to computing resource constraints. Furthermore, haptic integration presents an additional challenge with its requirement for a high update rate. As a result, most real-time surgical simulation systems employ a linear elasticity model, simplified numerical methods such as the boundary element method or spring-particle systems, and coarse volumetric meshes. However, these systems are not clinically realistic. We present here an ongoing work aimed at developing an efficient and physically realistic neurosurgery simulator using a non-linear finite element method (FEM) with haptic interaction. Real-time finite element analysis is achieved by utilizing the total Lagrangian explicit dynamic (TLED) formulation and GPU acceleration of per-node and per-element operations. We employ a virtual coupling method for separating deformable body simulation and collision detection from haptic rendering, which needs to be updated at a much higher rate than the visual simulation. The system provides accurate biomechancial modeling of soft tissue while retaining a real-time performance with haptic interaction. However, our experiments showed that the stability of the simulator depends heavily on the material property of the tissue and the speed of colliding objects. Hence, additional efforts including dynamic relaxation are required to improve the stability of the system.

  7. Finite element method for one-dimensional rill erosion simulation on a curved slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Yan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rill erosion models are important to hillslope soil erosion prediction and to land use planning. The development of rill erosion models and their use has become increasingly of great concern. The purpose of this research was to develop mathematic models with computer simulation procedures to simulate and predict rill erosion. The finite element method is known as an efficient tool in many other applications than in rill soil erosion. In this study, the hydrodynamic and sediment continuity model equations for a rill erosion system were solved by the Galerkin finite element method and Visual C++ procedures. The simulated results are compared with the data for spatially and temporally measured processes for rill erosion under different conditions. The results indicate that the one-dimensional linear finite element method produced excellent predictions of rill erosion processes. Therefore, this study supplies a tool for further development of a dynamic soil erosion prediction model.

  8. Finite Element Simulation of Sheet Metal Forming Process Using Local Interpolation for Tool Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Takayuki; Takuda, Hirohiko; Takamura, Masato; Makinouchi, Akitake; Teodosiu, Cristian

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of contact between a sheet and tools is one of the most difficult problems to deal with in finite-element simulations of sheet forming processes. In order to obtain more accurate tool models without increasing the number of elements, this paper describes a new formulation for contact problems using interpolation proposed by Nagata for tool surfaces. A contact search algorithm between sheet nodes and the interpolated tool surfaces was developed and was introduced into the static-explicit elastoplastic finite-element method code STAMP3D. Simulations of a square cup deep drawing process with a very coarsely discretized punch model were carried out. The simulated results showed that the proposed algorithm gave the proper drawn shape, demonstrating the validity of the proposed algorithm

  9. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM): Early Site Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meza, Juan; Hubbard, Susan; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Moulton, David; Denham, Miles E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Technology Innovation and Development (EM-32), is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high performance computing tool will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. As part of the initial development process, a series of demonstrations were defined to test ASCEM components and provide feedback to developers, engage end users in applications, and lead to an outcome that would benefit the sites. The demonstration was implemented for a sub-region of the Savannah River Site General Separations Area that includes the F-Area Seepage Basins. The physical domain included the unsaturated and saturated zones in the vicinity of the seepage basins and Fourmile Branch, using an unstructured mesh fit to the hydrostratigraphy and topography of the site. The calculations modeled variably saturated flow and the resulting flow field was used in simulations of the advection of non-reactive species and the reactive-transport of uranium. As part of the demonstrations, a new set of data management, visualization, and uncertainty quantification tools were developed to analyze simulation results and existing site data. These new tools can be used to provide summary statistics, including information on which simulation parameters were most important in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output.

  10. Stability analysis and finite element simulations of superplastic forming in the presence of hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    It is established that some superplastic materials undergo significant cavitation during deformation. In this work, stability analysis for the superplastic copper based alloy Coronze-638 at 550 °C based on Hart's definition of stable plastic deformation and finite element simulations for the balanced biaxial loading case are carried out to study the effects of hydrostatic pressure on cavitation evolution during superplastic forming. The finite element results show that imposing hydrostatic pressure yields to a reduction in cavitation growth.

  11. Discrete Element Simulations and Experiments on the Deformation of Cohesive Powders in a Bi-Axial Box

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imole, Olukayode Isaiah; Kumar, Nishant; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Luding, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    We compare element test experiments and simulations on the deformation of frictional, cohesive particles in a bi-axial box. We show that computer simulations with the Discrete Element Method qualitatively reproduce a uniaxial compression element test in the true bi-axial tester. We highlight the

  12. Micromagnetic simulation on the dynamic permeability spectrum of micrometer sized magnetic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Huanhuan; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The inductance of a thin film inductor with magnetic core is much less than μ'(magnetic core's permeability) times that of inductor without magnetic core due to the complicated magnetic structure in the scaled-down magnetic elements. Therefore, it is very important to optimize the micro-scale magnetic structure for improving the inductance value of the thin film inductor with magnetic core. In this paper, the magnetization dynamics and magnetic structure have been investigated using micromagnetic simulation method, in which the additional internal boundaries are considered. The simulated results show that the permeability of structured micromagnetic core is promoted 32.5% than that of magnetic element without slits. It opens a new way to improve the dynamic high frequency characteristics of micro-scale magnetic element, which can be used in a thin film inductor. - Highlights: • Simulate the magnetic element with dimensions of 2 μm×1 μm×100 nm with slits using micromagnetic simulation method. • The dynamic characteristics of micro-scale magnetic element can be improved when adding appropriate slits. • Give the corresponding area for different resonance frequency

  13. Automated element identification for EDS spectra evaluation using quantification and integrated spectra simulation approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, F

    2010-01-01

    This work describes first real automated solution for qualitative evaluation of EDS spectra in X-ray microanalysis. It uses a combination of integrated standardless quantitative evaluation, computation of analytical errors to a final uncertainty, and parts of recently developed simulation approaches. Multiple spectra reconstruction assessments and peak searches of the residual spectrum are powerful enough to solve the qualitative analytical question automatically for totally unknown specimens. The integrated quantitative assessment is useful to improve the confidence of the qualitative analysis. Therefore, the qualitative element analysis becomes a part of integrated quantitative spectrum evaluation, where the quantitative results are used to iteratively refine element decisions, spectrum deconvolution, and simulation steps.

  14. Validation and modification of the Blade Element Momentum theory based on comparisons with actuator disc simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Bak, Christian; Døssing, Mads

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) model using detailed numerical simulations with an axis symmetric actuator disc (AD) model has been carried out. The present implementation of the BEM model is in a version where exactly the same input in the form of non-dimensiona......A comprehensive investigation of the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) model using detailed numerical simulations with an axis symmetric actuator disc (AD) model has been carried out. The present implementation of the BEM model is in a version where exactly the same input in the form of non...

  15. Aspects of Finite Element Simulation of Axi-Symmetric Hydromechanical Deep Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Rikard; Olovsson, Lars; Danckert, Joachim

    1999-01-01

    A new approach for the Finite Element modelling of the hydromechanical deep drawing process is evaluated. In the model a Finite Difference approximation of Reynold’s equation is solved for the fluid flow between the blank and the draw die in the flange region. The approach is implemented...... as a contact algorithm in an explicit Finite Element code, Exhale2D. The developed model is verified against experiments and good agreement is obtained. It is concluded that the developed model is a promising approach for simulating the hydromechanical deep drawing process using the Finite Element Method....

  16. Simulated Space Environmental Effects on Thin Film Solar Array Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finckenor, Miria; Carr, John; SanSoucie, Michael; Boyd, Darren; Phillips, Brandon

    2017-01-01

    The Lightweight Integrated Solar Array and Transceiver (LISA-T) experiment consists of thin-film, low mass, low volume solar panels. Given the variety of thin solar cells and cover materials and the lack of environmental protection typically afforded by thick coverglasses, a series of tests were conducted in Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Environmental Effects Facility to evaluate the performance of these materials. Candidate thin polymeric films and nitinol wires used for deployment were also exposed. Simulated space environment exposures were selected based on SSP 30425 rev. B, "Space Station Program Natural Environment Definition for Design" or AIAA Standard S-111A-2014, "Qualification and Quality Requirements for Space Solar Cells." One set of candidate materials were exposed to 5 eV atomic oxygen and concurrent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation for low Earth orbit simulation. A second set of materials were exposed to 1 MeV electrons. A third set of samples were exposed to 50, 100, 500, and 700 keV energy protons, and a fourth set were exposed to >2,000 hours of near ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. A final set was rapidly thermal cycled between -55 and +125degC. This test series provides data on enhanced power generation, particularly for small satellites with reduced mass and volume resources. Performance versus mass and cost per Watt is discussed.

  17. Measurements of environmental gamma-ray spectra using a multi-element TL dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuta, Sadaaki; Boetter-Jensen, L.; Nielsen, S.P.

    1986-12-01

    A method to estimate the energy distribution and dose of environmental gamma radiation was developed using a multielement TL dosemeter. Experimentally obtained energy responses from a multi-element TL dosemeter with different kinds of filters were used to calculate the energy distribution and related dose by the SAND-II computer code. The code was originally developed to estimate the neutron flux using a multiple foil activation method. Measurements were made at several locations with the multi-element TL dosemeter and comparisons were made with results from a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and a high-pressure ionization chamber. (author)

  18. Finite element simulation of a novel composite light-weight microporous cladding panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lida; Wang, Dongyan

    2018-04-01

    A novel composite light-weight microporous cladding panel with matched connection detailing is developed. Numerical simulation on the experiment is conducted by ABAQUS. The accuracy and rationality of the finite element model is verified by comparison between the simulation and the experiment results. It is also indicated that the novel composite cladding panel is of desirable bearing capacity, stiffness and deformability under out-of-plane load.

  19. Numerical simulation of subwoofer array congurations using the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Banyuls-Juan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Teaching in the Master of Acoustic Engineering includes contents that require the modeling of acoustic systems of two types: simple systems through analytical theory and complex models using simulation techniques. In the present work, we describe an example of complex acoustic sources modeling using the finite element method: subwoofer sound radiation in different configurations. Numerical simulations in the frequency domain can calculate the radiation pattern of systems that do not have a simple analytical solution.

  20. Development of 3D dynamic gap element for simulation of asymmetric fuel behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyochan; Yang, Yongsik; Koo, Yanghyun; Kang, Changhak; Lee, Sunguk; Yang, Dongyol

    2014-01-01

    The accurate modeling of heat transfer across the gap between fuel pellets and the protective cladding is essential to understanding the fuel performance, including cladding stress and behavior under irradiated conditions. To establish a heat transfer model through a gap in the fuel performance code, the gap conductance based on the Ross and Stoute model was employed in most previous works. In this model, the gap conductance that determines the temperature gradient within the gap is a function of gap thickness, which is dependent on mechanical behavior. Recently, many researchers have been developing fuel performance codes based on the finite element method (FE) to calculate the temperature, stress, and strain in 2D or 3D. The gap conductance model for FE can be a challenging issue in terms of convergence and nonlinearity because the elements that are positioned in a gap have a different gap conductance, and the boundary conditions of the gap vary at each iteration step. In this paper, the specified 3D dynamic gap element has been proposed and implemented to simulate asymmetric thermo-mechanical fuel behavior. A thermo-mechanical 3D finite element module incorporating a gap element has been implemented using FORTRAN77. To evaluate the proposed 3D gap element, the missing pellet surface (MPS), which results in an asymmetric heat transfer in the pellet and cladding, was simulated. As a result, the maximum temperature of a pellet for the MPS problem calculated with the specified 3D gap element is much higher than the temperature calculated with a uniform gap conductance model that a multidimensional fuel performance code employs. The results demonstrate that a 3D simulation is essential to evaluate the temperature and stress of the pellet and cladding for an asymmetric geometry simulation. (author)

  1. VIBA-LAB2: a virtual ion beam analysis laboratory software package incorporating elemental map simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, S.J.; Orlic, I.; Sanchez, J.L.; Watt, F.

    1999-01-01

    The software package VIBA-lab1, which incorporates PIXE and RBS energy spectra simulation has now been extended to include the simulation of elemental maps from 3D structures. VIBA-lab1 allows the user to define a wide variety of experimental parameters, e.g. energy and species of incident ions, excitation and detection geometry, etc. When the relevant experimental parameters as well as target composition are defined, the program can then simulate the corresponding PIXE and RBS spectra. VIBA-LAB2 has been written with applications in nuclear microscopy in mind. A set of drag-and-drop tools has been incorporated to allow the user to define a three-dimensional sample object of mixed elemental composition. PIXE energy spectra simulations are then carried out on pixel-by-pixel basis and the corresponding intensity distributions or elemental maps can be computed. Several simulated intensity distributions for some 3D objects are demonstrated, and simulations obtained from a simple IC are compared with experimental results

  2. Modeling Fragment Simulating Projectile Penetration into Steel Plates Using Finite Elements and Meshfree Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James O’Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulating fragment penetration into steel involves complicated modeling of severe behavior of the materials through multiple phases of response. Penetration of a fragment-like projectile was simulated using finite element (FE and meshfree particle formulations. Extreme deformation and failure of the material during the penetration event were modeled with several approaches to evaluate each as to how well it represents the actual physics of the material and structural response. A steel Fragment Simulating Projectile (FSP – designed to simulate a fragment of metal from a weapon casing – was simulated for normal impact into a flat square plate. A range of impact velocities was used to examine levels of exit velocity ranging from relatively small to one on the same level as the impact velocity. The numerical code EPIC, used for all the simulations presented herein, contains the element and particle formulations, as well as the explicit methodology and constitutive models needed to perform these simulations. These simulations were compared against experimental data, evaluating the damage caused to the projectile and the target plates, as well as comparing the residual velocity when the projectile perforated the target.

  3. A Facility for Long-Term Mars Simulation Experiments: The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars Liengaard; Merrison, Jonathan; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Mikkelsen, Karina Aarup; Kristoffersen, Tommy; Nørnberg, Per; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Finster, Kai

    2008-06-01

    We describe the design, construction, and pilot operation of a Mars simulation facility comprised of a cryogenic environmental chamber, an atmospheric gas analyzer, and a xenon/mercury discharge source for UV generation. The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH) consists of a double-walled cylindrical chamber. The double wall provides a cooling mantle through which liquid N2 can be circulated. A load-lock system that consists of a small pressure-exchange chamber, which can be evacuated, allows for the exchange of samples without changing the chamber environment. Fitted within the MESCH is a carousel, which holds up to 10 steel sample tubes. Rotation of the carousel is controlled by an external motor. Each sample in the carousel can be placed at any desired position. Environmental data, such as temperature, pressure, and UV exposure time, are computer logged and used in automated feedback mechanisms, enabling a wide variety of experiments that include time series. Tests of the simulation facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to produce temperature cycles and maintain low temperature (down to -140°C), low atmospheric pressure (5 10 mbar), and a gas composition like that of Mars during long-term experiments.

  4. Determination of short-lived trace elements in environmental samples by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wardani, S.; Sihombing, E.; Hamzah, A.; Rochidi; Hery, P.S.; Hartaman, S.; Iman, J.

    1998-01-01

    Concentration of a short-lived trace elements in environmental samples were determined by neutron activation analysis, a counting loss often occur due to the high counting rate. A Pile-Up Rejecter (PUR) electric circuit was installed in counting a short-lived trace elements by a γ-ray spectrometer in order to correct a counting loss. The samples were irradiated for 30∼60 seconds at neutron flux of 3.5 x 10 12 n.cm -2 .s -1 , then the samples cooled for 120 second and counted for 180 second using this system. The nuclides concentration in the varieties environmental samples have a difference analysis result, was more accurate and precise, which the measured result would be 30 % more higher by PUR system than the result would be counted using a conventional γ-ray spectrometry method

  5. Human scalp hair as an epidemiologic monitor of environmental exposure to elemental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatt, A.; Sajjad, M.; DeSilva, K.N.; Secord, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The suitability of using scalp hair as an epidemiological monitor of environmental exposure is being evaluated. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) methods using short-lived nuclides have been developed for simultaneous multielement determinations in scalp hair. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) method has been used for measuring Pb and Cd. Precision and accuracy of the methods have been evaluated by analyzing standard reference materials and IAEA Intercomparison Hair Sample HH-1. A detailed study on different hair washing methods has been done and reported here. The effect of exogenous contaminants from shampoo on levels of certain elements has been studied. Variation of trace element levels along the longitudinal segments of hair strands has been investigated. The methodologies have been applied to screen population groups exposed to environmental arsenic and to study trichothiodystrophy. (author)

  6. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  7. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  8. Monte Carlo particle simulation and finite-element techniques for tandem mirror transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Matsuda, Y.; Stewart, J.J. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A description is given of numerical methods used in the study of axial transport in tandem mirrors owing to Coulomb collisions and rf diffusion. The methods are Monte Carlo particle simulations and direct solution to the Fokker-Planck equations by finite-element expansion. (author)

  9. Incorporating in vivo fall assessments in the simulation of femoral fractures with finite element models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijden, A.M. van der; Janssen, D.W.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Groen, B.E.; Nienhuis, B.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Tanck, E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Femoral fractures are a major health issue. Most experimental and finite element (FE) fracture studies use polymethylmethacrylate cups on the greater trochanter (GT) to simulate fall impact loads. However, in vivo fall studies showed that the femur is loaded distally from the GT. Our objective was

  10. Finite element simulations and experiments of ballistic impacts on high performance PE composite material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herlaar, K.; Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der; Jacobs, M.J.N.

    2005-01-01

    The use of lightweight composite armour concepts is essential for the protection of future combat systems, both vehicles and personal. The design of such armour systems is challenging due to the complex material behaviour. Finite element simulations can be used to help understand the important

  11. A Lagrangian finite element method for the simulation of flow of non-newtonian liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Ole; Bisgaard, C

    1983-01-01

    A Lagrangian method for the simulation of flow of non-Newtonian liquids is implemented. The fluid mechanical equations are formulated in the form of a variational principle, and a discretization is performed by finite elements. The method is applied to the slow of a contravariant convected Maxwell...

  12. PRIAM: A self consistent finite element code for particle simulation in electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Meur, G.; Touze, F.

    1990-06-01

    A 2 1/2 dimensional, relativistic particle simulation code is described. A short review of the used mixed finite element method is given. The treatment of the driving terms (charge and current densities), initial, boundary conditions are exposed. Graphical results are shown

  13. Discrete element simulation of mill charge in 3D using the BLAZE-DEM GPU framework

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, Nicolin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulation of charge motion in ball, semi autogenous (SAG) and autogenous mills has advanced to a stage where the effects of lifter design, power draft and product size can be evaluated with sufficient accuracy...

  14. Sound propagation in dry granular materials : discrete element simulations, theory, and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouraille, O.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    In this study sound wave propagation through different types of dry confined granular systems is studied. With three-dimensional discrete element simulations, theory and experiments, the influence of several micro-scale properties: friction, dissipation, particle rotation, and contact disorder, on

  15. Experiments and discrete element simulation of the dosing of cohesive powders in a simplified geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imole, Olukayode Isaiah; Krijgsman, Dinant; Weinhart, Thomas; Magnanimo, Vanessa; Chavez Montes, Bruno E.; Ramaioli, Marco; Luding, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We perform experiments and discrete element simulations on the dosing of cohesive granular materials in a simplified geometry. The setup is a canister box where the powder is dosed out through the action of a constant-pitch coil feeder connected to a motor. A dosing step consists of a rotation

  16. Discrete element simulation of internal stress in SiCp/aluminum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SiCp / Al-Mg-Si matrix composite was prepared by pressureless Infiltration Process. By discrete element method, microcosmic two-dimensional numerical model of SiCp / Al matrix composites was established and the simulation of the size and distribution of micro-contact pressure and tension was performed from small load ...

  17. Monte Carlo particle simulation and finite-element techniques for tandem mirror transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien, T.D.; Cohen, B.I.; Matsuda, Y.; Stewart, J.J. Jr.

    1985-12-01

    A description is given of numerical methods used in the study of axial transport in tandem mirrors owing to Coulomb collisions and rf diffusion. The methods are Monte Carlo particle simulations and direct solution to the Fokker-Planck equations by finite-element expansion. 11 refs

  18. An element-based finite-volume method approach for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcondes, Francisco [Federal University of Ceara, Fortaleza (Brazil). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Material Science], e-mail: marcondes@ufc.br; Varavei, Abdoljalil; Sepehrnoori, Kamy [The University of Texas at Austin (United States). Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering Dept.], e-mails: varavei@mail.utexas.edu, kamys@mail.utexas.edu

    2010-07-01

    An element-based finite-volume approach in conjunction with unstructured grids for naturally fractured compositional reservoir simulation is presented. In this approach, both the discrete fracture and the matrix mass balances are taken into account without any additional models to couple the matrix and discrete fractures. The mesh, for two dimensional domains, can be built of triangles, quadrilaterals, or a mix of these elements. However, due to the available mesh generator to handle both matrix and discrete fractures, only results using triangular elements will be presented. The discrete fractures are located along the edges of each element. To obtain the approximated matrix equation, each element is divided into three sub-elements and then the mass balance equations for each component are integrated along each interface of the sub-elements. The finite-volume conservation equations are assembled from the contribution of all the elements that share a vertex, creating a cell vertex approach. The discrete fracture equations are discretized only along the edges of each element and then summed up with the matrix equations in order to obtain a conservative equation for both matrix and discrete fractures. In order to mimic real field simulations, the capillary pressure is included in both matrix and discrete fracture media. In the implemented model, the saturation field in the matrix and discrete fractures can be different, but the potential of each phase in the matrix and discrete fracture interface needs to be the same. The results for several naturally fractured reservoirs are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the method. (author)

  19. Environmental pollution studies. Quantitative determination of elements in the air particulate matter by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutisna; Hidayat, Achmad; Muhayatun; Supriatna, Dadang

    2006-01-01

    Regarding to the 2002 PNCA Program for the Utilization of INAA in the Environmental Study, the elemental determination of air particulate matter have been done. Two sampling site were chosen to collect a PMs samples, i.e. Lembang and Bandung that represent the rural and the urban region respectively. The period of sampling was January 2002 to November 2002. Air sample was collect by GANT Stacked air sampler using 47 mm diameter cellulose filter which have a pore size of 0.45 μm and 8 μm for fine and coarse particle respectively. Quantitative elemental determination has been done using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis based on a comparative method. The elemental distributions on fine and coarse fraction of air particulate matter have been analyzed for both sampling sites as well as the enrichment factor (EF) for all elements interest. The result shows that the average annual concentrations of fine and coarse PMs in the Lembang sampling site were 7.8 μg.m -3 and 1.6 μg.m -3 respectively. Meanwhile at Bandung sampling site, the PMs are higher than that a Lembang sampling site, i.e. 14.4 μg.m -3 and 22.5 μg.m -3 for fine and coarse PMs respectively. The fine fraction was higher than the coarse fraction at Lembang sampling site, but at Bandung sampling site the fine fraction was lower than the coarse fraction. Fifteen elements of Na, Al, V, Mn, Br, I, Cl, Sc, Co, Fe, Cr, Zn, La, Sb and Sm were analyzed for both sampling site. Among those elements concerned, Na, Al, Br, Cl and Fe were major constituent elements in all fractions that have a concentration more than 40 ng.cm -3 . Generally, the concentration of elements determined in the urban sampling site was higher than that in the rural site. Al, V, Mn, Sc, Co and Fe are relatively higher in concentration in coarse fraction of urban site. Br element concentration was not significantly different for both sampling site. The EF values of most elements concerned are generally also higher for the fine fraction

  20. Asymmetric Rolling Process Simulations by Dynamic Explicit Crystallographic Homogenized Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Terao, Toshihiro; Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the asymmetric rolling (ASR) has been applied to the material processing of aluminum alloy sheet to control micro-crystal structure and texture in order to improve the mechanical properties. Previously, several studies aimed at high formability sheet generation have been carried out experimentally, but finite element simulations to predict the deformation induced texture evolution of the asymmetrically rolled sheet metals have not been investigated rigorously. In this study, crystallographic homogenized finite element (FE) codes are developed and applied to analyze the asymmetrical rolling processes. The textures of sheet metals were measured by electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD), and compared with FE simulations. The results from the dynamic explicit type Crystallographic homogenization FEM code shows that this type of simulation is a comprehensive tool to predict the plastic induced texture evolution

  1. Stress analysis and deformation prediction of sheet metal workpieces based on finite element simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren Penghao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After aluminum alloy sheet metal parts machining, the residual stress release will cause a large deformation. To solve this problem, this paper takes a aluminum alloy sheet aerospace workpiece as an example, establishes the theoretical model of elastic deformation and the finite element model, and places quantitative initial stress in each element of machining area, analyses stress release simulation and deformation. Through different initial stress release simulative analysis of deformation of the workpiece, a linear relationship between initial stress and deformation is found; Through simulative analysis of coupling direction-stress release, the superposing relationship between the deformation caused by coupling direction-stress and the deformation caused by single direction stress is found. The research results provide important theoretical support for the stress threshold setting and deformation controlling of the workpieces in the production practice.

  2. Calibration of the TIME2 environmental simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Hiscock, K.; Lloyd, J.

    1991-04-01

    The TARGET finite-difference groundwater modelling code has been used to reconstruct the hydrogeological environment of the area around Killingholme, Humberside, UK. Reconstructions have been made for the present day and for three periods during the past 120,000 years. Permeability development in the Chalk and the stratified nature of the current groundwater system act as boundary conditions for these reconstructions. The results from these reconstructions have been compared with values used by the environmental simulation code TIME2. With optimisation of partition coefficients within the water budget sub-model, values for recharge from TIME2 accord closely with those from this study for temperate and boreal conditions. TIME2 over-estimates recharge during tundra climate states because it does not account for permafrost. (author)

  3. Numerical simulation of mechatronic sensors and actuators finite elements for computational multiphysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenbacher, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Like the previous editions also the third edition of this book combines the detailed physical modeling of mechatronic systems and their precise numerical simulation using the Finite Element (FE) method. Thereby, the basic chapter concerning the Finite Element (FE) method is enhanced, provides now also a description of higher order finite elements (both for nodal and edge finite elements) and a detailed discussion of non-conforming mesh techniques. The author enhances and improves many discussions on principles and methods. In particular, more emphasis is put on the description of single fields by adding the flow field. Corresponding to these field, the book is augmented with the new chapter about coupled flow-structural mechanical systems. Thereby, the discussion of computational aeroacoustics is extended towards perturbation approaches, which allows a decomposition of flow and acoustic quantities within the flow region. Last but not least, applications are updated and restructured so that the book meets mode...

  4. On using moving windows in finite element time domain simulation for long accelerator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.-Q.; Candel, Arno; Ng, Cho; Ko, Kwok

    2010-01-01

    A finite element moving window technique is developed to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic waves induced by the transit of a charged particle beam inside large and long structures. The window moving along with the beam in the computational domain adopts high-order finite element basis functions through p refinement and/or a high-resolution mesh through h refinement so that a sufficient accuracy is attained with substantially reduced computational costs. Algorithms to transfer discretized fields from one mesh to another, which are the keys to implementing a moving window in a finite element unstructured mesh, are presented. Numerical experiments are carried out using the moving window technique to compute short-range wakefields in long accelerator structures. The results are compared with those obtained from the normal finite element time domain (FETD) method and the advantages of using the moving window technique are discussed.

  5. Heat transfer model and finite element formulation for simulation of selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Souvik; Juha, Mario; Shephard, Mark S.; Maniatty, Antoinette M.

    2017-10-01

    A novel approach and finite element formulation for modeling the melting, consolidation, and re-solidification process that occurs in selective laser melting additive manufacturing is presented. Two state variables are introduced to track the phase (melt/solid) and the degree of consolidation (powder/fully dense). The effect of the consolidation on the absorption of the laser energy into the material as it transforms from a porous powder to a dense melt is considered. A Lagrangian finite element formulation, which solves the governing equations on the unconsolidated reference configuration is derived, which naturally considers the effect of the changing geometry as the powder melts without needing to update the simulation domain. The finite element model is implemented into a general-purpose parallel finite element solver. Results are presented comparing to experimental results in the literature for a single laser track with good agreement. Predictions for a spiral laser pattern are also shown.

  6. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management: Development and Demonstrations - 12532

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moulton, J. David; Dixon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), Technology Innovation and Development is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of capabilities, which are organized into Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and a High-Performance Computing Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities target a level of functionality to allow end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model and management of data for model input. The High-Performance Computing capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The new capabilities are demonstrated through working groups, including one focused on the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone. The ASCEM program focused on planning during the first year and executing a prototype tool-set for an early demonstration of individual components. Subsequently, ASCEM has focused on developing and demonstrating an integrated set of capabilities, making progress toward a version of the capabilities that can be used to engage end users. Demonstration of capabilities continues to be implemented through working groups. Three different working groups, one focused on EM problems in the deep vadose zone, another investigating attenuation mechanisms for metals and radionuclides, and a third focusing on waste tank performance assessment, continue to make progress. The project

  7. Designing environmental campaigns by using agent-based simulations: strategies for changing environmental attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosler, Hans-Joachim; Martens, Thomas

    2008-09-01

    Agent-based computer simulation was used to create artificial communities in which each individual was constructed according to the principles of the elaboration likelihood model of Petty and Cacioppo [1986. The elaboration likelihood model of persuasion. In: Berkowitz, L. (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology. Academic Press, New York, NY, pp. 123-205]. Campaigning strategies and community characteristics were varied systematically to understand and test their impact on attitudes towards environmental protection. The results show that strong arguments influence a green (environmentally concerned) population with many contacts most effectively, while peripheral cues have the greatest impact on a non-green population with fewer contacts. Overall, deeper information scrutiny increases the impact of strong arguments but is especially important for convincing green populations. Campaigns involving person-to-person communication are superior to mass-media campaigns because they can be adapted to recipients' characteristics.

  8. Trace-element geochemistry of coal resource development related to environmental quality and health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This report assesses for decision makers and those involved in coal resource development the environmental and health impacts of trace-element effects arising from significant increases in the use of coal, unless unusual precautions are invoked. Increasing demands for energy and the pressing need for decreased dependence of the United States on imported oil require greater use of coal to meet the nation's energy needs during the next decade. If coal production and consumption are increased at a greatly accelerated rate, concern arises over the release, mobilization, transportation, distribution, and assimilation of certain trace elements, with possible adverse effects on the environment and human health. It is, therefore, important to understand their geochemical pathways from coal and rocks via air, water, and soil to plants, animals, and ultimately humans, and their relation to health and disease. To address this problem, the Panel on Trace Element Geochemistry of Coal Resource Development Related to Health (PECH) was established. Certain assumptions were made by the Panel to highlight the central issues of trace elements and health and to avoid unwarranted duplication of other studies. Based on the charge to the Panel and these assumptions, this report describes the amounts and distribution of trace elements related to the coal source; the various methods of coal extraction, preparation, transportation, and use; and the disposal or recycling of the remaining residues or wastes. The known or projected health effects are discussed at the end of each section.

  9. Elemental analysis of occupational and environmental lung diseases by electron probe microanalyzer with wavelength dispersive spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Toshinori; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Occupational and environmental lung diseases are a group of pulmonary disorders caused by inhalation of harmful particles, mists, vapors or gases. Mineralogical analysis is not generally required in the diagnosis of most cases of these diseases. Apart from minerals that are encountered rarely or only in specific occupations, small quantities of mineral dusts are present in the healthy lung. As such when mineralogical analysis is required, quantitative or semi-quantitative methods must be employed. An electron probe microanalyzer with wavelength dispersive spectrometer (EPMA-WDS) enables analysis of human lung tissue for deposits of elements by both qualitative and semi-quantitative methods. Since 1993, we have analyzed 162 cases of suspected occupational and environmental lung diseases using an EPMA-WDS. Our institute has been accepting online requests for elemental analysis of lung tissue samples by EPMA-WDS since January 2011. Hard metal lung disease is an occupational interstitial lung disease that primarily affects workers exposed to the dust of tungsten carbide. The characteristic pathological findings of the disease are giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) with centrilobular fibrosis, surrounded by mild alveolitis with giant cells within the alveolar space. EPMA-WDS analysis of biopsied lung tissue from patients with GIP has demonstrated that tungsten and/or cobalt is distributed in the giant cells and centrilobular fibrosing lesion in GIP. Pneumoconiosis, caused by amorphous silica, and acute interstitial pneumonia, associated with the giant tsunami, were also elementally analyzed by EPMA-WDS. The results suggest that commonly found elements, such as silicon, aluminum, and iron, may cause occupational and environmental lung diseases. Copyright © 2013 The Japanese Respiratory Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Numerical simulation system for environmental studies: SPEEDI-MP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Chino, Masamichi; Terada, Hiroaki; Harayama, Takaya; Kobayashi, Takuya; Tsuduki, Katsunori; Kim, Keyong-Ok; Furuno, Akiko

    2006-09-01

    A numerical simulation system SPEEDI-MP has been developed to apply for various environmental studies. SPEEDI-MP consists of dynamical models and material transport models for the atmospheric, terrestrial, and oceanic environments, meteorological and geographical database for model inputs, and system utilities for file management, visualization, analysis, etc., using graphical user interfaces (GUIs). As a numerical simulation tool, a model coupling program (model coupler) has been developed. It controls parallel calculations of several models and data exchanges among them to realize the dynamical coupling of the models. A coupled model system for water circulation has been constructed with atmosphere, ocean, wave, hydrology, and land-surface models using the model coupler. System utility GUIs are based on the Web technology, allowing users to manipulate all the functions on the system using their own PCs via the internet. In this system, the source estimation function in the atmospheric transport model can be executed on the grid computer system. Performance tests of the coupled model system for water circulation were also carried out for the flood event at Saudi Arabia in January 2005 and the storm surge case by the hurricane KATRINA in August 2005. (author)

  11. Representative elements: A step to large-scale fracture system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemo, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    Large-scale simulation of flow and transport in fractured media requires the development of a technique to represent the effect of a large number of fractures. Representative elements are used as a tool to model a subset of a fracture system as a single distributed entity. Representative elements are part of a modeling concept called dual permeability. Dual permeability modeling combines discrete fracture simulation of the most important fractures with the distributed modeling of the less important fracture of a fracture system. This study investigates the use of stochastic analysis to determine properties of representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. Simple fracture systems are treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. Explicit formulation of the hydraulic conductivity and transport dispersion reveals the dependence of these important characteristics on the parameters used to describe the fracture system. Understanding these dependencies will help to focus efforts to identify the characteristics of fracture systems. Simulations of stochastically generated fracture sets do not provide this explicit functional dependence on the fracture system parameters. 12 refs., 6 figs

  12. Cell-element simulations to optimize the performance of osmotic processes in porous membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2018-05-11

    We present a new module of the software tool PoreChem for 3D simulations of osmotic processes at the cell-element scale. We consider the most general fully coupled model (see e.g., Sagiv and Semiat (2011)) in 3D to evaluate the impact on the membrane performance of both internal and external concentration polarization, which occurs in a cell-element for different operational conditions. The model consists of the Navier–Stokes–Brinkman system to describe the free fluid flow and the flow within the membrane with selective and support layers, a convection–diffusion equation to describe the solute transport, and nonlinear interface conditions to fully couple these equations. First, we briefly describe the mathematical model and discuss the discretization of the continuous model, the iterative solution, and the software implementation. Then, we present the analytical and numerical validation of the simulation tool. Next, we perform and discuss numerical simulations for a case study. The case study concerns the design of a cell element for the forward osmosis experiments. Using the developed software tool we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the performance of a cell element that we designed for laboratory experiments of forward osmosis, and discuss the differences between the numerical solutions obtained with the full 3D and reduced 2D models. Finally, we demonstrate how the software enables investigating membrane heterogeneities.

  13. Finite-element simulation of blood perfusion in muscle tissue during compression and sustained contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankan, W J; Huyghe, J M; Slaaf, D W; van Donkelaar, C C; Drost, M R; Janssen, J D; Huson, A

    1997-09-01

    Mechanical interaction between tissue stress and blood perfusion in skeletal muscles plays an important role in blood flow impediment during sustained contraction. The exact mechanism of this interaction is not clear, and experimental investigation of this mechanism is difficult. We developed a finite-element model of the mechanical behavior of blood-perfused muscle tissue, which accounts for mechanical blood-tissue interaction in maximally vasodilated vasculature. Verification of the model was performed by comparing finite-element results of blood pressure and flow with experimental measurements in a muscle that is subject to well-controlled mechanical loading conditions. In addition, we performed simulations of blood perfusion during tetanic, isometric contraction and maximal vasodilation in a simplified, two-dimensional finite-element model of a rat calf muscle. A vascular waterfall in the venous compartment was identified as the main cause for blood flow impediment both in the experiment and in the finite-element simulations. The validated finite-element model offers possibilities for detailed analysis of blood perfusion in three-dimensional muscle models under complicated loading conditions.

  14. Simulation of Semi-Solid Material Mechanical Behavior Using a Combined Discrete/Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sistaninia, M.; Phillion, A. B.; Drezet, J.-M.; Rappaz, M.

    2011-01-01

    As a necessary step toward the quantitative prediction of hot tearing defects, a three-dimensional stress-strain simulation based on a combined finite element (FE)/discrete element method (DEM) has been developed that is capable of predicting the mechanical behavior of semisolid metallic alloys during solidification. The solidification model used for generating the initial solid-liquid structure is based on a Voronoi tessellation of randomly distributed nucleation centers and a solute diffusion model for each element of this tessellation. At a given fraction of solid, the deformation is then simulated with the solid grains being modeled using an elastoviscoplastic constitutive law, whereas the remaining liquid layers at grain boundaries are approximated by flexible connectors, each consisting of a spring element and a damper element acting in parallel. The model predictions have been validated against Al-Cu alloy experimental data from the literature. The results show that a combined FE/DEM approach is able to express the overall mechanical behavior of semisolid alloys at the macroscale based on the morphology of the grain structure. For the first time, the localization of strain in the intergranular regions is taken into account. Thus, this approach constitutes an indispensible step towards the development of a comprehensive model of hot tearing.

  15. FUDA MOD-2: a computer program for simulation the performance of fuel element validation exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chouhan, S.K.; Tripathi, R.M.; Prasad, P.N.; Chauhan, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    The PHWR fuel element performance is evaluated using the fuel analysis computer code FUDA MOD2. It is specifically written for performance simulation of UO 2 fuel pellet, located in zirconium alloy sheath operating under coolant pressure. For specific element power histories, the code investigates the variables and their interactions that govern fuel element performance. The input data requires pellet dimensions, element dimensions, sheath properties, heat transfer data, thermal hydraulic parameters of coolant, the inner filler gas composition, flux gradient and linear heat ratings (LHR) at different burn up. The output data generated by the code are radial temperature profile of fuel and sheath, fuel sheath-gap heat transfer coefficient, fission gas generated and released, fission gas pressure, sheath stress and strain for different burn-up zones. The code has been verified against literature data and post irradiation examinations carried out. It is also bench marked against various international fuel element simulation programmes available with water cooled reactors operating countries. The present paper describes the FUDA MOD2 code verification studies carried out using the literature data and post irradiation examination data. (author)

  16. A 3D finite element simulation model for TBM tunnelling in soft ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Thomas; Meschke, Günther

    2004-12-01

    A three-dimensional finite element simulation model for shield-driven tunnel excavation is presented. The model takes into account all relevant components of the construction process (the soil and the ground water, the tunnel boring machine with frictional contact to the soil, the hydraulic jacks, the tunnel lining and the tail void grouting). The paper gives a detailed description of the model components and the stepwise procedure to simulate the construction process. The soil and the grout material are modelled as saturated porous media using a two-field finite element formulation. This allows to take into account the groundwater, the grouting pressure and the fluid interaction between the soil and slurry at the cutting face and between the soil and grout around the tail void. A Cam-Clay plasticity model is used to describe the material behaviour of cohesive soils. The cementitious grouting material in the tail void is modelled as an ageing elastic material with time-dependent stiffness and permeability. To allow for an automated computation of arbitrarily long and also curvilinear driving paths with suitable finite element meshes, the simulation procedure has been fully automated. The simulation of a tunnel advance in soft cohesive soil below the ground water table is presented and the results are compared with measurements taken from the literature. Copyright

  17. Face-based smoothed finite element method for real-time simulation of soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal, Andrea; Bessard Duparc, Rémi; Bui, Huu Phuoc; Paulus, Christoph J.; Peterlik, Igor; Cotin, Stéphane

    2017-03-01

    In soft tissue surgery, a tumor and other anatomical structures are usually located using the preoperative CT or MR images. However, due to the deformation of the concerned tissues, this information suffers from inaccuracy when employed directly during the surgery. In order to account for these deformations in the planning process, the use of a bio-mechanical model of the tissues is needed. Such models are often designed using the finite element method (FEM), which is, however, computationally expensive, in particular when a high accuracy of the simulation is required. In our work, we propose to use a smoothed finite element method (S-FEM) in the context of modeling of the soft tissue deformation. This numerical technique has been introduced recently to overcome the overly stiff behavior of the standard FEM and to improve the solution accuracy and the convergence rate in solid mechanics problems. In this paper, a face-based smoothed finite element method (FS-FEM) using 4-node tetrahedral elements is presented. We show that in some cases, the method allows for reducing the number of degrees of freedom, while preserving the accuracy of the discretization. The method is evaluated on a simulation of a cantilever beam loaded at the free end and on a simulation of a 3D cube under traction and compression forces. Further, it is applied to the simulation of the brain shift and of the kidney's deformation. The results demonstrate that the method outperforms the standard FEM in a bending scenario and that has similar accuracy as the standard FEM in the simulations of the brain-shift and of the kidney's deformation.

