WorldWideScience

Sample records for electronics photonics information

  1. Electron and Photon ID

    CERN Document Server

    Hryn'ova, Tetiana; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The identification of prompt photons and the rejection of background coming mostly from photons from hadron decays relies on the high granularity of the ATLAS calorimeter. The electron identification used in ATLAS for run 2 is based on a likelihood discrimination to separate isolated electron candidates from candidates originating from photon conversions, hadron misidentification and heavy flavor decays. In addition, isolation variables are used as further handles to separate signal and background. Several methods are used to measure with data the efficiency of the photon identification requirements, to cover a broad energy spectrum. At low energy, photons from radiative Z decays are used. In the medium energy range, similarities between electrons and photon showers are exploited using Z->ee decays. At high energy, inclusive photon samples are used. The measurement of the efficiencies of the electron identification and isolation cuts are performed with the data using tag and probe techniques with large statis...

  2. Polymers for electronic & photonic application

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C P

    2013-01-01

    The most recent advances in the use of polymeric materials by the electronic industry can be found in Polymers for Electronic and Photonic Applications. This bookprovides in-depth coverage of photoresis for micro-lithography, microelectronic encapsulants and packaging, insulators, dielectrics for multichip packaging,electronic and photonic applications of polymeric materials, among many other topics. Intended for engineers and scientists who design, process, and manufacturemicroelectronic components, this book will also prove useful for hybrid and systems packaging managers who want to be info

  3. Photonic quantum information: science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological progress in the generation, manipulation and detection of individual single photons has opened a new scientific field of photonic quantum information. This progress includes the realization of single photon switches, photonic quantum circuits with specific functions, and the application of novel photonic states to novel optical metrology beyond the limits of standard optics. In this review article, the recent developments and current status of photonic quantum information technology are overviewed based on the author's past and recent works.

  4. Probing plasmonic nanostructures by photons and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald; Kneipp, Janina

    2015-01-01

    We discuss recent developments for studying plasmonic metal nanostructures. Exploiting photons and electrons opens up new capabilities to probe the complete plasmon spectrum including bright and dark modes and related local optical fields at subnanometer spatial resolution. This comprehensive...

  5. Photonics: Maintaining competitiveness in the information era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photonics concerns the use of photons to work with or to replace electrons in certain communications, computer, or control applications traditionally carried out by electronics. It is a key high-technology area, well established in long-distance fiber-optic telecommunications and rapidly growing in other areas of great importance to society. This report concentrates on technical areas where the overall worldwide market for equipment approaches $400 billion per year, i.e., Telecommunications; Information processing; Optical storage and display; Optical sensors; and Policy Issues. It is essential to increase our industrial competitiveness in product development, manufacturing skills, and marketing; There must be continuing industrial effort in long-range research and innovation; The photonics industry should consider the advantages of an industry association that could help organize consortia to conduct cooperative research and address technical problems and policy issues beyond the scope of any one organization; and Government contractors who receive a percentage of sales for their independent research should devote a sizable fraction to projects with a life span of 5 to 10 years.

  6. Enigmatic electrons, photons, and ``empty`` waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGregor, M.H.

    1995-08-22

    A spectroscopic analysis is made of electrons and photons from the standpoint of physical realism. In this conceptual framework, moving particles are portrayed as localized entities which are surrounded by ``empty`` waves. A spectroscopic model for the electron Stands as a guide for a somewhat similar, but in essential respects radically different, model for the photon. This leads in turn to a model for the ``zeron``. the quantum of the empty wave. The properties of these quanta mandate new basis states, and hence an extension of our customary framework for dealing with them. The zeron wave field of a photon differs in one important respect from the standard formalism for an electromagnetic wave. The vacuum state emerges as more than just a passive bystander. Its polarization properties provide wave stabilization, particle probability distributions, and orbit quantization. Questions with regard to special relativity are discussed.

  7. Electron pair creation by photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtwijk, Theodoor

    1960-01-01

    In our experiment on the creation of electron pairs a 5 MeV betatron was used as radiation source and a cloud chamber (with magnetic field) was used as detection instrument. The experimental arrangement is described in section 2.1. The cloud chamber was of the overcompression type so that the

  8. Progress in electronics and photonics with nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Murugan, Arul; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-01-01

    -property relationship to advanced applications. This editorial covers various aspects about nanomaterials, which will be useful/attractive for beginners in the field of nanotechnology as well as for experts and for industrialists looking forward to exploit them for real world applications.......Nanomaterials have been at the center of attraction for almost five decades as their contributions to different disciplines such as electronics, photonics and medicine are enormous. Various kinds of nanomaterials have been developed and are currently utilized in innumerable applications...

