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Sample records for electroslag remelted steel

  1. Theoretical-Experimental study on the electroslag remelting technology of high quality steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles P, E.F.

    1993-01-01

    This is a theoretical-experimental laboratory study on the Electroslag Remelting Technology (ESRT) of high quality steels. The objective of this study was to analyze the problems that this technology entails and thus facilitate its industrial application in Mexico. The study was carried out using a 1 Kg. capacity furnace, the behavior of different fluxes on the remelting of 1018 AISI carbon steel was established and a slag 70F/15/15 was selected for the remelting of H-13 AISI hot work tool steel. From the experimental results it was possible to establish a flux manufacture route, the electrode conditioning necessary for the experiments, and the critical points of the process. It was demonstrated that the crucible and electrode advance system are the more critical points in the furnace manufacture, that the start up is fundamental for the remelting continuity and that the CaF 2 base slags are more recommendable for special steels refining. It has been proven that it is possible to experiment with little laboratory electroslag furnaces. (Author)

  2. Effect of electroslag remelting on carbides in 8Cr13MoV martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao

    2015-11-01

    The effect of electroslag remelting (ESR) on carbides in 8Cr13MoV martensitic stainless steel was experimentally studied. Phases precipitated from liquid steel during solidification were calculated using the Thermo-Calc software. The carbon segregation was analyzed by original position analysis (OPA), and the carbides were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy- dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results indicated that more uniform carbon distribution and less segregation were obtained in the case of samples subjected to the ESR process. After ESR, the amount of netty carbides decreased significantly, and the chromium and vanadium contents in the grain-boundary carbides was reduced. The total area and average size of carbides were obviously smaller after the ESR process. In the sample subjected to ESR, the morphology of carbides changed from lamellar and angular to globular or lump, whereas the types of carbides did not change; both M23C6 and M7C3 were present before and after the ESR process.

  3. Criteria determining the selection of slags for the melt decontamination of radioactively contaminated stainless steel by electroslag remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckentin, J.M.R.; Damkroger, B.K.; Shelmidine, G.J.; Atteridge, D.G.

    1997-01-01

    Electroslag remelting is an excellent process choice for the melt decontamination of radioactively contaminated metals. ESR furnaces are easily enclosed and do not make use of refractories which could complicate thermochemical interactions between molten metal and slag. A variety of cleaning mechanisms are active during melting; radionuclides may be partitioned to the slag by means of thermochemical reaction, electrochemical reaction, or mechanical entrapment. At the completion of melting, the slag is removed from the furnace in solid form. The electroslag process as a whole is greatly affected by the chemical and physical properties of the slag used. When used as a melt decontamination scheme, the ESR process may be optimized by selection of the slag. In this research, stainless steel bars were coated with non-radioactive surrogate elements in order to simulate surface contamination. These bars were electroslag remelted using slags of various chemistries. The slags investigated were ternary mixtures of calcium fluoride, calcium oxide, and alumina. The final chemistries of the stainless steel ingots were compared with those predicted by the use of a Free Energy Minimization Modeling technique. Modeling also provided insight into the chemical mechanisms by which certain elements are captured by a slag. Slag selection was also shown to have an impact on the electrical efficiency of the process as well as the surface quality of the ingots produced

  4. Reliability and durability of the 12Kh1MF steel tubes of electroslag remelting and their welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanskaya, K.A.; Kulikova, L.V.; Mazel', R.E.; Khromchenko, F.A.; Strizhenova, V.F.

    1978-01-01

    Results of investigating the positive effect of electrolag remelting (ESR) on the properties of the base metal and welded joint of the 12Kh1MF steel steam pipes with the aim of increasing their durability up to 20,000 hrs, are presented. To estimate the quality and properties of tube billet metal, microstructure, content and nature of nonmetallic inclusions, content of gases, austenite grain size, austenite transformations during continuous cooling, metal ductility, mechanical properties at different temperatures and heat resisting properties, have been investigated. It is established, that the base metal in tubes of electroslag remelting possess higher heat resistance, while welded joints besides, have high deformability and resistance to brittle fracture

  5. Electroslag remelting of cobalt-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafziger, R.H.; Lincoln, R.L.

    1974-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the feasibility and possible advantages of electroslag remelting of MAR-M 302, MAR-M 509 and X-45. The alloys were electroslag remelted (ESR) in an inert gas using single-phase a.c. power and CaF 2 -CaO-(MgO)-Al 2 O 3 fluxes. Comparisons of ESR ingots with vacuum-arc remelted (VAR) ones were made on the basis of composition, surface condition, macrostructure, hardness, microstructure, room- and elevated-temperature tensile strength and ductility, and high-temperature stress-rupture strength. Minimal differences in non-metallic inclusions, chemical refinement (except perhaps for reduced S and P contents), hardness, and tensile properties were observed in ESR ingots as compared with VAR material. Microstructures of VAR ingots and of ESR ingots prepared with the quaternary flux contained larger intergranular eutectic lamellae than ESR material obtained using ternary fluxes. As regards the stress-rupture data, the MAR-M 302 ESR material exhibited, at the temperatures tested, a rupture strength approximately 10% superior to that of the VAR material in terms of sustained stress for a given life. As regards MAR-M 509, the ESR material was only slightly superior to the VAR material at 815 0 C (1,500 0 F); moreover, at 1,095 0 C (2,000 0 F), there is a crossover of the two curves, and the VAR material stands out as considerably superior at lower stress. Finally, the stress withstood for a given rupture life at 760 0 C (1,400 0 F) was approximately 10% greater for ESR X-45 than for the corresponding VAR material; at 1,040 0 C (1,900 0 F), a crossover of the two curves also occurs, though the advantage to the VAR material at lower stress levels is smaller than was the case for MAR-M 509. (orig.) [de

  6. Quality of the KhN73MBTYu alloy after electroslag remelting and vacuum arc remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelgaeva, A.V.; Krichevets, M.I.; Shinkina, N.S.; Komissarov, A.I.

    1978-01-01

    The structure and properties of the heat-resisting KhN73MBTYu alloy are investigated after electroslag remelting (ESR) and vacuum arc (VAR) remelting in commercial furnaces. The complex investigations of the casted metal were carried out by modern methods along with the standard acceptance tests, and a number of service properties were determined. It is established that the ESR metal contains magnesium and has the reduced sulphur concentration; the alloy has more fine-grained structure at high isotropy of the properties at room and operating temperatures; higher endurance is achieved under reversal rotational bending; no laminated fractures are observed. According to the basic quality factors the ESR metal satisfies all requirements for the VAR metal. Due to exclusion of strippling of ESR electrodes and ingots the yield of steel forgings increases by 20-25% and the prime cost decreases in comparison with the industrial production of VAR metal

  7. Application of the electroslag remelting process for the production of heavy turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, A.; Jauch, R.; Loewenkamp, H.; Tince, F.

    1977-01-01

    Discussion of the problems of the production of turbine rotors from steel X 22 CrMoV 12 1 using conventional ingot casting. Report on development work for the production of forging ingots from this steel by electroslag remelting. Presentation of the metallurgical results and data about ingot surface, internal constitution and also mechanical properties of the ESR ingots up to 2,300 mm diameter. (orig.) [de

  8. Thermal design of a pressure electroslag remelting furnace applied for 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz M, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Actual work defines the thermal design methodology for pressure electroslag remelting furnaces (P ESR) of variable capacity, applied for 5 Kg. It begins with classification and description of secondary refining furnaces, after PESR process and the concept of thermal design are described. Next, in base of the steel weight to remelt (5 Kg); ingot, crucible and electrode dimensions are obtained. These elements will be inside of pressure vessel whose thickness are determined according to ASME Code (Section 8, Division 1, U G-27). It was developed a computer program, where the furnace capacity can be modified, so like other conditions, and display principal dimensions of the furnace. Current and voltage are obtained from the heat necessary to remelt the ingot and the heat transfer in the crucible, is analysed because of it is the most critical element. It was selected too the equipment to registry temperatures and pressure in base of thermocouple characteristics. (Author)

  9. Numerical investigations of the electroslag remelting process for alloy 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesselmann, Nils

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation the development of a simulation strategy is presented, which enables a detailed description of relevant regions to appropriately model the electroslag remelting process. One of the challenges is to ensure a sufficient efficiency of the numerical model so that it can be used to perform extensive parametric studies. This is achieved by combining multiple computational domains and coupling the simulation codes ANSYS FLUENT and ANSYS EMAG. Therefore the electroslag remelting process is divided into a droplet simulation and models that account for the fluid flow in the slag and fluid flow and solidification in the metal pool. The droplet simulation considers the multiphase flow and the interaction of fluid flow and magneto hydrodynamics to simulate the behavior of the metal droplets passing through the slag layer. The Lorentz force is the main driving force for the fluid flow established in the slag region, which causes the liquid metal film on the electrode's bottom surface to be transported to the centerline. Therefore it was found that no metal droplets detach near the electrode's edge. Instead they accumulate at a certain characteristic radius. Between this radius and the centerline metal droplets form and detach homogeneously. The fluid flow in the slag region is directed to the centerline near the electrode's bottom surface, points downwards on the centerline, moves outwards near the phase boundary to the metal pool and is directed upwards at the surface of the copper mold. In the case of the smaller scale IME remelting plant, metal droplets only occur on the centerline. The steady state simulation of the electroslag remelting process developed during this work introduces a static phase boundary, which separates the slag and the metal region. The formulation of the static phase boundary drastically reduced the time required until convergence is achieved. The simulation model has been extensively validated by comparing the numerical results to

  10. Microstructure and wear properties of the electroslag remelting layer reinforced by TiC particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The electroslag remelting (ESR) layer reinforced by TiC particles was obtained by electroslag remelting.The microstructure and wear properties of the ESR layer were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM),X-ray diffraction (XRD),and wear test.The results indicate that TiC particles are synthesized by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction during the electroslag remelting process.The size of TiC particles is in the range of 1-10 μm,and the distribution of TiC particles is uniform,from outside to inside of the ESR layer,and the volume fraction and the size of TiC particles decrease gradually.Molten iron and slag flow into porosity due to the SHS process leading to rapid densification and the elimination of porosity in the ESR layer during the ESR process.TiC particles enhance the wear resistance of the ESR layer,whereas CaF2 can improve the high temperature lubricating property of the ESR layer.

  11. Thermal design of a pressure electroslag remelting furnace applied for 5; Diseno termico de un horno presurizado de refusion por electroescoria de 5 Kg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz M, J P

    1999-07-01

    Actual work defines the thermal design methodology for pressure electroslag remelting furnaces (P ESR) of variable capacity, applied for 5 Kg. It begins with classification and description of secondary refining furnaces, after PESR process and the concept of thermal design are described. Next, in base of the steel weight to remelt (5 Kg); ingot, crucible and electrode dimensions are obtained. These elements will be inside of pressure vessel whose thickness are determined according to ASMECode (Section 8, Division 1, U G-27). It was developed a computer program, where the furnace capacity can be modified, so like other conditions, and display principal dimensions of the furnace. Current and voltage are obtained from the heat necessary to remelt the ingot and the heat transfer in the crucible, is analysed because of it is the most critical element. It was selected too the equipment to registry temperatures and pressure in base of thermocouple characteristics. (Author)

  12. Influence of thermomechanical treatment on microstructure and properties of electroslag remelted Cu–Cr–Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kermajani, M.; Raygan, Sh.; Hanayi, K.; Ghaffari, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of ESR process on microstructure of Cu–Cr–Zr alloy was investigated. • The hardness, strength and electrical conductivity are sensitive to thermomechanical treatment. • The microstructure of the alloy can be optimized for obtaining the best combination of mechanical and electrical properties. - Abstract: Effect of thermomechanical treatment (TMT) on aging behavior of electroslag remelted Cu–Cr–Zr alloy was investigated. The relationship between microstructure, mechanical and electrical properties was clarified using hardness, tensile and electrical conductivity testing methods and optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques. The results showed that an appropriate processing and aging treatment may improve the properties of the alloy due to the formation of fine, dispersive and coherent precipitates within the matrix. Indeed, the optimum condition for electrical conductivity and mechanical properties was obtained after cold working of 40% followed by aging at 500 °C for 150 min

  13. The Structural Evolution and Segregation in a Dual Alloy Ingot Processed by Electroslag Remelting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The structural evolution and segregation in a dual alloy made by electroslag remelting (ESR was investigated by various analytical techniques. The results show that the macrostructure of the ingot consists of two crystallization structures: one is a quite narrow, fine, equiaxed grain region at the edge and the other is a columnar grain region, which plays a leading role. The typical columnar structure shows no discontinuity between the CrMoV, NiCrMoV, and transition zones. The average secondary arm-spacing is coarsened from 35.3 to 49.2 μm and 61.5 μm from the bottom to the top of the ingot. The distinctive features of the structure are attributed to the different cooling conditions during the ESR process. The Ni, Cr, and C contents markedly increase in the transition zone (TZ and show a slight increase from the bottom to the top and from the surface to the center of the ESR ingot due to the partition ratios, gravity segregation, the thermal buoyancy flow, the solutal buoyancy flow, and the inward Lorentz force. Less dendrite segregation exists in the CrMoV zone and the transition zone due to a stronger cooling rate (11.1 and 4.5 °C/s and lower Cr and C contents. The precipitation of carbides was observed in the ingot due to a lower solid solubility of the carbon element in the α phase.

  14. A three-phase comprehensive mathematical model of desulfurization in electroslag remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Guangqiang; He, Zhu; Li, Baokuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • First developed a three-phase coupled model of desulfurization in ESR process. • The MHD thermal flow in the reactor was clarified. • Distributions of sulfur concentration in the three phases were demonstrated. • An experiment was carried out to validate the simulation. - Abstract: A three-phase comprehensive mathematical model has been established to study the desulfurization behavior in electroslag remelting (ESR) process. The solutions of the mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation equations were simultaneously calculated by the finite volume method. The Joule heating and Lorentz force were fully coupled through solving the Maxwell’s equations with the assistance of the magnetic potential vector. The movements of the air-slag and slag-metal interfaces were described by the volume of fluid (VOF) approach. In order to include the influences of the air, the slag and the electric current on the desulfurization, a thermodynamic and kinetic module was introduced. An experiment was conducted to validate the model. The completely comparison between the measured and simulated data indicates that the model can describe the desulfurization behavior in the ESR process with an acceptable accuracy. The sulfur in the metal would be transferred into the slag under the combined effect of the slag treatment and the electrochemical reaction, and is primarily achieved in the period of the droplet formation. The sulfur in the slag then could be transferred into the air because of the oxidation. The maximum calculated removal ratio in the whole process is around 88%.

  15. Investigation of Heat Transfer and Magnetohydrodynamic Flow in Electroslag Remelting Furnace Using Vibrating Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Wang, Qiang; Lou, Yanchun; Chen, Rui; Song, Zhaowei; Li, Baokuan

    2016-01-01

    A transient three-dimensional (3D) coupled mathematical model has been developed to understand the effect of a vibrating electrode on the electromagnetic, two-phase flow and temperature fields as well as the solidification in the electroslag remelting (ESR) process. With the magnetohydrodynamic model, the Joule heating and Lorentz force, which are the source terms in the energy and momentum equations, are recalculated at each iteration as a function of the phase distribution. The influence of the vibrating electrode on the formation of the metal droplet is demonstrated by the volume of fluid approach. Additionally, the solidification of the metal is modeled by an enthalpy-based technique, in which the mushy zone is treated as a porous medium with porosity equal to the liquid fraction. The present work is the first attempt to investigate the innovative technology of the ESR process with a vibrating electrode by a transient 3D comprehensive model. A reasonable agreement between the experiment and simulation is obtained. The results indicate that the whole process is presented as a periodic activity. When the metal droplets fall from the tip of the electrode, the horizontal component of velocity will generate electrode vibration. This will lead to the distribution variation of the flow field in the slag layer. The variation of temperature distribution occurs regularly and is periodically accompanied by the behavior of the falling metal droplets. With the decreasing vibrating frequency and amplitude, the relative velocity of the electrode and molten slag increase accordingly. The diameter of the molten droplets, the maximum temperature and the depth of the molten pool gradually become smaller, lower and shallower.

  16. Production of a 304 stainless steel nuclear reactor forging from a very large electroslag refined ingot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, E.J.; Tihansky, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    A four-loop, upper barrel flange forging for a nuclear reactor was produced from what the authors believe to be the largest 304H grade stainless steel electroslag refined (ESR) ingot ever refined. The ingot was refined in a 1524-mm-diameter, ingot withdrawal-type ESR furnace using a lime-bearing slag, low-frequency a-c power, and dry air protection. Five electrodes were remelted in order to produce the desired ingot weight. The ingot was subsequently forged in a five-step operation on a 6800-metric-ton press to produce the desired barrel flange configuration. Testing of the finished machined forging revealed excellent tensile ductility, excellent ultrasonic penetrability, and good chemical uniformity with no macrosegregation. Overall quality was judged to be superior to previously produced, conventionally melted forgings

  17. Outcomes of experimental researches on stainless steel decontamination from radioactive contamination using electric slag remelting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vurim, A.D.; Pakhnitz, A.V.; Trukhachev, A.G.; Bukhtoyarov, O.I.; Goncharov, A.Ye.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Institute of Atomic Energy prepared and conducted the experiments the purpose of researching a possibility of applying of stainless steel electric slag remelting for its decontamination from radioactive contamination. The activities were conducted at participating of the specialists of Kurgan State University, Kurgan (Russian Federation). A stand, which includes the electroslag furnace (power - 150 kW, current - to 3000 A) and auxiliary equipment (the system of common and special ventilation, system of remote control, system of parameters measuring and registering and others) was created to conduct the experiments. The properties of slag compositions were researched in the course of experiments preparation. Oxide (CaO-Al 2 O 3 - CaO-SiO 2 - MgO-B 2 O 3 ) and fluoride-oxide (CaF 2 -SiO 2 - MgF 2 -SiO 2 ) slag systems and some their modifications were chosen to research physical and chemical properties. Physical and chemical properties of the slag systems were experimentally researched and it included: measuring of surface tension using the method of maximum pressure in a gas bubble (at the same time density was measured); measuring of slag alloys electrical conductivity; measuring of melt volt-ampere characteristics. The flue tubes of high temperature reactor gas cooling KET technological channels were chosen as a source of radioactive contaminated stainless steel. This reactor is meant for testing of the fuel pin and FA of the nuclear pulse propulsion. Decontamination effect for all the remelted flue tubes was indirectly confirmed by the outcomes of measuring of radioactive radiation dose rate of the materials, extracted of the crystallizer after experiments finishing. The outcomes of the experiments show that the following processes pass at electroslag remelting of radioactively contaminated steel: uranium extraction from steel; uranium transfer from steel to slag; saving or insignificant modification of steel initial composition; radionuclides deposing

  18. Numerical investigations of the electroslag remelting process for alloy 718; Numerische Untersuchungen des Elektroschlacke-Umschmelzprozesses fuer Alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesselmann, Nils

    2014-07-01

    In this dissertation the development of a simulation strategy is presented, which enables a detailed description of relevant regions to appropriately model the electroslag remelting process. One of the challenges is to ensure a sufficient efficiency of the numerical model so that it can be used to perform extensive parametric studies. This is achieved by combining multiple computational domains and coupling the simulation codes ANSYS FLUENT and ANSYS EMAG. Therefore the electroslag remelting process is divided into a droplet simulation and models that account for the fluid flow in the slag and fluid flow and solidification in the metal pool. The droplet simulation considers the multiphase flow and the interaction of fluid flow and magneto hydrodynamics to simulate the behavior of the metal droplets passing through the slag layer. The Lorentz force is the main driving force for the fluid flow established in the slag region, which causes the liquid metal film on the electrode's bottom surface to be transported to the centerline. Therefore it was found that no metal droplets detach near the electrode's edge. Instead they accumulate at a certain characteristic radius. Between this radius and the centerline metal droplets form and detach homogeneously. The fluid flow in the slag region is directed to the centerline near the electrode's bottom surface, points downwards on the centerline, moves outwards near the phase boundary to the metal pool and is directed upwards at the surface of the copper mold. In the case of the smaller scale IME remelting plant, metal droplets only occur on the centerline. The steady state simulation of the electroslag remelting process developed during this work introduces a static phase boundary, which separates the slag and the metal region. The formulation of the static phase boundary drastically reduced the time required until convergence is achieved. The simulation model has been extensively validated by comparing the

  19. Electroslag welding of rotor steels produced with vacuum-carbon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roshchin, M.B.; Modzhuk, M.D.; Izvekov, B.V.

    1985-01-01

    Metallurgical processes of electroslag welding of rotor steels, melted with vacuum-carbon deoxidation, have been considered. It is established, that during electroslag welding of steels with carbon content 0.20...0.30%, suppression of welding bath boiling and production of dense weld metal with a high impact strength can be ensured at oxygen concentration in soldered on metal not exceeding 0.01% and silicon content 0.06...0.10%

  20. The electrogas and electroslag multipass high speed welding of nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, F.; Hirsch, P.; Langenbahn, H.W.; Wubbels, B.

    1978-01-01

    High-speed electroslag and electrogas welding of 15 Mn Ni63 steel plates to achieve high strength and toughness joints for reactor pressure vessels are described. Mechanical testing of overheating-resistant, brittle fracture resistant low alloy steels is discussed. (UK)

  1. Alloying of titanium by oxygen during chamber electroslag remelting/Legiranje titanijuma kiseonikom u peći za elektropretapanje pod troskom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy D. Ryabtsev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of alloying titanium by oxygen in the process of chamber electroslag remelting. As an oxygen-containing ligature, we used the electrodes-satellite from the reaction mass residues mixture from the retort lid for magnesium thermal reduction of a titanium sponge, a specially prepared gaseous argon oxygen mixture containing 30% oxygen applied directly to the melting space, microsize (10-15 mm powder particles of titanium oxide and titanium oxide nanopowder with a particle size of 21 ± 5 nm. The structure and the properties of titanium alloyed by oxygen from the oxygen-containing ligature, gas phase and titanium oxide powder during chamber electroslag remelting of the titanium sponge are investigated. It was found that at the oxygen content of 0.053%mas. to 0.22%mas. in the metal formed a homogeneous single-phase structure typical for commercial titanium formed by polyhedral grains of the α-phase. The increase of the oxygen concentration in titanium for more than 0.22%mas. leads to the formation of the microstructure with a typical needle structure, which allows it to be classified as the α ׳-phase. / U radu su prikazani rezultati legiranja titanijuma kiseonikom u procesu elektropretapanja pod troskom u peći. Za vezivo, koje sadrzi kiseonik, korišćene su satelit elektrode iz reakcije masenih ostataka mešavine iz poklopca retorte za termalnu redukciju magnezijumtitanijumskog sunđera, specijalno pripremljena mešavina gasa argona i kiseonika sa 30% kiseonika primenjena direktno na mesto topljenja, čestice praha titanijum-oksida mikroveličine 10-15mm i nanoprah titanijum-oksida veličine čestica od 21± 5 nm. Ispitane su struktura i karakteristike titanijuma legiranog kiseonikom iz veziva , gasne faze i praha titanijum-oksida tokom elektropretapanja titanijumovog sunđera pod troskom u peći. Utvrđeno je da se pri sadržaju kiseonika od 0.053%mas.do 0.22%mas. u metalu formira homogena jednofazna struktura tipi

  2. Cold-rolled sheets production of stainless martensite-ageing steel smelted by vacuum arc and electroslag techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, A A; Grishkov, A I; Suslin, A P; Nesterenko, A A; Lola, V N [Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow (USSR)

    1975-05-01

    In cooperation with a number of metallurgical works the production of a high strength sheet stainless maraging steel EHP678 (000KH11N10M2T) has been tested by rolling cylindrical ingots of vacuum arc smelting at the blooming (the mass of rough ingots was 5.1 to 6.0 t, that of cleaned ingots - 3.8 to 5.1 t) or rectangular ingots of electroslag smelting (13 t) at the slabbing. The recommended regimes of heating and deformation are much similar to those used for the steel-KH18N10T. The output of valid cold-rolled sheets proved to be rather low (0.24 t/t for the vacuum arc smelting and 0.30 t/t for the electroslag smelting) mainly due to the losses on cleaning and a considerable portion of wrong-size slabs. The data are presented on the steel-EHP678 properties after various heat treatments. For the production of wide cold-rolled sheets of the steel EHP678 it is recommended to use steelmaking procedure with electroslag smelting including open-hearth melting in arc furnaces, rolling of ingots at the slabbing with heating up to 1260-1280 deg C (hold-up of 4.5 to 5 hrs); electroslag smelting for rectangular section slabs, rolling of ingots of electroslag smelting at the slabbing with their heating up to 1250 deg C (hold-up of 5.5 to 6 hrs), rolling at the 1680-type mill with heating up to 1250-1260 deg C (hold-up of 4 to 4.5 hrs ensuring the rolling temperature after a rough group not below 1100 deg C), quenching of hot-rolled sheets heating up to 920-940 deg C (hold-up of 3 to 3.5 min/mm), shot peening of sheets for descaling (provided the respective equipment is available) with a subsequent short-time pickling in an acid solution and cold rolling with a summary deformation of 35 to 45 %. The steelmaking with the electroslag smelting is much more profitable as regards to the fine technology of number of the main procedures, convenient cooperation of the works and a considerably greater output of the final products out of one ton of the steel produced.

  3. Hydrogen effect on different melts of steel 03Cr10Ni10Mo2(Ti,Al)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hruby, J.; Novosad, P.; Axamit, R.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on martensitic 03Cr10Ni10Mo2(Ti,Al) steel was studied following vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting with and without the effect of radiation. Under the influence of hydrogen and under the same parameters of catodic hydrogen charging of steel after vacuum induction melting shows a 20 - 30% reduction in total ductility. Steels after electroslag remelting show a higher reduction in total ductility - within the range of 26 - 33%, i.e., 33 - 43% for different melts, and contraction Z shows a reduction of 23 - 59%. Electroslag remelted steels show a greater reduction in plasticity owing to hydrogen than steels melted in vacuum induction furnaces. The reduction of the yield point and the breaking strength owing to hydrogen are more explicit than in steel after vacuum melting. In non-irradiated hydrogenated samples a higher yield point was evident. (B.S.)

  4. Formed electroslag welded joint from austenitic steel 18/10 CrNi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilek, L.; Kusak, L.; Martinak, A.

    1987-01-01

    The electroslag welded joint from titanium stabilized steel 18/10 CrNi of 150 mm in thickness showed positive results for both nondestructive and destructive testing. Czechoslovak flux VUZ-4F and the optimized welding mode were completely proven. The weldment was subject to deformation by forging with a removal of 20 to 50% and to bending deformation. A 40% to 50% deformation was necessary for breaking the coarse-grain casting structure. The bending deformation resulted in breaking the coarse-grain casting structure in the entire cross-section, it was, however, only acting in a narrow band corresponding to the largest curvature. At the same time, the heat affected zone decayed. Following heat treatment, especially forming, the delta ferrite content in the weld metal decreased, the mechanical properties of the weld metal and the welded joint following welding and heat treatment showed a relatively large scatter. Forming reduced the scatter and improved plastic properties. Machining within 40 and 50% resulted in good echogenicity of the welded joint in ultrasound testing. The welded joint showed equal properties as the base material of the weldment. (author). 15 figs., 2 tabs., 16 refs

  5. Microstructural evolution of a cold work tool steel after pulsed laser remelting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kosec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is the investigation of micro-structural behaviour of a Mat. No. 1.2379 (EN-X160CrMoV121; AISI D2 cold work tool steel after remelting with a precise pulsed Nd:YAG laser. The investigated steel is one of the most hard to weld tool steels, due to large amount of alloying elements. The analysis was done on single spots remelted with specific laser pulse shape and parameters, assuring crack-less solidification. Re-solidifi ed areas were investigated with microscopy, hardness measurements, X-ray spectroscopy and diffraction method. Laser treatment causes rapid solidifi cation leading into a formation of a fine dendritic microstructures containing high amount of retained austenite causing a significant decrease of hardness.

  6. The influence of amperage of electric arc on microhardness in the area single and overlapping remeltings of HS 6-5-2 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziedzic

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present thesis depicts the microhardness of HV0,065 surface layer of high speed steel HS6-5-2 remelted with the electric arc. There were different surface layer variants of remelting used – the amperage was changed from 50 to 120A with the stable scanning speed of 300mm/min. There was also the influence of overlapping of the remeltings on the microhardness result. The highest average microhardness of the surface layer of high speed steel HS6-5-2 amounting 1100 HV0,065 was achieved by using the amperage of electric arc of 50 A. The overlapping of remeltings is connected with the possibility of occurence of the microhardness decrease in the area of overlapping of the heat influence zone of second remelting (another remelting on the first remelting (the previous one.

  7. Computer simulation of the relationship between selected properties of laser remelted tool steel surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonek, Mirosław, E-mail: miroslaw.bonek@polsl.pl; Śliwa, Agata; Mikuła, Jarosław

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Prediction of the properties of laser remelted surface layer with the use of FEM analysis. • The simulation was applied to determine the shape of molten pool of remelted surface. • Applying of numerical model MES for simulation of surface laser treatment to meaningfully shorten time of selection of optimum parameters. • An FEM model was established for the purpose of building a computer simulation. - Abstract: Investigations >The language in this paper has been slightly changed. Please check for clarity of thought, and that the meaning is still correct, and amend if necessary.include Finite Element Method simulation model of remelting of PMHSS6-5-3 high-speed steel surface layer using the high power diode laser (HPDL). The Finite Element Method computations were performed using ANSYS software. The scope of FEM simulation was determination of temperature distribution during laser alloying process at various process configurations regarding the laser beam power and method of powder deposition, as pre-coated past or surface with machined grooves. The Finite Element Method simulation was performed on five different 3-dimensional models. The model assumed nonlinear change of thermal conductivity, specific heat and density that were depended on temperature. The heating process was realized as heat flux corresponding to laser beam power of 1.4, 1.7 and 2.1 kW. Latent heat effects are considered during solidification. The molten pool is composed of the same material as the substrate and there is no chemical reaction. The absorptivity of laser energy was dependent on the simulated materials properties and their surface condition. The Finite Element Method simulation allows specifying the heat affected zone and the temperature distribution in the sample as a function of time and thus allows the estimation of the structural changes taking place during laser remelting process. The simulation was applied to determine the shape of molten pool and the

  8. Spinodal decomposition in AISI 316L stainless steel via high-speed laser remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikarakara, Evans, E-mail: evans.chikarakara2@mail.dcu.ie [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Naher, Sumsun, E-mail: sumsun.naher@city.ac.uk [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London (United Kingdom); Brabazon, Dermot, E-mail: dermot.brabazon@dcu.ie [Advanced Processing Technology Research Centre, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-05-01

    A 1.5 kW CO{sub 2} pulsed laser was used to melt the surface of AISI 316L stainless steel with a view to enhancing the surface properties for engineering applications. A 90 μm laser beam spot size focused onto the surface was used to provide high irradiances (up to 23.56 MW/cm{sup 2}) with low residence times (as low as 50 μs) in order to induce rapid surface melting and solidification. Variations in microstructure at different points within the laser treated region were investigated. From this processing refined lamellar and nodular microstructures were produced. These sets of unique microstructures were produced within the remelted region when the highest energy densities were selected in conjunction with the lowest residence times. The transformation from the typical austenitic structure to much finer unique lamellar and nodular structures was attributed to the high thermal gradients achieved using these selected laser processing parameters. These structures resulted in unique characteristics including elimination of cracks and a reduction of inclusions within the treated region. Grain structure reorientation between the bulk alloy and laser-treated region occurred due to the induced thermal gradients. This present article reports on microstructure forms resulting from the high-speed laser surface remelting and corresponding underlying kinetics.

  9. The influence of remelting parameters of the electric arc and conventional tempering on the tribological resistance of high speed steel HS 6-5-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dziedzic

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present thesis depicts the results of the research of tribological high speed steel HS 6-5-2 remelted with the electric arc. Steel was remelted with different parameters. The amperage of electric arc was changed, the scanning speed was changed and the single, overlapping remeltings were used. There was also the influence of conventional tempering defined, which was conducted after remelting on the tribological resistance of hardened steel. For the previously mentioned processing variants, the intensity of tribological wear was defined and the linear wear were presented, and the friction coefficients. The type of tribological wear was also given, present during the friction, technically dry, of the hardened steel. The lower intensity of tribological wear was received for the single remelting by electric arc of 50 and 70A. Using the overlapping remeltings for the strengening of the surface layer of the high speed steel HS 6-5-2 causes the increase of the intensity of tribological wear in comparison to the steel with the single remelting. The conventional tempering leads to the decrease of the intensity of tribological wear.

  10. Autoradiographic investigation of the removal of non-metallic inclusions in connection with the steel remelting process in vacuum furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolaski, H.; Siewierski, J.

    1978-01-01

    The labelled radioactive non-metallic inclusions in steel were obtained through deoxidation of steel with an activated aluminium alloy containing 1% rare earths. Quantity and distribution of the non-metallic inclusions in the steel were determined by applying autoradiography to the longitudinal and cross sections of the steel slabs. After remelting in an electronic furnace the distribution of non-metallic inclusions was determined by autoradiography of the lateral surfaces and the cross section of the slabs. It was found that 50 - 70% of the inclusions could be removed. The results obtained from autoradiographic investigation allow the exploration of the mechanism of the removal of inclusions. (author)

  11. Effect of unit size on thermal fatigue behavior of hot work steel repaired by a biomimetic laser remelting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Dalong; Li, Zhongsheng; He, Qingbing; Chen, Dajun; Chen, Hanbin; Yang, Jiuzhou; Zhang, Peng; Zhou, Hong

    2018-01-01

    AISI H13 hot work steel with fatigue cracks was repaired by a biomimetic laser remelting (BLR) process in the form of lattice units with different sizes. Detailed microstructural studies and microhardness tests were carried out on the units. Studies revealed a mixed microstructure containing martensite, retained austenite and carbide particles with ultrafine grain size in units. BLR samples with defect-free units exhibited superior thermal fatigue resistance due to microstructure strengthening, and mechanisms of crack tip blunting and blocking. In addition, effects of unit size on thermal fatigue resistance of BLR samples were discussed.

  12. Characterizing and improving the toughness of thick-sectioned 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo electroslag weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, G.R.; Frost, R.H.

    1980-09-01

    Efforts to improve the toughness of electroslag weldments consisted of four endeavors: process control, changes caused in 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel by electroslag welding and post-weld heat treatment, electrochemical reactions during the electroslag welding, and toughness testing.

  13. Melting of corrosion-resistant steel of martensite class with given phase composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grashchenkov, P.M.; Kachanov, E.B.; Stetsenko, N.V.; Moshkevich, E.I.; Bunina, T.I.

    1979-01-01

    Introduced is a melting procedure for the EhP410U (vacuum arc remelted) and VNC-2M (electroslag remelted) stainless steels with carbon (carbon ferrochrome) and nickel additions to ensure a present phase composition. Magnetizability of cold specimens of the EhP410U steel should be within the limits 17.0-19.5 mV by a special device. During melting of the second steel controlled are not only cold specimens magnetizability of which should be not less than 16 mV, but hot as well (at 25O-400 deg C) by the level of magnetizability not higher than 0.5 mV. During vacuum arc remelting nitrogen content reduces in general by 0.014% and manganese content - by 0.23%; correspondingly the magnetizability of specimens insceases approximately by 1 mV. During electroslag remelting chemical and phase composition practically are not changed. Total and diffusible hydrogen contents in the vacuum remelted steel is rather low (1-5 and 0.03-0.35 cm 3 /100 gs), which provides increased reliability of the articles

  14. Electropolishing of Re-melted SLM Stainless Steel 316L Parts Using Deep Eutectic Solvents: 3 × 3 Full Factorial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrbaey, K.; Wimpenny, D. I.; Al-Barzinjy, A. A.; Moroz, A.

    2016-07-01

    This three-level three-factor full factorial study describes the effects of electropolishing using deep eutectic solvents on the surface roughness of re-melted 316L stainless steel samples produced by the selective laser melting (SLM) powder bed fusion additive manufacturing method. An improvement in the surface finish of re-melted stainless steel 316L parts was achieved by optimizing the processing parameters for a relatively environmentally friendly (`green') electropolishing process using a Choline Chloride ionic electrolyte. The results show that further improvement of the response value-average surface roughness ( Ra) can be obtained by electropolishing after re-melting to yield a 75% improvement compared to the as-built Ra. The best Ra value was less than 0.5 μm, obtained with a potential of 4 V, maintained for 30 min at 40 °C. Electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing the residual oxide film formed during the re-melting process. The material dissolution during the process is not homogenous and is directed preferentially toward the iron and nickel, leaving the surface rich in chromium with potentially enhanced properties. The re-melted and polished surface of the samples gave an approximately 20% improvement in fatigue life at low stresses (approximately 570 MPa). The results of the study demonstrate that a combination of re-melting and electropolishing provides a flexible method for surface texture improvement which is capable of delivering a significant improvement in surface finish while holding the dimensional accuracy of parts within an acceptable range.

  15. Application of ANFIS for analytical modeling of tensile strength of functionally graded steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the tensile strength of ferritic and austenitic functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting has been modeled. To produce functionally graded steels, two slices of plain carbon steel and austenitic stainless steels were spot welded and used as electroslag remelting electrode. Functionally graded steel containing graded layers of ferrite and austenite may be fabricated via diffusion of alloying elements during remelting stage. Vickers microhardness profile of the specimen has been obtained experimentally and modeled with adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS. To build the model for graded ferritic and austenitic steels, training, testing and validation using respectively 174 and 120 experimental data were conducted. According to the input parameters, in the ANFIS model, the Vickers microhardness of each layer was predicted. A good fit equation which correlates the Vickers microhardness of each layer to its corresponding chemical composition was achieved by the optimized network for both ferritic and austenitic graded steels. Afterwards; the Vickers microhardness of each layer in functionally graded steels was related to the yield stress of the corresponding layer and by assuming Holloman relation for stress-strain curve of each layer, they were acquired. Finally, by applying the rule of mixtures, tensile strength of functionally graded steels configuration was found through a numerical method. The obtained results from the proposed model are in good agreement with those acquired from the experiments.

  16. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Yu, Hao; Zhou, Tao; Song, Chenghao; Zhang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M 7 C 3 . The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective

  17. Effect of double quenching and tempering heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of a novel 5Cr steel processed by electro-slag casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: healygo@163.com; Yu, Hao, E-mail: yuhao@ustb.edu.cn; Zhou, Tao, E-mail: zhoutao130984@163.com; Song, Chenghao, E-mail: songchenghao28@126.com; Zhang, Kai, E-mail: zhangkai8901@126.com

    2014-12-01

    The effect of double quenching and tempering (DQT) treatment as well as conventional high temperature quenching and tempering (CQT) treatment on the microstructures and mechanical properties of low carbon 5Cr martensitic as cast steel produced by electroslag casting was investigated. The microstructure changes were characterized by optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The characteristics of carbides precipitated during tempering were analyzed on both carbon extraction replica and thin foil samples by TEM. The mechanical performance was evaluated by Vickers hardness test, tensile test, and Charpy V-notch impact test at ambient temperature. The results of microstructure study indicated that DQT treatment led to a finer microstructure than that of CQT. The carbides of the tempered samples were identified as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. The carbides along the prior austenite grain boundaries nucleated directly while those within the laths should be transformed from cementite which formed at the early tempering stage. Compared with CQT condition, yield strength slightly increased after DQT treatment, and impact toughness improved a lot. The strengthening mechanisms were analyzed and it was found that grain refining and precipitation strengthening were mainly responsible for the increase of strength. The superior toughness of DQT condition was attributed to the finer microstructure resulting in more frequent deflections of the cleavage crack and the smaller size of carbides along the prior austenite boundaries. EBSD analysis showed that both martensitic block and packet of low carbon 5Cr tempered martensitic steel could hinder crack propagation, while the latter was more effective.

  18. Influence of steel-making process and heat-treatment temperature on the fatigue and fracture properties of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, S. K.; Na, E. G.; Baek, T. H.; Won, S. Y.; Park, S. J.; Lee, S. W.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, high strength pressure vessel steels having the same chemical compositions were manufactured by the two different steel-making processes, such as Vacuum Degassing(VD) and Electro-Slag Remelting(ESR) methods. After the steel-making process, they were normalized at 955 deg. C, quenched at 843 .deg. C, and finally tempered at 550 .deg. C or 450 deg. C, resulting in tempered martensitic microstructures with different yielding strengths depending on the tempering conditions. Low-Cycle Fatigue(LCF) tests, Fatigue Crack Growth Rate(FCGR) tests, and fracture toughness tests were performed to investigate the fatigue and fracture behaviors of the pressure vessel steels. In contrast to very similar monotonic, LCF, and FCGR behaviors between VD and ESR steels, a quite difference was noticed in the fracture toughness. Fracture toughness of ESR steel was higher than that of VD steel, being attributed to the removal of impurities in steel-making process

  19. Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Resistance Behavior of New Cobalt-Free Maraging Steel Produced Through ESR Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seikh, Asiful H.; Halfa, Hossam; Baig, Muneer; Khan, Sohail M. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, two different grades (M23 and M29) of cobalt-free low nickel maraging steel have been produced through electroslag remelting (ESR) process. The corrosion resistance of these ESR steels was investigated in 1 M H2SO4 solution using linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The experiments were performed for different immersion time and solution temperature. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels, some significant characterization parameters from LPP and EIS curves were analyzed and compared with that of conventional C250 maraging steel. Irrespective of measurement techniques used, the results show that the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels was higher than the C250 steel. The microstructure of ESR steels was composed of uniform and well-distributed martensite accompanied with little amount of retained austenite in comparison with C250 steel.

  20. Hot ductility of structural steels melted with the use of direct reduction charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, V.N.; Bulat, S.I.; Litvinenko, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    A possibility of the use of direct reduction charge during the open arc melting of the 40Kh2N2MA steel with the subsequent electroslag remelting was investigated. It is shown that the use of such charge free from non-ferrous metal admixtures permits to increase an alloy hot ductility in the hot-brittleness range from 900 up to 1500 deg C. An increase of the deformation rate from 0.1 up to 1 s - 1 increases 1.5-3 times a level of minimum ductility within this temperature range. It is established that antimony and bismuth impurities considerably decrease hot ductility

  1. Fabrication of electroslag welded Magnox fuel transport flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuliani, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    The high weld metal deposition rate of the electroslag welding process offers an attractive method of fabricating nuclear fuel transport flasks from 370 mm (14.5in) thick steel plates. The paper describes pre-production trials carried out on full scale corner-section joints to establish that the weld metal meets the exacting mechanical property requirements for the Nuclear Industry. The paper presents results obtained on welds produced using two base metal compositions and two wires, one recommended for submerged-arc and the other for electroslag welding processes. Details of mechanical tests and metallographic examinations are given which led to the selection of the latter type of wire. It was found that while the weld metal deposited by this process may be sensitive to cracking, this can be avoided by careful selection of welding consumables and sound joints can be obtained under production conditions. (author)

  2. Electron-beam welding of 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) stainless steel: effect of machine parameters on weldability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, H.