  18. Large Eddy Simulation of turbulent flows in compound channels with a finite element code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xavier, C.M.; Petry, A.P.; Moeller, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical investigation of the developing flow in a compound channel formed by a rectangular main channel and a gap in one of the sidewalls. A three dimensional Large Eddy Simulation computational code with the classic Smagorinsky model is introduced, where the transient flow is modeled through the conservation equations of mass and momentum of a quasi-incompressible, isothermal continuous medium. Finite Element Method, Taylor-Galerkin scheme and linear hexahedrical elements are applied. Numerical results of velocity profile show the development of a shear layer in agreement with experimental results obtained with Pitot tube and hot wires. (author)

  19. Simulation of three-dimensional, time-dependent, incompressible flows by a finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.T.; Gresho, P.M.; Lee, R.L.; Upson, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    A finite element model has been developed for simulating the dynamics of problems encountered in atmospheric pollution and safety assessment studies. The model is based on solving the set of three-dimensional, time-dependent, conservation equations governing incompressible flows. Spatial discretization is performed via a modified Galerkin finite element method, and time integration is carried out via the forward Euler method (pressure is computed implicitly, however). Several cost-effective techniques (including subcycling, mass lumping, and reduced Gauss-Legendre quadrature) which have been implemented are discussed. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of the model

  20. BALANCED SCORECARDS EVALUATION MODEL THAT INCLUDES ELEMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USING AHP MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovanović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is oriented on improvement of environmental management system (EMS using BSC (Balanced Scorecard model that presents strategic model of measurem ents and improvement of organisational performance. The research will present approach of objectives and environmental management me trics involvement (proposed by literature review in conventional BSC in "Ad Barska plovi dba" organisation. Further we will test creation of ECO-BSC model based on business activities of non-profit organisations in order to improve envir onmental management system in parallel with other systems of management. Using this approach we may obtain 4 models of BSC that includ es elements of environmen tal management system for AD "Barska plovidba". Taking into acc ount that implementation and evaluation need long period of time in AD "Barska plovidba", the final choice will be based on 14598 (Information technology - Software product evaluation and ISO 9126 (Software engineering - Product quality using AHP method. Those standards are usually used for evaluation of quality software product and computer programs that serve in organisation as support and factors for development. So, AHP model will be bas ed on evolution criteria based on suggestion of ISO 9126 standards and types of evaluation from two evaluation teams. Members of team & will be experts in BSC and environmental management system that are not em ployed in AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation. The members of team 2 will be managers of AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation (including manage rs from environmental department. Merging results based on previously cr eated two AHP models, one can obtain the most appropriate BSC that includes elements of environmental management system. The chosen model will present at the same time suggestion for approach choice including ecological metrics in conventional BSC model for firm that has at least one ECO strategic orientation.

  1. The spatial module as environmental conditioning element: the Spanish pavilion by Corrales and Molezun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Suárez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the 50s a review of Modern Movement, which assimilates modular serialization and a connection with the environmental context, although with remote premises of the contemporary paradigms of sustainability arise. In this context, within national stage, stands out the Spanish pavilion at the Brussels International Exhibition in 1958 by Corrales and Molezún. This work seeks a quantitatively reveal of the environmental performance of the pavilion in its two locations and settings, in Brussels and Madrid, through simulation and analysis of energy and lighting models which reproduces the characteristic of the pavilion with the purpose of contributing to give a new critical point of view, valuing the module efficiency to adapt to different environmental conditions. The completed analysis reveals the influence of the climate, compactness and orientation, as in the difficulties associated with thermal comfort and natural light when glazing percentage are important and there are high solar radiation settings.

  2. Numerical simulations of earthquakes and the dynamics of fault systems using the Finite Element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, L. M.; Mora, P.; Weatherley, D.; Gross, L.; Xing, H.

    2006-12-01

    Simulations using the Finite Element method are widely used in many engineering applications and for the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs). Computational models based on the solution of PDEs play a key role in earth systems simulations. We present numerical modelling of crustal fault systems where the dynamic elastic wave equation is solved using the Finite Element method. This is achieved using a high level computational modelling language, escript, available as open source software from ACcESS (Australian Computational Earth Systems Simulator), the University of Queensland. Escript is an advanced geophysical simulation software package developed at ACcESS which includes parallel equation solvers, data visualisation and data analysis software. The escript library was implemented to develop a flexible Finite Element model which reliably simulates the mechanism of faulting and the physics of earthquakes. Both 2D and 3D elastodynamic models are being developed to study the dynamics of crustal fault systems. Our final goal is to build a flexible model which can be applied to any fault system with user-defined geometry and input parameters. To study the physics of earthquake processes, two different time scales must be modelled, firstly the quasi-static loading phase which gradually increases stress in the system (~100years), and secondly the dynamic rupture process which rapidly redistributes stress in the system (~100secs). We will discuss the solution of the time-dependent elastic wave equation for an arbitrary fault system using escript. This involves prescribing the correct initial stress distribution in the system to simulate the quasi-static loading of faults to failure; determining a suitable frictional constitutive law which accurately reproduces the dynamics of the stick/slip instability at the faults; and using a robust time integration scheme. These dynamic models generate data and information that can be used for earthquake forecasting.

  3. Explicit dynamics for numerical simulation of crack propagation by the extended finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menouillard, T.

    2007-09-01

    Computerized simulation is nowadays an integrating part of design and validation processes of mechanical structures. Simulation tools are more and more performing allowing a very acute description of the phenomena. Moreover, these tools are not limited to linear mechanics but are developed to describe more difficult behaviours as for instance structures damage which interests the safety domain. A dynamic or static load can thus lead to a damage, a crack and then a rupture of the structure. The fast dynamics allows to simulate 'fast' phenomena such as explosions, shocks and impacts on structure. The application domain is various. It concerns for instance the study of the lifetime and the accidents scenario of the nuclear reactor vessel. It is then very interesting, for fast dynamics codes, to be able to anticipate in a robust and stable way such phenomena: the assessment of damage in the structure and the simulation of crack propagation form an essential stake. The extended finite element method has the advantage to break away from mesh generation and from fields projection during the crack propagation. Effectively, crack is described kinematically by an appropriate strategy of enrichment of supplementary freedom degrees. Difficulties connecting the spatial discretization of this method with the temporal discretization of an explicit calculation scheme has then been revealed; these difficulties are the diagonal writing of the mass matrix and the associated stability time step. Here are presented two methods of mass matrix diagonalization based on the kinetic energy conservation, and studies of critical time steps for various enriched finite elements. The interest revealed here is that the time step is not more penalizing than those of the standard finite elements problem. Comparisons with numerical simulations on another code allow to validate the theoretical works. A crack propagation test in mixed mode has been exploited in order to verify the simulation

  4. Activation analysis of hair as an indicator of contamination of man by environmental trace element pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryabukhin, Yu.S.

    1976-10-01

    The burning of fossil fuel, discharges from metallurgical and chemical plants, the wide use of chemicals, and other human activities, result in releasing into the biosphere large quantities of elements which are found in relatively low concentrations in the human organism. The pollution of the biosphere by such trace elements, and in particular heavy metals, has reached such proportions that on the scale of significance of the factors causing the 'stressed' state of the environment of heavy metals occupy the second place and, according to forecasts, may in the future move on to the first. In the problem of pollution of the biosphere, man himself undoubtedly occupies the central position as a target. The pollution of air, soil and water, the contamination of micro-organisms, plants and animals are certainly growing into a serious threat and leading to heavy losses. However, it would be a real disaster if man himself became contaminated to levels giving rise to large scale harmful somatic or genetic effects. It is therefore an urgent problem today to determine the initial levels of trace elements in man and the extent of his contamination in areas where these elements are expected to show anomalous concentrations. Attention should be paid in the first place to those trace elements which probably play no physiological role, are particularly abundant in the environment, and have high toxicity (arsenic, mercury, lead, cadmium, etc.). Moreover, it should be born in mind that in anomalously high concentrations even the physiologically necessary trace elements (copper, zinc, manganese, fluorine, etc.) cause harmful effects. This paper justifies the use of hair samples as a biological indicator of environmental pollutants from physiological and morphological aspect and recommends on sample preparation and analysis methods

  5. Simultaneous shifts in elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids of Emiliania huxleyi in response to environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Rong; Ismar, Stefanie M. H.; Sommer, Ulrich; Zhao, Meixun

    2018-02-01

    Climate-driven changes in environmental conditions have significant and complex effects on marine ecosystems. Variability in phytoplankton elements and biochemicals can be important for global ocean biogeochemistry and ecological functions, while there is currently limited understanding on how elements and biochemicals respond to the changing environments in key coccolithophore species such as Emiliania huxleyi. We investigated responses of elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids (FAs) in a strain of E. huxleyi under three temperatures (12, 18 and 24 °C), three N : P supply ratios (molar ratios 10:1, 24:1 and 63:1) and two pCO2 levels (560 and 2400 µatm). Overall, C : N : P stoichiometry showed the most pronounced response to N : P supply ratios, with high ratios of particulate organic carbon vs. particulate organic nitrogen (POC : PON) and low ratios of PON vs. particulate organic phosphorus (PON : POP) in low-N media, and high POC : POP and PON : POP in low-P media. The ratio of particulate inorganic carbon vs. POC (PIC : POC) and polyunsaturated fatty acid proportions strongly responded to temperature and pCO2, both being lower under high pCO2 and higher with warming. We observed synergistic interactions between warming and nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2) on elemental cellular contents and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) proportion in most cases, indicating the enhanced effect of warming under nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2). Our results suggest differential sensitivity of elements and FAs to the changes in temperature, nutrient availability and pCO2 in E. huxleyi, which is to some extent unique compared to non-calcifying algal classes. Thus, simultaneous changes of elements and FAs should be considered when predicting future roles of E. huxleyi in the biotic-mediated connection between biogeochemical cycles, ecological functions and climate change.

  6. Activation analysis of hair as an indicator of contamination of man by environmental trace element pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryabukhin, Yu S [ed.

    1976-10-01

    The burning of fossil fuel, discharges from metallurgical and chemical plants, the wide use of chemicals, and other human activities, result in releasing into the biosphere large quantities of elements which are found in relatively low concentrations in the human organism. The pollution of the biosphere by such trace elements, and in particular heavy metals, has reached such proportions that on the scale of significance of the factors causing the 'stressed' state of the environment of heavy metals occupy the second place and, according to forecasts, may in the future move on to the first. In the problem of pollution of the biosphere, man himself undoubtedly occupies the central position as a target. The pollution of air, soil and water, the contamination of micro-organisms, plants and animals are certainly growing into a serious threat and leading to heavy losses. However, it would be a real disaster if man himself became contaminated to levels giving rise to large scale harmful somatic or genetic effects. It is therefore an urgent problem today to determine the initial levels of trace elements in man and the extent of his contamination in areas where these elements are expected to show anomalous concentrations. Attention should be paid in the first place to those trace elements which probably play no physiological role, are particularly abundant in the environment, and have high toxicity (arsenic, mercury, lead, cadmium, etc.). Moreover, it should be born in mind that in anomalously high concentrations even the physiologically necessary trace elements (copper, zinc, manganese, fluorine, etc.) cause harmful effects. This paper justifies the use of hair samples as a biological indicator of environmental pollutants from physiological and morphological aspect and recommends on sample preparation and analysis methods.

  7. Fundamental simulations of transverse load effects on Nb3Sn strands using finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T.; Chiesa, L.; Takayasu, M.

    2012-06-01

    A 2D finite element elasto-plastic analysis with various property values of the materials in composite Nb3Sn wires has been conducted to simulate the transverse compression effect on a single strand and a 3-strand cable as basic elements of a Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC). The simulation results have been compared with previously reported experimental results. A parametric study of the stress-strain characteristics of copper at 4 K was considered. The simulation results showed that wire and cable deformations due to the transverse load are very sensitive to the elasto-plastic material properties of copper and bronze. In a triplet it is found that the strain distributions inside the superconducting strand are very different along its axis, that is, for a configuration in which two strands lined in parallel to the transverse load direction shows much higher internal strain than other configurations under the same transverse load. The simulation results agree with the reported experimental results indicating a low Young's modulus for Nb3Sn wires under transverse compression. The simulation also supports the reported contact mechanics model for critical current degradation.

  8. Finite element methods in a simulation code for offshore wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Wolfgang

    1994-06-01

    Offshore installation of wind turbines will become important for electricity supply in future. Wind conditions above sea are more favorable than on land and appropriate locations on land are limited and restricted. The dynamic behavior of advanced wind turbines is investigated with digital simulations to reduce time and cost in development and design phase. A wind turbine can be described and simulated as a multi-body system containing rigid and flexible bodies. Simulation of the non-linear motion of such a mechanical system using a multi-body system code is much faster than using a finite element code. However, a modal representation of the deformation field has to be incorporated in the multi-body system approach. The equations of motion of flexible bodies due to deformation are generated by finite element calculations. At Delft University of Technology the simulation code DUWECS has been developed which simulates the non-linear behavior of wind turbines in time domain. The wind turbine is divided in subcomponents which are represented by modules (e.g. rotor, tower etc.).

  9. Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis (FFEA): A continuum mechanics software tool for mesoscale simulation of biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solernou, Albert; Hanson, Benjamin S; Richardson, Robin A; Welch, Robert; Read, Daniel J; Harlen, Oliver G; Harris, Sarah A

    2018-03-01

    Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis (FFEA) is a software package designed to perform continuum mechanics simulations of proteins and other globular macromolecules. It combines conventional finite element methods with stochastic thermal noise, and is appropriate for simulations of large proteins and protein complexes at the mesoscale (length-scales in the range of 5 nm to 1 μm), where there is currently a paucity of modelling tools. It requires 3D volumetric information as input, which can be low resolution structural information such as cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) maps or much higher resolution atomistic co-ordinates from which volumetric information can be extracted. In this article we introduce our open source software package for performing FFEA simulations which we have released under a GPLv3 license. The software package includes a C ++ implementation of FFEA, together with tools to assist the user to set up the system from Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) or Protein Data Bank (PDB) data files. We also provide a PyMOL plugin to perform basic visualisation and additional Python tools for the analysis of FFEA simulation trajectories. This manuscript provides a basic background to the FFEA method, describing the implementation of the core mechanical model and how intermolecular interactions and the solvent environment are included within this framework. We provide prospective FFEA users with a practical overview of how to set up an FFEA simulation with reference to our publicly available online tutorials and manuals that accompany this first release of the package.

  10. Goal-Oriented Self-Adaptive hp Finite Element Simulation of 3D DC Borehole Resistivity Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2011-05-14

    In this paper we present a goal-oriented self-adaptive hp Finite Element Method (hp-FEM) with shared data structures and a parallel multi-frontal direct solver. The algorithm automatically generates (without any user interaction) a sequence of meshes delivering exponential convergence of a prescribed quantity of interest with respect to the number of degrees of freedom. The sequence of meshes is generated from a given initial mesh, by performing h (breaking elements into smaller elements), p (adjusting polynomial orders of approximation) or hp (both) refinements on the finite elements. The new parallel implementation utilizes a computational mesh shared between multiple processors. All computational algorithms, including automatic hp goal-oriented adaptivity and the solver work fully in parallel. We describe the parallel self-adaptive hp-FEM algorithm with shared computational domain, as well as its efficiency measurements. We apply the methodology described to the three-dimensional simulation of the borehole resistivity measurement of direct current through casing in the presence of invasion.

  11. Discrete Element Method Simulation of a Boulder Extraction From an Asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchitsky, Anton K.; Johnson, Jerome B.; Reeves, David M.; Wilkinson, Allen

    2014-01-01

    The force required to pull 7t and 40t polyhedral boulders from the surface of an asteroid is simulated using the discrete element method considering the effects of microgravity, regolith cohesion and boulder acceleration. The connection between particle surface energy and regolith cohesion is estimated by simulating a cohesion sample tearing test. An optimal constant acceleration is found where the peak net force from inertia and cohesion is a minimum. Peak pulling forces can be further reduced by using linear and quadratic acceleration functions with up to a 40% reduction in force for quadratic acceleration.

  12. Finite element approach to global gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations using magnetic coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fivaz, M.; Brunner, S.; Ridder, G. de; Sauter, O.; Tran, T.M.; Vaclavik, J.; Villard, L.; Appert, K.

    1997-08-01

    We present a fully-global linear gyrokinetic simulation code (GYGLES) aimed at describing the instable spectrum of the ion-temperature-gradient modes in toroidal geometry. We formulate the Particle-In-Cell method with finite elements defined in magnetic coordinates, which provides excellent numerical convergence properties. The poloidal mode structure corresponding to k // =0 is extracted without approximation from the equations, which reduces drastically the numerical resolution needed. The code can simulate routinely modes with both very long and very short toroidal wavelengths, can treat realistic (MHD) equilibria of any size and runs on a massively parallel computer. (author) 10 figs., 28 refs

  13. Finite element simulation and experimental analysis of thermal distribution of optical transceiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, ZHANG; Lei, NIE; Kai, JIANG Chuan

    2018-01-01

    In order to optimize the heat dissipation design, the finite element simulation and temperature measurement experiment were used to research the optical transceiver temperature distribution. The results indicated that the shield cage impaired the convective heat transfer efficiency of the photoelectric conversion chip in the optical transceiver. Thus the heat dissipation of the device was weakened. The optimization method was put forward to introduce the external ducts by improving the structure design of the shield cage. The simulation showed the effectiveness of this method which could improve the heat dissipation efficiency of optical transceiver products.

  14. Finite Element Simulation of the Shear Effect of Ultrasonic on Heat Exchanger Descaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaolv; Wang, Zhihua; Wang, Hehui

    2018-03-01

    The shear effect on the interface of metal plate and its attached scale is an important mechanism of ultrasonic descaling, which is caused by the different propagation speed of ultrasonic wave in two different mediums. The propagating of ultrasonic wave on the shell is simulated based on the ANSYS/LS-DYNA explicit dynamic analysis. The distribution of shear stress in different paths under ultrasonic vibration is obtained through the finite element analysis and it reveals the main descaling mechanism of shear effect. The simulation result is helpful and enlightening to the reasonable design and the application of the ultrasonic scaling technology on heat exchanger.

  15. Trace Elements in Dominant Species of the Fenghe River, China: Their Relations to Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhou, Zhengchao; Bai, Yanying; Jiao, Wentao; Chen, Weiping

    2016-07-01

    The distribution of trace elements (TEs) in water, sediment, riparian soil and dominant plants was investigated in the Fenghe River, Northwestern China. The Fenghe River ecosystem was polluted with Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb. There was a high pollution risk in the midstream and downstream regions and the risk level for Cd was much higher than that of the other elements. The average values of bioconcentration coefficient for Cd and Zn were 2.21 and 1.75, respectively, indicating a large accumulation of Cd and Zn in the studied species. With broad ecological amplitudes, L. Levl. et Vant. Trin., and L. had the greatest TE concentrations in aboveground and belowground biomass of the studied species and were potential biomonitors or phytoremediators for the study area. Multivariate techniques including cluster analysis, correlation analysis, principal component analysis, and canonical correspondence analysis were used to analyze the relations between TE concentrations in plants and various environmental factors. The soil element concentration is the main factor determining the accumulation of TEs in plants. The co-release behavior of common pollutants and TEs drove the accumulation of Hg, Cd, and As in the studied plants. Significant enrichment of some elements in the Fenghe River has led to a decline in the biodiversity of plants. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. Finite element simulations with ANSYS workbench 17 theory, applications, case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Huei-Huang

    2017-01-01

    Finite Element Simulations with ANSYS Workbench 17 is a comprehensive and easy to understand workbook. Printed in full color, it utilizes rich graphics and step-by-step instructions to guide you through learning how to perform finite element simulations using ANSYS Workbench. Twenty seven real world case studies are used throughout the book. Many of these case studies are industrial or research projects that you build from scratch. Prebuilt project files are available for download should you run into any problems. Companion videos, that demonstrate exactly how to perform each tutorial, are also available. Relevant background knowledge is reviewed whenever necessary. To be efficient, the review is conceptual rather than mathematical. Key concepts are inserted whenever appropriate and summarized at the end of each chapter. Additional exercises or extension research problems are provided as homework at the end of each chapter. A learning approach emphasizing hands-on experiences spreads though this entire boo...

  17. Simulation of micromechanical behavior of polycrystals: finite elements versus fast Fourier transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, A; Lebensohn, R A

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we compare finite element and fast Fourier transform approaches for the prediction of the micromechanical behavior of polycrystals. Both approaches are full-field approaches and use the same visco-plastic single crystal constitutive law. We investigate the texture and the heterogeneity of the inter- and intragranular stress and strain fields obtained from the two models. Additionally, we also look into their computational performance. Two cases—rolling of aluminum and wire drawing of tungsten—are used to evaluate the predictions of the two models. Results from both the models are similar, when large grain distortions do not occur in the polycrystal. The finite element simulations were found to be highly computationally intensive, in comparison with the fast Fourier transform simulations. Figure 9 was corrected in this article on the 25 August 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version

  18. Finite element simulations with ANSYS Workbench 18 theory, applications, case studies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee,\tHuei-huang

    2018-01-01

    Finite Element Simulations with ANSYS Workbench 18 is a comprehensive and easy to understand workbook. Printed in full color, it utilizes rich graphics and step-by-step instructions to guide you through learning how to perform finite element simulations using ANSYS Workbench. Twenty seven real world case studies are used throughout the book. Many of these case studies are industrial or research projects that you build from scratch. Prebuilt project files are available for download should you run into any problems. Companion videos, that demonstrate exactly how to perform each tutorial, are also available. Relevant background knowledge is reviewed whenever necessary. To be efficient, the review is conceptual rather than mathematical. Key concepts are inserted whenever appropriate and summarized at the end of each chapter. Additional exercises or extension research problems are provided as homework at the end of each chapter. A learning approach emphasizing hands-on experiences is utilized though this entire...

  19. Migration of components from cork stoppers to food: challenges in determining inorganic elements in food simulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, T; Iglesias, M; Anticó, E

    2014-06-18

    The inorganic elements potentially migrating from cork to a food simulant [a hydroalcoholic solution containing 12 and 20% (v/v) ethanol] have been determined by means of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with atomic emission and mass spectrometric detection. The experimental instrumental conditions were evaluated in depth, taking into account spectroscopic and nonspectroscopic interference caused by the presence of ethanol and other components in the sample. We report concentrations ranging from 4 μg kg(-1) for Cd to 28000 μg kg(-1) for Al in the food simulant (concentrations given in kilograms of cork). The values found for Ba, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn have been compared with the guideline values stated in EU Regulation 10/2011. In all cases, cork met the general safety criteria applicable to food contact material. Finally, we have proposed water as an alternative to the hydroalcoholic solution to simplify quantification of the tested elements using ICP techniques.

  20. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for

  1. Simulation of granular and gas-solid flows using discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S.

    2003-10-01

    In recent years there has been increased research activity in the experimental and numerical study of gas-solid flows. Flows of this type have numerous applications in the energy, pharmaceuticals, and chemicals process industries. Typical applications include pulverized coal combustion, flow and heat transfer in bubbling and circulating fluidized beds, hopper and chute flows, pneumatic transport of pharmaceutical powders and pellets, and many more. The present work addresses the study of gas-solid flows using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques and discrete element simulation methods (DES) combined. Many previous studies of coupled gas-solid flows have been performed assuming the solid phase as a continuum with averaged properties and treating the gas-solid flow as constituting of interpenetrating continua. Instead, in the present work, the gas phase flow is simulated using continuum theory and the solid phase flow is simulated using DES. DES treats each solid particle individually, thus accounting for its dynamics due to particle-particle interactions, particle-wall interactions as well as fluid drag and buoyancy. The present work involves developing efficient DES methods for dense granular flow and coupling this simulation to continuum simulations of the gas phase flow. Simulations have been performed to observe pure granular behavior in vibrating beds. Benchmark cases have been simulated and the results obtained match the published literature. The dimensionless acceleration amplitude and the bed height are the parameters governing bed behavior. Various interesting behaviors such as heaping, round and cusp surface standing waves, as well as kinks, have been observed for different values of the acceleration amplitude for a given bed height. Furthermore, binary granular mixtures (granular mixtures with two particle sizes) in a vibrated bed have also been studied. Gas-solid flow simulations have been performed to study fluidized beds. Benchmark 2D

  2. Solid-phase extraction and determination of trace elements in environmental samples using naphthalene adsorbent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourreza, N.

    2004-01-01

    Naphthalene co-precipitated with quaternary ammonium salt such as tetraoctyl ammonium bromide and methyltrioctyl ammonium chloride have been used as adsorbent for solid phase extraction of metal ions such as Hg, Cd and Fe. The metal ions are retained on the adsorbent in a column as their complexes with suitable ligands and eluted by an eluent before instrumental measurements. The optimization of the procedures for solid phase extraction and consequent determination of trace elements and application to environmental samples especially water samples will be discussed. (author)

  3. Neutron activation investigation of the accumulation of some elements in Taraxacum officinale, resulting from environmental pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulev, I.; Dzhingova, R.

    1985-01-01

    Taraxinum officinale (dandelion) have been proposed as a biological monitor of antropogenic toxic metals. The INAA has been used to determine the content of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Sb, Se, Zn, and atomic absorption spectroscopy - of Cu and Pb in leaf samples collected round a smelter, in a living quarter of a big city and high up in Rila mountains. A logarithmic dependence of the concentration of the elements on the distance from the emitter was found. The results have shown that the leaves of Taraxacum Officinale reflect the level of environmental pollution thus beeing a very suitable bioindicator for local pollution

  4. Environmental Characteristics of Carbonatite and Alkaline Intrusion-related Rare Earth Element (REE) Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, R. R., II; Piatak, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Carbonatites and alkaline intrusions are important sources of REEs. Environmental risks related to these deposit types have been assessed through literature review and evaluation of the geochemical properties of representative samples of mill tailings and their leachates. The main ore mineral in carbonatite deposits is bastnasite [(Ce,La)(CO3)F], which is found with dolomite and calcite ( 65 %), barite (20 - 25 %), plus a number of minor accessory minerals including sulfides such as galena and pyrite. Generally, alkaline intrusion-related REE deposits either occur in layered complexes or with dikes and veins cutting alkaline intrusions. Such intrusions have a more diverse group of REE ore minerals that include fluorcarbonates, oxides, silicates, and phosphates. Ore also can include minor calcite and iron (Fe), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) sulfides. The acid-generating potential of both deposit types is low because of a predominance of carbonate minerals in the carbonatite deposits, the presence of feldspars and minor calcite in alkaline intrusion-related deposits, and to only minor to trace occurrence of potentially acid-generating sulfide minerals. Both deposit types, however, are produced by igneous and hydrothermal processes that enrich high-field strength, incompatible elements, which typically are excluded from common rock-forming minerals. Elements such as yttrium (Y), niobium Nb), zirconium (Zr), hafnium (Hf), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), scandium (Sc), thorium (Th), and uranium (U) can be characteristic of these deposits and may be of environmental concern. Most of these elements, including the REEs, but with the exception of U, have low solubilities in water at the near-neutral pH values expected around these deposits. Mill tailings from carbonatite deposits can exceed residential soil and sediment criteria for Pb, and leachates from mill tailings can exceed drinking water guidelines for Pb. The greatest environmental challenges, however, are

  5. Finite element simulation of the welding process and structural behaviour of welded components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locci, J.M.; Rouvray, A. de; Barbe, B.; Poirier, J.

    1977-01-01

    In the field of inelastic analysis of nuclear metal structures, the computation of residual stresses in welds, and their effects on the strength of welded components is of major importance. This paper presents an experimentally checked finite element simulation with the general nonlinear program PAM NEP-D, of the electron beam welding of two thick hemispherical shells, and the behaviour of the welded sphere under various additional thermomechanical sollicitations. (Auth.)

  6. Critical heat flux detection in rods simulating fuel elements by using dilation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, A.Z.

    1993-01-01

    In out-reactor heat transfer experiments, fuel elements are often simulated by electrically heated rods. In order to prevent the heating rod from being damaged by burnout, when the critical heat flux occurs a safety system is provided which checks the axial thermal expansion of the rod. In case of sudden temperature increase, the corresponding elongation causes a fast interruption of the electrical power supply. The experiments presented here show that this method is more effective than one that uses thermocouples. (author)

  7. Application of three dimensional finite element modeling for the simulation of machining processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, C.E.; Wu, W.T.; Chigurupati, P.; Jinn, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    For many years, metal cutting simulations have been performed using two dimensional approximations of the actual process. Factors such as chip morphology, cutting force, temperature, and tool wear can all be predicted on the computer. However, two dimensional simulation is limited to processes which are orthogonal, or which can be closely approximated as orthogonal.Advances in finite element technology, coupled with continuing improvement in the availability of low cost, high performance computer hardware, have made the three dimensional simulation of a large variety of metal cutting processes practical. Specific improvements include efficient FEM solvers, and robust adaptive remeshing. As researchers continue to gain an improved understanding of wear, material representation, tool coatings, fracture, and other such phenomena, the machining simulation system also must adapt to incorporate these evolving models.To demonstrate the capabilities of the 3D simulation system, a variety of drilling, milling, and turning processes have been simulated and will be presented in this paper. Issues related to computation time and simulation accuracy will also be addressed

  8. Confocal (micro)-XRF for 3D analysis of elements distribution in hot environmental particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielewski, M.; Eriksson, M.; Himbert, J.; Simon, R.; Betti, M.; Hamilton, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    Studies on the fate and transport of radioactive contaminates in the environment are often constrained by a lack of knowledge on the elemental distribution and general behavior of particulate bound radionuclides contained in hot particles. A number of hot particles were previously isolated from soil samples collected at former U.S. nuclear test sites in the Marshall Islands and characterized using non-destructive techniques [1]. The present investigation at HASYLAB is a part of larger research program at ITU regarding the characterization of environmental radioactive particles different locations and source-terms. Radioactive particles in the environment are formed under a number of different release scenarios and, as such, their physicochemical properties may provide a basis for identifying source-term specific contamination regimes. Consequently, studies on hot particles are not only important in terms of studying the elemental composition and geochemical behavior of hot particles but may also lead to advances in assessing the long-term impacts of radioactive contamination on the environment. Six particles isolated from soil samples collected at the Marshall Islands were studied. The element distribution in the particles was determined by confocal (micro)-XRF analysis using the ANKA FLUO beam line. The CRL (compound refractive lens) was used to focus the exciting beam and the polycapillary half lens to collimate the detector. The dimensions of confocal spot were measured by 'knife edge scanning' method with thin gold structure placed at Si wafer. The values of 3.1 x 1.4 x 18.4 (micro)m were achieved if defined as FWHMs of measured L?intensity profiles and when the19.1 keV exciting radiation was used. The collected XRF spectra were analyzed offline with AXIL [2] software to obtain net intensities of element characteristic lines.Further data processing and reconstruction of element distribution was done with the software 'R' [3] dedicated for statistical

  9. Finite Element Simulation of Medium-Range Blast Loading Using LS-DYNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhen Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the Finite Element simulation of blast loading using LS-DYNA. The objective is to identify approaches to reduce the requirement of computation effort while maintaining reasonable accuracy, focusing on blast loading scheme, element size, and its relationship with scale of explosion. The study made use of the recently developed blast loading scheme in LS-DYNA, which removes the necessity to model the explosive in the numerical models but still maintains the advantages of nonlinear fluid-structure interaction. It was found that the blast loading technique could significantly reduce the computation effort. It was also found that the initial density of air in the numerical model could be purposely increased to partially compensate the error induced by the use of relatively large air elements. Using the numerical approach, free air blast above a scaled distance of 0.4 m/kg1/3 was properly simulated, and the fluid-structure interaction at the same location could be properly duplicated using proper Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE coupling scheme. The study also showed that centrifuge technique, which has been successfully employed in model tests to investigate the blast effects, may be used when simulating the effect of medium- to large-scale explosion at small scaled distance.

  10. Finite element simulation of moisture movement and solute transport in a large caisson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Jones, B.G.; Parker, J.C.; Wadsworth, T.D.; White, H.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the solute transport experiments performed on compacted, crushed Bandelier Tuff in caisson B of the experimental cluster described by DePoorter (1981) are simulated. Both one- and three-dimensional simulations of solute transport have been performed using two selected finite element codes. Results of bromide and iodide tracer experiments conducted during near-steady flow conditions have been analyzed for pulse additions made on December 6, 1984, and followed over a period of up to 60 days. In addition, a pulse addition of nonconservative strontium tracer on September 28, 1984, during questionably steady flow conditions has been analyzed over a period of 240 days. One-dimensional finite element flow and transport simulations were carried out assuming the porous medium to be homogeneous and the injection source uniformly distributed. To evaluate effects of the nonuniform source distribution and also to investigate effects of inhomogeneous porous medium properties, three dimensional finite element analyses of transport were carried out. Implications of the three-dimensional effects for the design and analysis of future tracer studies are discussed

  11. Satellite image time series simulation for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The performance of environmental monitoring heavily depends on the availability of consecutive observation data and it turns out an increasing demand in remote sensing community for satellite image data in the sufficient resolution with respect to both spatial and temporal requirements, which appear to be conflictive and hard to tune tradeoffs. Multiple constellations could be a solution if without concerning cost, and thus it is so far interesting but very challenging to develop a method which can simultaneously improve both spatial and temporal details. There are some research efforts to deal with the problem from various aspects, a type of approaches is to enhance the spatial resolution using techniques of super resolution, pan-sharpen etc. which can produce good visual effects, but mostly cannot preserve spectral signatures and result in losing analytical value. Another type is to fill temporal frequency gaps by adopting time interpolation, which actually doesn't increase informative context at all. In this paper we presented a novel method to generate satellite images in higher spatial and temporal details, which further enables satellite image time series simulation. Our method starts with a pair of high-low resolution data set, and then a spatial registration is done by introducing LDA model to map high and low resolution pixels correspondingly. Afterwards, temporal change information is captured through a comparison of low resolution time series data, and the temporal change is then projected onto high resolution data plane and assigned to each high resolution pixel referring the predefined temporal change patterns of each type of ground objects to generate a simulated high resolution data. A preliminary experiment shows that our method can simulate a high resolution data with a good accuracy. We consider the contribution of our method is to enable timely monitoring of temporal changes through analysis of low resolution images time series only, and usage of

  12. Micromagnetic computer simulations of spin waves in nanometre-scale patterned magnetic elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-01-01

    Current needs for further advances in the nanotechnologies of information-storage and -processing devices have attracted a great deal of interest in spin (magnetization) dynamics in nanometre-scale patterned magnetic elements. For instance, the unique dynamic characteristics of non-uniform magnetic microstructures such as various types of domain walls, magnetic vortices and antivortices, as well as spin wave dynamics in laterally restricted thin-film geometries, have been at the centre of extensive and intensive researches. Understanding the fundamentals of their unique spin structure as well as their robust and novel dynamic properties allows us to implement new functionalities into existing or future devices. Although experimental tools and theoretical approaches are effective means of understanding the fundamentals of spin dynamics and of gaining new insights into them, the limitations of those same tools and approaches have left gaps of unresolved questions in the pertinent physics. As an alternative, however, micromagnetic modelling and numerical simulation has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of a variety of phenomena related to spin dynamics of nanometre-scale magnetic elements. In this review paper, I summarize the recent results of simulations of the excitation and propagation and other novel wave characteristics of spin waves, highlighting how the micromagnetic computer simulation approach contributes to an understanding of spin dynamics of nanomagnetism and considering some of the merits of numerical simulation studies. Many examples of micromagnetic modelling for numerical calculations, employing various dimensions and shapes of patterned magnetic elements, are given. The current limitations of continuum micromagnetic modelling and of simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion of magnetization are also discussed, along with further research directions for spin-wave studies.

  13. Micromagnetic computer simulations of spin waves in nanometre-scale patterned magnetic elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Koog

    2010-07-01

    Current needs for further advances in the nanotechnologies of information-storage and -processing devices have attracted a great deal of interest in spin (magnetization) dynamics in nanometre-scale patterned magnetic elements. For instance, the unique dynamic characteristics of non-uniform magnetic microstructures such as various types of domain walls, magnetic vortices and antivortices, as well as spin wave dynamics in laterally restricted thin-film geometries, have been at the centre of extensive and intensive researches. Understanding the fundamentals of their unique spin structure as well as their robust and novel dynamic properties allows us to implement new functionalities into existing or future devices. Although experimental tools and theoretical approaches are effective means of understanding the fundamentals of spin dynamics and of gaining new insights into them, the limitations of those same tools and approaches have left gaps of unresolved questions in the pertinent physics. As an alternative, however, micromagnetic modelling and numerical simulation has recently emerged as a powerful tool for the study of a variety of phenomena related to spin dynamics of nanometre-scale magnetic elements. In this review paper, I summarize the recent results of simulations of the excitation and propagation and other novel wave characteristics of spin waves, highlighting how the micromagnetic computer simulation approach contributes to an understanding of spin dynamics of nanomagnetism and considering some of the merits of numerical simulation studies. Many examples of micromagnetic modelling for numerical calculations, employing various dimensions and shapes of patterned magnetic elements, are given. The current limitations of continuum micromagnetic modelling and of simulations based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation of motion of magnetization are also discussed, along with further research directions for spin-wave studies.

  14. Trace element fluxes in sediments of an environmentally impacted river from a coastal zone of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Yuri Jacques Agra Bezerra; Cantalice, José Ramon Barros; Singh, Vijay P; do Nascimento, Clístenes Williams Araújo; Piscoya, Victor Casimiro; Guerra, Sérgio M S

    2015-10-01

    Data regarding trace element concentrations and fluxes in suspended sediments and bedload are scarce. To fill this gap and meet the international need to include polluted rivers in future world estimation of trace element fluxes, this study aimed to determine the trace element fluxes in suspended sediment and bedload of an environmentally impacted river in Brazil. Water, suspended sediment, and bedload from both the upstream and the downstream cross sections were collected. To collect both the suspended sediment and water samples, we used the US DH-48. Bedload measurements were carried out using the US BLH 84 sampler. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined by inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES). As and Hg were determined by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-FIAS). The suspended sediments contributed more than 99 % of the trace element flux. By far Pb and to a less extent Zn at the downstream site represents major concerns. The yields of Pb and Zn in suspended sediments were 4.20 and 2.93 kg km(2) year(-1), respectively. These yields were higher than the values reported for Pb and Zn for Tuul River (highly impacted by mining activities), 1.60 and 1.30 kg km(2) year(-1), respectively, as well as the Pb yield (suspended + dissolved) to the sea of some Mediterranean rivers equal to 3.4 kg km(2) year(-1). Therefore, the highest flux and yield of Pb and Zn in Ipojuca River highlighted the importance to include medium and small rivers-often overlooked in global and regional studies-in the future estimation of world trace element fluxes in order to protect estuaries and coastal zones.

  15. Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface thermal behavior with 3D dynamic gap element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Yong Sik; Koo, Yang Hyun; Kang, Chang Hak; Lee Sung Uk; Yang, Dong Yol

    2014-01-01

    Most of the fuel performance codes that are able to simulate a multidimensional analysis are used to calculate the radial temperature distribution and perform a multidimensional mechanical analysis based on a one-dimensional (1D) temperature result. The FRAPCON-FRAPTRAN code system incorporates a 1D thermal module and two-dimensional (2D) mechanical module when FEM option is activated. In this method, the multidimensional gap conductance model is not required because one-dimensional thermal analysis is carried out. On the other hand, a gap conductance model for a multi-dimension should be developed in the code to perform a multidimensional thermal analysis. ALCYONE developed by CEA introduces an equivalent heat convection coefficient that represents the multidimensional gap conductance. However, the code does not employ dynamic gap conductance which is a function of gap thickness and gap characteristics in direct. The BISON code, which has been developed by INL (Idaho National Laboratory), employed a thermo-mechanical contact method that is specifically designed for tightly-coupled implicit solutions that employ Jacobian-free solution methods. Owing to tightly-coupled implicit solutions, the BISON code solves gap conductance and gap thickness simultaneously with given boundary conditions. In this paper, 3D dynamic gap element has been proposed to resolve convergence issue and nonlinear characteristic of multidimensional gap conductance. To evaluate 3D dynamic gap element module, 3D thermomechanical module using FORTRAN77 has been implemented incorporating 3D dynamic gap element. To demonstrate effect of 3D dynamic gap element, thermal behavior of missing pellet surface (MPS) has been simulated by the developed module. LWR fuel performance codes should incorporate thermo-mechanical loop to solve gap conductance problem, iteratively. However, gap conductance in multidimensional model is difficult issue owing to its nonlinearity and convergence characteristics. In

  16. Simulation of hemp fibre bundle and cores using discrete element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Amin Sadek, M.; Chen, Y. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Biosystems Engineering; Lague, C. [Ottawa Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada). Faculty of Engineering; Landry, H. [Prairie Agricultural Machinery Inst., Humboldt, SK (Canada); Peng, Q. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering; Zhong, W. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Textile Sciences

    2010-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of hemp fibre and core must be well understood in order to obtain high-grade hemp fibre that is currently in high demand for various industrial applications. Modelling by discrete element method can simulate the mechanical behaviour of such materials. A commercial discrete element software called Particle Flow Code was used in this study. In particular, the 3-dimension (PFC3D) was used to simulate hemp fibre and core. Since the basic PFC3D particles are spherical, the individual virtual hemp fibres were defined as strings of balls held together by PFC3D parallel bonds. The study showed that the virtual fibre is flexible and can bend and break by forces. This reflects the characteristics of hemp fibre. Using the clump logic of PFC3D, the virtual hemp core was defined as a rigid and unbreakable body, which reflect the characteristics of the core. The virtual fibre and core were defined with several microproperties, some of which were previously calibrated. The PFC3D bond properties were calibrated in this study. They included normal and shear stiffness; pb{sub k}n and pb{sub k}s; normal and shear strength; and bond disk radius, R of the virtual fibre. The calibration started with developing a PFC3D model to simulate fibre tensile test. The microproperties of virtual fibre and core were calibrated by running the PFC3D model. Literature data from fibre tensile tests was compared with simulation results.