  9. Unfolding the band structure of electronic and photonic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, Ross

    In this thesis, we develop a generalised unfolding formalism to investigate the electronic and photonic properties of aperiodically-structured materials. We initially focus on GaAsBi alloys for electronic systems and Penrose-structured materials for photonic systems, aperiodic materials that cannot be easily studied using conventional band structure methods. We then extend our study to the supercell approach which facilitates an accurate modelling of the aperiodic structures at the price of obscuring essential physical information, due to a band folding effect. Then introducing a generalised unfolding algorithm, we return the supercell band structure to a traditional form that can again be used to analyse the electronic and photonic properties of the system. GaAsBi, which is a material with the potential to suppress the dominant loss mechanisms in telecommunications devices, was studied using the unfolded supercell band structure approach. We investigated the effect of bismuth on the properties of a host GaAs structure, including band movement, band broadening and effective mass. We validated our approach through a detailed comparison of both band movement and effective masses to the currently available experimental data. Then, we introduced a formalism for calculating the CHSH Auger recombination rates from our unfolded band structure, which will assist in determining the efficiency of the material. Quasicrystalline photonic materials built on the skeleton of Penrose lattices have proven to display photonic properties comparable to the ones found in photonic crystals, but with the added promise of increased isotropy. The photonic band structure of these materials is a prime target for the unfolding formalism because it allows a full exploration of the influence of the increased geometrical symmetry on their photonic characteristics. Furthermore, the network structure investigated demonstrated the existence of a sub-fundamental photonic band gap, a characteristic

  10. Advanced Photonic and Electronic Systems WILGA 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2010-01-01

    SPIE – PSP WILGA Symposium gathers two times a year in January and in May new adepts of advanced photonic and electronic systems. The event is oriented on components and applications. WILGA Symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering is well known on the web for its devotion to “young research” promotion under the eminent sponsorship of international engineering associations like SPIE and IEEE and their Poland Sections or Counterparts. WILGA is supported by the most important national professional organizations like KEiT PAN and PSP-Photonics Society of Poland. The Symposium is organized since 1998 twice a year. It has gathered over 4000 young researchers and published over 2000 papers mainly internationally, including more than 900 in 10 published so far volumes of Proc. SPIE. This paper is a digest of WILGA Symposium Series and WILGA 2010 summary. Introductory part treats WILGA Photonics Applications characteristics over the period 1998-2010. Following part presents a short report on the XXVth and XXVI...

  11. Photon/Electron Benchmarks for Intercode Comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Henry Grady III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sweezy, Jeremy Ed [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lemaire, Sebastien [CEA/DIF (France); Caillaud, M. [CEA/DIF (France); Sauvestre, J. E. [CEA/DIF (France); Umbert, A. [CEA/DIF (France)

    2015-07-21

    The goal of this work was to improve accuracy and efficiency of two Monte-Carlo transport codes (MCNP and DIANE) with an emphasis on γ+electron physics. The approach involved intercode comparisons + measurements for gamma/e- energy deposition in a cylinder with a photon source and different materials (C, Pb) and the bombardment of 15-MeV electrons on thick targets (Al, Be, Pb). Comparisons of the codes DIANE and MCNP6 showed good agreement (differences < 3%) for gamma-electron energy deposition in a 2D cylinder, except for the first 0.1 μm of lead (difference < 10%). Comparisons with measurements showed generally good agreement, often better than 10%; best-performing codes/options are problem-dependent; and single-event discrepancies are in active use in reviewing electron elastic scattering.

  12. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  13. The ATLAS Electron and Photon Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Samuel David; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Electron and photon triggers covering transverse energies from 5 GeV to several TeV are essential for signal selection in a wide variety of ATLAS physics analyses to study Standard Model processes and to search for new phenomena. Final states including leptons and photons had, for example, an important role in the discovery and measurement of the Higgs boson. Dedicated triggers are also used to collect data for calibration, efficiency and fake rate measurements. The ATLAS trigger system is divided in a hardware-based Level-1 trigger and a software-based high-level trigger, both of which were upgraded during the LHC shutdown in preparation for Run-2 operation. To cope with the increasing luminosity and more challenging pile-up conditions at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV, the trigger selections at each level are optimized to control the rates and keep efficiencies high. To achieve this goal multivariate analysis techniques are used. The ATLAS electron and photon triggers and their performance with Run 2 dat...

  14. Quantum-Dot-Based Photon Emission and Media Conversion for Quantum Information Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kumano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-photon as well as polarization-correlated photon pair emission from a single semiconductor quantum dots is demonstrated. Single photon generation and single photon-pair generation with little uncorrelated multiphoton emission and the feasibility of media conversion of the quantum states between photon polarization and electron spin are fundamental functions for quantum information applications. Mutual media conversion for the angular momentum between photon polarization and electron spin is also achieved with high fidelity via positively charged exciton state without external magnetic field. This is a clear indication that the coupling of photon polarizations and electron spins keeps secured during whole processes before photon emission. Possibility of a metal-embedded structure is demonstrated with the observation of drastic enhancement of excitation and/or collection efficiency of luminescence as well as clear antibunching of photons generated from a quantum dot.