    1975-04-01

    The high-manganese, nitrogen-strengthened 21-6-9 (Cr--Ni--Mn) austenitic stainless steel has a weldability rating similar to that of more common austenitic stainless steels in terms of cracking, porosity, etc. However, weld pool disruption problems may occur with this alloy that can be related to instability within the molten weld pool. Selection of machine parameters is critical to achieving weld pool quiescence as this report confirms from recent tests. Test samples came from heats of air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted, and electroslag remelted material. Low- and high-voltage machine parameters are discussed, and effects of parameter variation on weld pool behavior are given. Data relate weld pool behavior to weld fusion-zone geometry. Various weld parameters are recommended for the 21-6-9 alloy, regardless of its source or chemistry. (auth)

  3. Titanium nitride (TiN) precipitation in a maraging steel during the vacuum arc remelting (VAR) process - Inclusions characterization and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descotes, V.; Bellot, J.-P.; Perrin-Guérin, V.; Witzke, S.; Jardy, A.

    2016-07-01

    Titanium Nitride (TiN) inclusions are commonly observed in a Maraging steel containing Nitrogen and Titanium and remelted in a VAR furnace. They can be easily detected by optical microscopy. A nucleus is observed next to a large number of TiN inclusions. A TEM analysis was carried out on a biphasic nucleus composed of a calcium sulfide (CaS) and a spinel (MgAl2O4), surrounded by a TiN particle. An orientation relationship between these three phases was revealed, which suggests a heterogeneous germination of the TiN particle on the nucleus by epitaxial growth. Based on this observation, on thermodynamic considerations and on previous work, a model has been developed and coupled to a numerical simulation of the VAR process to study the formation and evolution of a TiN distribution in the VAR ingot. Microsegregation is modeled using the lever rule, while the kinetics of precipitation is mainly driven by the supersaturation of the liquid bath. This model highlights the influence of the melt rate on the final size of TiN particles.

  4. Development of nuclear grade stainless steels at KCSSL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balachandran, G.; Dhere, M.; Mahadik, A.; Hinge, N.M.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kalyani Carpenter Special Steels Ltd is an alloy steel plant, where a variety of alloy steel grades are produced for automotive, defence, nuclear and aerospace applications. The plant has developed expertise in processing of several alloy steel grades of superior quality that meets stringent specifications. Primary steel is processed through a combination of electric arc furnace, ladle furnace and vacuum degassing where stringent control over dephosphorisation, desulphurization, deoxidation is effected to get a refined high quality steel. The molten steel is cast through continuous casting of slabs or ingot casting. In grades specific to nuclear application, the primary cast products are further subjected to electroslag remelting to achieve further freedom from inclusions and to achieve a favourable solidification grain structure, which ultimately improve the hot workability of the alloy steel. Appropriate choice of slag and operating parameters are needed for realising the required ingot quality. The present study would examine the processing and quality aspects of some important grades of steels used in nuclear industry namely ferritic 9Cr-1Mo steel, martensitic stainless steels 403, 410, precipitation hardenable 17-4 PH stainless steel and austenitic 321, 316LN stainless steel, which were made and supplied for applications to Indian nuclear industry. The expertise developed in processing the steels in terms of melting, heat treatment and their relationship to structural features and mechanical properties would be highlighted. (author)

  5. High power diode laser remelting of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelickova, H; Tomastik, J; Ctvrtlik, R; Supik, J; Nemecek, S; Misek, M

    2014-01-01

    This article is focused on the laser surface remelting of the steel samples with predefined overlapping of the laser spots. The goal of our experimental work was to evaluate microstructure and hardness both in overlapped zone and single pass ones for three kinds of ferrous metals with different content of carbon, cast iron, non-alloy structural steel and tool steel. High power fibre coupled diode laser Laserline LDF 3600-100 was used with robotic guided processing head equipped by the laser beam homogenizer that creates rectangular beam shape with uniform intensity distribution. Each sample was treated with identical process parameters - laser power, beam diameter, focus position, speed of motion and 40% spot overlap. Dimensions and structures of the remelted zone, zone of the partial melting, heat affected zone and base material were detected and measured by means of laser scanning and optical microscopes. Hardness progress in the vertical axis of the overlapped zone from remelted surface layer to base material was measured and compared with the hardness of the single spots. The most hardness growth was found for cast iron, the least for structural steel. Experiment results will be used to processing parameters optimization for each tested material separately.

  6. Alloying effect on the structure and properties of austenitic heat-resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levitin, V.V.; Grabovskij, V.Ya.; Korostelev, V.F.; Ryvkin, Yu.A.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated have been mechanical properties at test temperatures of 20-95O deg C, wear resistance, softening at thermomechanical cycling and microstructure of cast austenitic chromium-nickel steels (13%Cr + 35%Ni), produced by electroslag remelting with variations in Ti, Mo, Nb and W contents. Regression equations for relationship of the investigated characteristics to alloying element content have been obtained. Titanium, molybdenum and niobium increasing hardness and strength limit at room and high temperatures promote a decrease in ductility. Tungsten increases strength properties, wear resistance and thermal stability of the steels without negative effect on the impact strength. The impact strength decrease with an increase in alloying is due to brittle precipitations along the boundaries of as-cast grains, containing Ti, Mo, Nb and Si

  7. Remelt Ingot Production Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandfield, J. F.

    The technology related to the production of remelt ingots (small ingots, sows and T-Bar) is reviewed. Open mold conveyors, sow casting, wheel and belt casting and VDC and HDC casting are described and compared. Process economics, capacity, product quality and process problems are listed. Trends in casting machine technology such as longer open mold conveyor lines are highlighted. Safety issues related to the operation of these processes are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of the various machine configurations and options e.g. such as dry filling with the mold out of water and wet filling with the mold in water for open mould conveyors are discussed. The effect of mold design on machine productivity, mold cracking and mold life is also examined.

  8. Effect of segregations on mechanical properties and crack propagation in spring steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Žužek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Considerable efforts have been made over the last decades to improve performance of spring steels, which would increase the service time of springs and also allow vehicles weight reduction. There are different possibilities of improving properties of spring steels, from modifying the chemical composition of steels to optimizing the deformation process and changing the heat treatment parameters. Another way of improving steel properties is through refining the microstructure and reducing amount of inclusions. Therefore, the focus of the current investigation was to determine the effect of more uniform and cleaner microstructure obtained through electro-slag remelting (ESR of steel on the mechanical and dynamic properties of spring steel, with special focus on the resistance to fatigue crack propagation. Effect of the microstructure refinement was evaluated in terms of tensile strength, elongation, fracture and impact toughness, and fatigue resistance under bending and tensile loading. After the mechanical tests the fracture surfaces of samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and the influence of microstructure properties on the crack propagation and crack propagation resistance was studied. Investigation was performed on hot rolled, soft annealed and vacuum heat treated 51CrV4 spring steel produced by conventional continuous casting and compared with steel additional refined through ESR. Results shows that elimination of segregations and microstructure refinement using additional ESR process gives some improvement in terms of better repeatability and reduced scattering, but on the other hand it has negative effect on crack propagation resistance and fatigue properties of the spring steel.

  9. High strength bimetallic composite material fabricated by electroslag casting and characteristics of its composite interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-shun Dong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic composite material of bainitic steel and PD3 steel was produced with electroslag casting process, and element distribution of its composite interface was investigated by theoretical calculation and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS. Results show that the tensile strength (1,450 MPa, hardness (HRC 41-47 and impact toughness (94.7J·cm-2 of bainitic steel were comparatively high, while its elongation was slightly low (4.0%. Tensile strength (1,100 MPa, hardness (>HRC 31 and elongation (7.72% of the interface were also relatively high, but its impact toughness was low at 20.4 J·cm-2. Results of theoretical calculation of the element distribution in the interface region were basically consistent with that of EDS. Therefore, electroslag casting is a practical process to produce bimetallic composite material of bainitic steel and PD3 steel, and theoretical calculation also is a feasible method to study element distribution of their interface.

  10. Microstructure and corrosive wear resistance of plasma sprayed Ni-based coatings after TIG remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianshun, Dong; Xiukai, Zhou; Guolu, Li; Li, Liu; Ran, Wang

    2018-02-01

    Ni based coatings were prepared on steel substrate by means of plasma spraying, and were remelted by TIG (tungsten inert gas arc) method subsequently. The microstructure, microhardness, electrochemical corrosion and corrosive wear resistance under PH = 4, PH = 7 and PH = 10 conditions of the coatings before and after remelting were investigated. The results showed that the TIG remelting obviously reduced the defects and dramatically decreased the coating’s porosity from 7.2% to 0.4%. Metallurgical bonding between the remelted coating and substrate was achieved. Meanwhile, the phase compositions of as-sprayed coating were γ-Ni, Mn5Si2 and Cr2B, while the phase compositions of the remelting coating were Fe3Ni, Cr23C6, Cr2B and Mn5Si2. The microhardness of the coating decreased from 724 HV to 608 HV, but the fracture toughness enhanced from 2.80 MPa m1/2 to 197.3 MPa m1/2 after remelting. After corrosive wear test, the average wear weight loss and 3D morphology of wear scar of two coatings indicated that the wear resistance of the remelted coating was remarkably higher than that of as-sprayed coating. Therefore, TIG remelting treatment was a feasible method to improve the coating’s microstructure and enhance its corrosive wear resistance.

  11. Estimation of structural strength of 38KhN3MFA steel, melted using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudrya, A.V.; Mochalov, B.V.; Fadeev, Yu.I.

    1982-01-01

    Quantity of steel melted by different methods using criteria of fracture mechanics is evaluated. Three technological variants of the 38KhN3MFA steel melting: acid Martin steel prepared by the duplex-process (melt 1); the main Martin steel melting with deoxidation and alloying in a ladle by liquid alloy and treatment with synthetic slag with argon purging after production (melt 2) and its electroslag remelt - ESP process (melt 3) are investigated. The analysis of the investigated melts has revealed that crack resistances of the acid Martin steel is higher than that of other melts at practically similar standard mechanical properties with 0.35 probability at 0.05 significance level in the low-tempered state; in the tempered state the best crack resistance is observed in the ESP main Martin steel. Metal of the main Martin melting has lower crack resistance as compared with other meltings at both strength levels. The results of the work point out the necessity of applying the criteria of fracture mechanics for obtaining an objective evaluation of the steel quality

  12. Microstructure and Wear Resistance of TIG Remelted NiCrBSi Thick Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-lu Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The self-fluxing NiCrBSi coatings with 800 μm thickness were prepared on the surface of AISI1045 steel substrate by plasma spraying. And the remelted coating was obtained using by the tungsten inert gas (TIG arc process. The microstructure, surface roughness, hardness, phase composition, and wear resistance of the sprayed coating and remelted coating were systematically investigated. The results demonstrate that TIG remelted treatment can significantly eliminate the microscopic defects in thick coating and improve its density. The surface roughness (Ra of the remelted coating is only 18.9% of the sprayed coating. The hardness of the remelted coating is 26.8% higher than that of the sprayed coating. The main phases in the sprayed coating are changed from γ-Ni, Cr7C3, and Cr2B to γ-Ni, Cr23C6, CrB, Ni3B, and Fe3C. The wear mass loss of the remelted coating is only 17.1% of the sprayed coating. Therefore, a Ni-based thick coating with good wear resistance can be obtained by plasma spraying and remelted technique.

  13. Analytical description of the effects of melting practice and heat treatment on the creep properties of a 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel is used worldwide as an elevated-temperature structural material, particularly in steam generation systems. Since this material is often used at service temperatures up to 600 0 C, successful design requires a consideration of its creep properties. Unfortunately, the development of an analytical description of the creep behavior of 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel is complicated by two phenomena. First, the creep strength of this material is quite sensitive to heat treatment. Second, this material tends to exhibit nonclassical creep under some conditions. In addition, especially in nuclear applications, the material used may be air-melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VAR), or electroslag remelted (ESR). Available creep data from air-melted, VAR, and ESR material have been analyzed. Heat treatments included both annealed and isothermally annealed, with and without a subsequent ''postweld'' heat treatment. It has been found that the elevated-temperature ultimate tensile strength (UTS) is a useful indicator of creep strength for a given heat of material regardless of melting practice or heat treatment. Meanwhile, the nonclassical creep behavior has been attributed to a change in creep mechanism which has been mathematically modeled

  14. Experimental evaluation of tool wear throughout a continuous stroke blanking process of quenched 22MnB5 ultra-high-strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, S.; Neumayer, F. F.; Serkyov, I.; Jesner, G.; Kelsch, R.; Geile, M.; Sommer, A.; Golle, R.; Volk, W.

    2017-09-01

    Steel is the most common material used in vehicles’ chassis, which makes its research an important topic for the automotive industry. Recently developed ultra-high-strength steels (UHSS) provide extreme tensile strength up to 1,500 MPa and combine great crashworthiness with good weight reduction potential. However, in order to reach the final shape of sheet metal parts additional cutting steps such as trimming and piercing are often required. The final trimming of quenched metal sheets presents a huge challenge to a conventional process, mainly because of the required extreme cutting force. The high cutting impact, due to the materials’ brittleness, causes excessive tool wear or even sudden tool failure. Therefore, a laser is commonly used for the cutting process, which is time and energy consuming. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the capability of a conventional blanking tool design in a continuous stroke piercing process using boron steel 22MnB5 sheets. Two different types of tool steel were tested for their suitability as active cutting elements: electro-slag remelted (ESR) cold work tool steel Bohler K340 ISODUR and powder-metallurgic (PM) high speed steel Bohler S390 MICROCLEAN. A FEM study provided information about an optimized punch design, which withstands buckling under high cutting forces. The wear behaviour of the process was assessed by the tool wear of the active cutting elements as well as the quality of cut surfaces.

  15. Effect of melting technique on grain size and heat resistance of the 12Kh1MF steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanskaya, K.A.; Kulikova, L.V.; Butneva, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    Investigated are the 12Kh1MF steel melted in open-hearth and arc furnaces (deoxidation by aluminium in 1.0 kg/t quantity) and then subjected to electroslag melting. The size of an austenitic grain depends on the residual contents of nitrogen and aluminium in steel. The open-hearth metal subjected to electroslag melting and containing a small quantity of nitrogen (0.006%) and aluminium (0.013%) has coarse austenitic grains and higher heat resistance compared to the steel melted in an arc furnace and also sub ected to electroslag melting. The nitride analysis of steel is carried out

  16. Remelting of metallurgical fines using thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, L.C.; Neto F, J.B.F.; Bender, O.W.; Collares, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A plasma furnace was developed for remelting of ferro alloys and silicon fines. The furnace capacity was about 4 Kg of silicon and power about 50 kW. The fine (20 to 100 mesh) was fed into the furnace directly at the high temperature zone. This system was tested for remelting silicon fines and the results in the recovery of silicon was about 95% and it took place a refine of aluminium and calcium. (author)

  17. Study on Thixojoining Process Using Partial Remelting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold-work tool steel is considered to be a nonweldable metal due to its high percentage content of carbon and alloy elements. The application of a new process of the semisolid joining of two dissimilar metals is proposed. AISI D2 cold-work tool steel was thixojoined to 304 stainless steel by using a partial remelting method. After thixojoining, microstructural examination including metallographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and Vickers hardness tests was performed. From the results, metallographic analyses along the joint interface between semisolid AISI D2 and stainless steel showed a smooth transition from one to another and neither oxides nor microcracking was observed. Hardness values obtained from the points in the diffusion zone were much higher than those in the 304 stainless steel but lower than those in the AISI D2 tool steel. The study revealed that a new type of nonequilibrium diffusion interfacial structure was constructed at the interface of the two different types of steel. The current work successfully confirmed that avoidance of a dendritic microstructure in the semisolid joined zone and high bonding quality components can be achieved without the need for force or complex equipment when compared to conventional welding processes.

  18. Fretting fatigue behaviour of Ni-free high-nitrogen stainless steel in a simulated body fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Maruyama, Sachiko Hiromoto, Eiji Akiyama and Morihiko Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fretting fatigue behaviour of Ni-free high-nitrogen steel (HNS with a yield strength of about 800 MPa, which was prepared by nitrogen gas pressurized electroslag remelting, was studied in air and in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS(-. For comparison, fretting fatigue behaviour of cold-rolled SUS316L steel (SUS316L(CR with similar yield strength was examined. The plain fatigue limit of HNS was slightly lower than that of SUS316L(CR although the former had a higher tensile strength than the latter. The fretting fatigue limit of HNS was higher than that of SUS316L(CR both in air and in PBS(-. A decrease in fatigue limit of HNS by fretting was significantly smaller than that of SUS316L(CR in both environments, indicating that HNS has better fretting fatigue resistance than SUS316L(CR. The decrease in fatigue limit by fretting is discussed taking into account the effect of friction stress due to fretting and the additional influences of wear, tribocorrosion and plastic deformation in the fretted area.

  19. Using cast-on electroslag technology for manufacturing nuclear power station equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovich, V.I.; Borodin, M.A.; Chistyakov, G.A.; Karpov, O.S.; Kriger, Yu.N.

    1984-01-01

    An application of a new electroslag cast-on process for manufacturing nuclear power station equipment is described. This process is compared with a welding process for manufacturing a D /SUB s/ -400-mm gate valve bonnet

  20. A fitness-for-purpose evaluation of fracture critical electro-slag welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    A fitness-for-purpose evaluation was performed on the electro-slag flange welds of the West Fremont bridge approach : superstructures, per the request of FHWA. This evaluation required gathering knowledge of the material properties, fabrication : def...

  1. FY 2017 Status of Sodium Freezing and Remelting Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Boron, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Momozaki, Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chojnowski, D. B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Reed, C. B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The Sodium Freezing and Remelting experiment facility at Argonne National Laboratory has been significantly modified and improved. The main improvement was replacement of the two original stainless steel test sections that had strain gages limited by their bonds to the stainless steel to maximum temperatures of 350°C with a single new test section with strain gages that can be utilized up to 980°C and a thin wall to enhance measured strains. Wetting of stainless steel by sodium within a practical time of one to a few days is expected to require temperatures of 450°C or greater. Thus, the higher temperature strain gages enable wetting in a short time of a few days. Wetting below 350°C would have required an impractically long time of at least weeks. Other improvements included upgrading of the loop configuration, incorporation of a cold finger to purify sodium, a new data acquisition system, and reinstallation of the many heaters, heater controllers, and thermocouples. After the loop had been heated to 400°C for about two hours, an initial sodium freezing test was conducted. It is thought that the sodium might have at least partially wetted the stainless steel wall under these conditions. The strain gage measurements indicate that an incremental step inward deformation of the test section thin wall occurred as the temperature decreased through the sodium freezing temperature. This behavior is consistent with sodium initially adhering to the stainless steel inner wall but breaking away from the wall as the freezing sodium contracted. Conduct of additional sodium freezing tests under well wetted conditions was prevented as a result of stoppage of all electrical work at Argonne by the Laboratory Director on July 25, 2017. A pathway to resuming electrical work is now in place at Argonne and additional sodium freezing testing will resume next fiscal year.

  2. Optimization of Thermochemical, Kinetic, and Electrochemical Factors Governing Partitioning of Radionuclides During Melt Decontamination of Radioactively Contaminated Stainless Steel; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VAN DEN AVYLE, JAMES A.; MALGAARD, DAVID; MOLECKE, MARTIN; PAL, UDAY B.; WILLIAMSON, RODNEY L.; ZHIDKOV, VASILY V.

    1999-01-01

    The Research Objectives of this project are to characterize and optimize the use of molten slags to melt decontaminate radioactive stainless steel scrap metal. The major focus is on optimizing the electroslag remelting (ESR) process, a widely used industrial process for stainless steels and other alloys, which can produce high quality ingots directly suitable for forging, rolling, and parts fabrication. It is our goal to have a melting process ready for a DOE D and D demonstration at the end of the third year of EMSP sponsorship, and this technology could be applied to effective stainless steel scrap recycle for internal DOE applications. It also has potential international applications. The technical approach has several elements: (1) characterize the thermodynamics and kinetics of slag/metal/contaminate reactions by models and experiments, (2) determine the capacity of slags for radioactive containment, (3) characterize the minimum levels of residual slags and contaminates in processed metal, and (4) create an experimental and model-based database on achievable levels of decontamination to support recycle applications. Much of the experimental work on this project is necessarily focused on reactions of slags with surrogate compounds which behave similar to radioactive transuranic and actinide species. This work is being conducted at three locations. At Boston University, Prof. Uday Pal's group conducts fundamental studies on electrochemical and thermochemical reactions among slags, metal, and surrogate contaminate compounds. The purpose of this work is to develop a detailed understanding of reactions in slags through small laboratory scale experiments and modeling. At Sandia, this fundamental information is applied to the design of electroslag melting experiments with surrogates to produce and characterize metal ingots. In addition, ESR furnace conditions are characterized, and both thermodynamic and ESR process models are utilized to optimize the process. To

  3. Influência da refusão por plasma na microestrutura de um revestimento Fe-Mn-Cr-Si depositado por aspersão térmica arco elétrico sobre aço inoxidável ASTM A743-CA6NM Influence of plasma remelting on the microstructure of Fe-Mn-Cr-Si arc thermal spray coating deposited on ASTM A743-CA6NM stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Geraldo Marenda Pukasiewicz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ASTM A743-CA6NM é um aço inoxidável martensítico muito utilizado na fabricação de turbinas hidráulicas devido a sua elevada tenacidade, entretanto apresenta restrições com relação à regiões recuperadas por soldagem. Diferentes técnicas de deposição tem sido aplicadas com o intuito de reduzir ou eliminar a tensão residual. A deposição de revestimentos resistentes a cavitação é outra forma importante de aumentar a vida útil destes componentes. O objetivo deste trabalho é avaliar a influência do tipo e intensidade de corrente de refusão por plasma na microestrutura, composição química e microdureza de um revestimento Fe-Mn-Cr-Si resistente a cavitação depositado por aspersão térmica arco elétrico sobre aço ASTMA743-CA6NM. Observou-se que a adoção de menores valores de corrente média, assim como a utilização de corrente pulsada reduziram a formação de ferrita δ e a espessura final da ZTA, possibilitando a formação do revestimento com menores alterações na microestrutura do metal base. Verificou-se que a microestrutura e microdureza dos revestimentos refundidos não se mostraram muito sensível a variações na diluição do metal base. A utilização de corrente contínua promoveu um alinhamento da estrutura dendrítica no sentido da movimentação da tocha, entretanto este comportamento não foi observado em revestimentos refundidos com corrente pulsada.ASTM A743-CA6NM martensitic stainless steel have been used in hydraulic turbines manufacturing, but show some restrictions in welded recovered areas. Different techniques have been applied in order to reduce or eliminate residual stress, with life increase. The deposition of cavitation resistant coatings is another important way to increase the service life of these components. The objective of this study is evaluate the influence of type and intensity of plasma remelting current on the microstructure, chemical composition and microhardness of the Fe

  4. Properties of surface layer of X40CrMoV5-1 in the relation to remelting conditions by the use of a high power diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrzanski, L.A.; Bonek, M.; Klimpel, A.

    2003-01-01

    Investigations included remelting experiments on the X40CrMoV5-1 hot-work steel with the high power diode laser. Tests have been made using the high power diode laser (HPDL) in the technological process of remelting. The effect of remelting parameters on structure and properties of its surface layer, as well as on remelting geometry and shape. The influence of the technological conditions and their effect on the mechanical properties of the surface layer, and especially its hardness has been tested. Dependence of the microhardness changes, on the degree of the laser beam influence on the treated surface, and mostly on the hardness increase in the remelted layer is presented. The influence of remelting process parameters on the structure of substrate material is presented. Guidelines for remelting of the X40CrMoV5-1 steel surface using the high power diode laser feature the outcome of the investigation aimed at obtaining its optimum mechanical and working properties. (author)

  5. Metal transfer during vacuum consumable arc remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanner, F.J.

    1977-11-01

    A description of the vacuum consumable arc remelt process as related to solidification and a review of vacuum arc literature is presented. Metal transfer at arc lengths less than or equal to 3 cm was found to occur when liquid metal spikes hanging from the cathode form a low resistance bridge (drop short) by touching the anode and subsequently rupturing. During the bridge lifetime (0.0003 to 0.020 s) the arc is extinguished and all of the electrical power is directed through the molten bridge. The formation and rupture of these molten metal bridges are confirmed with electrical resistance measurements. At long arc lengths (greater than 10 cm) the spikes separate before touching the anode

  6. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending

  7. Development of a Cu-Sn based brazing system with a low brazing and a high remelting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieding, M.; Holländer, U.; Möhwald, K.

    2017-03-01

    Objective of the project presented is the development of a joining process for hot working steel components at low brazing temperatures leading to a bond with a much higher remelting temperature. This basically is achieved by the use of a Cu-Sn melt spinning foil combined with a pure Cu foil. During brazing, the Sn content of the foil is decreased by diffusion of Sn into the additional Cu resulting in a homogenious joint with a increased remelting temperature of the filler metal. Within this project specimens were brazed and diffusion annealed in a vacuum furnace at 850 °C varying the processing times (0 - 10 h). The samples prepared were studied metallographically and diffusion profiles of Sn were recorded using EDX line scans. The results are discussed in view of further investigations and envisaged applications.

  8. Treatment of radioactive metallic waste by the electro-slag melting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Atsuhiro; Nagura, Kanetake; Noura, Tsuyoshi

    1983-01-01

    The applicability of the electro-slag melting method for treating plutonuim contaminated metallic waste was studied. A 100kg test furnace was built and simulated metallic waste was melted and solidified in this furnace. Waste volume was reduced to 1/25 with a decontamination factor of 25 and the slag and the copper mold are repeatedly usable. The process is expected to be employed in the project of PWTF (Plutonium contaminated Wate Treatment Facilities). (author)

  9. Active optical system for advanced 3D surface structuring by laser remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pütsch, O.; Temmler, A.; Stollenwerk, J.; Willenborg, E.; Loosen, P.

    2015-03-01

    Structuring by laser remelting enables completely new possibilities for designing surfaces since material is redistributed but not wasted. In addition to technological advantages, cost and time benefits yield from shortened process times, the avoidance of harmful chemicals and the elimination of subsequent finishing steps such as cleaning and polishing. The functional principle requires a completely new optical machine technology that maintains the spatial and temporal superposition and manipulation of three different laser beams emitted from two laser sources of different wavelength. The optical system has already been developed and demonstrated for the processing of flat samples of hot and cold working steel. However, since particularly the structuring of 3D-injection molds represents an application example of high innovation potential, the optical system has to take into account the elliptical beam geometry that occurs when the laser beams irradiate a curved surface. To take full advantage of structuring by remelting for the processing of 3D surfaces, additional optical functionality, called EPS (elliptical pre-shaping) has to be integrated into the existing set-up. The development of the beam shaping devices not only requires the analysis of the mechanisms of the beam projection but also a suitable optical design. Both aspects are discussed in this paper.

  10. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  11. In vivo oxidation in remelted highly cross-linked retrievals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, B H; Van Citters, D W; Currier, J H; Collier, J P

    2010-10-20

    Elimination of free radicals to prevent oxidation has played a major role in the development and product differentiation of the latest generation of highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearing materials. In the current study, we (1) examined oxidation in a series of retrieved remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene bearings from a number of device manufacturers and (2) compared the retrieval results with findings for shelf-stored control specimens. The hypothesis was that radiation-cross-linked remelted ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene would maintain oxidative stability in vivo comparable with the stability during shelf storage and in published laboratory aging tests. Fifty remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners and nineteen remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene tibial inserts were received after retrieval from twenty-one surgeons from across the U.S. Thirty-two of the retrievals had been in vivo for two years or more. Each was measured for oxidation with use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A control series of remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene acetabular liners from three manufacturers was analyzed with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure free radical content and with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to measure oxidation initially and after eight to nine years of shelf storage in air. The never-implanted, shelf-aged controls had no measurable free-radical content initially or after eight to nine years of shelf storage. The never-implanted controls showed no increase in oxidation during shelf storage. Oxidation measurements showed measurable oxidation in 22% of the retrieved remelted highly cross-linked liners and inserts after an average of two years in vivo. Because never-implanted remelted highly cross-linked ultra-high molecular weight

  12. Feasibility of re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, S. J.; Smith, K. P.

    1999-10-26

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) sometimes accumulate inside pieces of equipment associated with oil and gas production and processing activities. Typically, the NORM accumulates when radium that is present in solution in produced water precipitates out in scale and sludge deposits. Scrap equipment containing residual quantities of these NORM-bearing scales and sludges can present a waste management problem if the radium concentrations exceed regulatory limits or activate the alarms on radiation screening devices installed at most scrap metal recycling facilities. Although NORM-contaminated scrap metal currently is not disposed of by re-melting, this form of recycling could present a viable disposition option for this waste stream. Studies indicate that re-melting NORM-contaminated scrap metal is a viable recycling option from a risk-based perspective. However, a myriad of economic, regulatory, and policy issues have caused the recyclers to turn away virtually all radioactive scrap metal. Until these issues can be resolved, re-melting of the petroleum industry's NORM-impacted scrap metal is unlikely to be a widespread practice. This paper summarizes the issues associated with re-melting radioactive scrap so that the petroleum industry and its regulators will understand the obstacles. This paper was prepared as part of a report being prepared by the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission's NORM Subcommittee.

  13. Interstitial loop growth in electron irradiated vacuum-remelted FV448

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buswell, J.T.; Fisher, S.B.

    1979-05-01

    An investigation of the resistance to void swelling of the ferritic steel FV448 has been made in electron irradiation experiments in a High Voltage Electron Microscope. Overaged samples of vacuum-remelted FV448 showed zero swelling after irradiation to doses of up to 30 dpa, in the temperature range 400 to 550 0 C. The resistance to void swelling was due to the absence of mutual interaction between interstitial loops. Impurity segregation to the loops, and precipitation, prevented continuous dislocation climb, thus removing biased sinks from the system at low doses. An interstitial-impurity binding energy of 0.5 eV was measured, suggesting that the impurity responsible was carbon or nitrogen. Some effects attributable to the heating of thin foils in the HVEM environment were detected. (author)

  14. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  15. Laser Remelting of Plasma-Sprayed Tungsten Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Holub, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2014), s. 750-754 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Grant - others:European Project ExtreMat(XE) NMP-CT-2004-500253 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : functionally graded coatings * laser remelting * plasma facing materials * thermal conductivity * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11666-014-0067-4

  16. Effect of Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nitrogen-Alloyed High-Mn Austenitic Hot Work Die Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In view of the requirements for mechanical properties and service life above 650 °C, a high-Mn austenitic hot work die steel, instead of traditional martensitic hot work die steel such as H13, was developed in the present study. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the newly developed work die steel was studied. The results show that the microstructure of the high-Mn as-cast electroslag remelting (ESR ingot is composed of γ-Fe, V(C,N, and Mo2C. V(C,N is an irregular multilateral strip or slice shape with severe angles. Most eutectic Mo2C carbides are lamellar fish-skeleton-like, except for a few that are rod-shaped. With increasing solid solution time and temperature, the increased hardness caused by solid solution strengthening exceeds the effect of decreased hardness caused by grain size growth, but this trend is reversed later. As a result, the hardness of specimens after various solid solution heat treatments increases first and then decreases. The optimal combination of hardness and austenitic grain size can be obtained by soaking for 2 h at 1170 °C. The maximum Rockwell hardness (HRC is 47.24 HRC, and the corresponding austenite average grain size is 58.4 μm. When the solid solution time is 3 h at 1230 °C, bimodality presented in the histogram of the austenite grain size as a result of further progress in secondary recrystallization. Compared with the single-stage aging, the maximum impact energy of the specimen after two-stage aging heat treatment was reached at 16.2 J and increased by 29.6%, while the hardness decreased by 1–2 HRC. After two-stage aging heat treatment, the hardness of steel reached the requirements of superior grade H13, and the maximum impact energy was 19.6% higher than that of superior grade H13, as specified in NADCA#207-2003.

  17. Remelting of metallurgical fines using thermal plasma; Refusao de finos metalurgicos via plasma termico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicente, L C; Neto F, J B.F.; Bender, O W; Collares, M P

    1993-12-31

    A plasma furnace was developed for remelting of ferro alloys and silicon fines. The furnace capacity was about 4 Kg of silicon and power about 50 kW. The fine (20 to 100 mesh) was fed into the furnace directly at the high temperature zone. This system was tested for remelting silicon fines and the results in the recovery of silicon was about 95% and it took place a refine of aluminium and calcium. (author) 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Refining U-Zr-Nb alloys by remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, B.M.; Kniess, C.T.; Riella, H.G.; Ferraz, W.B.

    2011-01-01

    The high density U-Zr-Nb and U-Nb uranium-based alloys can be employed as nuclear fuel in a PWR reactor due to their high density and nuclear properties. These alloys can stabilize the gamma phase, however, according to TTT diagrams, at the working temperature of a PWR reactor, all gamma phase transforms to α'' phase in a few hours. To avoid this kind of transformation during the nuclear reactor operation, the U-Zr-Nb alloy and U-Nn are used in α'' phase. The stability of α'' phase depends on the alloy composition and cooling rate. The alloy homogenization has to be very effective to eliminate precipitates rich in Zr and Nb to avoid changes in the alloying elements contents in the matrix. The homogenization was obtained by remelting the alloy and keeping it in the liquid state for enough time to promote floating of the precipitates (usually carbides, less dense) and leaving the matrix free of precipitates. However, this floating by density difference may result in segregation between the alloying elements (Nb and Zr, at the top) and uranium (at the bottom). The homogenized alloys were characterized in terms of metallographic techniques, optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, EDS and X-ray diffraction. In this paper, it is shown that the contents of Zr and Nb at the bottom and at the top of the matrix are constant. (author)

  19. Refining U-Zr-Nb alloys by remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguiar, B.M.; Kniess, C.T.; Riella, H.G., E-mail: bmaguiar@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferraz, W.B. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The high density U-Zr-Nb and U-Nb uranium-based alloys can be employed as nuclear fuel in a PWR reactor due to their high density and nuclear properties. These alloys can stabilize the gamma phase, however, according to TTT diagrams, at the working temperature of a PWR reactor, all gamma phase transforms to {alpha}'' phase in a few hours. To avoid this kind of transformation during the nuclear reactor operation, the U-Zr-Nb alloy and U-Nn are used in {alpha}'' phase. The stability of {alpha}'' phase depends on the alloy composition and cooling rate. The alloy homogenization has to be very effective to eliminate precipitates rich in Zr and Nb to avoid changes in the alloying elements contents in the matrix. The homogenization was obtained by remelting the alloy and keeping it in the liquid state for enough time to promote floating of the precipitates (usually carbides, less dense) and leaving the matrix free of precipitates. However, this floating by density difference may result in segregation between the alloying elements (Nb and Zr, at the top) and uranium (at the bottom). The homogenized alloys were characterized in terms of metallographic techniques, optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, EDS and X-ray diffraction. In this paper, it is shown that the contents of Zr and Nb at the bottom and at the top of the matrix are constant. (author)

  20. The Influence of Laser Surface Remelting on the Microstructure of EN AC-48000 Cast Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piątkowski J.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper present a thermal analysis of laser heating and remelting of EN AC-48000 (EN AC-AlSi12CuNiMg cast alloy used mainly for casting pistons of internal combustion engines. Laser optics were arranged such that the impingement spot size on the material was a circular with beam radius rb changes from 7 to 1500 μm. The laser surface remelting was performed under argon flow. The resulting temperature distribution, cooling rate distribution, temperature gradients and the depth of remelting are related to the laser power density and scanning velocity. The formation of microstructure during solidification after laser surface remelting of tested alloy was explained. Laser treatment of alloy tests were perform by changing the three parameters: the power of the laser beam, radius and crystallization rate. The laser surface remelting needs the selection such selection of the parameters, which leads to a significant disintegration of the structure. This method is able to increase surface hardness, for example in layered castings used for pistons in automotive engines.

  1. Microstructure Evolution of Mg-Gd-Y-Zn-Zr Magnesium Alloy During Partial Remelting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianquan TAO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the research on the microstructure evolution of Mg-Gd-Y-Zn-Zr magnesium alloy through partial remelting process. It aims at finding out what effects the microstructure of semi-solid Mg-Gd-Y-Zn-Zr alloy will result in under different remelting temperatures and holding times. Based on the results, if to raise the remelting temperature and to prolong the holding time, the size of solid grain will tend to expand and its spheroidization degree also begins to show improvement. In addition, the grain shows tendency of coarsening when the holding time increases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6483

  2. Effect of the Remelting on Transformations in Co-Cr-Mo Prosthetics Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kacprzyk B.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article we were studing the impact of the remelting on transformations in Co-Cr-Mo prosthetics alloy. The TDA curves were analyzed, the microstructure was examined, the analysis of the chemical composition and hardness using the Brinell method was made. It was found that the obtained microstructure of the alloys that we studied do not differ significantly. In all four samples, microscopic images were similar to each other. The volume, size and distribution of the phases remain similar. Analysis of the chemical composition showed that all the samples fall within the compositions provided for the test alloy. Further to this the hardness of the samples, regardless of the number of remeltings did not show any significant fluctuations and remained within the error limit.After analyzing all the results, it can be concluded that the remeltings of the alloys should not have a significant impact on their properties. Secondarily melted alloys can be used for prosthetics works.

  3. Laser surface remelting of a Cu-Al-Ni-Mn shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero da Silva, Murillo, E-mail: murilloromero_@hotmail.com [Postgraduate Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235, São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Gargarella, Piter [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235, São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Gustmann, Tobias [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstraße 20, d-01069 Dresden (Germany); Botta Filho, Walter José; Kiminami, Claudio S. [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235, São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Eckert, Jürgen [Erich Schmid Institute of Materials Science, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstraße 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Department Materials Physics, Montanuniversität Leoben, Jahnstraße 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Pauly, Simon [IFW Dresden, Institute for Complex Materials, Helmholtzstraße 20, d-01069 Dresden (Germany); Bolfarini, Claudemiro [Department of Materials Engineering, Federal University of São Carlos, Rodovia Washington Luís, km 235, São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-04-20

    Cu-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) show better thermal and electrical conductivity, lower cost and are easier to process than traditional Ti-based SMAs, but they exhibit a lower ductility and lower fatigue life. These properties can be improved by decreasing the grain size and reducing microstructural segregations, which may be obtained using laser surface remelting treatments. The aim of the present work was to produce and characterize laser remelted Cu-11.85Al-3.2Ni-3Mn SMA plates. Twelve plates with the dimensions of 50×10×1.5 mm were produced by suction casting in a first step. The surface of the plates was remelted afterwards with a laser beam power of 300 W, hatching of 50% and using three different scanning speeds: 100, 300 and 500 mm/s. The plates were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry as well as by tensile and microhardness tests. The remelted region showed a T morphology, with average thickness of 52, 29 and 23 µm for the plates remelted with scanning speeds of 100, 300 and 500 mm/s, respectively. In the plates remelted with 100 and 300 mm/s, some pores were found around the center of the track, due to the keyhole instability. The same phase formed in the as-cast sample was obtained in the laser remelted coatings: the monoclinic β′{sub 1} martensitic phase with zig-zag morphology. However, the laser treated samples exhibit lower transformation temperatures than the as-cast sample, due to grain refinement at the surface. They also show an improvement in the mechanical properties, with an increase of up to 162 MPa in fracture stress, up to 2.2% in ductility and up to 20.9 HV in microhardness when compared with the as-cast sample, which makes the laser surface remelting a promising method for improving the mechanical properties of Cu-based SMAs.

  4. Microstructure Analysis of Laser Remelting for Thermal Barrier Coatings on the Surface of Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Bin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the preparation and organization performance of thermal barrier coatings (TCBs on the surface of titanium were studied experimentally. Nanostructured 8 wt% yttria partially stabilized zirconia coatings were deposited by air plasma spraying. The microstructure of nanostructured and the conventional coating was studied after laser remelting. It has shown that formed a network of micro-cracks and pits after laser remelting on nanostructured coatings. With the decrease of the laser scanning speed, mesh distribution of micro cracks was gradually thinning on nanostructured coatings. Compared with conventional ceramic layers, the mesh cracks of nanostructured coating is dense and the crack width is small.

  5. Synthesis of mullite-based coatings from alumina and zircon powder mixtures by plasma spraying and laser remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, S.; Das, J.; Bandyopadhyay, P.P.

    2015-01-01

    A mechanical mixture of alumina and pulverized zircon sand in 3:2 M ratio has been plasma sprayed to obtain mullite coating. Thereafter, the top layer of the coating has been remelted using laser. The presence of a mullite phase in the as-sprayed and laser remelted coatings has been confirmed qualitatively using X-ray diffraction. Both as-sprayed and laser remelted coatings have been characterized for their microstructure, hardness and porosity. The ultrafine grain structure of the coating produced by rapid quenching has been analyzed using transmission electron microscope. Presence of a mullite phase in the coatings has also been confirmed using small angle electron diffraction. Laser remelting has resulted in an appreciable reduction in porosity and increase in hardness in the coatings. - Highlights: • Mullite has been produced by plasma spraying of alumina–zircon powder mixture. • As sprayed coating shows good integrity. • Laser remelting reduced porosity and increased coating hardness

  6. Synthesis of mullite-based coatings from alumina and zircon powder mixtures by plasma spraying and laser remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazra, S. [Integrated Test Range, Chandipur, Balasore, Odisha 756025 (India); Das, J. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, 721302 (India); Bandyopadhyay, P.P., E-mail: ppb@mech.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, IIT Kharagpur, 721302 (India)

    2015-03-15

    A mechanical mixture of alumina and pulverized zircon sand in 3:2 M ratio has been plasma sprayed to obtain mullite coating. Thereafter, the top layer of the coating has been remelted using laser. The presence of a mullite phase in the as-sprayed and laser remelted coatings has been confirmed qualitatively using X-ray diffraction. Both as-sprayed and laser remelted coatings have been characterized for their microstructure, hardness and porosity. The ultrafine grain structure of the coating produced by rapid quenching has been analyzed using transmission electron microscope. Presence of a mullite phase in the coatings has also been confirmed using small angle electron diffraction. Laser remelting has resulted in an appreciable reduction in porosity and increase in hardness in the coatings. - Highlights: • Mullite has been produced by plasma spraying of alumina–zircon powder mixture. • As sprayed coating shows good integrity. • Laser remelting reduced porosity and increased coating hardness.

  7. Materials designed for containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piehl, K.H.

    1976-01-01

    The present article points out that high-tensile fine-grained steels have been used successfully in the construction of reactor containments, spherical gasometers, and pressure vessels. It has been confirmed that their use requires safety measures concerning lay out and production. Viscosity properties of high-tensile, fine-grained steels can be improved significantly by means of electroslag remelting. The extent to which this improvement influences the heat-affected zone is being examined. (orig./RW) [de

  8. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in microstructure.