  17. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Kardynał, B.E. [Peter Grünberg Institute 9, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Barnes, C.H.W. [Department of Physics, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Dunin-Borkowski, R.E., E-mail: rafaldb@gmail.com [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Grünberg Institute 5, Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2013-11-15

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness.

  18. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somodi, P.K.; Twitchett-Harrison, A.C.; Midgley, P.A.; Kardynał, B.E.; Barnes, C.H.W.; Dunin-Borkowski, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p–n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p–n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. - Highlights: • Finite element simulations are performed to calculate electrostatic dopant potentials in TEM specimens that contain p–n junctions. • The effect of the electrical state of the specimen surface on the projected potential is assessed for equipotential specimen surfaces. • The step in projected potential is always found to be lower than the step in potential in the bulk device. • The step in projected potential is least sensitive to surface state energy for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. • The depletion width measured from the projected potential has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness

  19. Moving finite element method aided by computerized symbolic manipulation and its application to dynamic fracture simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Toshihisa; Takemoto, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Recently, the authors have shown that the combined method of the path-independent J' integral (dynamic J integral) and a moving isoparametric element procedure is an effective tool for the calculation of dynamic stress intensity factors. In the moving element procedure, the nodal pattern of the elements near a crack tip moves according to the motion of the crack-tip. An iterative numerical technique was used in the previous procedure to find the natural coordinates (ξ, η) at the newly created nodes. This technique requires additional computing time because of the nature of iteration. In the present paper, algebraic expressions for the transformation of the global coordinates (x, y) to the natural coordinates (ξ, η) were obtained by using a computerized symbolic manipulation system (REDUCE 3.2). These algebraic expressions are also very useful for remeshing or zooming techniques often used in finite element analysis. The present moving finite element method demonstrates its effectiveness for the simulation of a fast fracture. (author)

  20. Numerical simulations of helium flow through prismatic fuel elements of very high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Felipe Lopes; Pinto, Joao Pedro C.T.A.

    2013-01-01

    The 4 th generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) most popular concept uses a graphite-moderated and helium cooled core with an outlet gas temperature of approximately 1000 deg C. The high output temperature allows the use of the process heat and the production of hydrogen through the thermochemical iodine-sulfur process as well as highly efficient electricity generation. There are two concepts of VHTR core: the prismatic block and the pebble bed core. The prismatic block core has two popular concepts for the fuel element: multihole and annular. In the multi-hole fuel element, prismatic graphite blocks contain cylindrical flow channels where the helium coolant flows removing heat from cylindrical fuel rods positioned in the graphite. In the other hand, the annular type fuel element has annular channels around the fuel. This paper shows the numerical evaluations of prismatic multi-hole and annular VHTR fuel elements and does a comparison between the results of these assembly reactors. In this study the analysis were performed using the CFD code ANSYS CFX 14.0. The simulations were made in 1/12 fuel element models. A numerical validation was performed through the energy balance, where the theoretical and the numerical generated heat were compared for each model. (author)

  1. Design Optimization of a Thermoelectric Cooling Module Using Finite Element Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Muhammad; Somdalen, Ragnar; Rodrigo, Marina Sancho

    2018-05-01

    The thermoelectric industry is concerned about the size reduction, cooling performance and, ultimately, the production cost of thermoelectric modules. Optimization of the size and performance of a commercially available thermoelectric cooling module is considered using finite element simulations. Numerical simulations are performed on eight different three-dimensional geometries of a single thermocouple, and the results are further extended for a whole module as well. The maximum temperature rise at the hot and cold sides of a thermocouple is determined by altering its height and cross-sectional area. The influence of the soldering layer is analyzed numerically using temperature dependent and temperature independent thermoelectric properties of the solder material and the semiconductor pellets. Experiments are conducted to test the cooling performance of the thermoelectric module and the results are compared with the results obtained through simulations. Finally, cooling rate and maximum coefficient of performance (COPmax) are computed using convective and non-convective boundary conditions.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Boehmite Evaluated by Atomic Force Microscopy Experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fankhanel, J.; Daum, B.; Kempe, A.; Rolfes, R.; Silbernagl, D.; Khorasani, M.Gh.Z.; Sturm, H.; Sturm, H.

    2016-01-01

    Boehmite nanoparticles show great potential in improving mechanical properties of fiber reinforced polymers. In order to predict the properties of nanocomposites, knowledge about the material parameters of the constituent phases, including the boehmite particles, is crucial. In this study, the mechanical behavior of boehmite is investigated using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) experiments and Molecular Dynamic Finite Element Method (MDFEM) simulations. Young’s modulus of the perfect crystalline boehmite nanoparticles is derived from numerical AFM simulations. Results of AFM experiments on boehmite nanoparticles deviate significantly. Possible causes are identified by experiments on complementary types of boehmite, that is, geological and hydrothermally synthesized samples, and further simulations of imperfect crystals and combined boehmite/epoxy models. Under certain circumstances, the mechanical behavior of boehmite was found to be dominated by inelastic effects that are discussed in detail in the present work. The studies are substantiated with accompanying X-ray diffraction and Raman experiments.

  3. Biological and environmental reference materials for trace elements, nuclides and organic microcontaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes Toro, E.; Parr, R.M.; Clements, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This report has been produced from a database on analytical reference materials of biological and environmental origin, which is maintained at the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is an updated version of an earlier report, published in 1985, which focussed mainly on reference materials for trace elements. In the present version of the report, reference materials for trace elements still constitute the major part of the data; however, information is also now included on a number of other selected analytes of relevance to IAEA programmes, i.e. radionuclides, stable isotopes and organic microcontaminants. The database presently contains 2,694 analyte values for 117 analytes in 116 biological and 77 environmental (non-biological) reference materials produced by 20 different suppliers. Additional information on the cost of the material, the unit size supplied, (weight or volume), and the minimum weight of material recommended for analysis is also provided (if available to the authors). It is expected that this report will help analysts to select the reference material that matches as closely as possible, with respect to matrix type and concentrations of the analytes of interest, the ''real'' samples that are to be analysed. Refs, 12 tabs

  4. Three-dimensional finite element magnetic simulation of an innovative multi-coiled magnetorheological brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaidillah; Permata, A. N. S.; Mazlan, S. A.; Tjahjana, D. D. D. P.; Widodo, P. J.

    2017-10-01

    This research delivers a finite element magnetic simulation of a novel disk type multi-coil magnetorheological brake (MR brake). The MR brake axial design had more than one coil located outside of the casing. This design could simplify the maintenance process of brakes. One pair of coils was used as the representative of the entire coil in the simulation process, and it could distribute magnetic flux in all parts of the electromagnetic. The objective of this simulation was to produce magnetic flux on the surface of the disc brake rotor. The value of the MR brake magnetic flux was higher than that of the current MR brake having one coil with a larger size. The result of the simulation would be used to identify the effect of different fluids on each variation. The Magneto-rheological fluid MRF-132DG and MRF-140CG were injected in each gap as much as 0.50, 1.00, and 1.50 mm, respectively. On the simulation process, the coils were energized at 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.00, 1.50, and 2.00 A, respectively. The magnetic flux produced by MRF-140CG was 336 m Tesla on the gap of 0.5 mm. The result of the simulation shows that the smaller the gap variation was, the higher the magnetic value was.

  5. Quasistatic field simulations based on finite elements and spectral methods applied to superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, Stephan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the numerical simulation of electromagnetic fields in the quasi-static approximation which is applicable in many practical cases. Main emphasis is put on higher-order finite element methods. Quasi-static applications can be found, e.g., in accelerator physics in terms of the design of magnets required for beam guidance, in power engineering as well as in high-voltage engineering. Especially during the first design and optimization phase of respective devices, numerical models offer a cheap alternative to the often costly assembly of prototypes. However, large differences in the magnitude of the material parameters and the geometric dimensions as well as in the time-scales of the electromagnetic phenomena involved lead to an unacceptably long simulation time or to an inadequately large memory requirement. Under certain circumstances, the simulation itself and, in turn, the desired design improvement becomes even impossible. In the context of this thesis, two strategies aiming at the extension of the range of application for numerical simulations based on the finite element method are pursued. The first strategy consists in parallelizing existing methods such that the computation can be distributed over several computers or cores of a processor. As a consequence, it becomes feasible to simulate a larger range of devices featuring more degrees of freedom in the numerical model than before. This is illustrated for the calculation of the electromagnetic fields, in particular of the eddy-current losses, inside a superconducting dipole magnet developed at the GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung as a part of the FAIR project. As the second strategy to improve the efficiency of numerical simulations, a hybrid discretization scheme exploiting certain geometrical symmetries is established. Using this method, a significant reduction of the numerical effort in terms of required degrees of freedom for a given accuracy is achieved. The

  6. COST action TD1407: network on technology-critical elements (NOTICE)—from environmental processes to human health threats

    OpenAIRE

    Cobelo-García, A.; Filella, M.; Croot, P.; Frazzoli, C.; Du Laing, G.; Ospina-Alvarez, N.; Rauch, S.; Salaun, P.; Schäfer, J.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-01-01

    The current socio-economic, environmental and public health challenges that countries are facing clearly need common-defined strategies to inform and support our transition to a sustainable economy. Here, the technology-critical elements (which includes Ga, Ge, In, Te, Nb, Ta, Tl, the Platinum Group Elements and most of the rare-earth elements) are of great relevance in the development of emerging key technologies—including renewable energy, energy efficiency, electronics or the aerospace ind...

  7. Finite Element Simulation of Total Nitrogen Transport in Riparian Buffer in an Agricultural Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaosheng Lin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Riparian buffers can influence water quality in downstream lakes or rivers by buffering non-point source pollution in upstream agricultural fields. With increasing nitrogen (N pollution in small agricultural watersheds, a major function of riparian buffers is to retain N in the soil. A series of field experiments were conducted to monitor pollutant transport in riparian buffers of small watersheds, while numerical model-based analysis is scarce. In this study, we set up a field experiment to monitor the retention rates of total N in different widths of buffer strips and used a finite element model (HYDRUS 2D/3D to simulate the total N transport in the riparian buffer of an agricultural non-point source polluted area in the Liaohe River basin. The field experiment retention rates for total N were 19.4%, 26.6%, 29.5%, and 42.9% in 1,3,4, and 6m-wide buffer strips, respectively. Throughout the simulation period, the concentration of total N of the 1mwide buffer strip reached a maximum of 1.27 mg/cm3 at 30 min, decreasing before leveling off. The concentration of total N about the 3mwide buffer strip consistently increased, with a maximum of 1.05 mg/cm3 observed at 60 min. Under rainfall infiltration, the buffer strips of different widths showed a retention effect on total N transport, and the optimum effect was simulated in the 6mwide buffer strip. A comparison between measured and simulated data revealed that finite element simulation could simulate N transport in the soil of riparian buffer strips.

  8. Enhancing effect of marine oligotrophy on environmental concentrations of particle-reactive trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffree, R.A.; Szymczak, R.

    2000-01-01

    A biogeochemical model has been previously developed that explains the inverse and nonlinear relationship between Po-210 concentration in zooplankton and their biomass, under oligotrophic conditions in French Polynesia. In this study the model structure was reviewed to determine a set of biogeochemical behaviors of Po-210, proposed to be critical to its environmental enhancement under oligotrophy: this set was then used to identify 25 other elements with comparable behaviors to Po-210. Field investigation in the Timor Sea showed that four of these a priori identified elements, viz. Cd, Co, Pb, and Mn as well as Cr and Ni, showed elevated water concentrations with reduced particle removal rates in the euphotic zone, results that are consistent with those previously obtained for Po-210 and the proposed explanatory model. These findings point to the enhanced susceptibility to contamination with particle-reactive elements of oligotrophic marine systems, whose degree and geographic extent may be enhanced by projected increases in sea surface temperatures from global warming

  9. How Does Environmental Regulation Affect Industrial Transformation? A Study Based on the Methodology of Policy Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference of factor input structure determines different response to environmental regulation. This paper constructs a theoretical model including environmental regulation, factor input structure, and industrial transformation and conducts a policy simulation based on the difference of influencing mechanism of environmental regulation considering industrial heterogeneity. The findings show that the impact of environmental regulation on industrial transformation presents comparison of distortion effect of resource allocation and technology effect. Environmental regulation will promote industrial transformation when technology effect of environmental regulation is stronger than distortion effect of resource allocation. Particularly, command-control environmental regulation has a significant incentive effect and spillover effect of technological innovation on cleaning industries, but these effects do not exist in pollution-intensive industries. Command-control environmental regulation promotes industrial transformation. The result of simulation showed that environmental regulation of market incentives is similar to that of command-control.

  10. Fretting wear simulation of press-fitted shaft with finite element analysis and influence function method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hyong; Kwon, Seok Jin [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-01-15

    In this paper the fretting wear of press-fitted specimens subjected to a cyclic bending load was simulated using finite element analysis and numerical method. The amount of microslip and contact variable at press-fitted and bending load condition in a press-fitted shaft was analysed by applying finite element method. With the finite element analysis result, a numerical approach was applied to predict fretting wear based on modified Archard's equation and updating the change of contact pressure caused by local wear with influence function method. The predicted wear profiles of press-fitted specimens at the contact edge wear compared with the experimental results obtained by rotating bending fatigue tests. It is shown that the depth of fretting wear by repeated slip between shaft and boss reaches the maximum value at the contact edge. The initial surface profile is continuously changed by the wear at the contact edge, and then the corresponding contact variables are redistributed. The work establishes a basis for numerical simulation of fretting wear on press fits.

  11. Fretting wear simulation of press-fitted shaft with finite element analysis and influence function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hyong; Kwon, Seok Jin; Choi, Jae Boong; Kim, Young Jin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the fretting wear of press-fitted specimens subjected to a cyclic bending load was simulated using finite element analysis and numerical method. The amount of microslip and contact variable at press-fitted and bending load condition in a press-fitted shaft was analysed by applying finite element method. With the finite element analysis result, a numerical approach was applied to predict fretting wear based on modified Archard's equation and updating the change of contact pressure caused by local wear with influence function method. The predicted wear profiles of press-fitted specimens at the contact edge wear compared with the experimental results obtained by rotating bending fatigue tests. It is shown that the depth of fretting wear by repeated slip between shaft and boss reaches the maximum value at the contact edge. The initial surface profile is continuously changed by the wear at the contact edge, and then the corresponding contact variables are redistributed. The work establishes a basis for numerical simulation of fretting wear on press fits

  12. Mixed Finite Element Simulation with Stability Analysis for Gas Transport in Low-Permeability Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed F. El-Amin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural gas exists in considerable quantities in tight reservoirs. Tight formations are rocks with very tiny or poorly connected pors that make flow through them very difficult, i.e., the permeability is very low. The mixed finite element method (MFEM, which is locally conservative, is suitable to simulate the flow in porous media. This paper is devoted to developing a mixed finite element (MFE technique to simulate the gas transport in low permeability reservoirs. The mathematical model, which describes gas transport in low permeability formations, contains slippage effect, as well as adsorption and diffusion mechanisms. The apparent permeability is employed to represent the slippage effect in low-permeability formations. The gas adsorption on the pore surface has been described by Langmuir isotherm model, while the Peng-Robinson equation of state is used in the thermodynamic calculations. Important compatibility conditions must hold to guarantee the stability of the mixed method by adding additional constraints to the numerical discretization. The stability conditions of the MFE scheme has been provided. A theorem and three lemmas on the stability analysis of the mixed finite element method (MFEM have been established and proven. A semi-implicit scheme is developed to solve the governing equations. Numerical experiments are carried out under various values of the physical parameters.

  13. MD and BCA simulations of He and H bombardment of fuzz in bcc elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaver, T. P. C.; Zhang, S.; Nordlund, K.

    2017-08-01

    We present results of MD simulations of low energy He ion bombardment of low density fuzz in bcc elements. He ions can penetrate several micrometers into sparse fuzz, which allows for a sufficient He flux through it to grow the fuzz further. He kinetic energy falls off exponentially with penetration depth. A BCA code was used to carry out the same ion bombardment on the same fuzz structures as in MD simulations, but with simpler, 10 million times faster calculations. Despite the poor theoretical basis of the BCA at low ion energies, and the use of somewhat different potentials in MD and BCA calculations, the ion penetration depths predicted by BCA are only ∼12% less than those predicted by MD. The MD-BCA differences are highly systematic and trends in the results of the two methods are very similar. We have carried out more than 200 BCA calculation runs of ion bombardment of fuzz, in which parameters in the ion bombardment process were varied. For most parameters, the results show that the ion bombardment process is quite generic. The ion species (He or H), ion mass, fuzz element (W, Ta, Mo, Fe) and fuzz element lattice parameter turned out to have a modest influence on ion penetration depths at most. An off-normal angle of incidence strongly reduces the ion penetration depth. Increasing the ion energy increases the ion penetration, but the rate by which ion energy drops off at high ion energies follows the same exponential pattern as at lower energies.

  14. Simultaneous shifts in elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids of Emiliania huxleyi in response to environmental changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate-driven changes in environmental conditions have significant and complex effects on marine ecosystems. Variability in phytoplankton elements and biochemicals can be important for global ocean biogeochemistry and ecological functions, while there is currently limited understanding on how elements and biochemicals respond to the changing environments in key coccolithophore species such as Emiliania huxleyi. We investigated responses of elemental stoichiometry and fatty acids (FAs in a strain of E. huxleyi under three temperatures (12, 18 and 24 °C, three N : P supply ratios (molar ratios 10:1, 24:1 and 63:1 and two pCO2 levels (560 and 2400 µatm. Overall, C : N : P stoichiometry showed the most pronounced response to N : P supply ratios, with high ratios of particulate organic carbon vs. particulate organic nitrogen (POC : PON and low ratios of PON vs. particulate organic phosphorus (PON : POP in low-N media, and high POC : POP and PON : POP in low-P media. The ratio of particulate inorganic carbon vs. POC (PIC : POC and polyunsaturated fatty acid proportions strongly responded to temperature and pCO2, both being lower under high pCO2 and higher with warming. We observed synergistic interactions between warming and nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2 on elemental cellular contents and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA proportion in most cases, indicating the enhanced effect of warming under nutrient deficiency (and high pCO2. Our results suggest differential sensitivity of elements and FAs to the changes in temperature, nutrient availability and pCO2 in E. huxleyi, which is to some extent unique compared to non-calcifying algal classes. Thus, simultaneous changes of elements and FAs should be considered when predicting future roles of E. huxleyi in the biotic-mediated connection between biogeochemical cycles, ecological functions and climate change.

  15. Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis (FFEA: A continuum mechanics software tool for mesoscale simulation of biomolecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Solernou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating Finite Element Analysis (FFEA is a software package designed to perform continuum mechanics simulations of proteins and other globular macromolecules. It combines conventional finite element methods with stochastic thermal noise, and is appropriate for simulations of large proteins and protein complexes at the mesoscale (length-scales in the range of 5 nm to 1 μm, where there is currently a paucity of modelling tools. It requires 3D volumetric information as input, which can be low resolution structural information such as cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET maps or much higher resolution atomistic co-ordinates from which volumetric information can be extracted. In this article we introduce our open source software package for performing FFEA simulations which we have released under a GPLv3 license. The software package includes a C ++ implementation of FFEA, together with tools to assist the user to set up the system from Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB or Protein Data Bank (PDB data files. We also provide a PyMOL plugin to perform basic visualisation and additional Python tools for the analysis of FFEA simulation trajectories. This manuscript provides a basic background to the FFEA method, describing the implementation of the core mechanical model and how intermolecular interactions and the solvent environment are included within this framework. We provide prospective FFEA users with a practical overview of how to set up an FFEA simulation with reference to our publicly available online tutorials and manuals that accompany this first release of the package.

  16. Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden density currents with adaptive, discontinuous finite elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Parkinson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs are an important tool for the detailed analysis of turbidity current dynamics. Models that resolve the vertical structure and turbulence of the flow are typically based upon the Navier–Stokes equations. Two-dimensional simulations are known to produce unrealistic cohesive vortices that are not representative of the real three-dimensional physics. The effect of this phenomena is particularly apparent in the later stages of flow propagation. The ideal solution to this problem is to run the simulation in three dimensions but this is computationally expensive. This paper presents a novel finite-element (FE DNS turbidity current model that has been built within Fluidity, an open source, general purpose, computational fluid dynamics code. The model is validated through re-creation of a lock release density current at a Grashof number of 5 × 106 in two and three dimensions. Validation of the model considers the flow energy budget, sedimentation rate, head speed, wall normal velocity profiles and the final deposit. Conservation of energy in particular is found to be a good metric for measuring model performance in capturing the range of dynamics on a range of meshes. FE models scale well over many thousands of processors and do not impose restrictions on domain shape, but they are computationally expensive. The use of adaptive mesh optimisation is shown to reduce the required element count by approximately two orders of magnitude in comparison with fixed, uniform mesh simulations. This leads to a substantial reduction in computational cost. The computational savings and flexibility afforded by adaptivity along with the flexibility of FE methods make this model well suited to simulating turbidity currents in complex domains.

  17. Feasibility study on using three element TLD badge based on CaSO4:Dy as environmental dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, Sreeletha; BharathiLashmi, G.V.; Yasotha, E.; Devanathan, P.S.; Annalakshmi, O.; Mathiyarasu, R.

    2018-01-01

    A three element thermoluminescence badge based on CaSO 4 :Dy is used for personnel monitoring in India. The three discs of the badge is heated in sequential manner by hot nitrogen gas and from the amount of light emitted while heating, the doses are estimated. This badge was redesigned as a two element system and is used for environmental monitoring. Though the two element badge has some advantages, the software used for processing of TLDs in the semiautomatic reader has to be modified and separate badges has to be maintained for environmental dose measurements. In this work a feasibility study has been carried out to use the three element personnel monitoring badge itself for environmental monitoring also. This study was also carried out to understand the abnormal pattern of the glow curves observed in some field cards

  18. Monitoring Change of Body Fluid during Physical Exercise using Bioimpedance Spectroscopy and Finite Element Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Röthlingshöfer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Athletes need a balanced body composition in order to achieve maximum performance. Especially dehydration reduces power and endurance during physical exercise. Monitoring the body composition, with a focus on body fluid, may help to avoid reduction in performance and other health problems.For this, a potential measurement method is bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS. BIS is a simple, non-invasive measurement method that allows to determine different body compartments (body fluid, fat, fat-free mass. However, because many physiological changes occur during physical exercise that can influence impedance measurements and distort results, it cannot be assumed that the BIS data are related to body fluid loss alone.To confirm that BIS can detect body fluid loss due to physical exercise, finite element (FE simulations were done. Besides impedance, also the current density contribution during a BIS measurement was modeled to evaluate the influence of certain tissues on BIS measurements.Simulations were done using CST EM Studio (Computer Simulation Technology, Germany and the Visible Human Data Set (National Library of Medicine, USA. In addition to the simulations, BIS measurements were also made on athletes. Comparison between the measured bioimpedance data and simulation data, as well as body weight loss during sport, indicates that BIS measurements are sensitive enough to monitor body fluid loss during physical exercise.doi:10.5617/jeb.178 J Electr Bioimp, vol. 2, pp. 79-85, 2011

  19. Finite element simulation and Experimental verification of Incremental Sheet metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik Yanamundra, Krishna; Karthikeyan, R., Dr.; Naranje, Vishal, Dr

    2018-04-01

    Incremental sheet metal forming is now a proven manufacturing technique that can be employed to obtain application specific, customized, symmetric or asymmetric shapes that are required by automobile or biomedical industries for specific purposes like car body parts, dental implants or knee implants. Finite element simulation of metal forming process is being performed successfully using explicit dynamics analysis of commercial FE software. The simulation is mainly useful in optimization of the process as well design of the final product. This paper focuses on simulating the incremental sheet metal forming process in ABAQUS, and validating the results using experimental methods. The shapes generated for testing are of trapezoid, dome and elliptical shapes whose G codes are written and fed into the CNC milling machine with an attached forming tool with a hemispherical bottom. The same pre-generated coordinates are used to simulate a similar machining conditions in ABAQUS and the tool forces, stresses and strains in the workpiece while machining are obtained as the output data. The forces experimentally were recorded using a dynamometer. The experimental and simulated results were then compared and thus conclusions were drawn.

  20. A hybrid Boundary Element Unstructured Transmission-line (BEUT) method for accurate 2D electromagnetic simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.simmons@nottingham.ac.uk; Cools, Kristof; Sewell, Phillip

    2016-11-01

    Time domain electromagnetic simulation tools have the ability to model transient, wide-band applications, and non-linear problems. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) and the Transmission Line Modeling (TLM) method are both well established numerical techniques for simulating time-varying electromagnetic fields. The former surface based method can accurately describe outwardly radiating fields from piecewise uniform objects and efficiently deals with large domains filled with homogeneous media. The latter volume based method can describe inhomogeneous and non-linear media and has been proven to be unconditionally stable. Furthermore, the Unstructured TLM (UTLM) enables modelling of geometrically complex objects by using triangular meshes which removes staircasing and unnecessary extensions of the simulation domain. The hybridization of BEM and UTLM which is described in this paper is named the Boundary Element Unstructured Transmission-line (BEUT) method. It incorporates the advantages of both methods. The theory and derivation of the 2D BEUT method is described in this paper, along with any relevant implementation details. The method is corroborated by studying its correctness and efficiency compared to the traditional UTLM method when applied to complex problems such as the transmission through a system of Luneburg lenses and the modelling of antenna radomes for use in wireless communications. - Graphical abstract:.

  1. Finite element simulation of the mechanism of laser ultrasound induced pain weapon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Zhan, Ren Jun; Shan, Ning

    2018-03-01

    The Laser-Ultrasonic technique uses laser energy to generate ultrasound waves in various solids. In normal conditions, this technique is used to inspect large structures without destruction, but in military use, we hope get this destruction. Nociceptors in Human skin can feel cold, heat, mechanical and other stimuli, when the stimulus exceeds a certain threshold will produce pain. Based on this principle, a laser induced pain weapon may be made. The generated ultrasound wave form is affected by features of laser pulse. The results obtained from the finite element model of laser generated ultrasound are presented in terms of temperature and displacement. At first step, the transient temperature field can be precisely calculated by using the finite element method. Then, laser generated surface acoustic wave forms are calculated by coupling the temperature distribution. Displacement is used to represent the mechanical action of skin caused by laser ultrasound. Results from numerical simulation are compared with other references; the accuracy of the method is proved accordingly. The results of simulation in the given conditions demonstrate that the stresses generated by pulse laser in human skin model were about -8 and +4 MPa. According to the results of simulation, the max and min stress are both emerged in the range of 0 600 um, that is exactly the location of myelinated Aδ and unmyelinated C nociceptor. The value of stress is can be adjusted by chose suitable parameters of laser. The study provides a possibility for developing a new non-lethal weapon to control riots or crowd.

  2. Strain Localization during Equal-Channel Angular Pressing Analyzed by Finite Element Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Daniel Horn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Equal-Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP is a method used to introduce severe plastic deformation into a metallic billet without changing its geometry. In special cases, strain localization occurs and a pattern consisting of regions with high and low deformation (so-called shear and matrix bands can emerge. This paper studies this phenomenon numerically adopting two-dimensional finite element simulations of one ECAP pass. The mechanical behavior of aluminum is modeled using phenomenological plasticity theory with isotropic or kinematic hardening. The effects of the two different strain hardening types are investigated numerically by systematic parameter studies: while isotropic hardening only causes minor fluctuations in the plastic strain fields, a material with high initial hardening rate and sufficient strain hardening capacity can exhibit pronounced localized deformation after ECAP. The corresponding finite element simulation results show a regular pattern of shear and matrix bands. This result is confirmed experimentally by ECAP-processing of AA6060 material in a severely cold worked condition, where microstructural analysis also reveals the formation of shear and matrix bands. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and numerical results in terms of shear and matrix band width and length scale. The simulations provide additional insights regarding the evolution of the strain and stress states in shear and matrix bands.

  3. Improving formability of tube bending for a copper material using finite element simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Duc Toan; Nnuyen, Dinh Thanh [Hungyen University of Technology and Education, Hungyen (Viet Nam); Kim, Young Suk [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Bending tubes are key products in many industries. The geometric parameters of the bending process are considered according to Taguchi's orthogonal array and then coupled with finite element simulation to predict and improve the formability of the tube bending process for copper JIS25A material. Three parameters, namely, mandrel diameter, distance between mandrel rings, and distance from the tip of the mandrel bar to the center of the base die, are selected to study their effects on the quality of the bending process. The variance analysis shows that the effect distribution of each parameter to bending quality is determined, and optimal conditions are adopted to conduct experiments.

  4. Finite Element Multibody Simulation of a Breathing Crack in a Rotor with a Cohesive Zone Model

    OpenAIRE

    Liong, Rugerri Toni; Proppe, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    The breathing mechanism of a transversely cracked shaft and its influence on a rotor system that appears due to shaft weight and inertia forces is studied. The presence of a crack reduces the stiffness of the rotor system and introduces a stiffness variation during the revolution of the shaft. Here, 3D finite element (FE) model and multibody simulation (MBS) are introduced to predict and to analyse the breathing mechanism on a transverse cracked shaft. It is based on a cohesive zone model (CZ...

  5. Free surface simulation of a two-layer fluid by boundary element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weoncheol Koo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A two-layer fluid with free surface is simulated in the time domain by a two-dimensional potential-based Numerical Wave Tank (NWT. The developed NWT is based on the boundary element method and a leap-frog time integration scheme. A whole domain scheme including interaction terms between two layers is applied to solve the boundary integral equation. The time histories of surface elevations on both fluid layers in the respective wave modes are verified with analytic results. The amplitude ratios of upper to lower elevation for various density ratios and water depths are also compared.

  6. Finite Element Simulation of the Compaction and Springback of Alumix 321 PM Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley G. Selig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element simulation of the compaction and springback of an aluminum-based powder metallurgy alloy (Alumix 321 was developed and validated using the LS-DYNA hydrocode. The present work aims to directly address the current scarcity of modeling works on this popular alloy system. The Alumix 321 constitutive material parameters are presented. The model can predict the results of single-action compaction as well as the amount of springback experienced by a compact upon ejection from the die. The model has been validated using a series of experiments including powder compaction, optical densitometry, and the creation of a compaction curve.

  7. The finite element simulation analysis research of 38CrSi cylindrical power spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei; Lv, Qiongying; Zhao, Yujuan; Lv, Yunxia

    2018-01-01

    In order to grope for the influence of the main cylindrical spinning process parameters on the spinning process, this paper combines with real tube power spinning process and uses ABAQUS finite element analysis software to simulate the tube power spinning process of 38CrSi steel materials, through the analysis of the stress, strain of the part forming process, analyzes the influence of the thickness reduction and the feed rate to the forming process, and analyzes the variation of the spinning force, finally determines the reasonable main spinning process parameters combination.

  8. Numerical simulation and design of a fluxset sensor by finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preis, K.; Bardi, I.; Biro, O.; Richter, K.R. [Technical Univ. of Graz (Austria); Pavo, J. [Technical Univ. of Budapest (Hungary); Gasparics, A. [Research Inst. for Material Science, Budapest (Hungary); Ticar, I. [Univ. of Maribor (Slovenia)

    1998-09-01

    A 3D model of a fluxset sensor serving to measure magnetic fields arising in Eddy Current Nondestructive Testing applications is analyzed by the finite element method. The voltage induced in the pick-up coil is obtained by computing the flux of the core of the sensor for several values of the exciting current at various external fields. It is shown that the time shift of the ensuing voltage impulse depends linearly on the external field in a wide range. The behavior of the sensor is furthermore simulated in a real nondestructive testing arrangement consisting of an exciting coil located above a conducting plate with a crack.

  9. Random lock-in intervals for tubular structural elements subject to simulated natural wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus F.; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    1999-01-01

    The paper reports on wind tunnel experiments with an elastically suspended circular cylinder vibrating under the excitation of natural wind of high turbulence degree. The natural wind turbulence was simulated bysuperposing the low frequency part of the natural wind turbulence on the background high...... structural elements subject to thenatural wind. The engineering relevance of the investigation is supported by comparing with the unrealistic highlyconservative rules of wind induced fatique commonly given in codes of practice. The stochastic lock-in model aswell as the related fatigue calculation procedure...

  10. Segregation of the elements of the platinum group in a simulated high-level waste glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitamura, H.; Banba, T.; Kamizono, H.; Kiriyama, Y.; Kumata, M.; Murakami, T.; Tashiro, S.

    1983-01-01

    Segregation of the elements of the platinum group occurred during vitrification of the borosilicate glass containing 20 wt% simulated high-level waste oxides. The segregated materials were composed of two crystalline phases: one was the solid solution of ruthenium and rhodium dioxides and the other was that of palladium and rhodium metals also with tellurium. The segregated materials were not distributed homogeneously throughout the glass: (i) on the surface of the glass, there occurred palladium, rhodium and tellurium alloy alone; and (ii) at the inner part of the glass, the agglomerates of the two phases were concentrated in one part and dispersed in the other

  11. Aspects of cleaning environmental materials for multi-element analysis, e.g. plant samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markert, B.

    1992-01-01

    Cleaning of samples is often the first step in the entire procedure of sample preparation in environmental trace element research. The question must generally be raised of whether cleaning is meaningful before chemical investigations with plant material (e.g. for the determination of transfer factors in the soil/plant system) or not (e.g. for food chain analysis in the plant/animal system). The most varied cleaning procedures for plant samples are currently available ranging from dry and wet wiping of the leaf or needle surface up to the complete removal of the cuticule with the aid of chlorofom. There is at present no standardized cleaning procedure for plant samples so that it is frequently not possible to compare analytical data from different working groups studying the same plant species. (orig.)

  12. Contribution of neutron activation analysis and radioanalytical techniques to trace element speciation in environmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallorini, M.; Orvini, E.; Sabbioni, E.; Pietra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility of the NAA in contributing to trace element speciation in environmental and biological samples is shown by a few selected applications. They are: (i) the determination of different species of vanadium, arsenic and selenium in freshwater. The pre-irradiation treatments in which the different chemical species are selectively isolated are critically evaluated. Problems arising from possible contaminations or losses and from blanks are discussed; (ii) the use of NAA in metallobiochemical speciation once biochemical methods of cellular fractionation for the isolation of metallobiocomplexes are developed. Examples concern the biochemical speciation of vanadium in human blood and the development of a method for speciation of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds in biological samples. The use of radioanalytical techniques in developing the separation procedures of different trace metal chemical and biochemical species is also briefly discussed. 24 references, 5 figures, 4 tables

  13. Finite Element Model Characterization Of Nano-Composite Thermal And Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yoshiki; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    Thermal and environmental barrier coatings have been applied for protecting Si based ceramic matrix composite components from high temperature environment in advanced gas turbine engines. It has been found that the delamination and lifetime of T/EBC systems generally depend on the initiation and propagation of surface cracks induced by the axial mechanical load in addition to severe thermal loads. In order to prevent T/EBC systems from surface cracking and subsequent delamination due to mechanical and thermal stresses, T/EBC systems reinforced with nano-composite architectures have showed promise to improve mechanical properties and provide a potential crack shielding mechanism such as crack bridging. In this study, a finite element model (FEM) was established to understand the potential beneficial effects of nano-composites systems such as SiC nanotube-reinforced oxide T/EBC systems.

  14. Numerical simulations of granular dynamics: I. Hard-sphere discrete element method and tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Walsh, Kevin J.; Murdoch, Naomi; Michel, Patrick

    2011-03-01

    We present a new particle-based (discrete element) numerical method for the simulation of granular dynamics, with application to motions of particles on small solar system body and planetary surfaces. The method employs the parallel N-body tree code pkdgrav to search for collisions and compute particle trajectories. Collisions are treated as instantaneous point-contact events between rigid spheres. Particle confinement is achieved by combining arbitrary combinations of four provided wall primitives, namely infinite plane, finite disk, infinite cylinder, and finite cylinder, and degenerate cases of these. Various wall movements, including translation, oscillation, and rotation, are supported. We provide full derivations of collision prediction and resolution equations for all geometries and motions. Several tests of the method are described, including a model granular “atmosphere” that achieves correct energy equipartition, and a series of tumbler simulations that show the expected transition from tumbling to centrifuging as a function of rotation rate.

  15. Direct numerical simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with the spectral element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xu; Tan Duowang

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady three-dimensional high-order spectral element method code. The numerical model used consists of Navier-Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation. The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory. Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code, including instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers. These results indicate that turbulent structures of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions. The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of simulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows. (authors)

  16. Finite element simulation of nanoindentation tests using a macroscopic computational model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, Mourad; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a numerical procedure to simulate nanoindentation tests using a macroscopic computational model. Both theoretical and numerical aspects of the proposed methodology, based on the coupling of isotropic elasticity and anisotropic plasticity described with the quadratic criterion of Hill are presented to model this behaviour. The anisotropic plastic behaviour accounts for the mixed nonlinear hardening (isotropic and kinematic) under large plastic deformation. Nanoindentation tests were simulated to analyse the nonlinear mechanical behaviour of aluminium alloy. The predicted results of the finite element (FE) modelling are in good agreement with the experimental data, thereby confirming the accuracy level of the suggested FE method of analysis. The effects of some technological and mechanical parameters known to have an influence during the nanoindentation tests were also investigated.

  17. PATH: a lumped-element beam-transport simulation program with space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    PATH is a group of computer programs for simulating charged-particle beam-transport systems. It was developed for evaluating the effects of some aberrations without a time-consuming integration of trajectories through the system. The beam-transport portion of PATH is derived from the well-known program, DECAY TURTLE. PATH contains all features available in DECAY TURTLE (including the input format) plus additional features such as a more flexible random-ray generator, longitudinal phase space, some additional beamline elements, and space-charge routines. One of the programs also provides a simulation of an Alvarez linear accelerator. The programs, originally written for a CDC 7600 computer system, also are available on a VAX-VMS system. All of the programs are interactive with input prompting for ease of use

  18. Multibody simulations of trolleybus vertical dynamics and influences of spring-damper structural elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polach P.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical dynamic properties of the ŠKODA 21 Tr low-floor trolleybus were investigated on an artificial test track when driving with a real vehicle and when simulating driving with a multibody model along a virtual test track. Driving along the artificial test track was aimed to determine vertical dynamic properties of the real trolleybus and on the basis of them to verify computer trolleybus models. Time histories and extreme values of the air springs relative deflections are the monitored quantities. Due to differences of the experiments and the computer simulations results the influences of the characteristics of the spring-damper structural elements of the axles suspension and the radial characteristics of the tires used in the trolleybus multibody model on the extreme values of the monitored quantities are evaluated.

  19. Achieving a high mode count in the exact electromagnetic simulation of diffractive optical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, André; Brenner, Karl-Heinz

    2018-03-01

    The application of rigorous optical simulation algorithms, both in the modal as well as in the time domain, is known to be limited to the nano-optical scale due to severe computing time and memory constraints. This is true even for today's high-performance computers. To address this problem, we develop the fast rigorous iterative method (FRIM), an algorithm based on an iterative approach, which, under certain conditions, allows solving also large-size problems approximation free. We achieve this in the case of a modal representation by avoiding the computationally complex eigenmode decomposition. Thereby, the numerical cost is reduced from O(N 3 ) to O(N log N), enabling a simulation of structures like certain diffractive optical elements with a significantly higher mode count than presently possible. Apart from speed, another major advantage of the iterative FRIM over standard modal methods is the possibility to trade runtime against accuracy.

  20. Simulating Stresses Associated with the Bending of Wood Using a Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Gaff

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the stress-strain curves of various thicknesses of soft and hard wood when bent during three-point loading. The finite element method was used to simulate the course of stresses that occurred during the bending of these materials. Reference curves obtained by bending real specimens offered a basis for simulation. The results showed that with increasing material thickness, deflection values decreased and the proportionality limit increased; eventually, the bendability coefficient value decreased and the loading force necessary for bending increased. Moreover, it was apparent when bending hard materials that higher loading forces were necessary for different materials of the same thickness. It is possible to determine the stress-strain curves without having to perform experiments (except for indispensable reference ones under real conditions.