  15. Spying on photons with photons: quantum interference and information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    The quest to have both which-path knowledge and interference fringes in a double-slit experiment dates back to the inception of quantum mechanics (QM) and to the famous Einstein-Bohr debates. In this paper we propose and discuss an experiment able to spy on one photon's path with another photon. We modify the quantum state inside the interferometer as opposed to the traditional physical modification of the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setup. We are able to show that it is the ability to harvest or not which-path information that finally limits the visibility of the interference pattern and not the "wave-like" or "particle-like" experimental setups. Remarkably, a full "particle-like" experimental setup is able to show interference fringes with 100% visibility if the quantum state is carefully engineered.

  16. Electron and photon identification in the D0 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrina, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Raja, R.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2014-06-01

    The electron and photon reconstruction and identification algorithms used by the D0 Collaboration at the Fermilab Tevatron collider are described. The determination of the electron energy scale and resolution is presented. Studies of the performance of the electron and photon reconstruction and identification are summarized.

  17. Progress in electronics and photonics with nanomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Murugan, Arul; Kotakoski, Jani

    2017-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been at the center of attraction for almost five decades as their contributions to different disciplines such as electronics, photonics and medicine are enormous. Various kinds of nanomaterials have been developed and are currently utilized in innumerable applications....... Nevertheless, their simple realization and easy and efficient upscaling are topics under intense investigation. Innovative strategies have been adopted for nanomaterial synthesis and their usability. Here, we provide a brief overview on nanomaterials ranging from basic understanding of their structure......-property relationship to advanced applications. This editorial covers various aspects about nanomaterials, which will be useful/attractive for beginners in the field of nanotechnology as well as for experts and for industrialists looking forward to exploit them for real world applications....

  18. Electronic healthcare information security

    CERN Document Server

    Dube, Kudakwashe; Shoniregun, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing healthcare expenditure and pressing demand for improved quality and efficiency of patient care services are driving innovation in healthcare information management. The domain of healthcare has become a challenging testing ground for information security due to the complex nature of healthcare information and individual privacy. ""Electronic Healthcare Information Security"" explores the challenges of e-healthcare information and security policy technologies. It evaluates the effectiveness of security and privacy implementation systems for anonymization methods and techniqu

  19. Radial Moment Calculations of Coupled Electron-Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANKE,BRIAN C.; LARSEN,EDWARD W.

    2000-07-19

    The authors consider the steady-state transport of normally incident pencil beams of radiation in slabs of material. A method has been developed for determining the exact radial moments of 3-D beams of radiation as a function of depth into the slab, by solving systems of 1-D transport equations. They implement these radial moment equations in the ONEBFP discrete ordinates code and simulate energy-dependent, coupled electron-photon beams using CEPXS-generated cross sections. Modified P{sub N} synthetic acceleration is employed to speed up the iterative convergence of the 1-D charged particle calculations. For high-energy photon beams, a hybrid Monte Carlo/discrete ordinates method is examined. They demonstrate the efficiency of the calculations and make comparisons with 3-D Monte Carlo calculations. Thus, by solving 1-D transport equations, they obtain realistic multidimensional information concerning the broadening of electron-photon beams. This information is relevant to fields such as industrial radiography, medical imaging, radiation oncology, particle accelerators, and lasers.

  20. Electron and photon emissions from gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casta, R., E-mail: castaromain@gmail.com, E-mail: romain.casta@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Champeaux, J.-P.; Moretto-Capelle, P.; Sence, M.; Cafarelli, P. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, Laboratoire Collisions Agrégats Réactivité, IRSAMC, CNRS, UMR 5589 (France)

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we develop a totally new probabilistic model for the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticles irradiated by X-ray photons. This model allows direct applications to recent researches about the radiotherapy enhancement by gold nanoparticles in the context of cancer treatment. Our model uses, in a complete original way, simulated Auger cascade and stopping power to compute electron emission spectra, photon emission spectra and released energy inside the material of gold nanoparticles. It allows us to present new results about the electron and photon emission of gold nanoparticle irradiated by hard X-rays.

  1. Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Hybrid Electronic and Photonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Hybrid Electronic and Photonic Systems This grant studied DNA nanostructures and their applications in a variety of...Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Self-assembled Nanomaterials for Hybrid Electronic and Photonic Systems Report

  2. Electron transport through a quantum dot assisted by cavity photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Nzar Rauf; Tang, Chi-Shung; Manolescu, Andrei; Gudmundsson, Vidar