  9. Microstructural evolution and thixoformability of semi-solid aluminum 319s alloy during re-melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.G.; Zhu, Q.; Lu, H.X.; Zhang, F.; Li, D.Q.; Midson, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to characterize both microstructural evolution and thixoformability during partial melting of semi-solid 319s alloy. The thixoformability criteria of 319s was initially investigated by thermodynamic analysis. In-situ observation of partial re-melting was performed by a Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope to determine the effect of heating rate on melting characteristics. Meanwhile, the microstructural evolution of 319s alloy at extremely low heating rate was also investigated in order to understand the mechanism of re-melting process. The studies demonstrated that 319s alloy is suitable for thixocasting because of the controllable liquid fraction in the operating window of 15 °C. The process window was effected by both temperature and heating time. The primary particles evolution in 319s alloy can be divided into four stages, and the coarsening rate during isothermal test is 227 μm 3 /s. The effective method to obtain desirable microstructure is to manage the time in the semi-solid state by controlling heating rate and soaking time. - Highlights: • The thixoformability of 319s is discussed by using SPSC and thermodynamic analysis. • The re-melting processes at different heating rate are in-situ observed. • We identified the four stages of microstructural evolution during re-melting. • The coarsening rate K for 319s during isothermal test is identified. • The variation tendency of Si particle size with increasing time is reported

  10. Scratch test induced shear banding in high power laser remelted metallic glass layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, D. T. A.; Ocelik, V.; de Hosson, J. Th. M.

    Laser remelted surface layers of a Cu-based metallic glass forming alloy have been produced with fully amorphous depths up to 350 mu m for single track widths of around 1.3 mm and have been checked by transmission of synchrotron radiation. They have been subjected to indentation hardness and scratch

  11. Problems in steel industry for power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolbenko, E.T.; Kryanin, I.R.

    1979-01-01

    The main problems of steel industry in power engineering are considered. The effect of charge materials upon steel quality is analyzed. Radical dicision of the problem is the ensurance of power engineering plants with high quality original charge materials, which are quite pure according to impurities such as: iron melted from metallized charge or prereduced pellets. The usage of such materials considerably improves the complex of technological and service properties and structure of large responsible products: vessels of the reactor core, especially large shafts and others. For the most responsible power engineering dies it is necessary to smelt steel of 150-200 tons and above. The main direction of steel melting industry is quality steel melting in large 150-200 tons arc furnaces which are equipped with magnetic stirrer installations. It is marked that the branch of power engineering is equipped with unique installations of out-of-furnace steel refining. It is shown that further increase in the metal quality is possible when vacuum and electroslag technique of melting is used. It permits to reduce considerably the amount of sulphur, gases, nonmetallic inclusions, to increase the metal density, to remove zonal segregation in large steel ingots. The main problem in the field of usage of material, produced by new melting methods is the expansion of the product nomenclature and the development of technical conditions, reflecting the increase in material properties as a result of new technique application. Importance of development and introduction of new automation and testing methods in metallurgical processes is marked

  12. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of Ti–Zr beta titanium alloy after laser surface remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Y.; Li, X.; Wang, Y.Y.; Zhao, W.; Li, G.; Liu, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The surface mechanical properties of the alloy have been greatly improved. • Its grain size was decreased from 100 μm to 10 μm. • The metastable ω with the size of 20–50 nm was observed in the alloy after LSR. • The strengthening effect is mainly due to fine microstructure and strengthened phase. -- Abstract: The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the microstructural evolution and surface mechanical properties of Ti–Zr beta titanium alloy were investigated. The surfaces of the Ti–Zr alloy was re-melted using a CO 2 laser. X-ray diffraction, Scanning electron microscope, Transmission electron microscope, nanoindentation, and microhardness analyses were performed to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties of the alloy. The results showed that the alloy microstructure in the remelting region was greatly refined and homogeneous compared with that in the base material because of the rapid remelting and resolidifying. Meanwhile, the metastable hexagonal ω phases with the size of 20–50 nm was found and uniformly distributed throughout the β matrix after LSR. Phase transformation and microstructural refinement were the major microstructural changes in the alloys after LSR. The microhardness and elastic modulus in the remelted region clearly increased by 92.9% and 21.78%, respectively, compared with those in the region without laser processing. The strengthening effect of LSR on the mechanical properties of the Ti–Zr alloy was also addressed. Our results indicated that LSR was an effective method of improving the surface mechanical properties of alloys

  13. Remelting of Aluminium by Continuous Submersion of Rolled Scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farner, Snorre

    2000-12-01

    When remelting aluminium scrap, metal losses due to dross generation is a common problem. Reduction of these losses will give substantial economic and environmental benefits. Dross is generated when aluminium metal oxidizes and films of oxide envelope molten metal. When a cold metal object is immersed in a melt, the heat of the melt around this is transferred so rapidly into the object that a shell of melt often solidifies to the surface of the object. When scrap with low bulk density is charged to a melt, solidification of melt on the cold scrap prevents melt from entering the cavities in the bulk of the scrap, and the bulk density remains low. Thus the scrap tends to float on the melt surface. Submersion of this scrap is important to avoid oxidation and subsequent dross generation. One solution to this is to roll scrap to a strip and feed it into the melt. This system has been examined by studying feeding of a continuous, thin aluminium plate into molten aluminium. Also, the effect of lacquer was considered, as well as feeding the plate into a launder with melt flowing along the surface of the plate. An analytical, one-dimensional, steady-state model has been developed to describe the melting and the melting mechanisms. It is based on a shell solidifying on the plate surface and a gap introducing a thermal resistance 1/h{sub g} between the shell and the plate. The thermal resistance 1/h{sub l} of the boundary layer of the melt is included. Depending on these resistances, the initial temperature of the plate and the melt temperature, a shell will form, and the plate will penetrate a distance P into the melt before it melts away. An experimental apparatus was designed and constructed to feed aluminium plate from a coil into a melt bath at a specified velocity. The plate could be withdrawn rapidly to ''freeze'' the situation like it was below the melt surface. The penetration depth P of the plate could be measured and shell formation observed

  14. HPDL Remelting of Anodised Al-Si-Cu Cast Alloys Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Labisz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the investigations of the laser remelting of the AlSi9Cu4 cast aluminium alloy with the anodised and non-anodised surfacelayer and hardness changes have been presented in this paper. The surface layer of the tested aluminium samples was remelted with thelaser of a continuous work. The power density was from 8,17•103 W/cm2 to 1,63•104 W/cm2. The metallographic tests were conducted inform of light microscope investigations of the received surface layer. The main goal of the investigation was to find the relation betweenthe laser beam power and its power density falling on a material, evaluating the shape and geometry of the remelted layers and theirhardness. As the substrate material two types of surfaces of the casted AlSi9Cu4 alloy were applied – the non–treated as cast surface aswell the anodized surface. As a device for this type of surface laser treatment the High Power Diode Laser was applied with a maximumpower of 2.2 kW and the dimensions of the laser beam focus of 1.8 x 6.8 mm. By mind of such treatment it is also possible to increasehardness as well eliminate porosity and develop metallurgical bonding at the coating-substrate interface. Suitable operating conditions forHPDL laser treatment were finally determined, ranging from 1.0 to 2.0 kW. Under such conditions, taking into account the absorptionvalue, the effects of laser remelting on the surface shape and roughness were studied. The results show that surface roughness is reducedwith increasing laser power by the remelting process only for the non-anodised samples, and high porosity can be found in the with highpower remelted areas. The laser influence increases with the heat input of the laser processing as well with the anodisation of the surface,because of the absorption enhancement ensured through the obtained alumina layer.

  15. An analysis of the joints’ properties of thick-grained steel welded by the SAW and ESW methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk R.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of properties of welded joints of thick-grained steel of P460NH type used more and more often in the modern constructions. A process of examining a technology of welding has been carried out on the thick-walled butt joints of sheet metal by two methods of welding namely submerged arc welding (SAW - 121 and electroslag (ESW - 722. The article deals with a topic of optimizing a process of welding thick-walled welded joints of fine-grained steel due to their mechanical properties and efficiency.

  16. The evaluation process of the decommissioning of nuclear installations from the perspective of materials remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornacek, M.; Necas, V.; Zachar, M.

    2012-01-01

    The subject of the work is to evaluate the process of decommissioning SW from operation in terms of releasable materials into the environment in the form of ingots after remelting depending on the changes of selected input parameters. The number as well as batch load is analysed in terms of compliance with the limits for release into the environment. Calculations were carried out by means of OMEGA and MicroShield , which are described more detailed in the next sections. (author)

  17. Laser re-melting of tungsten damaged by transient heat loads

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loewenhoff, Th.; Linke, J.; Matějíček, Jiří; Rasinski, M.; Vostřák, M.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, December (2016), s. 165-170 ISSN 2352-1791. [International Conference of Fusion Reactor Material (ICFRM-17) /17./. Aachen, 11.10.2015-16.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma facing material * Laser surface remelting * Transient heat load * Tungsten Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nme.2016.04.004

  18. Microstructure and sliding wear properties of HVOF sprayed, laser remelted and laser clad Stellite 6 coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Houdková, Š.; Pala, Zdeněk; Smazalová, E.; Vostřák, M.; Česánek, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 129-141 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Stellite 6 * HVOF * Laser remelting * Laser clad * Wear * Phase transformation Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials OBOR OECD: Coating and films Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0257897216308817

  19. Near-liquidus forging, partial remelting and thixoforging of an AZ91D + Y magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zude; Chen Qiang; Hu Chuankai; Huang Shuhai; Wang Yuanqing

    2009-01-01

    A new route, near-liquidus forging plus partial remelting, has been developed for obtaining globular microstructures. Firstly, a material is formed by near-liquidus forging for obtaining a fine dendritic microstructure. Globular microstructure can be produced by reheating the material into the semi-solid temperature range for a period of time. In this paper, an AZ91D alloy with the addition of yttrium was prepared by near-liquidus forging. Microstructure evolution during partial remelting was studied at temperatures and for times. Tensile mechanical properties of thixoforged components were also determined. It is shown that the fine dendritic structure firstly evolves into a blocky structure during partial remelting. With prolonged holding time, the blocky structure disintegrates into polygonal solid particles. Prolonging time and increasing temperature promote a faster spheroidization. Good mechanical properties are obtained for the thixoforged AZ91D alloy with the addition of yttrium prepared by near-liquidus forging, with a yield strength of 160.9 MPa and a ultimate tensile strength of 301.7 MPa and a elongation to fracture of 9.734%.

  20. ESRC guide vanes of hydraulic turbine for Three Gorges project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui CHEN

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and internal quality of low carbon martensite Electroslag Remelting Casting (ESRCstainless steel castings are superior to that of sand casting ones. The key technologies for the equipments and ESRC processes have been resolved during the experimental research period of guide vanes of hydraulic turbines for Three Gorges project. And ESRC guide vanes of hydraulic turbines for Three Gorges project have been produced successfully.

  1. Characterization of an AISI H-13 steel for work in hot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godinez, J.; Robles, E.

    1998-01-01

    Two materials were acquired which elaborated through secondary refining processes known as electroslag refusing (ESR) and electric arc in vacuum refusing (VAR) were acquired. These materials were thermically treated, for subsequently to determine their mechanical properties in longitudinal and transversal directions with respect to rolling direction, moreover they were characterized through scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction determining microstructure, carbides and non-metallic inclusions. The results of the mechanical essays allowed to evaluate the fracture toughness to this steel by the Barsom and Rolfe method. (Author)

  2. Hydrogen attack of steel. Progress report, April 1, 1978--March 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewmon, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    Four normalized carbon steels made in different ways (Si-killed, Al-killed, REM-treated, and electroslag refined) were studied to determine the role of differing fine inclusions on the early stages of hydrogen attack (HA). Hydrogen exposures were made at 450 0 C (6.5 MPa) and 375 0 C (7.6 MPa). The first stage of HA is shown to be the development of a closely spaced (1-2 μm) array of small bubbles over the ferrite/pearlite, or occasionally the ferrite/ferrite boundaries. These grew together to form tears, primarily in the rolling plane, leading to more rapid expansion normal to this plane. The planes of separation followed high solute layers in banded steel but only rarely did the fracture surfaces follow inclusions. At 450 0 C REM-treated steel was attacked the fastest and the Al-killed steel took two to four times as long for attack

  3. Laser borided composite layer produced on austenitic 316L steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajczak Daria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Austenitic 316L steel is well-known for its good resistance to corrosion and oxidation. Therefore, this material is often used wherever corrosive media or high temperatures are to be expected. The main drawback of this material is very low hardness and low resistance to mechanical wear. In this study, the laser boriding was used in order to improve the wear behavior of this material. As a consequence, a composite surface layer was produced. The microstructure of laser-borided steel was characterized by only two zones: re-melted zone and base material. In the re-melted zone, a composite microstructure, consisting of hard ceramic phases (borides and a soft austenitic matrix, was observed. A significant increase in hardness and wear resistance of such a layer was obtained.

  4. Effect of re-melting on particle distribution and interface formation in SiC reinforced 2124Al matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Durbadal, E-mail: durbadal73@yahoo.co.in [MEF Division, CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India); Viswanathan, Srinath [Dept of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement particles plays an important role in improving properties of the metal matrix composites. Hence, it is important to find out the interface structure of composite after re-melting. In the present investigation, the 2124Al matrix with 10 wt.% SiC particle reinforced composite was re-melted at 800 °C and 900 °C for 10 min followed by pouring into a permanent mould. The microstructures reveal that the SiC particles are distributed throughout the Al-matrix. The volume fraction of SiC particles varies from top to bottom of the composite plate and the difference increases with the decrease of re-melting temperature. The interfacial structure of re-melted 2124Al–10 wt.%SiC composite was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, an electron probe micro-analyzer, a scanning transmission electron detector fitted with scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer. It is found that a thick layer of reaction product is formed at the interface of composite after re-melting. The experimental results show that the reaction products at the interface are associated with high concentration of Cu, Mg, Si and C. At re-melting temperature, liquid Al reacts with SiC to form Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and Al–Si eutectic phase or elemental Si at the interface. High concentration of Si at the interface indicates that SiC is dissociated during re-melting. The X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer analyses confirm that Mg- and Cu-enrich phases are formed at the interface region. The Mg is segregated at the interface region and formed MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the presence of oxygen. The several elements identified at the interface region indicate that different types of interfaces are formed in between Al matrix and SiC particles. The Al–Si eutectic phase is formed around SiC particles during re-melting which restricts the SiC dissolution. - Highlights: • Re-melted composite shows homogeneous particle

  5. Fatigue Life and Microstructure after Multiple Remelting of A359 Matrix Composites Reinforced with SiC Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klasik A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of fatigue life tests and microstructure examinations of A359 alloy matrix composites (F3S.10S and F3S.30S containing 10 and 30wt% of SiC particles, subjected to multiple remelting by conventional gravity casting. Mechanical characteristics were determined in a modified low cycle fatigue (MLCF test, enabling rapid estimation of fatigue life and other mechanical parameters in practice of any material. Qualitative and quantitative metallographic examinations were also carried out. The quantitative evaluation of microstructure was performed by computer image analysis. A set of geometrical parameters of the reinforcing particles, pores and eutectic precipitates present in the metal matrix was determined. The relationships between the mechanical parameters, structural characteristics and the number of remelting operations were presented. It was found that up to the fourth remelting, the mechanical characteristics, including fatigue life, are slightly deteriorated but decrease gradually in the subsequent operations of remelting. The observed effect is mainly due to the shrinkage porosity occurring as a result of gravity casting. To eliminate this defect, the use of squeeze casting process was recommended. It has also been shown that multiple remelting can be an easy and economically well-founded alternative to other more expensive recycling methods.

  6. Refining technology for the recycling of stainless steel radioactive scrap metals, FY 94 bi-annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizia, R.E.; Atteridge, D.G.; Buckentin, J.; Carter, J.; Davis, H.L.; Devletian, J.H.; Scholl, M.R.; Turpin, R.B.; Webster, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    The research addressed under this project is the recycling of metallic nuclear-related by-product materials under the direction of Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO). The program addresses the recycling of radioactive scrap metals (RSM) for beneficial re-use within the DOE complex; in particular, this program addresses the recycling of stainless steel RSM. It is anticipated that various stainless steel components under WINCO control at the Idaho Falls Engineering Laboratory (INEL), such as fuel pool criticality barriers and fuel storage racks will begin to be recycled in FY94-95. The end product of this recycling effort is expected to be waste and overpack canisters for densified high level waste for the Idaho Waste Immobilization Facility and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific components of this problem area that are presently being, or have been, addressed by CAAMSEC are: (1) the melting/remelting of stainless steel RSM into billet form; (2) the melting/remelting initial research focus will be on the use of radioactive surrogates to study; (3) the cost effectiveness of RSM processing oriented towards privatization of RSM reuse and/or resale. Other components of this problem that may be addressed under program extension are: (4) the melting/remelting of carbon steel; (5) the processing of billet material into product form which shall meet all applicable ASTM requirements; and, (6) the fabrication of an actual prototypical product; the present concept of an end product is a low carbon Type 304/316 stainless steel cylindrical container for densified and/or vitrified high level radioactive waste and/or the Universal Canister System for dry (interim) storage of spent fuel. The specific work reported herein covers the melting/remelting of stainless steel open-quotes scrapclose quotes metal into billet form and the study of surrogate material removal effectiveness by various remelting techniques

  7. The oxidation kinetics for sublimates formed during niobium electron-beam remelting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chumarev, V.M.; Gulyaeva, R.I.; Mar'evich, V.P.; Upolovnikova, A.G.; Udoeva, L.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation of sublimates of Nb-Al electron beam remelting is investigated under conditions of isothermal and continuous heating in the air. It is stated that basic oxidation products are niobium and aluminium oxides, as well as aluminium niobates of variable composition of Al 2 O 3 · mNb 2 O 5 . The more aluminium enriched sublimates possess an increased resistance to oxidation. Formed in sublimates NbAl 3 intermetallic compound features the highest heat resistance. Oxidation parameters are determined by the method of nonisothermic kinetics. It is noted that the running processes exhibit a multistage nature and are limited by internal diffusion [ru

  8. Dendrite Array Disruption by Bubbles during Re-melting in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard N.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Pore Formation and Mobility Investigation (PFMI), Succinonitrile Water alloys consisting of aligned dendritic arrays were re-melted prior to conducting directional solidification experiments in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station. Thermocapillary convection initiated by bubbles at the solid-liquid interface during controlled melt back of the alloy was observed to disrupt the initial dendritic alignment. Disruption ranged from detaching large arrays to the transport of small dendrite fragments at the interface. The role of bubble size and origin is discussed along with subsequent consequences upon reinitiating controlled solidification.

  9. Microstructure and wear resistance of laser cladded Ni-Cr-Co-Ti-V high-entropy alloy coating after laser remelting processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zhaobing; Cui, Xiufang; Liu, Zhe; Li, Yang; Dong, Meiling; Jin, Guo

    2018-02-01

    An attempt, combined with the technologies of laser cladding and laser remelting, has been made to develop a Ni-Cr-Co-Ti-V high entropy alloy coating. The phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and wear resistance (rolling friction) were studied in detail. The results show that after laser remelting, the phase composition remains unchanged, that is, as-cladded coating and as-remelted coatings are all composed of (Ni, Co)Ti2 intermetallic compound, Ti-rich phase and BCC solid solution phase. However, after laser remelting, the volume fraction of Ti-rich phase increases significantly. Moreover, the micro-hardness is increased, up to ∼900 HV at the laser remelting parameters: laser power of 1 kW, laser spot diameter of 3 mm, and laser speed of 10 mm/s. Compared to the as-cladded high-entropy alloy coating, the as-remelted high-entropy alloy coatings have high friction coefficient and low wear mass loss, indicating that the wear resistance of as-remelted coatings is improved and suggesting practical applications, like coatings on brake pads for wear protection. The worn surface morphologies show that the worn mechanism of as-cladded and as-remelted high-entropy alloy coatings are adhesive wear.

  10. Interface Analyses Between a Case-Hardened Ingot Casting Steel and Carbon-Containing and Carbon-Free Refractories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruhstorfer, Jens; Dudczig, Steffen; Rudolph, Martin; Schmidt, Gert; Brachhold, Nora; Schöttler, Leandro; Rafaja, David; Aneziris, Christos G.

    2018-06-01

    Corrosion tests of carbon-free and carbon-containing refractories were performed. The carbon-free crucibles corroded, whereas the carbon-containing crucibles were negligibly attacked. On them, inclusions were attached. This study investigates melt oxygen contents, interface properties, and steel compositions with their non-metallic inclusions in order to explore the inclusion formation and deposition mechanisms. The carbon-free crucibles were based on alumina, mullite, and zirconia- and titania-doped alumina (AZT). The carbon-containing (-C) ones were alumina-C and AZT-C. Furthermore, nanoscaled carbon and alumina additives (-n) were applied in an AZT-C-n material. In the crucibles, the case-hardened steel 17CrNiMo7-6 was remelted at 1580 °C. It was observed that the melt and steel oxygen contents were higher for the tests in the carbon-free crucibles. Into these crucibles, the deoxidizing alloying elements Mn and Si diffused. Reducing contents of deoxidizing elements resulted in higher steel oxygen levels and less inclusions, mainly of the inclusion group SiO2-core-MnS-shell (2.5 to 8 μ m). These developed from smaller SiO2 nuclei. The inclusion amount in the steel was highest after remelting in AZT-C-n for 30 minutes but decreased strongly with increasing remelting time (60 minutes) due to inclusions' deposition on the refractory surface. The Ti from the AZT and the nanoadditives supported inclusion growth and deposition. Other inclusion groups were alumina and calcium aluminate inclusions. Their contents were high after remelting in carbon- or AZT-containing crucibles but generally decreased during remelting. On the AZT-C-n crucible, a dense layer formed from vitreous compositions including Al, Ca, Mg, Si, and Ti. To summarize, for reducing forming inclusion amounts, mullite is recommended as refractory material. For capturing formed inclusions, AZT-C-n showed a high potential.

  11. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  12. Effects of laser remelting on microstructures and immersion corrosion performance of arc sprayed Al coating in 3.5% NaCl solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ze; Zhang, Donghui; Yan, Baoxu; Kong, Dejun

    2018-02-01

    An arc sprayed aluminum (Al) coating on S355 steel was processed using a laser remelting (LR). The microstructures, chemical element composition, and phases of the obtained Al coating were analyzed using a field mission scanning electronic microscope (FESEM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), and X-ray diffractometer (XRD), respectively, and the residual stresses were measured using an X-ray diffraction stress tester. The immersion corrosion tests and potentiodynamic polarization of Al coating in 3.5% NaCl solution were performed to investigate the effects of LR on its immersion corrosion behaviors, and the corrosion mechanism of Al coating was also discussed. The results show that the arc sprayed Al coating is composed of Al phase, while that by LR is composed of Al-Fe and AlO4FeO6 phases, and the porosities and cracks in the arc sprayed Al coating are eliminated by LR, The residual stress of arc sprayed Al coating is -5.6 ± 18 MPa, while that after LR is 137.9 ± 12 MPa, which deduces the immersion corrosion resistance of Al coating. The corrosion mechanism of arc sprayed Al coating is pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion, while that by LR is uniform corrosion and pitting corrosion. The corrosion potential of arc sprayed Al coating by LR shifts positively, which improves its immersion corrosion resistance.

  13. Study of the properties of biotitico-quartzitic gneisses from locality Braniskoin natural form and after remelting in atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharov Michal

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the changes of structural and physico-chemical properties after remelting of a temperature over 1615 °C. The following properties were analysed: chemical composition and microscopic changes in the structure of mineral.

  14. Microstructure, microhardness and corrosion resistance of remelted TiG2 and Ti6Al4V by a high power diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya-Vazquez, M.R.; Sánchez-Amaya, J.M.; Boukha, Z.; Botana, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Laser remelting of TiG2 and Ti6Al4V is performed with argon shielded diode laser. ► Microstructure, microhardness and corrosion of remelted samples are deeply analysed. ► Microstructural changes of laser remelted TiG2 lead to microhardness increase. ► Remelted Ti6Al4V presents microhardness increase and corrosion improvement. ► Martensite depth in remelted Ti6Al4V is linearly proportional to laser fluence. - Abstract: The high strength, low density and superior corrosion resistance allow titanium alloys to be widely employed in different industrial applications. The properties of these alloys can be modulated by different heat treatments, including laser processing. In the present paper, laser remelting treatments, performed with a high power diode laser, were applied to samples of two titanium alloys (TiG2 and Ti6Al4V). The influence of the applied laser fluence on microstructure, microhardness and corrosion resistance is investigated. Results show that laser remelting treatments with appropriate fluences provoke microstructural changes leading to microhardness increase and corrosion resistance improvement.

  15. Microstructure, microhardness and corrosion resistance of remelted TiG2 and Ti6Al4V by a high power diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya-Vazquez, M.R. [Laboratorio de Corrosion y Proteccion, Universidad de Cadiz, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Avda. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sanchez-Amaya, J.M., E-mail: josemaria.sanchez@uca.es [Titania, Ensayos y Proyectos Industriales S.L., Ctra Sanlucar A-2001 Km 7,5, Parque Tecnologico TecnoBahia-Edif. RETSE Nave 4, 11500 El Puerto de Santa Maria, Cadiz (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CASEM, Avda. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510-Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Boukha, Z.; Botana, F.J. [Laboratorio de Corrosion y Proteccion, Universidad de Cadiz, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Avda. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser remelting of TiG2 and Ti6Al4V is performed with argon shielded diode laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure, microhardness and corrosion of remelted samples are deeply analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural changes of laser remelted TiG2 lead to microhardness increase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Remelted Ti6Al4V presents microhardness increase and corrosion improvement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Martensite depth in remelted Ti6Al4V is linearly proportional to laser fluence. - Abstract: The high strength, low density and superior corrosion resistance allow titanium alloys to be widely employed in different industrial applications. The properties of these alloys can be modulated by different heat treatments, including laser processing. In the present paper, laser remelting treatments, performed with a high power diode laser, were applied to samples of two titanium alloys (TiG2 and Ti6Al4V). The influence of the applied laser fluence on microstructure, microhardness and corrosion resistance is investigated. Results show that laser remelting treatments with appropriate fluences provoke microstructural changes leading to microhardness increase and corrosion resistance improvement.

  16. Nitrogen alloyed material for steam turbine and generator components: an alternative to expensive nondestructive inservice inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, G.; Menzel, J.

    1990-01-01

    In efforts to improve the efficiency of energy conversion systems the trend in power generation is towards increased output capacities, pressures and, in particular, temperatures. If these goals are to be achieved, it will be necessary for materials displaying distinctly improved properties to be used without this involving any dramatic rise in costs, e.g. by the use of superalloys. A new steel making technique, based on pressurized electroslag remelting, has spawned a new generation of advanced engineering materials, the nitrogen alloyed steels. The paper describes the properties of these ferritic and austenitic N-steels and their potential for future applications

  17. Interaction between computational modelling and experiments for vacuum consumable arc remelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, L. A.; Zanner, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    A combined computational-experimental modelling effort is currently underway to characterize the vacuum consumable arc remelt process. This effort involves the coupling of experimental results with a magnetohydrodynamic flow model which is capable of time accurate solutions of the interdependent fluid flow-solidification process in the ingot. Models such as this are driven by boundary conditions. Considerable data have been compiled from direct observation of the electrode tip and molten pool surface by means of high speed photography in order to gain an understanding of the processes at the pool surface and the appropriate corresponding boundary conditions. The crucible wall/molten metal miniscus conditions are less well understood. Pool volumes are computed at different melting currents and show reasonable agreement with experimentally determined values. Current flow through the ingot is evaluated numerically and the results indicate that a significant portion of the melt current does not reach the interior of the ingot. U-6 wt. % Nb alloy was used.

  18. Laser surface modification of boronickelized medium carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Pertek, Aleksandra; Kulka, Michał; Klimek, Leszek

    2015-11-01

    A two-step process was applied to produce the multicomponent boride layers. Boronickelizing consisted of nickel plating and diffusion boriding. Two different methods of heat treatment of boronickelized C45 steel were used: a typical through-hardening, and a laser surface modification with remelting. Microstructure and some mechanical properties of these layers were examined. Microstructural characterization was studied using optical microscope, Scanning Electron Microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction and X-ray diffraction. The laser modification improved wear resistance, cohesion as well as low-cycle fatigue of the boronickelized layer. Compressive stresses, occurring after laser remelting, could be the reason for the advantageous mechanical behavior of the layer.

  19. Influence of the counter-pressure casting on the macrostructure of high nitrogen steel industrial blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.; Rashev, Ts.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of high nitrogen steel (HNS) sheets production has not yet been solved. Sheets represent 90% of the world output of stainless and other steels, but there are no published data about HNS technologies and production of sheets on an industrial scale. The big steel bath (BSB) method and the counter-pressure casting (CPC) have proved the possibility of producing highly homogeneous ingots (1.3 and 10 tons) with all alloying elements, including nitrogen. In this way, the BSB and CPC methods have proved themselves to be universal ones for the production of shaped castings, HNS electrodes for remelting and sort, as well as, of sheets. (orig.)

  20. Modern trends in increasing the quality of the steels intended for cutting and metal-working tools: I. Improvement of granule metallurgy processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyanchikov, L. N.

    2008-12-01

    The following new technological processes for producing fine gas-atomized powders of tool and high-speed steels with a low content of nonmetallic inclusions are considered: the process designed by Böhler Uddeholm Powder Technology (Austria) and processes involving a heated gas. In the former process, a metal is poured from a ladle with electroslag heating, and the atomizing unit consists of three injectors. A new process of producing tools from fine powders by three-dimensional printing, i.e., so-called 3D-printing, is described.

  1. Characterization of an AISI H-13 steel for work in hot; Caracterizacion del acero H-13 AISI para trabajado en caliente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinez, J.; Robles, E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Sintesis y Caracterizacion de Materiales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Two materials were acquired which elaborated through secondary refining processes known as electroslag refusing (ESR) and electric arc in vacuum refusing (VAR) were acquired. These materials were thermically treated, for subsequently to determine their mechanical properties in longitudinal and transversal directions with respect to rolling direction, moreover they were characterized through scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction determining microstructure, carbides and non-metallic inclusions. The results of the mechanical essays allowed to evaluate the fracture toughness to this steel by the Barsom and Rolfe method. (Author)

  2. Structure and properties of the tool steel after electron beam treatment and following tempering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozyr', I.G.; Borodin, R.V.; Voropaev, A.V.; Potapov, V.G.

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of changing the surface structure of chromium tool steel has been considered. The given properties were reached through the surface remelting by electron beam with following tempering of strengthened layer. The found distinguished zones with different structure and properties are formed as the result of this treatment. It is shown that for hipereutectoid steel the thermal furnace annealing at 300 deg C is necessary for strengthened surface layer forming after electron beam remelting. The same result can be had by means of short-term heating with electronic beam up to higher temperatures, but is not higher A 1 . The evaluation of temperature fields was carried out by numerical solution of nonstationary heat conductivity equation

  3. Remelting of aluminium with the addition of AlTi5B1 and AlTi3C0,15 grain refiners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobešrek, M.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available It was found that concentration of boron in aluminium with the addition of AlTi5B1 grain refiner is decreasing during remelting as a consequence of TiB2 particles settling down due to gravity. TiB2 particles remained in aluminium after four remelts shows lower effect of grain refinement compared to non-remelted samples with the same TiB2 content. It was also found that TiC particles are still present in aluminium with the addition of AlTi3C0,15 grain refiner after four remelts and they probably participate in nucleation of α-Al grains.

  4. Refusion of zircaloy scraps by VAR (vacuum arc remelting): preliminary results; Fusao de cavacos de zircaloy por VAR: resultados preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, L.A.T.; Mucsi, C.S.; Sato, I.M.; Rossi, J.L.; Martinez, L.G., E-mail: lgallego@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Correa, H.P.S. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Orlando, M.T.D. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Fuel elements and structural components of the core of PWR nuclear reactors are made in zirconium alloys known as Zircaloy. Machining chips and shavings resulting from the manufacturing of these components can not be discarded as scrap, once these alloys are strategic materials for the nuclear area, have high costs and are not produced in Brazil on an industrial bases and, consequently, are imported for the manufacture of nuclear fuel. The reuse of Zircaloy chips has economic, strategic and environmental aspects. In this work is proposed a process for recycling Zircaloy scraps using a VAR (vacuum arc remelting) furnace in order to obtain ingots suitable for the manufacture of components of the reactors. The ingots obtained are being studied in order to verify the influence of processing on composition and microstructure of the remelted material. In this work are presented preliminary results of the composition of obtained ingots compared to start material and the resulting microstructure. (author)

  5. The Influence of Remelting on the Properties of AlSi6Cu4 Alloy Modified by Antimony

    OpenAIRE

    Medlen D.; Bolibruchova D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of multiple remelting influence on AlSi6Cu4 alloy modified by antimony on chosen mechanical characteristics, microstructure and gas content. This foundry alloy is used mostly in automotive industry. Foundry Aluminum-Silicon alloys are also used in number of industrial weight sensitive applications because of their low weight and very good castability and good mechanical properties. Modifiers are usually added to molten aluminum-silicon alloys to refine the eut...

  6. Grain refinement of AZ91D alloy by intensive melt shearing and its persistence after remelting and isothermal holding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Yubo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensive melt shearing has a significant grain refining effect on some light alloys. However, the persistence of the grain refining effect during isothermal holding and remelting is still unclear, although it is very important for the practical application. In this study, intensive melt shearing was achieved in a twin-screw mechanism to investigate its grain refining effect on AZ91D magnesium alloy. The refinement mechanism was discussed and the persistence of grain refinement after remelting and isothermal holding was also studied. A Zeiss imaging system with polarized light was used for quantitative measurement of grain size. The results show that the intensive melt shearing has a significant grain refining effect on AZ91D magnesium alloy. With the application of intensive melt shearing, the grain size of AZ91D magnesium alloy can be reduced from 530 μm (for a typical as-cast microstructure to 170 μm, which is about 70% size reduction. The grain refinement achieved by the intensive melt shearing can be partially kept after isothermal holding and remelting. It is believed that the refinement effect was mainly due to the finer and well dispersed oxide particles formed by high intensive shearing. The smaller size of oxide particles and their slow motion velocity in the sheared melt could make important contributions to the remained grain refinement.

  7. Experiences within British Steel since 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, D.S.

    1999-01-01

    The experience of British steel is that there is a serious and continuing threat of radioactive material being included in scrap delivered to steelworks. All scrap entering the steelworks is monitored for radioactivity. The scrap suppliers and the national authorities have recognized the difficulties caused by the presence of radioactivity in scrap, and are working to minimise the problem. Both domestic and imported scrap has been found to contain radioactivity, but the imported scrap is much more likely to contain radioactivity. If radioactivity is found the Environmental Agency is informed, and established procedures are used to minimise the hazard, and to isolate the radioactivity. Detecting, and isolating radioactive scrap, and preventing it being re-melted in the steelmaking process, is part of the overall commitment of British Steel to work safely, and to provide a safe, good quality, product (author)

  8. Stainless steel recycle FY94 progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imrich, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Materials Technology Section (MTS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was asked to demonstrate the practicality of recycling previously contaminated stainless steel components such as reactor heat exchanger heads, process water piping and slug buckets into 208 liters (55 gallon) drums and 2.8 cubic meter (100 ft 3 ) storage boxes. Radioactively contaminated stainless steel scrap will be sent to several industrial partners where it will be melted, decontaminated/cast into ingots, and rolled into plate and sheet and fabricated into the drums and boxes. As part of this recycle initiative, MTS was requested to demonstrate that radioactively contaminated Type 304L stainless steel could be remelted and cast to meet the applicable ASTM specification for fabrication of drums and boxes. In addition, MTS was requested to develop the technical basis of melt decontamination and establish practicality of using this approach for value added products. The findings presented in this investigation lead to the following conclusions: recycle of 18 wt% Cr-8 wt% Ni alloy can be achieved by melting Type 304 stainless steel in a air vacuum induction furnace; limited melt decontamination of the contaminated stainless steel was achieved, surface contamination was removed by standard decontamination techniques; carbon uptake in the as-cast ingots resulted from the graphite susceptor used in this experiment and is unavoidable with this furnace configuration. A new furnace optimized for melting stainless steel has been installed and is currently being tested for use in this program

  9. Investigation of Acoustic Emission during Fracture Toughness Testing of Chevron-Notched Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    chevron-notched specimlens was employed to investigate crack growth in four steels )rel)ared by electroslag-remelt casting. 15-5PH, AISI 4140 , D6AC, and...this investigation: 15-SPH, AISI 4140 , D6AC and AISI 440C. The composition of each steel is given in Table 1. Castings were prepared by electro- slag...well defined, it appears that the AISI 4140 (Figure 2b) and the D6AC (Figure 2c) failed primarily by cleavage also. The fracture illustrated in Figure

  10. The Effect of Remelting on the Physical Properties of Borotellurite Glass Doped with Manganese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Syed Putra Hashim Syed; Sidek, Haji Abdul Aziz; Halimah, Mohamed Kamari; Matori, Khamirul Amin; Yusof, Wan Mohamad Daud Wan; Zaid, Mohd Hafiz Mohd

    2013-01-01

    A systematic set of borotellurite glasses doped with manganese (1–x) [(B2O3)0.3(TeO2)0.7]-xMnO, with x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mol%, were successfully synthesized by using a conventional melt and quench-casting technique. In this study, the remelting effect of the glass samples on their microstructure was investigated through density measurement and FT-IR spectra and evaluated by XRD techniques. Initial experimental results from XRD evaluation show that there are two distinct phases of glassy and crystallite microstructure due to the existence of peaks in the sample. The different physical behaviors of the studied glasses were closely related to the concentration of manganese in each phase. FTIR spectra revealed that the addition of manganese oxide contributes the transformation of TeO4 trigonal bipyramids with bridging oxygen (BO) to TeO3 trigonal pyramids with non-bridging oxygen (NBO). PMID:23296276

  11. The Effect of Remelting on the Physical Properties of Borotellurite Glass Doped with Manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Putra Hashim Syed Hashim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A systematic set of borotellurite glasses doped with manganese (1–x [(B2O30.3(TeO20.7]-xMnO, with x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mol%, were successfully synthesized by using a conventional melt and quench-casting technique. In this study, the remelting effect of the glass samples on their microstructure was investigated through density measurement and FT-IR spectra and evaluated by XRD techniques. Initial experimental results from XRD evaluation show that there are two distinct phases of glassy and crystallite microstructure due to the existence of peaks in the sample. The different physical behaviors of the studied glasses were closely related to the concentration of manganese in each phase. FTIR spectra revealed that the addition of manganese oxide contributes the transformation of TeO4 trigonal bipyramids with bridging oxygen (BO to TeO3 trigonal pyramids with non-bridging oxygen (NBO.

  12. Effect of Remelting Duration on Microstructure and Properties of SiCp/Al Composite Fabricated by Powder-Thixoforming for Electronic Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Cai

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a novel processing method called powder thixoforming was proposed to prepare composites reinforced with 50 vol % of SiC particles (SiCp that were used for electronic packaging in order to investigate the effects of remelting duration on its microstructure and properties. Optical Microscope (OM, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, X-ray Diffraction (XRD and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM methods were applied for the material characterization and the corresponding physical and mechanical properties were examined in detail. The obtained results indicate that the remelting duration exerted a large effect on the microstructure as well as the SiCp/Al interfacial reaction. The density and hardness of the composite continuously increased with increasing remelting duration. The thermal conductivity (TC and bending strength (BS first increased during the initial 90 min and then decreased. The remelting duration exerted a limited influence on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE. The optimal TC, BS, and hardness of these composites were up to 135.79 W/(m·K, 348.53 MPa, and 105.23 HV, respectively, and the CTE was less than 6.5 ppm/K after the composites were remelted at 600 °C for 90 min. The properties of the composites could thus be controlled to conform to the application requirements for electronic packaging materials.

  13. Regional distribution and losses of end-of-life steel throughout multiple product life cycles-Insights from the global multiregional MaTrace model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Kondo, Yasushi; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Kenichi

    2017-01-01

    Substantial amounts of post-consumer scrap are exported to other regions or lost during recovery and remelting, and both export and losses pose a constraint to desires for having regionally closed material cycles. To quantify the challenges and trade-offs associated with closed-loop metal recycling, we looked at the material cycles from the perspective of a single material unit and trace a unit of material through several product life cycles. Focusing on steel, we used current process parameters, loss rates, and trade patterns of the steel cycle to study how steel that was originally contained in high quality applications such as machinery or vehicles with stringent purity requirements gets subsequently distributed across different regions and product groups such as building and construction with less stringent purity requirements. We applied MaTrace Global, a supply-driven multiregional model of steel flows coupled to a dynamic stock model of steel use. We found that, depending on region and product group, up to 95% of the steel consumed today will leave the use phase of that region until 2100, and that up to 50% can get lost in obsolete stocks, landfills, or slag piles until 2100. The high losses resulting from business-as-usual scrap recovery and recycling can be reduced, both by diverting postconsumer scrap into long-lived applications such as buildings and by improving the recovery rates in the waste management and remelting industries. Because the lifetimes of high-quality (cold-rolled) steel applications are shorter and remelting occurs more often than for buildings and infrastructure, we found and quantified a tradeoff between low losses and high-quality applications in the steel cycle. Furthermore, we found that with current trade patterns, reduced overall losses will lead to higher fractions of secondary steel being exported to other regions. Current loss rates, product lifetimes, and trade patterns impede the closure of the steel cycle.

  14. Investigation into the Cyclic Strength of the Bodies of Steam Shutoff Valves from 10Kh9MFB-Sh Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Kunavin, S. A.; Prudnikov, D. A.; Shchenkova, I. A.; Bazhenov, A. M.; Zadoinyi, V. A.; Starkovskii, G. L.

    2018-02-01

    Steam shutoff valves are operated under complex loading conditions at thermal and nuclear power stations. In addition to exposure to high temperature and stresses resulting in fatigue, these valves are subjected to cyclic loads in heating-up-cooling down, opening-closing, etc. cycles. The number of these cycles to be specified in designing the valves should not exceed the maximum allowable value. Hence, the problem of cyclic failure rate of steam shutoff valve bodies is critical. This paper continues the previous publications about properties of the construction material for steam shutoff valve bodies (grade 10Kh9MFB-Sh steel) produced by electroslag melting and gives the results of investigation into the cyclic strength of this material. Fatigue curves for the steal used for manufacturing steam shutoff valve bodies are presented. The experimental data are compared with the calculated fatigue curves plotted using the procedures outlined in PNAE G-002-986 and RD 10-249-98. It is confirmed that these procedures may be used in designing valve bodies from 10Kh9MFB-Sh steel. The effect of the cyclic damage after preliminary cyclic loading of the specimens according to the prescribed load conditions on the high-temperature strength of the steel is examined. The influence of cyclic failure rate on the long-term strength was investigated using cylindrical specimens with a smooth working section in the as-made conditions and after two regimes of preliminary cyclic loading (training) at a working temperature of 570°C and the number of load cycles exceeding the design value, which was 2 × 103 cycles. The experiments corroborated that the material (10Kh9MFB-Sh steel) of the body manufactured by the method of electroslag melting had high resistance to cyclic failure rate. No effect of cyclic damages in the metal of the investigated specimens on the high-temperature strength has been found.