  1. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Rayleigh−Taylor Instability with the Spectral Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Zhang; Duo-Wang, Tan

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh−Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady three-dimensional high-order spectral element method code. The numerical model used consists of Navier–Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation. The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory. Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh−Taylor instabilities are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code, including instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers. These results indicate that turbulent structures of Rayleigh–Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions. The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of simulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh−Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  2. Toward transient finite element simulation of thermal deformation of machine tools in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Andreas; Ruprecht, Daniel; Wensch, Joerg

    2018-01-01

    Finite element models without simplifying assumptions can accurately describe the spatial and temporal distribution of heat in machine tools as well as the resulting deformation. In principle, this allows to correct for displacements of the Tool Centre Point and enables high precision manufacturing. However, the computational cost of FE models and restriction to generic algorithms in commercial tools like ANSYS prevents their operational use since simulations have to run faster than real-time. For the case where heat diffusion is slow compared to machine movement, we introduce a tailored implicit-explicit multi-rate time stepping method of higher order based on spectral deferred corrections. Using the open-source FEM library DUNE, we show that fully coupled simulations of the temperature field are possible in real-time for a machine consisting of a stock sliding up and down on rails attached to a stand.

  3. Report on intercomparison IAEA/W-4 of the determination of trace elements in simulated fresh water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszonicki, L.; Hanna, A.N.; Suschny, O.

    1985-05-01

    The report presents results of a laboratory intercomparison on the determination of trace elements in simulated fresh water. 20 trace elements were analyzed by 38 laboratories from 21 countries. The results of the reported comparison confirm the agreement of the nominal concentration values of trace elements in the IAEA/W-4 simulated fresh water with the determined values of these elements. They also confirm that concentrated solutions of this type can be stored in quartz ampoules without any noticeable changes due to the adsorption of trace components on the quartz wall of vessels for considerable time. The concentration values of trace elements could be certified and the material IAEA/W-4 simulated fresh water issued as a reference material. 84% of all results were obtained either by atomic absorption or by atomic emission spectroscopy

  4. Analysis of Interactions of Logistics Elements of K-1 Tracked Vehicles in Republic Of Korea Army by Using Simulation Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Si-Won

    2007-01-01

    ...: component failure rate, repair rate, inventory service level, and logistics delays. The model with these logistics elements is simulated for the acquirement of data and the results provide guidance...

  5. Field sampling of soil pore water to evaluate trace element mobility and associated environmental risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Jimenez, Eduardo, E-mail: eduardo.moreno@uam.es [Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Beesley, Luke [James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH (United Kingdom); Lepp, Nicholas W. [35, Victoria Road, Formby, Liverpool L37 7DH (United Kingdom); Dickinson, Nicholas M. [Department of Ecology, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, PO Box 84 (New Zealand); Hartley, William [School of Computing, Science and Engineering, University of Salford, Cockcroft Building, Salford, M5 4WT (United Kingdom); Clemente, Rafael [Dep. of Soil and Water Conservation and Organic Waste Management, CEBAS-CSIC, Campus Universitario de Espinardo, PO Box 164, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    Monitoring soil pollution is a key aspect in sustainable management of contaminated land but there is often debate over what should be monitored to assess ecological risk. Soil pore water, containing the most labile pollutant fraction in soils, can be easily collected in situ offering a routine way to monitor this risk. We present a compilation of data on concentration of trace elements (As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in soil pore water collected in field conditions from a range of polluted and non-polluted soils in Spain and the UK during single and repeated monitoring, and propose a simple eco-toxicity test using this media. Sufficient pore water could be extracted for analysis both under semi-arid and temperate conditions, and eco-toxicity comparisons could be effectively made between polluted and non-polluted soils. We propose that in-situ pore water extraction could enhance the realism of risk assessment at some contaminated sites. - Highlights: > In situ pore water sampling successfully evaluates trace elements mobility in soils. > Field sampling proved robust for different soils, sites and climatic regimes. > Measurements may be directly related to ecotoxicological assays. > Both short and long-term monitoring of polluted lands may be achieved. > This method complements other widely used assays for environmental risk assessment. - In situ pore water sampling from a wide variety of soils proves to be a beneficial application to monitor the stability of pollutants in soils and subsequent risk through mobility.

  6. Neutron activation analysis for environmental trace element research determination of elemental composition of sediments in the Sea of Galillee, Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavi, N; Ne` eman, E; Brenner, S; Butenko, V [Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel). Medical School

    1996-12-01

    The aims of this work were to: a) demonstrate the effectiveness of instrumental neutron activation analysis for determining the background concentrations of trace elements in the sediments collected from the Sea of Gallile. b) determine the advantage factors for epithermal neutron irradiation. c) determine the contribution of silicon to the total {sup 28}Al activity by the {sup 28}Si(n,p){sup 28}Al reaction. c) check the validity of the method by determining the elemental content of U.S. NBS Standard Reference Material SRM-1633a (fly ash). d) calculate the average enrichment factors for the elements in sediments . e) determine the concentrations of the artificial radionuclides {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and the naturally occurring radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th (authors).

  7. Finite element simulation of HIP-process to produce 3d near net shape parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zadeh, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    One of the major problems when producing powder metallurgy parts through hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is the non homogeneous shrinkage of HIP-capsule during the process. This leads to time and cost consuming machining of the HIP parts. In order to reduce the machining to a minimum, one can try to simulate the HIP-process by means of numerical methods. Hereby, the part distortion can be predicted, and hence a new HIP-capsule can be designed in such a way to prevent the distortion partly or even completely. In the following, a finite element method is used, on one hand, to simulate part shrinkage during HIP process; on the other hand a method is integrated in this simulation to optimize the HIP-capsule geometry. For the determination of material dependent parameters, a mixture of theoretical and experimental methods is used. Results of simulation are verified for a complex 3d HIP part out of TiAl6V4

  8. Research on burnout fault of moulded case circuit breaker based on finite element simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yang; Chang, Shuai; Zhang, Penghe; Xu, Yinghui; Peng, Chuning; Shi, Erwei

    2017-09-01

    In the failure event of molded case circuit breaker, overheating of the molded case near the wiring terminal has a very important proportion. The burnout fault has become an important factor restricting the development of molded case circuit breaker. This paper uses the finite element simulation software to establish the model of molded case circuit breaker by coupling multi-physics field. This model can simulate the operation and study the law of the temperature distribution. The simulation results show that the temperature near the wiring terminal, especially the incoming side of the live wire, of the molded case circuit breaker is much higher than that of the other areas. The steady-state and transient simulation results show that the temperature at the wiring terminals is abnormally increased by increasing the contact resistance of the wiring terminals. This is consistent with the frequent occurrence of burnout of the molded case in this area. Therefore, this paper holds that the burnout failure of the molded case circuit breaker is mainly caused by the abnormal increase of the contact resistance of the wiring terminal.

  9. Simulation of bonding effects in HRTEM images of light element materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Kurasch

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of multislice high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM simulation can be improved by calculating the scattering potential using density functional theory (DFT. This approach accounts for the fact that electrons in the specimen are redistributed according to their local chemical environment. This influences the scattering process and alters the absolute and relative contrast in the final image. For light element materials with well defined geometry, such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers, the DFT based simulation scheme turned out to be necessary to prevent misinterpretation of weak signals, such as the identification of nitrogen substitutions in a graphene network. Furthermore, this implies that the HRTEM image does not only contain structural information (atom positions and atomic numbers. Instead, information on the electron charge distribution can be gained in addition.In order to produce meaningful results, the new input parameters need to be chosen carefully. Here we present details of the simulation process and discuss the influence of the main parameters on the final result. Furthermore we apply the simulation scheme to three model systems: A single atom boron and a single atom oxygen substitution in graphene and an oxygen adatom on graphene.

  10. A spectral element method with adaptive segmentation for accurately simulating extracellular electrical stimulation of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiber, Calvin D; Dokos, Socrates; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2017-05-01

    The capacity to quickly and accurately simulate extracellular stimulation of neurons is essential to the design of next-generation neural prostheses. Existing platforms for simulating neurons are largely based on finite-difference techniques; due to the complex geometries involved, the more powerful spectral or differential quadrature techniques cannot be applied directly. This paper presents a mathematical basis for the application of a spectral element method to the problem of simulating the extracellular stimulation of retinal neurons, which is readily extensible to neural fibers of any kind. The activating function formalism is extended to arbitrary neuron geometries, and a segmentation method to guarantee an appropriate choice of collocation points is presented. Differential quadrature may then be applied to efficiently solve the resulting cable equations. The capacity for this model to simulate action potentials propagating through branching structures and to predict minimum extracellular stimulation thresholds for individual neurons is demonstrated. The presented model is validated against published values for extracellular stimulation threshold and conduction velocity for realistic physiological parameter values. This model suggests that convoluted axon geometries are more readily activated by extracellular stimulation than linear axon geometries, which may have ramifications for the design of neural prostheses.

  11. Simulation studies of acceleration of heavy ions and their elemental compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toida, Mieko; Ohsawa, Yukiharu

    1996-07-01

    By using a one-dimensional, electromagnetic particle simulation code with full ion and electron dynamics, we have studied the acceleration of heavy ions by a nonlinear magnetosonic wave in a multi-ion-species plasma. First, we describe the mechanism of heavy ion acceleration by magnetosonic waves. We then investigate this by particle simulations. The simulation plasma contains four ion species: H, He, O, and Fe. The number density of He is taken to be 10% of that of H, and those of O and Fe are much lower. Simulations confirm that, as in a single-ion-species plasma, some of the hydrogens can be accelerated by the longitudinal electric field formed in the wave. Furthermore, they show that magnetosonic waves can accelerate all the particles of all the heavy species (He, O, and Fe) by a different mechanism, i.e., by the transverse electric field. The maximum speeds of the heavy species are about the same, of the order of the wave propagation speed. These are in good agreement with theoretical prediction. These results indicate that, if high-energy ions are produced in the solar corona through these mechanisms, the elemental compositions of these heavy ions can be similar to that of the background plasma, i.e., the corona

  12. COST action TD1407: network on technology-critical elements (NOTICE)--from environmental processes to human health threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobelo-García, A; Filella, M; Croot, P; Frazzoli, C; Du Laing, G; Ospina-Alvarez, N; Rauch, S; Salaun, P; Schäfer, J; Zimmermann, S

    2015-10-01

    The current socio-economic, environmental and public health challenges that countries are facing clearly need common-defined strategies to inform and support our transition to a sustainable economy. Here, the technology-critical elements (which includes Ga, Ge, In, Te, Nb, Ta, Tl, the Platinum Group Elements and most of the rare-earth elements) are of great relevance in the development of emerging key technologies-including renewable energy, energy efficiency, electronics or the aerospace industry. In this context, the increasing use of technology-critical elements (TCEs) and associated environmental impacts (from mining to end-of-life waste products) is not restricted to a national level but covers most likely a global scale. Accordingly, the European COST Action TD1407: Network on Technology-Critical Elements (NOTICE)-from environmental processes to human health threats, has an overall objective for creating a network of scientists and practitioners interested in TCEs, from the evaluation of their environmental processes to understanding potential human health threats, with the aim of defining the current state of knowledge and gaps, proposing priority research lines/activities and acting as a platform for new collaborations and joint research projects. The Action is focused on three major scientific areas: (i) analytical chemistry, (ii) environmental biogeochemistry and (iii) human exposure and (eco)-toxicology.

  13. Weld distortion prediction of the ITER Vacuum Vessel using Finite Element simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caixas, Joan, E-mail: joan.caixas@f4e.europa.eu [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Guirao, Julio [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S. L., Marqués de San Esteban 52, Entlo, 33209 Gijon (Spain); Bayon, Angel; Jones, Lawrence; Arbogast, Jean François [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Barbensi, Andrea [Ansaldo Nucleare, Corso F.M. Perrone, 25, I-16152 Genoa (Italy); Dans, Andres [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Facca, Aldo [Mangiarotti, Pannellia di Sedegliano, I-33039 Sedegliano (UD) (Italy); Fernandez, Elena; Fernández, José [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Iglesias, Silvia [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S. L., Marqués de San Esteban 52, Entlo, 33209 Gijon (Spain); Jimenez, Marc; Jucker, Philippe; Micó, Gonzalo [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Ordieres, Javier [Numerical Analysis Technologies, S. L., Marqués de San Esteban 52, Entlo, 33209 Gijon (Spain); Pacheco, Jose Miguel [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Paoletti, Roberto [Walter Tosto, Via Erasmo Piaggio, 72, I-66100 Chieti Scalo (Italy); Sanguinetti, Gian Paolo [Ansaldo Nucleare, Corso F.M. Perrone, 25, I-16152 Genoa (Italy); Stamos, Vassilis [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Tacconelli, Massimiliano [Walter Tosto, Via Erasmo Piaggio, 72, I-66100 Chieti Scalo (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Computational simulations of the weld processes can rapidly assess different sequences. ► Prediction of welding distortion to optimize the manufacturing sequence. ► Accurate shape prediction after each manufacture phase allows to generate modified procedures and pre-compensate distortions. ► The simulation methodology is improved using condensed computation techniques with ANSYS in order to reduce computation resources. ► For each welding process, the models are calibrated with the results of coupons and mock-ups. -- Abstract: The as-welded surfaces of the ITER Vacuum Vessel sectors need to be within a very tight tolerance, without a full-scale prototype. In order to predict welding distortion and optimize the manufacturing sequence, the industrial contract includes extensive computational simulations of the weld processes which can rapidly assess different sequences. The accurate shape prediction, after each manufacturing phase, enables actual distortions to be compared with the welding simulations to generate modified procedures and pre-compensate distortions. While previous mock-ups used heavy welded-on jigs to try to restrain the distortions, this method allows the use of lightweight jigs and yields important cost and rework savings. In order to enable the optimization of different alternative welding sequences, the simulation methodology is improved using condensed computation techniques with ANSYS in order to reduce computational resources. For each welding process, the models are calibrated with the results of coupons and mock-ups. The calibration is used to construct representative models of each segment and sector. This paper describes the application to the construction of the Vacuum Vessel sector of the enhanced simulation methodology with condensed Finite Element computation techniques and results of the calibration on several test pieces for different types of welds.

  14. Weld distortion prediction of the ITER Vacuum Vessel using Finite Element simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caixas, Joan; Guirao, Julio; Bayon, Angel; Jones, Lawrence; Arbogast, Jean François; Barbensi, Andrea; Dans, Andres; Facca, Aldo; Fernandez, Elena; Fernández, José; Iglesias, Silvia; Jimenez, Marc; Jucker, Philippe; Micó, Gonzalo; Ordieres, Javier; Pacheco, Jose Miguel; Paoletti, Roberto; Sanguinetti, Gian Paolo; Stamos, Vassilis; Tacconelli, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Computational simulations of the weld processes can rapidly assess different sequences. ► Prediction of welding distortion to optimize the manufacturing sequence. ► Accurate shape prediction after each manufacture phase allows to generate modified procedures and pre-compensate distortions. ► The simulation methodology is improved using condensed computation techniques with ANSYS in order to reduce computation resources. ► For each welding process, the models are calibrated with the results of coupons and mock-ups. -- Abstract: The as-welded surfaces of the ITER Vacuum Vessel sectors need to be within a very tight tolerance, without a full-scale prototype. In order to predict welding distortion and optimize the manufacturing sequence, the industrial contract includes extensive computational simulations of the weld processes which can rapidly assess different sequences. The accurate shape prediction, after each manufacturing phase, enables actual distortions to be compared with the welding simulations to generate modified procedures and pre-compensate distortions. While previous mock-ups used heavy welded-on jigs to try to restrain the distortions, this method allows the use of lightweight jigs and yields important cost and rework savings. In order to enable the optimization of different alternative welding sequences, the simulation methodology is improved using condensed computation techniques with ANSYS in order to reduce computational resources. For each welding process, the models are calibrated with the results of coupons and mock-ups. The calibration is used to construct representative models of each segment and sector. This paper describes the application to the construction of the Vacuum Vessel sector of the enhanced simulation methodology with condensed Finite Element computation techniques and results of the calibration on several test pieces for different types of welds

  15. Quasi-static earthquake cycle simulation based on nonlinear viscoelastic finite element analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agata, R.; Ichimura, T.; Hyodo, M.; Barbot, S.; Hori, T.

    2017-12-01

    To explain earthquake generation processes, simulation methods of earthquake cycles have been studied. For such simulations, the combination of the rate- and state-dependent friction law at the fault plane and the boundary integral method based on Green's function in an elastic half space is widely used (e.g. Hori 2009; Barbot et al. 2012). In this approach, stress change around the fault plane due to crustal deformation can be computed analytically, while the effects of complex physics such as mantle rheology and gravity are generally not taken into account. To consider such effects, we seek to develop an earthquake cycle simulation combining crustal deformation computation based on the finite element (FE) method with the rate- and state-dependent friction law. Since the drawback of this approach is the computational cost associated with obtaining numerical solutions, we adopt a recently developed fast and scalable FE solver (Ichimura et al. 2016), which assumes use of supercomputers, to solve the problem in a realistic time. As in the previous approach, we solve the governing equations consisting of the rate- and state-dependent friction law. In solving the equations, we compute stress changes along the fault plane due to crustal deformation using FE simulation, instead of computing them by superimposing slip response function as in the previous approach. In stress change computation, we take into account nonlinear viscoelastic deformation in the asthenosphere. In the presentation, we will show simulation results in a normative three-dimensional problem, where a circular-shaped velocity-weakening area is set in a square-shaped fault plane. The results with and without nonlinear viscosity in the asthenosphere will be compared. We also plan to apply the developed code to simulate the post-earthquake deformation of a megathrust earthquake, such as the 2011 Tohoku earthquake. Acknowledgment: The results were obtained using the K computer at the RIKEN (Proposal number

  16. Plane shear flows of frictionless spheres: Kinetic theory and 3D soft-sphere discrete element method simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Vescovi, Dalila; Berzi, Diego; Richard, Patrick; Brodu, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    International audience; We use existing 3D Discrete Element simulations of simple shear flows of spheres to evaluate the radial distribution function at contact that enables kinetic theory to correctly predict the pressure and the shear stress, for different values of the collisional coefficient of restitution. Then, we perform 3D Discrete Element simulations of plane flows of frictionless, inelastic spheres, sheared between walls made bumpy by gluing particles in a regular array, at fixed av...

  17. How reliable are environmental data on 'orphan' elements? The case of bismuth concentrations in surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filella, Montserrat

    2010-01-01

    Like all elements of the periodic table, bismuth is ubiquitously distributed throughout the environment as a result of natural processes and human activities. It is present as Bi(III) in environmental, biological and geochemical samples. Although bismuth and its compounds are considered to be non-toxic to humans, its increasing use as a replacement for lead has highlighted how little is known about its environmental and ecotoxicological behaviour. In this first critical review paper on the existing information on bismuth occurrence in natural waters, 125 papers on fresh and marine waters have been collated. Although the initial objective of this study was to establish the range of the typical concentrations of total dissolved bismuth in natural waters, this proved impossible to achieve due to the wide, and hitherto unexplained, dispersion of published data. Since analytical limitations might be one of the reasons underlying value dispersion, new analytical methods published since 2000--intended to be applied to natural waters--have also been reviewed. Disappointingly, the detection limits of the bulk of them are well above those required; they are thus of limited usefulness. Analysis of the existing information on bismuth in secondary references (i.e., books, review chapters) and on its chemical speciation in seawater revealed that the uncritical reproduction of old data is a widespread practice.

  18. Preconcentration of traces of radionuclides and elements with foamed polyurethane sorbents in the analysis of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palagyi, S.; Braun, T.

    1986-01-01

    The importance of preconcentration and the permanent need of efficient preconcentrating agents in environmental analysis are pointed out. Foamed polyurethane sorbents draw attention as novel agents in separation chemistry. A survey is presented of recent applications of unloaded and reagent-loaded open-cell type resilient polyurethane foams in the separation and preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, and of the latest uses of these foams in the preconcentration and detection of traces of some, mainly inorganic materials in environmental samples, using radioanalytical techniques. Possible future uses of polyurethane foams in trace element detection in environmental analysis are outlined. (author)

  19. Environmental contextualisation of potential toxic elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in biochar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freddo, Alessia; Cai Chao; Reid, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Nine dissimilar biochars, produced from varying feedstock at different pyrolysis temperatures, are appraised with respect to concentrations of potentially toxic elements, specifically, metals, metalloids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Concentrations of the metals and metalloids varied with the following ranges (mg kg −1 ): 0.02–0.94, Cd; 0.12–6.48, Cr; 0.04–13.2, Cu; 0.1–1.37, Ni; 0.06–3.87, Pb; 0.94–207, Zn and 0.03–0.27, As. Σ 16 PAH concentrations (16 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) PAHs) range between 0.08 mg kg −1 to 8.7 mg kg −1 . Subsequent comparison with background soil concentrations, concentration applied to the regulation of composted materials (Publicly Available Specification (PAS 100)) and European Union (EU) regulations relating to the application of sewage sludge to agricultural land suggest low risk associated with the concentrations of PTEs observed in biochar. Collectively, results suggest that environmental impacts attributable to metals, metalloids and PAHs associated with biochar following its application to soil are likely to be minimal. - Highlights: ► Concentrations of PTEs varied with feedstock and temperature of production. ► Of the PTEs Zn (0.94–207 mg kg −1 ) was of most priority. ► PTE levels did not infringe guidance values for compost or sewage sludge. ► Biochar ( −1 ) is unlikely to make any real difference to PTE concentrations in soil. - Environmental impacts attributable to metals, metalloids and PAHs associated with biochar following its application to soil are likely to be minimal.

  20. Environmental impact of toxic elements in red mud studied by fractionation and speciation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milačič, Radmila; Zuliani, Tea; Ščančar, Janez

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) is mostly produced from bauxite ore, which contains up to 70% of Al(2)O(3) (alumina). Before alumina is refined to aluminum metal, it is purified by hot alkaline extraction. As a waste by-product red mud is formed. Due to its high alkalinity and large quantities, it represents a severe disposal problem. In Kidričevo (Slovenia), red mud was washed with water before disposal, and after drying, covered with soil. In Ajka (Hungary), the red mud slurry was collected directly in a containment structure, which burst caused a major accident in October 2010. In the present work the environmental impact of toxic elements in red mud from Kidričevo and Ajka were evaluated by applying a sequential extraction procedure and speciation analysis. The predominant red mud fraction was the insoluble residue; nevertheless, environmental concern was focused on the highly mobile water-soluble fraction of Al and Cr. Al in the water-soluble Ajka mud fraction was present exclusively in form of toxic [Al(OH)(4)](-), while Cr existed in its toxic hexavalent form. Comparative assessment to red mud from Kidričevo (Slovenia) with a lower alkalinity (pH 9) with that from Ajka demonstrated significantly lower Al solubility and the presence of only trace amounts of Cr(VI), confirming that disposal of neutralized mud is environmentally much more acceptable and carries a smaller risk of ecological accidents. Since during the Ajka accident huge amounts of biologically available Al and moderate Cr(VI) concentrations were released into the terrestrial and aquatic environments, monitoring of Al and Cr(VI) set free during remedial actions at the contaminated site is essential. Particular care should be taken to minimize the risk of release of soluble Al species and Cr(VI) into water supplies and surface waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental routes for platinum group elements to biological materials. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, Kristine H.; Morrison, Gregory M. [Water Environment Transport, Chalmers University of Technology, SE 412 96 Goteborg (Sweden); Rauch, Sebastien [R.M. Parsons Laboratory 48-108, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2004-12-01

    The increased use of platinum group elements (PGE) in automobile catalysts has led to concern over potential environmental and biological accumulation. Platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) concentrations have increased in the environment since the introduction of automobile catalysts. This review summarises current knowledge concerning the environmental mobility, speciation and bioavailability of Pt, Pd and Rh. The greater proportion of PGE emissions is from automobile catalysts, in the form of nanometer-sized catalyst particles, which deposit on roadside surfaces, as evidenced in samples of road dust, grass and soil. In soil, PGE can be transformed into more mobile species through complexation with organic matter and can be solubilised in low pH rainwater. There are indications that environmentally formed Pd species are more soluble and hence more mobile in the environment than Rh and Pt. PGE can reach waterbodies through stormwater transport and deposition in sediments. Besides external contamination of grass close to roads, internal PGE uptake has been observed for plants growing on soil contaminated with automobile catalyst PGE. Fine particles of PGE were also detected on the surface of feathers sampled from passerines and raptors in their natural habitat, and internal organs of these birds also contained PGE. Uptake has been observed in sediment-dwelling invertebrates, and laboratory studies have shown an uptake of PGE in eel and fish exposed to water containing road dust.The available evidence indicates that the PGE, especially Pd, are transported to biological materials through deposition in roots by binding to sulphur-rich low molecular weight species in plants. PGE uptake to exposed animals have uptake rates in the following order: Pd>Pt>Rh. The liver and kidney accumulate the highest levels of PGE, especially Pd. Urinary Pd and Rh, but not Pt, levels are correlated with traffic intensity. Dental alloys may lead to elevated urinary Pt levels

  2. A finite-element simulation of galvanic coupling intra-body communication based on the whole human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yong; Zhang, Kai; Hao, Qun; Hu, Lanxin; Wang, Jingwen; Shang, Fuzhou

    2012-10-09

    Simulation based on the finite-element (FE) method plays an important role in the investigation of intra-body communication (IBC). In this paper, a finite-element model of the whole body model used for the IBC simulation is proposed and verified, while the FE simulation of the galvanic coupling IBC with different signal transmission paths has been achieved. Firstly, a novel finite-element method for modeling the whole human body is proposed, and a FE model of the whole human body used for IBC simulation was developed. Secondly, the simulations of the galvanic coupling IBC with the different signal transmission paths were implemented. Finally, the feasibility of the proposed method was verified by using in vivo measurements within the frequency range of 10 kHz-5 MHz, whereby some important conclusions were deduced. Our results indicate that the proposed method will offer significant advantages in the investigation of the galvanic coupling intra-body communication.

  3. Simulation on Temperature Field of Radiofrequency Lesions System Based on Finite Element Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, D; Qian, Z; Li, W; Qian, L

    2011-01-01

    This paper mainly describes the way to get the volume model of damaged region according to the simulation on temperature field of radiofrequency ablation lesion system in curing Parkinson's disease based on finite element method. This volume model reflects, to some degree, the shape and size of the damaged tissue during the treatment with all tendencies in different time or core temperature. By using Pennes equation as heat conduction equation of radiofrequency ablation of biological tissue, the author obtains the temperature distribution field of biological tissue in the method of finite element for solving equations. In order to establish damage models at temperature points of 60 deg. C, 65 deg. C, 70 deg. C, 75 deg. C, 80 deg. C, 85 deg. C and 90 deg. C while the time points are 30s, 60s, 90s and 120s, Parkinson's disease model of nuclei is reduced to uniform, infinite model with RF pin at the origin. Theoretical simulations of these models are displayed, focusing on a variety of conditions about the effective lesion size on horizontal and vertical. The results show the binary complete quadratic non-linear joint temperature-time models of the maximum damage diameter and maximum height. The models can comprehensively reflect the degeneration of target tissue caused by radio frequency temperature and duration. This lay the foundation for accurately monitor of clinical RF treatment of Parkinson's disease in the future.

  4. Mechanical behaviour of synthetic surgical meshes: finite element simulation of the herniated abdominal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Gascón, B; Peña, E; Melero, H; Pascual, G; Doblaré, M; Ginebra, M P; Bellón, J M; Calvo, B

    2011-11-01

    The material properties of meshes used in hernia surgery contribute to the overall mechanical behaviour of the repaired abdominal wall. The mechanical response of a surgical mesh has to be defined since the haphazard orientation of an anisotropic mesh can lead to inconsistent surgical outcomes. This study was designed to characterize the mechanical behaviour of three surgical meshes (Surgipro®, Optilene® and Infinit®) and to describe a mechanical constitutive law that accurately reproduces the experimental results. Finally, through finite element simulation, the behaviour of the abdominal wall was modelled before and after surgical mesh implant. Uniaxial loading of mesh samples in two perpendicular directions revealed the isotropic response of Surgipro® and the anisotropic behaviour of Optilene® and Infinit®. A phenomenological constitutive law was used to reproduce the measured experimental curves. To analyze the mechanical effect of the meshes once implanted in the abdomen, finite element simulation of the healthy and partially herniated repaired rabbit abdominal wall served to reproduce wall behaviour before and after mesh implant. In all cases, maximal displacements were lower and maximal principal stresses higher in the implanted abdomen than the intact wall model. Despite the fact that no mesh showed a behaviour that perfectly matched that of abdominal muscle, the Infinit® mesh was able to best comply with the biomechanics of the abdominal wall. Copyright © 2011 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Distributions of 12 elements on 64 absorbers from simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.; Marsh, S.F.

    1994-12-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 64 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) (pH 14.2). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y) and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 768 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2304 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing NCAW solutions

  6. Crack nucleation in solid materials under external load - simulations with the Discrete Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klejment Piotr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of cracking processes require an appropriate numerical technique. Classical engineering approach to the problem has its roots in the continuum mechanics and is based mainly on the Finite Element Method. This technique allows simulations of both elastic and large deformation processes, so it is very popular in the engineering applications. However, a final effect of cracking - fragmentation of an object at hand can hardly be described by this approach in a numerically efficient way since it requires a solution of a problem of nontrivial evolving in time boundary conditions. We focused our attention on the Discrete Element Method (DEM, which by definition implies “molecular” construction of the matter. The basic idea behind DEM is to represent an investigated body as an assemblage of discrete particles interacting with each other. Breaking interaction bonds between particles induced by external forces imeditelly implies creation/evolution of boundary conditions. In this study we used the DEM approach to simulate cracking process in the three dimensional solid material under external tension. The used numerical model, although higly simplified, can be used to describe behaviour of such materials like thin films, biological tissues, metal coatings, to name a few.

  7. Distributions of 15 elements on 58 absorbers from simulated Hanford Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

    1994-11-01

    As part of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System program at Los Alamos, we evaluated 58 commercially available or experimental absorber materials for their ability to remove hazardous components from high-level waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, pillared layered materials, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. We tested these absorbers with a solution that simulates Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) (pH 14.0). To this simulant solution we added the appropriate radionuclides and used gamma spectrometry to measure fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y), actinides (U and Am), and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, and Zr). For each of 870 element/absorber combinations, we measured distribution coefficients for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to obtain information about sorption kinetics. On the basis of these 2610 measured distribution coefficients, we determined that many of the tested absorbers may be suitable for processing DSSF solutions

  8. Sensitivity of Particle Size in Discrete Element Method to Particle Gas Method (DEM_PGM) Coupling in Underbody Blast Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-12

    Particle Size in Discrete Element Method to Particle Gas Method (DEM_PGM) Coupling in Underbody Blast Simulations Venkatesh Babu, Kumar Kulkarni, Sanjay...buried in soil viz., (1) coupled discrete element & particle gas methods (DEM-PGM) and (2) Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE), are investigated. The...DEM_PGM and identify the limitations/strengths compared to the ALE method. Discrete Element Method (DEM) can model individual particle directly, and

  9. Comparisons of Particle Tracking Techniques and Galerkin Finite Element Methods in Flow Simulations on Watershed Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, D.; Yeh, G.

    2009-12-01

    This paper applies two numerical approximations, the particle tracking technique and Galerkin finite element method, to solve the diffusive wave equation in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional flow simulations. The finite element method is one of most commonly approaches in numerical problems. It can obtain accurate solutions, but calculation times may be rather extensive. The particle tracking technique, using either single-velocity or average-velocity tracks to efficiently perform advective transport, could use larger time-step sizes than the finite element method to significantly save computational time. Comparisons of the alternative approximations are examined in this poster. We adapt the model WASH123D to examine the work. WASH123D is an integrated multimedia, multi-processes, physics-based computational model suitable for various spatial-temporal scales, was first developed by Yeh et al., at 1998. The model has evolved in design capability and flexibility, and has been used for model calibrations and validations over the course of many years. In order to deliver a locally hydrological model in Taiwan, the Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (TTFRI) is working with Prof. Yeh to develop next version of WASH123D. So, the work of our preliminary cooperationx is also sketched in this poster.

  10. Geomechanical Simulations of CO2 Storage Integrity using the Livermore Distinct Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J P; Johnson, S M; Friedmann, S J

    2008-07-11

    Large-scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects involving annual injections of millions of tons of CO{sub 2} are a key infrastructural element needed to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The large rate and volume of injection will induce pressure and stress gradients within the formation that could activate existing fractures and faults, or drive new fractures through the caprock. We will present results of an ongoing investigation to identify conditions that will activate existing fractures/faults or make new fractures within the caprock using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC is a multiphysics code, developed at LLNL, capable of simulating dynamic fracture of rock masses under a range of conditions. As part of a recent project, LDEC has been extended to consider fault activation and dynamic fracture of rock masses due to pressurization of the pore-space. We will present several demonstrations of LDEC functionality and applications of LDEC to CO{sub 2} injection scenarios including injection into an extensively fractured rockmass. These examples highlight the advantages of explicitly including the geomechanical response of each interface within the rockmass. We present results from our investigations of Teapot Dome using LDEC to study the potential for fault activation during injection. Using this approach, we built finite element models of the rock masses surrounding bounding faults and explicitly simulated the compression and shear on the fault interface. A CO{sub 2} injection source was introduced and the area of fault activation was predicted as a function of injection rate. This work presents an approach where the interactions of all locations on the fault are considered in response to specific injection scenarios. For example, with LDEC, as regions of the fault fail, the shear load is taken up elsewhere on the fault. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies of Teapot Dome and indicate

  11. Geomechanical Simulations of Caprock Integrity Using the Livermore Distinict Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S; Friedmann, S J

    2008-04-17

    Large-scale carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects involving annual injections of millions of tons of CO2 are a key infrastructural element needed to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The large rate and volume of injection will induce pressure and stress gradients within the formation that could activate existing fractures and faults, or drive new fractures through the caprock. We will present results of an ongoing investigation to identify conditions that will activate existing fractures/faults or make new fractures within the caprock using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC is a multiphysics code, developed at LLNL, capable of simulating dynamic fracture of rock masses under a range of conditions. As part of a recent project, LDEC has been extended to consider fault activation and dynamic fracture of rock masses due to pressurization of the pore-space. We will present several demonstrations of LDEC functionality and an application of LDEC to a CO2 injection scenario. We present results from our investigations of Teapot Dome using LDEC to study the potential for fault activation during injection. Using this approach, we built finite element models of the rock masses surrounding bounding faults and explicitly simulated the compression and shear on the fault interface. A CO2 injection source was introduced and the area of fault activation was predicted as a function of injection rate. This work presents an approach where the interactions of all locations on the fault are considered in response to specific injection scenarios. For example, with LDEC, as regions of the fault fail, the shear load is taken up elsewhere on the fault. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies of Teapot Dome and indicate significantly elevated pore pressures are required to activate the bounding faults, given the assumed in situ stress state on the faults.

  12. Environmental regulation in a network of simulated microbial ecosystems

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Hywel T. P.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2008-01-01

    The Earth possesses a number of regulatory feedback mechanisms involving life. In the absence of a population of competing biospheres, it has proved hard to find a robust evolutionary mechanism that would generate environmental regulation. It has been suggested that regulation must require altruistic environmental alterations by organisms and, therefore, would be evolutionarily unstable. This need not be the case if organisms alter the environment as a selectively neutral by-product of their ...

  13. Forward and adjoint spectral-element simulations of seismic wave propagation using hardware accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Daniel; Videau, Brice; Pouget, Kevin; Komatitsch, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Improving the resolution of tomographic images is crucial to answer important questions on the nature of Earth's subsurface structure and internal processes. Seismic tomography is the most prominent approach where seismic signals from ground-motion records are used to infer physical properties of internal structures such as compressional- and shear-wave speeds, anisotropy and attenuation. Recent advances in regional- and global-scale seismic inversions move towards full-waveform inversions which require accurate simulations of seismic wave propagation in complex 3D media, providing access to the full 3D seismic wavefields. However, these numerical simulations are computationally very expensive and need high-performance computing (HPC) facilities for further improving the current state of knowledge. During recent years, many-core architectures such as graphics processing units (GPUs) have been added to available large HPC systems. Such GPU-accelerated computing together with advances in multi-core central processing units (CPUs) can greatly accelerate scientific applications. There are mainly two possible choices of language support for GPU cards, the CUDA programming environment and OpenCL language standard. CUDA software development targets NVIDIA graphic cards while OpenCL was adopted mainly by AMD graphic cards. In order to employ such hardware accelerators for seismic wave propagation simulations, we incorporated a code generation tool BOAST into an existing spectral-element code package SPECFEM3D_GLOBE. This allows us to use meta-programming of computational kernels and generate optimized source code for both CUDA and OpenCL languages, running simulations on either CUDA or OpenCL hardware accelerators. We show here applications of forward and adjoint seismic wave propagation on CUDA/OpenCL GPUs, validating results and comparing performances for different simulations and hardware usages.

  14. Full wave simulation of waves in ECRIS plasmas based on the finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I (Italy); Mascali, D.; Neri, L.; Castro, G.; Patti, G.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S.; Ciavola, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Di Donato, L. [Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sorbello, G. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S. Sofia 62, 95123, Catania, Italy and Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica ed Informatica (DIEEI), Viale Andrea Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Isernia, T. [Università Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, delle Infrastrutture e dell' Energia Sostenibile (DIIES), Via Graziella, I-89100 Reggio Calabria (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    This paper describes the modeling and the full wave numerical simulation of electromagnetic waves propagation and absorption in an anisotropic magnetized plasma filling the resonant cavity of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The model assumes inhomogeneous, dispersive and tensorial constitutive relations. Maxwell's equations are solved by the finite element method (FEM), using the COMSOL Multiphysics{sup ®} suite. All the relevant details have been considered in the model, including the non uniform external magnetostatic field used for plasma confinement, the local electron density profile resulting in the full-3D non uniform magnetized plasma complex dielectric tensor. The more accurate plasma simulations clearly show the importance of cavity effect on wave propagation and the effects of a resonant surface. These studies are the pillars for an improved ECRIS plasma modeling, that is mandatory to optimize the ion source output (beam intensity distribution and charge state, especially). Any new project concerning the advanced ECRIS design will take benefit by an adequate modeling of self-consistent wave absorption simulations.

  15. Toward the modeling of combustion reactions through discrete element method (DEM) simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Martina Costa; Alobaid, Falah; Wang, Yongqi

    2018-03-01

    In this work, the process of combustion of coal particles under turbulent regime in a high-temperature reaction chamber is modeled through 3D discrete element method (DEM) simulations. By assuming the occurrence of interfacial transport phenomena between the gas and solid phases, one investigates the influence of the physicochemical properties of particles on the rates of heterogeneous chemical reactions, as well as the influence of eddies present in the gas phase on the mass transport of reactants toward the coal particles surface. Moreover, by considering a simplistic chemical mechanism for the combustion process, thermochemical and kinetic parameters obtained from the simulations are employed to discuss some phenomenological aspects of the combustion process. In particular, the observed changes in the mass and volume of coal particles during the gasification and combustion steps are discussed by emphasizing the changes in the chemical structure of the coal. In addition to illustrate how DEM simulations can be used in the modeling of consecutive and parallel chemical reactions, this work also shows how heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions become a source of mass and energy for the gas phase.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Recycled Concrete Using Convex Aggregate Model and Base Force Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijiang Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By using the Base Force Element Method (BFEM on potential energy principle, a new numerical concrete model, random convex aggregate model, is presented in this paper to simulate the experiment under uniaxial compression for recycled aggregate concrete (RAC which can also be referred to as recycled concrete. This model is considered as a heterogeneous composite which is composed of five mediums, including natural coarse aggregate, old mortar, new mortar, new interfacial transition zone (ITZ, and old ITZ. In order to simulate the damage processes of RAC, a curve damage model was adopted as the damage constitutive model and the strength theory of maximum tensile strain was used as the failure criterion in the BFEM on mesomechanics. The numerical results obtained in this paper which contained the uniaxial compressive strengths, size effects on strength, and damage processes of RAC are in agreement with experimental observations. The research works show that the random convex aggregate model and the BFEM with the curve damage model can be used for simulating the relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of RAC.

  17. Finite element simulation of lower limb injuries to the driver in minibus frontal collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang-Liang; Lei, Chen; Li, Kui; Fu, Shuo-Zhen; Wu, Zheng-Wei; Yin, Zhi-Yong

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to explore the biomechanical mechanism of lower limb injuries to the driver by establishing a finite element (FE) simulation model of collisions. First a minibus FE model was integrated with a seat belt system. Then it was used to rebuild two collisions together with the total human model for safety (THUMS) provided by Toyota Motor Corporation: a rear-end collision between a minibus and a truck and a head-on collision of a minibus to a rigid wall. The impact velocities of both collisions were set at 56 km/h. The vehicle dynamic response, vehicle deceleration, and dashboard intrusion in the two collisions were compared. In the minibus rear-end truck collision, the peak values of the von Mises equivalent stress at the tibia and the femur were 133 MPa and 126 MPa respectively; while in the minibus head-on rigid wall collision, the data were 139 MPa and 99 MPa. Compared with the minibus head-on rigid wall collision, the vehicle deceleration was smaller and the dashboard intrusion was larger in the minibus rear-end truck collision. The results illustrate that a longer dashboard incursion distance corresponds to a higher von Mises equivalent stress at the femur. The simulation results are consistent with the driver's autopsy report on lower limbs injuries. These findings verify that FE simulation method is reliable and useful to analyze the mechanisms of lower limb injuries to the driver in minibus frontal collisions.