    2013-11-01

    We investigate transient transport of electrons through a single quantum dot controlled by a plunger gate. The dot is embedded in a finite wire with length Lx assumed to lie along the x-direction with a parabolic confinement in the y-direction. The quantum wire, originally with hard-wall confinement at its ends, ±Lx/2, is weakly coupled at t = 0 to left and right leads acting as external electron reservoirs. The central system, the dot and the finite wire, is strongly coupled to a single cavity photon mode. A non-Markovian density-matrix formalism is employed to take into account the full electron-photon interaction in the transient regime. In the absence of a photon cavity, a resonant current peak can be found by tuning the plunger-gate voltage to lift a many-body state of the system into the source-drain bias window. In the presence of an x-polarized photon field, additional side peaks can be found due to photon-assisted transport. By appropriately tuning the plunger-gate voltage, the electrons in the left lead are allowed to undergo coherent inelastic scattering to a two-photon state above the bias window if initially one photon was present in the cavity. However, this photon-assisted feature is suppressed in the case of a y-polarized photon field due to the anisotropy of our system caused by its geometry.

  3. Electron and Photon Reconstruction and Identification with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Turlay, E

    2008-01-01

    The status of the reconstruction and identification of electrons and photons in the ATLAS detector is presented. Electrons and photons are crucial for both a thorough understanding of the detector and physics studies. An electrons identification efficiency of 64% can be reached for a jet rejection of 10^5. The electromagnetic energy scale can be estimated with a permil accuracy. The reconstruction process is described along with the identification and calibration techniques developed to obtain the required performance.

  4. Pushing the limits of single-photon information encoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, T.; Tentrup, Tristan Bernhard Horst; Uppu, Ravitej; Mosk, Allard; Pinkse, Pepijn Willemszoon Harry

    2016-01-01

    Single photons are the carrier of choice in many quantum information processing protocols. Encoding information in a high-dimensional Hilbert space allows for the transfer of more than one bit of information per photon. We use a spatial light modulator (SLM) to direct the single photons to distinct

  5. Electrons and photons in periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    with the numerically exact results we discuss the validity of certain approximative methods for calculating the exchange interaction. These ideas are applied also to graphene, where the emergence of a band gap is in itself interesting in that it turns the otherwise semimetallic graphene into a semiconductor, paving...... the way for graphene transistors. Photonic band gaps can be engineered using structures with a periodic modulations of the refractive index, commonly referred to as photonic crystal. We discuss the application of photonic crystals to slow light phenomena, where advantage is taken of the divergence...

  6. Inexpensive electronics and software for photon statistics and correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamari, Benjamin D; Zhang, Dianwen; Buckman, Richard E; Milas, Peker; Denker, John S; Chen, Hui; Li, Hongmin; Goldner, Lori S

    2014-07-01

    Single-molecule-sensitive microscopy and spectroscopy are transforming biophysics and materials science laboratories. Techniques such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and single-molecule sensitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) are now commonly available in research laboratories but are as yet infrequently available in teaching laboratories. We describe inexpensive electronics and open-source software that bridges this gap, making state-of-the-art research capabilities accessible to undergraduates interested in biophysics. We include a discussion of the intensity correlation function relevant to FCS and how it can be determined from photon arrival times. We demonstrate the system with a measurement of the hydrodynamic radius of a protein using FCS that is suitable for the undergraduate teaching laboratory. The FPGA-based electronics, which are easy to construct, are suitable for more advanced measurements as well, and several applications are described. As implemented, the system has 8 ns timing resolution, can control up to four laser sources, and can collect information from as many as four photon-counting detectors.

  7. Relativistic quantum dynamics in strong fields: Photon emission from heavy, few-electron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, S. [Kassel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Indelicato, P. [Lab. Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure et Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Stoehlker, T. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2005-03-01

    Recent progress in the study of the photon emission from highly-charged heavy ions is reviewed. These investigations show that high-Z ions provide a unique tool for improving the understanding of the electron-electron and electron-photon interaction in the presence of strong fields. Apart from the bound-state transitions, which are accurately described in the framework of quantum electrodynamics, much information has been obtained also from the radiative capture of (quasi-) free electrons by high-Z ions. Many features in the observed spectra hereby confirm the inherently relativistic behavior of even the simplest compound quantum systems in nature. (orig.)

  8. Sub electron readout noise & photon counting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, J.-L.; Balard, Ph.; Daigle, O.; Destefanis, G.; Feautrier, Ph.; Guillaume, Ch.; Rothman, J.

    We present recent advances on ultra low noise visible detectors at Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, photon counting and EMCCD developments in collaboration with Observatoire de haute provence, Laboratoire d'astrophysique de l'observatoire de Grenoble and Laboratoire d'Astrophysique Experimentale (Montreal). After a review of the progress with third generation Image Photon Counting Systems (IPCS), we present the OCAM camera, based on the E2V CCD220 EMCCD, part of the Opticon JRA2 programme, and the CCCP controller, a new controller for the 3DNTT instrument that reduces the clock induced charge of an EMCCD by a factor 10, making it competitive with IPCS detectors for very faint fluxes. We will finally present the RAPID project and the concept of photon counting avalanche photodiode CMOS device (in collaboration with CEA-LETI) which is foreseen to be the ultimate detector for the visible-IR range providing no readout noise, high QE and extremely fast readout.