  15. AFM study of the effects of laser surface remelting on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pariona, Moises Meza, E-mail: mmpariona@uepg.br [Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, State University of Ponta Grossa (UEPG), Ponta Grossa 84010-919, PR (Brazil); Teleginski, Viviane; Santos, Kelly dos; Leandro Ribeiro dos Santos, Everton; Aparecida de Oliveira Camargo de Lima, Angela [Graduate Program in Engineering and Materials Science, State University of Ponta Grossa (UEPG), Ponta Grossa 84010-919, PR (Brazil); Riva, Rudimar [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos 12227-000, SP (Brazil)

    2012-12-15

    Laser beam welding has recently been incorporated into the fabrication process of aircraft and automobile structures. Surface roughness is an important parameter of product quality that strongly affects the performance of mechanical parts, as well as production costs. This parameter influences the mechanical properties such as fatigue behavior, corrosion resistance, creep life, etc., and other functional characteristics such as friction, wear, light reflection, heat transmission, lubrification, electrical conductivity, etc. The effects of laser surface remelting (LSR) on the morphology of Al-Fe aerospace alloys were examined before and after surface treatments, using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), low-angle X-ray diffraction (LA-XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), microhardness measurements (Vickers hardness), and cyclic voltammetry. This analysis was performed on both laser-treated and untreated sanded surfaces, revealing significant differences. The LA-XRD analysis revealed the presence of alumina, simple metals and metastable intermetallic phases, which considerably improved the microhardness of laser-remelted surfaces. The morphology produced by laser surface remelting enhanced the microstructure of the Al-Fe alloys by reducing their roughness and increasing their hardness. The treated surfaces showed passivity and stability characteristics in the electrolytic medium employed in this study. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples laser-treated and untreated showed significant differences. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The La-XRD revealed the presence of alumina in Al-1.5 wt.% Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated reducing the roughness and increasing the hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated surfaces showed characteristic passive in the electrolytic medium. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The laser-treated is a promising technique for applications technological.

  16. Effect of Laser Remelting on Friction-Wear Behaviors of Cold Sprayed Al Coatings in 3.5% NaCl Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jing

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A cold sprayed Al coating on S355 structural steel was processed using a laser remelting (LR. The surface and cross-section morphologies, chemical compositions, and phases of as-obtained Al coating before and after LR were analyzed using a scanning electronic microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, and X-ray diffractometer (XRD, respectively, and their hardness was measured using a micro-hardness tester. The friction-wear behaviors of Al coating before and after LR in 3.5% NaCl solution were conducted to simulate the sand and gravel scouring on its surface in seawater, the effects of wear loads and speeds on the tribological properties of Al coating were analyzed, and the wear mechanisms under different wear loads and speeds were also discussed. The results show that the Al coating after LR is primarily composed of an Al phase and its hardness is 104.66 HV, increasing 54.70 HV than the cold sprayed Al coating. The average coefficient of friction (COF of cold sprayed Al coating at the wear load of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 N is 0.285, 0.239, and 0.435, respectively, while that after LR is 0.243, 0.227, and 0.327, respectively, decreased by 14.73%, 5.02% and 24.83% compared to the cold sprayed Al coating. The wear rate of cold sprayed Al coating at the wear load of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 N is 1.60 × 10−4, 2.36 × 10−4, and 2.40 × 10−4 mm3/m·N, respectively, while that after LR is 1.59 × 10−4, 1.70 × 10−4, and 1.94 × 10–4 mm3/m·N, respectively, decreased by 1%, 32%, and 23%, respectively, indicating that LR has high anti-friction performance. Under the wear load action of 1.0 N, the average COF of laser remelted Al coating at the wear speeds of 300, 400 and 500 times/min is 0.294, 0.279, and 0.239, respectively, and the corresponding wear rate is 1.06 × 10−4, 1.24 × 10−4, and 1.70 × 10−4 mm3/m·N, respectively. The wear mechanism of cold sprayed Al coating is primarily corrosion wear at the loads of 0.5 and 1.0 N, and

  17. The influence of remelting on the properties of AlSi6Cu4 alloy modified by antimony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Medlen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of multiple remelting influence on AlSi6Cu4 alloy modified by antimony on chosen mechanical characteristics, microstructure and gas content. This foundry alloy is used mostly in automotive industry. Foundry Aluminum-Silicon alloys are also used in number of industrial weight sensitive applications because of their low weight and very good castability and good mechanical properties. Modifiers are usually added to molten aluminum-silicon alloys to refine the eutectic phase particle shape and improve the mechanical properties of the final cast products and Al-Si alloys cast properties.

  18. Remelting of nanogranitoids in UHP felsic granulites from Erzgebirge (Bohemian Massif, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-vigil, A.; Stöckhert, B.; Hermann, J.; Yaxley, G.; Cesare, B.; Bartoli, O.

    2017-12-01

    Crustal melting commonly takes place at pressures ≤ 1.5 GPa. Anatexis at UHP conditions, however, can occur during subduction of continental crust down to mantle depths. Understanding the timing, mechanisms and nature of this process is important as it has major mechanical and geochemical implications. One way to address this problem is through the novel studies of nanogranitoids in migmatites and granulites (Cesare et al. 2015). We have remelted crystallized former melt inclusions (nanogranitoids) trapped in garnets of diamond-bearing UHP felsic granulites from Erzgebirge, Bohemian Massif. These rocks are made of Qtz+Phe+Pl+Grt+Ky+Bt+Dia, and their peak conditions have been estimated at P≥4.5 GPa and T≥1000 ºC. Nanogranitoids appear homogeneously distributed throughout the entire garnet crystals, are 5-50 µm across and often isometric, with partially developed negative crystal shape, and were trapped during garnet growth in the presence of melt. The mineral assemblage within nanogranites consists of Qtz+Pl+Phe+Pg+Phl±Ky±Dia±Gr±Ap±Rt (Stöckhert et al. 2009). Fragments of nanogranitoids-bearing garnets were loaded inside gold capsules, enclosed in SiO2 or C powders that acted as cushion, either dry or with H2O in excess, and subjected to conditions between 975-1100 ºC and 2.5-4.5 GPa for 2-24 hrs. Re-homogenization has not been completely achieved. Nanogranitoids partially melt, melt often coexists with Als, diamond or Gr, and Grt grows into the melt to form a higher #Mg and Ti, ≈5 µm fringe. Preliminary EMP analyses indicate that melts are granitic sensu stricto, with low FeOt+MgO (≈2 wt%), moderate to high in ASI, and high in TiO2 (≈0.4-0.8 wt%), P2O5 (up to 1 wt%) and volatiles (100-EMP totals ≈ 10-15 wt%). These preliminary results suggest that (i) anatexis started in the presence of a H2O-rich fluid phase, (ii) melt was present and equilibrated at quite high T (>850-950 ºC, Hayden & Watson 2007) at or close to peak conditions, (iii) Als

  19. Macrosegregation During Re-melting and Holding of Directionally Solidified Al-7 wt.% Si Alloy in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, M.; Ghods, M.; Angart, S. G.; Grugel, R. N.; Tewari, S. N.; Poirier, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    As-cast aluminum-7 wt.% ailicon alloy sample rods were re-melted and directionally solidified on Earth which resulted in uniform dendritically aligned arrays. These arrays were then partially back-melted through an imposed, and constant, temperature gradient in the microgravity environment aboard the International Space Station. The mushy zones that developed in the seed crystals were held for different periods prior to initiating directional solidification. Upon return, examination of the initial mushy-zone regions exhibited significant macrosegregation in terms of a solute-depleted zone that increased as a function of the holding time. The silicon (solute) content in these regions was measured on prepared longitudinal sections by electron microprobe analysis as well as by determining the fraction eutectic on several transverse sections. The silicon content was found to increase up the temperature gradient resulting in significant silicon concentration immediately ahead of the mushy-zone tips. The measured macrosegregation agrees well with calculations from a mathematical model developed to simulate the re-melting and holding process. The results, due to processing in a microgravity environment where buoyancy and thermosolutal convection are minimized, serve as benchmark solidification data.

  20. Experience manufacturing and properties of the high-strength corrosion-resistant magnetic 03Kh12K12D2 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Moshkevich, E.I.; Bakuma, S.F.; Bulat, S.I.; Tikhonenko, V.D.

    1976-01-01

    In industrial conditions, steel 03Kh12K12D2 (DI48-VD) was melted in a 7-tinduction furnace with subsequent vacuum arc remelting. Ingots of dia 500 and 630 mm were forged into slabs and forgings. The slabs were rolled into sheets, 40 mm thick, and the forgings were rolled into sectional shapes. To obtain the optimum mechanical, corrosion, and magnetic properties, the metal was annealed at 600 deg C (10 hr) and 650 deg C (5 and 10 hr). The developed melting and remelting process enabled to obtain steel meeting all the requirements as for the chemical composition, workability, and mechanical magnetic properties. On testing in water with high parameters (200 deg C, 16 kgf/cm 2 ) and in synthetic sea water (70-90 deg C) the corrosion rate did not exceed 1 μm per year

  1. A Preliminary Study to Enhance the Tribological Performance of CoCrMo Alloy by Fibre Laser Remelting for Articular Joint Implant Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chi-Wai; Smith, Graham; Lee, Seunghwan

    2018-01-01

    are chiefly attributable to the presence of the laser-formed hard coating on the surface. Laser remelting possesses several competitive advantages of being a clean, non-contact, fast, highly accurate and automated process compared to other surface coating methods. The promising results of this study point...

  2. Discussion on some problems concerned the origin of hydrothermal uranium deposit from the point of remelting in situ view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ke

    2001-01-01

    The authors try to discuss some problems concerned the origin of hydrothermal uranium (U) deposit from the point of remelting in situ view about granite formation. The problems include the time differences between mineralization and country rock (granite), characteristics, differences between 'large granite bodies' and 'small granite bodies', granite discriminant that is used to judge whether or not granite produce U deposit as well as relationship of U mineralization to W(Sn), Nd, Ta mineralization, red beds and tectonic movements. According to the theory of remelting in situ, granite bodies in the same period that can be investigated are actual doming portions of the same remelting layer, which had be so stripped by erosion that granite bodies rustled. Thus the size variation of granite bodies implies only the fact of different erosion levels. Since U always moves in long distance with hydrothermal solution from its parent granite, it always deposits in outer contact zone, which, as a kind of country rock, might be sedimentary rock (including red bed), metamorphic rock, of early period granite. The two former situations indicate less erosion levels (small granite bodies) while the later situation indicates larger erosion levels (large granite bodies). Because the country rock of later is granite, an illusion of large time difference between mineralization related granite and granite might be made. Also, there is no direct and simple connection between U mineralization and discriminant which is calculated from primary chemical composition of granite and has been unsuccessfully used as an index to judge whether of not a granite body would produce U mineralization because in this situation the granite is only country rock. Besides, the U mineralization is later than the one of W(Sn), Nd, Ta in general so that it often relate to 'large granite bodies', in which 'mineralization crust' is lower than the one of W(Sn), Nd, Ta and mineral composition is relatively simple

  3. Aircraft Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  4. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Casuccio (RJ Lee Group); Michael Potter (RJ Lee Group); Fred Schwerer (RJ Lee Group); Dr. Richard J. Fruehan (Carnegie Mellon University); Dr. Scott Story (US Steel)

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel

  5. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  6. Studies on corrosion protection of laser hybrid welded AISI 316 by laser remelting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming Ove; Ambat, Rajan; Rasmussen, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    laser surface melting on microstructure and corrosion behaviour of AISI 316L welds. Welding and laser treatment parameters were varied. General corrosion behaviour of the weld and laser treated surface was characterised using a gel visualization test. The local electrochemistry of the weld and laser......Unlike in autogenous laser welding, hybrid laser welding of stainless steel could introduce grain boundary carbides due to low cooling rates. Formation of grain boundary carbides leads to reduced corrosion properties. Studies have initially been carried out on hybrid laser welding and subsequent...... treated surface was investigated using a novel micro electrochemical technique with a tip resolution of ~1 mm. Results show that hybrid laser welding of 316L has increased corrosion susceptibility probably as a result of grain boundary carbide formation. However a suitable post laser treatment could...

  7. Effects of Laser Re-melting on the Corrosion Properties of HVOF Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Toor, I. H.; Patel, F.; Baig, M. A.

    2013-05-01

    HVOF coating of Inconel 625 powder on carbon steel is carried out. Laser melting of the resulting coating is realized to improve coating structural integrity. Morphological and microstructural changes are examined in the coating prior and after laser treatment process using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The residual stress developed is measured on the surface vicinity of the laser-treated coating using the XRD technique. The corrosion resistance of the laser-treated and untreated coating surfaces is measured, incorporating the potentiodynamic tests in 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. It is found that laser treatment reduces the pores and produces cellular structures with different sizes and orientations in the coating. Laser-controlled melting improves the corrosion resistance of the coating surface.

  8. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  9. Inertia and friction welding of aluminum alloy 1100 to type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inertia and friction-welding processes were evaluated for joining aluminum alloy 1100-H14 and Type 316 vacuum-induction melted, vacuum-arc remelted (VIM VAR) stainless steel. While both processes consistently produced joints in which the strength exceeded the strength of the aluminum base metal, 100 percent bonding was not reliably achieved with inertia welding. The deficiency points out the need for development of nondestructive testing techniques for this type of joint. Additionally, solid-state volume diffusion did not appear to be a satisfactory explanation for the inertia and friction-welding bonding mechanism

  10. Methods of improvement in hardness of composite surface layer on cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of usable properties of surface layers improvement of cast carbon steel 200–450, by put directly in founding process a composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy and next its remelting with use of welding technology TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas. Technology of composite surface layer guarantee mainly increase in hardness and abrasive wear resistance of cast steel castings on machine elements. This technology can be competition for generally applied welding technology (surfacing by welding and thermal spraying. However the results of studies show, that is possible to connection of both methods founding and welding of surface hardening of cast steel castings. In range of experimental plan was made test castings with composite surface layer, which next were remelted with energy 0,8 and 1,6 kJ/cm. Usability for industrial applications of test castings was estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  11. Survey of the effect of heat-to-heat variations upon the fatigue-crack propagation behavior of types 304 and 316 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, L.A.

    1975-05-01

    The fatigue-crack growth behavior of four heats of annealed Type 304 stainless steel and three heats of annealed Type 316 stainless steel were studied at elevated temperature using the techniques of linear-elastic fracture mechanics. It is estimated that a factor of 1.5 applied above and below the mean line would provide upper and lower bounds that would account for heat-to-heat variations. In addition, the three heats of Type 316 represented three different melt practices: air-melt, vacuum-arc-remelt, and double-vacuum-melt processes. No effect on fatigue-crack growth behavior was noted due to melt practice. (U.S.)

  12. Technical issues of fabrication technologies of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo; Hirose, Takanori

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The key technical issues of RAFM steel fabrication are the control of Ta, and deoxidation of the steel with a limited amount of Al addition. • Addition of Ta with poor deoxidation might results in the agglomeration of inclusions at 1/2t position. • ESR was proved to be effective removing Ta oxide inclusions and avoiding agglomeration of inclusions at 1/2t position, and achieving low oxygen concentration. -- Abstract: The key issue for DEMO application is that Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels fabrication technologies has to be highly assured, especially with respect to high availability, reliability and reduced activation capability on the DEMO level fabrication, which requires not a few tons but thousand tons RAFM fabrication. One of the key technical issues of RAFM fabrication is the control of Ta, and deoxidation of the steel with a limited amount of Al addition. The series of F82H (Fe–8Cr–2W–V, Ta) melting revealed that Ta have tendency to form oxide on melting process, and this will have large impact on reliability of the steels. Al is also the key elements, as it is commonly used for deoxidation of steels, and achieving lower oxygen level is essential to obtain good mechanical properties, but the maximum concentration of Al is limited in view of reduced activation capability. These tendency and limitation resulted in the Ta oxide agglomeration in the middle of plate, but the remelting process, ESR (electro slag remelting), was found to be successful on removing those Ta oxides

  13. Modelling of plasma generation and expansion in a vacuum arc: application to the vacuum arc remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapelle, P.; Bellot, J.P.; Duval, H.; Jardy, A.; Ablitzer, D.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a complete theoretical description of the behaviour of the electric arc in the vacuum arc remelting process, a model has been developed for the column of plasma generated by a single cluster of cathode spots. The model combines a kinetic approach, taking into account the formation of the plasma in the cathodic region, and a hydrodynamic approach, describing the expansion of the plasma in the vacuum between the electrodes. The kinetic model is based on a system of Boltzmann-Vlasov-Poisson equations and uses a particle-type simulation procedure, combining the PIC (particle in cell) and FPM (finite point set method) methods. In the two-dimensional hydrodynamic model, the plasma is assimilated to a mixture of two continuous fluids (the electrons and the ions), each described by a system of coupled transport equations. Finally, a simplified method has been defined for calculating the electric current density and the energy flux density transmitted by the plasma to the anode. The results of the numerical simulation presented are consistent with a certain number of experimental data available in the literature. In particular, the model predicts a percentage of the electric power of the cluster transmitted to the anode (25%) in good agreement with the value indicated in the literature. (author)

  14. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Qingchun; Zhou Hong; Wang Chengtao; Zhang Wei; Lin Pengyu; Sun Na; Ren Luquan

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  15. Effect of medium on friction and wear properties of compacted graphite cast iron processed by biomimetic coupling laser remelting process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing-chun; Zhou, Hong; Wang, Cheng-tao; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Peng-yu; Sun, Na; Ren, Luquan

    2009-04-01

    Stimulated by the cuticles of soil animals, an attempt to improve the wear resistance of compact graphite cast iron (CGI) with biomimetic units on the surface was made by using a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process in air and various thicknesses water film, respectively. The microstructures of biomimetic units were examined by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction was used to describe the microstructure and identify the phases in the melted zone. Microhardness was measured and the wear behaviors of biomimetic specimens as functions of different mediums as well as various water film thicknesses were investigated under dry sliding condition, respectively. The results indicated that the microstructure zones in the biomimetic specimens processed with water film are refined compared with that processed in air and had better wear resistance increased by 60%, the microhardness of biomimetic units has been improved significantly. The application of water film provided finer microstructures and much more regular grain shape in biomimetic units, which played a key role in improving the friction properties and wear resistance of CGI.

  16. The effect of remelting various combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium alloy on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Mehta, Aruna S

    2012-01-01

    Remelting previously cast base metal alloy can adversely affect the mechanical properties of the alloy and necessitates addition of new alloy. To study the effect of remelting different combinations of new and used cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloy on its mechanical properties and microstructure. Using induction casting, 24 tensile test specimens were prepared for eight different combinations of new and used Co-Cr alloy. The test specimens were assessed for yield strength and percentage elongation. Microhardness was evaluated using Vickers's hardness tester. The tensile testing was carried out on a 50 kN servo-hydraulic universal testing machine. Microstructure analysis was done using an optical photomicroscope on the fractured samples after acid etching. The mean values (±standard deviation) and coefficient of variation were calculated. Student's 't' test was used for statistical analysis. Statistical significance was assumed at P=.05. The mean yield strength of eight different combination groups were as follows: group A: 849 MPa, group B ₁ : 834 MPa, group B ₂ : 915 MPa, group B ₃ : 897 MPa, group C ₁ : 874 MPa, group C ₂ : 859 MPa, group D ₁ : 845 MPa, and group D ₂ : 834 MPa. The mean percentage elongation for the different groups were as follows: group A: 7%, group B ₁ : 7%, group B ₂ : 8%, group B ₃ : 7%, group C ₁ : 8%, group C ₂ : 7%, group D ₁ : 7%, and group D 2 : 8%. The mean hardness values were as follows: group A: 373 VHN, group B ₁ : 373 VHN, group B ₂ : 346 VHN, group B ₃ : 346 VHN, group C ₁ : 364 VHN, group C ₂ : 343 VHN, group D ₁ : 376 VHN, and group D ₂ : 373 VHN. Repeated remelting of base metal alloy for dental casting without addition of new alloy can affect the mechanical properties of the alloy. Microstructure analysis shows deterioration upon remelting. However, the addition of 25% and 50% (by weight) of new alloy to the remelted alloy can bring about improvement both in mechanical properties and in

  17. Survey of welding processes for field fabrication of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel pressure vessels. [128 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grotke, G.E.

    1980-04-01

    Any evaluation of fabrication methods for massive pressure vessels must consider several welding processes with potential for heavy-section applications. These include submerged-arc and shielded metal-arc, narrow-joint modifications of inert-gas metal-arc and inert-gas tungsten-arc processes, electroslag, and electron beam. The advantage and disadvantages of each are discussed. Electroslag welding can be dropped from consideration for joining of 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel because welds made with this method do not provide the required mechanical properties in the welded and stress relieved condition. The extension of electron-beam welding to sections as thick as 4 or 8 inches (100 or 200 mm) is too recent a development to permit full evaluation. The manual shielded metal-arc and submerged-arc welding processes have both been employed, often together, for field fabrication of large vessels. They have the historical advantage of successful application but present other disadvantages that make them otherwise less attractive. The manual shielded metal-arc process can be used for all-position welding. It is however, a slow and expensive technique for joining heavy sections, requires large amounts of skilled labor that is in critically short supply, and introduces a high incidence of weld repairs. Automatic submerged-arc welding has been employed in many critical applications and for welding in the flat position is free of most of the criticism that can be leveled at the shielded metal-arc process. Specialized techniques have been developed for horizontal and vertical position welding but, used in this manner, the applications are limited and the cost advantage of the process is lost.

  18. Study of cast and thermo-mechanically strengthened chromium-nickel nitrogen-containing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkina, V.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Svyazhin, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen on the structure and strength of corrosion-resistant chromium-nickel steels after thermal and thermomechanical treatment is studied. The 06Kh15N7AD and 07Kh15N7DAMB steels alloying by nitrogen was accomplished through the basic composition steels remelting in the molecular nitrogen atmosphere under the pressure of 0.1-2.5 MPa. The 02Kh15N5DAF and 05Kh15N5DAM steels ingots were obtained through melting in a plasma furnace under the nitrogen pressure of 0.4MPA. The high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) was performed by rolling with preliminary blanks heating up to 1050 deg C and the rolling end temperature not below 950 deg C. It is shown, that the HTMT of the nitrogen-containing steels makes it possible to obtain strength characteristics by 1.5 times exceeding the properties of traditionally applicable corrosion-resistant steels, whereby sufficiently high plasticity of the nitrogen-containing steel is retained [ru

  19. Stainless steels with low contents in residual elements for nitric acid environments. Influence of melting processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desestret, A.; Gay, G.; Soulignac, P.

    1983-01-01

    Nitric acid solutions, as they are for instance employed in the chemical treatment of nuclear fuels, do not apparently pose any more corrosion problems and the safe use of the several steels is well documented. The most difficult corrosion problems are next those related to ''tunnel'' penetrations, in the hot-rolling direction (longitudinal). This phenomenon can be quite important such as to imperial complex structures. Up to the last few years, the only manner to eliminate such ''tunnel'' corrosions was to carry out special operations of remelting and refining under careful selected slag (Electro Slag Remelting or ESR). It turns out indeed that non metallic inclusions are the prime factors in this type of corrosion. Well adapted ladle refining processes made possible to obtain equivalent results at lower costs, while purity and cleanliness are improved to such a degree that a steel of type Cr 18 - Ni 10 thus produced exhibit a nearly absolute resistance to intergranular corrosion in the 14 N (65%) boiling nitric acid (the Huey test) whatever the ''sensitization'' treatment, between 1000 0 C and 600 0 C. In view of its very high tolerance to varied thermal cycles and of the near complete disappearance of any ''tunnel'' corrosion, such a steel is of great interest when complex parts are produced, by machining forged or rolled metal, which is then assembled by welding techniques or procedures which would be forbidden in the case of usual Cr 18 -Ni 10 steels. Similar improvements are also obtained on the two other special steels used in nitric environments: Cr 25 - Ni 20 - C [fr

  20. Electron pulsed beam induced processing of thin film surface by Nb3Ge deposited into a stainless steel tape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, I.; Korenev, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    A surface of superconductive thin film of Nb 3 Ge deposited onto a stainless steel tape was processed using the electron beam technique. The electron beam used had the following parameters: beam current density from 400 to 1000 A/cm 2 ; beam energy 100 keV; beam impulse length 300 ns. By theoretical analysis it is shown that the heating of film surface is an adiabatic process. It corresponds to our experimental data and pictures showing a surface remelting due to electron beam influence. After beam processing the superconductive parameters of the film remain unchanged. Roentgenograms have been analysed of Nb 3 Ge film surface recrystallized due to electron beam influence

  1. Effect of small additions of niobium on the welding behavior of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorhead, A.J.; Sikka, V.K.; Reed, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    To systematically study the effect of niobium on the behavior of Type 304 stainless steel, a low-niobium commercial heat was remelted with varying niobium additions - up to 1000 ppM. A standardized weldability test, the Spot Varestraint, was used to compare the propensity of various heats for hot cracking. The fusion and heat-affected zone cracking behavior of the experimental heats was similar to that of a heat of commercial Type 304, and much superior to that of a commercial heat of Type 347 stainless steel. The superior resistance to fusion zone cracking was attributed to the presence of a small amount of delta ferrite in the microstructure of the weld nugget in the experimental materials. The outstanding heat-affected zone cracking behavior was at least partly attributable to backfilling of grain boundary separations in the experimental heats, as well as in the commercial Type 304

  2. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  3. Calculation of the end form the rotating electrode in the liquid environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumanov, I. V.; Anikeev, A. N.

    2017-10-01

    Electroslag Remelting Process (further - ESR) is an advanced technology of ingots’ production, which are used in applications such as aviation, power generation, medicine etc. [1, 2]. However, the purity of the resulting metal and its structural homogeneity depend on the selected remelting regime. This article provides mathematical calculation, which allows estimating the optimal shape of the electrode’s end and this will contribute to the creation of optimal conditions for obtaining the maximum performance values of electroslag remelting. Such conditions can be provided at radial flow of molten metal on the even melted-off surface, that is reached by rotation of the melted electrode with an optimum speed.

  4. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  5. Effects of solution treatment on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of 4A duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Panpan; Wang, Aiqin; Wang, Wenyan [Henan Univ. of Science and Technology, Luoyang (China). School of Material Science and Engineering; Xie, Jingpei [Henan Univ. of Science and Technology, Luoyang (China). Collaborative Innovation Center of Nonferrous Metals

    2018-02-15

    In this study, 4A duplex stainless steels were prepared via remelting in an intermediate frequency furnace and subsequently solution treated at different temperatures. The effects of solution treatment on the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of 4A duplex stainless steel were investigated. Microstructures were characterized via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were evaluated via hardness test, tensile test, and impact test experiments. The point corrosion resistance was studied via chemical immersion and potentiodynamic anodic polarization. The results showed that with increasing solution temperature in the range of 1223 - 1423 K, the tensile strength and hardness first decreased and then increased, and minimum values were obtained at 1323 K. The σ phase precipitated at the boundaries of the α/γ phases in samples solution treated at 1223 K, decreasing both impact energy and pitting potential of the experimental steels. When experimental steels were solution treated at 1373 K for 2 h, a suitable volume fraction of α/γ was uniformly distributed throughout the microstructure, and the steels exhibited optimal mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance.

  6. Possibilities for the Reuse of Steel from Decommissioning. Selected Scenarios in the Process of Proposal and Evaluation of Manufacturing Processes for Conditional Released Steel and their Application in General and Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, P.; Daniska, V.; Ondra, F.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Conditional release of steels from NPP decommissioning enables controlled reuse of non-negligible volumes of steels. For proposal of scenarios for steel reuse, it is needed to identify and evaluate partial elementary activities of the whole process from conditional release of steels, manufacturing of various elements up to realisation of scenarios. For scenarios of reuse of conditionally released steel the products of steel, as steel reinforcements, rails, profiles and sheets for technical constructions such as bridges, tunnels, railways and other constructions which guarantee the long-term properties over the periods of 50-100 years are considered. The idea offers also the possibility for using this type of steel for particular technical constructions, directly usable in nuclear facilities. The paper presents the review of activities for manufacturing of various steel construction elements made from conditionally released steels and their use in general and also in the nuclear industry. As the starting material for manufacturing of steel elements ingots or just fragments of steel after dismantling in controlled area can be used. These input materials are re-melted in industrial facilities in order to achieve the required physical and chemical characteristics. Mostly used technique for manufacturing of the steel construction elements is rolling. As the products considered in scenarios for reuse of conditional released steels are bars for reinforcement concrete, rolled steel sheets and other rolled profiles. For use in the nuclear industry it offers the possibility for casting of thick-walled steel containers for long-term storage of high level radioactive components in integral storage and also assembly of stainless steel tanks for storing of liquid radioactive waste. Lists of elementary activities which are needed for manufacturing of selected steel elements are elaborated. These elementary activities are then the base for detailed safety evaluation of external

  7. A Preliminary Study to Enhance the Tribological Performance of CoCrMo Alloy by Fibre Laser Remelting for Articular Joint Implant Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Wai Chan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available CoCrMo alloy has long been used as a pairing femoral head material for articular joint implant applications because of its biocompatibility and reliable tribological performance. However, friction and wear issues are still present for CoCrMo (metal/CoCrMo (metal or CoCrMo (metal/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE (plastic pairs in clinical observations. The particulate wear debris generated from the worn surfaces of CoCrMo or UHMWPE can pose a severe threat to human tissues, eventually resulting in the failure of implants and the need for revision surgeries. As a result, a further improvement in tribological properties of this alloy is still needed, and it is of great interest to both the implant manufacturers and clinical surgeons. In this study, the surface of CoCrMo alloy was laser-treated by a fibre laser system in an open-air condition (i.e., no gas chamber required. The CoCrMo surfaces before and after laser remelting were analysed and characterised by a range of mechanical tests (i.e., surface roughness measurement and Vickers micro-hardness test and microstructural analysis (i.e., XRD phase detection. The tribological properties were assessed by pin-on-disk tribometry and dynamic light scattering (DLS. Our results indicate that the laser-treated surfaces demonstrated a friction-reducing effect for all the tribopairs (i.e., CoCrMo against CoCrMo and CoCrMo against UHHMWPE and enhanced wear resistance for the CoCrMo/CoCrMo pair. Such beneficial effects are chiefly attributable to the presence of the laser-formed hard coating on the surface. Laser remelting possesses several competitive advantages of being a clean, non-contact, fast, highly accurate and automated process compared to other surface coating methods. The promising results of this study point to the possibility that laser remelting can be a practical and effective surface modification technique to further improve the tribological performance of Co

  8. Hegelian Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    Even in our globalized world the notion of national economies remain incredibly strong, just as a considerable part of the literature on transnational governance and globalization continue to rely on a zero-sum perspective concerning the relationship between the national and the transnational. De...... of the European steel industry....

  9. The influence of the weld toe grinding and wig remelting weld toe rehabilitation techniques, on variable stresses, in case of cross fillet welds, reinforced with additional welding rows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babis Claudiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Variable stresses where the load value varies between a maximum and a minimum value, or varies the position in time, cause after accumulating a large number of load cycles in those structures, the emergence of drug fatigue. Fatigue is characterized by failure on values of the applied stress from the load cycles, below the material flow, values which in case of static stress would not have caused problems. Knowing that the variable stressed structures are sensitive to stress concentrators, the paper aims to highlight the influence of two techniques to reduce stress concentrator weld toe grinding and WIG remelting weld toe, on the behavior of variable tensile test of cross corner welded specimens, reinforced with additional welding rows.

  10. Effect of biomimetic non-smooth unit morphology on thermal fatigue behavior of H13 hot-work tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chao; Zhou, Hong; Cong, Dalong; Wang, Chuanwei; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan

    2012-06-01

    The thermal fatigue behavior of hot-work tool steel processed by a biomimetic coupled laser remelting process gets a remarkable improvement compared to untreated sample. The 'dowel pin effect', the 'dam effect' and the 'fence effect' of non-smooth units are the main reason of the conspicuous improvement of the thermal fatigue behavior. In order to get a further enhancement of the 'dowel pin effect', the 'dam effect' and the 'fence effect', this study investigated the effect of different unit morphologies (including 'prolate', 'U' and 'V' morphology) and the same unit morphology in different sizes on the thermal fatigue behavior of H13 hot-work tool steel. The results showed that the 'U' morphology unit had the optimum thermal fatigue behavior, then the 'V' morphology which was better than the 'prolate' morphology unit; when the unit morphology was identical, the thermal fatigue behavior of the sample with large unit sizes was better than that of the small sizes.

  11. Effect of vacuum arc melting/casting parameters on shrinkage cavity/piping of austenitic stainless steel ingot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamran, J.; Feroz, M.; Sarwar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Shrinkage cavity/piping at the end of the solidified ingot of steels is one of the most common casting problem in 316L austenitic stainless steel ingot, when consumable electrode is melted and cast in a water-cooled copper mould by vacuum arc re-melting furnace. In present study an effort has been made to reduce the size of shrinkage cavity/ piping by establishing the optimum value of hot topping process parameters at the end of the melting process. It is concluded that the shrinkage cavity/piping at the top of the solidified ingot can be reduced to minimum by adjusting the process parameters particularly the melting current density. (author)

  12. Studies on the influence of processing methods on the corrosion characteristics of electroslag-tape-plating with NiMo16Cr16Ti. Untersuchungen zum Einfluss der Prozessfuehrung auf die Korrosionseigenschaften beim Elektroschlacke-Bandplattieren mit NiMo16Cr16Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, J

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the project was to demonstrate an economic possibility of using NiMo16Cr16Ti reliably as a plating material with simple to use methods. For this, the electroslag and submerged arc welding with tape electrodes as a coating technology are compared with each other. As the research showed, it is possible to coat large surface area, thick walled components economically with NiMo16Cr16Ti using electroslag (RES) tape plating. The choice of powder is important for the hot crack freedom and the precipitation poverty and thus the corrosion resistance of the plating. The silicon content was proved to be of importance in the plating. With the right choice of powder, the second layer already possesses the endurance of laminated materials against intercrystalline corrosion in coating tests as well as against pitting in a 10% FeCl{sub 3} solution. The coating capability lies at 0.5 m{sup 2}/h. - In addition the use of video thermography for on-line surveillance of seam on RES plates is documented. The evaluation of the pictures makes possible the targeting of the external magnets and thus the influencing of the melting bath flux. (orig./RHM) With 80 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Study on microstructural changes in thermally-aged stainless steel weld-overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Microstructural changes in stainless steel electroslag weld-overlay cladding. > Thermal aging caused progress of spinodal decomposition and precipitation of G phases in the {delta}-ferrite phase. > The degree of the spinodal decomposition had a linear relationship to the hardness. - Abstract: The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes was investigated in stainless steel weld-overlay cladding composed of 90% austenite and 10% {delta}-ferrite phases using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to cooling process after post-welding heat treatments (PWHT), a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was already observed due to spinodal decomposition in the ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 deg. C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the ferrite phase. The chemical compositions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type carbides seemed to be formed at the austenite/ferrite interface were analyzed. The analyses of the magnitude of the spinodal decomposition and the hardness implied that the spinodal decomposition was the main cause of the hardening.

  14. Mechanical properties of brazing joints of alumina dispersion strengthened copper to 316 stainless steel for fusion reactor divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Araki, Toshiaki.

    1994-01-01

    Brazing of alumina dispersion strengthened copper to 316 stainless steel was carried out with the brazing parameters such as brazing alloy, clearance and time to investigate the influence of brazing conditions on the joint strength. Tensile and Charpy impact tests of the joint specimens were performed to evaluate their strength. Microstructure and hardness of the brazed zone were examined with an optical microscope and a Vickers hardness tester. The excellent brazing joint strength was achieved with BAu-2 brazing alloy. The tensile strength of the joint with the brazing clearance of 0.2mm and the brazing time of 300s was as large as that of the diffusion bonding joint. However, Charpy absorbed energy of the brazing was lower than that of the diffusion bonding. Alumina dispersion strengthened copper remelted near the brazed zone because of diffusion of the brazing alloy, and the specimens fractured at the remelted zone. The brazed zone included many voids, which caused a scattering of the strength. (author)

  15. Radioactive scrap metal decontamination technology assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckentin, J.M.; Damkroger, B.K.; Schlienger, M.E.

    1996-04-01

    Within the DOE complex there exists a tremendous quantity of radioactive scrap metal. As an example, it is estimated that within the gaseous diffusion plants there exists in excess of 700,000 tons of contaminated stainless steel. At present, valuable material is being disposed of when it could be converted into a high quality product. Liquid metal processing represents a true recycling opportunity for this material. By applying the primary production processes towards the material's decontamination and re-use, the value of the strategic resource is maintained while drastically reducing the volume of material in need of burial. Potential processes for the liquid metal decontamination of radioactively contaminated metal are discussed and contrasted. Opportunities and technology development issues are identified and discussed. The processes compared are: surface decontamination; size reduction, packaging and burial; melting technologies; electric arc melting; plasma arc centrifugal treatment; air induction melting; vacuum induction melting; and vacuum induction melting and electroslag remelting

  16. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  17. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T.; Kameda, J.; Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the δ-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 °C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the δ-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the γ-austenite and δ-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  18. Microstructural changes of a thermally aged stainless steel submerged arc weld overlay cladding of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, T., E-mail: takeuchi.tomoaki@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kameda, J. [National Institute for Materials Science, Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Toyama, T.; Matsukawa, Y. [Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Nishiyama, Y.; Onizawa, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of thermal aging on microstructural changes in stainless steel submerged arc weld-overlay cladding of reactor pressure vessels was investigated using atom probe tomography (APT). In as-received materials subjected to post-welding heat treatments (PWHTs), with a subsequent furnace cooling, a slight fluctuation of the Cr concentration was observed due to spinodal decomposition in the {delta}-ferrite phase but not in the austenitic phase. Thermal aging at 400 Degree-Sign C for 10,000 h caused not only an increase in the amplitude of spinodal decomposition but also the precipitation of G phases with composition ratios of Ni:Si:Mn = 16:7:6 in the {delta}-ferrite phase. The degree of the spinodal decomposition in the submerged arc weld sample was similar to that in the electroslag weld one reported previously. We also observed a carbide on the {gamma}-austenite and {delta}-ferrite interface. There were no Cr depleted zones around the carbide.

  19. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  20. Laser surface texturing of tool steel: textured surfaces quality evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šugár, Peter; Šugárová, Jana; Frnčík, Martin

    2016-05-01

    In this experimental investigation the laser surface texturing of tool steel of type 90MnCrV8 has been conducted. The 5-axis highly dynamic laser precision machining centre Lasertec 80 Shape equipped with the nano-second pulsed ytterbium fibre laser and CNC system Siemens 840 D was used. The planar and spherical surfaces first prepared by turning have been textured. The regular array of spherical and ellipsoidal dimples with a different dimensions and different surface density has been created. Laser surface texturing has been realized under different combinations of process parameters: pulse frequency, pulse energy and laser beam scanning speed. The morphological characterization of ablated surfaces has been performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique. The results show limited possibility of ns pulse fibre laser application to generate different surface structures for tribological modification of metallic materials. These structures were obtained by varying the processing conditions between surface ablation, to surface remelting. In all cases the areas of molten material and re-cast layers were observed on the bottom and walls of the dimples. Beside the influence of laser beam parameters on the machined surface quality during laser machining of regular hemispherical and elipsoidal dimple texture on parabolic and hemispherical surfaces has been studied.

  1. Laser surface modification of Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating on AISI H13 tool steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, M. S.; Aqida, S. N.; Ismail, I.

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents laser surface modification of plasma sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating to seal porosity defect. Laser surface modification on plasma sprayed YSZ was conducted using 300W JK300HPS Nd: YAG laser at different operating parameters. Parameters varied were laser power and pulse frequency with constant residence time. The coating thickness was measured using IM7000 inverted optical microscope and surface roughness was analysed using two-dimensional Mitutoyo Surface Roughness Tester. Surface roughness of laser surface modification of YSZ H-13 tool steel decreased significantly with increasing laser power and decreasing pulse frequency. The re-melted YSZ coating showed higher hardness properties compared to as-sprayed coating surface. These findings were significant to enhance thermal barrier coating surface integrity for dies in semi-solid processing.

  2. Trace element control in binary Ni-25Cr and ternary Ni-30Co-30Cr master alloy castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detrois, Martin [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States); Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jablonski, Paul D. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States);

    2017-10-23

    Electro-slag remelting (ESR) is used for control of unwanted elements in commercial alloys. This study focuses on master alloys of Ni-25Cr and Ni-30Co-30Cr, processed through a combination of vacuum induction melting (VIM) and electro-slag remelting (ESR). Minor additions were made to control tramp element levels and modify the melting characteristics. Nitrogen and sulfur levels below 10 ppm and oxygen levels below 100 ppm were obtained in the final products. The role of the alloy additions in lowering the tramp element content, the resulting residual inclusions and the melting characteristics were determined computationally and confirmed experimentally. Additions of titanium were beneficial to the control of oxygen levels during VIM and nitrogen levels during ESR. Aluminum additions helped to control oxygen levels during remelting, however, aluminum pickup occurred when excess titanium was present during ESR. The usefulness of these master alloys for use as experimental remelt stock will also be discussed.

  3. Methods of forging steel

    OpenAIRE

    Pečoler, Primož

    2014-01-01

    The following work presents processes of steel forming, challenges when forging steel, forming machines suitable for forging and which choice of machine is most suitable for forging. We can separate steel forming to free forging and drop forging. Free forging can be divided to hand forging and machine forging. The correct choice of furnaces is also very important. We must reach correct temperature in the furnace for raw steel to melt with less scalings. In diploma I mentioned some machine...

  4. Prospects of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannykh, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of world steel production is considered as well as the development strategy of metallurgy industry in the Russian Federation through to 2020. The main factors determining the conservation of steel as perspective material for industry are given: energy expenses on production, the well-proven recirculation technology, the capability of changing steel properties in wide range, temperature range of operation. The conclusion is made that in the immediate future steel will not lose its importance [ru

  5. Trends in steel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Dual phase steels, composite products, and microalloyed steels are making inroads in the automotive industry applications for bumpers, automotive parts, bodies, mechanical parts, suspension and steering equipment and truck bumpers. New steels are also used to support solar mirrors and cells, in corrosive environments in the oil and gas industry, fusion reactors, and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants

  6. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  7. The steel scrap age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  8. Lanthanum additions and the toughness of ultra-high strength steels and the determination of appropriate lanthanum additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrison, Warren M.; Maloney, James L.

    2005-01-01

    Studies of commercial heats of AF1410 steel suggest that under appropriate conditions additions of rare-earth elements can significantly enhance fracture toughness. This improvement in toughness is not due to an extremely low inclusion volume fraction but is apparently due to the formation of larger and more widely spaced inclusions. The purpose of this work is to discuss our experience in using rare-earth additions to laboratory scale vacuum induction melted and subsequently vacuum arc remelted heats of ultra-high strength steels to achieve inclusion distributions similar to those observed in commercial heats modified with lanthanum additions. The results indicate that lanthanum additions of 0.015 wt.% to low sulfur steels which have been well deoxidized using carbon-vacuum deoxidation can result in lanthanum rich inclusions which are similar in size, volume fraction and spacing to those obtained in commercially produced heats of ultra-high strength steel to which lanthanum has been added. The heat of steel to which lanthanum additions of 0.015 wt.% were made had significantly higher toughness than did the heat of the same steel in which the sulfur had been gettered as small and closely spaced particles of MnS and which had an inclusion volume fraction similar to that of the heat modified by the addition of 0.015 wt.% lanthanum. This improvement in toughness was attributed to an increase in inclusion spacing. An addition of 0.06 wt.% lanthanum was excessive. Such an addition of lanthanum resulted in a huge volume fraction of large cuboidal inclusions which primarily contain lanthanum and oxygen and which are extremely detrimental to toughness

  9. Effect of cerium and thermomechanical processing on microstructure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of cerium content and thermomechanical processing on structure and properties of Fe–10.5 wt.%Al–0.8 wt%C alloy has been investigated. Alloys were prepared by a combination of air induction melting with flux cover (AIMFC) and electroslag remelting (ESR). The ESR ingots were hot-forged and hotrolled at ...