  18. Compact electrostatic beam optics for multi-element focused ion beams: simulation and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Jose V; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2011-01-01

    Electrostatic beam optics for a multi-element focused ion beam (MEFIB) system comprising of a microwave multicusp plasma (ion) source is designed with the help of two widely known and commercially available beam simulation codes: AXCEL-INP and SIMION. The input parameters to the simulations are obtained from experiments carried out in the system. A single and a double Einzel lens system (ELS) with and without beam limiting apertures (S) have been investigated. For a 1 mm beam at the plasma electrode aperture, the rms emittance of the focused ion beam is found to reduce from ∼0.9 mm mrad for single ELS to ∼0.5 mm mrad for a double ELS, when S of 0.5 mm aperture size is employed. The emittance can be further improved to ∼0.1 mm mrad by maintaining S at ground potential, leading to reduction in beam spot size (∼10 μm). The double ELS design is optimized for different electrode geometrical parameters with tolerances of ±1 mm in electrode thickness, electrode aperture, inter electrode distance, and ±1° in electrode angle, providing a robust design. Experimental results obtained with the double ELS for the focused beam current and spot size, agree reasonably well with the simulations.

  19. Finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in thin semiconductor specimens for electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somodi, P K; Twitchett-Harrison, A C; Midgley, P A; Kardynał, B E; Barnes, C H W; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional finite element simulations of electrostatic dopant potentials in parallel-sided semiconductor specimens that contain p-n junctions are used to assess the effect of the electrical state of the surface of a thin specimen on projected potentials measured using off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope. For a specimen that is constrained to have an equipotential surface, the simulations show that the step in the projected potential across a p-n junction is always lower than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk device, but is relatively insensitive to the value of the surface state energy, especially for thicker specimens and higher dopant concentrations. The depletion width measured from the projected potential, however, has a complicated dependence on specimen thickness. The results of the simulations are of broader interest for understanding the influence of surfaces and interfaces on electrostatic potentials in nanoscale semiconductor devices. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Simulator for candu600 fuel handling system. environmental implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulpe, S.; Valeca, S.; Predescu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Personnel training are a main topic in the security and reliability of several industrial processes. The simulator is a physical device that reproduces real operation of a device used in a production process technology. Typically, a simulator is intended to train the operators to work properly with the real device in the production process, but simulators can be involved frequently in the research and evaluation of performance of human operators. Process simulation has a significant role in the training of operators of nuclear plants. To ensure the safe operation, protection of workers and the environment, of any nuclear power plant, the training of its operators in all operating modes of the plant is essential. A trained operator who can handle any emergency in a controlled manner, without panic, protecting equipment and personnel is an asset for a nuclear power plant. (authors)

  1. Environmental management policy analysis using complex system simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Roberts, D.; Oakes, R.; Shieh, A.; Hardie, W.; Pope, P.

    1999-01-01

    The two primary modules of Envirosim (the model of Los Alamos TA-55 and the WIPP transport/storage model) have been combined into one application, with the simulated waste generated by TA-55 operations being fed to storage, packaging, and transport simulation entities. Three simulation scenarios were executed which demonstrate the usefulness of Envirosim as a policy analysis tool for use in planning shipments to WIPP. A graphical user interface (GUI) has been implemented using IDL (Interactive Data Language) which allows the analyst to easily view simulation results. While IDL is not necessarily the graphics interface that would be selected for a production version of Envirosim, it does provide some powerful data manipulation capabilities, and it runs on a variety of platforms

  2. Environmental Systems Simulations for Carbon, Energy, Nitrogen, Water, and Watersheds: Design Principles and Pilot Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lant, C.; Pérez Lapena, B.; Xiong, W.; Kraft, S.; Kowalchuk, R.; Blair, M.

    2016-01-01

    Guided by the Next Generation Science Standards and elements of problem-based learning, four human-environment systems simulations are described in brief—carbon, energy, water, and watershed—and a fifth simulation on nitrogen is described in more depth. These science, technology, engineering, and

  3. Quantification of Gaseous Elemental Mercury Dry Deposition to Environmental Surfaces using Mercury Stable Isotopes in a Controlled Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, A. P.; Schauer, J. J.; Shafer, M. M.; Olson, M.; Robinson, M.; Vanderveer, P.; Creswell, J. E.; Parman, A.; Mallek, J.; Gorski, P.

    2009-12-01

    Andrew P. Rutter (1) * *, James J, Schauer (1,2) *, Martin M. Shafer(1,2), Michael R. Olson (1), Michael Robinson (1), Peter Vanderveer (3), Joel Creswell (1), Justin L. Mallek (1), Andrew M. Parman (1) (1) Environmental Chemistry and Technology Program, 660 N. Park St, Madison, WI 53705. (2) Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, 2601 Agriculture Drive, Madison, WI 53718. (3) Biotron, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 2115 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706 * Correspond author(jjschauer@wisc.edu) * *Presenting author (aprutter@wisc.edu) Abstract Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is the predominant component of atmospheric mercury outside of arctic depletion events, and locations where anthropogenic point sources are not influencing atmospheric concentrations. GEM constitutes greater than 99% of the mercury mass in most rural and remote locations. While dry and wet deposition of atmospheric mercury is thought to be dominated by oxidized mercury (a.k.a. reactive mercury), only small GEM uptake to environmental surfaces could impact the input of mercury to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Dry deposition and subsequent re-emission of gaseous elemental mercury is a pathway from the atmosphere that remains only partially understood from a mechanistic perspective. In order to properly model GEM dry deposition and re-emission an understanding of its dependence on irradiance, temperature, and relative humidity must be measured and parameterized for a broad spectrum of environmental surfaces colocated with surrogate deposition surfaces used to make field based dry deposition measurements. Measurements of isotopically enriched GEM dry deposition were made with a variety of environmental surfaces in a controlled environment room at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The experimental set up allowed dry deposition components which are not easily separated in the field to be decoupled. We were able to isolate surface transfer processes from variabilities caused by

  4. Ergonomic aspects simulation digital online: an educational game proposal to promote environmental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbex, D F; Jappur, R; Selig, P; Varvakis, G

    2012-01-01

    This article addresses the ergonomic criteria that guide the construction of an educational game called Environmental Simulator. The focus is on environment navigation considering aspects of content architecture and its esthetics functionality.

  5. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yijie; Wang, Qiming; Cui, Yi; Huo, Yongzhong; Ding, Shurong

    2011-06-01

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  6. Simulation of irradiation hardening of Zircaloy within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Yijie; Wang Qiming; Cui Yi; Huo Yongzhong [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Ding Shurong, E-mail: dsr1971@163.com [Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Within plate-type dispersion nuclear fuel elements, the metal matrix and cladding attacked continuously by fast neutrons undergo irradiation hardening, which might have remarkable effects upon the mechanical behaviors within fuel elements. In this paper, with the irradiation hardening effect of metal materials mainly considered together with irradiation growth effect of the cladding, the three-dimensional large-deformation constitutive relations for the metal matrix and cladding are developed. The method of virtual temperature increase in the previous studies is further developed to model the irradiation swelling of fuel particles; the method of anisotropic thermal expansion is introduced to model irradiation growth of the cladding; and a method of multi-step-temperature loading is proposed to simulate the coupling features of irradiation-induced swelling of the fuel particles together with irradiation growth of the cladding. Above all, based on the developed relationship between irradiation growth at certain burnup and the loaded virtual temperatures, with considering that certain burnup corresponds to certain fast neutron fluence, the time-dependent constitutive relation due to irradiation hardening effect is replaced by the virtual-temperature-dependent one which is introduced into the commercial software to simulate the irradiation hardening effects of the matrix and cladding. Numerical simulations of the irradiation-induced mechanical behaviors are implemented with the finite element method in consideration of the micro-structure of the fuel meat. The obtained results indicate that when the irradiation hardening effects are introduced into the constitutive relations of the metal matrix and cladding: (1) higher maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the matrix exist with the equivalent plastic strains remaining almost the same at lower burnups; (2) the maximum Mises stresses for certain burnup at the cladding are enhanced while the maximum equivalent

  7. Development of a Three-Dimensional Spectral Element Model for NWP: Idealized Simulations on the Sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viner, K.; Reinecke, P. A.; Gabersek, S.; Flagg, D. D.; Doyle, J. D.; Martini, M.; Ryglicki, D.; Michalakes, J.; Giraldo, F.

    2016-12-01

    NEPTUNE: the Navy Environmental Prediction sysTem Using the NUMA*corE, is a 3D spectral element atmospheric model composed of a full suite of physics parameterizations and pre- and post-processing infrastructure with plans for data assimilation and coupling components to a variety of Earth-system models. This talk will focus on the initial struggles and solutions in adapting NUMA for stable and accurate integration on the sphere using both the deep atmosphere equations and a newly developed shallow-atmosphere approximation, as demonstrated through idealized test cases. In addition, details of the physics-dynamics coupling methodology will be discussed. NEPTUNE results for test cases from the 2016 Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP-2016) will be shown and discussed. *NUMA: Nonhydrostatic Unified Model of the Atmosphere; Kelly and Giraldo 2012, JCP

  8. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2014-01-01

    been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade...... for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel...... that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved....

  9. The effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Scaramal da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthracene is a highly toxic organic compound capable of contaminating water and soils, and biodegradation is an important tool for remediating polluted environments. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on the activity of the protocatechol 3,4-dioxygenase (P3,4O enzyme produced by the isolate Leifsonia sp. in cell-free and immobilized extracts. The isolate was grown in Luria Bertani broth medium (LB amended with 250 mg L-1 of phenanthrene. Various levels of pH (4.0-9.0, temperature (5-80 °C, time (0-90 min, trace elements (Cu2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, and cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, K+ and NH4+ were tested to determine which conditions optimized enzyme activity. In general, the immobilized extract exhibited higher enzyme activity than the cell-free extract in the presence of trace elements and cations. Adding iron yielded the highest relative activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 16 and 99 %, respectively. Copper also increased enzyme activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 8 and 44 %, respectively. Enzyme activity in the phosphate buffer was high across a wide range of pH, reaching 80 % in the pH range between 6.5 and 8.0. The optimum temperatures for enzyme activity differed for cell-free and immobilized extracts, with maximum enzyme activity observed at 35 ºC for the cell-free extract and at 55 ºC for the immobilized extract. The cell-free extract of the P3,4O enzyme exhibited high activity only during the first 3 min of incubation, when it showed 50 % relative activity, and dropped to 0 % after 60 min of incubation. By contrast, activity in the immobilized extract was maintained during 90 min of incubation. This isolate has important characteristics for phenanthrene biodegradation, producing high quantities of the P3,4O enzyme that forms part of the most important pathway for PAH biodegradation.

  10. Development of Modeling and Simulation for Magnetic Particle Inspection Using Finite Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun-Youl [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic particle inspection (MPI) is a widely used nondestructive inspection method for aerospace applications essentially limited to experiment-based approaches. The analysis of MPI characteristics that affect sensitivity and reliability contributes not only reductions in inspection design cost and time but also improvement of analysis of experimental data. Magnetic particles are easily attracted toward a high magnetic field gradient. Selection of a magnetic field source, which produces a magnetic field gradient large enough to detect a defect in a test sample or component, is an important factor in magnetic particle inspection. In this work a finite element method (FEM) has been employed for numerical calculation of the MPI simulation technique. The FEM method is known to be suitable for complicated geometries such as defects in samples. This thesis describes the research that is aimed at providing a quantitative scientific basis for magnetic particle inspection. A new FEM solver for MPI simulation has been developed in this research for not only nonlinear reversible permeability materials but also irreversible hysteresis materials that are described by the Jiles-Atherton model. The material is assumed to have isotropic ferromagnetic properties in this research (i.e., the magnetic properties of the material are identical in all directions in a single crystal). In the research, with a direct current field mode, an MPI situation has been simulated to measure the estimated volume of magnetic particles around defect sites before and after removing any external current fields. Currently, this new MPI simulation package is limited to solving problems with the single current source from either a solenoid or an axial directional current rod.

  11. Discrete Element Simulations of Density-Driven Volcanic Deformation: Applications to Martian and Terrestrial Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, L. L.; McGovern, P. J.; Morgan, J. K.

    2008-12-01

    We have carried out 2-D numerical simulations using the discrete element method (DEM) to investigate density-driven deformation in volcanic edifices on Earth (e.g., Hawaii) and Mars (e.g., Olympus Mons and Arsia Mons). Located within volcanoes are series of magma chambers, reservoirs, and conduits where magma travels and collects. As magma differentiates, dense minerals settle out, building thick accumulations referred to as cumulates that can flow ductilely due to stresses imparted by gravity. To simulate this process, we construct granular piles subject to Coulomb frictional rheology, incrementally capture internal rectangular regions to which higher densities and lower interparticle friction values are assigned (analogs for denser, weaker cumulates), and then bond the granular edifice. Thus, following each growth increment, the edifice is allowed to relax gravitationally with a reconfigured weak cumulate core. The presence and outward spreading of the cumulate causes the development of distinctive structural and stratigraphic patterns. We obtained a range of volcanic shapes that vary from broad, shallowly dipping flanks reminiscent of those of Olympus Mons, to short, steep surface slopes more similar to Arsia Mons. Edifices lacking internal cumulate exhibit relatively horizontal strata compared to the high-angle, inward dipping strata that develops within the cumulate-bearing edifices. Our simulated volcanoes also illustrate a variety of gravity driven deformation features, including regions of thrust faulting within the flanks and large-scale flank collapses, as observed in Hawaii and inferred on Olympus Mons. We also see significant summit subsidence, and of particular interest, distinct summit calderas. The broad, flat caldera and convex upward profile of Arsia Mons appears to be well-simulated by cumulate-driven volcanic spreading. In contrast, the concave upward slopes of Olympus Mons are more challenging to reproduce, and instead are attributed to volcanic

  12. Discrete element simulation studies of angles of repose and shear flow of wet, flexible fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Y; Wassgren, C; Ketterhagen, W; Hancock, B; Curtis, J

    2018-04-18

    A discrete element method (DEM) model is developed to simulate the dynamics of wet, flexible fibers. The angles of repose of dry and wet fibers are simulated, and the simulation results are in good agreement with experimental results, validating the wet, flexible fiber model. To study wet fiber flow behavior, the model is used to simulate shear flows of wet fibers in a periodic domain under Lees-Edwards boundary conditions. Significant agglomeration is observed in dilute shear flows of wet fibers. The size of the largest agglomerate in the flow is found to depend on a Bond number, which is proportional to liquid surface tension and inversely proportional to the square of the shear strain rate. This Bond number reflects the relative importance of the liquid-bridge force to the particle's inertial force, with a larger Bond number leading to a larger agglomerate. As the fiber aspect ratio (AR) increases, the size of the largest agglomerate increases, while the coordination number in the largest agglomerate initially decreases and then increases when the AR is greater than four. A larger agglomerate with a larger coordination number is more likely to form for more flexible fibers with a smaller bond elastic modulus due to better connectivity between the more flexible fibers. Liquid viscous force resists pulling of liquid bridges and separation of contacting fibers, and therefore it facilitates larger agglomerate formation. The effect of liquid viscous force is more significant at larger shear strain rates. The solid-phase shear stress is increased due to the presence of liquid bridges in moderately dense flows. As the solid volume fraction increases, the effect of fiber-fiber friction coefficient increases sharply. When the solid volume fraction approaches the maximum packing density, the fiber-fiber friction coefficient can be a more dominant factor than the liquid bridge force in determining the solid-phase shear stress.

  13. Element determination of fine particles in environmental aerosols using PIXE; Determinacion elemental de paticulas finas en aerosoles ambientales usando PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia O, B. [ITT, 50000 Toluca (Mexico); Aldape U, F. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gaolivab@gmail.com

    2007-07-01

    The Mexico city is classified as one of the more populated cities of the world which presents a decrease in the air quality and that gives place to a severe problematic in atmospheric pollution. To cooperate in the solution of this problem it is necessary to carry out studies that allow a better knowledge of the atmosphere of the city. This study presents the results of a monitoring campaign of fine particle carried out from September 21 to December 12, 2001 in three sites of the Mexico City center area. The samples were collected every third day with a collector type unit of heaped filters (Gent). The analysis of these samples was carried out in the 2 MV accelerator of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) applying the PIXE technique and with this analysis its were identified in the samples approximately 15 elements in each one of the 3 sites and was calculated the concentration in that its were present. With these results a database was created and by means of it mathematical treatment the Enrichment factor (FE), the time series of each element and the multiple correlation matrix were evaluated. The obtained results showed that the Civil Registration site (Salto del Agua) it was the more polluted coinciding that to a bigger concentration of activities a bigger increase in the pollution is generated. (Author)

  14. GPU accelerated Discrete Element Method (DEM) molecular dynamics for conservative, faceted particle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spellings, Matthew [Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Marson, Ryan L. [Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Anderson, Joshua A. [Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Glotzer, Sharon C., E-mail: sglotzer@umich.edu [Chemical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Materials Science & Engineering, University of Michigan, 2300 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Biointerfaces Institute, University of Michigan, 2800 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Faceted shapes, such as polyhedra, are commonly found in systems of nanoscale, colloidal, and granular particles. Many interesting physical phenomena, like crystal nucleation and growth, vacancy motion, and glassy dynamics are challenging to model in these systems because they require detailed dynamical information at the individual particle level. Within the granular materials community the Discrete Element Method has been used extensively to model systems of anisotropic particles under gravity, with friction. We provide an implementation of this method intended for simulation of hard, faceted nanoparticles, with a conservative Weeks–Chandler–Andersen (WCA) interparticle potential, coupled to a thermodynamic ensemble. This method is a natural extension of classical molecular dynamics and enables rigorous thermodynamic calculations for faceted particles.

  15. Numerical simulation of potato slices drying using a two-dimensional finite element model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beigi Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and numerical study was conducted to investigate the process of potato slices drying. For simulating the moisture transfer in the samples and predict the dehydration curves, a two-dimensional finite element model was developed and programmed in Compaq Visual Fortran, version 6.5. The model solved the Fick’s second law for slab in a shrinkage system to calculate the unsteady two-dimensional moisture transmission in rectangular coordinates (x,y. Moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient were determined by minimizing the sum squares of residuals between experimental and numerical predicted data. Shrinkage kinetics of the potato slices during dehydration was determined experimentally and found to be a linear function of removed moisture. The determined parameters were used in the mathematical model. The predicted moisture content values were compared to the experimental data and the validation results demonstrated that the dynamic drying curves were predicted by the methodology very well.

  16. An explanation for the shape of nanoindentation unloading curves based on finite element simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolshakov, A.; Pharr, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    Current methods for measuring hardness and modulus from nanoindentation load-displacement data are based on Sneddon's equations for the indentation of an elastic half-space by an axially symmetric rigid punch. Recent experiments have shown that nanoindentation unloading data are distinctly curved in a manner which is not consistent with either the flat punch or the conical indenter geometries frequently used in modeling, but are more closely approximated by a parabola of revolution. Finite element simulations for conical indentation of an elastic-plastic material are presented which corroborate the experimental observations, and from which a simple explanation for the shape of the unloading curve is derived. The explanation is based on the concept of an effective indenter shape whose geometry is determined by the shape of the plastic hardness impression formed during indentation

  17. Fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements: Defining role of out-of-plane residual shear stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakesh, R., E-mail: rakesh.rad87@gmail.com [DAE Graduate Fellows, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Metallic Fuels Division, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kohli, D. [DAE Graduate Fellows, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India); Metallic Fuels Division, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sinha, V.P.; Prasad, G.J. [Metallic Fuels Division, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Samajdar, I. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, IIT Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2014-02-01

    Bond strength and microstructural developments were investigated during fabrication of simulated plate fuel elements. The study involved roll bonding of aluminum–aluminum (case A) and aluminum–aluminum + yttria (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) dispersion (case B). Case B approximated aluminum–uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) ‘fuel-meat’ in an actual plate fuel. Samples after different stages of fabrication, hot and cold rolling, were investigated through peel and pull tests, micro-hardness, residual stresses, electron and micro-focus X-ray diffraction. Measurements revealed a clear drop in bond strength during cold rolling: an observation unique to case B. This was related to significant increase in ‘out-of-plane’ residual shear stresses near the clad/dispersion interface, and not from visible signatures of microstructural heterogeneities.

  18. Discrete Element Simulation of Elastoplastic Shock Wave Propagation in Spherical Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shoaib

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Elastoplastic shock wave propagation in a one-dimensional assembly of spherical metal particles is presented by extending well-established quasistatic compaction models. The compaction process is modeled by a discrete element method while using elastic and plastic loading, elastic unloading, and adhesion at contacts with typical dynamic loading parameters. Of particular interest is to study the development of the elastoplastic shock wave, its propagation, and reflection during entire loading process. Simulation results yield information on contact behavior, velocity, and deformation of particles during dynamic loading. Effects of shock wave propagation on loading parameters are also discussed. The elastoplastic shock propagation in granular material has many practical applications including the high-velocity compaction of particulate material.

  19. Finite element simulation of the thermoelastic behaviour of a fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soba, A.; Denis, A.

    2000-01-01

    In 1986 the irradiation of the first prototypes of MOX fuels fabricated in Argentina started. The experiment's description, the results of the PlEs and the comparison with the output of the BACO code were published in 1996. In particular, Eddy current testings were performed before and after irradiation. The latter yielded wavelike signals whose amplitude variations can be easily correlated with the pellet distribution through the fuel rod and with the power profile. The present work attempts to give a thermomechanical interpretation of this experimental fact. The pellet and the cladding are simulated by a finite element scheme. Although the results are still preliminary, the tendency of the system to expand preferentially in the vicinity of the pellet's edge is well represented and the results correlate properly with the experimental observations. (author)

  20. Adaptive Finite Element Method Assisted by Stochastic Simulation of Chemical Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Cotter, Simon L.; Vejchodský , Tomá š; Erban, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Stochastic models of chemical systems are often analyzed by solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation, which is a drift-diffusion partial differential equation for the probability distribution function. Efficient numerical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation requires adaptive mesh refinements. In this paper, we present a mesh refinement approach which makes use of a stochastic simulation of the underlying chemical system. By observing the stochastic trajectory for a relatively short amount of time, the areas of the state space with nonnegligible probability density are identified. By refining the finite element mesh in these areas, and coarsening elsewhere, a suitable mesh is constructed and used for the computation of the stationary probability density. Numerical examples demonstrate that the presented method is competitive with existing a posteriori methods. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  1. The effect of innovation competence on the choice of information elements in a simulated NPD process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Helle Alsted; Juhl, Hans Jørn

    to prompt different managerial behaviour. This study uses a role-play approach to investigating the relationship between innovation competence (exploitation or exploration competences) and the acquisition of information elements in a simulated new product development (NPD) process. Results show that two......This paper presents a study of the relationship between innovation competence and managerial behaviour. Within the resource-based view of the firm the development of new products is often related to the attainment of dynamic capabilities. Different levels of dynamic capabilities are expected...... distinct clusters can be identified among respondents, one cluster with both exploitation and exploration competence experience and a second cluster only with exploitation competence experience. Contrary to expectations analysis of variance and Chi-square tests for independence show that there are no clear...

  2. Design and finite element simulation of vacuum systems for insertion devices in Indus-2 storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, D.P.; Bais, Vijay; Sridhar, R.; Dhimole, Vivek K.; Nitesh, Suthar; Rawal, B.R.; Chogaonkar, Swati

    2015-01-01

    Indus-2 is a 2.5 GeV, 300 mA, Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) located at Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore. As part of insertion device (ID) development programme two new devices namely, APPLE-2 (Advanced Planar Polarized Light Emitter) type Undulator (also known as U-3 Undulator) and 5 Tesla superconducting wavelength shifter (SWLS) are being developed. APPLE-2 will generate variably polarized synchrotron radiation (SR) required for carrying out magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and magnetic linear dichroism (MLD) experiments and SWLS will generate synchrotron radiation (SR) with critical photon energy of about 20.8 keV for Energy Dispersive XRD beam line. This paper describes design details and finite element analysis results of various simulations carried out for the vacuum systems of these IDs

  3. Finite Element Simulation and Experimental Verification of Internal Stress of Quenched AISI 4140 Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Qin, Shengwei; Hao, Qingguo; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2017-03-01

    The study of internal stress in quenched AISI 4140 medium carbon steel is of importance in engineering. In this work, the finite element simulation (FES) was employed to predict the distribution of internal stress in quenched AISI 4140 cylinders with two sizes of diameter based on exponent-modified (Ex-Modified) normalized function. The results indicate that the FES based on Ex-Modified normalized function proposed is better consistent with X-ray diffraction measurements of the stress distribution than FES based on normalized function proposed by Abrassart, Desalos and Leblond, respectively, which is attributed that Ex-Modified normalized function better describes transformation plasticity. Effect of temperature distribution on the phase formation, the origin of residual stress distribution and effect of transformation plasticity function on the residual stress distribution were further discussed.

  4. Engineering design of plasma generation devices using Elmer finite element simulation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bondarenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasma generation devices are important technology for many engineering disciplines. The process for acquiring experience for designing plasma devices requires practice, time, and the right tools. The practice and time depend on the individual and the access to the right tools can be a limiting factor to achieve experience and to get an idea on the possible risks. The use of Elmer finite element method (FEM software for verifying plasma engineering design is presented as an accessible tool that can help modeling multi-physics and verifying plasma generation devices. Furthermore, Elmer FEM will be suitable for experienced engineer and can be used for determining the risks in a design or a process that use plasma. A physical experiment was conducted to demonstrate new features of plasma generation technology where results are compared with plasma simulation using Elmer FEM.

  5. The pellet-cladding contact in a fuel rod and its simulation by finite elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanajura, C.A.S.

    1988-01-01

    A model to analyse the mechanical behavior of a fuel rod of a PWR is presented. We drew our attention to the phenomenon of pellet-pellet and pellet-cladding contact by taking advantage of a model which assumes the hypotheses of axisymmetry, elastic behavior with infinitesimal deformations and changes of the material properties with temperature. It also includes the effects of swelling and initial relocation. The problem of contact gives rise to a variational formulation which employs Lagrangian multipliers. With this approach an iterative scheme is constructed to obtain the solution. The finite element method is applied to space discretization. The model sensibility to some parameters and its performance concerning fuel rod behavior is discussed by means of numerical simulations. (author) [pt

  6. Finite element simulations of internal stresses generated during the ferroelastic deformation of NiTi bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manach, P.Y.; Favier, D.; Rio, G.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the generation of internal stresses during the predeformation of NiTi shape memory alloys in the martensitic state. This allows to determine the initial stress state in which the material will transform during the shape memory effect due to heating consecutively to this prestrain. In that way a three-dimensional finite element model of the deformation of shape memory alloys has been developed, the constitutive law being defined using an elastohysteresis tensor model. The influence of behavioural and geometrical factors are illustrated considering the numerical simulation of different cases of practical importance for industrial applications : the study of the bending behaviour of a NiTi cantilever beam as well as the study of the swelling of a pipe connection under both uniform and non uniform internal displacement fields. (orig.)

  7. A discrete element and ray framework for rapid simulation of acoustical dispersion of microscale particulate agglomerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohdi, T. I.

    2016-03-01

    In industry, particle-laden fluids, such as particle-functionalized inks, are constructed by adding fine-scale particles to a liquid solution, in order to achieve desired overall properties in both liquid and (cured) solid states. However, oftentimes undesirable particulate agglomerations arise due to some form of mutual-attraction stemming from near-field forces, stray electrostatic charges, process ionization and mechanical adhesion. For proper operation of industrial processes involving particle-laden fluids, it is important to carefully breakup and disperse these agglomerations. One approach is to target high-frequency acoustical pressure-pulses to breakup such agglomerations. The objective of this paper is to develop a computational model and corresponding solution algorithm to enable rapid simulation of the effect of acoustical pulses on an agglomeration composed of a collection of discrete particles. Because of the complex agglomeration microstructure, containing gaps and interfaces, this type of system is extremely difficult to mesh and simulate using continuum-based methods, such as the finite difference time domain or the finite element method. Accordingly, a computationally-amenable discrete element/discrete ray model is developed which captures the primary physical events in this process, such as the reflection and absorption of acoustical energy, and the induced forces on the particulate microstructure. The approach utilizes a staggered, iterative solution scheme to calculate the power transfer from the acoustical pulse to the particles and the subsequent changes (breakup) of the pulse due to the particles. Three-dimensional examples are provided to illustrate the approach.

  8. Numerical simulations of negatively buoyant jets in an immiscible fluid using the Particle Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier-Torrecilla, Monica; Geyer, Adelina; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Idelsohn, Sergio R.; Oñate, Eugenio

    2010-05-01

    In this work we investigate numerically the injection of a negatively buoyant jet into a homogenous immiscible ambient fluid using the Particle Finite Element Method (PFEM), a newly developed tool that combines the flexibility of particle-based methods with the accuracy of the finite element discretization. In order to test the applicability of PFEM to the study of negatively buoyant jets, we have compared the two-dimensional numerical results with experiments investigating the injection of a jet of dyed water through a nozzle in the base of a cylindrical tank containing rapeseed oil. In both simulations and experiments, the fountain inlet flow velocity and nozzle diameter were varied to cover a wide range of Reynolds Re and Froude numbers Fr, such that 0.1 < Fr < 30, reproducing both weak and strong fountains in a laminar regime (8 < Re < 1350). Numerical results, together with the experimental observations, allow us to describe three different fountain behaviors that have not been previously reported. Based on the Re and Fr values for the numerical and experimental simulations, we have built a regime map to define how these values may control the occurrence of each of the observed flow types. Whereas the Fr number itself provides a prediction of the maximum penetration height of the jet, its combination with the Re number provides a prediction of the flow behavior for a specific nozzle diameter and injection velocity. Conclusive remarks concerning the dynamics of negatively buoyant jets may be applied later on to several geological situations, e.g. the flow structure of a fully submerged subaqueous eruptive vent discharging magma or the replenishment of magma chambers in the Earth's crust.

  9. Ultrafast vortex core dynamics investigated by finite-element micromagnetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gliga, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The investigations carried out in this thesis concern the ultrafast dynamics of a fundamental micromagnetic configuration: the vortex. Over the past decade, a detailed understanding of the dynamic and static properties of such magnetic nanostructures has been achieved as a result of close interplay between experiments, theory and numeric simulations. Here, micromagnetic simulations were performed based on the finite-element method. The vortex structure arises in laterally-confined ferromagnets, in particular in thin-film elements, and is characterized by an in-plane curling of the magnetic moments around a very stable and narrow core. In the present study, a novel process in micromagnetism was found: the ultrafast reversal of the vortex core. The possibility of easily switching the core orientation by means of short in-plane field pulses is surprising in view of the very high stability of the core. Moreover, the simulations presented here showed that this reversal process unfolds on a time scale of only a few tens of picoseconds, which leads to the prediction of the fastest and most complex micromagnetic reversal process known to date. Indeed, the vortex core is not merely switched: it is destroyed and recreated in the immediate vicinity with an opposite direction. This is mediated by a rapid sequence of vortex-antivortex pair creation and annihilation subprocesses and results in a sudden burst-like emission of spin waves. Equally fascinating is the ultrafast dynamics of an isolated magnetic antivortex, the topological counterpart of the vortex. The simulations performed here showed that the static complementarity between vortices and antivortices is equally reflected in their ultrafast dynamics, which leads to the reversal of the antivortex core. A promising means for the control of the magnetization on the nanoscale consists in exploiting the spin-transfer torque effect. The study of the current-induced dynamics of vortices showed that the core reversal can be

  10. Effect of environmental temperature on diffraction efficiency for multilayer diffractive optical elements in Mid-wave infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Mingxu; Cui, Qingfeng; Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of environmental temperature change on multilayer diffractive optical elements (MLDOEs) is evaluated from the viewpoint of the diffraction efficiency and the polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency (PIDE). As environmental temperature changes, the microstructure heights of MLDOEs expand or contract, and refractive indices of substrate materials also change. Based on the changes in microstructure height and substrate material index with environmental temperature, the theoretical relation between diffraction efficiency of MLDOEs and environmental temperature is deduced. A practical 3-5μm Mid-wave infrared (MWIR) optical system designed with a MLDOE, which made of ZNSE and GE, is discussed to illustrate the influence of environmental temperature change. The result shows that diffraction efficiency reduction is no more than 85% and PIDE reduction is less than 50% when environmental temperature ranges from -20°C to 60°C. According to the calculated diffraction efficiency in different environmental temperatures, the MTF of hybrid optical system is modified and the modified MTF curve is compared with the original MTF curve. Although the hybrid optical system achieved passive athermalization in above environmental temperature range, the modified MTF curve also remarkably decline in environmental temperature extremes after the consideration of diffraction efficiency change of MLDOE. It is indicated that the image quality of hybrid optical system with ZNSE-GE MLDOE is significantly sensitive to environmental temperature change. The analysis result can be used for optical engineering design with MLDOEs in MWIR.

  11. Mixed finite element-based fully conservative methods for simulating wormhole propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng; Sun, Shuyu; Wu, Yuanqing

    2015-01-01

    Wormhole propagation during reactive dissolution of carbonates plays a very important role in the product enhancement of oil and gas reservoir. Because of high velocity and nonuniform porosity, the Darcy–Forchheimer model is applicable for this problem instead of conventional Darcy framework. We develop a mixed finite element scheme for numerical simulation of this problem, in which mixed finite element methods are used not only for the Darcy–Forchheimer flow equations but also for the solute transport equation by introducing an auxiliary flux variable to guarantee full mass conservation. In theoretical analysis aspects, based on the cut-off operator of solute concentration, we construct an analytical function to control and handle the change of porosity with time; we treat the auxiliary flux variable as a function of velocity and establish its properties; we employ the coupled analysis approach to deal with the fully coupling relation of multivariables. From this, the stability analysis and a priori error estimates for velocity, pressure, concentration and porosity are established in different norms. Numerical results are also given to verify theoretical analysis and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  12. Finite-element 3D simulation tools for high-current relativistic electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Stanley; Ekdahl, Carl

    2002-08-01

    The DARHT second-axis injector is a challenge for computer simulations. Electrons are subject to strong beam-generated forces. The fields are fully three-dimensional and accurate calculations at surfaces are critical. We describe methods applied in OmniTrak, a 3D finite-element code suite that can address DARHT and the full range of charged-particle devices. The system handles mesh generation, electrostatics, magnetostatics and self-consistent particle orbits. The MetaMesh program generates meshes of conformal hexahedrons to fit any user geometry. The code has the unique ability to create structured conformal meshes with cubic logic. Organized meshes offer advantages in speed and memory utilization in the orbit and field solutions. OmniTrak is a versatile charged-particle code that handles 3D electric and magnetic field solutions on independent meshes. The program can update both 3D field solutions from the calculated beam space-charge and current-density. We shall describe numerical methods for orbit tracking on a hexahedron mesh. Topics include: 1) identification of elements along the particle trajectory, 2) fast searches and adaptive field calculations, 3) interpolation methods to terminate orbits on material surfaces, 4) automatic particle generation on multiple emission surfaces to model space-charge-limited emission and field emission, 5) flexible Child law algorithms, 6) implementation of the dual potential model for 3D magnetostatics, and 7) assignment of charge and current from model particle orbits for self-consistent fields.

  13. Finite element analysis and simulation of rheological properties of bulk molding compound (BMC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, M. Fatih; Aydin, Ismail

    2013-12-01

    Bulk molding compound (BMC) is one of the important composite materials with various engineering applications. BMC is a thermoset plastic resin blend of various inert fillers, fiber reinforcements, catalysts, stabilizers and pigments that form a viscous, molding compound. Depending on the end-use application, bulk molding compounds are formulated to achieve close dimensional control, flame and scratch resistance, electrical insulation, corrosion and stain resistance, superior mechanical properties, low shrink and color stability. Its excellent flow characteristics, dielectric properties, and flame resistance make this thermoset material well-suited to a wide variety of applications requiring precision in detail and dimensions as well as high performance. When a BMC is used for these purposes, the rheological behavior and properties of the BMC is the main concern. In this paper, finite element analysis of rheological properties of bulk molding composite material was studied. For this purpose, standard samples of composite material were obtained by means of uniaxial hot pressing. 3 point flexural tests were then carried out by using a universal testing machine. Finite element analyses were then performed with defined material properties within a specific constitutive material behavior. Experimental and numerical results were then compared. Good correlation between the numerical simulation and the experimental results was obtained. It was expected with this study that effects of various process parameters and boundary conditions on the rheological behavior of bulk molding compounds could be determined by means of numerical analysis without detailed experimental work.

  14. hree-Dimensional Finite Element Simulation of the Buried Pipe Problem in Geogrid Reinforced Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Yousif Fattah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Buried pipeline systems are commonly used to transport water, sewage, natural oil/gas and other materials. The beneficial of using geogrid reinforcement is to increase the bearing capacity of the soil and decrease the load transfer to the underground structures. This paper deals with simulation of the buried pipe problem numerically by finite elements method using the newest version of PLAXIS-3D software. Rajkumar and Ilamaruthi's study, 2008 has been selected to be reanalyzed as 3D problem because it is containing all the properties needed by the program such as the modulus of elasticity, Poisson's ratio, angle of internal friction. It was found that the results of vertical crown deflection for the model without geogrid obtained from PLAXIS-3D are higher than those obtained by two-dimensional plane strain by about 21.4% while this percent becomes 12.1 for the model with geogrid, but in general, both have the same trend. The two dimensional finite elements analysis predictions of pipe-soil system behavior indicate an almost linear displacement of pipe deflection with applied pressure while 3-D analysis exhibited non-linear behavior especially at higher loads.

  15. Simulation of the cabling process for Rutherford cables: An advanced finite element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanes, J.; Garlasche, M.; Bordini, B.; Dallocchio, A.

    2016-12-01

    In all existing large particle accelerators (Tevatron, HERA, RHIC, LHC) the main superconducting magnets are based on Rutherford cables, which are characterized by having: strands fully transposed with respect to the magnetic field, a significant compaction that assures a large engineering critical current density and a geometry that allows efficient winding of the coils. The Nb3Sn magnets developed in the framework of the HL-LHC project for improving the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are also based on Rutherford cables. Due to the characteristics of Nb3Sn wires, the cabling process has become a crucial step in the magnet manufacturing. During cabling the wires experience large plastic deformations that strongly modify the geometrical dimensions of the sub-elements constituting the superconducting strand. These deformations are particularly severe on the cable edges and can result in a significant reduction of the cable critical current as well as of the Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the stabilizing copper. In order to understand the main parameters that rule the cabling process and their impact on the cable performance, CERN has developed a 3D Finite Element (FE) model based on the LS-Dyna® software that simulates the whole cabling process. In the paper the model is presented together with a comparison between experimental and numerical results for a copper cable produced at CERN.

  16. Mixed finite element-based fully conservative methods for simulating wormhole propagation

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2015-10-11

    Wormhole propagation during reactive dissolution of carbonates plays a very important role in the product enhancement of oil and gas reservoir. Because of high velocity and nonuniform porosity, the Darcy–Forchheimer model is applicable for this problem instead of conventional Darcy framework. We develop a mixed finite element scheme for numerical simulation of this problem, in which mixed finite element methods are used not only for the Darcy–Forchheimer flow equations but also for the solute transport equation by introducing an auxiliary flux variable to guarantee full mass conservation. In theoretical analysis aspects, based on the cut-off operator of solute concentration, we construct an analytical function to control and handle the change of porosity with time; we treat the auxiliary flux variable as a function of velocity and establish its properties; we employ the coupled analysis approach to deal with the fully coupling relation of multivariables. From this, the stability analysis and a priori error estimates for velocity, pressure, concentration and porosity are established in different norms. Numerical results are also given to verify theoretical analysis and effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  17. Numerical simulation of a flow-like landslide using the particle finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Krabbenhoft, Kristian; Sheng, Daichao; Li, Weichao

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, an actual landslide process that occurred in Southern China is simulated by a continuum approach, the particle finite element method (PFEM). The PFEM attempts to solve the boundary-value problems in the framework of solid mechanics, satisfying the governing equations including momentum conservation, displacement-strain relation, constitutive relation as well as the frictional contact between the sliding mass and the slip surface. To warrant the convergence behaviour of solutions, the problem is formulated as a mathematical programming problem, while the particle finite element procedure is employed to tackle the issues of mesh distortion and free-surface evolution. The whole procedure of the landslide, from initiation, sliding to deposition, is successfully reproduced by the continuum approach. It is shown that the density of the mass has little influence on the sliding process in the current landslide, whereas both the geometry and the roughness of the slip surface play important roles. Comparative studies are also conducted where a satisfactory agreement is obtained.