  9. Electron-positron pair production by ultrarelativistic electrons in a soft photon field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastichiadis, A.; Marscher, A. P.; Brecher, K.

    1986-01-01

    The fully differential cross section for photon-electron pair production is integrated numerically over phase space. Results are obtained for the astrophysically interesting case in which the interaction between an ultrarelativistic electron and a soft photon results in electron-positron pair production. The positron spectrum is a function of the energies of both the photon and the electron, as well as the angle of interaction. It is found that the energy at which the positron distribution peaks is inversely proportional to the photon energy and independent of the electron energy. The positron spectrum is integrated once more over initial electron energies for a power-law energy distribution of primary electrons. The same procedure is repeated for the recoil particle; it is shown that the peak of the recoil energy distribution depends linearly on the energy of the primary electron. Finally, semianalytical expressions are obtained for the energy losses of the primary electrons.

  10. A New Approach of Electronics and Photonics Convergence on Si CMOS Platform: How to Reduce Device Diversity of Photonics for Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumi Wada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrated photonics via Si CMOS technology has been a strategic area since electronics and photonics convergence should be the next platform for information technology. The platform is recently referred to as “Si photonics” that attracts much interest of researchers in industries as well as academia in the world. The main goal of Si Photonics is currently to reduce material diversity of photonic devices to pursuing CMOS-compatibility. In contrast, the present paper proposes another route of Si Photonics, reducing diversity of photonic devices. The proposed device unifying functionality of photonics is a microresonator with a pin diode structure that enables the Purcell effect and Franz-Keldysh effect to emit and to modulate light from SiGe alloys.

  11. Infusing photonics to increase enrollment in electronics engineering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayiotou, Chrys A.; Seeber, Fred P.

    2007-06-01

    During the last 15 years most of the electronics engineering technology programs across the nation have experienced a constant decline in enrollment. Today's high school students do not seem to consider a career in electronics engineering appealing enough to commit to a field of study in desperate need of new students. They still associate electronics programs with the electronics section of a department store; televisions, stereo systems, DVD and VCR players, and other disposable electronics. While the downward trend continues across the nation, Indian River Community College (IRCC) has been able not only to stop it but to reverse it by attracting a new generation of students. By introducing high school students to new and emerging technologies, their perception of established degrees has changed and their interest has been stimulated. Photonics is one of those technologies capturing students' attention. IRCC, a partner college in the National Center for Optics and Photonics Education (OP-TEC), with the assistance of other colleges like Camden County College which already offers an Associate in Applied Science degree in Photonics, has created a Photonics specialization under the Electronics Engineering Technology program. The targeted marketing of this new specialization has led to an increase in enrollment of 50% in 2005, 80% in 2006, and for 2007 it is projected it to be over 100%. An interesting comparison can be made concerning enrollment at colleges with a full AAS program in photonics like Camden County College and IRCC which uses photonics as an enabling technology. This analysis could lead to a new approach in restructuring engineering technology degrees with the infusion of photonics throughout many technology fields. This presentation will discuss the plan of action that made possible this initiative at Indian River Community College and new program directions at Camden County College, Blackwood, New Jersey.

  12. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is paramount for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. The results obtained with the pp collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at sqrt(s)= 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1 and 2.7 fb-1 respectively , as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented.

  13. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00436885; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electrons and photons is paramount for many ATLAS physics analyses. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed $in$-$situ$ using a large statistics of $Z \\rightarrow ee$ events. The results obtained with the $pp$ collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ and 2.7 fb$^{-1}$ respectively, as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented

  14. An Electron/Photon/Relaxation Data Library for MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, III, H. Grady [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-08-07

    The capabilities of the MCNP6 Monte Carlo code in simulation of electron transport, photon transport, and atomic relaxation have recently been significantly expanded. The enhancements include not only the extension of existing data and methods to lower energies, but also the introduction of new categories of data and methods. Support of these new capabilities has required major additions to and redesign of the associated data tables. In this paper we present the first complete documentation of the contents and format of the new electron-photon-relaxation data library now available with the initial production release of MCNP6.

  15. Electronic Collection Management and Electronic Information Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    TITLE: Electronic Information Management for PfP Nations [La gestion electronique des informations pour les pays du PfP] To order the complete...and information centers As a key institutional structure for providing information "collection" and "services" to users, the library or information...including the specialized staff, to select, structure , offer intellectual access to, interpret, distribute, preserve the integrity of, and ensure the

  16. Electronic Publishing or Electronic Information Handling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    The current dramatic evolution in information technology is bringing major modifications in the way scientists communicate. The concept of 'electronic publishing' is too restrictive and has often different, sometimes conflicting, interpretations. It is thus giving way to the broader notion of 'electronic information handling' encompassing the diverse types of information, the different media, as well as the various communication methodologies and technologies. New problems and challenges result also from this new information culture, especially on legal, ethical, and educational grounds. The procedures for validating 'published material' and for evaluating scientific activities will have to be adjusted too. 'Fluid' information is becoming a common concept. Electronic publishing cannot be conceived without link to knowledge bases nor without intelligent information retrieval tools.