  10. Steel: Price and Policy Issues

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cooney, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Steel prices remain at historically elevated levels. The rapid growth of steel production and demand in China is widely considered as a major cause of the increases in both steel prices and the prices of steelmaking inputs...

  11. Nickel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Sheet, Strip, and Plate 72Ni - 15.5Cr - 0.95 (Cb (Nb) + Ta) - 2.5Ti - 0.70Al - 7.0Fe Consumable Electrode, Remelted or Vacuum Induction Melted, Solution Heat Treated, Precipitation-Hardenable

    CERN Document Server

    SAE Aerospace Standards. London

    2012-01-01

    Nickel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Sheet, Strip, and Plate 72Ni - 15.5Cr - 0.95 (Cb (Nb) + Ta) - 2.5Ti - 0.70Al - 7.0Fe Consumable Electrode, Remelted or Vacuum Induction Melted, Solution Heat Treated, Precipitation-Hardenable

  12. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  13. Steel Industry Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  14. Effect of temperature and aluminium additions on the mechanical properties of the 13% chromium ferrite stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, S.

    1975-01-01

    The potential interest of the ferritic stainless steels as component materials for nuclear power reactors led to investigate how aluminium influences the mechanical properties of 13% chromium ferritic stainless steels between room temperature and about 700 0 C. Nominal 13% chromium and 0.04 to 0.08% carbon ferritic stainless steels containing 0, 0.13, 2.19 and 4.15% aluminium, respectively, were obtained by vacuum remelting of a commercial martensitic-ferritic stainless steel and suitable additions of aluminium. After successive rolling operations and recrystallizations performed in order to obtain final 0.5 mm thick sheets with similar average grain sizes the specimens of the above mentioned steels were tested in a tensile test Instron machine, with a constant strain rate (approximately equal to 1.6 x 10 -3 min -1 ), at room temperature, 140, 265, 415, 565 and 715 0 C. The results obtained show that strengthening by aluminium is strongly temperature dependent. At 265 0 C all the steels presentes serrated plastic deformation (Portevin-Le Chatelier effect), which is attributed to interactions of the interstitial and substitutional solute atoms with dislocations in the body centered cubic structure. Flow stress drops were still observed at 465 0 C, although the tests performed at 565 and 715 0 C showed work-softening of the materials and total absence of serrations. Stress relaxation tests at room temperature yielded values of the apparent activation volumes, which are scattered between about 100 and 130 b 3 (b-Burgers vector), being almost constant with stress, strain and aluminium content. Therefore, although aluminium appreciably strengthens the 13% chromium steel, the behaviour summarized suggests that the mechanism controlling plastic deformation at room temperature is the same for all the tested steels, the values of the apparent activitation volumes being probably determined by the interstitial content. Stress relaxation tests at 20, 75, 140 and 265 0 C for

  15. Usage de la refusion par bombardement électronique pour la purification et le recyclage des alliages Application of the electron beam remelting for the purification and the recycling of alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellot Jean-Pierre

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Parmi les techniques de purification ultime de métaux à hauts points de fusion, le procédé de refusion par bombardement électronique associe une puissance thermique garantissant la fusion du métal, et une refusion sous vide permettant l'élimination d'impuretés par distillation. Ce papier présente la technique et le potentiel d'élimination par distillation. Among the ultimate purification techniques applied to the high melting point metallic materials, the electron beam remelting process, combining a high thermal power and vacuum, is particularly conducive to volatilization. This paper describes the technique and its efficiency to remove impurities by distillation.

  16. Damascus steel ledeburite class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, D. A.; Arkhangelsky, L. B.; Plotnikova, N. V.

    2017-02-01

    Discovered that some of blades Damascus steel has an unusual nature of origin of the excess cementite, which different from the redundant phases of secondary cementite, cementite of ledeburite and primary cementite in iron-carbon alloys. It is revealed that the morphological features of separate particles of cementite in Damascus steels lies in the abnormal size of excess carbides having the shape of irregular prisms. Considered three hypotheses for the formation of excess cementite in the form of faceted prismatic of excess carbides. The first hypothesis is based on thermal fission of cementite of a few isolated grains. The second hypothesis is based on the process of fragmentation cementite during deformation to the separate the pieces. The third hypothesis is based on the transformation of metastable cementite in the stable of angular eutectic carbide. It is shown that the angular carbides are formed within the original metastable colony ledeburite, so they are called “eutectic carbide”. It is established that high-purity white cast iron is converted into of Damascus steel during isothermal soaking at the annealing. It was revealed that some of blades Damascus steel ledeburite class do not contain in its microstructure of crushed ledeburite. It is shown that the pattern of carbide heterogeneity of Damascus steel consists entirely of angular eutectic carbides. Believe that Damascus steel refers to non-heat-resistant steel of ledeburite class, which have similar structural characteristics with semi-heat-resistant die steel or heat-resistant high speed steel, differing from them only in the nature of excess carbide phase.

  17. Development of Zr-containing advanced reduced-activation alloy (ARAA) as structural material for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Y.B., E-mail: borobang@gmail.com [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, S.H. [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, D.W. [Nuclear Fusion Engineering Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, S. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Y.H. [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Żywczak, A. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre of Materials and Nanotechnology, Kraków (Poland); Rhee, C.K. [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Creep and impact resistances of reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steel are enhanced by the addition of Zr. • A 5 ton scale heat of Zr containing RAFM steel, ARAA, has been produced for material property evaluation. • The physical, thermal, magnetic and mechanical properties of ARAA are quite similar to those of Eurofer 97. - Abstract: Korea has developed an advanced reduced-activation alloy (ARAA) as a structural material for helium-cooled ceramic reflector test blanket module (HCCR-TBM) applications. The present paper describes the history of alloy development and the properties of ARAA, which has been produced at a 5 t scale using vacuum induction melting and electro-slag re-melting methods. ARAA is a 9Cr–1.2W based ferritic–martensitic steel with 0.01 wt.% Zr. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and physical and magnetic properties of ARAA show similar temperature dependencies to those observed for Eurofer 97. However, ARAA exhibits a much longer creep–rupture time than conventional RAFM steel, which suggests a positive effect on Zr addition. The enhanced creep strength of ARAA by the addition of Zr is attributed to the reduced temperature-dependence of the yield strength.

  18. Structural amorphous steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.P.; Liu, C.T.; Porter, W.D.; Thompson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist's dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed

  19. Performance Steel Castings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    system components to be built. Figure la shows the machine design . PSC-2012 Page 94 Glue Application Sheet Transfer Feed Elevator Figure la...Department of Defense such as cleats, ejection chutes , control arms, muzzle brakes, mortar components, clevises, tow bar clamps, ammo conveyor elements...Foundry and the members of Steel Founders’ Society of America. Abstract Weapon system designers and builders need advanced steel casting technology

  20. Life after Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Bobby Curran grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, finished high school, and followed his grandfather's steel-toed bootprints straight to Sparrows Point, a 3,000-acre sprawl of industry on the Chesapeake Bay. College was not part of the plan. A gritty but well-paying job at the RG Steel plant was Mr. Curran's ticket to a secure…

  1. Microstructural evolution during DPRM process of semisolid ledeburitic D2 tool steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, M N; Omar, M Z; Syarif, J; Sajuri, Z; Salleh, M S; Alhawari, K S

    2013-01-01

    Semisolid metal processing is a relatively new technology that offers several advantages over liquid processing and solid processing because of the unique behaviour and characteristic microstructure of metals in this state. With the aim of finding a minimum process chain for the manufacture of high-quality production at minimal cost for forming, the microstructural evolution of the ledeburitic AISI D2 tool steel in the semisolid state was studied experimentally. The potential of the direct partial remelting (DPRM) process for the production of AISI D2 with a uniform globular microstructure was revealed. The liquid fraction was determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructures of the samples were investigated using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy analyser, while X-ray phase analysis was performed to identify the phase evolution and the type of carbides. Mechanical characterisation was completed by hardness measurements. The typical microstructure after DPRM consists of metastable austenite which was located particularly in the globular grains (average grain size about 50 μ m), while the remaining interspaces were filled by precipitated eutectic carbides on the grain boundaries and lamellar network.

  2. Microstructural Evolution during DPRM Process of Semisolid Ledeburitic D2 Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Semisolid metal processing is a relatively new technology that offers several advantages over liquid processing and solid processing because of the unique behaviour and characteristic microstructure of metals in this state. With the aim of finding a minimum process chain for the manufacture of high-quality production at minimal cost for forming, the microstructural evolution of the ledeburitic AISI D2 tool steel in the semisolid state was studied experimentally. The potential of the direct partial remelting (DPRM process for the production of AISI D2 with a uniform globular microstructure was revealed. The liquid fraction was determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructures of the samples were investigated using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy analyser, while X-ray phase analysis was performed to identify the phase evolution and the type of carbides. Mechanical characterisation was completed by hardness measurements. The typical microstructure after DPRM consists of metastable austenite which was located particularly in the globular grains (average grain size about 50 μm, while the remaining interspaces were filled by precipitated eutectic carbides on the grain boundaries and lamellar network.

  3. Microstructural Evolution during DPRM Process of Semisolid Ledeburitic D2 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, M. N.; Omar, M. Z.; Syarif, J.; Sajuri, Z.; Salleh, M. S.; Alhawari, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Semisolid metal processing is a relatively new technology that offers several advantages over liquid processing and solid processing because of the unique behaviour and characteristic microstructure of metals in this state. With the aim of finding a minimum process chain for the manufacture of high-quality production at minimal cost for forming, the microstructural evolution of the ledeburitic AISI D2 tool steel in the semisolid state was studied experimentally. The potential of the direct partial remelting (DPRM) process for the production of AISI D2 with a uniform globular microstructure was revealed. The liquid fraction was determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The microstructures of the samples were investigated using an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectroscopy analyser, while X-ray phase analysis was performed to identify the phase evolution and the type of carbides. Mechanical characterisation was completed by hardness measurements. The typical microstructure after DPRM consists of metastable austenite which was located particularly in the globular grains (average grain size about 50 μm), while the remaining interspaces were filled by precipitated eutectic carbides on the grain boundaries and lamellar network. PMID:24223510

  4. Spinodal Decomposition in Functionally Graded Super Duplex Stainless Steel and Weld Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Vahid A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Wessman, Sten; Karlsson, Leif

    2018-04-01

    Low-temperature phase separations (T duplex stainless steel (SDSS) base and weld metals were investigated for short heat treatment times (0.5 to 600 minutes). A novel heat treatment technique, where a stationary arc produces a steady state temperature gradient for selected times, was employed to fabricate functionally graded materials. Three different initial material conditions including 2507 SDSS, remelted 2507 SDSS, and 2509 SDSS weld metal were investigated. Selective etching of ferrite significantly decreased in regions heat treated at 435 °C to 480 °C already after 3 minutes due to rapid phase separations. Atom probe tomography results revealed spinodal decomposition of ferrite and precipitation of Cu particles. Microhardness mapping showed that as-welded microstructure and/or higher Ni content accelerated decomposition. The arc heat treatment technique combined with microhardness mapping and electrolytical etching was found to be a successful approach to evaluate kinetics of low-temperature phase separations in SDSS, particularly at its earlier stages. A time-temperature transformation diagram was proposed showing the kinetics of 475 °C-embrittlement in 2507 SDSS.

  5. Clean steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels

  6. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  7. Thermochemical surface engineering of steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Steels provides a comprehensive scientific overview of the principles and different techniques involved in thermochemical surface engineering, including thermodynamics, kinetics principles, process technologies and techniques for enhanced performance of steels...

  8. Cold formability of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, G.; Leclerq, G.; Moliexe, F.; Namdar, R.; Roesch, L.; Sanz, G.

    1977-01-01

    This work was essentially aimed to the study of the following three questions. Is it possible to assess the cold formability of steels using simple material properties as criteria. What values of mechanical properties can one expect to reach in cold formed parts. Are there simple ways of characterizing the speroidization treatments carried out on steels before cold forming operations. The present report describes the results obtained during this investigation. It is logically divided into three separate parts. Experimental study of cold formability in wire drawing. Influence of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of high carbon cold drawn wires. Contribution to the study of characterization methods of cold forming steels subjected to a spheroidization heat treatment

  9. National steel tries wheeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudak, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, National Steel felt the need to take the next step to make its Detroit-based division, Great Lakes Steel, more competitive in the world flat-rolled steel market. In 1988, Great Lakes Steel started flowing natural gas through the first fully litigated bypass (Competitive Sourcing Option) of a local distribution company. In 1989, the second connection with the new supply route for gas transportation, Panhandle Eastern had started flowing and the LDC, Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. (MichCon) had pulled out their piping previously serving the plants. Since we had been able to structure a fully reliable supply route, storage and balancing program for gas in the face of such strong opposition by the LDC, the author felt it was time to attack the next singularly sourced major commodity, electricity. Electricity, at this major integrated steel plant, represented approximately 7% of plant cost yearly. Yet being monopolized, Great Lakes Division (GLD) could not multiple source this commodity like it does with its other 93% of costs, except for labor (25% of the 93%). Multiple sourcing is done to bring competitive pressure to suppliers and to diversify supplies and protect plant operation in the event of failure by one supplier. This paper describes National Steel's strategy to reduce the cost of power, at the minimum of capital costs, the most expedient way possible, that does not sacrifice any major long-term potential cost improvements. The results show that competitively priced power is available across the mid-west, at prices well below many state regulated electric utilities, for at least 5 to 15 years, but with major obstacles in obtaining transmission access

  10. Volatilization from PCA steel alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagrman, D.L.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    The mobilizations of key components from Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) steel alloy have been measured with laboratory-scale experiments. The experiments indicate most of the mobilization from PCA steel is due to oxide formation and spalling but that the spalled particles are large enough to settle rapidly. Based on the experiments, models for the volatization of iron, manganese, and cobalt from PCA steel in steam and molybdenum from PCA steel in air have been derived.

  11. Fatigue damage of steel components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster, Søren; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials......Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials...

  12. Material properties of the F82H melted in an electric arc furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo, E-mail: sakasegawa.hideo@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Kano, Sho; Abe, Hiroaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku university, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We studied material properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. • We melted F82H using a 20 tons electric arc furnace for the first time. • Mass effect likely affected material properties. • MX (M: Metal, C: Carbon and/or Nitrogen) precipitates mainly formed on grain and sub grain boundaries. - Abstract: Fusion DEMO reactor requires over 11,000 tons of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. It is necessary to develop the manufacturing technology for fabricating such large-scale steel with appropriate mechanical properties. In this work, we focused fundamental mechanical properties and microstructures of F82H-BA12 heat which was melted using a 20 tons electric arc furnace followed by electroslag remelting process. Its raw material of iron was blast furnace iron, because the production volume of electrolytic iron which has been used in former heats, is limited. After melting and forging, this F82H-BA12 heat was heat-treated in four different conditions to consider their fluctuations and to optimize them, and tensile and Charpy impact tests were then performed. The result of these mechanical properties were comparable to those of former F82H heats less than 5 tons which were melted applying vacuum induction melting.

  13. Thermally Stable Nanocrystalline Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme-Smith, Christopher Neil; Ooi, Shgh Woei; Bhadeshia, Harshad K. D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Two novel nanocrystalline steels were designed to withstand elevated temperatures without catastrophic microstructural changes. In the most successful alloy, a large quantity of nickel was added to stabilize austenite and allow a reduction in the carbon content. A 50 kg cast of the novel alloy was produced and used to verify the formation of nanocrystalline bainite. Synchrotron X-ray diffractometry using in situ heating showed that austenite was able to survive more than 1 hour at 773 K (500 °C) and subsequent cooling to ambient temperature. This is the first reported nanocrystalline steel with high-temperature capability.

  14. Joining uranium to steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, M.A.

    1976-05-01

    A method has been devised which will allow the joining of uranium to steel by fusion welding through the use of an intermediate material. Uranium-0.5 titanium was joined to AISI 304L stainless steel by using a vanadium insert. Also, a method is now available for selecting possible filler metals when two entirely dissimilar metals need to be joined. This method allows a quantitative ranking to be made of the possible filler metals and thus the most likely candidate can be selected

  15. Nitrogen-alloyed martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, H.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented on initial results with pressure-nitrided martensitic steels. In heat-resistant steels, thermal stability and toughness are raised by nitrogen. In cold work steel, there is a more favourable corrosion behaviour. (orig./MM) [de

  16. Effect of nitrogen alloying on the microstructure and abrasive wear of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Simmons, J.W.; Rawers, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    Alloying stainless steels with nitrogen has distinct advantages. Nitrogen is a strong austenite stabilizer and a potent solid-solution strengthener, and nitrogen has greater solubility than carbon iron. This study investigates the relationship among nitrogen concentration, precipitate microstructure, and abrasive wear using two high-nitrogen stainless steel alloys: Fe-19Cr-5Mn-5Ni-3Mo (SS1) and Fe-16Cr-7Mn-5Ni(SS2). Alloy SS1 contained 0.7 wt% N and was solution annealed at 1,150 C, thereby dissolving the nitrogen interstitially in the austenite. Subsequent aging, or cold work and aging, at 900 C led to the grain-boundary, cellular, and transgranular precipitation of Cr 2 N. Alloy SS2 was remelted in a high-pressure (200 MPa) N 2 atmosphere, leading to a spatial gradient of nitrogen in the alloy in the form of interstitial nitrogen and Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates. Nitrogen contents varied from a low of approximately 0.7 wt% at the bottom of the billet to a high of 3.6 wt% at the top. Nitrogen in excess of approximately 0.7 wt% formed increasingly coarser and more numerous Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates. The precipitate morphology created in alloy SS1 due to aging, or cold work and aging, had little effect on the abrasive wear of the alloy. However, a decrease in the abrasive wear rate in alloy SS2 was observed to correspond to the increase in number and size of the Cr 2 N and CrN precipitates

  17. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  18. Laser surface modification of stainless steels for cavitation erosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Chi Tat

    1999-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603 (Fe -17.6Cr -11.2Ni -2.5Mo -1.4Mn -0.4Si -0.03C) has higher pitting corrosion resistance but lower cavitation erosion resistance than that of UNS S30400. This is because of its lower tendency for strain induced martensitic transformation and higher stacking fault energy as compared with those of UNS S30400. In order to improve its cavitation erosion resistance, surface modification of S31603 was performed by laser surface melting and laser surface alloying using a 2-kW CW Nd-YAG laser and a 3-kW CW CO2 laser. For laser surface melting, austenitic stainless steel UNS S30400, super duplex stainless steel UNS S32760 and martensitic stainless steel UNS S42000 were also investigated for comparison purpose. For laser surface alloying, alloying materials including various elements (Co, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si & C), alloys (AlSiFe & NiCrSiB), ceramics (Si3N 4, SiC, Cr3C2, TiC, CrB & Cr2O 3) and alloys-ceramics (Co-WC, Ni-WC, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Cr2C3) were used to modify the surface of S31603. The alloyed surface was achieved first by flame spraying or pre-placing of the alloy powder on the S31603 surface and then followed by laser surface remelting. The cavitation erosion characteristics of laser surface modified specimens in 3.5% NaCl solution at 23°C were studied by means of a 20-kHz ultrasonic vibrator at a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 mum. In addition, their pitting corrosion behaviour was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The microstructures, compositions, phase changes and damage mechanisms under cavitation erosion were investigated by optical microscopy, SEM, EDAX and X-ray diffractometry. Mechanical properties such as microhardness profile were also examined. The cavitation erosion resistance Re (reciprocal of the mean depth of penetration rate) of laser surface melted S31603 was found to be improved by 22% and was attributed to the existence of tensile residual stress. Improvement on the Re of S42000 was found to be 8.5 times

  19. Guns, Germs and Steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 1. Guns, Germs and Steel - A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 years. Suri Venkatachalam. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 1 January 2001 pp 84-88. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  20. Underwater welding of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  1. Japan steel mill perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murase, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The international and Japan's steel industry, the coking coal market, and Japan's expectations from Canada's coal industry are discussed. Japan's steel mills are operating at full capacity. Crude steel production for the first half of 2004 was 55.8 million tons. The steel mills are profitable, but costs are high, and there are difficulties with procuring raw materials. Japan is trying to enhance the quality of coke, in order to achieve higher productivity in the production of pig iron. Economic growth is rising disproportionately in the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), with a large increase in coking coal demand from China. On the supply side, there are several projects underway in Australia and Canada to increase production. These include new developments by Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Grande Cache Coal, Western Canadian Coal, and Northern Energy and Mining in Canada. The Elga Mine in the far eastern part of Russia is under development. But the market is expected to remain tight for some time. Japan envisions Canadian coal producers will provide a stable coal supply, expansion of production and infrastructure capabilities, and stabilization of price. 16 slides/overheads are included.

  2. On choice of tempered steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govorov, A.A.; Pan'shin, I.F.; Rakhmanov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a graphical method for choosing structural steels, a change in the propagation work of a crack and in the critical temperature of brittleness of 40, 40Kh, 40KhN, and 40KhNM steels, was examined depending on the hardness after hardening and tempering. A diagram enabling to choose the grade of steel for making an article of known dimensions according to the preset values of its mechanical properties has been plotted. The developed selection scheme takes into account the hardenability of steels and the influence of the hardness after thermal treatment on the cold-shortness of steel

  3. Challenges in Special Steel Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, G.

    2018-02-01

    Special bar quality [SBQ] is a long steel product where an assured quality is delivered by the steel mill to its customer. The bars have enhanced tolerance to higher stress application and it is demanded for specialised component making. The SBQ bars are sought for component making processing units such as closed die hot forging, hot extrusion, cold forging, machining, heat treatment, welding operations. The final component quality of the secondary processing units depends on the quality maintained at the steel maker end along with quality maintained at the fabricator end. Thus, quality control is ensured at every unit process stages. The various market segments catered to by SBQ steel segment is ever growing and is reviewed. Steel mills need adequate infrastructure and technological capability to make these higher quality steels. Some of the critical stages of processing SBQ and the critical quality maintenance parameters at the steel mill in the manufacture has been brought out.

  4. Heat Treatment and Properties of Iron and Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Digges, Thomas

    1966-01-01

    .... Chemical compositions, heat treatments, and some properties and uses are presented for structural steels, tool steels, stainless and heat-resisting steels, precipitation-hardenable stainless steels...

  5. Steel for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A steel contains, in percent by weight, the following constituents: carbon from 0.13 to 0.18, silicon from 0.17 to 0.37, manganese from 0.30 to 0.60, chromium from 1.7 to 2.4, nickel from 1.0 to 1.5, molybdenum from 0.5 to 0.7, vanadium from 0.05 to 0.12, aluminium from 0.01 to 0.035, nitrogen from 0.05 to 0.012, copper from 0.11 to 0.20, arsenic from 0.0035 to 0.0055, iron and impurities, the balance. This steel is preferable for use in the manufacture of nuclear reactors. 1 table

  6. Advances in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldev Raj; Jayakumar, T.; Saibaba, Saroja; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Shankar, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a broad spectrum of topics spanning the entire life cycle of stainless steel-from alloy design and characterization to engineering design, fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, quality assurance of components, in-service performance assessment, life prediction and finally failure analysis of materials and components. The contents provide useful feedback for further developments aimed at effective utilization of this class of materials. The book comprises articles that bring out contemporary developments in stainless steels and is thematically classified into the following sections. 1. Component design, modelling and structural integrity, 2. Manufacturing technology, 3. Property evaluation, 4. Alloy development and applications, 5. NDE methods, 6. Corrosion and surface modification. The book commences with articles on component design and structural integrity, thus opening up the areas of challenge for researchers and academia. The articles in the book relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.G.; Fly, G.W.; Baker, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Steel Containment Buckling program is in its fourth phase of work directed at the evaluation of the effects of the structural failure mode of steel containments when the membrane stresses are compressive. The structural failure mode for this state of stress is instability or buckling. The program to date has investigated: (1) the effect on overall buckling capacity of the ASME area replacement method for reinforcing around circular penetrations; (2) a set of benchmark experiments on ring-stiffened shells having reinforced and framed penetrations; (3) large and small scale experiments on knuckle region buckling from internal pressure and post-buckling behavior to failure for vessel heads having torispherical geometries; and (4) buckling under time-dependent loadings (dynamic buckling). The first two investigations are complete, the knuckle buckling experimental efforts are complete with data analysis and reporting in progress, and the dynamic buckling experimental and analytical work is in progress

  8. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear steel containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require a dynamic capacity reduction factor to be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are suggested

  9. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  10. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  11. Steele Richardson Olszewski syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree S Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease and its plus syndromes are an important cause of morbidity in the geriatric age group. Its plus syndromes show a myriad of clinical features characterized by progressive symptoms. Here we present a 65-year-old woman with progressive "Parkinsonian-like features," i.e., mask-like face, slowness of all movements and tendency to fall, and difficulty in eye movements, leading to the diagnosis of Steele Richardson Olszewski Syndrome or progressive supranuclear palsy.

  12. Steels and welding nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessa, M.; Milella, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  13. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  14. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  15. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  16. Sixty Years of Casting Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, John

    2015-11-01

    The 60 years of solidification research since the publication of Chalmer's constitutional undercooling in 1953 has been a dramatic advance of understanding which has and continues to be an inspiration. In contrast, 60 years of casting research has seen mixed fortunes. One of its success stories relates to improvements in inoculation of gray irons, and another to the discovery of spheroidal graphite iron, although both of these can be classified as metallurgical rather than casting advances. It is suggested that true casting advances have dated from the author's lab in 1992 when a critical surface turbulence condition was defined for the first time. These last 20 years have seen the surface entrainment issues of castings developed to a sufficient sophistication to revolutionize the performance of light alloy and steel foundries. However, there is still a long way to go, with large sections of the steel and Ni-base casting industries still in denial that casting defects are important or even exist. The result has been that special ingots are still cast poorly, and shaped casting operations have suffered massive losses. For secondary melted and cast materials, electro-slag remelting has the potential to be much superior to expensive vacuum arc remelting, which has cost our aerospace and defense industries dearly over the years. This failure to address and upgrade our processing of liquid metals is a serious concern, since the principle entrainment defect, the bifilm, is seen as the principle initiator of cracks in metals; in general, bifilms are the Griffith cracks that initiate failures by cracking. A new generation of crack resistant metals and engineering structures can now be envisaged.

  17. Simulations of the Penetration of 6061-T6511 Aluminum Targets by Spherical-Nosed VAR 4340 Steel Projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabbara, M.R.; Warren, T.L.

    1998-10-21

    In certain penetration events it is proposed that the primary mode of deformation of the target can be approximated by known analytical expressions. In the context of an analysis code, this approximation eliminates the need for discretizing the target as well as the need for a contact algorithm. Thus, this method substantially reduces the computer time and memory requirements. In this paper a forcing function which is derived from a spherical-cavity expansion (SCE) analysis has been implemented in a transient dynamic finite element code. This irnplementation is capable of computing the structural and component responses of a projectile due to a three dimensional penetration event. Simulations are presented for 7.1 l-mm-diameter, 74.7-mm-long, spherical-nose, vacuum- arc-remelted (VAR) 4340 steel projectiles that penetrate 6061-T6511 aluminum targets. Final projectile configurations obtained from the simulations are compared with post-test radiographs obtained from the corresponding experiments. It is shown that the simulations accurately predict the permanent projectile deformation for three dimensional loadings due to incident pitch and yaw over a wide range of striking velocities.

  18. Milled Die Steel Surface Roughness Correlation with Steel Sheet Friction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, J.; Brown, C.A.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates correlations between the surface topography ofmilled steel dies and friction with steel sheet. Several die surfaces were prepared by milling. Friction was measured in bending under tension testing. Linear regression coefficients (R2) between the friction and texture...

  19. Steels for nuclear power. I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohusova, O.; Brumovsky, M.; Cukr, B.; Hatle, Z.; Protiva, K.; Stefec, R.; Urban, A.; Zidek, M.

    1976-01-01

    The principles are listed of nuclear reactor operation and the reactors are classified by neutron energy, fuel and moderator designs, purpose and type of moderator. The trend and the development of light-water reactor applications are described. The fundamental operating parameters of the WWER type reactors are indicated. The effect is discussed of neutron radiation on reactor structural materials. The characteristics are described of steel corrosion due to the contact of the steel with steam or sodium in the primary coolant circuit. The reasons for stress corrosion are given and the effects of radiation on corrosion are listed. The requirements and criteria are given for the choice of low-alloy steel for the manufacture of pressure vessels, volume compensators, steam generators, cooling conduits and containment. A survey is given of most frequently used steels for pressure vessels and of the mechanical and structural properties thereof. The basic requirements for the properties of steel used in the primary coolant circuit are as follows: sufficient strength in operating temperature, toughness, good weldability, resistance to corrosion and low brittleness following neutron irradiation. The materials are listed used for the components of light-water and breeder reactors. The production of corrosion-resistant steels is discussed with a view to raw materials, technology, steel-making processes, melting processes, induction furnace steel-making, and to selected special problems of the chemical composition of steels. The effects are mainly discussed of lead, bismuth and tin as well as of some other elements on hot working of high-alloy steels and on their structure. The problems of corrosion-resistant steel welding and of pressure vessel cladding are summed up. Also discussed is the question of the concept and safeguards of the safety of nuclear installation operation and a list is presented of most commonly used nondestructive materials testing methods. The current

  20. Steel designers' handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gorenc, Branko; Tinyou, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The Revised 7th Edition of Steel Designers' Handbook is an invaluable tool for all practising structural, civil and mechanical engineers as well as engineering students at university and TAFE in Australia and New Zealand. It has been prepared in response to changes in the design Standard AS 4100, the structural Design Actions Standards, AS /ANZ 1170, other processing Standards such as welding and coatings, updated research as well as feedback from users. This edition is based on Australian Standard (AS) 4100: 1998 and subsequent amendments. The worked numerical examples in the book have been e

  1. Additive Manufacturing of High-Performance 316L Stainless Steel Nanocomposites via Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMangour, Bandar Abdulaziz

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel alloy is an attractive industrial material combining outstanding corrosion resistance, ductility, and biocompatibility, with promising structural applications and biomedical uses. However, 316L has low strength and wear resistance, limiting its high-performance applicability. Adding secondary hard nanoscale reinforcements to steel matrices, thereby forming steel-matrix nanocomposites (SMCs), can overcome these problems, improving the performance and thereby the applicability of 316L. However, SMC parts with complex-geometry cannot be easily achieved limiting its application. This can be avoided through additive manufacturing (AM) by generating layer-by-layer deposition using computer-aided design data. Expanding the range of AM-applicable materials is necessary to fulfill industrial demand. This dissertation presents the characteristics of new AM-processed high-performance 316L-matrix nanocomposites with nanoscale TiC or TiB2 reinforcements, addressing specific aspects of material design, process control and optimization, and physical metallurgy theory. The nanocomposites were prepared by high-energy ball-milling and consolidated by AM selective laser melting (SLM). Continuous and refined ring-like network structures were obtained with homogenously distributed reinforcements. Additional grain refinement occurred with reinforcement addition, attributed to nanoparticles acting as nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation. The influence of reinforcement content was first investigated; mechanical and tribological behaviors improved with increased reinforcement contents. The compressive yield strengths of composites with TiB2 or TiC reinforcements were approximately five or two times those of 316L respectively. Hot isostatic pressing post-treatment effectively eliminated major cracks and pores in SLM-fabricated components. The effects of the SLM processing parameters on the microstructure and mechanical performance were also investigated. Laser

  2. The industrial ecology of steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  3. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, T.; Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Michel, H.; Lebrun, J.P.; Hertz, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution (γ N ) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs

  4. Metadynamic recrystallization in C steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    EN24 and EN2 steels, a drop from 4000 s to 6 s for similar temperature rise was observed. Metadynamic ... carbon–manganese or silicon–manganese steels, but stops after a reduction at ... growth by strain-induced grain boundary migration;.

  5. Mechanics in Steels through Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tirumalasetty, G.K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study consolidated in this thesis is to understand the mechanics in steels using microscopy. In particular, the mechanical response of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels is correlated with their microstructures. Chapter 1 introduces the current state of the art of TRIP

  6. A Tale of Wootz Steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    manufacture of steel in south India by a crucible process at ... indicates that the production of wootz steel was almost on an industrial scale in ... in an Age of Design marked by ... The Russian Anasoff also studied the process of manufacturing.

  7. Irradiation creep in ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeulen, W.; Bremaecker, A. de; Burbure, S. de; Huet, J.J.; Asbroeck, P. van

    Pressurized and non-pressurized capsules of several ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie between 400 and 500 0 C up to 3.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). Results of the diameter measurements are presented and show that the total in-pile deformation is lower than for austenitic steels

  8. Steel structures for nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In the guide the requirements concerning design and fabrication of steel structures for nuclear facilities and documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are presented. Furthermore, regulations concerning inspection of steel structures during construction of nuclear facilities and during their operation are set forth

  9. Steels from materials science to structural engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sha, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Steels and computer-based modelling are fast growing fields in materials science as well as structural engineering, demonstrated by the large amount of recent literature. Steels: From Materials Science to Structural Engineering combines steels research and model development, including the application of modelling techniques in steels.  The latest research includes structural engineering modelling, and novel, prototype alloy steels such as heat-resistant steel, nitride-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel and low nickel maraging steel.  Researchers studying steels will find the topics vital to their work.  Materials experts will be able to learn about steels used in structural engineering as well as modelling and apply this increasingly important technique in their steel materials research and development. 

  10. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, A.T.W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    θ-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The θ-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  11. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  12. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  13. Methods of making bainitic steel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakas, Michael Paul; Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung; Zagula, Thomas Andrew; Langhorst, Benjamin Robert

    2018-01-16

    Methods of making bainitic steels may involve austenitizing a quantity of steel by exposing the quantity of steel to a first temperature. A composition of the quantity of steel may be configured to impede formation of non-bainite ferrite, pearlite, and Widmanstatten ferrite. The quantity of steel may be heat-treated to form bainite by exposing the quantity of steel to a second, lower temperature. The second, lower temperature may be stabilized by exposing the quantity of steel to the second, lower temperature in the presence of a thermal ballast.

  14. Stahlschüssel key to steel

    CERN Document Server

    Wegst, W S

    2016-01-01

    The Key to Steel (Stahlschlüssel/Stahlschluessel) cross reference book will help you to decode / decipher steel designations and find equivalent materials worldwide. The 2016 edition includes more than 70,000 standard designations and trade names from approximately 300 steelmakers and suppliers. Presentation is trilingual: English, French, and German. Materials covered include structural steels, tool steels, valve steels, high temperature steels and alloys, stainless and heat-resisting steels, and more. Standards and designations from 25 countries are cross-referenced.

  15. Advanced steel reheat furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

  16. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  17. Steel containment buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require that a dynamic capacity reduction factor be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are recommended. (orig.)

  18. Cold-formed steel design

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  19. Micropurity in stainless steel making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1981-01-01

    New technologies were developed by the Vitkovice research institutes in response to high requirements for the quality of high-alloy steels for nuclear power, viz., duplex technology with double vacuum degassing at the DH unit and oxidation vacuum degassing using the VAKUVIT equipment. The steel produced shows low contents of impurities and high micropurity. A study was conducted into changes in carbon content and the formation of titanium nitrides and carbonitrides in austenitic steels during their production, and optimum technological parameters were found for eliminating their formation in forgings. (author)

  20. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and : transverse mild steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams : exhibit earl...

  1. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and transverse mild : steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams exhibit early-...

  2. [The Steel factor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R

    1997-01-01

    Mice bearing mutations at either of two loci, dominant White spotting(W) or Steel(Sl), exhibit development defects in hematopoietic, melanocytic and germ cells. Genetics studies have shown that the SI locus encodes the Steel factor (SF), which is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, the product of the W locus. SF is synthesized in membrane-bound form and can be processed to produce a soluble form. Cell-cell interaction is important in the production of normal blood cells in vivo and in vitro and in the cellular expansion of leukemic cells. We discuss here how SF decreases the requirements in cell interaction for blast colony formation in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and the presence of membrane-bound SF possibly contributes to the density-dependent growth of the AML blasts. We explain that SF is mainly a survival factor for hematopoietic cells, of little proliferative effect, which maintains CD34+ hematopoietic cells in an undifferentiated state. These properties would potentially allow the maintenance of hematopoietic cells in culture for the purpose of marrow purging or gene therapy. The activation of the c-kit signal transduction pathway may play a significant role in the development of many types of non-hematological malignancies by disrupting normal cell-cell interactions and allowing the growth of cancer cell populations. In summary, the properties of the SF indicate it has a role for survival signals during the process of normal differentiation, AML proliferation and in the maintenance of many c-kit+ tumors.

  3. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  4. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  5. High-strength maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grachev, S.V.; Shejn, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of data on technological and operation properties of maraging steels on Fe-Cr-Ni, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr-Co-Mo bases is given. Their advantages and drawbacks are pointed out. The scheme of strengthening heat treatment is considered. The fields of the most effective application of maraging steels for instance, for products operating under conditions of low-cycle and shock cyclic loading are mentioned

  6. Steel refining possibilities in LF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, M. G.; Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Ciobanu, F.; Pollifroni, M.

    2018-01-01

    This article presents the main possibilities for steel refining in Ladle Furnace (LF). These, are presented: steelmaking stages, steel refining through argon bottom stirring, online control of the bottom stirring, bottom stirring diagram during LF treatment of a heat, porous plug influence over the argon stirring, bottom stirring porous plug, analysis of porous plugs disposal on ladle bottom surface, bottom stirring simulation with ANSYS, bottom stirring simulation with Autodesk CFD.

  7. MICROALLOYED STEELS FOR THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanshu Bhattacharya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two major drivers for the use of newer steels in the automotive industry are fuel efficiency and increased safety performance. Fuel efficiency is mainly a function of weight of steel parts, which in turn, is controlled by gauge and design. Safety is determined by the energy absorbing capacity of the steel used to make the part. All of these factors are incentives for the U.S. automakers to use both Highly Formable and Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS to replace the conventional steels used to manufacture automotive parts in the past. AHSS is a general term used to describe various families of steels. The most common AHSS is the dual-phase steel that consists of a ferrite-martensite microstructure. These steels are characterized by high strength, good ductility, low tensile to yield strength ratio and high bake hardenability. Another class of AHSS is the complex-phase or multi-phase steel which has a complex microstructure consisting of various phase constituents and a high yield to tensile strength ratio. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP steels is another class of AHSS steels finding interest among the U.S. automakers. These steels consist of a ferrite-bainite microstructure with significant amount of retained austenite phase and show the highest combination of strength and elongation, so far, among the AHSS in use. High level of energy absorbing capacity combined with a sustained level of high n value up to the limit of uniform elongation as well as high bake hardenability make these steels particularly attractive for safety critical parts and parts needing complex forming. A relatively new class of AHSS is the Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P steels. These steels seem to offer higher ductility than the dual-phase steels of similar strengths or similar ductility as the TRIP steels at higher strengths. Finally, martensitic steels with very high strengths are also in use for certain parts. The most recent initiative in the area of AHSS

  8. Calibration-free electrical conductivity measurements for highly conductive slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Christopher J.; Gao, Huang; Pal, Uday B.; Van den Avyle, James A.; Melgaard, David K.

    2000-01-01

    This research involves the measurement of the electrical conductivity (K) for the ESR (electroslag remelting) slag (60 wt.% CaF 2 - 20 wt.% CaO - 20 wt.% Al 2 O 3 ) used in the decontamination of radioactive stainless steel. The electrical conductivity is measured with an improved high-accuracy-height-differential technique that requires no calibration. This method consists of making continuous AC impedance measurements over several successive depth increments of the coaxial cylindrical electrodes in the ESR slag. The electrical conductivity is then calculated from the slope of the plot of inverse impedance versus the depth of the electrodes in the slag. The improvements on the existing technique include an increased electrochemical cell geometry and the capability of measuring high precision depth increments and the associated impedances. These improvements allow this technique to be used for measuring the electrical conductivity of highly conductive slags such as the ESR slag. The volatilization rate and the volatile species of the ESR slag measured through thermogravimetric (TG) and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively, reveal that the ESR slag composition essentially remains the same throughout the electrical conductivity experiments

  9. Properties of hot rolled steels for enamelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilovski, Dragica; Gavrilovski, Milorad

    2003-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the structure and properties of experimental produced hot rolled steels suitable for enamelling are presented in the paper. Hot rolled steels for enamelling represent a special group of the steels for conventional enamelling. Their quality has to be adapted to the method and conditions of enamelling. Therefore, these steels should meet some specific requirements. In addition to usual investigation of the chemical composition and mechanical properties, microstructure and quality of the steel surface also were investigated. The basic aim was to examine steels capability for enamelling, i. e. steels resistance to the fish scales phenomena, by trial enamelling, as well as quality of the steel - enamel contact surface, to evaluate the binding. Also, the changes of the mechanical properties, especially the yield point, during thermal treatment, as a very specific requirement, were investigated, by simplified method. Good results were obtained confirming the steels capability for enamelling. (Original)

  10. Laser cladding of austenitic stainless steel using NiTi strips for resisting cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, K.Y.; Cheng, F.T.; Man, H.C.

    2005-01-01

    Being part of a larger project on using different forms of nickel titanium (NiTi) in the surface modification of stainless steel for enhancing cavitation erosion resistance, the present study employs NiTi strips as the cladding material. Our previous study shows that laser surfacing using NiTi powder can significantly increase the cavitation erosion resistance of AISI 316 L stainless steel [K.Y. Chiu, F.T. Cheng, H.C. Man, Mater. Sci. Eng. A 392 (2005) 348-358]. However, from an engineering point of view, NiTi strips are more attractive than powder because NiTi powder is very expensive due to high production cost. In the present study, NiTi strips were preplaced on AISI 316 L samples and remelted using a high-power CW Nd:YAG laser to form a clad layer. To lower the dilution due to the substrate material, samples doubly clad with NiTi were prepared. The volume dilution ratio in the singly clad sample was high, being in the range of 13-30% depending on the processing parameters, while that of the doubly clad sample was reduced to below 10%. Analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) reveals that the clad layer is composed of a NiTi B2 based matrix together with fine precipitates of a tetragonal structure. Vickers indentation shows a tough cladding/substrate interface. The microhardness of the clad layer is increased from 200 HV of the substrate to about 750 HV due to the dissolution of elements like Fe, Cr and N in the matrix. Nanoindentation tests record a recovery ratio near to that of bulk NiTi, a result attributable to a relatively low dilution. The cavitation erosion resistance of the doubly clad samples is higher than that of 316-NiTi-powder (samples laser-surfaced with NiTi powder) and approaches that of NiTi plate. The high erosion resistance is attributed to a high hardness, high indentation recovery ratio and the absence of cracks or pores

  11. Fractal and probability analysis of creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr–1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Mengjia; Xu, Jijin, E-mail: xujijin_1979@sjtu.edu.cn; Lu, Hao; Chen, Jieshi; Chen, Junmei; Wei, Xiao

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Statistical and fractal analysis is applied to study the creep fracture surface. • The tensile residual stresses promote the initiation of creep crack. • The fractal dimension of a mixed mode fracture surface shows a wavy variation. • The fractal dimension increases with increasing intergranular fracture percentage. • Height coordinates of intergranular fracture surface fit Gaussian distribution. - Abstract: In order to clarify creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr–1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses, creep crack tests were carried out on the tension creep specimens, in which the residual stresses were generated by local remelting and cooling. Residual stresses in the specimens were measured using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. The fracture surface of the creep specimen was analyzed using statistical methods and fractal analysis. The relation between fractal dimension of the fracture surface and fracture mode of the creep specimen was discussed. Due to different fracture mechanisms, the probability density functions of the height coordinates vary with the intergranular crack percentage. Good fitting was found between Gaussian distribution and the probability function of height coordinates of the high percentage intergranular crack surface.