  18. Application limits of finite element models for simulation of shock transfer processes in concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutzik, Norbert J.; Eibl, Josef

    2005-01-01

    Shocks on building structures due to impact loads (drop of wreckage and heavy masses from accidents, transport operations, explosions, etc.), especially in case of a postulated aircraft crash, may lead to feasibility problems due to high-induced vibrations and large expenditures at safety-related systems accommodated inside the building structures. A rational and cost-effective qualification of the functionality of such systems requires the prediction of reliable information about the nature of structural responses induced by impact loading in the corresponding regions of the structure. The analytic derivation of realistic and reliable structural responses requires the application of adequate mathematical models and methods as well as a critical evaluation of all factors that influence the entire shock transmission path, from the area of impact to the site of installation of the affected component or system in the structure. Despite extensive studies and computational analyses of impact-induced shocks performed using finite element simulation method, limited and insufficient experimental results to date have precluded a complete investigation and clarification of several 'peculiarities' in the field of shock transmission in finite element models. This refers mainly to the divergence of results observed using FE models when not considering a the required FE element discretization ratio as well as to the attenuation and scatter behavior of the dynamic response results obtained for large building structures and given large distances between the load impact application areas and the component anchoring locations. The cause for such divergences are related to several up to now not clarified 'phenomena' of FE models especially the low-pass filtering effects and dispersion characteristics of FE models

  19. Thresholds of Extinction: Simulation Strategies in Environmental Values Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Frank

    1990-01-01

    Describes a simulation exercise for campers and an accompanying curriculum unit--"Thresholds of Extinction"--that addresses the issues of endangered species. Uses this context to illustrate steps in the process of values development: awareness, gathering data, resolution (decision making), responsibility (acting on values), and…

  20. Using the discrete element method to simulate brittle fracture in the indentation of a silica glass with a blunt indenter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, Damien; Iordanoff, Ivan; Charles, Jean-luc; Jebahi, Mohamed; Neauport, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of materials is usually simulated by a continuous mechanics approach. However, non-continuous phenomena such as multi-fracturing cannot be accurately simulated using a continuous description. The discrete element method (DEM) naturally accounts for discontinuities and is therefore a good alternative to the continuum approach. This work uses a discrete element model based on interaction given by 3D beam model. This model has proved to correctly simulate the elastic properties at the macroscopic scale. The simulation of brittle cracks is now tackled. This goal is attained by computing a failure criterion based on an equivalent hydrostatic stress. This microscopic criterion is then calibrated to fit experimental values of the macroscopic failure stress. Then, the simulation results are compared to experimental results of indentation tests in which a spherical indenter is used to load a silica glass, which is considered to be a perfectly brittle elastic material. (authors)

  1. Assessing the risks of trace elements in environmental materials under selected greenhouse vegetable production systems of China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yong [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Biao, E-mail: bhuang@issas.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Wenyou [Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Weindorf, David C.; Liu, Xiaoxiao [Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States); Niedermann, Silvana [Department of Environmental Systems Science, Institute of Agricultural Science, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-02-01

    The risk assessment of trace elements of different environmental media in conventional and organic greenhouse vegetable production systems (CGVPS and OGVPS) can reveal the influence of different farming philosophy on the trace element accumulations and their effects on human health. These provide important basic data for the environmental protection and human health. This paper presents trace element accumulation characteristics of different land uses; reveals the difference of soil trace element accumulation both with and without consideration of background levels; compares the trace element uptake by main vegetables; and assesses the trace element risks of soils, vegetables, waters and agricultural inputs, using two selected greenhouse vegetable systems in Nanjing, China as examples. Results showed that greenhouse vegetable fields contained significant accumulations of Zn in CGVPS relative to rice–wheat rotation fields, open vegetable fields, and geochemical background levels, and this was the case for organic matter in OGVPS. The comparative analysis of the soil medium in two systems with consideration of geochemical background levels and evaluation of the geo-accumulation pollution index achieved a more reasonable comparison and accurate assessment relative to the direct comparison analysis and the evaluation of the Nemerow pollution index, respectively. According to the Chinese food safety standards and the value of the target hazard quotient or hazard index, trace element contents of vegetables were safe for local residents in both systems. However, the spatial distribution of the estimated hazard index for producers still presented certain specific hotspots which may cause potential risk for human health in CGVPS. The water was mainly influenced by nitrogen, especially for CGVPS, while the potential risk of Cd and Cu pollution came from sediments in OGVPS. The main inputs for trace elements were fertilizers which were relatively safe based on relevant

  2. Assessing the risks of trace elements in environmental materials under selected greenhouse vegetable production systems of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yong; Huang, Biao; Hu, Wenyou; Weindorf, David C.; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Niedermann, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    The risk assessment of trace elements of different environmental media in conventional and organic greenhouse vegetable production systems (CGVPS and OGVPS) can reveal the influence of different farming philosophy on the trace element accumulations and their effects on human health. These provide important basic data for the environmental protection and human health. This paper presents trace element accumulation characteristics of different land uses; reveals the difference of soil trace element accumulation both with and without consideration of background levels; compares the trace element uptake by main vegetables; and assesses the trace element risks of soils, vegetables, waters and agricultural inputs, using two selected greenhouse vegetable systems in Nanjing, China as examples. Results showed that greenhouse vegetable fields contained significant accumulations of Zn in CGVPS relative to rice–wheat rotation fields, open vegetable fields, and geochemical background levels, and this was the case for organic matter in OGVPS. The comparative analysis of the soil medium in two systems with consideration of geochemical background levels and evaluation of the geo-accumulation pollution index achieved a more reasonable comparison and accurate assessment relative to the direct comparison analysis and the evaluation of the Nemerow pollution index, respectively. According to the Chinese food safety standards and the value of the target hazard quotient or hazard index, trace element contents of vegetables were safe for local residents in both systems. However, the spatial distribution of the estimated hazard index for producers still presented certain specific hotspots which may cause potential risk for human health in CGVPS. The water was mainly influenced by nitrogen, especially for CGVPS, while the potential risk of Cd and Cu pollution came from sediments in OGVPS. The main inputs for trace elements were fertilizers which were relatively safe based on relevant

  3. Finite Element Simulations of Two Vertical Drop Tests of F-28 Fuselage Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Littell, Justin D.; Annett, Martin S.; Haskin, Ian M.

    2018-01-01

    In March 2017, a vertical drop test of a forward fuselage section of a Fokker F-28 MK4000 aircraft was conducted as part of a joint NASA/FAA project to investigate the performance of transport aircraft under realistic crash conditions. In June 2017, a vertical drop test was conducted of a wing-box fuselage section of the same aircraft. Both sections were configured with two rows of aircraft seats, in a triple-double configuration. A total of ten Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were secured in seats using standard lap belt restraints. The forward fuselage section was also configured with luggage in the cargo hold. Both sections were outfitted with two hat racks, each with added ballast mass. The drop tests were performed at the Landing and Impact Research facility located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The measured impact velocity for the forward fuselage section was 346.8-in/s onto soil. The wing-box section was dropped with a downward facing pitch angle onto a sloping soil surface in order to create an induced forward acceleration in the airframe. The vertical impact velocity of the wing-box section was 349.2-in/s. A second objective of this project was to assess the capabilities of finite element simulations to predict the test responses. Finite element models of both fuselage sections were developed for execution in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark), a commercial explicit nonlinear transient dynamic code. The models contained accurate representations of the airframe structure, the hat racks and hat rack masses, the floor and seat tracks, the luggage in the cargo hold for the forward section, and the detailed under-floor structure in the wing-box section. Initially, concentrated masses were used to represent the inertial properties of the seats, restraints, and ATD occupants. However, later simulations were performed that included finite element representations of the seats, restraints, and ATD occupants. These models were developed to more

  4. Numerical simulation of the interaction of elements of active protection with metal barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchenko, P. A.; Batuev, S. P.; Radchenko, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The present paper is aimed at working out the algorithm of multi-contact interaction of solid bodies; it studies the influence of the shape of projectile (damage agent) on its penetration capability. Steel projectiles of different shape have been considered as damage agents: sphere, regular tetrahedron, cube, cylinder and plate. The weight of projectiles has been kept the same. Antitank grenade has been used as a target. The study has been conducted by means of numerical simulation using finite element analysis. The simulation is three-dimensional. Behavior of materials has been described by elasto-plastic model taking into consideration the fracture and fragmentation of interacting bodies. The speed of interaction has been considered within the range of 800 to 2000 m/s. Research results demonstrated significant influence of the projectile shape on its penetration capability. Projectile in the shape of elongated cylinder has shown better penetration capability. Considering the weight of damage agents (except for sphere and plate) their maximum penetration capability has been reached at the speed of 1400 m/s. Increase of the speed of interaction has been followed by intensive fracture of damage agents and their penetration capability thus has worsened.

  5. Simulating subduction zone earthquakes using discrete element method: a window into elusive source processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, D. G.; Morgan, J.

    2017-12-01

    Large earthquakes that occur on convergent plate margin interfaces have the potential to cause widespread damage and loss of life. Recent observations reveal that a wide range of different slip behaviors take place along these megathrust faults, which demonstrate both their complexity, and our limited understanding of fault processes and their controls. Numerical modeling provides us with a useful tool that we can use to simulate earthquakes and related slip events, and to make direct observations and correlations among properties and parameters that might control them. Further analysis of these phenomena can lead to a more complete understanding of the underlying mechanisms that accompany the nucleation of large earthquakes, and what might trigger them. In this study, we use the discrete element method (DEM) to create numerical analogs to subduction megathrusts with heterogeneous fault friction. Displacement boundary conditions are applied in order to simulate tectonic loading, which in turn, induces slip along the fault. A wide range of slip behaviors are observed, ranging from creep to stick slip. We are able to characterize slip events by duration, stress drop, rupture area, and slip magnitude, and to correlate the relationships among these quantities. These characterizations allow us to develop a catalog of rupture events both spatially and temporally, for comparison with slip processes on natural faults.

  6. Implementation of a roughness element to trip transition in large-eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudet, J.; Monier, J.-F.; Gao, F.

    2015-02-01

    In aerodynamics, the laminar or turbulent regime of a boundary layer has a strong influence on friction or heat transfer. In practical applications, it is sometimes necessary to trip the transition to turbulent, and a common way is by use of a roughness element ( e.g. a step) on the wall. The present paper is concerned with the numerical implementation of such a trip in large-eddy simulations. The study is carried out on a flat-plate boundary layer configuration, with Reynolds number Rex=1.3×106. First, this work brings the opportunity to introduce a practical methodology to assess convergence in large-eddy simulations. Second, concerning the trip implementation, a volume source term is proposed and is shown to yield a smoother and faster transition than a grid step. Moreover, it is easier to implement and more adaptable. Finally, two subgrid-scale models are tested: the WALE model of Nicoud and Ducros ( Flow Turbul. Combust., vol. 62, 1999) and the shear-improved Smagorinsky model of Lévêque et al. ( J. Fluid Mech., vol. 570, 2007). Both models allow transition, but the former appears to yield a faster transition and a better prediction of friction in the turbulent regime.

  7. Discrete element simulation of charging and mixed layer formation in the ironmaking blast furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Tamoghna; Saxén, Henrik

    2016-11-01

    The burden distribution in the ironmaking blast furnace plays an important role for the operation as it affects the gas flow distribution, heat and mass transfer, and chemical reactions in the shaft. This work studies certain aspects of burden distribution by small-scale experiments and numerical simulation by the discrete element method (DEM). Particular attention is focused on the complex layer-formation process and the problems associated with estimating the burden layer distribution by burden profile measurements. The formation of mixed layers is studied, and a computational method for estimating the extent of the mixed layer, as well as its voidage, is proposed and applied on the results of the DEM simulations. In studying a charging program and its resulting burden distribution, the mixed layers of coke and pellets were found to show lower voidage than the individual burden layers. The dynamic evolution of the mixed layer during the charging process is also analyzed. The results of the study can be used to gain deeper insight into the complex charging process of the blast furnace, which is useful in the design of new charging programs and for mathematical models that do not consider the full behavior of the particles in the burden layers.

  8. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing and associated microseismicity using finite-discrete element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic fracturing (HF technique has been extensively used for the exploitation of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs. HF enhances the connectivity of less permeable oil and gas-bearing rock formations by fluid injection, which creates an interconnected fracture network and increases the hydrocarbon production. Meanwhile, microseismic (MS monitoring is one of the most effective approaches to evaluate such stimulation process. In this paper, the combined finite-discrete element method (FDEM is adopted to numerically simulate HF and associated MS. Several post-processing tools, including frequency-magnitude distribution (b-value, fractal dimension (D-value, and seismic events clustering, are utilized to interpret numerical results. A non-parametric clustering algorithm designed specifically for FDEM is used to reduce the mesh dependency and extract more realistic seismic information. Simulation results indicated that at the local scale, the HF process tends to propagate following the rock mass discontinuities; while at the reservoir scale, it tends to develop in the direction parallel to the maximum in-situ stress.

  9. Low-velocity impact damage of woven fabric composites: Finite element simulation and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, M.A.; Naderi, S.; Bushroa, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Low-velocity impact test on GFRP with different energy levels and thicknesses. • Using force–deflection curve to determine critical energy for penetration threshold. • Reflection of damage processes to different type of diagrams. • Significant influence of Initial energy and thickness on dynamic response of plates. • Good agreements between experimental and FEM models for the force history data. - Abstract: This paper addresses the response of Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic laminates (GFRPs) under low-velocity impact. Experimental tests were performed according to ASTM: D5628 for different initial impact energy levels ranging from 9.8 J to 29.4 J and specimen thicknesses of 2, 3 and 4 mm. The impact damage process and contact stiffness were studied incrementally until a perforation phase of the layered compounds occurred, in line with a force–deflection diagram and imaging of impacted laminates. The influence that impact parameters such as velocity and initial energy had on deflection and damage of the test specimens was investigated. Finite Element Simulation (FES) was done using MSC. MARC® was additionally carried out to understand the impact mechanism and correlation between these parameters and the induced damage. The simulation and experimental results reached good accord regarding maximum contact force and contact time with insignificant amount of damage

  10. SIMULATION OF COOLING TOWER AND INFLUENCE OF AERODYNAMIC ELEMENTS ON ITS WORK UNDER CONDITIONS OF WIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Dobrego

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern Cooling Towers (CT may utilize different aerodynamic elements (deflectors, windbreak walls etc. aimed to improvement of its heat performance especially at the windy conditions. In this paper the effect of flow rotation in overshower zone of CT and windbreak walls on a capacity of tower evaporating unit in the windy condition is studied numerically. Geometry of the model corresponds to real Woo-Jin Power station, China. Analogy of heat and mass transfer was used that allowed to consider aerodynamic of one-dimension flow and carried out detailed 3D calculations applying modern PC. Heat transfer coefficient of irrigator and its hydrodynamic resistance were established according to experimental data on total air rate in cooling tower. Numerical model is tested and verified with experimental data.Nonlinear dependence of CT thermal performance on wind velocity is demonstrated with the minimum (critical wind velocity at ucr ~ 8 m/s for simulated system. Application of windbreak walls does not change the value of the critical wind velocity, but may improves performance of cooling unit at moderate and strong wind conditions. Simultaneous usage of windbreak walls and overshower deflectors may increase efficiency up to 20–30 % for the deflectors angle a = 60o. Simulation let one analyze aerodynamic patterns, induced inside cooling tower and homogeneity of velocities’ field in irrigator’s area.Presented results may be helpful for the CT aerodynamic design optimization, particularly, for perspective hybrid type CTs.

  11. A discrete element based simulation framework to investigate particulate spray deposition processes

    KAUST Repository

    Mukherjee, Debanjan

    2015-06-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Inc. This work presents a computer simulation framework based on discrete element method to analyze manufacturing processes that comprise a loosely flowing stream of particles in a carrier fluid being deposited on a target surface. The individual particulate dynamics under the combined action of particle collisions, fluid-particle interactions, particle-surface contact and adhesive interactions is simulated, and aggregated to obtain global system behavior. A model for deposition which incorporates the effect of surface energy, impact velocity and particle size, is developed. The fluid-particle interaction is modeled using appropriate spray nozzle gas velocity distributions and a one-way coupling between the phases. It is found that the particle response times and the release velocity distribution of particles have a combined effect on inter-particle collisions during the flow along the spray. It is also found that resolution of the particulate collisions close to the target surface plays an important role in characterizing the trends in the deposit pattern. Analysis of the deposit pattern using metrics defined from the particle distribution on the target surface is provided to characterize the deposition efficiency, deposit size, and scatter due to collisions.

  12. Finite Element Simulation of the Presta Joining Process for Assembled Camshafts: Application to Aluminum Shafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Scherzer

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work shows a sequence of numerical models for the simulation of the Presta joining process: a well-established industrial process for manufacturing assembled camshafts. The operation is divided into two sub-steps: the rolling of the shaft to widen the cam seat and the joining of the cam onto the shaft. When manufactured, the connection is tested randomly by loading it with a static torque. Subsequently, there are three numerical models using the finite element method. Additionally, a material model of finite strain viscoplasticity with nonlinear kinematic hardening is used throughout the whole simulation process, which allows a realistic representation of the material behavior even for large deformations. In addition, it enables a transfer of the deformation history and of the internal stresses between different submodels. This work also shows the required parameter identification and the associated material tests. After comparing the numerical results with experimental studies of the manufacturing process for steel-steel connections, the models are used to extend the joining process to the utilization of aluminum shafts.

  13. Study on the dynamics of halogen elements in the agro-environment and these element`s deficiency, toxicity and environmental hazards by the application of the neutron activation analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuita, Kouichi [National Inst. of Agro-Environmental Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    A neutron activation analysis method is an accurate and highly sensitive method for analyzing halogen elements (iodine, bromine and chlorine) except fluorine. It is unsubstitutable and valuable method especially for iodine (including radioactive {sup 129}I) and bromine which are present at lower levels. Halogen elements have high chemical and physiological activities and move widely in the environment. As a result, deficiency and an excess of halogen elements in plants and animals have occurred and artificial halogen compounds have caused environmental pollution in wide areas. We efficiently utilized the neutron activation analysis method and an activable tracer method to obtain valuable findings which contribute to the clarification of and measures against these actual problems and which are also concerned with the occurrence, distribution and migration of halogen elements in the environment, especially agricultural and forestry ecosystems in space and in time. (author)

  14. Fish passage through hydropower turbines: Simulating blade strike using the discrete element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, M C; Romero-Gomez, P

    2014-01-01

    Among the hazardous hydraulic conditions affecting anadromous and resident fish during their passage though hydro-turbines two common physical processes can lead to injury and mortality: collisions/blade-strike and rapid decompression. Several methods are currently available to evaluate these stressors in installed turbines, e.g. using live fish or autonomous sensor devices, and in reduced-scale physical models, e.g. registering collisions from plastic beads. However, a priori estimates with computational modeling approaches applied early in the process of turbine design can facilitate the development of fish-friendly turbines. In the present study, we evaluated the frequency of blade strike and rapid pressure change by modeling potential fish trajectories with the Discrete Element Method (DEM) applied to fish-like composite particles. In the DEM approach, particles are subjected to realistic hydraulic conditions simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and particle-structure interactions-representing fish collisions with turbine components such as blades-are explicitly recorded and accounted for in the calculation of particle trajectories. We conducted transient CFD simulations by setting the runner in motion and allowing for unsteady turbulence using detached eddy simulation (DES), as compared to the conventional practice of simulating the system in steady state (which was also done here for comparison). While both schemes yielded comparable bulk hydraulic performance values, transient conditions exhibited an improvement in describing flow temporal and spatial variability. We released streamtraces (in the steady flow solution) and DEM particles (transient solution) at the same locations where sensor fish (SF) were released in previous field studies of the advanced turbine unit. The streamtrace- based results showed a better agreement with SF data than the DEM-based nadir pressures did because the former accounted for the turbulent dispersion at the

  15. BRIDGING OUTDOOR AND INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL SIMULATION FOR ASSESSING AND AIDING SUSTAINABLE URBAN NEIGHBOURHOOD DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengzhi Peng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Urban dwellers in cities located in hot-arid or hothumid regions have greater needs to live in between outdoor and indoor environments. The sustainability of urban building design in these regions cannot be fully assessed by indoor environmental simulation not taking into account the microclimatic factors of the surrounding urban neighbourhood. We find that the current suites of outdoor and indoor simulation software do not connect with each other to give us a holistic understanding of both outdoor and indoor simulation results. This paper reports on our current development of a methodological framework for bridging the current gap between outdoor and indoor environmental simulation. Our objective is that assessment of sustainability at an urban neighbourhood level can be carried out more holistically, and hence achieving more valid environmental simulations from an urban  dwelling point of view. The outdoor-indoor coupling methodology is currently modelled on a digital work flow among three key software platforms: (1 ENVImet for urban neighbourhood outdoor simulation, (2 Ecotect for building indoor simulation, (3 uCampus for combined outdoor-indoor 3D visualisation modelling of an entire urban neighbourhood including its individual buildings. A case study of a new neighbourhood development proposed for New Cairo is presented to demonstrate how indoor environmental simulation can be grounded on outdoor environmental simulation of the urban neighbourhood. Graphical outputs from this outdoorindoor coupling approach to neighbourhood simulation can be further brought together onto a Web-based 3D virtual reality modelling platform to enable wider accessibility.

  16. Determination of short half-life elements in biological, foodstuff, and environmental samples qualitatively by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syukria Kurniawati; Muhayatun Santoso; Diah Dwiana Lestiani

    2010-01-01

    NAA applications at routine operation power of 15 MW at Multipurpose Reactor GA Siwabessy (MPR-GAS) for sample matrices analysis have been widely applied. However, the results are not optimum for some matrices especially for short half-live elements. Preliminary study of short half-life elements determination in biological, foodstuff, and environmental samples using 1 MW power have been conducted to solve this problem. The samples were irradiated in rabbit system of MPR-GAS for 5 minutes, counted for 200 seconds by HPGe detector, and the spectrum were analyzed further using software Genie 2000 and Bandung NAA Utility. Analysis under 1 MW power on biological and foodstuff samples were capable to detect eight elements: Al, Br, CI, Ca, I, K, Mg, Ti, and Na for biological samples; Al, Br, CI, Ca, I, K, Mg, Mn, and Na for foodstuff samples, while at 15 MW power only three elements (CI, K, Na) were detected. At 1 MW power the counting process is more optimum due to smaller radiation exposure and dead time. For the environmental samples, the number of elements detected by 1 MW and 15 MW powers did not differ significantly. Generally, the results on the three types of samples showed that the elements of short half-life are better detected at 1 MW than that of 15 MW power. Further research needs to be done to obtain the optimum analytical conditions for irradiation and counting time determination. (author)

  17. Development of mechanical analysis module for simulation of SFR fuel rod behavior using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Andong; Jeong, Hyedong; Suh, Namduk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyochan; Yang, Yongsik [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Korean SFR developer decided to adapt metal fuel, current study focused on the metal fuel instead of oxide fuel. The SFR metal fuel has been developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and many efforts focused on designing and manufacturing the metal fuel. Since a nuclear fuel is the first barrier to protect radioactive isotope release, the fuel's integrity must be secured during steady-state operation and accident condition within an acceptable range. Whereas the design and evaluation methodologies, code systems and test procedures of a light water reactor fuel are sufficiently established, those of the SFR fuel needs more technical advances. In the view of regulatory point, there are still many challenging issues which are required to secure the safety of fuel and reactors. For this reason, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has launched the new project to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. The ALFUS code was developed by CRIEPI and employs mechanistic model for fission gas release and swelling of fuel slug. In the code system, a finite element method was introduced to analyze the fuel and cladding's mechanical behaviors. The FEAST code is more advanced code system for SFR which adopted mechanistic FGR and swelling model but still use analytical model to simulate fuel and cladding mechanical behavior. Based on the survey of the previous studies, fuel and cladding mechanical model should be improved. Analysis of mechanical behavior for fuel rod is crucial to evaluate overall rod's integrity. In addition, it is because contact between fuel slug and cladding or an over-pressure of rod internal pressure can cause rod failure during steady-state and other operation condition. The most of reference codes have simplified mechanical analysis model, so called 'analytical mode', because the detailed mechanical analysis requires large amount of calculation time and computing power. Even

  18. Development of mechanical analysis module for simulation of SFR fuel rod behavior using finite element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Andong; Jeong, Hyedong; Suh, Namduk; Kim, Hyochan; Yang, Yongsik

    2014-01-01

    Korean SFR developer decided to adapt metal fuel, current study focused on the metal fuel instead of oxide fuel. The SFR metal fuel has been developed by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and many efforts focused on designing and manufacturing the metal fuel. Since a nuclear fuel is the first barrier to protect radioactive isotope release, the fuel's integrity must be secured during steady-state operation and accident condition within an acceptable range. Whereas the design and evaluation methodologies, code systems and test procedures of a light water reactor fuel are sufficiently established, those of the SFR fuel needs more technical advances. In the view of regulatory point, there are still many challenging issues which are required to secure the safety of fuel and reactors. For this reason, the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) has launched the new project to develop the regulatory technology for SFR system including a fuel area. The ALFUS code was developed by CRIEPI and employs mechanistic model for fission gas release and swelling of fuel slug. In the code system, a finite element method was introduced to analyze the fuel and cladding's mechanical behaviors. The FEAST code is more advanced code system for SFR which adopted mechanistic FGR and swelling model but still use analytical model to simulate fuel and cladding mechanical behavior. Based on the survey of the previous studies, fuel and cladding mechanical model should be improved. Analysis of mechanical behavior for fuel rod is crucial to evaluate overall rod's integrity. In addition, it is because contact between fuel slug and cladding or an over-pressure of rod internal pressure can cause rod failure during steady-state and other operation condition. The most of reference codes have simplified mechanical analysis model, so called 'analytical mode', because the detailed mechanical analysis requires large amount of calculation time and computing power. Even

  19. Fast sequential multi-element determination of major and minor elements in environmental samples and drinking waters by high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Nieto, Beatriz; Gismera, Ma Jesús; Sevilla, Ma Teresa; Procopio, Jesús R

    2015-01-07

    The fast sequential multi-element determination of 11 elements present at different concentration levels in environmental samples and drinking waters has been investigated using high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The main lines for Cu (324.754 nm), Zn (213.857 nm), Cd (228.802 nm), Ni (232.003 nm) and Pb (217.001 nm), main and secondary absorption lines for Mn (279.482 and 279.827 nm), Fe (248.327, 248.514 and 302.064 nm) and Ca (422.673 and 239.856 nm), secondary lines with different sensitivities for Na (589.592 and 330.237 nm) and K (769.897 and 404.414 nm) and a secondary line for Mg (202.582 nm) have been chosen to perform the analysis. A flow injection system has been used for sample introduction so sample consumption has been reduced up to less than 1 mL per element, measured in triplicate. Furthermore, the use of multiplets for Fe and the side pixel registration approach for Mg have been studied in order to reduce sensitivity and extend the linear working range. The figures of merit have been calculated and the proposed method was applied to determine these elements in a pine needles reference material (SRM 1575a), drinking and natural waters and soil extracts. Recoveries of analytes added at different concentration levels to water samples and extracts of soils were within 88-115% interval. In this way, the fast sequential multi-element determination of major and minor elements can be carried out, in triplicate, with successful results without requiring additional dilutions of samples or several different strategies for sample preparation using about 8-9 mL of sample. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of ALE finite element method and adaptive smoothed finite element method for the numerical simulation of friction stir welding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Stelt, A.A.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Quak, W.; Akkerman, Remko; Huetink, Han; Menary, G

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the material flow around the pin during friction stir welding (FSW) is simulated using a 2D plane strain model. A pin rotates without translation in a disc with elasto-viscoplastic material properties and the outer boundary of the disc is clamped. Two numerical methods are used to

  1. Environmental and biological behaviour of plutonium and some other transuranium elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richmond, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives are to summarize our knowledge of the way in which plutonium and some other transuranium elements migrate through ecosystems; to consider how the physiochemical state of these elements and the biological systems through which they pass may influence this movement; and to put into perspective the risks of serious illness in man resulting from his exposure to these elements in the environment

  2. RARE EARTH ELEMENTS: A REVIEW OF PRODUCTION, PROCESSING, RECYCLING, AND ASSOCIATED ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are a group of 15 chemical elements in the periodic table, specifically the lanthanides. Two other elements, scandium and yttrium, have a similar physiochemistry to the lanthanides, are commonly found in the same mineral assemblages, and are often refe...

  3. Deciphering RNA Regulatory Elements Involved in the Developmental and Environmental Gene Regulation of Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Salavati, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a vector-borne parasite with intricate life cycle that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals. This pathogen relies on fine regulation of gene expression to respond and adapt to variable environments, with implications in transmission and infectivity. However, the involved regulatory elements and their mechanisms of actions are largely unknown. Here, benefiting from a new graph-based approach for finding functional regulatory elements in RNA (GRAFFER), we have predicted 88 new RNA regulatory elements that are potentially involved in the gene regulatory network of T. brucei. We show that many of these newly predicted elements are responsive to both transcriptomic and proteomic changes during the life cycle of the parasite. Moreover, we found that 11 of predicted elements strikingly resemble previously identified regulatory elements for the parasite. Additionally, comparison with previously predicted motifs on T. brucei suggested the superior performance of our approach based on the current limited knowledge of regulatory elements in T. brucei.

  4. Ecopedagogy as an element of citizenship education: The dialectic of global/local spheres of citizenship and critical environmental pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiaszek, Greg William

    2016-10-01

    Emerging from popular education movements in Latin America, ecopedagogy is a critical environmental pedagogy which focuses on understanding the connections between social conflict and environmentally harmful acts carried out by humans. These connections are often politically hidden in education. Ecopedagogy, while being pluralistic, is in its essence defined as a critical, transformative environmental pedagogy centred on increasing social and environmental justice. Its ultimate aim is to find a sustainable balance between the conflicting goals of diverse notions of human progress and environmental wellbeing. This article is based on two comparative research projects. The first was a qualitative study on ecopedagogical models involving 31 expert ecopedagogues in Argentina, Brazil and the Appalachian region of the United States. They were asked for their perspectives on how successful ecopedagogy can be defined within the contexts in which they taught and conducted research. The second study analysed how 18 international expert scholars of citizenship and/or environmental pedagogy from six world continents regarded the ways in which citizenship intersects with environmental issues and the pedagogies of both in an increasingly globalised world, with specific focus on Global Citizenship Education. Results from the first study indicate the following two needs for effective environmental pedagogies: (1) for there to be an ecopedagogical paradigm shift in environmental teaching and research; and (2) for ecopedagogy to be an essential element of citizenship education (and vice versa). This article examines how conflicting processes of globalisation both help and hinder in achieving such a paradigm shift by decentring traditional nation-state citizenship. Results from the second study indicate how critical teaching within and between different spheres of citizenship (e.g. local, national, global, and planetary citizenship) is essential for ecopedagogy (and the

  5. Simulation of flow over double-element airfoil and wind tunnel test for use in vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R K

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention due to their suitability in micro-electricity generation. There are few vertical axis wind turbine designs with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double-element airfoil mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work a low Reynolds number airfoil is selected to design a double-element airfoil blade for use in vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency. Double-element airfoil blade design consists of a main airfoil and a slat airfoil. Orientation of slat airfoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper and air flow simulation over double-element airfoil. With primary wind tunnel test an orientation parameter for the slat airfoil is initially obtained. Further a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double-element airfoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using ANSYS CFX software. It is observed that there is an increase in the lift coefficient by 26% for single-element airfoil at analysed conditions. The CFD simulation results were validated with wind tunnel tests. It is also observe that by selecting proper airfoil configuration and blade sizes an increase in lift coefficient can further be achieved

  6. Finite element analysis of plantar fascia during walking: a quasi-static simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Nien; Chang, Chih-Wei; Li, Chun-Ting; Chang, Chih-Han; Lin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-01-01

    The plantar fascia is a primary arch supporting structure of the foot and is often stressed with high tension during ambulation. When the loading on the plantar fascia exceeds its capacity, the inflammatory reaction known as plantar fasciitis may occur. Mechanical overload has been identified as the primary causative factor of plantar fasciitis. However, a knowledge gap exists between how the internal mechanical responses of the plantar fascia react to simple daily activities. Therefore, this study investigated the biomechanical responses of the plantar fascia during loaded stance phase by use of the finite element (FE) modeling. A 3-dimensional (3-D) FE foot model comprising bones, cartilage, ligaments, and a complex-shaped plantar fascia was constructed. During the stance phase, the kinematics of the foot movement was reproduced and Achilles tendon force was applied to the insertion site on the calcaneus. All the calculations were made on a single healthy subject. The results indicated that the plantar fascia underwent peak tension at preswing (83.3% of the stance phase) at approximately 493 N (0.7 body weight). Stress concentrated near the medial calcaneal tubercle. The peak von Mises stress of the fascia increased 2.3 times between the midstance and preswing. The fascia tension increased 66% because of the windlass mechanism. Because of the membrane element used in the ligament tissue, this FE model was able to simulate the mechanical structure of the foot. After prescribing kinematics of the distal tibia, the proposed model indicated the internal fascia was stressed in response to the loaded stance phase. Based on the findings of this study, adjustment of gait pattern to reduce heel rise and Achilles tendon force may lower the fascia loading and may further reduce pain in patients with plantar fasciitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Finite Element Simulation of GFRP Reinforced Concrete Beam Externally Strengthened With CFRP Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salleh Norhafizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The construction technology now has become more and more advanced allowing the development of new technologies or material to replace the previous one and also solved some of the troubles confronted by construction experts. The Glass Fibre Reinforced Polymer (GFRP composite is an alternative to replace the current usage of steel as it is rust proof and stronger in terms of stiffness compared to steel. Furthermore, GFRP bars have a high strength-to-weight ratio, making them attractive as reinforcement for concrete structures. However, the tensile behavior of GFRP bars is characterized by a linear elastic stress–strain relationship up to failure and, therefore, concrete elements reinforced with GFRP reinforcement exhibit brittle failure without warning. Design codes encourage over-reinforced GFRP design since it is more progressive and leads to a less catastrophic failure with a higher degree of deformability. Moreover, because of GFRP low modulus of elasticity, GFRP reinforced concrete members exhibit larger deflections and wider cracks width than steel reinforced concrete. This aims of this paper is to developed 2D Finite Element (FE models that can accurately simulate the respond on an improvement in the deflection of GFRP reinforced concrete beam externally strengthened with CFRP plates on the tension part of beam. The prediction of flexural response according to RCCSA software was also discussed. It was observed that the predicted FE results are given similar result with the experimental measured test data. Base on this good agreement, a parametric study was the performed using the validation FE model to investigate the effect of flexural reinforcement ratio and arrangement of the beams strengthened with different regions of CFRP plates.

  8. Transuranium elements leaching from simulated HLW glasses in synthetic interstitial claywater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    1992-08-01

    The main objective of this Master Thesis is to measure the steady-state concentrations of Pu, Np, and Am upon the leaching of High-Level Waste Glass in two types of synthetic claywater: humic acid free and humic acid containing synthetic claywater. The synthetic claywater has a composition that is representative for the in-situ interstitial groundwater of the Boom clay formation, a potential geological repository of radioactive waste in Belgium. The steady-state concentrations of transuranium elements were measured by leaching experiments with a typical duration of 400 days. Five main conclusions are drawn from the experimental data. (1) The transuranium elements that are released from simulated High Level Waste Glass are dominantly present in the synthetic claywater solutions as colloids. These colloids are smaller than 2 nm in absence of humic acids. In the presence of humic acids however, the colloids interact with actinides (adsorb or coagulate) and form particles larger than 2 nm. Np and Am are associated with inorganic and organic colloids in the synthetic interstitial claywater solution whereas Pu forms only inorganic colloids. (2) The steady-state concentration of Pu is in good agreement with the solubility of the Pu compound PuO 2 .xH 2 O. It is therefore concluded that PuO 2 .xH 2 O is the solubility controlling phase. (3) The Pu(IV)-species are dominant in the leaching solutions. Carbonate and humic acid complexes are negligible. (4) The steady-state concentrations of Np and Am in leaching solutions were much lower than the values calculated on the basis of known thermodynamic data. This indicates that the solubility controlling phases for Np and Am were not correctly identified or that the measured Np and Am concentrations were not steady-state values. (5) Non-active glass leaching tests have indicated that no organic colloids were formed as a result of glass dissolution. (A.S.)

  9. Simulation of dielectrophoretic assembly of carbon nanotubes using 3D finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S D; McGruer, N E; Adams, G G

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important methods for selective and repeatable assembly of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is alternating current dielectrophoresis (DEP). This method has been demonstrated experimentally as a viable technique for nano-scale manufacturing of novel CNT based devices. Previous numerical analyses have studied the motion of nanotubes, the volume from which they are assembled, and the rate of assembly, but have been restricted by various simplifying assumptions. In this paper we present a method for simulating the motion and behavior of CNTs subjected to dielectrophoresis using a three-dimensional electrostatic finite element analysis. By including the CNT in the finite element model, we can accurately predict the effect of the CNT on the electric field and the resulting force distribution across the CNT can be determined. We have used this information to calculate the motion of CNTs assembling onto the electrodes, and show how they tend to move towards the center of an electrode and come into contact at highly skewed angles. Our analysis suggests that the CNTs move to the electrode gap only after initially contacting the electrodes. We have also developed a model of the elastic deformation of CNTs as they approach the electrodes demonstrating how the induced forces can significantly alter the CNT shape during assembly. These results show that the CNT does not behave as a rigid body when in close proximity to the electrodes. In the future this method can be applied to a variety of real electrode geometries on a case-by-case basis and will provide more detailed insight into the specific motion and assembly parameters necessary for effective DEP assembly. (paper)

  10. Investigation of the elemental contents of some environmental samples from the Blue Nile and White Nile around Khartoum area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, Kamal Khalifa

    1997-10-01

    This work was performed to evaluate the environmental pollution at the Blue Nile (BN) and White Nile (WN) around Khartoum state. Samples of soil, sediments, plants, fish and water were collected from the studied area and analyzed. The concentrations of some elements (K, Ca, Ti, Fe, Cr, Co, Cu, Ni, Sr, Rb, Na, P, Zn, Br, Y, Zr, and Pb) were determined using the following analytical methods; atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), flame photometry, colorimetry and ultra violet spectrometry (UV). The data obtained was compared with the data from literature. The data was statistically analyzed to compare the results obtained by the different methods. The results of most elements determined by more than one method were significantly similar. The statistical analysis together with the chemical analysis revealed that the soil and sediments of the BN and WN are significantly different. The extent of pollution was determined by calculating the enrichment factors. The enrichment factors in sediments were calculated using both Fe and Ti as reference elements where values were almost equal. Some elements were slightly enriched at some sites but not to a degree to indicate a serious pollution. The accumulation of elements in plants as a clue for pollution was also calculated. Some elements; P, Cu and Zn were accumulated. The elemental concentrations in fish and water were not that high but water was still higher than the WHO recommended concentrations. (Author)

  11. Developing a new library of materials and structural elements for the simulative evaluation of buildings' energy performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulos, Agis M.; Oxizidis, Simos; Papathanasiou, Luciano [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, P.O. Box 483, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece)

    2008-05-15

    Contemporary building energy simulation programs are not only used by researchers but also are common tools in the hands of engineers and architects. Most of them are using databases of materials and structural elements, with characteristics originating from the country or the broader region where the specific program was developed. Thus, often the particularities met in other countries are not considered. Such a database of materials and constructions systematically used in the Greek building sector was developed for use with the simulation program EnergyPlus, which has become quite popular over the last years. In order to determine the applicability of the database, the energy behaviour of a typical multistory, multifamily building was simulated, having the exact materials and structural elements and patterns used in Greece. Furthermore, different thicknesses of insulation were simulated, corresponding to local climatic conditions and, even more important, to different dates of the building's construction. The results are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)

  12. Three-dimensional Finite Elements Method simulation of Total Ionizing Dose in 22 nm bulk nFinFETs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzikyriakou, Eleni, E-mail: ec3g12@soton.ac.uk; Potter, Kenneth; Redman-White, William; De Groot, C.H.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulation of Total Ionizing Dose using the Finite Elements Method. • Carrier generation, transport and trapping in the oxide. • Application in three-dimensional bulk FinFET model of 22 nm node. • Examination of trapped charge in the Shallow Trench Isolation. • Trapped charge dependency of parasitic transistor current. - Abstract: Finite Elements Method simulation of Total Ionizing Dose effects on 22 nm bulk Fin Field Effect Transistor (FinFET) devices using the commercial software Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD is presented. The simulation parameters are extracted by calibrating the charge trapping model to experimental results on 400 nm SiO{sub 2} capacitors irradiated under zero bias. The FinFET device characteristics are calibrated to the Intel 22 nm bulk technology. Irradiation simulations of the transistor performed with all terminals unbiased reveal increased hardness up to a total dose of 1 MRad(SiO{sub 2}).