  17. Simultaneous optimization of photons and electrons for mixed beam radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S.; Fix, M. K.; Joosten, A.; Henzen, D.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Kueng, R.; Aebersold, D. M.; Stampanoni, M. F. M.; Manser, P.

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and investigate an inverse treatment planning process (TPP) for mixed beam radiotherapy (MBRT) capable of performing simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures. A simulated annealing based direct aperture optimization (DAO) is implemented to perform simultaneous optimization of photon and electron apertures, both shaped with the photon multileaf collimator (pMLC). Validated beam models are used as input for Monte Carlo dose calculations. Consideration of photon pMLC transmission during DAO and a weight re-optimization of the apertures after deliverable dose calculation are utilized to efficiently reduce the differences between optimized and deliverable dose distributions. The TPP for MBRT is evaluated for an academic situation with a superficial and an enlarged PTV in the depth, a left chest wall case including the internal mammary chain and a squamous cell carcinoma case. Deliverable dose distributions of MBRT plans are compared to those of modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT), photon IMRT and if available to those of clinical VMAT plans. The generated MBRT plans dosimetrically outperform the MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans for all investigated situations. For the clinical cases of the left chest wall and the squamous cell carcinoma, the MBRT plans cover the PTV similarly or more homogeneously than the VMAT plans, while OARs are spared considerably better with average reductions of the mean dose to parallel OARs and D 2% to serial OARs by 54% and 26%, respectively. Moreover, the low dose bath expressed as V 10% to normal tissue is substantially reduced by up to 45% compared to the VMAT plans. A TPP for MBRT including simultaneous optimization is successfully implemented and the dosimetric superiority of MBRT plans over MERT, photon IMRT and VMAT plans is demonstrated for academic and clinical situations including superficial targets with and without deep-seated part.

  18. Single Microwave Photon Detection with a Trapped Electron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April Cridland

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate theoretically the use of an electron in a Penning trap as a detector of single microwave photons. At the University of Sussex we are developing a chip Penning trap technology, designed to be integrated within quantum circuits. Microwave photons are guided into the trap and interact with the electron’s quantum cyclotron motion. This is an electric dipole transition, where the near field of the microwave radiation induces quantum jumps of the cyclotron harmonic oscillator. The quantum jumps can be monitored using the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect, providing the quantum non demolition signal of the microwave quanta. We calculate the quantum efficiency of photon detection and discuss the main features and technical challenges for the trapped electron as a quantum microwave sensor.

  19. Organizational Models of Electronic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-chen Chen

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Along with the popularity of Internet, electronic information is getting more and more important. To find efficient organization methods of electronic information is the main issue for information retrieval. Many solutions have been proposed.The aim of this article is to discuss the existing organizational models of electronic information. We explain their backgrounds of developments, their environments of applications and some related issues.[Article content in Chinese

  20. Convergence of Photonics and Electronics for Terahertz Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salazar, Adrian Ruiz; Rommel, Simon; Anufriyev, E.

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz wireless communications are expected to offer the required high capacity and low latency performance necessary for short-range wireless access and control applications. We present an overview of some the activities in this area in the newly started H2020 ITN project CELTA: Convergence...... of Electronics and Photonics Technologies Enabling Terahertz Applications....

  1. PENELOPE, an algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F.; Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Baro, J.; Sempau, J.

    1996-07-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from 1 keV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres, cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm. (Author) 108 refs.

  2. PENELOPE, and algorithm and computer code for Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvat, F.; Fernandez-Varea, J.M.; Baro, J.; Sempau, J.

    1996-10-01

    The FORTRAN 77 subroutine package PENELOPE performs Monte Carlo simulation of electron-photon showers in arbitrary for a wide energy range, from similar{sub t}o 1 KeV to several hundred MeV. Photon transport is simulated by means of the standard, detailed simulation scheme. Electron and positron histories are generated on the basis of a mixed procedure, which combines detailed simulation of hard events with condensed simulation of soft interactions. A simple geometry package permits the generation of random electron-photon showers in material systems consisting of homogeneous bodies limited by quadric surfaces, i.e. planes, spheres cylinders, etc. This report is intended not only to serve as a manual of the simulation package, but also to provide the user with the necessary information to understand the details of the Monte Carlo algorithm.