  12. Fractal and probability analysis of creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr–1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Mengjia; Xu, Jijin; Lu, Hao; Chen, Jieshi; Chen, Junmei; Wei, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Statistical and fractal analysis is applied to study the creep fracture surface. • The tensile residual stresses promote the initiation of creep crack. • The fractal dimension of a mixed mode fracture surface shows a wavy variation. • The fractal dimension increases with increasing intergranular fracture percentage. • Height coordinates of intergranular fracture surface fit Gaussian distribution. - Abstract: In order to clarify creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr–1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses, creep crack tests were carried out on the tension creep specimens, in which the residual stresses were generated by local remelting and cooling. Residual stresses in the specimens were measured using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. The fracture surface of the creep specimen was analyzed using statistical methods and fractal analysis. The relation between fractal dimension of the fracture surface and fracture mode of the creep specimen was discussed. Due to different fracture mechanisms, the probability density functions of the height coordinates vary with the intergranular crack percentage. Good fitting was found between Gaussian distribution and the probability function of height coordinates of the high percentage intergranular crack surface.

  13. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  14. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  15. Notch aspects of RSP steel microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Černý

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For a rather long time, basic research projects have been focused on examinations of mechanical properties for Rapid Solidification Powder (RSP steels. These state-of-art steels are commonly known as “powdered steels“. In fact, they combine distinctive attributes of conventional steel alloys with unusual resistance of construction material manufactured by so called “pseudo-powdered” metallurgy.Choice of suitable materials for experimental verification was carried out based on characteristic application of so called “modern steel”. First, groups of stainless and tool steel types (steel grades ČSN 17 and 19 were selected. These provided representative specimens for the actual comparison experiment. For stainless steel type, two steel types were chosen: hardenable X47Cr14 (ČSN 17 029 stainless steel and non-hardenable X2CrNiMo18-14-3 (ČSN 17 350 steel. They are suitable e.g. for surgical tools and replacements (respectively. For tooling materials, C80U (ČSN 19 152 carbon steel and American D2 highly-alloyed steel (ČSN “equivalent” being 19 572 steel were chosen for the project. Finally, the M390 Böhler steel was chosen as representative of powdered (atomized steels. The goal of this paper is to discuss structural aspects of modern stainless and tool steel types and to compare them against the steel made by the RSP method. Based on the paper's results, impact of powdered steel structural characteristics on the resistance to crack initiation shall be evaluated.

  16. Anodized Steel Electrodes for Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagu, Jagdeep S; Wijayantha, K G Upul; Bohm, Mallika; Bohm, Siva; Kumar Rout, Tapan

    2016-03-09

    Steel was anodized in 10 M NaOH to enhance its surface texture and internal surface area for application as an electrode in supercapacitors. A mechanism was proposed for the anodization process. Field-emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEGSEM) studies of anodized steel revealed that it contains a highly porous sponge like structure ideal for supercapacitor electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements showed that the surface of the anodized steel was Fe2O3, whereas X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements indicated that the bulk remained as metallic Fe. The supercapacitor performance of the anodized steel was tested in 1 M NaOH and a capacitance of 18 mF cm(-2) was obtained. Cyclic voltammetry measurements showed that there was a large psueudocapacitive contribution which was due to oxidation of Fe to Fe(OH)2 and then further oxidation to FeOOH, and the respective reduction of these species back to metallic Fe. These redox processes were found to be remarkably reversible as the electrode showed no loss in capacitance after 10000 cycles. The results demonstrate that anodization of steel is a suitable method to produce high-surface-area electrodes for supercapacitors with excellent cycling lifetime.

  17. Corrosion of steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preece, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    A comparative study has been made of those properties of Massiv and Standard cements which are considered to determine their ability to protect steel reinforcement from corroding. Saturated Massiv cement has a higher evaporabel water content, but a significantly finer pore structure than has saturated Standard cement. This fine structure resulted in an electrical resistivity ten times higher and chloride diffusivity ten times lower than those of Standard cement. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the passive current density of steel in Massiv mortar is higher than that of steel in Standard mortar, but the higher current should lead to a more rapid decrease in potential to a level at which neither chloride attack of hydrogen evolution will occur. Whereas steel in Standard mortar was found to be highly susceptible to crevice corrosion, no such attack has been observed in Massiv mortar. Moreover, the initiation of chloride induced corrosion and the subsequent rates of corrosion were both lower in Massiv mortar than in Standard mortar. Thus, it may be predicted that Massiv cement would provide greater protection for steel reinforcement in underground structures exposed to chloride containing ground water than would Standard cement. (author)

  18. Ductility of high chromium stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Kazantsev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to optimize the hot working conditions for high chromium stainless steels the experiments were carried in the temperature range of 800-1300 deg C using hot torsion tests and cylindrical specimens of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels 08Kh13, 12Kh13, 20Kh13, 30Kh13 and 40Kh13. Testing results showed that steel plasticity varies in a wide range depending on carbon content. Steels of lesser carbon concentration (08Kh13 and 12Kh13) exhibit a sharp increase in plasticity with a temperature rise, especially in the interval of 1200-1250 deg C. Steels 20Kh13 and 30Kh13 display insignificant plasticity increasing, whereas plastic properties of steel 40Kh13 increase noticeably in the range of 1000-1300 deg C. It is shown that optimal hot working conditions for specific steel must be selected with account of steel phase composition at high temperatures

  19. Financial Management: Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    In a February 1, 2001 letter, you expressed concerns about repayments of federally guaranteed loans by borrowers under the Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee Program and the effect of the program on the U.S. steel industry...

  20. Optimum design of steel structures

    CERN Document Server

    Farkas, József

    2013-01-01

    This book helps designers and manufacturers to select and develop the most suitable and competitive steel structures, which are safe, fit for production and economic. An optimum design system is used to find the best characteristics of structural models, which guarantee the fulfilment of design and fabrication requirements and minimize the cost function. Realistic numerical models are used as main components of industrial steel structures. Chapter 1 containts some experiences with the optimum design of steel structures Chapter 2 treats some newer mathematical optimization methods. Chapter 3 gives formulae for fabrication times and costs. Chapters 4 deals with beams and columns. Summarizes the Eurocode rules for design. Chapter 5 deals with the design of tubular trusses. Chapter 6 gives the design of frame structures and fire-resistant design rules for a frame. In Chapters 7 some minimum cost design problems of stiffened and cellular plates and shells are worked out for cases of different stiffenings and loads...

  1. Functionally Graded Mo sintered steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cisneros-Belmonte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Functionally graded materials (FGM, the multi-materials, strive to satisfy the numerous requirements demanded of parts in a given combination of compositions and microstructures. The required material compatibility lead the manufacturing process and the achieving of an interface, not always diffuse. Powder metallurgy is one of the techniques used in manufacturing functionally graded materials, in particular the compaction matrix of the possible techniques for forming these materials. In this paper, a process of forming a functionally graded steel based on the use of a high molybdenum steel with cooper and other steel with copper, without molybdenum, is proposed with the aim of concentrating this element to the surface of the workpiece, increasing the mechanical strength. The study is completed with the evaluation of physical properties (density and porosity distribution, mechanical properties (hardness, tensile strength and elongation and microstructural analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  2. Chemical decontamination of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onuma, Tsutomu; Akimoto, Hidetoshi

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns a method for chemical decontamination of radioactive metal waste materials contaminated with radioactive materials on the surface, generated in radioactive materials-handling facilities. The invention is comprised of a method of chemical decontamination of stainless steel, characterized by comprising a first process of immersing a stainless steel-based metal waste material contaminated by radioactive materials on the surface in a sulfuric acid solution and second process of immersing in an aqueous solution of sulfuric acid and oxidizing metal salt, in which a portion of the surface of the stainless steel to be decontaminated is polished mechanically to expose a portion of the base material before the above first and second processes. 1 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  4. Boron Steel: An Alternative for Costlier Nickel and Molybdenum Alloyed Steel for Transmission Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Verma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Case Carburized (CC low carbon steels containing Ni, Cr and Mo alloying elements are widely used for transmission gears in automobile, as it possesses desired mechanical properties. In order to cut cost and save scarce materials like Ni and Mo for strategic applications, steel alloyed with Boron has been developed, which gives properties comparable to Ni-Cr-Mo alloyed steel. In the process of steel development, care was taken to ensure precipitation of boron which results in precipitation hardening. The characterization of the developed boron steel had exhibited properties comparable to Ni-Cr-Mo alloyed steel and superior to conventional boron steel.

  5. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  6. Corrosion behaviour of laser clad stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damborenea, J.J. de; Weerasinghe, V.M.; West, D.R.F.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper is focussed in the study of the properties of a clad layer of stainless steel on a mild steel. By blowing powder of the alloy into a melt pool generated by a laser of 2 KW, an homogeneous layer of 316 stainless steel can be obtained. Structure, composition and corrosion behaviour are similar to those of a stainless steel in as-received condition. (Author)

  7. Modern steels for light automobiles (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, A. K.

    1994-10-01

    The article considers the directions of work at VAZ together with metallurgists of the CIS for creating highly efficient economically-alloyed and microalloyed steels; highly ductile forged steels with improved corrosion resistance coated with zinc and with good stamping, welding, and painting capacity. Steels are created for petrol tanks with aluminum-zinc coatings instead of lead, and new heat and corrosion-resistant steels are developed for automobile exhaust gas systems.

  8. Inclusion control in high-performance steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holappa, L.E.K.; Helle, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    Progress of clean steel production, fundamentals of oxide and sulphide inclusions as well as inclusion morphology in normal and calcium treated steels are described. Effects of cleanliness and inclusion control on steel properties are discussed. In many damaging constructional and engineering applications the nonmetallic inclusions have a quite decisive role in steel performance. An example of combination of good mechanical properties and superior machinability by applying inclusion control is presented. (author)

  9. Boron steel. I Part. Preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaraiz Franco, E.; Esteban Hernandez, J. A.

    1960-01-01

    With the advent of the first nuclear reactors arise the need for control rods and shielding duties for some types of radiations. One of the materials used for this purpose has been the high boron steel. This paper describes the melting and casting procedures employed for the production, at laboratory scale, of steels with Boron content ranging from 1 to 4 per cent, as well as the metallographic and X-Ray techniques used for the identification of the present phases. The electrolytic technique employed for the isolation of the Fe 2 B phase and its subsequent X-Ray identification has proved to be satisfactory. (Author) 11 refs

  10. Plating on stainless steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.; Johnson, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Quantitative adhesion data are presented for a variety of electroplated stainless steel type alloys. Results show that excellent adhesion can be obtained by using a Wood's nickel strike or a sulfamate nickel strike prior to final plating. Specimens plated after Wood's nickel striking failed in the deposit rather than at the interface between the substrate and the coating. Flyer plate quantitative tests showed that use of anodic treatment in sulfuric acid prior to Wood's nickel striking even further improved adhesion. In contrast activation of stainless steels by immersion or cathodic treatment in hydrochloric acid resulted in very reduced bond strengths with failure always occurring at the interface between the coating and substrate

  11. Steeling and Resilience in Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Donalyn

    2014-01-01

    Steel is an incredibly strong alloy of iron and carbon. Due to its incredible strength and durability, this resilient material is commonly used for constructing buildings. The transitive verb "steeling" is defined in Miriam-Webster dictionary as "to fill with resolution or determination, as in, she 'steeled herself to face the…

  12. A model for TRIP steel constitutive behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Menari, G

    2011-01-01

    A constitutive model is developed for TRIP steel. This is a steel which contains three or four different phases in its microstructure. One of the phases in TRIP steels is metastable austenite (Retained Austenite) which transforms to martensite upon deformation. The accompanying transformation strain

  13. Microstructural Development during Welding of TRIP steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirthalingam, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are promising solutions for the production of lighter automobiles which reduce fuel consumption and increase passenger safety by improving crash-worthiness. Transformation Induced Plasticity Steel (TRIP) are part of the advanced high strength steels which

  14. performance of steel slag performance of steel slag as fine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Suitability of using steel slag (SS) as substitute for sand in concrete was ... The strength of SS concrete increased with increase in proporti. 10 mm. .... additives used. All other oxides ..... low lime coal fly ash in foamed concrete”, Fuel, Vol. 84,.

  15. Teaching Steel Connections Using an Interactive Virtual Steel Sculpture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaveni, Saeed; Chou, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many structural failures are attributed to connection failures. Connections are the glue that holds a structure together. The failures of the Hartford Coliseum in 1977, the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City in 1980, and the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in 2007 are all…

  16. Physical characterization of steel and stainless steel metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavilla, A.O.; Lucchesi, C.G.; Sandin, O.O.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the physical characterization of steel powders (obtained by atomization) for later sintering and for the construction of porous sheets and filtrating tubes, capable of operating at temperatures between 600 deg C and 800 deg C in corrosive atmospheres. This methodology was based on the equipment and methods used for the physical characterization of uranium oxide powders. (Author) [es

  17. Some comments about the situation of the Steel Industry in the Arab Countries (Arab Steel Summit)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidar, Y.; Astier, J.

    2009-01-01

    The Arab Steel Summit, that convened in Abu Dhabi in April, gave us another opportunity to review the situation of the Arab Iron and Steel Industry, with regard to the present World economic context. We will address: - the World situation of steel production, focusing on the Arab Countries; - the related situation of steel consumption; - the steel trade, including imports, exports and prices; - the consequences for technology and economy. (authors)

  18. Microstructural examination of 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel after irradiation at elevated temperatures in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Chen-Yih; Gelles, D.S.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-06-01

    A remelted 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel (HT-9) has been examined by transmission electron microscopy before and after irradiation in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The irradiation temperatures were 365,420, 520, and 600 degree C with the fluences as high as 7.3 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E > 0.1 MeV) or 34 dpa. The extracted precipitates from each specimen were identified using x-ray microanalysis and selected area diffraction. The precipitates in the unirradiated condition were primarily M 23 C 6 carbides, which formed at martensite lath and prior austenite grain boundaries. During irradiation at elevated temperatures, small amounts of other phases formed, which were tentatively identified as the chromium-rich α', the nickel-silicon rich G-phase, and the intermetallic Chi phase. Irradiation-induced voids were observed only in specimens irradiated at 420 degree C to a dose of 34 dpa; no voids were found for specimens irradiated at 365, 520, and 600 degree C (∼11, ∼34, and ∼34 dpa). These results are not in agreement with previous experiments in that voids have not been reported in this alloy at relatively high fluence level (∼67 dpa) following irradiation in another fast-spectrum reactor (EBR.II). This is, however, the first observation following FFTF irradiation. The present results indicate that cavities can form in HT-9 at modest fluence levels even without significant generation of helium. Hence, the cavity formation in this class of ferritic alloys is not simply caused by helium generation but rather more complex mechanisms. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Steel story founded on coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Paper reports on an iron and steel plant in New Zealand which uses non-coking subbituminuous coal to produce the sponge iron. The transport of the ironsand and the coal to the site and the operation of the kiln in which the ironsand is reduced by the coal is described.

  20. Metadynamic recrystallization in C steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Metadynamic recrystallization has been investigated in three plain carbon steels (ENIA, EN2 and EN24) through the use of hot interrupted compression tests on a wedge plastometer. Holding time was 0.5 s between passes. Strain rates of 0.05 and 0.12/s and small strain increments of 3, 5 and 7% were employed.

  1. Corrosion of austenitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    1977-01-01

    Types of corrosion observed in a heat exchanger pipe and on a support of still of molasses fermented wort, both in austenitic stainless steel, are focused. Not only are the causes which might have had any kind of influence on them examined, but also the measures adopted in order to avoid and lessen its occurence.

  2. Fatigue Strength of Weathering Steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kunz, Ludvík; Lukáš, Petr; Klusák, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 1 (2012), s. 18-22 ISSN 1392-1320 Grant - others:GA MPO(CZ) FT/TA5/076 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : fatigue of weathering steel * corrosion pits * fatigue notch factor Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 0.522, year: 2012

  3. Argon solubility in liquid steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, R; Dankert, O; Van Veen, A; Kamperman, AA

    2000-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to establish the solubility of argon in liquid interstitial-free steel. The solubility appears to be lower than 0.1 at ppb, The results are in line with argon solubilities reported in the literature on liquid iron. Semiempirical theories and calculations based on the

  4. Kinetics of borided gear steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ration (FeB + Fe2B) due to the high intensity stress states generally situated at the ... performed molten salt boriding of AISI D2 steel with borax (Na2B4O7) as the ... the borided layer thickness; silicon, chromium and aluminium have moderate.

  5. Development of PWR pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druce, S.; Edwards, B.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements to be met by vessel steels for pressurized water reactors are analyzed. Chemicat composition of low-alloyed steels, mechanical properties of sheets and forgings made of these steels and changes in the composition and properties over the wall thickness of the reactor vessel are presented. Problems of the vessel manufacturing including welding and heat treatment processes of sheets and forgings are considered. Special attention is paid to steel embrittlement during vessel fabrication and operation (radiation embrittlement, thermal embrittlement). The role of non-metal inclusions and their effect on anisotropy of fracture toughness is discussed. Possible developments of vessel steels and procedures for producing reactor vessels are reviewed

  6. Development of PWR pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Druce, S.; Edwards, B.

    1982-01-01

    Requirements to be met by vessel steels for pressurized water reactors are analyzed. Chemicat composition of low-alloyed steels, mechanical properties of sheets and forgings made of these steels and changes in the composition and properties over the wall thickness of the reactor vessel are presented. Problems of the vessel manufacturing including welding and heat treatment processes of sheets and forgings are considered. Special attention is paid to steel embrittlement during vessel fabrication and operation (radiation embrittlement, thermal embrittlement). The role of non-metal inclusions and their effect on anisotropy of fracture toughness is discussed. Possible developments of vessel steels and procedures for producing reactor vessels are reviewed.

  7. High - speed steel for precise cased tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karwiarz, J.; Mazur, A.

    2001-01-01

    The test results of high-vanadium high - speed steel (SWV9) for precise casted tools are presented. The face -milling cutters of NFCa80A type have been tested in industrial operating conditions. An average life - time of SWV9 steel tools was 3-10 times longer compare to the conventional high - speed milling cutters. Metallography of SWB9 precise casted steel revealed beneficial for tool properties distribution of primary vanadium carbides in the steel matrix. Presented results should be a good argument for wide application of high - vanadium high - speed steel for precise casted tools. (author)

  8. Study on cementitious properties of steel slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The converter steel slag chemical and mineral components in China’s main steel plants have been analysed in the present paper. The electronic microscope, energy spectrum analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the main mineral compositions in the converter slag. Converter slag of different components were grounded to obtain a powder with specific surface area over 400m2/kg, making them to take place some part of the cement in the concrete as the admixture and carry out the standard tests. The results indicate that the converter slag can be used as cementitious materials for construction. Furthermore, physical mechanic and durability tests on the concrete that certain amount of cement be substituted by converter steel slag powder from different steel plants are carried out, the results show that the concrete with partial substitution of steel slag powder has the advantages of higher later period strength, better frost resistance, good wear resistance and lower hydration heat, etc. This study can be used as the technical basis for “Steel Slag Powder Used For Cement And Concrete”, “Steel Slag Portland Cement”, “Low Heat Portland Steel Slag Cement”, “Steel Slag Road Cement” in China, as well as a driving force to the works of steel slag utilization with high-value addition, circular economy, energy conservation and discharge reduction in the iron and steel industry.

  9. Corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, J A; Guzman, A; Zuccari, A; Thornburg, D W; Rhodes, B F; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1997-07-01

    The corrosion of 2205 duplex stainless steel was compared with that of AISI type 316L stainless steel. The 2205 stainless steel is a potential orthodontic bracket material with low nickel content (4 to 6 wt%), whereas the 316L stainless steel (nickel content: 10 to 14 wt%) is a currently used bracket material. Both stainless steels were subjected to electrochemical and immersion (crevice) corrosion tests in 37 degrees C, 0.9 wt% sodium chloride solution. Electrochemical testing indicates that 2205 has a longer passivation range than 316L. The corrosion rate of 2205 was 0.416 MPY (milli-inch per year), whereas 316L exhibited 0.647 MPY. When 2205 was coupled to 316L with equal surface area ratio, the corrosion rate of 2205 reduced to 0.260 MPY, indicating that 316L stainless steel behaved like a sacrificial anode. When 316L is coupled with NiTi, TMA, or stainless steel arch wire and was subjected to the immersion corrosion test, it was found that 316L suffered from crevice corrosion. On the other hand, 2205 stainless steel did not show any localized crevice corrosion, although the surface of 2205 was covered with corrosion products, formed when coupled to NiTi and stainless steel wires. This study indicates that considering corrosion resistance, 2205 duplex stainless steel is an improved alternative to 316L for orthodontic bracket fabrication when used in conjunction with titanium, its alloys, or stainless steel arch wires.

  10. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included

  11. Irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Vacek, M.

    1975-01-01

    A Standard Research Programme on Irradiation Embrittlement of Pressure Vessel Steels was approved by the Coordinating Meeting on the 12th May 1972 at the Working Group on Engineering Aspects of Irradiation Embrittlement of Pressure Vessel Steels. This Working Group was set up by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna. Seven countries with their research institutes agreed on doing irradiation experiments according to the approved programme on steel A533 B from the U.S. HSST Programme. The Czechoslovak contribution covering tensile and impact testing of non-irradiated steel and steel irradiated at 280degC to 1.3 x 10 23 n/m 2 (E above 1 MeV) is presented in this report. As an additional part the same set of experiments was carried out on two additional steels - A 542 and A 543, made in SKODA Works for comparison of their irradiation embrittlement and hardening with A533 B steel. (author)

  12. Earthquake response of steel braces and braced steel frames

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, Wenshui

    1996-01-01

    This thesis consists of three parts. Chapter 2 deals with the dynamic buckling behavior of steel braces under cyclic axial end displacement. Braces under such a loading condition belong to a class of "acceleration magnifying" structural components, in which a small motion at the loading points can cause large internal acceleration and inertia. This member-level inertia is frequently ignored in current studies of braces and braced structures. This chapter shows that, under certain conditions, ...

  13. Advanced cold rolled steels for automotive applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Harald; Mattissen, Dorothea; Schaumann, Thomas Wilhelm [ThyssenKrupp Steel AG, Center of Materials Excellence, Dortmund (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Advanced high-strength steels offer a great potential for the further development of automobile bodies-in-white due to their combined mechanical properties of high formability and strength. They represent the first choice in material selection for strength and crash-relevant parts with challenging geometries. The intensive development of multiphase steels by ThyssenKrupp Steel has led to hot dip galvanizing concepts with an outstanding forming potential. Hot rolled, hot dip galvanized complex-phase steels are currently produced in addition to cold rolled dual phase (DP) and retained austenite (RA) or transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. New continuously annealed grades of steel are being developed with tensile strength levels of up to 1000 MPa in combination with sufficient ductility for the high demands of structural automobile components. These steels make use of the classic advantages of microalloying as well as the principles of DP steels and RA / TRIP steels. Further improvement of properties will be reached by the new class of high manganese alloyed steels. (orig.)

  14. On high temperature strength of carbon steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Manabu; Kanero, Takahiro; Ihara, Yoshihito

    1977-01-01

    In the steels for high temperature use, the oxidation resistance is regarded as important, but carbon steels show enough oxidation resistance to be used continuously at the temperature up to 500 deg. C if the strength is left out of consideration, and up to 450 deg. C even when the strength is taken into account. Moreover, the production is easy, the workability and weldability are good, and the price is cheap in carbon steels as compared with alloy steels. In the boilers for large thermal power stations, 0.15-0.30% C steels are used for reheater tubes, main feed water tubes, steam headers, wall water tubes, economizer tubes, bypass pipings and others, and they account for 70% of all steel materials used for the boilers of 350 MW class and 30% in 1000 MW class. The JIS standard for the carbon steels for high temperature use and the related standards in foreign countries are shown. The high temperature strength of carbon steels changes according to the trace elements, melting and heat treatment as well as the main compositions of C, Si and Mn. Al and N affect the high temperature strength largely. The characteristics of carbon steels after the heating for hours, the factors controlling the microstructure and high temperature strength, and the measures to improve the high temperature strength of carbon steels are explained. (Kako, I.)

  15. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vičan, Josef; Gocál, Jozef; Odrobiňák, Jaroslav; Koteš, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  16. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vičan Josef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  17. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  18. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ....A.) Upon prolonged exposure to temperatures above 775 °F (412 °C), the carbide phase of plain carbon steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel, and carbon-silicon steel may convert to graphite. (b) (Reproduces 124.2.B.) Upon prolonged exposure to...

  19. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  20. Nano-composite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  1. Steel Pickling in Challenging Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Maanonen, Mika

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to collect data on the pickling procedure and parameters especially in conditions where there are limited amount of power for heating, limited water treatment possibilities and equipment to maintain pickling processes. Information about steel pickling, alternative methods and processes before and after pickling was acquired. Data on most common chemicals for pickling were acquired and compared. Cleaning efficiency, ease of use, safety, price and availability...

  2. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasan Ghasemi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance incompanies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, ithas rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan’s Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aimsto share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how the projectsystematic implementation led to succes.

  3. Thermophysical properties of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.S.

    1975-09-01

    Recommended values of the thermodynamic and transport properties of stainless steels Type 304L and Type 316L are given for temperatures from 300 to 3000 0 K. The properties in the solid region were obtained by extrapolating available experimental data to the melting range, while appropriate correlations were used to estimate the properties in the liquid region. The properties evaluated include the enthalpy, entropy, specific heat, vapor pressure, density, thermal expansion coefficient, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and viscosity. (9 fig, 11 tables)

  4. Benchmarking in Mobarakeh Steel Company

    OpenAIRE

    Sasan Ghasemi; Mohammad Nazemi; Mehran Nejati

    2008-01-01

    Benchmarking is considered as one of the most effective ways of improving performance in companies. Although benchmarking in business organizations is a relatively new concept and practice, it has rapidly gained acceptance worldwide. This paper introduces the benchmarking project conducted in Esfahan's Mobarakeh Steel Company, as the first systematic benchmarking project conducted in Iran. It aims to share the process deployed for the benchmarking project in this company and illustrate how th...

  5. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  6. Corrosion of mild steel and stainless steel by marine Vibrio sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Wagh, A.B.

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steel and mild steel coupons exposed to media with and without a bacterial culture Vibrio sp. was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Pitting type of corrosion was noticed which was more...

  7. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wenning; Feng, Lajun; Feng, Hui; Cao, Ying; Liu, Lei; Cao, Mo; Ge, Yanfeng

    The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel.

  8. Utilization of structural steel in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Muiris C; Allwood, Julian M

    2014-08-08

    Over one-quarter of steel produced annually is used in the construction of buildings. Making this steel causes carbon dioxide emissions, which climate change experts recommend be reduced by half in the next 37 years. One option to achieve this is to design and build more efficiently, still delivering the same service from buildings but using less steel to do so. To estimate how much steel could be saved from this option, 23 steel-framed building designs are studied, sourced from leading UK engineering firms. The utilization of each beam is found and buildings are analysed to find patterns. The results for over 10 000 beams show that average utilization is below 50% of their capacity. The primary reason for this low value is 'rationalization'-providing extra material to reduce labour costs. By designing for minimum material rather than minimum cost, steel use in buildings could be drastically reduced, leading to an equivalent reduction in 'embodied' carbon emissions.

  9. Metallurgy of steels for PWR pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kepka, M.; Mocek, J.; Barackova, L.

    1980-01-01

    A survey and the chemical compositions are presented of reactor pressure vessel steels. The metallurgy is described of steel making for pressure vessels in Japan and the USSR. Both acidic and alkaline open-hearth steel is used for the manufacture of ingots. The leading world manufacturers of forging ingots for pressure vessels, however, exclusively use electric steel. Vacuum casting techniques are exclusively used. Experience is shown gained with the introduction of the manufacture of forging ingots for pressure vessels at SKODA, Plzen. The metallurgical procedure was tested utilizing alkaline open hearths, electric arc furnaces and facilities for vacuum casting of steel. Pure charge raw materials should be used for securing high steel purity. Prior to forging pressure vessel rings, not only should sufficiently big bottoms and heads be removed but also the ingot middle part should be scrapped showing higher contents of impurities and nonhomogeneous structure. (B.S.)

  10. Metallurgy of steels for PWR pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepka, M; Mocek, J; Barackova, L [Skoda, Plzen (Czechoslovakia)

    1980-09-01

    A survey and the chemical compositions are presented of reactor pressure vessel steels. The metallurgy is described of steel making for pressure vessels in Japan and the USSR. Both acidic and alkaline open-hearth steel is used for the manufacture of ingots. The leading world manufacturers of forging ingots for pressure vessels, however, exclusively use electric steel. Vacuum casting techniques are exclusively used. Experience is shown gained with the introduction of the manufacture of forging ingots for pressure vessels at SKODA, Plzen. The metallurgical procedure was tested utilizing alkaline open hearths, electric arc furnaces and facilities for vacuum casting of steel. Pure charge raw materials should be used for securing high steel purity. Prior to forging pressure vessel rings, not only should sufficiently big bottoms and heads be removed but also the ingot middle part should be scrapped showing higher contents of impurities and nonhomogeneous structure.

  11. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  12. Nitrogen-containing steels and thermomechanical treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaputkina, L.; Prokoshkina, V.G.; Svyazhin, G.

    2004-01-01

    The strengthening of nitrogen-containing corrosion-resistant steels resulting from alloying and thermomechanical treatment have been investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis, light microscopy, hardness measurements and tensile testing. Combined data have been obtained for nitrogen interaction with alloying elements , peculiarities of deformed structure and short-range of nitrogen-containing steels of various structural classes. The higher nitrogen and total alloying element contents, the higher deformation strengthening. Prospects of use the steels with not high nitrogen content and methods of their thermomechanical strengthening are shown. High temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) is very effective for obtaining high and thermally stable constructional strength of nitrogen-containing steels of all classes. The HTMT is most effective if used in a combination with dispersion hardening for aging steels or in the case of mechanically unstable austenitic steels. (author)

  13. Evaluation criteria of structural steel reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zav'yalov, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Different low-carbon and medium-carbon structural steels are investigated. It is stated that steel reliability evaluation criteria depend on the fracture mode, steel suffering from the brittle fracture under the influence of the stresses (despite their great variety) arising in articles during the production and operation. Fibrous steel fracture at the given temperature and article thickness says about its high ductility and toughness and brittle fractures are impossible. Brittle fractures take place in case of a crystalline and mixed fracture with a predominant crystalline component. Evaluation methods of article and sample steel structural strength differing greatly from real articles in a thickness (diameter) or used at temperatures higher than possible operation temperatures cannot be reliability evaluation criteria because at a great thickness (diameter) and lower operation temperatures steel fracture and its strain mode can change resulting in a sharp reliability degradation

  14. DETERMINANTS OF RETAINED EARNINGS IN PROFITABLE STEEL COMPANIES IN INDIA: A STUDY OF STEEL SECTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Sohaib Masood

    2018-01-01

    In this paper an attempt has been made to identify the important determinants of retained earnings in profitable steel companies in steel sector of India and which have impact on the retention of earnings of steel companies under study. Multiple linear regression is used to identify the determinants of retained earnings for a period of sixteen years. Also the importance of retained earnings as a source of finance for steel sector companies is also studied in the paper.

  15. Evaluation of Flash Bainite in 4130 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-11011 Evaluation of Flash Bainite in 4130 Steel G. Vigilante M. Hespos S. Bartolucci...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluation of Flash Bainite in 4130 Steel 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...need to be addressed, the Flash Bainite processing of 4130 steel demonstrates promise for applications needing a combination of high strength with

  16. Mechanism of creep in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Silveira, T.L.

    In the present work the creep criterions to identify the deformation mechanisms through the exponent of the strain rate versus stress relationship are presented. When applied to several stainless steels these criterions show an apparent contradiction for the proper mechanism acting at Σ/D above 10 9 /cm 2 . Microstructural aspects interfering in different manners with the fracture of these steels could be a reason for rationalizing the contradictory behavior. This is discussed in suggested deformation maps for the steels investigated [pt

  17. Problems in development of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahon, C.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The tendency of steels to intercrystalline fracture at low stresses is the main factor, limiting fracture resistance of steels in agressive media at conventional and elevated temperatures. The reasons for the phenomenon are analyzed. In particular, the role of grain boundary segregations of non-metallic impurities is pointed out. The ways of the problem solving both at the expense of corresponding microstructure control and by means of selection of the steel chemical composition are considered

  18. Experimental studies of Steel Corrugated Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarev Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this particular article is to assess existing calculations of steel corrugated constructions. Steel Corrugated Construction is a perspective type of constructions, which is exhibiting numerous advantages in comparison with one that currently applied in automobile and railroad networks (reinforced concrete water-throughput pipes, reinforced concrete frame bridges. The evaluation of experimental data on models of constructions of this particular type has been carried out in order to improve calculations of Steel Corrugated Constructions.

  19. Auburn Steel Company radioactive contamination incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, F.J.; Cabasino, L.; Kelly, R.; Awai, A.; Kasyk, G.

    1986-04-01

    On February 21, 1983, workers at the Auburn Steel Company, Auburn, New York discovered that about 120 tons of steel poured that day had become contaminated with 60 Co. In addition to the steel, the air cleaning system and portions of the mill used in casting the steel were contaminated. Approximately 25 curies of 60 Co were involved. Decontamination and disposal of the contamination cost in excess of $2,200,000. This report details the discovery of the contamination, decontamination of the plant and disposal of the contamination

  20. Applications of electron beam to precoated steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshiishi, K.; Masuhara, K.

    1992-01-01

    Applications of EB to precoated steel started with paint cure and have expanded to film lamination and surface modification. These applications can offer precoated steel some advantages which are difficult or impossible to gain by thermal methods. But there are also such problems as adhesion, formability and paintability in EB processing. In practice, using EB technologies along with thermal technologies cannot be avoided for precoated steel at the present. Future development of EB applications to precoated steel will depend on how we can seek superiority and distinction of EB technology against conventional and competitive technologies. (author)

  1. Industrial investigations of the liquid steel filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Janiszewski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hitherto existing investigations concerning the ceramic filter use in the steel making processes have given good results. The obtained results of filtration have proved that this method may be used as an effective and cheap way of steel filtration from non-metallic inclusions. Placing filters in the tundish is the best location considering the limitation of the possibility of secondary pollution of steel. Yet, the results presented in this paper, of an experiment prepared and carried out in the industrial environment, are the only positive results obtained, which are connected with so much quantities of liquid steel processed with use of the multi-hole ceramic filters.

  2. Data for a steel industry model

    OpenAIRE

    Mæstad, Ottar

    2000-01-01

    SNF has recently developed a new model of the steel market and some of the major factor markets connected to the steel industry. The aim of the model has been to study how regulations of the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the steel industry might affect the structure of the industry. It has also been an objective to investigate how structural changes in the steel industry might influence on the industry’s demand for transport services. This paper outlines the details about the data that...

  3. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, J.; Samek, L.; Verleysen, P.; Verbeken, K.; Houbert, Y.

    2012-11-01

    The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the car body has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties. (Author) 48 refs.

  4. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  5. Use of ferritic steels in breeder reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarca, P.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of LMFBR reactor steam generator materials is reviewed. Tensile properties of stainless steel-304, stainless steel-316, chromium-molybdenum steels, and Incoloy 800H are presented for elevated temperatures

  6. Precaution against radioactive contamination of steel products in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewers, E.; Schulz-Klemp, V.; Steffen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Regulations for handling of radioactive materials in Germany. Engagement of the Germany Iron and Steel Institute (VDEh) since the end of the eighties and measures taken. Level of radioactivity in uncontaminated steel products. Agreements between steel industry and scrap supplying industry as well as terms of delivery. Actual status of equipment for detection of radioactivity in the German steel plants. Demands of steel users for clean steel. (author)

  7. Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600 0 C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications

  8. Compactibility of atomized high-speed steel and steel 3 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulak, L.D.; Gavrilenko, A.P.; Pikozh, A.P.; Kuz'menko, N.N.

    1985-01-01

    Spherical powders and powders of lammellar-scaly shape of high-speed R6M5K5 steel and steel 3 produced by the method of centrifugal atomization of a rotating billet under conditions of cold pressing in steel moulds are studied for thier compactability. Compacting pressure dependnences are establsihed for density of cold-pressed compacts of spherical and scaly powders. The powders of lammellar-scaly shape both of high-speed steel and steel 3 are found to possess better compactibility within a wide range of pressures as compared to powders of spherical shape. Compacts of the lammellar-scaly powders possess also higher mechanical strength

  9. Weldability charts for constructional steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion, J C; Ashby, M F

    2012-01-01

    The weldability of materials is still a poorly understood concept; a quantitative assessment remains elusive. The variables associated with welding are reduced here into two groups - processing parameters and material properties - from which two characteristic indices are defined and used as the basis of weldability charts. For the case of constructional steels, a carbon equivalent characterises both heat affected zone hardenability and the maximum hardness developed after solid state phase transformations. The welding process is characterised by its energy input. A mathematical model is used to establish relationships between the indices, which are displayed on charts as contours of microstructure and hardness.

  10. Steel-soil composite bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Guangli; Pettersson, Lars; Karoumi, Raid

    2017-01-01

    viability, while their environmental performance is overlooked. Today’s designers are urged to seek new design options to reduce the environmental burdens. Sweden owns more than 24574 bridges and most of them are short spans. Among them, the slab frame bridge (CFB) is a common solution. Soil steel composite...... bridge (SSCB), alternatively, is a functionally equivalent solution to CFB and shows advantages in low cost and easy construction. This paper compares the environmental performance between these two bridge types based on life cycle assessment (LCA). The analysis and result shows that, the SSCB...

  11. Electroplastic drawing of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troitskij, O.A.; Spitsyn, V.I.; Sokolov, N.V.; Ryzhkov, V.G.

    1977-01-01

    Effect of electroplastic drawing on mechanical, magnetic and electrical properties of wire of 12Kh18N10T and Kh13N13M2 steels was studied. Pulse, direct and alternating currents were used. Direct and alternating current densities were 400 A/mm 2 , mean density of pulse current was 200 A/mm 2 . The investigations have shown that the current density increase results in decreasing the wire strengthening intensity though in increasing plastic properties. As a result of electroplastic drawing the growth of magnetic characteristics of wire occurs

  12. Refractories for steel-works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanova, R.A.; Galant, C.L.; Haas, C.; Rosenbaum, V.

    The routine procedures utilized for quality control of refractory materials used by PIRATINI's steel-works, are presented ' under an objetive and practical maner. The attention of the paper is concentrated upon the following' refractory types with higher consume: silicon-aluminous; aluminous; basic magnesia; basic chrom-magnesia. All steps of utilization are described, including specification, supplies programation, storage; sampling; physical tests, and also aplication procedures. Results from routine analysis during a six month period, by ' means of X-Ray Quantometry, using the fusion pearls procedure, are presented compared with Atomic Absorption [pt

  13. Spectrographic analysis of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabato, S.F.; Lordello, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Two spectrogaphyic solution techniques, 'Porous Cup' and 'Vacuum Cup', were investigated in order to determine the minor constituents (Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Cu and V) of stainless steels. Iron and cobalt were experimented as internal standards. The precision varied from 4 to 11% for both spectrographic techniques, in which cobalt was used as international standard. Certified standards from National Bureau of Standards and Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas were analysed to verify the accuracy of both techniques. The best accuracy was obtained with the Vacuum Cup techniques. (Author) [pt

  14. [Initial stages of steel biocorrosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhigletsova, S K; Rodin, V B; Kobelev, V S; Aleksandrova, N V; Rasulova, G E; Kholodenko, V P

    2000-01-01

    Initial stages of corrosion of mild steel induced by Klebsiela rhinoscleromatis BO2 were studied in various media. The effect of the microorganism was detected 8-10 h after inoculation. The number of viable cells were virtually unchanged within one month in all media, but the corrosive activity of the strain decreased. The corrosive activity of microorganisms can be determined by spectrophotometry even only after incubation for 24 h. At a low level of organic substrate, even strong colonization with microorganisms does not inevitably result in a significant damage to metals.

  15. Anisotropic densification of reference steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Bates, J.F.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1975-09-01

    A correlation is presented for the densification expected during neutron irradiation of 20 percent CW 316 stainless steel cladding of FTR specification. The densification is known to be a function of time, prior heat treatment, cold work level, irradiation temperature and minor element composition. For FTR fuel pin use, the temperature and carbon composition were chosen as the only relevant variables on which to base the correlation. The densification of FTR cladding is expected to be slightly anisotropic, leading to a diameter change somewhat less than that predicted by the isotropic relationship ΔD = -D 0 /3

  16. Failures on stainless steel components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haenninen, H.

    1994-01-01

    Economic losses due to failure mainly by corrosion in process and nuclear industries are considered. In these industries the characteristics of different forms of corrosion and their economic effects are fairly well known and, especially, in nuclear industry the assessment of corrosion related costs has been comprehensive. In both industries the economic losses resulting from environmentally enhanced cracking of stainless steel components and the accompanying failures and outages have been considerable, owing as much to the frequency as the unpredictability of such occurrences. (orig.)

  17. Help for the Steel Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA Lewis Research Center (LRC) and Gladwin Engineering resulted in the adaptation of aerospace high temperature metal technology to the continuous casting of steel. The continuous process is more efficient because it takes less time and labor. A high temperature material, once used on the X-15 research plane, was applied to metal rollers by a LRC developed spraying technique. Lewis Research Center also supplied mold prototype of metal composites, reducing erosion and promoting thermal conductivity. Rollers that previously cracked due to thermal fatigue, lasted longer. Gladwin's sales have increased, and additional NASA-developed innovations are anticipated.

  18. Corrosion characteristics of DMR-1700 steel and comparison with different steels in marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurrappa, I.; Malakondaiah, G.

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, a systematic corrosion study has been carried out on DMR-1700 steel to understand the protective nature of oxide scale that forms on its surface under marine environmental conditions. Further, the studies related to oxide scales as well as pitting and crevice corrosion resistance of both stainless steels and widely used low alloy steel EN24 in marine environment have been studied for comparison purpose. The surface morphologies of corroded steels have been observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM) in order to understand the nature of corrosion. A high performance protective coating that has been developed for protection of low alloy steels DMR-1700 and EN24 against corrosion is presented after stressing the importance of surface engineering in enhancing the life of steels. Based on the studies with different techniques, DMR-1700 steel has been recommended for manufacture of components used in aerospace systems in association with appropriate protective coating for improving their efficiency

  19. Microstructure and transformation kinetics in bainitic steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luzginova, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of reaching a better understanding of the microstructure evolution and the overall phase transformation kinetics in hyper-eutectoid steels a commercial SAE 52100 bearing steel and 7 model alloys with different concentrations of chromium, cobalt and aluminum have been studied in this

  20. Effect of ausforming on nanobainite steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, W.; Tomota, Y.; Koo, M.S.; Adachi, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of ausforming on kinetics, morphology and crystallography of nanobainite steel was examined by electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Ausforming has been found to accelerate bainite transformation at 573 K. A characteristic microstructure consisting of blocky bainitic laths and retained austenite is observed in the ausformed bainite steel, where strong variant selection takes place due to the operated slip systems.