  13. Comparison Elements on STG DICE cell for Content-Addressable Memory and Simulation of Single-Event Transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Stenin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparison elements on base the STG DICE cell and the logical element “Exclusive OR” for a content-addressable memory were designed and simulated. The comparison element contains two identical joint groups of transistors that are spaced on the chip by the distance of four micrometers, so the loss of data in STG DICE cell practically excluded. On the characteristics of the new 65-nm CMOS comparison element, we predict the hardness of these item to single event rate (SER more to hundred times compared to elements on 6-transistors cells and the standard DICE cell with distances 0.5-0.6 μm between mutually sensitive nodes.

  14. Elemental line scanning of an increment core using EDXRF: from fundamental research to environmental forensics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Jean Christophe Balouet; Gil Oudijk

    2008-01-01

    Environmental forensics seeks to determine the responsible parties for contamination from leaks or spills of petroleum or other toxic products. Dendrochemistry contributes to environmental forensics at the intersection of analytical chemistry, tree biology, and environmental responsibility. To be useful, dendrochemistry requires the rigorous application of analytical...

  15. Finite element simulation of the compression behaviour of airy breakfast cereals

    KAUST Repository

    Mamlouk, Hedi

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we are concerned by the fragmentation study of five breakfast cereals from the market exhibiting differences in shape, formulation and texture. The experimental part of the study encompasses compression testing and fragment size evaluation using 2D image analysis. Structural information about the airy structure is then determined using X-ray tomography and related 3D image analysis. The numerical part has the ambition of assessing the fragmentation process using a damage-based mechanical model that simulates solid material rupture events as onset and growth of damage up to brittle failure. The model is based on a finite element scheme in which direct information of the 3D airy structure is encoded in the solid meshing. The force-displacement signature well shows competition between bending and compression driven failure depending on cereal shape. Our results show also large dispersion in the porous structure that affects significantly the result of the fragmentation. The numerical model is able to simulate the result of fragmentation at the cost of identifying two mechanical parameters, namely Young\\'s modulus and critical stress. These two quantities are proved to be product dependent and display a large range of variation. Industrial relevance The design of new food product becomes more and more based on functionality criteria. In a typical chewing process the need to understand the deformation mechanisms leading to fragmentation helps in understanding the role of the structure and, in turn, the processing conditions for building new transformed products. There is an increasing industrial demand in that sense especially knowing that some of the cereal products can be designed to meet these criteria for specific populations (old people with dental problems, infant feeding). Our work is, within this context, an attempt to set a numerical and experimental framework for studying the fragmentation of five selected breakfast cereals from the market.

  16. Dynamic simulation and finite element analysis of the human mandible injury protected by polyvinyl alcohol sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi, E-mail: mnavid@iust.ac.ir; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-09-01

    There have been intensive efforts to find a suitable kinetic energy absorbing material for helmet and bulletproof vest design. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is currently in extensive use as scaffolding material for tissue engineering applications. PVA can also be employed instead of commonly use kinetic energy absorbing materials to increase the kinetic energy absorption capacity of current helmet and bulletproof vest materials owing to its excellent mechanical properties. In this study, a combined hexahedral finite element (FE) model is established to determine the potential protection ability of PVA sponge in controlling the level of injury for gunshot wounds to the human mandible. Digital computed tomography data for the human mandible are used to establish a three-dimensional FE model of the human mandible. The mechanism by which a gunshot injures the protected mandible by PVA sponge is dynamically simulated using the LS-DYNA code under two different shot angles. The stress distributions in different parts of the mandible and sponge after injury are also simulated. The modeling results regardless of shot angle reveal that the substantial amount of kinetic energy of the steel ball (67%) is absorbed by the PVA sponge and, consequently, injury severity of the mandible is significantly decreased. The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. The results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and bulletproof vest design to absorb most of the impact energy and reduce the transmitted load. - Highlights: • The ability of PVA sponge to control the injury to the human mandible is computed. • A hexahedral FE model for gunshot wounds to the human mandible is established. • The kinetic energy and injury severity of the mandible is minimized by the sponge. • The highest energy loss (170 J) is observed for the impact at entry angle of 70°. • PVA suggests as an alternative

  17. RHEOLOGICAL AND ELEMENTAL ANALYSES OF SIMULANT SB5 SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR-MELTER FEED TANK SLURRIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.

    2010-02-08

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will complete Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in fiscal year 2010. DWPF has experienced multiple feed stoppages for the SB5 Melter Feed Tank (MFT) due to clogs. Melter throughput is decreased not only due to the feed stoppage, but also because dilution of the feed by addition of prime water (about 60 gallons), which is required to restart the MFT pump. SB5 conditions are different from previous batches in one respect: pH of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product (9 for SB5 vs. 7 for SB4). Since a higher pH could cause gel formation, due in part to greater leaching from the glass frit into the supernate, SRNL studies were undertaken to check this hypothesis. The clogging issue is addressed by this simulant work, requested via a technical task request from DWPF. The experiments were conducted at Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) wherein a non-radioactive simulant consisting of SB5 Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) product simulant and frit was subjected to a 30 hour SME cycle at two different pH levels, 7.5 and 10; the boiling was completed over a period of six days. Rheology and supernate elemental composition measurements were conducted. The caustic run exhibited foaming once, after 30 minutes of boiling. It was expected that caustic boiling would exhibit a greater leaching rate, which could cause formation of sodium aluminosilicate and would allow gel formation to increase the thickness of the simulant. Xray Diffraction (XRD) measurements of the simulant did not detect crystalline sodium aluminosilicate, a possible gel formation species. Instead, it was observed that caustic conditions, but not necessarily boiling time, induced greater thickness, but lowered the leach rate. Leaching consists of the formation of metal hydroxides from the oxides, formation of boric acid from the boron oxide, and dissolution of SiO{sub 2}, the major frit component. It is likely that the observed precipitation of Mg

  18. Multi-element analyses of Vietnamese environmental samples for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, T.H.; Nguyen, T.B.; Nguyen, T.N.; Yoshida, S.

    2005-01-01

    The Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used for measuring 8 major and 27 trace elements in food and soil samples collected in Vietnam. The concentration of elements in food samples was different from different locations and also from different food groups. Depth profiles of the elements were discussed for soil samples. (author)

  19. Numeric simulation model for long-term orthodontic tooth movement with contact boundary conditions using the finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ryo; Yamaoka, Satoshi; Anh, Tuan Nguyen; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Koga, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2017-11-01

    Although many attempts have been made to simulate orthodontic tooth movement using the finite element method, most were limited to analyses of the initial displacement in the periodontal ligament and were insufficient to evaluate the effect of orthodontic appliances on long-term tooth movement. Numeric simulation of long-term tooth movement was performed in some studies; however, neither the play between the brackets and archwire nor the interproximal contact forces were considered. The objectives of this study were to simulate long-term orthodontic tooth movement with the edgewise appliance by incorporating those contact conditions into the finite element model and to determine the force system when the space is closed with sliding mechanics. We constructed a 3-dimensional model of maxillary dentition with 0.022-in brackets and 0.019 × 0.025-in archwire. Forces of 100 cN simulating sliding mechanics were applied. The simulation was accomplished on the assumption that bone remodeling correlates with the initial tooth displacement. This method could successfully represent the changes in the moment-to-force ratio: the tooth movement pattern during space closure. We developed a novel method that could simulate the long-term orthodontic tooth movement and accurately determine the force system in the course of time by incorporating contact boundary conditions into finite element analysis. It was also suggested that friction is progressively increased during space closure in sliding mechanics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature. (note)

  1. Optimization of tissue physical parameters for accurate temperature estimation from finite-element simulation of radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Swetha; Mast, T Douglas

    2015-10-07

    Computational finite element models are commonly used for the simulation of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) treatments. However, the accuracy of these simulations is limited by the lack of precise knowledge of tissue parameters. In this technical note, an inverse solver based on the unscented Kalman filter (UKF) is proposed to optimize values for specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity resulting in accurately simulated temperature elevations. A total of 15 RFA treatments were performed on ex vivo bovine liver tissue. For each RFA treatment, 15 finite-element simulations were performed using a set of deterministically chosen tissue parameters to estimate the mean and variance of the resulting tissue ablation. The UKF was implemented as an inverse solver to recover the specific heat, thermal conductivity, and electrical conductivity corresponding to the measured area of the ablated tissue region, as determined from gross tissue histology. These tissue parameters were then employed in the finite element model to simulate the position- and time-dependent tissue temperature. Results show good agreement between simulated and measured temperature.

  2. Environmental impact of some trace elements emission from the work environment of Atbara Cement Factory and Atbara Railway Foundry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimir, S A.M. [University of Khartoum, Faculty of Education, Department of Chemistry, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2006-06-15

    This work was performed to evaluate the chemical pollution level by some trace elements at the work environment of Atbara Cement Factory (ACF) and Atbara Railway Foundry (ARF). Samples of soil and air were collected from the two sites study, ACF and ARF. To assess the environmental impact of these industrial complexes, the samples were collected from sites expected to be free from industrial emission to serve as control. Plant samples were also collected from (ACF) and the control site. The samples were analyzed and the concentrations of K, Na, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zu and Pb were determined using three analytical techniques: Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray fluorescence (X RF), and flame emission photometry (FEP). Soil samples were chemically fractionated using separation methods and the solutions were analyzed using AAS methods and FEP to determine the chemical form of the elements. The quality of the data was achieved through the analysis of certified reference materials. The results of this study were compared with previous literature. The data were treated by calculating enrichment factor and statistically by multivariate analysis such as, principle component analysis and cluster analysis. The findings of the study were concluded as follows. The effect of emission from both sites is very clear when the concentrations of the studied trace elements in soil and air samples are compared with the respective concentrations at the control site. Higher values of these elements are found at ARF and slightly high at ACF. The elements which can be attributed to industrial emission are noticeably higher at ARF, for example Cu is forty times as higher as compared to the control site. While Zn is slightly high and Pb is very high. The same remarks are further confirmed by enrichment factor calculation. For soil samples enrichment factor was obtained for two groups of elements, the enriched group includes the elements Pb, Cu and Zn which have enrichment factors higher in

  3. Environmental impact of some trace elements emission from the work environment of Atbara Cement Factory and Atbara Railway Foundry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimir, S.A.M.

    2006-06-01

    This work was performed to evaluate the chemical pollution level by some trace elements at the work environment of Atbara Cement Factory (ACF) and Atbara Railway Foundry (ARF). Samples of soil and air were collected from the two sites study, ACF and ARF. To assess the environmental impact of these industrial complexes, the samples were collected from sites expected to be free from industrial emission to serve as control. Plant samples were also collected from (ACF) and the control site. The samples were analyzed and the concentrations of K, Na, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zu and Pb were determined using three analytical techniques: Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray fluorescence (X RF), and flame emission photometry (FEP). Soil samples were chemically fractionated using separation methods and the solutions were analyzed using AAS methods and FEP to determine the chemical form of the elements. The quality of the data was achieved through the analysis of certified reference materials. The results of this study were compared with previous literature. The data were treated by calculating enrichment factor and statistically by multivariate analysis such as, principle component analysis and cluster analysis. The findings of the study were concluded as follows. The effect of emission from both sites is very clear when the concentrations of the studied trace elements in soil and air samples are compared with the respective concentrations at the control site. Higher values of these elements are found at ARF and slightly high at ACF. The elements which can be attributed to industrial emission are noticeably higher at ARF, for example Cu is forty times as higher as compared to the control site. While Zn is slightly high and Pb is very high. The same remarks are further confirmed by enrichment factor calculation. For soil samples enrichment factor was obtained for two groups of elements, the enriched group includes the elements Pb, Cu and Zn which have enrichment factors higher in

  4. Development of a comprehensive database of scattering environmental conditions and simulation constraints for offshore wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hübler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For the design and optimisation of offshore wind turbines, the knowledge of realistic environmental conditions and utilisation of well-founded simulation constraints is very important, as both influence the structural behaviour and power output in numerical simulations. However, real high-quality data, especially for research purposes, are scarcely available. This is why, in this work, a comprehensive database of 13 environmental conditions at wind turbine locations in the North and Baltic Sea is derived using data of the FINO research platforms. For simulation constraints, like the simulation length and the time of initial simulation transients, well-founded recommendations in the literature are also rare. Nevertheless, it is known that the choice of simulation lengths and times of initial transients fundamentally affects the quality and computing time of simulations. For this reason, studies of convergence for both parameters are conducted to determine adequate values depending on the type of substructure, the wind speed, and the considered loading (fatigue or ultimate. As the main purpose of both the database and the simulation constraints is to compromise realistic data for probabilistic design approaches and to serve as a guidance for further studies in order to enable more realistic and accurate simulations, all results are freely available and easy to apply.

  5. Identifying populations sensitive to environmental chemicals by simulating toxicokinetic variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Caroline L; Pearce, Robert G; Setzer, R Woodrow; Wetmore, Barbara A; Wambaugh, John F

    2017-09-01

    The thousands of chemicals present in the environment (USGAO, 2013) must be triaged to identify priority chemicals for human health risk research. Most chemicals have little of the toxicokinetic (TK) data that are necessary for relating exposures to tissue concentrations that are believed to be toxic. Ongoing efforts have collected limited, in vitro TK data for a few hundred chemicals. These data have been combined with biomonitoring data to estimate an approximate margin between potential hazard and exposure. The most "at risk" 95th percentile of adults have been identified from simulated populations that are generated either using standard "average" adult human parameters or very specific cohorts such as Northern Europeans. To better reflect the modern U.S. population, we developed a population simulation using physiologies based on distributions of demographic and anthropometric quantities from the most recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data. This allowed incorporation of inter-individual variability, including variability across relevant demographic subgroups. Variability was analyzed with a Monte Carlo approach that accounted for the correlation structure in physiological parameters. To identify portions of the U.S. population that are more at risk for specific chemicals, physiologic variability was incorporated within an open-source high-throughput (HT) TK modeling framework. We prioritized 50 chemicals based on estimates of both potential hazard and exposure. Potential hazard was estimated from in vitro HT screening assays (i.e., the Tox21 and ToxCast programs). Bioactive in vitro concentrations were extrapolated to doses that produce equivalent concentrations in body tissues using a reverse dosimetry approach in which generic TK models are parameterized with: 1) chemical-specific parameters derived from in vitro measurements and predicted from chemical structure; and 2) with

  6. Discrete element method (DEM) simulations of stratified sampling during solid dosage form manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Bruno C; Ketterhagen, William R

    2011-10-14

    Discrete element model (DEM) simulations of the discharge of powders from hoppers under gravity were analyzed to provide estimates of dosage form content uniformity during the manufacture of solid dosage forms (tablets and capsules). For a system that exhibits moderate segregation the effects of sample size, number, and location within the batch were determined. The various sampling approaches were compared to current best-practices for sampling described in the Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) Blend Uniformity Working Group (BUWG) guidelines. Sampling uniformly across the discharge process gave the most accurate results with respect to identifying segregation trends. Sigmoidal sampling (as recommended in the PQRI BUWG guidelines) tended to overestimate potential segregation issues, whereas truncated sampling (common in industrial practice) tended to underestimate them. The size of the sample had a major effect on the absolute potency RSD. The number of sampling locations (10 vs. 20) had very little effect on the trends in the data, and the number of samples analyzed at each location (1 vs. 3 vs. 7) had only a small effect for the sampling conditions examined. The results of this work provide greater understanding of the effect of different sampling approaches on the measured content uniformity of real dosage forms, and can help to guide the choice of appropriate sampling protocols. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic induced softening in frictional granular materials investigated by discrete-element-method simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemrich, Laure; Carmeliet, Jan; Johnson, Paul A.; Guyer, Robert; Jia, Xiaoping

    2017-12-01

    A granular system composed of frictional glass beads is simulated using the discrete element method. The intergrain forces are based on the Hertz contact law in the normal direction with frictional tangential force. The damping due to collision is also accounted for. Systems are loaded at various stresses and their quasistatic elastic moduli are characterized. Each system is subjected to an extensive dynamic testing protocol by measuring the resonant response to a broad range of ac drive amplitudes and frequencies via a set of diagnostic strains. The system, linear at small ac drive amplitudes, has resonance frequencies that shift downward (i.e., modulus softening) with increased ac drive amplitude. Detailed testing shows that the slipping contact ratio does not contribute significantly to this dynamic modulus softening, but the coordination number is strongly correlated to this reduction. This suggests that the softening arises from the extended structural change via break and remake of contacts during the rearrangement of bead positions driven by the ac amplitude.

  8. Systemic characterization and evaluation of particle packings as initial sets for discrete element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Cortés, Lucía Argüelles; Farias, Márcio Muniz de; Morales, Irvin Pablo Pérez; Valera, Roberto Roselló; Oñate, Eugenio

    2018-07-01

    A methodology that comprises several characterization properties for particle packings is proposed in this paper. The methodology takes into account factors such as dimension and shape of particles, space occupation, homogeneity, connectivity and isotropy, among others. This classification and integration of several properties allows to carry out a characterization process to systemically evaluate the particle packings in order to guarantee the quality of the initial meshes in discrete element simulations, in both the micro- and the macroscales. Several new properties were created, and improvements in existing ones are presented. Properties from other disciplines were adapted to be used in the evaluation of particle systems. The methodology allows to easily characterize media at the level of the microscale (continuous geometries—steels, rocks microstructures, etc., and discrete geometries) and the macroscale. A global, systemic and integral system for characterizing and evaluating particle sets, based on fuzzy logic, is presented. Such system allows researchers to have a unique evaluation criterion based on the aim of their research. Examples of applications are shown.

  9. Finite element simulation of earthquake cycle dynamics for continental listric fault system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, T.; Shen, Z. K.

    2017-12-01

    We simulate stress/strain evolution through earthquake cycles for a continental listric fault system using the finite element method. A 2-D lithosphere model is developed, with the upper crust composed of plasto-elastic materials and the lower crust/upper mantle composed of visco-elastic materials respectively. The media is sliced by a listric fault, which is soled into the visco-elastic lower crust at its downdip end. The system is driven laterally by constant tectonic loading. Slip on fault is controlled by rate-state friction. We start with a simple static/dynamic friction law, and drive the system through multiple earthquake cycles. Our preliminary results show that: (a) periodicity of the earthquake cycles is strongly modulated by the static/dynamic friction, with longer period correlated with higher static friction and lower dynamic friction; (b) periodicity of earthquake is a function of fault depth, with less frequent events of greater magnitudes occurring at shallower depth; and (c) rupture on fault cannot release all the tectonic stress in the system, residual stress is accumulated in the hanging wall block at shallow depth close to the fault, which has to be released either by conjugate faulting or inelastic folding. We are in a process of exploring different rheologic structure and friction laws and examining their effects on earthquake behavior and deformation pattern. The results will be applied to specific earthquakes and fault zones such as the 2008 great Wenchuan earthquake on the Longmen Shan fault system.

  10. 3D Finite Element Simulation of Pellet-Cladding Mechanical Interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Sang Kyu; Lee, Sung Uk; Lee, Eun Ho; Yang, Dong Yol; Kim, Hyo Chan; Yang, Dong Yol

    2016-01-01

    In a nuclear power plant, the fuel assembly, which is composed of fuel rods, burns, and the high temperature can generate power. The fuel rod consists of pellets and a cladding that covers the pellets. It is important to understand the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction with regard to nuclear safety. This paper proposes simulation of the PCMI. The gap between the pellets and the cladding, and the contact pressure are very important for conducting thermal analysis. Since the gap conductance is not known, it has to be determined by a suitable method. This paper suggests a solution. In this study, finite element (FE) contact analysis is conducted considering thermal expansion of the pellets. As the contact causes plastic deformation, this aspect is considered in the analysis. A 3D FE module is developed to analyze the PCMI using FORTRAN 90. The plastic deformation due to the contact between the pellets and the cladding is the major physical phenomenon. The simple analytical solution of a cylinder is proposed and compared with the fuel rod performance code results

  11. Features and validation of discrete element method for simulating pebble flow in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yong; Li Yanjie

    2005-01-01

    The core of a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is composed of big number of fuel pebbles, their kinetic behaviors are of great importance in estimating the path and residence time of individual pebble, the evolution of the mixing zone for the assessment of the efficiency of a reactor. Numerical method is highlighted in modern reactor design. In view of granular flow, the Discrete Element Model based on contact mechanics of spheres was briefly described. Two typical examples were presented to show the capability of the DEM method. The former is piling with glass/steel spheres, which provides validated evidences that the simulated angles of repose are in good coincidence with the experimental results. The later is particle discharge in a flat- bottomed silo, which shows the effects of material modulus and demonstrates several features. The two examples show the DEM method enables to predict the behaviors, such as the evolution of pebble profiles, streamlines etc., and provides sufficient information for pebble flow analysis and core design. In order to predict the cyclic pebble flow in a HTGR core precisely and efficiently, both model and code improvement are needed, together with rational specification of physical properties with proper measuring techniques. Strategic and methodological considerations were also discussed. (authors)

  12. An Image-Based Finite Element Approach for Simulating Viscoelastic Response of Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image-based micromechanical modeling approach to predict the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture. An improved image analysis technique based on the OTSU thresholding operation was employed to reduce the beam hardening effect in X-ray CT images. We developed a voxel-based 3D digital reconstruction model of asphalt mixture with the CT images after being processed. In this 3D model, the aggregate phase and air void were considered as elastic materials while the asphalt mastic phase was considered as linear viscoelastic material. The viscoelastic constitutive model of asphalt mastic was implemented in a finite element code using the ABAQUS user material subroutine (UMAT. An experimental procedure for determining the parameters of the viscoelastic constitutive model at a given temperature was proposed. To examine the capability of the model and the accuracy of the parameter, comparisons between the numerical predictions and the observed laboratory results of bending and compression tests were conducted. Finally, the verified digital sample of asphalt mixture was used to predict the asphalt mixture viscoelastic behavior under dynamic loading and creep-recovery loading. Simulation results showed that the presented image-based digital sample may be appropriate for predicting the mechanical behavior of asphalt mixture when all the mechanical properties for different phases became available.

  13. Molecular Simulations of Cyclic Loading Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Atomistic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT in many engineered bionanomaterials and electromechanical devices have imposed an urgent need on the understanding of the fatigue behavior and mechanism of CNT under cyclic loading conditions. To date, however, very little work has been done in this field. This paper presents the results of a theoretical study on the behavior of CNT subject to cyclic tensile and compressive loads using quasi-static molecular simulations. The Atomistic Finite Element Method (AFEM has been applied in the study. It is shown that CNT exhibited extreme cyclic loading resistance with yielding strain and strength becoming constant within limited number of loading cycles. Viscoelastic behavior including nonlinear elasticity, hysteresis, preconditioning (stress softening, and large strain have been observed. Chiral symmetry was found to have appreciable effects on the cyclic loading behavior of CNT. Mechanisms of the observed behavior have been revealed by close examination of the intrinsic geometric and mechanical features of tube structure. It was shown that the accumulated residual defect-free morphological deformation was the primary mechanism responsible for the cyclic failure of CNT, while the bond rotating and stretching experienced during loading/unloading played a dominant role on the strength, strain and modulus behavior of CNT.

  14. Numerical Simulations of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Turbines Using the Blade Element Momentum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Thulin, Oskar; Aliseda, Alberto

    2011-11-01

    Energy extraction from the available kinetic energy in tidal currents via Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines has recently attracted scientists' attention as a highly predictable source of renewable energy. The strongest tidal resources have a concentrated nature that require close turbine spacing in a farm of MHK turbines. This tight spacing, however, will lead to interaction of the downstream turbines with the turbulent wake generated by upstream turbines. This interaction can significantly reduce the power generated and possibly result in structural failure before the expected service life is completed. Development of a numerical methodology to study the turbine-wake interaction can provide a tool for optimization of turbine spacing to maximize the power generated in turbine arrays. In this work, we will present numerical simulations of the flow field in a farm of horizontal axis MHK turbines using the Blade Element Momentum Theory (BEMT). We compare the value of integral variables (i.e. efficiency, power, torque and etc.) calculated for each turbine in the farm for different arrangements with varying streamwise and lateral offsets between turbines. We find that BEMT provides accurate estimates of turbine efficiency under uniform flow conditions, but overpredicts the efficiency of downstream turbines when they are strongly affected by the wakes. Supported by DOE through the National Northwest Marine Renewable Energy Center.

  15. A Finite Element Model to Simulate Defect Formation during Friction Stir Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a 3D coupled thermo-mechanical finite element model is developed to predict and analyze the defect formation during friction stir welding based on coupled Eulerian Lagrangian method. The model is validated by comparing the estimated welding temperature, processed zone shape and void size with those obtained experimentally. The results compared indicate that the simulated temperature and the data measured are in good agreement with each other. In addition, the model can predict the plasticized zone shape and the presence of a void in the weld quite accurately. However, the void size is overestimated. The effects of welding parameters and tool pin profile are also analyzed. The results reveal that welding at low welding speed or high tool rotational speed could produce a smaller void. Moreover, compared to a smooth tool pin, a featured tool pin can enhance plastic flow in the weld and achieve defect-free weldment. The results are helpful for the optimization of the welding process and the design of welding tools.

  16. Systemic characterization and evaluation of particle packings as initial sets for discrete element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfa, Carlos Recarey; Cortés, Lucía Argüelles; Farias, Márcio Muniz de; Morales, Irvin Pablo Pérez; Valera, Roberto Roselló; Oñate, Eugenio

    2017-10-01

    A methodology that comprises several characterization properties for particle packings is proposed in this paper. The methodology takes into account factors such as dimension and shape of particles, space occupation, homogeneity, connectivity and isotropy, among others. This classification and integration of several properties allows to carry out a characterization process to systemically evaluate the particle packings in order to guarantee the quality of the initial meshes in discrete element simulations, in both the micro- and the macroscales. Several new properties were created, and improvements in existing ones are presented. Properties from other disciplines were adapted to be used in the evaluation of particle systems. The methodology allows to easily characterize media at the level of the microscale (continuous geometries—steels, rocks microstructures, etc., and discrete geometries) and the macroscale. A global, systemic and integral system for characterizing and evaluating particle sets, based on fuzzy logic, is presented. Such system allows researchers to have a unique evaluation criterion based on the aim of their research. Examples of applications are shown.

  17. Finite element simulation of photoacoustic fiber optic sensors for surface corrosion detection on a steel rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qixiang; Owusu Twumasi, Jones; Hu, Jie; Wang, Xingwei; Yu, Tzuyang

    2018-03-01

    Structural steel members have become integral components in the construction of civil engineering infrastructures such as bridges, stadiums, and shopping centers due to versatility of steel. Owing to the uniqueness in the design and construction of steel structures, rigorous non-destructive evaluation techniques are needed during construction and operation processes to prevent the loss of human lives and properties. This research aims at investigating the application of photoacoustic fiber optic transducers (FOT) for detecting surface rust of a steel rod. Surface ultrasonic waves propagation in intact and corroded steel rods was simulated using finite element method (FEM). Radial displacements were collected and short-time Fourier transform (STFT) was applied to obtain the spectrogram. It was found that the presence of surface rust between the FOT and the receiver can be detected in both time and frequency domain. In addition, spectrogram can be used to locate and quantify surface rust. Furthermore, a surface rust detection algorithm utilizing the FOT has been proposed for detection, location and quantification of the surface rust.

  18. Age- and sex-specific thorax finite element model development and simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoell, Samantha L; Weaver, Ashley A; Vavalle, Nicholas A; Stitzel, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    The shape, size, bone density, and cortical thickness of the thoracic skeleton vary significantly with age and sex, which can affect the injury tolerance, especially in at-risk populations such as the elderly. Computational modeling has emerged as a powerful and versatile tool to assess injury risk. However, current computational models only represent certain ages and sexes in the population. The purpose of this study was to morph an existing finite element (FE) model of the thorax to depict thorax morphology for males and females of ages 30 and 70 years old (YO) and to investigate the effect on injury risk. Age- and sex-specific FE models were developed using thin-plate spline interpolation. In order to execute the thin-plate spline interpolation, homologous landmarks on the reference, target, and FE model are required. An image segmentation and registration algorithm was used to collect homologous rib and sternum landmark data from males and females aged 0-100 years. The Generalized Procrustes Analysis was applied to the homologous landmark data to quantify age- and sex-specific isolated shape changes in the thorax. The Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) 50th percentile male occupant model was morphed to create age- and sex-specific thoracic shape change models (scaled to a 50th percentile male size). To evaluate the thoracic response, 2 loading cases (frontal hub impact and lateral impact) were simulated to assess the importance of geometric and material property changes with age and sex. Due to the geometric and material property changes with age and sex, there were observed differences in the response of the thorax in both the frontal and lateral impacts. Material property changes alone had little to no effect on the maximum thoracic force or the maximum percent compression. With age, the thorax becomes stiffer due to superior rotation of the ribs, which can result in increased bone strain that can increase the risk of fracture. For the 70-YO models

  19. Combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride on chloroplast structure and functional elements in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiqing; Wang, Lihong; Zhou, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2016-05-01

    Acid rain and rare earth element (REE) pollution exist simultaneously in many agricultural regions. However, how REE pollution and acid rain affect plant growth in combination remains largely unknown. In this study, the combined effects of simulated acid rain and lanthanum chloride (LaCl3) on chloroplast morphology, chloroplast ultrastructure, functional element contents, chlorophyll content, and the net photosynthetic rate (P n) in rice (Oryza sativa) were investigated by simulating acid rain and rare earth pollution. Under the combined treatment of simulated acid rain at pH 4.5 and 0.08 mM LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane was smooth, proteins on this membrane were uniform, chloroplast structure was integrated, and the thylakoids were orderly arranged, and simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a mild antagonistic effect; the Mg, Ca, Mn contents, the chlorophyll content, and the P n increased under this combined treatment, with a synergistic effect of simulated acid rain and LaCl3. Under other combined treatments of simulated acid rain and LaCl3, the chloroplast membrane surface was uneven, a clear "hole" was observed on the surface of chloroplasts, and the thylakoids were dissolved and loose; and the P n and contents of functional elements (P, Mg, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo) and chlorophyll decreased. Under these combined treatments, simulated acid rain and LaCl3 exhibited a synergistic effect. Based on the above results, a model of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis was established in order to reveal the combined effects on plant photosynthesis, especially on the photosynthetic organelle-chloroplast. Our results would provide some references for further understanding the mechanism of the combined effects of simulated acid rain and LaCl3 on plant photosynthesis.

  20. Elemental cycling response of an Adirondack subalpine spruce-fir forest to atmospheric and environmental change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew J. Friedland; Eric K. Miller

    1996-01-01

    Patterns and trends in forest elemental cycling can become more apparent in the presence of atmospheric perturbations. High-elevation forests of the northeastern United States have received large amounts of atmospheric deposition of pollutants, which have altered natural elemental cycling and retention rates in a variety of ways. This study examined atmospheric...

  1. BIOGAS PLANT AS AN ELEMENT THAT HAS A POSITIVE INFLUENCE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES OF RURAL SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Pawłowski

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary rural landscape, an agricultural biogas plant is becoming an increasingly frequent element of agricultural installations. There is a need to ask an important question: is a new technology, such as biogas plants with medium power of 1MW, listed as investments which can have significant environmental impacts? This question is becoming an integral part of rural space as a new form of village buildings. The inevitable changes in the rural landscape and the way of carrying out farming have both a positive and negative impact on the rural environment. Biogas plants, as new objects in developing country industries, are undoubtedly an important element in the way of obtaining green energy. Location is the most important factor for the success of the establishment and operation of the biogas plant, which is important not only for economic reasons, but also socio-environmental and landscape reasons.

  2. Cell-element simulations to optimize the performance of osmotic processes in porous membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.; Iliev, Oleg; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Printsypar, Galina; Shi, Meixia

    2018-01-01

    concerns the design of a cell element for the forward osmosis experiments. Using the developed software tool we qualitatively and quantitatively investigate the performance of a cell element that we designed for laboratory experiments of forward osmosis

  3. FREESURF: A three-dimensional finite-element model for simulating groundwater flow into and around an excavation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzman, Morley

    1992-07-15

    A three-dimensional finite-element code was developed and used to simulate the flow of groundwater towards an excavation in a saturated porous medium, allowing for seepage faces. An iterative procedure was used to predict the movement of the water table and the seepage flux. The numerical solution agreed well with experimental results from a sandbox experiment. (auth)

  4. Computer simulation of the influence of the alloying elements on secondary hardness of the high-speed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Sitek, W.; Zaclona, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the method of modelling of high-speed steels' (HSS) properties, being basing on chemical composition and heat treatment parameters, employing neural networks. An example of its application possibility the computer simulation was made of the influence of the particular alloying elements on hardness and obtained results are presented. (author)

  5. 3D micro-crack propagation simulation at enamel/adhesive interface using FE submodeling and element death techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng-Liang; Lin, Chun-Li; Sun, Ming-Tsung; Chang, Yen-Hsiang

    2010-06-01

    This study investigates micro-crack propagation at the enamel/adhesive interface using finite element (FE) submodeling and element death techniques. A three-dimensional (3D) FE macro-model of the enamel/adhesive/ceramic subjected to shear bond testing was generated and analyzed. A 3D micro-model with interfacial bonding structure was constructed at the upper enamel/adhesive interface where the stress concentration was found from the macro-model results. The morphology of this interfacial bonding structure (i.e., resin tag) was assigned based on resin tag geometry and enamel rod arrangement from a scanning electron microscopy micrograph. The boundary conditions for the micro-model were determined from the macro-model results. A custom iterative code combined with the element death technique was used to calculate the micro-crack propagation. Parallel experiments were performed to validate this FE simulation. The stress concentration within the adhesive occurred mainly at the upper corner near the enamel/adhesive interface and the resin tag base. A simulated fracture path was found at the resin tag base along the enamel/adhesive interface. A morphological observation of the fracture patterns obtained from in vitro testing corresponded with the simulation results. This study shows that the FE submodeling and element death techniques could be used to simulate the 3D micro-stress pattern and the crack propagation noted at the enamel/adhesive interface.

  6. Real-time surgical simulation for deformable soft-tissue objects with a tumour using Boundary Element techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Becker, A. A.; Jones, I. A.; Glover, A. T.; Benford, S. D.; Vloeberghs, M.

    2009-08-01

    A virtual-reality real-time simulation of surgical operations that incorporates the inclusion of a hard tumour is presented. The software is based on Boundary Element (BE) technique. A review of the BE formulation for real-time analysis of two-domain deformable objects, using the pre-solution technique, is presented. The two-domain BE software is incorporated into a surgical simulation system called VIRS to simulate the initiation of a cut on the surface of the soft tissue and extending the cut deeper until the tumour is reached.

  7. Real-time surgical simulation for deformable soft-tissue objects with a tumour using Boundary Element techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P; Becker, A A; Jones, I A; Glover, A T; Benford, S D; Vloeberghs, M

    2009-01-01

    A virtual-reality real-time simulation of surgical operations that incorporates the inclusion of a hard tumour is presented. The software is based on Boundary Element (BE) technique. A review of the BE formulation for real-time analysis of two-domain deformable objects, using the pre-solution technique, is presented. The two-domain BE software is incorporated into a surgical simulation system called VIRS to simulate the initiation of a cut on the surface of the soft tissue and extending the cut deeper until the tumour is reached.

  8. Understanding the discrete element method simulation of non-spherical particles for granular and multi-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Matuttis, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gives readers a more thorough understanding of DEM and equips researchers for independent work and an ability to judge methods related to simulation of polygonal particles Introduces DEM from the fundamental concepts (theoretical mechanics and solidstate physics), with 2D and 3D simulation methods for polygonal particlesProvides the fundamentals of coding discrete element method (DEM) requiring little advance knowledge of granular matter or numerical simulationHighlights the numerical tricks and pitfalls that are usually only realized after years of experience, with relevant simple experiment

  9. MULTI AGENT-BASED ENVIRONMENTAL LANDSCAPE (MABEL) - AN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE SIMULATION MODEL: SOME EARLY ASSESSMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandridis, Konstantinos T.; Pijanowski, Bryan C.

    2002-01-01

    The Multi Agent-Based Environmental Landscape model (MABEL) introduces a Distributed Artificial Intelligence (DAI) systemic methodology, to simulate land use and transformation changes over time and space. Computational agents represent abstract relations among geographic, environmental, human and socio-economic variables, with respect to land transformation pattern changes. A multi-agent environment is developed providing task-nonspecific problem-solving abilities, flexibility on achieving g...

  10. Investigation on the Behavior of the Jointing Clamps to the Simulated Environmental - LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivan, P.; Segarceanu, D.; Geambasu, C.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the main aspect concerning the electric parameter variation of jointing clamps operating under specific environmental conditions determinate by pressure, temperature and humidity. The testing of jointing clamps capability to meet and exceed the required performances all along its operating life implies the performing of LOCA simulation conditions while the jointing clamps is bright in a relatively short time under conditions equivalent to those at the end of its service life. The paper describes ageing and measurement techniques and the analyses of electric parameter behaviour in these environmental simulated conditions. (author)

  11. BIOGAS PLANT AS AN ELEMENT THAT HAS A POSITIVE INFLUENCE ON THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES OF RURAL SPACE

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Pawłowski

    2017-01-01

    In the contemporary rural landscape, an agricultural biogas plant is becoming an increasingly frequent element of agricultural installations. There is a need to ask an important question: is a new technology, such as biogas plants with medium power of 1MW, listed as investments which can have significant environmental impacts? This question is becoming an integral part of rural space as a new form of village buildings. The inevitable changes in the rural landscape and the way of carrying out ...

  12. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  13. A study of elemental migration from poly(ethylene terephthalate) of food packagings to simulated solutions by radiometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Eufemia Paez; Saki, Mitiko; Silva, Leonardo G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Brazilian plastic production for food packagings, in recent years, has grown in the same proportion as food consumption. Considering that the plastic manufacturing involves catalytic processes and the use of additives, when the foods are in direct contact with these materials, the components present in plastics may migrate to the food. The Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has established boundary-values of migrants as well as procedures to evaluate migration of elements and substances from plastic packaging to food. In this study elemental composition of poly (ethylene terephthalate) - PET - packaging and results of elemental migration were obtained. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to determine elemental concentrations in PET packagings and the radiometric method was applied for elemental migration determination. This radiometric method consisted of irradiating the PET samples with neutrons, followed by migration exposition and radioactivity measurement in food-simulated solution. Experimental conditions used for migration were 10 days exposure period at 40 deg C. Migration was evaluated for soft drink, juice and water PET packaging. The analytical results indicated that PET packagings contain Co and Sb and those elements are transferred to the simulated solutions. However, these migration results were lower than the maximum tolerance values established by ANVISA. The migration detection limits also indicated high sensitivity of the radiometric method. (author)

  14. Trace element analysis of human hair by neutron activation technique. Part of a coordinated programme on health-related environmental research, using nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, N.B.

    1982-10-01

    Hair mineral analysis was performed to measure population exposure to a number of environmental elemental pollutants. A total of 44 scalp hair samples from young Korean army recruits living in Seoul were analysed by INAA for 26 elements, including such elements of environmental health interest as As, Cd, and Hg. The levels reported were comparable with those reported in open literature. These results indicated that there was no evidence of any harmful exposure of the individuals studied to the metal pollutants monitored

  15. Elements in a new sustainable industrial culture - Environmental assessment in product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alting, Leo; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Wenzel, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    In the last few years the environmental focus in the manufacturing industry has shifted from the manufacturing processes to the products themselves, as these are accountable for the environmental impacts in all life cycle phases. The paper describes for 3 industrial cases how a newly developed LCA...... methodology can assist the product developer in development of more environmentally friendly products. Finally, common experience gained will be discussed....

  16. Maintaining environmental quality while expanding biomass production: Sub-regional U.S. policy simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbendewe-Mondzozo, Aklesso; Swinton, Scott M.; Izaurralde, R. César; Manowitz, David H.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates environmental policy effects on ligno-cellulosic biomass production and environmental outcomes using an integrated bioeconomic optimization model. The environmental policy integrated climate (EPIC) model is used to simulate crop yields and environmental indicators in current and future potential bioenergy cropping systems based on weather, topographic and soil data. The crop yield and environmental outcome parameters from EPIC are combined with biomass transport costs and economic parameters in a representative farmer profit-maximizing mathematical optimization model. The model is used to predict the impact of alternative policies on biomass production and environmental outcomes. We find that without environmental policy, rising biomass prices initially trigger production of annual crop residues, resulting in increased greenhouse gas emissions, soil erosion, and nutrient losses to surface and ground water. At higher biomass prices, perennial bioenergy crops replace annual crop residues as biomass sources, resulting in lower environmental impacts. Simulations of three environmental policies namely a carbon price, a no-till area subsidy, and a fertilizer tax reveal that only the carbon price policy systematically mitigates environmental impacts. The fertilizer tax is ineffectual and too costly to farmers. The no-till subsidy is effective only at low biomass prices and is too costly to government. - Highlights: ► Bioeconomic optimization model predicts how biomass production affects environment. ► Rising biomass production could impair climate and water quality. ► Environmental protection policies compared as biomass supply grows. ► Carbon price protects the environment cost-effectively as biomass supply expands

  17. Goal-Oriented Self-Adaptive hp Finite Element Simulation of 3D DC Borehole Resistivity Simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.; Pardo, David; Paszyński, Maciej R.