  3. Conversion from Single Photon to Single Electron Spin Using Electrically Controllable Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiwa, Akira; Fujita, Takafumi; Kiyama, Haruki; Allison, Giles; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2017-01-01

    Polarization is a fundamental property of light and could provide various solutions to the development of secure optical communications with high capacity and high speed. In particular, the coherent quantum state conversion between single photons and single electron spins is a prerequisite for long-distance quantum communications and distributed quantum computation. Electrically defined quantum dots have already been proven to be suitable for scalable solid state qubits by demonstrations of single-spin coherent manipulations and two-qubit gate operations. Thus, their capacity for quantum information technologies would be considerably extended by the achievement of entanglement between an electron spin in the quantum dots and a photon. In this review paper, we show the basic technologies for trapping single electrons generated by single photons in quantum dots and for detecting their spins using the Pauli effect with sensitive charge sensors.

  4. Raman scattering of photons by the channeling electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreeva, D. R.; Kalashnikov, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    The motion of channeling particles in the accompanying coordinate system can be considered as a two-dimensional atom in the case of axial channeling. The transversal motion of the channeling particles is characterized by discrete spectrum. The occupation probability of the transversal motion levels depends on the entrance angle of the charged particles relative to the crystallographic axis. In the scattering of a photon by the ;quasi-bound; electron moving in the axial channeling regime would appear the frequencies ω which are a combination of the incident photon frequency ω0 and the frequency ωNM (ωNM is the transition frequency in transverse quantized motion of the channeling electron: ω =ω0 ±ωMN , where ℏωMN = 2γ2 ΔE⊥NM for the relativistic electron, γ2 = E / (mc2) is the Lorentz factor of the channeling electron). In the article are discussed the criteria for choosing an adequate continuous potential of the crystallographic axis and the quantum characteristics of a transversal motion of the channeling electron. The peculiarities of the Raman scattering spectrum of photons by electrons in the axial channeling regime are analyzed and the differential cross section of this process is found.

  5. Information Optics and Photonics Algorithms, Systems, and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Javidi, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    This book addresses applications, recent advances, and emerging areas in fields with applications in information optics and photonics systems. The objective of this book is to illustrate and discuss novel approaches, analytical techniques, models, and technologies that enhance sensing, measurement, processing, interpretation, and visualization of information using free space optics and photonics. The material in this book concentrates on integration of diverse fields for cross-disciplinary applications including bio-photonics, digitally enhanced sensing and imaging systems, multi-dimensional optical imaging and image processing, bio-inspired imaging, 3D visualization, 3D displays, imaging on the nano-scale, quantum optics, super resolution imaging, photonics for biological applications, and holographic information systems. As a result, this book is a useful resource for researchers, engineers, and graduate students who work in the diverse fields comprising information optics and photonics.

  6. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  7. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A. [UNR

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  8. Synchronization of optical photons for quantum information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Kenzo; Hashimoto, Yosuke; Yoshikawa, Jun-Ichi; Ohdan, Hideaki; Toyama, Takeshi; van Loock, Peter; Furusawa, Akira

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental element of quantum information processing with photonic qubits is the nonclassical quantum interference between two photons when they bunch together via the Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) effect. Ultimately, many such photons must be processed in complex interferometric networks. For this purpose, it is essential to synchronize the arrival times of the flying photons and to keep their purities high. On the basis of the recent experimental success of single-photon storage with high purity, we demonstrate for the first time the HOM interference of two heralded, nearly pure optical photons synchronized through two independent quantum memories. Controlled storage times of up to 1.8 μs for about 90 events per second were achieved with purities that were sufficiently high for a negative Wigner function confirmed with homodyne measurements.

  9. Multi-photon creation and single-photon annihilation of electron-positron pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Huayu

    2011-04-27

    In this thesis we study multi-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair production in a trident process, and singlephoton e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation in a triple interaction. The pair production is considered in the collision of a relativistic electron with a strong laser beam, and calculated within the theory of laser-dressed quantum electrodynamics. A regularization method is developed systematically for the resonance problem arising in the multi-photon process. Total production rates, positron spectra, and relative contributions of different reaction channels are obtained in various interaction regimes. Our calculation shows good agreement with existing experimental data from SLAC, and adds further insights into the experimental findings. Besides, we study the process in a manifestly nonperturbative domain, whose accessibility to future all-optical experiments based on laser acceleration is shown. In the single-photon e{sup +}e{sup -} pair annihilation, the recoil momentum is absorbed by a spectator particle. Various kinematic configurations of the three incoming particles are examined. Under certain conditions, the emitted photon exhibits distinct angular and polarization distributions which could facilitate the detection of the process. Considering an equilibrium relativistic e{sup +}e{sup -} plasma, it is found that the single-photon process becomes the dominant annihilation channel for plasma temperatures above 3 MeV. Multi-particle correlation effects are therefore essential for the e{sup +}e{sup -} dynamics at very high density. (orig.)