  1. Steel plate reinforcement of orthotropic bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teixeira de Freitas, S.

    2012-01-01

    The PhD research is focused on the reinforcement of fatigue cracked orthotropic steel bridge decks (OBD) by adding a second steel plate to the existing deck. The main idea is to stiffen the existing deck plate, which will reduce the stresses at the fatigue sensitive details and extend the fatigue

  2. High quality steel casting for energy technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, F.; Koefler, G.

    1982-01-01

    The casting of several chromium-molybdenum steels for steam and hydraulic turbines is discussed. Non-destructive testing of the castings is performed demonstrating the safety for use in nuclear technology. The effect of metallurgical parameters on steel casting quality, the heat treatment, and the effect of construction design on costs for fettling and repair weldings are considered. (Auth.)

  3. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs.

  4. Plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Corroded steel plate; plastic collapse; FEM; rough surface. ... The main aim of present work is to study plastic collapse load of corroded steel plates with irregular surfaces under tension. Non-linear finite element method ... Department of Ocean Engineering, AmirKabir University of Technology, 15914 Tehran, Iran ...

  5. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is...

  6. Erosion behaviour of hydro turbine steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    creases grain size hardening (Ikegami and Nemoto 1996). Nitrogen solubility ... 116. Table 1. Chemical composition of 13/4 martensitic and 21–4–N nitronic steel (wt %). Steel. C. Si Mn. Cr. Ni. N. S ..... In Fe–Cr–Ni alloys, Schramm and Reed ...

  7. Development of structural steels for nuclear application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jun Hwa; Chi, S. H.; Ryu, W. S.; Lee, B. S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, J. H.; Oh, Y. J.; Byun, T. S.; Yoon, J. H.; Park, D. K.; Oh, J. M.; Cho, H. D.; Kim, H.; Kim, H. D.; Kang, S. S.; Kim, J. W.; Ahn, S. B.

    1997-08-01

    To established the bases of nuclear structural material technologies, this study was focused on the localization and improvement of nuclear structural steels, the production of material property data, and technology developments for integrity evaluation. The important test and analysis technologies for material integrity assessment were developed, and the materials properties of the pressure vessel steels were evaluated systematically on the basis of those technologies, they are microstructural characteristics, tensile and indentation deformation properties, impact properties, and static and dynamic fracture toughness, fatigue and corrosion fatigue etc. Irradiation tests in the research reactors were prepared or completed to obtain the mechanical properties of irradiated materials. The improvement of low alloy steel was also attempted through the comparative study on the manufacturing processes, computer assisted alloy and process design, and application of the inter critical heat treatment. On the other hand, type 304 stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and tested successfully. High strength type 316LN stainless steels for reactor internals were developed and the microstructural characteristics, corrosion resistance, mechanical properties at high temperatures, low cycle fatigue property etc. were tested and analyzed in the view point of the effect of nitrogen. Type 347 stainless steels with high corrosion resistance and toughness for pipings and tubes and low-activated Cr-Mn steels were also developed and their basic properties were evaluated. Finally, the martensitic stainless steels for turbine blade were developed and tests. (author). 242 refs., 100 tabs., 304 figs

  8. Stainless steel fabrications: past and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, R.

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with stainless steel fabrications of Fairey Engineering Company for the nuclear industry. The manufacture of stainless steel containers for Magnox and Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors, flexible fabrication facility, and welding development, are all briefly described. (U.K.)

  9. GRAPHITIZED STEELS IN MACHINE-BUILDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Akimov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that graphitized steels in some cases due to its intermediate disposition by structure and characteristics among low-carbon steels and cast irons, can provide the necessary combination of characteristics of construction material and consequently to increase safety and durability of details of metallurgical and machinebuilding industry machines.

  10. Microstructural characterisation and corrosion performance of old railway girder bridge steel and modern weathering structural steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewary, N.K.; Kundu, A.; Nandi, R.; Saha, J.K.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure and corrosion performance are compared for two structural steels. • Microstructure evolution shows primarily ferrite-pearlite in both the steels. • Steels show higher corrosion rate in 1% HCl solution than in 3.5% NaCl solution. • The corrosion products show the presence of oxide, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxides. • The corroded surface reveals morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette. - Abstract: A comparison on microstructure and corrosion performance has been made between the two structural steels used in old railway girder bridge (Sample A) and modern grades of weathering structural steel (Sample B). The microstructures, viewed under optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), show mainly ferrite-pearlite phase constituents in both the steels, A and B. The phase fraction analysis shows higher amount of pearlite in steel A compared to that of steel B. The grain size of steel A is larger than that of steel B under identical processing condition. The immersion corrosion test in 3.5% NaCl shows that the corrosion rate of steel A increases with time, while the same for steel B decreases with time. On the other hand, corrosion test in 1% HCl shows that the corrosion rate of both steel A and B is higher as compared to that of NaCl which always decreases with time. The XRD analysis of corrosion products show the presence of many oxides, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide like Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH), Akaganeite (β-FeOOH), Magnetite (Fe_3O_4) and Maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3) in both the steels. The SEM images of corroded surfaces reveal different morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette etc. which indicate that the corrosion products primarily contain Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH) and Akaganeite (β-FeOOH).

  11. Dephosphorization of melts with chromium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of the results of laboratory and pilot plant research into the dephosphorization of high-chromium melts reported in the literature, mostly Japanese. The use of high-alloy chromium and chromium-nickel steels in nuclear power engineering showed the negative impact of phosphorus on stress corrosion at high temperatures and on the development of cracks under overlays during welding. For a number of years attention is therefore being devoted to the attainment of a low phosphorus content in these steels. Current dephosphorization methods may be divided into oxidation and reduction methods. Oxidation dephosphorization may be carried out using synthetic mixtures: in the use of CaO-FeCl 2 , BaO-BaCl 2 -Cr 2 O 3 , Li 2 CO 3 -CaO-CaF 2 -FeO and Na 2 CO 3 /K 2 CO 3 -NaCl/KCl/KF/CaCl 2 /FeCl 2 a high initial C content, low content of Cr and Si and a low temperature of the melt are advantageous for dephosphorization. Experiments have also been made with dephosphorization in a bottom-blown oxygen converter and in an AOD converter. The most frequently used substances for reduction dephosphorization are calcium and calcium carbide; the best C content ranges between 0.5 and 1.8%, a high Cr content and a high bath temperature are also advantageous. The use of the reduction procedure is greatly limited by the generation of highly toxic phosphine. Another tested method - electroslag remelting is not suitable for commercial application for its economic exactingness. (A.K.)

  12. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  13. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumner, Aaran, E-mail: aaran.sumner@nottingham.ac.uk [University of Nottingham, Nottingham University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Gerada, Chris, E-mail: chris.gerada@nottingham.ac.uk [Electrical Machines, University of Nottingham, Tower Building, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil, E-mail: neil.brown@cummins.com [Advanced Electrical Machines Research and Technology at Cummins Power Generation, Peterborough PE2 6FZ, England (United Kingdom); Clare, Adam, E-mail: adam.clare@nottingham.ac.uk [Advanced Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  14. Corrosion of steels in sour gas environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twigg, R.J.

    1984-03-01

    This report presents a study on the effects of sour gas environments on steels. Emphasis is placed on alloys commonly used in the heavy water, sour gas and refining industries. In addition, 'high strength, low alloy' steels, known as 'oil country tubular goods', are included. Reference is made to the effects of hydrogen sulphide environments on austenitic steels and on certain specialty steels. Theories of hydrogen-related cracking mechanisms are outlined with emphasis placed on sulphide stress cracking and hydrogen induced cracking in carbon and low alloy steels. Methods of controlling sulphide stress cracking and hydrogen induced cracking are addressed separately. Case histories from the heavy water, refining, and sour gas industries are used to illustrate operating experience and failure mechanisms. Finally, recommendations, based largely on the author's industrial experience, are made with respect to quality assurance and inspection requirements for sour service components. Only published literature was surveyed. Abstracts were made of all references, reviewing the major sources in detail

  15. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  16. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  17. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  18. Steel weldability. Underbead cold cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, F.; Defourny, J.; Bragard, A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of underbead cold cracking has been studied by the implant technique. This approach allows to take into account in a quantitative manner the different factors acting on the cold cracking phenomenon: structure under the weld bead, level of restraint, hydrogen content in the molten metal. The influence of the metallurgical factors depending from the chemical composition of the steel has been examined. It appeared that carbon equivalent is an important factor to explain cold cracking sensitivity but that it is not sufficient to characterize the steel. The results have shown that vanadium may have a deleterious effect on the resistance to cold cracking when the hydrogen content is high and that small silicon additions are beneficient. The influence of the diffusible hydrogen content has been checked and the important action of pre- and postheating has been shown. These treatments allow the hydrogen to escape from the weld before the metal has been damaged. Some inclusions (sulphides) may also decrease the influence of hydrogen. A method based on the implant tests has been proposed which allows to choose and to control safe welding conditions regarding cold cracking

  19. Silicate enamel for alloyed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ket'ko, K.K.

    1976-01-01

    The use of silicate enamels in the metallurgical industry is discussed. Presented are the composition and the physico-chemical properties of the silicate enamel developed at the factory 'Krasnyj Oktyabr'. This enamel can be used in the working conditions both in the liquid and the solid state. In so doing the enamel is melted at 1250 to 1300 deg C, granulated and then reduced to a fraction of 0.3 to 0.5 mm. The greatest homogeneity is afforded by a granulated enamel. The trials have shown that the conversion of the test ingots melted under a layer of enamel leads to the smaller number of the ingots rejected for surface defect reasons and the lower metal consumption for slab cleaning. The cost of the silicate enamel is somewhat higher than that of synthetic slags but its application to the melting of stainless steels is still economically beneficial and technologically reasonable. Preliminary calculations only for steel EhI4IEh have revealed that the use of this enamel saves annually over 360000 roubles [ru

  20. Radiation blistering of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Naritsugu; Tanabe, Tetsuo; Imoto, Shosuke

    1980-01-01

    Surface blistering of stainless steels due to 20 keV He + ion bombardment has been investigated by examination of surface topography with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. Blisters of 0.1 to 2 μm in diameter are observed in all samples irradiated with fluence of about 1 x 10 18 He + /cm 2 at any temperature between -80 0 C and 500 0 C. With increasing the fluence blister covers are ruptured and exfoliated and finally the surface becomes rough surface without traces of blister formation. The surface effect is severer at 500 0 C than at 100 0 C irradiation. Also in double-phase stainless steel DP-3, similar surface topography to 316 SS is observed. But by the difference of the erosion rate by sputtering of the surface between α-phase and γ-phase, a striped pattern appears in DP-3 with heavy irradiation of about 2 x 10 19 He + /cm 2 . (author)

  1. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenning Shen

    Full Text Available The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel. Keywords: Stainless steel, Carbon steel, Anti-corrosion, Conductivity, Electrochemical, EIS

  2. Micro-Abrasion Wear Resistance of Borided 316L Stainless Steel and AISI 1018 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Calderon, C. D.; Rodríguez-Castro, G. A.; Meneses-Amador, A.; Campos-Silva, I. E.; Andraca-Adame, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M. E.; Gallardo-Hernández, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    The 316L stainless steel has high corrosion resistance but low tribological performance. In different industrial sectors (biomedical, chemical, petrochemical, and nuclear engineering), improvement upon wear resistance of 316L stainless steel components using accessible and inexpensive methods is critical. The AISI 1018 steel is widely used in industry, but its tribological performance is not the best among steels. Therefore, in this study the behavior of the borided 316L stainless steel and 1018 steel is evaluated under micro-abrasion wear. The boriding was carried out at 1223 K over 6 h of exposure time, resulting in a biphase layer composed of FeB/Fe2B phases. In order to evaluate Fe2B phase with no influence from FeB phase, AISI 1018 steel samples were borided at 1273 K for over 20 min and then diffusion annealed at 1273 K over 2 h to obtain a Fe2B mono-phase layer. Micro-abrasion wear resistance was evaluated by a commercial micro-abrasion testing rig using a mix of F-1200 SiC particles with deionized water as abrasive slurry. The obtained wear rates for FeB and Fe2B phases and for the 316L stainless steel were compared. Wear resistance of 316L stainless steel increases after boriding. The wear mechanisms for both phases and for the stainless steel were identified. Also, transient conditions for rolling and grooving abrasion were determined for the FeB and Fe2B phases.

  3. Current status of stainless steel industry and development of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Deuk; Lee, Chan Soo; Kim Kwang Tae

    2000-01-01

    Stainless steel is not only clean and smooth in its surface, but also it is superior in quality in terms of corrosion resistance and strength. So that, it is widely in use in the field of construction, chemical installations, and other industries. Growth of stainless steel industry started since the steel technology was developed for mass production in 1960s. Since then stainless steel industry grew rapidly on account of diversified development in this field and growth rate went up to 5.8% per year comparable to 2.3% of steel growth. The rapid growth is attributed to significant industry developments in Europe and Japan in the years of 1970s and 1980s. In addition to these the expansion of stainless steel industry in Korea and Taiwan. Presently Korea produces about 120,000 tons of stainless steel and occupies about 8% of international market. This means Korea become the second largest single country in world in stainless steel production. Moreover Korea is to reinforce its domestic production line by affiliating production companies, increasing of production capability, and specializing in types of stainless steel. This paper is to describe activity of material development, and types of stainless steel for industry use. (Hong, J. S.)

  4. Radiotracers in Swedish Steel Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, I.; Erwall, L. G. [Isotope Techniques Laboratory, Stockholm (Sweden); Nyquist, O. [Surahammars Bruks AB, Surahammar (Sweden)

    1967-06-15

    Recent tracer investigations in Swedish steel plants have mainly dealt with problems concerning uon-metallic inclusions, slag weight determination and - labelling of special steel qualities for identification. Suspected inclusion sources, such as furnace slag, ladle-bottom mortar and some brick materials as stopper, nozzle.and channel bricks have been labelled radioactively in different ways. The labelling technique has been studied for the different systems and a new method was developed for brick materials. This includes vacuum impregnation with an aqueous solution of the inactive tracer, reheating to 1300 Degree-Sign C and neutron-irradiation in a reactor. A sufficiently homogeneous labelling of the material was obtained in this way. The tracer used was terbium, which was added as the nitrate and then decomposed to oxide during the heating process. The oxide is strongly bound to the ceramic material. The number of radioactive inclusions was determined by.autoradiography, and related to the total number pf inclusions, obtained by visual slag-counting, to give the percentage of inclusions originating from the labelled object. Some investigations have been made using simultaneous labelling of two or more sources. It seems to be difficult, however, to measure separately more than two tracers: one short-lived (e.g. 140La) and one long-lived (e.g. {sup 160}Tb). The slag weight determinations were made using the isotope dilution technique with {sup 131}Ba and {sup 140}La as tracers. A difference in slag weight is sometimes obtained. An attempt is made to explain these deviations. The material transport through a blast furnace has been followed by using a piece of graphite, labelled with {sup 140}La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and measuring the radiation intensity outside the furnace walls and in the tuyere. Studies have been made to determine suitable radiotracers for labelling of steel for subsequent identification. Up to three different isotopes can be used simultaneously

  5. [Factors influencing electrocardiogram results in workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y H; Yu, S F; Gu, G Z; Chen, G S; Zhou, W H; Wu, H; Jiao, J

    2016-02-20

    To investigate the factors influencing the electrocardiogram results in the workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant. From September to December, 2013, cluster sampling was used to select 3 150 workers exposed to noise in the steel-making and steel-rolling workshops of an iron and steel plant, and a questionnaire survey and physical examinations were performed. The number of valid workers was 2 915, consisting of 1 606 workers in the steel-rolling workshop and 1 309 in the steel-making workshop. The electrocardiogram results of the workers in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops were analyzed. The overall abnormal rate of electrocardiogram was 26.35%, and the workers in the steel-making workshop had a significantly higher abnormal rate of electrocardiogram than those in the steel-rolling workshop(32.24% vs 21.54%, Pelectrocardiogram than female workers(27.59% vs 18.61%, Pelectrocardiogram than those who did not drink(28.17% vs 23.75%, Pelectrocardiogram than those who were not exposed to high temperature(29.43% vs 20.14%, Pelectrocardiogram in the workers with cumulative noise exposure levels of electrocardiogram results. High cumulative noise exposure, alcohol consumption, and high temperature may affect the abnormal rate of electrocardiogram in the workers exposed to noise in steel-making and steel-rolling workshops.

  6. Ferritic steels for French LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Mathieu, B.; Petrequin, P.

    1983-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many components of the French LMFBR. Up to now, ferritic steels have not been considered for these components, mainly due to their relatively low creep properties. Some ferritic steels are usable when the maximum temperatures in service do not exceed about 530 0 C. It is the case of the steam generators of the Phenix plant, where the exchange tubes of the evaporator are made of 2,25% Cr-1% Mo steel, stabilized or not by addition of niobium. These ferritic alloys have worked successfully since the first steam production in October 1973. For the SuperPhenix power plant, an ''all austenitic stainless alloy'' apparatus has been chosen. However, for the future, ferritic alloys offer potential for use as alternative materials in the evaporators: low alloys steels type 2,25% Cr-1% Mo (exchange tubes, tube-sheets, shells), or at higher chromium content type 9% Cr-2% Mo NbV (exchange tubes) or 12M Cr-1% Mo-V (tube-sheets). Most of these steels have already an industrial background, and are widely used in similar applications. The various potential applications of these steels are reviewed with regards to the French LMFBR steam generators, indicating that some points need an effort of clarification, for instance the properties of the heterogeneous ferritic/austenitic weldments

  7. Chemical analysis of steel by optical emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, M.O.; Kajita, T.; Jeszensky, G.

    1981-01-01

    The development of the chemical analysis for special steels by optical emission spectrometry direct reading method with computer, at the Siderurgica N.S. Aparecida S.A. is presented. Results are presented for the low alloy steels and high speed steel. Also, the contribution of this method to the special steel preparation is commented. (Author) [pt

  8. 78 FR 11090 - Steel Import Monitoring and Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... tariffs on these steel imports and providing the steel industry time to restructure. The monitoring system... submissions were received from a coalition of eight steel trade groups (referred to as the ``industry''), a... that helps the industry to closely monitor steel imports. The comments are summarized below. The three...

  9. Development of new high-performance stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Soo

    2002-01-01

    This paper focused on high-performance stainless steels and their development status. Effect of nitrogen addition on super-stainless steel was discussed. Research activities at Yonsei University, on austenitic and martensitic high-performance stainless, steels, and the next-generation duplex stainless steels were introduced

  10. Symbolic aesthetics in steel structural systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usama Abdul-Mun'em Khuraibet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic expression and its orders are important for steel structures forming. Steel structures are a compilation of structural elements, where its shapes have standard dimensions and pre-fabricated. As the steel construction systems not only aim to achieve the functional requirements for users, but must also have the symbolic aesthetics which provides visually and cognitive expression for viewers. In this sense the research interested in expressional aesthetics in these systems and highlights the importance of attention as structural items. Therefore the visual items which related with steel structures contain some of the most powerful forms of modern architecture, steel structures with a glass cladding, agility and accuracy in manufacture of structural elements as visual items, structural interest in the forms of spaces which have long span systems or in high buildings are different forms of expression and influence. So the research focuses on the study of those expressive patterns related with the steel construction properties, including the advantages of these systems at the level of strength and firmness, flexibility and economy as well as aesthetic and expression. Accordingly, the research problem concentrated on educational shortage in the study of the structural steel system aspects concerning constructional characteristic, expressive and aesthetic features, and how to deal with them as a language bearing the symbols and meanings which have clear structural style, because it the best ways to make those systems as communication means with users, by premise that the use of expressional symbol in steel construction increases the aesthetic value. Therefore the research aims to reveal the most structural and expressive patterns by analysis the expressional means and steel structural aesthetics.

  11. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    . The overall assessment of the weld bonding process is made using several commercial adhesives with varying working times under different surface conditions. The quality of the resulting joints is evaluated by means of macroetching observations, tension-shear tests and peel tests. The theoretical investigation......This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot-welding...... of the process consists of numerical predictions based on the commercial finite element program SORPAS with the purpose of establishing the most favourable parameters that allow spot-welding through the adhesives....

  12. Hydrogen damage in stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen damage has been studied in a wide variety of stainless steels. Both internal and external hydrogen damage were evaluated by ductility or J-integral under rising tensile loads and by fractography. Analysis of the data has emphasized the potential effects of strain-induced martensite on hydrogen damage. Strain-induced martensite was neither necessary nor sufficient for hydrogen damage in the alloys studied. Neither ductility loss nor fracture-mode change correlated generally with martensite formation. Alloy composition, particularly nickel and nitrogen contents, was the primary factor in resistance to hydrogen damage. Thermomechanical processing, however, could alter the degree of hydrogen damage in an alloy and was critical for optimizing resistance to hydrogen damage. 10 figures, 10 tables

  13. Niobium in steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyakishev, N.P.; Tulin, N.A.; Pliner, Y.L.

    1984-01-01

    Data are presented on the reserves and processing of niobium raw materials followed by brief review of the current status and long-range trends in the commercial usage of niobium and its compounds. A survey is made of the physical properties of niobium and its chemical reactions with elements of direct concern in the manufacture of ferroalloys, quality steels and other products. Niobium minerals and ores, along with common ore processing practices are described briefly. Attention is paid to Brazilian niobium ores, and to the Araxa deposit specifically. Some emphasis has been given to methods of processing lean niobium ores not easily amenable to simple concentration. A systematic review is presented of the techniques used in the production of niobium ferroalloys. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Tritiated Water Interaction with Stainless Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-01-01

    Experiments conducted to study tritium permeation of stainless steel at ambient and elevated temperatures revealed that HT converts relatively quickly to HTO. Further, the HTO partial pressure contributes essentially equally with elemental tritium gas in driving permeation through the stainless steel. Such permeation appears to be due to dissociation of the water molecule on the hot stainless steel surface. There is an equilibrium concentration of HTO vapor above adsorbed gas on the walls of the experimental apparatus evident from freezing transients. The uptake process of tritium from the carrier gas involves both surface adsorption and isotopic exchange with surface bound water

  15. Special stainless steels for sea water service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, A.C.

    1983-01-01

    Very exacting demands are made on the corrosion resistance and mechanical properties of materials which in their service come into contact with seawater, and in many cases simultaneously with corrosive process solutions. The demand for higher alloy stainless steels for seawater application is rising in pace with the increasing requirements for safety and operation economy. The corrosion conditions in seawater and the resistance of stainless steels in this medium will be dealt with in the following. Sanicro 28 will then be compared with stainless steels, types AISI 304, 316 and 317, as well as with Alloy 20, Alloy 825 and SANDVIK 2RK65. (Author) [pt

  16. Thermal embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Alexander, D.J.; Stoller, R.E.; Wang, J.A.; Odette, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    As a result of observations of possible thermal embrittlement from recent studies with welds removed from retired steam generators of the Palisades Nuclear Plant (PNP), an assessment was made of thermal aging of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under nominal reactor operating conditions. Discussions are presented on (1) data from the literature regarding relatively low-temperature thermal embrittlement of RPV steels; (2)relevant data from the US power reactor-embrittlement data base (PR-EDB); and (3)potential mechanisms of thermal embrittlement in low-alloy steels

  17. Validation of constitutive equations for steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentin, T.; Magain, P.; Quik, M.; Labibes, K.; Albertini, C.

    1997-01-01

    High strain rate mechanical properties are a major concern for each steel manufacturer, especially with respect to thin sheet steel used in the automotive branch. We began to study this topic by starting a project with the following goals: acquiring reliable experimental data, understanding in depth the energy absorption in thin sheet steel and finding the right constitutive material equation. The first part of the project has been presented in. In this paper we present data computation and comparison with the existing material model theories to exploit the experimental data. (orig.)

  18. Optimizing the Gating System for Steel Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jezierski

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the attempt to optimize a gating system to produce cast steel castings. It is based on John Campbell’s theory and presents the original results of computer modelling of typical and optimized gating systems for cast steel castings. The current state-of-the-art in cast steel casting foundry was compared with several proposals of optimization. The aim was to find a compromise between the best, theoretically proven gating system version, and a version that would be affordable in industrial conditions. The results show that it is possible to achieve a uniform and slow pouring process even for heavy castings to preserve their internal quality.

  19. Radiation-induced sensitisation of stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, D.I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The book contains the proceedings of a symposium on radiation-induced sensitization of stainless steels, which took place at Berkeley, United Kingdom, 1986. The purpose of the symposium was to examine the mechanism leading to inter-granular corrosion of 20%Cr/25% Ni/Nb stainless steel cladding of AGR fuel following irradiation. Nine papers are presented, of which three are theoretical, two papers are based upon corrosion studies of 20%Cr/25%Ni/Nb steel, and the remaining are concerned with compositional redistribution and its measurement. (U.K.)

  20. The optical metallography of some maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, E.; Pollock, J.T.A.

    1981-05-01

    The structural features of maraging steels, including those that impose limitations on strength and toughness, are briefly reviewed. Phase relationships in the iron-nickel matrix system are introduced which, in conjunction with alloy composition and heat treatment, allow the interpretation of microstructure. Details are presented of methods for revealing the microstructure of maraging steels; the prior austenite grain size following a variety of heat treatments is of special interest since excessive grain size can lead to poor ductility. These methods are illustrated with micrographs of the microstructures of MAR 350 and MAR 400 steels in the cast, solution-treated, aged and cold-worked states

  1. Reaustenitisation of steels with different initial microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Caballero, F.; Capdevila, C.; San Martin, D.; Garcia-de Andre, C.

    2004-01-01

    During the last years, physical mathematical models concerning continuous cooling and isothermal phase transformations valid for a wide range of steel have been attained. However, the modelling of continuous heating transformations has not undergone the same development than in cooling. This investigation concerns with the study and Modelization of continuous heating phase transformations to study the process which is generally referred to as austenitisation of the steel. Therefore, our main aim is to describe those processes which control the non-isothermal formation of austenite in steel with initial microstructures of ferrite and/or pearlite. (Author) 10 refs

  2. Quenching simulation of steel grinding balls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata-Hernandez, O.; Reyes, L. A.; Camurri, C.; Carrasco, C.; Garza-Monte-de-Oca, F.; Colas, R.

    2015-07-01

    The phase transformations of high carbon steel during quenching and equalizing were modelled using commercial computer packages based on the finite element method and the kinetic transformation of steel. The model was used to predict the temperature and microstructural changes taking place within balls of two different sizes that are used for grinding mineral ores. A good correlation between the temperatures measured by inserted thermocouples and those predicted by the model was obtained after modifying the thermal conductivity of the steel within the temperature domain at which mixed phases are present. The phase transformations predicted were confirmed by metallographic analyses. (Author)

  3. Dynamic characteristics of automotive steel sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mihaliková

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this experimental research was to perform an analysis of deformation characteristics on two different types of steel: IF steel, and micro-alloyed steel were used automotive industry. For that purpose changes of properties of these materials were carried out by static 10-3 · s-1 and dynamic 103 · s-1 strain rate assess its plastic properties. Vickers micro hardness test was carried out by the static and dynamic loading condition and describes different hardness distribution. The higher strain hardening of materials was obtained too that was confirmed by distribution of dislocations.

  4. EIS Response of MIC on Carbon Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Maahn, Ernst

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Microbially influenced corrosion of carbon steel under sulphate reducing (sulphide-producing) bacterial activity (SRB) results in the formation of both ferrous sulphides as well as biofilm on the metal surface. The electrochemical characteristics of the ferrous sulphide/steel interface...... as compared to the biofilm/ferrous sulphide/steel interface has been studied with EIS, DC polarisations (Tafel, LPR) and a potentiostatic step technique. The electrochemical response is related to a threshold sulphide concentration above which very characteristic changes such as indications of finite...

  5. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  6. Noise pollution in iron and steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisio, G.; Piromalli, W.; Acerbo, P.

    1999-01-01

    Iron and steel industry is characterized by high energy consumption and thus present remarkable problems from the point of view of noise pollution. The aims of this paper is to examine characteristic and acoustical emissions and immisions of some fundamentals iron and steel plants with several remarks on the possible measures to reduce noise pollution. For a large integrate iron and steel system, some surveys are shown with all devices running and, in addition, comparisons are made with other surveys when the main devices were out of service owing to great maintenance works [it

  7. Resistance Spot Welding of dissimilar Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Kolařík

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the properties of resistance spot welds between low carbon steel and austenitic CrNi stainless steel. The thickness of the welded dissimilar materials was 2 mm. A DeltaSpot welding gun with a process tape was used for welding the dissimilar steels. Resistance spot welds were produced with various welding parameters (welding currents ranging from 7 to 8 kA. Light microscopy, microhardness measurements across the welded joints, and EDX analysis were used to evaluate the quality of the resistance spot welds. The results confirm the applicability of DeltaSpot welding for this combination of materials.

  8. Hydrogen transport in iron and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Derrick, R.G.; Donovan, J.A.; Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The permeabilities of protium, deuterium, and tritium in iron and T-1 steel at temperatures as low as 260 0 K are in agreement with the equation proposed by Gonzalez. However, the permeabilities of HP-9-4-20 and 4130 steel to hydrogen are typically lower than predicted. The present data also show that, within experimental accuracy, the isotope effect on the permeability of hydrogen in HP-9-4-20, 4130 and T-1 steel, and high purity iron can be estimated by an inverse square root of mass correction. Trapping effects prevent the development of diffusivity and solubility equations. (auth)

  9. Diffusion zinc plating of structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazakovskaya, Tatiana; Goncharov, Ivan; Tukmakov, Victor; Shapovalov, Vyacheslav

    2004-01-01

    The report deals with the research on diffusion zinc plating of structural steels when replacing their cyanide cadmium plating. The results of the experiments in the open air, in vacuum, in the inert atmosphere, under various temperatures (300 - 500 deg.C) for different steel brands are presented. It is shown that diffusion zinc plating in argon or nitrogen atmosphere ensures obtaining the qualitative anticorrosion coating with insignificant change of mechanical properties of steels. The process is simple, reliable, ecology pure and cost-effective. (authors)

  10. Radiation embrittlement of WWER 440 pressure vessel steel and of some improved steels by western producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsky, J.; Vacek, M.; Stoces, B.; Pav, T.; Otruba, J.; Novosad, P.; Brumovsky, M.

    1982-01-01

    The resistance was studied of Cr-Mo-V type steel 15Kh2MFA to radiation embrittlement at an irradiation temperature of around 288 degC. Studied was the steel used for the manufacture of the pressure vessel of the Paks nuclear reactor in Hungary. The obtained results of radiation embrittlement and hardening of steel 15Kh2MFA were compared with similar values of Mn-Ni-Mo type steels A 533-B and A 508 manufactured by leading western manufacturers within the international research programme coordinated by the IAEA. It was found that the resistance of steel 15Kh2MFA to radiation embrittlement is comparable with steels A 533-B and A 508 by western manufacturers. (author)

  11. Corrosion fatigue of pressure vessel steels in PWR environments--influence of steel sulfur content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, P.M.; Druce, S.G.; Truswell, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    Large effects of simulated light water reactor environments at 288 C on fatigue crack growth in low alloy pressure vessel steels are observed only when specific mechanical, metallurgical, and electrochemical conditions are satisfied simultaneously. In this paper, the relative importance of three key variables--steel impurity content, water chemistry, and flow rate--and their interaction with loading rate or strain rate are examined. In particular, the results of a systematic examination of the influence of a steel's sulfur content are described

  12. Age-hardening susceptibility of high-Cr ODS ferritic steels and SUS430 ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongsheng, E-mail: chen.dongsheng85@gmail.com [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Kimura, Akihiko; Han, Wentuo; Je, Hwanil [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The role of oxide particles in α/α′ phase decomposition behavior; microstructure of phase decomposition observed by TEM. • The characteristics of ductility loss caused by age-hardening. • Correlation of phase decomposition and age-hardening explained by dispersion strengthened models. • Age-hardening susceptibility of ODS steels and SUS430 steel. - Abstract: The effect of aging on high-Cr ferritic steels was investigated with focusing on the role of oxide particles in α/α′ phase decomposition behavior. 12Cr-oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel, 15Cr-ODS steel and commercial SUS430 steel were isothermally aged at 475 °C for up to 10,000 h. Thermal aging caused a larger hardening in SUS430 than 15Cr-ODS, while 12Cr-ODS showed almost no hardening. A characteristic of the ODS steels is that the hardening was not accompanied by the significant loss of ductility that was observed in SUS430 steel. After aging for 2000 h, SUS430 steel shows a larger ductile–brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift than 15Cr-ODS steel, which suggests that the age-hardening susceptibility is lower in 15Cr-ODS steel than in conventional SUS430 steel. Thermal aging leaded to a large number of Cr-rich α′ precipitates, which were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Correlation of age-hardening and phase decomposition was interpreted by Orowan type strengthening model. Results indicate that oxide particles cannot only suppress ductility loss, but also may influence α/α′ phase decomposition kinetics.

  13. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafarzadegan, M.; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: ► FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. ► The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. ► The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. ► The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW TOOL STEEL FOR ALUMINUM EXTRUSION DIES

    OpenAIRE

    José Britti Bacalhau; Fernanda Moreno Rodrigues; Rafael Agnelli Mesquita

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum extrusion dies are an important segment of application on industrial tools steels, which are manufactured in steels based on AISI H13 steel. The main properties of steels applied to extrusion dies are: wear resistance, impact resistance and tempering resistance. The present work discusses the characteristics of a newly developed hot work steel to be used on aluminum extrusion dies. The effects of Cr and Mo contents with respect to tempering resistance and the Al addition ...

  15. Hydrogen gas embrittlement of stainless steels mainly austenitic steels. Volumes 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azou, P.

    1988-01-01

    Steel behavior in regard to hydrogen is examined especially austenitic steels. Gamma steels are studied particularly the series 300 with various stabilities and gamma steels with improved elasticity limit for intermetallic phase precipitation and nitrogen additions. A two-phase structure γ + α' is also studied. All the samples are tested for mechanical behavior in gaseous hydrogen. Influence of metallurgical effects and of testing conditions on hydrogen embrittlement are evidenced. Microstructure resulting from mechanical or heat treatments, dislocation motion during plastic deformation and influence of deformation rate are studied in detail [fr

  16. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The morphology of the corrosion of steel in cement paste was studied in situ. • During galvanostatic corrosion, carbon steel reinforcement corroded homogeneously. • On ferritic stainless steel, deep corrosion pits formed and caused wider cracks. • The measured rate of steel loss correlated well with Faraday’s law of electrolysis. - Abstract: In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover

  17. Volatility Spillover in Chinese Steel Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Wen

    2018-03-01

    This paper examines volatility spillover in Chinese steel markets by comparing spillover effects before and after steel futures market established and finds some interesting change. Volatility spillover method based on multi-GARCH model are proposed. The results show that there is significant proof for spillover effects from B2B electronic market to spot market, and two-way effects between futures and spot market. Market policy planners and practitioners could make decisions according to the master of spillovers. We also find that B2B e-market and futures market can both provide efficient protection against steel price volatility risk, B2B e-market offer a broad-based platform for trading steel commodities over time and space since e-market role in information flow process is dominant.

  18. Hybrid Laser Welding of Large Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhi, Farhang

    Manufacturing of large steel structures requires the processing of thick-section steels. Welding is one of the main processes during the manufacturing of such structures and includes a significant part of the production costs. One of the ways to reduce the production costs is to use the hybrid...... laser welding technology instead of the conventional arc welding methods. However, hybrid laser welding is a complicated process that involves several complex physical phenomena that are highly coupled. Understanding of the process is very important for obtaining quality welds in an efficient way....... This thesis investigates two different challenges related to the hybrid laser welding of thick-section steel plates. Employing empirical and analytical approaches, this thesis attempts to provide further knowledge towards obtaining quality welds in the manufacturing of large steel structures....

  19. Superheat effect on bainite steel hardenability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubachek, V.V.; Sklyuev, P.V.

    1978-01-01

    The bainite hardenability of 34KhN1M and 35 KhN1M2Ph steels has been investigated by the end-face hardening technique. It is established that, as the temperature of austenitization rises from 900 to 1280 deg C, the temperature of bainite transformation increases and bainite hardenability of the steels falls off. A repeated slow heating to 900 deg C of previously overheated 34KhN1M steel breaks up grain, lowers the temperature of the bainite transformation and raises the hardenability to values obtained with ordinary hardening from 900 deg C. A similar heating of previously overheated 35KhN1M2Ph steel is accompanied by restoration of initial coarse grains and maintenance of both the elevated bainite transformation temperature and to lower hardenability corresponding to hardening from the temperature of previous overheating

  20. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  1. TiC-reinforced cast Cr steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Schrems, K. K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5-4.5Ti, and 1-1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  2. Corrosion behavior of sensitized duplex stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, F J; Panyayong, W; Rogers, W; Velasquez-Plata, D; Oshida, Y; Moore, B K

    1998-01-01

    The present work investigates the corrosion behavior of 2205 duplex stainless steel in 0.9% NaCl solution after various heat-treatments, and compares it to that of 316L austenitic stainless steel. Both stainless steels were heat-treated at 500, 650, and 800 degrees C in air for 1 h, followed by furnace cooling. Each heat-treated sample was examined for their microstructures and Vickers micro-hardness, and subjected to the X-ray diffraction for the phase identification. Using potentiostatic polarization method, each heat-treated sample was corrosion-tested in 37 degrees C 0.9% NaCl solution to estimate its corrosion rate. It was found that simulated sensitization showed an adverse influence on both steels, indicating that corrosion rates increased by increasing the sensitization temperatures.

  3. Manufacture of Damascus steel: Metallographic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criado, A.J.; Martinez, J.A.; Calabres, R.; Arias, D.

    1997-01-01

    Damascus Steel is the denomination that the Europeans gave to the material with which the musulman swords were manufactured during the Era of the Crusades. This hypereutectoid steel presents a high content in carbon more than 0.8%, and in some cases up to 2% in weight. The secret of its good mechanical characteristics is based in the hot forging process in the temperatures interval between 650 and 850 degree centigree. The final quenching in water brine or other aqueous solutions, confers to the swords manufactured with this steel a good resistance to its cutting edge and a high toughness. In the present investigation, the manufacture processes of this type of steel are studied. Electronic scanning microscopy has been applied to the study of materials manufactured by the authors following the ancient craftsmen methods of forging and quenching. (Author) 16 refs

  4. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-01-01

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  5. Cubic martensite in high carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Xiao, Wenlong; Jiao, Kun; Ping, Dehai; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2018-05-01

    A distinguished structural characteristic of martensite in Fe-C steels is its tetragonality originating from carbon atoms occupying only one set of the three available octahedral interstitial sites in the body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe lattice. Such a body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure is believed to be thermodynamically stable because of elastic interactions between the interstitial carbon atoms. For such phase stability, however, there has been a lack of direct experimental evidence despite extensive studies of phase transformations in steels over one century. In this Rapid Communication, we report that the martensite formed in a high carbon Fe-8Ni-1.26C (wt%) steel at room temperature induced by applied stress/strain has actually a bcc rather than a bct crystal structure. This finding not only challenges the existing theories on the stability of bcc vs bct martensite in high carbon steels, but also provides insights into the mechanism for martensitic transformation in ferrous alloys.

  6. Advances in the heat treatment of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Kim, J.I.; Syn, C.K.

    1978-06-01

    A number of important recent advances in the processing of steels have resulted from the sophisticated uses of heat treatment to tailor the microstructure of the steels so that desirable properties are established. These new heat treatments often involve the tempering or annealing of the steel to accompish a partial or complete reversion from martensite to austenite. The influence of these reversion heat treatments on the product microstructure and its properties may be systematically discussed in terms of the heat treating temperature in relation to the phase diagram. From this perspective, four characteristic heat treatments are defined: (1) normal tempering, (2) inter-critical tempering, (3) intercritical annealing, and (4) austenite reversion. The reactions occurring during each of these treatments are described and the nature and properties of typical product microstructures discussed, with specific reference to new commercial or laboratory steels having useful and exceptional properties

  7. Overview of Steel Slag Application and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant quantities of steel slag are generated as waste material or byproduct every day from steel industries. Slag is produced from different types of furnaces with different operating conditions. Slag contains Ferrous Oxide, Calcium Oxide, Silica etc. Physical and chemical properties of slag are affected by different methods of slag solidification such as air cooled, steam, and injection of additives. Several material characterization methods, such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Scanned Electron Microscopy (SEM and Inductive Coupled Plasma (ICP-OES are used to determine elemental composition in the steel slag. Therefore, slags can become one of the promising materials in various applications such as in transportation industry, construction, cement production, waste water and water treatment. The various applications of steel slag indicate that it can be reused and utilized rather than being disposed to the landfill. This paper presents a review of its applications and utilization.

  8. Clean Cast Steel Technology, Phase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles E. Bates

    2003-02-24

    The objective of the Clean Cast Steel Technology Program was to improve casting product quality by removing or minimizing oxide defects and to allow the production of higher integrity castings for high speed machining lines. Previous research has concentrated on macro-inclusions that break, chip, or crack machine tool cutters and drills and cause immediate shutdown of the machining lines. The overall goal of the project is to reduce the amount of surface macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions and improve the machinability of steel castings. Macro-inclusions have been identified by industrial sponsors as a major barrier to improving the quality and marketability of steel castings.

  9. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Azawi, A.; Smistrup, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography...... and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro-and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate...... the minimum line width that can be realized by our fabrication method and the influence of etching angle on the structure profile during the ion beam etching process. Trenches down to 400 nm in width have been successfully fabricated into a 316 type electro-polished steel wafer. Afterward a plastic replica...

  10. Fire-induced collapses of steel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dondera, Alexandru; Giuliani, Luisa

    Single-story steel buildings such as car parks and industrial halls are often characterised by stiff beams and flexible columns and may experience an outward (sway) collapse during a fire, endangering people and properties outside the building. It is therefore a current interest of the research...... to investigate the collapse behaviour of single-story steel frames and identify relevant structural characteristics that influence the collapse mode. In this paper, a parametric study on the collapse a steel beam-column assembly with beam hinged connection and fixed column support is carried out under...... on the beam. By means of those tables, a simple method for the assessment and the countermeasure of unsafe collapse mode of single-story steel buildings can be derived....