    2011-01-01

    (adjusting polynomial orders of approximation) or hp (both) refinements on the finite elements. The new parallel implementation utilizes a computational mesh shared between multiple processors. All computational algorithms, including automatic hp goal

  18. Trace elements assessment in agricultural and desert soils of Aswan area, south Egypt: Geochemical characteristics and environmental impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mohamed Abdallah Gad; Pöllmann, Hebert

    2015-12-01

    Determination of chemical elements, Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sc, Sr, Ti, Y, and Zn have been performed in agricultural and desert soils and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) at Aswan area. Consequently, the pollution indices, univariate and multivariate statistical methods have been applied, in order to assess the geochemical characteristics of these elements and their impact on soil environmental quality and plant, and to reach for their potential input sources. The investigation revealed that the mean and range values of all element concentrations in agricultural soil are higher than those in desert soil. Furthermore, the agricultural soil displayed various degrees of enrichment and pollution of Cd, Zn, Mo, Co, P, Ti, Pb. The geochemical pattern of integrated pollution indices gave a clear image of extreme and strong pollution in the agricultural soil stations, their poor quality with high risk to human health and considered as a tocsin for an alert. In contrast, the desert soil is the good environmental quality and safe for plant, animal and human health. Alfalfa is tolerant plant and considered as a biomarker for P and Mo in polluted agricultural soil. Four geochemical associations of analyzing elements in agricultural soil and three ones in desert soil have been generated, and their enhancements were essentially caused by various anthropogenic activities and geogenic sources. The investigation also revealed that the broad extended desert soil is fruitful and promising as cultivable lands for agricultural processes in the futures.

  19. Physiological impact of transposable elements encoding DDE transposases in the environmental adaptation of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fléchard, Maud; Gilot, Philippe

    2014-07-01

    We have referenced and described Streptococcus agalactiae transposable elements encoding DDE transposases. These elements belonged to nine families of insertion sequences (ISs) and to a family of conjugative transposons (TnGBSs). An overview of the physiological impact of the insertion of all these elements is provided. DDE-transposable elements affect S. agalactiae in a number of aspects of its capability to adapt to various environments and modulate the expression of several virulence genes, the scpB-lmB genomic region and the genes involved in capsule expression and haemolysin transport being the targets of several different mobile elements. The referenced mobile elements modify S. agalactiae behaviour by transferring new gene(s) to its genome, by modifying the expression of neighbouring genes at the integration site or by promoting genomic rearrangements. Transposition of some of these elements occurs in vivo, suggesting that by dynamically regulating some adaptation and/or virulence genes, they improve the ability of S. agalactiae to reach different niches within its host and ensure the 'success' of the infectious process. © 2014 The Authors.

  20. Studies on Elemental Contents of Some Biological and Environmental Materials Using Nuclear And Atomic Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El Aziz, W.M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The elemental concentration values of 31 elements in the fertilizer samples, have been determined by applying a sensitive nondestructive analytical techniques such as INAA. It has also shown enough sensitivity to determine the concentrations of several trace and rare earth elements, The concentration values of elements were compared with the corresponding elements obtained by the ICP-MS and XRF techniques, for the same samples. Phosphorus fertilizers contain varying amounts of heavy metals and other rare earth elements as contaminants from either phosphate rock ores or other ingredients used in the phosphate fertilizer industry. As some heavy metals are potentially harmful to human health, attention is being given to its avenues of entry into the human food chain. Uptake of such elements by plants consumed directly or indirectly by humans is one avenue of entry, so the effects of heavy metal contaminants in phosphate fertilizers are of concern. Commercial fertilizers have been used for decades and will probably continue to be used for many decades to come. Hence, even low annual accumulations may finally build up undesired concentrations in soil, especially where fertilizers with high heavy metal or rare earth element concentrations are used.Thus, a total of three synthetic and natural eye-liner samples of known origin that are commercially available in the Egyptian market were analyzed using Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), Atomic Absorption Mass Spectroscopy (AA-MS) and elemental analysis using Thermal Neutron Activation Technique (TNAT) for the natural one in powder form. It was found that lead (>86%) represents the main hazardous element in the natural eye-liner from African sources. Aluminum and Antimony were also found in the later sample in considerable concentration 0.92% and 0.71% respectively. For the synthetic two samples from French and American sources, the major hazardous element found to be Carbon in high concentration 94% and 52% respectively. The

  1. Coupled large eddy simulation and discrete element model of bedload motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, D.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a three-dimensional large eddy simulation of turbulence to a three-dimensional discrete element model of turbulence. The large eddy simulation of the turbulent fluid is extended into the bed composed of non-moving particles by adding resistance terms to the Navier-Stokes equations in accordance with the Darcy-Forchheimer law. This allows the turbulent velocity and pressure fluctuations to penetrate the bed of discrete particles, and this addition of a porous zone results in turbulence structures above the bed that are similar to previous experimental and numerical results for hydraulically-rough beds. For example, we reproduce low-speed streaks that are less coherent than those over smooth-beds due to the episodic outflow of fluid from the bed. Local resistance terms are also added to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the drag of individual moving particles. The interaction of the spherical particles utilizes a standard DEM soft-sphere Hertz model. We use only a simple drag model to calculate the fluid forces on the particles. The model reproduces an exponential distribution of bedload particle velocities that we have found experimentally using high-speed video of a flat bed of moving sand in a recirculating water flume. The exponential distribution of velocity results from the motion of many particles that are nearly constantly in contact with other bed particles and come to rest after short distances, in combination with a relatively few particles that are entrained further above the bed and have velocities approaching that of the fluid. Entrainment and motion "hot spots" are evident that are not perfectly correlated with the local, instantaneous fluid velocity. Zones of the bed that have recently experienced motion are more susceptible to motion because of the local configuration of particle contacts. The paradigm of a characteristic saltation hop length in riverine bedload transport has infused many aspects of geomorphic thought, including

  2. Elemental thin film depth profiles by ion beam analysis using simulated annealing - a new tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeynes, C; Barradas, N P; Marriott, P K; Boudreault, G; Jenkin, M; Wendler, E; Webb, R P

    2003-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and related techniques have long been used to determine the elemental depth profiles in films a few nanometres to a few microns thick. However, although obtaining spectra is very easy, solving the inverse problem of extracting the depth profiles from the spectra is not possible analytically except for special cases. It is because these special cases include important classes of samples, and because skilled analysts are adept at extracting useful qualitative information from the data, that ion beam analysis is still an important technique. We have recently solved this inverse problem using the simulated annealing algorithm. We have implemented the solution in the 'IBA DataFurnace' code, which has been developed into a very versatile and general new software tool that analysts can now use to rapidly extract quantitative accurate depth profiles from real samples on an industrial scale. We review the features, applicability and validation of this new code together with other approaches to handling IBA (ion beam analysis) data, with particular attention being given to determining both the absolute accuracy of the depth profiles and statistically accurate error estimates. We include examples of analyses using RBS, non-Rutherford elastic scattering, elastic recoil detection and non-resonant nuclear reactions. High depth resolution and the use of multiple techniques simultaneously are both discussed. There is usually systematic ambiguity in IBA data and Butler's example of ambiguity (1990 Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 45 160-5) is reanalysed. Analyses are shown: of evaporated, sputtered, oxidized, ion implanted, ion beam mixed and annealed materials; of semiconductors, optical and magnetic multilayers, superconductors, tribological films and metals; and of oxides on Si, mixed metal silicides, boron nitride, GaN, SiC, mixed metal oxides, YBCO and polymers. (topical review)

  3. Spheronization process particle kinematics determined by discrete element simulations and particle image velocimentry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, Martin; García, R Edwin; Thommes, Markus

    2014-12-30

    Spheronization is an important pharmaceutical manufacturing technique to produce spherical agglomerates of 0.5-2mm diameter. These pellets have a narrow size distribution and a spherical shape. During the spheronization process, the extruded cylindrical strands break in short cylinders and evolve from a cylindrical to a spherical state by deformation and attrition/agglomeration mechanisms. Using the discrete element method, an integrated modeling-experimental framework is presented, that captures the particle motion during the spheronization process. Simulations were directly compared and validated against particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments with monodisperse spherical and dry γ-Al2O3 particles. demonstrate a characteristic torus like flow pattern, with particle velocities about three times slower than the rotation speed of the friction plate. Five characteristic zones controlling the spheronization process are identified: Zone I, where particles undergo shear forces that favors attrition and contributes material to the agglomeration process; Zone II, where the static wall contributes to the mass exchange between particles; Zone III, where gravitational forces combined with particle motion induce particles to collide with the moving plate and re-enter Zone I; Zone IV, where a subpopulation of particles are ejected into the air when in contact with the friction plate structure; and Zone V where the low poloidal velocity favors a stagnant particle population and is entirely controlled by the batch size. These new insights in to the particle motion are leading to deeper process understanding, e.g., the effect of load and rotation speed to the pellet formation kinetics. This could be beneficial for the optimization of a manufacturing process as well as for the development of new formulations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental Health Assessment for Pyrotechnic Perchlorate Elimination/Mitigation Program for M118/M119 Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-11

    17% Potassium Chlorate 3811-04-9 67% 80% Potassium Nitrate 7757-79-1 81% 13% 70% 70% Red Gum 9000-20-8 3% 3% Silicon 7440-21-3 6% Sulfur 7704-34-9 8... potassium perchlorate from the flash composition of the formulations for the Ml18 and Ml19 simulators. These simulators are used in training to produce...simulators that are more efficient, are life-cycle cost effective, and more conducive to human health and environmental quality. b. Potassium perchlorate

  5. Simulation of Water Environmental Capacity and Pollution Load Reduction Using QUAL2K for Water Environmental Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruibin; Qian, Xin; Yuan, Xingcheng; Ye, Rui; Xia, Bisheng; Wang, Yulei

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, water quality degradation associated with rapid socio-economic development in the Taihu Lake Basin, China, has attracted increasing attention from both the public and the Chinese government. The primary sources of pollution in Taihu Lake are its inflow rivers and their tributaries. Effective water environmental management strategies need to be implemented in these rivers to improve the water quality of Taihu Lake, and to ensure sustainable development in the region. The aim of this study was to provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making. In this study, the QUAL2K model for river and stream water quality was applied to predict the water quality and environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, which is a polluted tributary in the Taihu Lake Basin. The model parameters were calibrated by trial and error until the simulated results agreed well with the observed data. The calibrated QUAL2K model was used to calculate the water environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, and the water environmental capacities of CODCr NH3-N, TN, and TP were 17.51 t, 1.52 t, 2.74 t and 0.37 t, respectively. The results showed that the NH3-N, TN, and TP pollution loads of the studied river need to be reduced by 50.96%, 44.11%, and 22.92%, respectively to satisfy the water quality objectives. Thus, additional water pollution control measures are needed to control and reduce the pollution loads in the Hongqi River watershed. The method applied in this study should provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making. PMID:23222206

  6. Simulation of water environmental capacity and pollution load reduction using QUAL2K for water environmental management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruibin; Qian, Xin; Yuan, Xingcheng; Ye, Rui; Xia, Bisheng; Wang, Yulei

    2012-12-07

    In recent years, water quality degradation associated with rapid socio-economic development in the Taihu Lake Basin, China, has attracted increasing attention from both the public and the Chinese government. The primary sources of pollution in Taihu Lake are its inflow rivers and their tributaries. Effective water environmental management strategies need to be implemented in these rivers to improve the water quality of Taihu Lake, and to ensure sustainable development in the region. The aim of this study was to provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making. In this study, the QUAL2K model for river and stream water quality was applied to predict the water quality and environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, which is a polluted tributary in the Taihu Lake Basin. The model parameters were calibrated by trial and error until the simulated results agreed well with the observed data. The calibrated QUAL2K model was used to calculate the water environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, and the water environmental capacities of COD(Cr) NH(3)-N, TN, and TP were 17.51 t, 1.52 t, 2.74 t and 0.37 t, respectively. The results showed that the NH(3)-N, TN, and TP pollution loads of the studied river need to be reduced by 50.96%, 44.11%, and 22.92%, respectively to satisfy the water quality objectives. Thus, additional water pollution control measures are needed to control and reduce the pollution loads in the Hongqi River watershed. The method applied in this study should provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making.

  7. Simulation of Water Environmental Capacity and Pollution Load Reduction Using QUAL2K for Water Environmental Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulei Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, water quality degradation associated with rapid socio-economic development in the Taihu Lake Basin, China, has attracted increasing attention from both the public and the Chinese government. The primary sources of pollution in Taihu Lake are its inflow rivers and their tributaries. Effective water environmental management strategies need to be implemented in these rivers to improve the water quality of Taihu Lake, and to ensure sustainable development in the region. The aim of this study was to provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making. In this study, the QUAL2K model for river and stream water quality was applied to predict the water quality and environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, which is a polluted tributary in the Taihu Lake Basin. The model parameters were calibrated by trial and error until the simulated results agreed well with the observed data. The calibrated QUAL2K model was used to calculate the water environmental capacity of the Hongqi River, and the water environmental capacities of CODCr NH3-N, TN, and TP were 17.51 t, 1.52 t, 2.74 t and 0.37 t, respectively. The results showed that the NH3-N, TN, and TP pollution loads of the studied river need to be reduced by 50.96%, 44.11%, and 22.92%, respectively to satisfy the water quality objectives. Thus, additional water pollution control measures are needed to control and reduce the pollution loads in the Hongqi River watershed. The method applied in this study should provide a basis for water environmental management decision-making.

  8. Apex simulation: environmental benefits of agroforestry and grass buffers for corn-soybean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Policy Environmental Extender (APEX) model is used to simulate the effects of vegetative filter strips on runoff and pollutant loadings from agricultural watersheds. A long-term paired watershed study under corn (Zea mays L-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] rotation with agroforestr...

  9. APEX simulation: environmental benefits of agroforestry and grass buffers on corn-soybean watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Agricultural Policy Environmental Extender (APEX) model has the ability to simulate the effects of vegetative filter strips on runoff and pollutant loadings from agricultural watersheds. The objectives of this study were to calibrate and validate the APEX model for three adjacent watersheds and...

  10. An approach to teaching and research of simulation for environmental engineering design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartak, M.; Drkal, F.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Schwarzer, J.; Lain, M.; Sourek, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper starts out by elaborating why computer modeling and simulation is such an important technique/ tool for modern state-of-the-art environmental engineering. It then continues with how this is currently integrated in engineering analysis and design. The paper continues with describing what

  11. Simulating sanitation and waste flows and their environmental impacts in East African urban centres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyoo, R.

    2014-01-01

    Simulating Sanitation and Waste Flows and their Environmental Impacts in East African Urban Centres

    Abstract

    If improperly managed, urban waste flows can pose a significant threat to the quality of both the natural environment and public health.

  12. Explicit dynamics for numerical simulation of crack propagation by the extended finite element method; Dynamique explicite pour la simulation numerique de propagation de fissure par la methode des elements finis etendus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menouillard, T

    2007-09-15

    Computerized simulation is nowadays an integrating part of design and validation processes of mechanical structures. Simulation tools are more and more performing allowing a very acute description of the phenomena. Moreover, these tools are not limited to linear mechanics but are developed to describe more difficult behaviours as for instance structures damage which interests the safety domain. A dynamic or static load can thus lead to a damage, a crack and then a rupture of the structure. The fast dynamics allows to simulate 'fast' phenomena such as explosions, shocks and impacts on structure. The application domain is various. It concerns for instance the study of the lifetime and the accidents scenario of the nuclear reactor vessel. It is then very interesting, for fast dynamics codes, to be able to anticipate in a robust and stable way such phenomena: the assessment of damage in the structure and the simulation of crack propagation form an essential stake. The extended finite element method has the advantage to break away from mesh generation and from fields projection during the crack propagation. Effectively, crack is described kinematically by an appropriate strategy of enrichment of supplementary freedom degrees. Difficulties connecting the spatial discretization of this method with the temporal discretization of an explicit calculation scheme has then been revealed; these difficulties are the diagonal writing of the mass matrix and the associated stability time step. Here are presented two methods of mass matrix diagonalization based on the kinetic energy conservation, and studies of critical time steps for various enriched finite elements. The interest revealed here is that the time step is not more penalizing than those of the standard finite elements problem. Comparisons with numerical simulations on another code allow to validate the theoretical works. A crack propagation test in mixed mode has been exploited in order to verify the simulation

  13. Modeling and Simulation of Multi-scale Environmental Systems with Generalized Hybrid Petri Nets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa eHerajy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Predicting and studying the dynamics and properties of environmental systems necessitates the construction and simulation of mathematical models entailing different levels of complexities. Such type of computational experiments often require the combination of discrete and continuous variables as well as processes operating at different time scales. Furthermore, the iterative steps of constructing and analyzing environmental models might involve researchers with different background. Hybrid Petri nets may contribute in overcoming such challenges as they facilitate the implementation of systems integrating discrete and continuous dynamics. Additionally, the visual depiction of model components will inevitably help to bridge the gap between scientists with distinct expertise working on the same problem. Thus, modeling environmental systems with hybrid Petri nets enables the construction of complex processes while keeping the models comprehensible for researchers working on the same project with significantly divergent education path. In this paper we propose the utilization of a special class of hybrid Petri nets, Generalized Hybrid Petri Nets (GHPN, to model and simulate environmental systems exposing processes interacting at different time-scales. GHPN integrate stochastic and deterministic semantics as well as other types of special basic events. Moreover, a case study is presented to illustrate the use of GHPN in constructing and simulating multi-timescale environmental scenarios.

  14. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R. S.; Agasthya, G. A.; Yoriyaz, H.; Kapadia, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work—32S, 12C, 23Na, 14N, 31P and 39K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in 31P, 39K and 23Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique.

  15. 3D element imaging using NSECT for the detection of renal cancer: a simulation study in MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R S; Agasthya, G A; Yoriyaz, H; Kapadia, A J

    2013-09-07

    This work describes a simulation study investigating the application of neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) for noninvasive 3D imaging of renal cancer in vivo. Using MCNP5 simulations, we describe a method of diagnosing renal cancer in the body by mapping the 3D distribution of elements present in tumors using the NSECT technique. A human phantom containing the kidneys and other major organs was modeled in MCNP5. The element composition of each organ was based on values reported in literature. The two kidneys were modeled to contain elements reported in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and healthy kidney tissue. Simulated NSECT scans were executed to determine the 3D element distribution of the phantom body. Elements specific to RCC and healthy kidney tissue were then analyzed to identify the locations of the diseased and healthy kidneys and generate tomographic images of the tumor. The extent of the RCC lesion inside the kidney was determined using 3D volume rendering. A similar procedure was used to generate images of each individual organ in the body. Six isotopes were studied in this work - (32)S, (12)C, (23)Na, (14)N, (31)P and (39)K. The results demonstrated that through a single NSECT scan performed in vivo, it is possible to identify the location of the kidneys and other organs within the body, determine the extent of the tumor within the organ, and to quantify the differences between cancer and healthy tissue-related isotopes with p ≤ 0.05. All of the images demonstrated appropriate concentration changes between the organs, with some discrepancy observed in (31)P, (39)K and (23)Na. The discrepancies were likely due to the low concentration of the elements in the tissue that were below the current detection sensitivity of the NSECT technique.

  16. Mixed finite element simulations in two-dimensional groundwater flow problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hideo

    1989-01-01

    A computer code of groundwater flow in two-dimensional porous media based on the mixed finite element method was developed for accurate approximations of Darcy velocities in safety evaluation of radioactive waste disposal. The mixed finite element procedure solves for both the Darcy velocities and pressure heads simultaneously in the Darcy equation and continuity equation. Numerical results of a single well pumping at a constant rate in a uniform flow field showed that the mixed finite element method gives more accurate Darcy velocities nearly 50 % on average error than standard finite element method. (author)

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of Human Abdominal Impact Responses and Injuries through Finite Element Simulations of a Full Human Body Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Jesse S; El-Jawahri, Raed; Barbat, Saeed; Prasad, Priya

    2005-11-01

    Human abdominal response and injury in blunt impacts was investigated through finite element simulations of cadaver tests using a full human body model of an average-sized adult male. The model was validated at various impact speeds by comparing model responses with available experimental cadaver test data in pendulum side impacts and frontal rigid bar impacts from various sources. Results of various abdominal impact simulations are presented in this paper. Model-predicted abdominal dynamic responses such as force-time and force-deflection characteristics, and injury severities, measured by organ pressures, for the simulated impact conditions are presented. Quantitative results such as impact forces, abdominal deflections, internal organ stresses have shown that the abdomen responded differently to left and right side impacts, especially in low speed impact. Results also indicated that the model exhibited speed sensitive response characteristics and the compressibility of the abdomen significantly influenced the overall impact response in the simulated impact conditions. This study demonstrates that the development of a validated finite element human body model can be useful for abdominal injury assessment. Internal organ injuries, which are difficult to detect in experimental studies with human cadavers due to the difficulty of instrumentation, may be more easily identified with a validated finite element model through stress-strain analysis.

  18. 26th Space Simulation Conference Proceedings. Environmental Testing: The Path Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    Topics covered include: A Multifunctional Space Environment Simulation Facility for Accelerated Spacecraft Materials Testing; Exposure of Spacecraft Surface Coatings in a Simulated GEO Radiation Environment; Gravity-Offloading System for Large-Displacement Ground Testing of Spacecraft Mechanisms; Microscopic Shutters Controlled by cRIO in Sounding Rocket; Application of a Physics-Based Stabilization Criterion to Flight System Thermal Testing; Upgrade of a Thermal Vacuum Chamber for 20 Kelvin Operations; A New Approach to Improve the Uniformity of Solar Simulator; A Perfect Space Simulation Storm; A Planetary Environmental Simulator/Test Facility; Collimation Mirror Segment Refurbishment inside ESA s Large Space; Space Simulation of the CBERS 3 and 4 Satellite Thermal Model in the New Brazilian 6x8m Thermal Vacuum Chamber; The Certification of Environmental Chambers for Testing Flight Hardware; Space Systems Environmental Test Facility Database (SSETFD), Website Development Status; Wallops Flight Facility: Current and Future Test Capabilities for Suborbital and Orbital Projects; Force Limited Vibration Testing of JWST NIRSpec Instrument Using Strain Gages; Investigation of Acoustic Field Uniformity in Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Recent Developments in Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Assembly, Integration and Test Centre in Malaysia: Integration between Building Construction Works and Equipment Installation; Complex Ground Support Equipment for Satellite Thermal Vacuum Test; Effect of Charging Electron Exposure on 1064nm Transmission through Bare Sapphire Optics and SiO2 over HfO2 AR-Coated Sapphire Optics; Environmental Testing Activities and Capabilities for Turkish Space Industry; Integrated Circuit Reliability Simulation in Space Environments; Micrometeoroid Impacts and Optical Scatter in Space Environment; Overcoming Unintended Consequences of Ambient Pressure Thermal Cycling Environmental Tests; Performance and Functionality Improvements to Next Generation

  19. Report on intercomparison air-3/1 of the determination of trace elements in simulated air filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszonicki, L.; Veglia, A.; Suschny, O.

    1982-06-01

    The report is a sum up of an intercomparison experiment organized by the Analytical Quality Control Service of the IAEA, for simulated air filters (Air-3/1) spiked with 17 trace elements. The purpose was twofold: to assist participating laboratories in controlling their own performance, and to characterize exactly the prepared batch of air filters in order to be able to use them as reference filters for elemental trace analysis. The results submitted by 29 laboratories from 20 countries are presented and statistically processed. The analytical methods used are also specified. Conclusions concerning the use of filters Air-3/1 as certified reference filters are presented

  20. Sociopolitical and economic elements to explain the environmental performance of countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Thiago Alexandre das Neves; García-Sánchez, Isabel-María

    2017-01-01

    The present research explains environmental performance using an ecological composite index as the dependent variable and focusing on two national dimensions: sociopolitical characteristics and economics. Environmental performance is measured using the Composite Index of Environmental Performance (CIEP) indicator proposed by García-Sánchez et al. (2015). The first model performs a factor analysis to aggregate the variables according to each analyzed dimension. In the second model, the estimation is run using only single variables. Both models are estimated using generalized least square estimation (GLS) using panel data from 152 countries and 6 years. The results show that sociopolitical factors and international trade have a positive effect on environmental performance. When the variables are separately analyzed, democracy and social policy have a positive effect on environmental performance while transport, infrastructure, consumption of goods, and tourism have a negative effect. Further observation is that the trade-off between importing and exporting countries overshadows the pollution caused by production. It was also observed that infrastructure has a negative coefficient for developing countries and positive for developed countries. The best performances are in the democratic and richer countries that are located in Europe, while the worst environmental performance is by the nondemocratic and the poorest countries, which are on the African continent.

  1. Computer Simulation and Experimental Study of Deformation in a Radial Tire under Different Static Loads Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Hamid Reza Ghoreishy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research work is devoted to the simulation of a steel-belted radial tire under different static loads. The nonlinear finite element calculations were performed using the MSC.MARC code, installed on a computer system equipped with a parallel processing technology. Hybrid elements in conjunction with two hyperelastic models, namely Marlow and Yeoh, and rebar layer implemented in surface elements were used for the modeling of rubbery and reinforcing parts, respectively. Linear elastic material models were also used for the modeling of the reinforcing elements including steel cord in belts, polyester cord in carcass and nylon cord in cap ply section. Two-dimensional axisymmetric elements were used for the modeling of rim-mounting and inflation and three-dimensional models were developed for the application of the radial, tangential, lateral and torsional loads. Different finite element models were developed, in which both linear and quadratic elements were used in conjunction with different mesh densities in order to find the optimum finite element model. Based on the results of the load deflection (displacement data, the tire stiffness under radial, tangential, lateral and torsional loads were calculated and compared with their corresponding experimentally measured values. The comparison was verified by the accuracy of the measured radial stiffness. However, due to the neglecting of the stiffness in shear and bending modes in cord-rubber composites, modeled with rebar layer methodology, the difference between computed values and real data are not small enough so that a more robust material models and element formulation are required to be developed.

  2. Normalized rare earth elements in water, sediments, and wine: identifying sources and environmental redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, David Z.; Bau, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The concentrations of the rare earth elements (REE) in surface waters and sediments, when normalized on an element-by-element basis to one of several rock standards and plotted versus atomic number, yield curves that reveal their partitioning between different sediment fractions and the sources of those fractions, for example, between terrestrial-derived lithogenous debris and seawater-derived biogenous detritus and hydrogenous metal oxides. The REE of ancient sediments support their partitioning into these same fractions and further contribute to the identification of the redox geochemistry of the sea water in which the sediments accumulated. The normalized curves of the REE that have been examined in several South American wine varietals can be interpreted to reflect the lithology of the bedrock on which the vines may have been grown, suggesting limited fractionation during soil development.

  3. Element concentrations in candidate biological and environmental reference materials by k0-standardized INAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    K 0 -Based Neutron Activation Analysis (k 0 INAA) was used to analyze the candidate reference materials Apple Leaves and Peach Leaves, and Oriental Tobacco Leaves and Virginia Tobacco Leaves. Concentration values for 27 elements were measured. The accuracy was ascertained by analysis of two certified reference materials. NIST 1572 Citrus Leaves and 1573 Tomato Leaves. The homogeneity test of the IAEA Evernia prunastri candidate reference material in aliquots ≥ 100 mg is extended to the elements Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Zn, Rb, Sb, Cs, Ba, Ce and Th. (orig.)

  4. The development of a collaborative virtual environment for finite element simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Jalil, Mohamad Kasim

    Element Analysis module, such as is demonstrated in this work). One of the major issues in developing a CVE system for engineering design purposes is to obtain any pertinent simulation results in real-time. This is critical so that the designers can make decisions based on these results quickly. For example, in a finite element analysis, if a design model is changed or perturbed, the analysis results must be obtained in real-time or near real-time to make the virtual meeting environment realistic. In this research, the finite difference-based Design Sensitivity Analysis (DSA) approach is employed to approximate structural responses (i.e. stress, displacement, etc), so as to demonstrate the applicability of CVRoom for engineering design trade-offs. This DSA approach provides for fast approximation and is well-suited for the virtual meeting environment where fast response time is required. The DSA-based approach is tested on several example test problems to show its applicability and limitations. This dissertation demonstrates that an increase in efficiency and reduction of time required for a complex design processing can be accomplished using the approach developed in this dissertation research. Several implementations of CVRoom by students working on common design tasks were investigated. All participants confirmed the preference of using the collaborative virtual environment developed in this dissertation work (CVRoom) over other modes of interactions. It is proposed here that CVRoom is representative of the type of collaborative virtual environment that will be used by most designers in the future to reduce the time required in a design cycle and thereby reduce the associated cost.

  5. Finite-element modeling of compression and gravity on a population of breast phantoms for multimodality imaging simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, Gregory M; Kiarashi, Nooshin; Lo, Joseph Y; Samei, E; Segars, W P

    2016-05-01

    The authors are developing a series of computational breast phantoms based on breast CT data for imaging research. In this work, the authors develop a program that will allow a user to alter the phantoms to simulate the effect of gravity and compression of the breast (craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique) making the phantoms applicable to multimodality imaging. This application utilizes a template finite-element (FE) breast model that can be applied to their presegmented voxelized breast phantoms. The FE model is automatically fit to the geometry of a given breast phantom, and the material properties of each element are set based on the segmented voxels contained within the element. The loading and boundary conditions, which include gravity, are then assigned based on a user-defined position and compression. The effect of applying these loads to the breast is computed using a multistage contact analysis in FEBio, a freely available and well-validated FE software package specifically designed for biomedical applications. The resulting deformation of the breast is then applied to a boundary mesh representation of the phantom that can be used for simulating medical images. An efficient script performs the above actions seamlessly. The user only needs to specify which voxelized breast phantom to use, the compressed thickness, and orientation of the breast. The authors utilized their FE application to simulate compressed states of the breast indicative of mammography and tomosynthesis. Gravity and compression were simulated on example phantoms and used to generate mammograms in the craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views. The simulated mammograms show a high degree of realism illustrating the utility of the FE method in simulating imaging data of repositioned and compressed breasts. The breast phantoms and the compression software can become a useful resource to the breast imaging research community. These phantoms can then be used to evaluate and compare imaging

  6. Possibilities of High Resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry in the Determination of Trace Elements in Environmental Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaya Velitchkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents new quantitative data for the spectral interferences obtained by high resolution 40.68 MHz radial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (HR-ICP-OES in the determination of Zn, Cd, Sb, Cu, Mn, Pb, Sn, Cr, U, and Ba in environmental materials in the presence of a complex matrix, containing Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Ti. The -concept for quantification of spectral interferences was used. The optimum line selection for trace analysis of a variety of multicomponent matrices requires the choice of prominent lines, which are free or negligibly influenced by line interference problems. The versatility of -concept as basic methodology was experimentally demonstrated in the determination of trace of elements in soil and drinking water. The detection limits are lower in comparison with corresponding threshold concentration levels for soil and drinking water in accordance with environmental regulations. This paper shows the possibilities of present day ICP-OES equipment in the direct determination of trace elements (without preconcentration of impurities in environmental samples.

  7. [Remodeling simulation of human femur under bed rest and spaceflight circumstances based on three dimensional finite element analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenting; Wang, Dongmei; Lei, Zhoujixin; Wang, Chunhui; Chen, Shanguang

    2017-12-01

    Astronauts who are exposed to weightless environment in long-term spaceflight might encounter bone density and mass loss for the mechanical stimulus is smaller than normal value. This study built a three dimensional model of human femur to simulate the remodeling process of human femur during bed rest experiment based on finite element analysis (FEA). The remodeling parameters of this finite element model was validated after comparing experimental and numerical results. Then, the remodeling process of human femur in weightless environment was simulated, and the remodeling function of time was derived. The loading magnitude and loading cycle on human femur during weightless environment were increased to simulate the exercise against bone loss. Simulation results showed that increasing loading magnitude is more effective in diminishing bone loss than increasing loading cycles, which demonstrated that exercise of certain intensity could help resist bone loss during long-term spaceflight. At the end, this study simulated the bone recovery process after spaceflight. It was found that the bone absorption rate is larger than bone formation rate. We advise that astronauts should take exercise during spaceflight to resist bone loss.

  8. Multilevel discretized random field models with 'spin' correlations for the simulation of environmental spatial data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Žukovič, Milan; Hristopulos, Dionissios T

    2009-01-01

    A current problem of practical significance is how to analyze large, spatially distributed, environmental data sets. The problem is more challenging for variables that follow non-Gaussian distributions. We show by means of numerical simulations that the spatial correlations between variables can be captured by interactions between 'spins'. The spins represent multilevel discretizations of environmental variables with respect to a number of pre-defined thresholds. The spatial dependence between the 'spins' is imposed by means of short-range interactions. We present two approaches, inspired by the Ising and Potts models, that generate conditional simulations of spatially distributed variables from samples with missing data. Currently, the sampling and simulation points are assumed to be at the nodes of a regular grid. The conditional simulations of the 'spin system' are forced to respect locally the sample values and the system statistics globally. The second constraint is enforced by minimizing a cost function representing the deviation between normalized correlation energies of the simulated and the sample distributions. In the approach based on the N c -state Potts model, each point is assigned to one of N c classes. The interactions involve all the points simultaneously. In the Ising model approach, a sequential simulation scheme is used: the discretization at each simulation level is binomial (i.e., ± 1). Information propagates from lower to higher levels as the simulation proceeds. We compare the two approaches in terms of their ability to reproduce the target statistics (e.g., the histogram and the variogram of the sample distribution), to predict data at unsampled locations, as well as in terms of their computational complexity. The comparison is based on a non-Gaussian data set (derived from a digital elevation model of the Walker Lake area, Nevada, USA). We discuss the impact of relevant simulation parameters, such as the domain size, the number of

  9. Multilevel discretized random field models with 'spin' correlations for the simulation of environmental spatial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žukovič, Milan; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2009-02-01

    A current problem of practical significance is how to analyze large, spatially distributed, environmental data sets. The problem is more challenging for variables that follow non-Gaussian distributions. We show by means of numerical simulations that the spatial correlations between variables can be captured by interactions between 'spins'. The spins represent multilevel discretizations of environmental variables with respect to a number of pre-defined thresholds. The spatial dependence between the 'spins' is imposed by means of short-range interactions. We present two approaches, inspired by the Ising and Potts models, that generate conditional simulations of spatially distributed variables from samples with missing data. Currently, the sampling and simulation points are assumed to be at the nodes of a regular grid. The conditional simulations of the 'spin system' are forced to respect locally the sample values and the system statistics globally. The second constraint is enforced by minimizing a cost function representing the deviation between normalized correlation energies of the simulated and the sample distributions. In the approach based on the Nc-state Potts model, each point is assigned to one of Nc classes. The interactions involve all the points simultaneously. In the Ising model approach, a sequential simulation scheme is used: the discretization at each simulation level is binomial (i.e., ± 1). Information propagates from lower to higher levels as the simulation proceeds. We compare the two approaches in terms of their ability to reproduce the target statistics (e.g., the histogram and the variogram of the sample distribution), to predict data at unsampled locations, as well as in terms of their computational complexity. The comparison is based on a non-Gaussian data set (derived from a digital elevation model of the Walker Lake area, Nevada, USA). We discuss the impact of relevant simulation parameters, such as the domain size, the number of

  10. Development of variable width ribbon heating elements for liquid metal and gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel rod simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; Lovell, R.T.; Post, D.W.; Snyder, S.D.

    1980-01-01

    Variable width ribbon heating elements have been fabricated which provide a chopped cosine, variable heat flux profile for fuel rod simulators used in test loops by the Breeder Reactor Program Thermal Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety test facility and the Gas-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor Core Flow Test Loop. Thermal, mechanical, and electrical design considerations result in the derivation of an analytical expression for the ribbon contours. From this, the ribbons are machined and wound on numerically controlled equipment. Postprocessing and inspection results in a wound, variable width ribbon with the precise dimensional, electrical, and mechanical properties needed for use in fuel pin simulators

  11. Spectral-element simulation of two-dimensional elastic wave propagation in fully heterogeneous media on a GPU cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudianto, Indra; Sudarmaji

    2018-04-01

    We present an implementation of the spectral-element method for simulation of two-dimensional elastic wave propagation in fully heterogeneous media. We have incorporated most of realistic geological features in the model, including surface topography, curved layer interfaces, and 2-D wave-speed heterogeneity. To accommodate such complexity, we use an unstructured quadrilateral meshing technique. Simulation was performed on a GPU cluster, which consists of 24 core processors Intel Xeon CPU and 4 NVIDIA Quadro graphics cards using CUDA and MPI implementation. We speed up the computation by a factor of about 5 compared to MPI only, and by a factor of about 40 compared to Serial implementation.

  12. Compilation of elemental concentration data for NBS Biological and Environmental Standard Reference Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladney, E.S.

    1980-07-01

    Concentration data on up to 76 elementals in 19 NBS Standard Reference Materials have been collected from 325 journal articles and technical reports. These data are summarized into mean +- one standard deviation values and compared with available data from NBS and other review articles. Data are presented on the analytical procedures employed and all raw data are presented in appendixes

  13. Workshop on environmental research for transuranic elements, Seattle, Washington, November 12--14, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Brief summaries are presented of discussions among scientists conducting research on the transport and diffusion of transuranium elements in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Emphasis was placed on 238 Pu, 239 Pu, 240 Pu, and 241 Am in ecosystems and food chains. Areas for future research were suggested to insure the safe storage of radioactive wastes from the nuclear industry

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF : ANALYTIC ELEMENT MODELING OF GROUND-WATER FLOW AND HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several advances in the analytic element method have been made to enhance its performance and facilitate three-dimensional ground-water flow modeling in a regional aquifer setting. First, a new public domain modular code (ModAEM) has been developed for modeling ground-water flow ...

  15. Studies on the finite element simulation in sheet metal stamping processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying

    The sheet metal stamping process plays an important role in modern industry. With the ever-increasing demand for shape complexity, product quality and new materials, the traditional trial and error method for setting up a sheet metal stamping process is no longer efficient. As a result, the Finite Element Modeling (FEM) method has now been widely used. From a physical point of view, the formability and the quality of a product are influenced by several factors. The design of the product in the initial stage and the motion of the press during the production stage are two of these crucial factors. This thesis focuses on the numerical simulation for these two factors using FEM. Currently, there are a number of commercial FEM software systems available in the market. These software systems are based on an incremental FEM process that models the sheet metal stamping process in small incremental steps. Even though the incremental FEM is accurate, it is not suitable for the initial conceptual design for its needing of detailed design parameters and enormous calculation times. As a result, another type of FEM, called the inverse FEM method or one-step FEM method, has been proposed. While it is less accurate than that of the incremental method, this method requires much less computation and hence, has a great potential. However, it also faces a number of unsolved problems, which limits its application. This motivates the presented research. After the review of the basic theory of the inverse method, a new modified arc-length search method is proposed to find better initial solution. The methods to deal with the vertical walls are also discussed and presented. Then, a generalized multi-step inverse FEM method is proposed. It solves two key obstacles: the first one is to determine the initial solution of the intermediate three-dimensional configurations and the other is to control the movement of nodes so they could only slide on constraint surfaces during the search by

  16. Using molecular dynamics simulations and finite element method to study the mechanical properties of nanotube reinforced polyethylene and polyketone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, S.; Alizadeh, Y.; Ansari, R.; Aryayi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the mechanical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotube reinforced composites. Polyethylene and polyketone are selected as the polymer matrices. The effects of nanotube atomic structure and diameter on the mechanical properties of polymer matrix nanocomposites are investigated. It is shown that although adding nanotube to the polymer matrix raises the longitudinal elastic modulus significantly, the transverse tensile and shear moduli do not experience important change. As the previous finite element models could not be used for polymer matrices with the atom types other than carbon, molecular dynamics simulations are used to propose a finite element model which can be used for any polymer matrices. It is shown that this model can predict Young’s modulus with an acceptable accuracy.

  17. Time-domain finite-difference/finite-element hybrid simulations of radio frequency coils in magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shumin; Duyn, Jeff H

    2008-01-01

    A hybrid method that combines the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and the finite-element time-domain (FETD) method is presented for simulating radio-frequency (RF) coils in magnetic resonance imaging. This method applies a high-fidelity FETD method to RF coils, while the human body is modeled with a low-cost FDTD method. Since the FDTD and the FETD methods are applied simultaneously, the dynamic interaction between RF coils and the human body is fully accounted for. In order to simplify the treatment of the highly irregular FDTD/FETD interface, composite elements are proposed. Two examples are provided to demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the hybrid method in high-field receive-and-transmit coil design. This approach is also applicable to general bio-electromagnetic simulations

  18. Studies on concentration of minor stable elements in marine environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Hamaji; Ishii, Toshiaki; Iimura, Mitsue; Koyanagi, Taku

    1978-01-01

    Information on the physico-chemical state and quantity of stable elements in marine environments is frequently required to analyze the radioecological behavior of radionuclides released from nuclear facilities into the sea. In this work, determination of stable Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Zr, Rb, Cs and some rare earth elements (Ce, Eu, Tb, Yb and Lu) in seawater and marine organisms was carried out and the concentration factors were estimated. Seawater and marine organisms were collected on the seashore of Ibaraki Prefecture and analyse