  11. Tritium at the Steel Creek Landing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnett, M.; Heffner, J.D.; Fledderman, P.D.; Littrell, J.W.; Hayes, D.W.; Dodgen, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997 and January 1998, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) collected routine weekly grab samples from the Savannah River near the Steel Creek Boat Landing

  12. Constitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Huetink, Han; Khan, A.

    2010-01-01

    A physically based, macroscale constitutive model has been developed that can describe the complex mechanical behavior of metastable austenitic stainless steels. In the developed model a generalized model for the mechanically induced martensitic transformation is introduced. Mechanical tests have

  13. Consitutive modeling of metastable austenitic stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih

    2008-01-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels combine high formability and high strength, which are generally opposing properties in materials. This property is a consequence of the martensitic phase transformation that takes place during deformation. This transformation is purely mechanically induced

  14. Thermal stability of phosphate coatings on steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, P.; Szelag, P.; Novák, M.; Mastný, L.; Brožek, Vlastimil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2015), s. 489-492 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Steel * phosphates * coatings * structure Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.959, year: 2014

  15. Evolution of stainless steels in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the stainless steels used in the conventional industry, their adoption and successive evolutions in the nuclear industry, from one generation of nuclear reactors to another, is presented. Specific examples for several steels are given, covering fabrication procedures, qualification methods, property databases and design allowable stresses, to show how the ever-increasing demands for better performance and reliability, in particular under neutron irradiation, have been met. Particular attention is paid to the austenitic stainless steels types 304L, 316L, 316L(N), 316L(N)-IG, titanium stabilized grade 321, precipitation strengthened alloy 800, conventional and low activation ferritic/martensitic steels and their oxygen dispersion strengthening (ODS) derivatives. For each material, the evolution of the associated filler metal and welding techniques are also presented. (author)

  16. Improvements of stainless steels tribological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquot, P.; Stauder, B.; Varlet, J.

    2012-01-01

    A lot of superficial treatment solutions have been tested to improve the tribological properties of stainless steels. Among these treatments are those described here and proposed by the Bodycote firm: Nitreg S, Kolsterising and Nivox. (O.M.)

  17. Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Shunichi; Hida, Yoshio; Yamamoto, Michio; Ando, Tomozumi; Shirai, Tasuku.

    1982-05-01

    Ultrasonic testing of austenitic stainless steel welds has been considered difficult because of the high noise level and remarkable attenuation of ultrasonic waves. To improve flaw detectability in this kind of steel, various inspection techniques have been studied. A series of tests indicated: (1) The longitudinal angle beam transducers newly developed during this study can detect 4.8 mm dia. side drilled holes in dissimilar metal welds (refraction angle: 55 0 from SUS side, 45 0 from CS side) and in cast stainless steel welds (refraction angle: 45 0 , inspection frequency: 1 MHz). (2) Cracks more than 5% t in depth in the heat affected zones of fine-grain stainless steel pipe welds can be detected by the 45 0 shear wave angle beam method (inspection frequency: 2 MHz). (3) The pattern recognition method using frequency analysis technology was presumed useful for discriminating crack signals from spurious echoes. (author)

  18. Stainless Steel to Titanium Bimetallic Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaluzny, J. A. [Fermilab; Grimm, C. [Fermilab; Passarelli, D. [Fermilab

    2015-01-01

    In order to use stainless steel piping in an LCLS-II (Linac Coherent Light Source Upgrade) cryomodule, stainless steel to titanium bimetallic transitions are needed to connect the stainless steel piping to the titanium cavity helium vessel. Explosion bonded stainless steel to titanium transition pieces and bimetallic transition material samples have been tested. A sample transition tube was subjected to tests and x-ray examinations between tests. Samples of the bonded joint material were impact and tensile tested at room temperature as well as liquid helium temperature. The joint has been used successfully in horizontal tests of LCLS-II cavity helium vessels and is planned to be used in LCLS-II cryomodules. Results of material sample and transition tube tests will be presented.

  19. Laser cutting of thick steel plates and simulated steel components using a 30 kW fiber laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Koji; Ishigami, Ryoya; Yamagishi, Ryuichiro

    2016-01-01

    Laser cutting of thick steel plates and simulated steel components using a 30 kW fiber laser was studied for application to nuclear decommissioning. Successful cutting of carbon steel and stainless steel plates up to 300 mm in thickness was demonstrated, as was that of thick steel components such as simulated reactor vessel walls, a large pipe, and a gate valve. The results indicate that laser cutting applied to nuclear decommissioning is a promising technology. (author)

  20. The use of steel slag in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martauz, P.; Vaclavik, V.; Cvopa, B.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a research dealing with the use of unstable steel slag as a 100% substitute for natural aggregate in the production of concrete. Portland cement CEM I 42.5N and alkali activated hybrid cement H-CEMENT were used as the binder. The test results confirm the possibility to use steel slag as the filler in the production of concrete.

  1. A technique for predicting steel corrosion resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, V. F.; Sokolov, R. A.; Neradovskiy, D. F.; Muratov, K. R.

    2018-01-01

    Research works were carried out to develop a technique with the aim to increase the lifetime of steel items used in corrosive media. The possibility to monitor corrosion parameters of steel samples is analyzed on the basis of magnetic properties obtained by means of a magnetic structuroscope DIUS-1.15M designed by the Institute of Metal Physics of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMP UB RAS).

  2. Behavior of prestressing steels after fire

    OpenAIRE

    Atienza Riera, José Miguel; Elices Calafat, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Even if a fire does not give rise to apparent damage in a prestressed structure, mechanical properties of materials as well as load distribution can be affected. A verification of residual load bearing capacity after fire is necessary to determine if the structure can be maintained in use. Mechanical properties of structural steels at high temperatures have been extensively studied. However, no attention has been paid to the behavior of steel wires after fire. This paper seeks to give a simpl...

  3. Chemical resistance of the stainless REMANIT steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The leaflet contains tables showing the corrosion behaviour of the REMANIT steels in various media, as e.g. in acids, brines, salty solutions, or in organic environments. The data given include information on the composition and concentration of the attacking agent, and on temperatures. The documentation is intended to serve as a guide for selecting the suitable steel quality for intended applications. (MM) [de

  4. Behaviour of stainless steel in natural seawater

    OpenAIRE

    Compere, Chantal; Le Bozec, Nathalie

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, investigations performed in natural and artificial seawater on stainless steels will be presented. They concerned studies on: biofilm formation, passive layers composition, electrochemical behaviour, localised corrosion and the evolution of these different parameters as a function of ageing time. According to literature surveys, the different aspects will be discussed. Some conclusions will be drawn concerning the actual knowledge on the behaviour of stainless steels in seawater.

  5. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  6. The steel industry in France in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creton, B.

    2009-01-01

    Here is given a summary of the activity report of the French Steel Federation for the year 2008. This year has been marked by amalgamation inside the iron and steel industry, a decrease of the European Union imports of the third world source as China, very important variations of raw materials prices, and the continuation of the purchase of mining assets or of shares in firms of this sector by firms as ArcelorMittal, Severstal or by Chinese firms. (O.M.)

  7. Hot ductility of continuously cast structural steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytel, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to explain the hot ductility of the structural steels characterized by different amount of carbon and morphology of sulfides. Two different rolling processes were simulated under computer controlled, high temperature deformation MTS system. Results of this study show that morphology of sulfides as well as temperature and amount of deformation are responsible for level of hot ductility of the steel tested. (author)

  8. PLASTIC ANALYSIS OF STEEL FRAME STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rogac

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the plastic analysis of steel frame structure loaded by gravity loads. By applying the cinematic theorem of ultimate analysis, the ultimate load for the case of elastic - ideally plastic material is calculated. The identical structure was treated in the computer program SAP2000 where the zone of material reinforcement in the plastic area was covered. Keywords: Steel frame structure, plastic analysis, ultimate gravity load, material reinforcement.

  9. Friction Welding of Titanium and Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Atsushi, HASUI; Yoichi, KIRA; Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University; Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd.

    1985-01-01

    Titanium-steel is a combination of dissimilar materials, which are difficult to weld in general, owing to inevitable formation of brittle intermetallic compounds. A prominent feature of friction welding process is ability to weld dissimilar materials in many kinds of combinations. This report deals with friction weldabilily of pure titanium and S25C steel, which are 12 mm in diameter. Main results are summarized as follows; (1) Suitable welding conditions to obtain a sound weld, which has a j...

  10. Research regarding the vacuuming of liquid steel on steel degassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaon, M.; Radu, M.; Şerban, S.; Zgripcea, L.

    2018-01-01

    When the liquid steel comes in contact with the atmosphere of the elaboration aggregates, a process of gas diffusion into the metal bath takes place on the one hand, and on the other hand a process that allows them to pass from the metal bath into the atmosphere. The meaning of these processes is determined by a number of factors as follows: the quality of raw and auxiliary materials (moisture content, oils, etc.), the boiling intensity, the evacuation duration, the properties of used slags, the values of the casting ladle processing parameters (bubbling, vacuuming, etc.). The research was carried out at an electrical steelwork, equipped with an electric arc furnace type EBT (Electric Bottom Tapping) capacity 100t, LF (Ladle-Furnace) and VD (Vacuum Degassing) facilities, establishing some correlations between the vacuuming parameters from the V.D.facility and the amounts of hydrogen and nitrogen removed from the metal bath, as well as their removal efficiency, were taken into consideration. The obtained data was processed in MATLAB calculation program, the established correlations form was presented both in analytical and graphical form. The validity of these correlations was verified in practice, being particularly useful in research.

  11. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  12. The development of EUROFER reduced activation steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaaf, B. van der E-mail: vanderschaaf@nrg-nl.com; Tavassoli, F.; Fazio, C.; Rigal, E.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; LeMarois, G

    2003-09-01

    Ferritic martensitic steels show limited swelling and susceptibility to helium effects and can be made with low activation chemical compositions. These properties make them the reference steel for the development of breeding blankets in fusion power plants. EUROFER97 is the European implementation of such a steel, where experience gained from an IEA co-operation with Japan and the US is also implemented. Results obtained so far show that EUROFER steel has attractive mechanical properties even after long ageing times. Compatibility tests in water and PbLi17 are in progress. Oxidised aluminium is the most effective protective layer in PbLi17. The displacement damage and helium formation strongly influence the hydrogen transport in the steel. Present experiments should be backed by tests in a more fusion relevant environment, e.g. IFMIF. The 2.5 dpa neutron irradiations at low temperatures result in a higher DBTT. High dose irradiations, up to 80 dpa, are underway. The early results of ODS grades with EUROFER steel composition show potential of these grades for increasing the operating temperature with 100-150 K.

  13. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  14. Steel desulphurization with synthetic slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heput, T.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, sulphur is considered a harmful element for steel quality, reason why all the technological steps are being taken in order to eliminate it from the metal bath. This paper deals with the influence of the chemical composition, on the slag quantity and of the bath stirring condition upon the desulphurization process in the casting ladle by treatment with synthetic slag. The experiments were made at an open-hearth plant with the steel tapping in two ladles (the desulphurization was made with synthetic slag at one ladle while the other one was considered standard and at the electric steel plant and for the synthetic slag formation a mix was used, made, according to several receipts, of: lime (50-75%, fluorine (0-17%, bauxite (0-32% and aluminous slag (8-22%. The data were processed in the calculation programs EXCEL and MATLAB, which resulted in a series of correlations between the desulphurization degree and the chemical composition of the slag, respectively the slag quantity both for the charges bubbled with Argon and the unbubbled ones.

    En general, el azufre es considerado un elemento nocivo para la calidad del acero y, por eso, en la práctica, se toman todas las medidas de orden tecnológico para su eliminación del baño metálico. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la composición química, de la cantidad de escoria y del estado de agitación del baño sobre el proceso de desulfuración en la cuchara para fundir por tratamiento con escoria sintética. Los experimentos se han realizado en una acería evacuando el acero en dos ollas (en una cuchara se efectuó la desulfuración con escoria sintética y a la otra se consideró como patrón y en un acería eléctrica y para la formación de la escoria sintética se utilizó una mezcla producida según muchas recetas, formada por: cal (50-75%, fluorina (0-17%, bauxita (0-32% y escoria aluminosa (8-22%. Los datos han sido procesados en los programas de c

  15. Tensile-property characterization of thermally aged cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaud, W.F.; Toben, P.T.; Soppet, W.K.; Chopra, O.K.

    1994-02-01

    The effect of thermal aging on tensile properties of cast stainless steels during service in light water reactors has been evaluated. Tensile data for several experimental and commercial heats of cast stainless steels are presented. Thermal aging increases the tensile strength of these steels. The high-C Mo-bearing CF-8M steels are more susceptible to thermal aging than the Mo-free CF-3 or CF-8 steels. A procedure and correlations are presented for predicting the change in tensile flow and yield stresses and engineering stress-vs.-strain curve of cast stainless steel as a function of time and temperature of service. The tensile properties of aged cast stainless steel are estimated from known material information, i.e., chemical composition and the initial tensile strength of the steel. The correlations described in this report may be used for assessing thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steel components

  16. The Study on Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot-Stamped Steel by Using Laser Heat Source (Ⅲ) - Comparison on Laser Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot -Stamped Steel-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, So Young; Kim, Jong Do [Korea Maritime and Ocean University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Su [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    This study was conducted to compare the laser weldability of boron steel and hot-stamped steel. In general, boron steel is used in the hot-stamping process. Hot-stamping is a method for simultaneously forming and cooling boron steel in a press die after heating it to the austenitizing temperature. Hot-stamped steel has a strength of 1500 MPa or more. Thus, in this study, the laser weldability of boron steel and that of hot-stamped steel were investigated and compared. A continuous wave disk laser was used to produce butt and lap joints. In the butt welding, the critical cooling speed at which full penetration was obtained in the hot-stamped steel was lower than that of boron steel. In the lap welding, the joint widths were similar regardless of the welding speed when full penetration was obtained.

  17. The Study on Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot-Stamped Steel by Using Laser Heat Source (Ⅲ) - Comparison on Laser Weldability of Boron Steel and Hot -Stamped Steel-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, So Young; Kim, Jong Do; Kim, Jong Su

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the laser weldability of boron steel and hot-stamped steel. In general, boron steel is used in the hot-stamping process. Hot-stamping is a method for simultaneously forming and cooling boron steel in a press die after heating it to the austenitizing temperature. Hot-stamped steel has a strength of 1500 MPa or more. Thus, in this study, the laser weldability of boron steel and that of hot-stamped steel were investigated and compared. A continuous wave disk laser was used to produce butt and lap joints. In the butt welding, the critical cooling speed at which full penetration was obtained in the hot-stamped steel was lower than that of boron steel. In the lap welding, the joint widths were similar regardless of the welding speed when full penetration was obtained

  18. IMPACT STRENGTH AND FAILURE ANALYSIS OF WELDED DAMASCUS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Mintách

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the experimental research of damascus steel from point of view of the structural analyze, impact strength and failure analyzes. The damascus steel was produced by method of forged welding from STN 41 4260 spring steel and STN 41 9312 tool steel. The damascus steel consisted of both 84 and 168 layers. The impact strength was experimentally determined for original steels and damascus steels after heat treatment in dependence on temperature in the range from -60 to 160 °C. It has been found that the impact strength of experimental steels decreased with decreasing temperature behind with correlated change of damage mode. In the case of experimental tests performed at high temperature ductile fracture was revealed and with decreasing temperature proportion of cleavage facets increased. Only the STN 41 9312 steel did not show considerable difference in values of the impact strength with changing temperature.

  19. Characterization of D2 tool steel friction surfaced coatings over low carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekharbabu, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Rao, K. Prasad

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Solid state coating by friction surfacing method. • D2 tool steel is coated over relatively softer low carbon steel. • Defect free interface between tool steel coating and low carbon steel substrate. • D2 coatings exhibited higher hardness and good wear resistance. • Highly refined martensitic microstructure in the coating. - Abstract: In this work D2 tool steel coating is produced over a low carbon steel substrate using friction surfacing process. The process parameters are optimized to get a defect free coating. Microstructural characterization is carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Infrared thermography is used to measure the thermal profile during friction surfacing of D2 steel. Wear performance of the coating is studied using Pin-on-Disk wear tests. A lower rotational speed of the consumable rod and higher translational speed of the substrate is found to result in thinner coatings. Friction surfaced D2 steel coating showed fine-grained martensitic microstructure compared to the as-received consumable rod which showed predominantly ferrite microstructure. Refinement of carbides in the coating is observed due to the stirring action of the process. The infrared thermography studies showed the peak temperature attained by the D2 coating to be about 1200 °C. The combined effect of martensitic microstructure and refined carbides resulted in higher hardness and wear resistance of the coating

  20. Steel-reinforced concrete-filled steel tubular columns under axial and lateral cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajpourbonab, Ebrahim; Kute, Sunil Y.; Inamdar, Vilas M.

    2018-03-01

    SRCFT columns are formed by inserting a steel section into a concrete-filled steel tube. These types of columns are named steel-reinforced concrete-filled steel tubular (SRCFT) columns. The current study aims at investigating the various types of reinforcing steel section to improve the strength and hysteresis behavior of SRCFT columns under axial and lateral cyclic loading. To attain this objective, a numerical study has been conducted on a series of composite columns. First, FEM procedure has been verified by the use of available experimental studies. Next, eight composite columns having different types of cross sections were analyzed. For comparison purpose, the base model was a CFT column used as a benchmark specimen. Nevertheless, the other specimens were SRCFT types. The results indicate that reinforcement of a CFT column through this method leads to enhancement in load-carrying capacity, enhancement in lateral drift ratio, ductility, preventing of local buckling in steel shell, and enhancement in energy absorption capacity. Under cyclic displacement history, it was observed that the use of cross-shaped reinforcing steel section causes a higher level of energy dissipation and the moment of inertia of the reinforcing steel sections was found to be the most significant parameter affecting the hysteresis behavior of SRCFT columns.

  1. Kawasaki Steel Giho, Vol. 27, No. 4, 1995. Special issue on steel structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    ;Contents (Partial): Vertical Gust Prediction of Cable-Stayed Bridges in Yawed Wind; Design and Construction of a Super Platform Structure Made of Steel; Prefabricated Steel Deck of Battledeck Floor Type for Redecking; Aesthetic Design of Structures; and Lift-up Construction Method for Multi-layer Building.

  2. Redemption of asthma pharmaceuticals among stainless steel and mild steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Kristian Tore; Hansen, Johnni

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose was to examine bronchial asthma according to cumulative exposure to fume particulates conferred by stainless steel and mild steel welding through a proxy of redeemed prescribed asthma pharmaceuticals. METHODS: A Danish national company-based historical cohort of 5,303 male ever...... was estimated by combining questionnaire data on welding work with a welding exposure matrix. The estimated exposure accounted for calendar time, welding intermittence, type of steel, welding methods, local exhaustion and welding in confined spaces. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were...... nonsignificant increased rate of redemption of asthma medicine was observed among high-level exposed stainless steel welders in comparison with low-level exposed welders (HR 1.54, 95 % CI 0.76-3.13). This risk increase was driven by an increase risk among non-smoking stainless steel welders (HR 1.46, 95 % CI 1...

  3. Analysis of the Behaviour of Composite Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Petkevičius

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There was a pending influence of steel fiber on the strength and stiffness of composite steel–concrete slabs under statical short–time load. Steel profiled sheeting and steel fiber reinforced concrete were used for specimens. Four composite slabs were made. Experimental investigations into the behaviour and influence of steel fiber reinforced concrete in composite slabs were conducted. Transverse, longitudinal, shear deformation and deflection of the slab were measured. The results indicated that the use of steel fiber in composite slabs was effective: strength was 20–24 % higher and the meanings of deflections under the action of the bending moment were 0,6MR (where MR is the bending moment at failure of the slabs and were 16–18 % lower for slabs with usual concrete. Article in Lithuanian

  4. Topic 1. Steels for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.; Kepka, M.; Barackova, L.; Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Cukr, B.; Protiva, K.; Petrman, I.; Tvrdy, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Mazanec, K.; Kupca, L.; Brezina, M.

    1980-01-01

    Part 1 of the Proceedings consists of papers on the criteria for the selection and comparison of the properties of steel for pressure vessels and on the metallurgy of the said steels, the selection of suitable material for internal tubing systems, the manufacture of high-alloy steels for WWER components, the mechanical and metallurgical properties of steel 22K for WWER 440 pressure components, and of steel 10MnNi2Mo for the WWER primary coolant circuit, and the metallographic assessment of steel 0Kh18N10T. (J.P.)

  5. Heat treatments in a conventional steel to reproduce the microstructure of a nuclear grade steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosalio G, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ferritic steels used in the manufacture of pressurized vessels of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) suffer degradation in their mechanical properties due to damage caused by the neutron fluxes of high energy bigger to a Mega electron volt (E> 1 MeV) generated in the reactor core. The materials with which the pressurized vessels of nuclear reactors cooled by light water are built correspond to low alloy ferritic steels. The effect of neutron irradiation on these steels is manifested as an increase in hardness, mechanical strength, with the consequent decrease in ductility, fracture toughness and an increase in temperature of ductile-brittle transition. The life of a BWR is 40 years, its design must be considered sufficient margin of safety because pressure forces experienced during operation, maintenance and testing of postulated accident conditions. It is necessary that under these conditions the vessel to behave ductile and likely to propagate a fracture is minimized. The vessels of light water nuclear reactors have a bainite microstructure. Specifically, the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (Veracruz, Mexico) are made of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1. At present they are carrying out some welding tests for the construction of a model of a BWR, however, to use nuclear grade steel such as Astm A-533 to carry out some of the welding tests, is very expensive; perform these in a conventional material provides basic information. Although the microstructure present in the conventional material does not correspond exactly to the degree of nuclear material, it can take of reference. Therefore, it is proposed to conduct a pilot study to establish the thermal treatment that reproduces the microstructure of nuclear grade steel, in conventional steel. The resulting properties of the conventional steel samples will be compared to a JRQ steel, that is a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1, provided by IAEA. (Author)

  6. 76 FR 33239 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of China; Initiation of Countervailing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [C-570-978] High Pressure Steel... countervailing duty (``CVD'') petition concerning imports of high pressure steel cylinders (``steel cylinders... of Antidumping Duties and Countervailing Duties on High Pressure Steel Cylinders from the People's...

  7. Inconel alloys development -Development of the advanced nuclear materials-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuk, Il Hiun; Jang, Jin Sung; Rhee, Chang Kyu; Chung, Man Kyo; Woo, Yun Myeoung; Han, Chang Hee

    1994-07-01

    We surveyed the current status and problems in S/G U-tubes in Korea and worldwide. Also we gathered manufacturing specifications of S/G U-tubes and compared/analyzed the differences in them company by company. We produced alloy 600 tubes (in cooperation with Sammi Special Steels) through V.I.M. (Vacuum Induction Melting; 2 ton capacity), 4 steps of hot press forging, hot extrusion (10:1 of reduction ratio), 3 steps of cold pilgerings and so on. We will continue to characterize the tubes and 2nd time preproduce the tubes using the feed-back data. With regard to alloy 690, which is getting popular for S/G U-tubes worldwide, we cast four 60 Kg ingots and two 6 Kg ingots by V.I.M.. We analyzed the chemical composition, macrostructures, hot workability, and so on ; all ingots were good except on 60 Kg ingot. Finally we produced high quality alloy 690 ingot (about 1 Kg) by E.S.R. (Electroslag Remelting) method (in cooperation with Yeoungnam University). We used CaF/CaO/Al2O3/MgO quartenary slag system. We have made directionally grown good ingots by E.S.R. and especially the hot workability at 1100 deg C - the temperature at which V.I.M. ingots showed very poor hot workability - was very much improved (from 30 to 90 % of reduction of area). We continue to analyze the effects of E.S.R. to the structure and properties of alloy 690 (grain size, morphology, and directionality; any changes of inclusions and so on). (Author)

  8. ESR hollows molten metal/slag interface detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, B.; Klein, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    A system for detecting the location of a molten metal/slag interface during the casting of electroslag remelted hollows includes a gamma ray radiation source and a scintillation counter. The source and counter reside outside the casting mould and are held in fixed spatial relationships with respect to one another and with respect to the mandrel. The radiation from the source is directed chordally through the mould and through the annular casting zone, defined between the sidewalls of the upwardly driven mandrel and the mould without contacting said mandrel. The counter provides an electrical signal responsive to the rate of radiation events detected thereby. (author)

  9. Mechanical properties of irradiated 9Cr-2WVTa steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Rieth, M.

    1998-01-01

    An Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel has excellent strength and impact toughness before and after irradiation in the Fast Flux Test Facility and the High Flux Reactor (HFR). The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increased only 32 C after 28 dpa at 365 C in FFTF, compared to a shift of ∼60 C for a 9Cr-2WV steel--the same as the 9Cr-2WVTa steel but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile but without tantalum. This difference occurred despite the two steels having similar tensile properties before and after irradiation. The 9Cr-2WVTa steel has a smaller prior-austenite grain size, but otherwise microstructures are similar before irradiation and show similar changes during irradiation. The irradiation behavior of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel differs from the 9Cr-2WV steel and other similar steels in two ways: (1) the shift in DBTT of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF does not saturate with fluence by ∼28 dpa, whereas for the 9Cr-2WV steel and most similar steels, saturation occurs at <10 dpa, and (2) the shift in DBTT for 9Cr-2WVTa steel irradiated in FFTF and HFR increased with irradiation temperature, whereas it decreased for the 9Cr-2WV steel, as it does for most similar steels. The improved properties of the 9Cr-2WVTa steel and the differences with other steels were attributed to tantalum in solution

  10. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien; Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Parkinson, Dula; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Bjegović, Dubravka; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  11. In situ 3D monitoring of corrosion on carbon steel and ferritic stainless steel embedded in cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2014-06-01

    In a X-ray microcomputed tomography study, active corrosion was induced by galvanostatically corroding steel embedded in cement paste. The results give insight into corrosion product build up, crack formation, leaching of products into the cracks and voids, and differences in morphology of corrosion attack in the case of carbon steel or stainless steel reinforcement. Carbon steel was homogeneously etched away with a homogeneous layer of corrosion products forming at the steel/cement paste interface. For ferritic stainless steel, pits were forming, concentrating the corrosion products locally, which led to more extensive damage on the cement paste cover. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Iron and steel research at CENIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, S. F.; Lopez, F.; Morcillo, M.

    2003-01-01

    In 2002 the National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM) celebrated its 39th anniversary. During this time, steel has been the most studied material of all the metals and alloys researched in the different projects funded by national science and technology plans, European metallurgical research programmes, and by the iron and steel making companies who over the years have placed their trust in the research work undertaken at CENIM. Two generations of researchers have dedicated their careers to studying the different aspects of steel, from primary metallurgy considering iron ores and enrichment processes, the thermodynamics of reactions in the blast furnace and in the ladle, thermal and thermomechanical treatments, the physical metallurgy of steels, their mechanical properties, and finally their deterioration in a wide range of media of different aggressivities. CENIM maintains its commitment to iron and steel research, drawing attention to the vast amount of research work undertaken and financed within the framework of the ECSC programme since Spain joined the European Community in January 1986. (Author) 3 refs

  13. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the α' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450 0 C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450 0 C. 18 refs., 13 figs

  14. Plasticity of low carbon stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Fel'dgandler, Eh.G.; Kareva, E.N.

    1975-01-01

    In the temperature range 800-1200 0 C and with strain rates of from 10 -3 to 3 s -1 , austenitic (000Kh18N12) and austenitic-ferrite (000Kh26N6) very low carbon stainless steels containing 0.02-0.03% C exhibit no higher resilience than corresponding ordinary steels containing 0.10-0.12% C. However, the plasticity of such steels (particularly two-phase steels) at 900-1100 0 C is appreciably inferior owing to the development of intergranular brittle fracture. Pressure treatment preceded by partial cooling of the surface to 850 0 C yields rolled and forged products with acceptable indices but is inconvenient technically. At the Zlatoustovsk and Ashin metallurgical plants successful tests have been performed involving the forging and rolling of such steels heated to 1280-1300 0 C without partial cooling; it was necessary to improve the killing conditions, correct the chemical composition (increasing the proportion of ferrite) and take measures against heat loss. (author)

  15. Nanostructuring steel for injection molding tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azawi, A; Smistrup, K; Kristensen, A

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanostructured plastic items by injection molding with ridges down to 400 nm in width, which is the smallest line width replicated from nanostructured steel shims, is presented. Here we detail a micro-fabrication method where electron beam lithography, nano-imprint lithography and ion beam etching are combined to nanostructure the planar surface of a steel wafer. Injection molded plastic parts with enhanced surface properties, like anti-reflective, superhydrophobic and structural colors can be achieved by micro- and nanostructuring the surface of the steel molds. We investigate the minimum line width that can be realized by our fabrication method and the influence of etching angle on the structure profile during the ion beam etching process. Trenches down to 400 nm in width have been successfully fabricated into a 316 type electro-polished steel wafer. Afterward a plastic replica has been produced by injection molding with good structure transfer fidelity. Thus we have demonstrated that by utilizing well-established fabrication techniques, nanostructured steel shims that are used in injection molding, a technique that allows low cost mass fabrication of plastic items, are produced. (paper)

  16. Dual-phase ULCB steels thermomechanically processed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.

    2001-01-01

    The design philosophy of the processing of dual-phase (D-P) ultra low carbon steels (ULCB) by thermomechanical treatment has been briefly discussed. Modelling of the structure evolution during thermomechanical rolling of ULCB steel was based upon the established empirical equations for yield flow at different conditions of: deformation temperatures, strain rates and stresses for applied amount of deformation during hot deformation compression tests. The critical amount of deformation needed for the occurrence of dynamic or static recrystallization was determined. The dependence of grain refinement of the acicular bainitic and polygonal ferrite of the accelerated cooling and amount of stored energy of deformation in steel has been evaluated. Effect of the decreasing of the finishing temperature of thermomechanical processing on the increase of the impact toughness of dual-phase microstructure consisted of the bainitie-martensite islands in the ferrite matrix has been shown. The effect of ageing process after thermomechanical rolling of heavy plates on fracture toughness values of J 0.2 for ULCB-Ni steels has been established from cod tests measurements. New low cost technology of rolling of ULCB steels dual-phase is proposed. (author)

  17. Corrosion of carbon steel in neutral water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Noboru; Iwahori, Toru; Kurosawa, Tatsuo

    1983-01-01

    The initial corrosion behavior of materials used in the construction of heat exchanger and piping system of BWR nuclear power plants and thermal power plants have been examined in neutral water at 30, 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C with two concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the water. In air-saturated water, the corrosion rate of carbon steel was so higher than those in deaerated conditions and the maximum corrosion rate was observed at 200 deg C. The corrosion rate in deaerated water gradually increased with increasing the water temperature. Low alloy steel (2.25 Cr, 1Mo) exhibited good corrosion resistance compared with the corrosion of carbon steel under similar testing conditions. Oxide films grown on carbon steel in deaerated water at 50, 100, 160, 200, and 285 deg C for 48 and 240 hrs were attacked by dissolved oxygen in room temperature water respectively. However the oxide films formed higher than about 160 deg C showed more protective. The electrochemical behavior of carbon steel with oxide films was also similar to the effect of temperature on the stability of oxide films. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy and the steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, R.S.

    1977-01-01

    Fossil fuels represent a large part of the cost of iron and steel making and their increasing cost has stimulated investigation of methods to reduce the use of fossil fuels in the steel industry. Various iron and steel making routes have been studied by the European Nuclear Steelmaking Club (ENSEC) and others to determine to what extent they could use energy derived from a nuclear reactor to reduce the amount of fossil fuel consumed. The most promising concept is a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor heating helium to a temperature sufficient to steam reform hydrocarbons into reducing gases for the direct reduction of iron ores. It is proposed that the reactor/reformer complex should be separate from the direct-reduction plant/steelworks and should provide reducing gas by pipeline, not only to a number of steel works but to other industrial users. The composition of suitable reducing gases and the methods of producing them from various feedstocks are discussed. Highly industrialised countries with large steel and chemical industries have shown greatest interest in the concept, but those countries with large iron-ore reserves and growing direct capacity should consider the future value of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor as a means of extending the life of their gas reserves. (author)

  19. Measurement of radioactivity in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachtendonk, H.-J. von; Luengen, S.; Wilke, N.

    1999-01-01

    Even after the control of scrap deliveries, there remains a small risk that the radioactive contaminated scrap passes the detecting devices. Therefore, the chemical laboratory takes a role to measure each heat for the absence of artificial radioactive nuclides with a gamma spectrometer equipped with NaI-detector. As the measurement must be performed in sequence with the steel production process, the allowable time for the measurement is quite limited. On the other hand, there could be still some possibility that background radiation might be present as the samples may contain some natural radioactivity. The task is how to differentiate the nature of radioactivity between naturally remaining radioactivity within safe limit and artificial nuclides present in the sample at a low level even though a very small amount of radioactivity could be detected in short time in both cases. We have set the alarm limit to 0.1 Bq/g for Co-60 as indicating nuclide. This limit is set more than 4 s (s = standard deviation) from the average background radiation. Therefore, false alarms are quite improbable. Strategy: The NaI gamma spectrometer performs a gross gamma measurement but it can not differentiate the nature of the nuclides present. If the alarm limit is hurt, the sample is measured on a high resolution gamma spectrometer with Ge-detector for identification of the gamma emitting nuclides. Calibration: Even though no appropriate international standards are adapted and no commercial measuring equipment is commercially available, the desired standard should contain Co-60 in the order of 1 to 100 Bq/g. The presence of other gamma emitting nuclides is desirable. In the Workshop we will present how to surmount this difficulty. (author)

  20. Comparison of the performance of concrete-filled steel tubular and hollow steel diagrid buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Minu Ann; S, Sajith A.; Nagarajan, Praveen

    2018-03-01

    In the recent construction scenario, diagrid structures are becoming a popular high-rise building structural system. Diagrid structures consist of diagonals in the perimeter and an interior core. The corner and interior vertical columns are not required due to the structural efficiency of diagrid structural systems. Steel and concrete are commonly used material for diagrid. An alternate material for diagrid is concrete-filled steel tube (CFST). CFST incorporates the advantages of both steel and concrete. In CFST, the inward buckling of the steel tube is effectively prevented by the filled concrete. The compressive strength of concrete increases due to the tri-axial state of stress in concrete induced by the steel tube. The longitudinal as well as lateral reinforcement to the concrete core is also provided by the steel tube. This paper compares the performance of CFST and steel diagrid buildings using linear static analysis. For this purpose, a 12 storey and 36 storey building are analysed using finite element method and CFST diagrid building is found to perform better.

  1. Interaction model of steel ladle of continuous caster in steel works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Bang Fu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For further research on the precondition and interoperability model of interaction ladles among continuous caster, this article takes steel ladle of Y steel works as the object of research. On the basis of turnover number calculation model of single cast steel ladle, the relationship between cast number and the turnover number and turnover times and last turnover number are further analyzed. The simulation of steel ladle turnover rules was taken on the 2 continuous casters with Gantt chart. After that, the relationships between turnover number and last turnover number and non-turnover number are researched deeply. Combining with the Gantt chart, the expressions of start casting time and empty ladle ending time and heavy ladle starting time were put forward. The precondition of steel ladle interaction is obtained, which means the exchange ladle should not undertaking transport task in first stop continuous caster, and the empty ladle end time of exchange ladle of first stop continuous caster should early than the heavy ladle start time of last stop continuous caster. After applying the model to practice, 3 steel ladles of No.2 continuous caster can be reduced. This research results is supplying theoretical basis for steel ladle controlling and production organization optimization, and enriches the theory and method of metallurgical process integration.

  2. Inhibition Effect of Deanol on Mild Steel Corrosion in Dilute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICOLAAS

    2014-06-23

    Jun 23, 2014 ... allows for extensive use as the material of construction in petro- leum industries .... steel specimens was investigated after mass-loss analysis ..... Ogbuliec, Inhibition of pseudo-anaerobic corrosion of oil pipeline steel in ...

  3. Corrosion of steel structures in sea-bed sediment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    corrosion mechanism, measurement of metal corrosion rate, corrosion ... cables, steel rigs, pipelines and other marine facilities, is ..... make high strength steel material to crack with stress ... of SBS has yet been very limited, and selection of.

  4. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-07-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  5. Determination of inclusions in liquid steel after calcium treatment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tshilombo, K

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nozzle blocking was eliminated by calcium-treated liquid steel through changing the chemical and phase composition of alumina inclusions in aluminium-killed steel. Three different methods were applied to determine the composition of inclusions...

  6. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-03-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  7. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  8. ballistic performance of a quenched and tempered steel against

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    was investigated. Low alloy steel ... obliquity obliquity with a projectile velocity with a projectile velocity with a projectile .... quenching on low carbon and alloyed steel [5, 15]. Several studies .... Mars 190, Mars 240, Mars 270, Creusot-Loire,.

  9. Analysis of polypyrrole-coated stainless steel electrodes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of polypyrrole-coated stainless steel electrodes - Estimation of specific ... is carried out on stainless steel electrodes using -toluene sulphonic acid. ... The feasibility of the electrode for supercapacitor applications is investigated.

  10. Machinability of structural steels with calcium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pytel, S.; Zadecki, M.

    2003-01-01

    The machinability of the plain carbon and low alloy structural steels with carbon content of 0.1-0.6% is briefly discussed in the first part of the paper. In the experimental part a dependence between the addition of calcium and some changes in sulphide and oxide inclusions morphology is presented. The Volvo test for measurement of machinability index B i has been applied. Using the multiple regression methods two relationships between machinability index B i and stereological parameters of non-metallic inclusions as well as hardness of the steels have been calculated. The authors have reached the conclusion that owing to the changes in inclusion chemical composition and geometry as result of calcium addition the machinability index of the steel can be higher. (author)

  11. Strengthening Hadfield steel welds by nitrogen alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, C.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening Hadfield steel weld repairs by introducing nitrogen into the weld region was proven to be feasible via two welding techniques. The first technique required a pure Hadfield steel filler material to be diffusion treated in a high pressure nitrogen gas environment, and subsequently used during tungsten inert gas welding with a pure argon shielding gas. The second technique used a Hadfield steel filler material, and a 10% nitrogen containing argon shielding gas during tungsten inert gas welding. Both techniques increased the yield strength, the hardening rate, and the ultimate strength of the weld region. Using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy, we determined that the increased strength of the weld region resulted from a combination of nitrogen alloying and microstructural refinement

  12. Nanoscale microstructural characterization of a nanobainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timokhina, I.B., E-mail: ilana.timokhina@eng.monash.edu.au [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Beladi, H. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Xiong, X.Y. [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Adachi, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hodgson, P.D. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2011-08-15

    A 0.79 C-1.5 Si-1.98 Mn-0.98 Cr-0.24 Mo-1.06 Al-1.58 Co (wt.%) steel was isothermally heat treated at 200 deg. C for 10 days and 350 deg. C for 1 day to form a nanoscale bainitic microstructure consisting of nanobainitic ferrite laths with high dislocation density and retained austenite films. The microstructures of the samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Despite the formation of nanoscale bainite with a high volume fraction of retained austenite in both steels, the ductility of both steels was surprisingly low. It is believed that this was associated with the formation of carbon-depleted retained austenite after isothermal transformation at 200 deg. C due to the formation of high number of Fe-C clusters and particles in the bainitic ferrite laths and carbon-enriched austenite after isothermal transformation at 350 deg. C.

  13. Fusion welding of borated stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robino, C.V.; Cieslak, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Borated austenitic stainless steels have been developed for use in the nuclear industry where storage, transport, and reprocessing of nuclear materials are required. The objective of this work is to develop appropriate joining technology for borated stainless steels based upon understanding the response of these materials to thermal processing involving melting. This understanding is being developed through the application of physical metallurgy techniques to determine the evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties within the various regions of the HAZ. Initial investigations include development of the kinetics of boride coarsening in the solid-state region of HAZ and the effect of boride coarsening on the impact properties of this region of the weld zone. Microstructures of the borated stainless steels, their response to high temperature isothermal heat treatments, and the implications of these heat treatments with respect to welding behavior will be presented

  14. Heat transfer coefficients during quenching of steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, H.S.; Jalil, J.M. [University of Technology, Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Baghdad (Iraq); Peet, M.J.; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H. [University of Cambridge, Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Heat transfer coefficients for quenching in water have been measured as a function of temperature using steel probes for a variety of iron alloys. The coefficients were derived from measured cooling curves combined with calculated heat-capacities. The resulting data were then used to calculate cooling curves using the finite volume method for a large steel sample and these curves have been demonstrated to be consistent with measured values for the large sample. Furthermore, by combining the estimated cooling curves with time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams it has been possible to predict the variation of hardness as a function of distance via the quench factor analysis. The work should prove useful in the heat treatment of the steels studied, some of which are in the development stage. (orig.)

  15. Biaxial Loading Tests for steel containment vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyagawa, T. [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Wright, D.J.; Arai, S.

    1999-07-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a 1/10 scale of the steel containment vessel (SCV) test for the understanding of ultimate structural behavior beyond the design pressure condition. Biaxial Loading Tests were supporting tests for the 1/10 scale SCV model to evaluate the method of estimating failure conditions of thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions. The tentative material models of SGV480 and SPV490 were obtained. And the behavior of SGV480 and SPV490 thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions could be well simulated by FE-Analyses with the tentative material models and Mises constitutive law. This paper describes the results and the evaluations of these tests. (author)

  16. Biaxial Loading Tests for steel containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyagawa, T.; Wright, D.J.; Arai, S.

    1999-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has conducted a 1/10 scale of the steel containment vessel (SCV) test for the understanding of ultimate structural behavior beyond the design pressure condition. Biaxial Loading Tests were supporting tests for the 1/10 scale SCV model to evaluate the method of estimating failure conditions of thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions. The tentative material models of SGV480 and SPV490 were obtained. And the behavior of SGV480 and SPV490 thin steel plates under biaxial loading conditions could be well simulated by FE-Analyses with the tentative material models and Mises constitutive law. This paper describes the results and the evaluations of these tests. (author)

  17. Fatigue in Steel Structures under Random Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning

    1999-01-01

    types of welded plate test specimens and full-scale offshore tubular joints. The materials that have been used are either conventional structural steel with a yield stress of ~ 360-410 MPa or high-strength steel with a yield stress of ~ 810-1010 MPa. The fatigue tests and the fracture mechanics analyses......Fatigue damage accumulation in steel structures under random loading is studied. The fatigue life of welded joints has been determined both experimentally and from a fracture mechanics analysis. In the experimental part of the investigation, fatigue test series have been carried through on various...... have been carried out using load histories, which are realistic in relation to the types of structures studied, i.e. primarily bridges, offshore structures and chimneys. In general, the test series carried through show a significant difference between constant amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue...

  18. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, J. P.; Vite T, J.; Castillo S, M.; Vite T, M.

    2009-01-01

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  19. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, John W Jr; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov–Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage. (paper)

  20. Continuous cooling transformation behaviors of CLAM steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qing-sheng; Zheng, Shu-hui; Huang, Qun-ying; Liu, Shao-jun; Han, Yang-yang

    2013-01-01

    The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behaviors of CLAM (China Low Activation Martensitic) steel were studied, the CCT diagram was constructed, and the influence of cooling rates on the microstructures was also investigated. The microstructures were investigated using optical microscopy (OM) and microhardness tests were also carried out. The results showed that CLAM steel possessed high hardenability and there were ferrite and martensite transformation regions only. The maximum cooling rate to form ferrite microstructure was found to be 10–12 K/min. In order to obtain fully ferrite microstructure, the cooling rate should be lower than 1 K/min. The CCT diagram also gave relevant parameters such as the transformation temperatures, i.e., A c1 , A c3 , M s and M f were 1124 K, 1193 K, 705 K and 593 K, respectively. The diagram made it possible to predict the microstructures and properties of CLAM steel with different cooling rates