  10. Electron and photon energy calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Saskia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is needed for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. A pre-requisite of this calibration is a good understanding of the material in front of the calorimeter and of the inter-calibration of the different calorimeter layers. The Z->ee sample is also used to measure the energy resolution. The results obtained with the pp collisions data at sqrt(s)=13 TeV in 2016 (2015) corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 33.9 (3.1)fb-1 of sqrt(s)=13 TeV are presented as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales.

  11. Highly efficient photonic nanowire single-photon sources for quantum information applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Claudon, J.; Munsch, M.

    2013-01-01

    Within the emerging field of optical quantum information processing, the current challenge is to construct the basic building blocks for the quantum computing and communication systems. A key component is the singlephoton source (SPS) capable of emitting single photons on demand. Ideally, the SPS...... must feature near-unity efficiency, where the efficiency is defined as the number of detected photons per trigger, the probability g(2)(τ=0) of multi-photon emission events should be 0 and the emitted photons are required to be indistinguishable. An optically or electrically triggered quantum light...... emitter, e.g. a nitrogen-vacancy center or a semiconductor quantum dot (QD), embedded in a solid-state semiconductor host material appears as an attractive platform for generating such single photons. However, for a QD in bulk material, the large index contrast at the semiconductor-air interface leads...

  12. Distribution of quantum information between an atom and two photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Bernhard

    2008-11-03

    The construction of networks consisting of optically interconnected processing units is a promising way to scale up quantum information processing systems. To store quantum information, single trapped atoms are among the most proven candidates. By placing them in high finesse optical resonators, a bidirectional information exchange between the atoms and photons becomes possible with, in principle, unit efficiency. Such an interface between stationary and ying qubits constitutes a possible node of a future quantum network. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate the prospects of a quantum interface consisting of a single atom trapped within the mode of a high-finesse optical cavity. In a two-step process, we distribute entanglement between the stored atom and two subsequently emitted single photons. The long atom trapping times achieved in the system together with the high photon collection efficiency of the cavity make the applied protocol in principle deterministic, allowing for the creation of an entangled state at the push of a button. Running the protocol on this quasi-stationary quantum interface, the internal state of the atom is entangled with the polarization state of a single emitted photon. The entanglement is generated by driving a vacuum-stimulated Raman adiabatic passage between states of the coupled atom-cavity system. In a second process, the atomic part of the entangled state is mapped onto a second emitted photon using a similar technique and resulting in a polarization-entangled two-photon state. To verify and characterize the photon-photon entanglement, we measured a violation of a Bell inequality and performed a full quantum state tomography. The results prove the prior atom-photon entanglement and demonstrate a quantum information transfer between the atom and the two emitted photons. This reflects the advantages of a high-finesse cavity as a quantum interface in future quantum networks. (orig.)

  13. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards wide-field time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2015-07-01

    Single photon detecting capabilities of an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD), where a photon is converted into a photoelectron that is accelerated through a high voltage before hitting the CCD chip, were characterised. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. Based on these results, we propose that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an EBCCD or EBCMOS camera would allow photon arrival time determination from the photon event pulse height with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter (TAC), or a 2-dimensional streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), may benefit from this approach. Moreover, the EBCCD was used on a fluorescence microscope to image fluorescently labelled cells in single photon counting mode.

  14. Polymer ring resonators for high density photonic and electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haishan

    2009-12-01

    Electrical interconnect based on the copper wires will be the bottleneck for the future performance improvement of multi-core CPUs. Chip scale optical interconnect based on high density photonic and electronic-photonic integration is one of the feasible solutions. Ring resonators are promising photonic components serving as building blocks. High density integration of ring resonators is also important for high throughput lab-on-a-chip biosensors and opto-microwave integrated circuits. Polymer materials are compatible with most semiconductor fabrication processes. Polymers can be easily doped with rare earth ions, quantum dots etc. to make active optical devices. Especially, over several hundreds pm/V electro-optic (EO) coefficients and femtosecond scale response time of EO polymers enables photonic devices with sub 1V to millivolt drive voltages and terahertz bandwidth. This dissertation describes several technologies about design, simulation, fabrication, integration with electronic circuits and fiber optics of polymer ring resonators, and demonstrates three application examples of polymer ring resonators in communications and biochemical sensing. First the Beam Propagation Method (BPM) and the matrix analysis are combined to provide a fast circuit level simulation and design procedure of polymer ring resonators. Several low cost fabrication techniques based on electron beam irradiation effects on EO polymers are introduced. For the practical electronicphotonic integration, a hybrid integration scheme of EO polymer waveguide devices with Si integrated circuits is developed. One application is an all-dielectric RF sensor or receiver with sensitivity of 100 V/m and theoretical bandwidth over 100 GHz. This device is based on a novel structure with polymer ring resonator directly coupled to a side polished optical fiber. The other two examples are biochemical sensors based on multi-slot waveguide and ring resonator reflector structures.

  15. [Electronic poison information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier.

  16. Accessible Electronic and Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Policy establishes EPA's responsibilities and procedures for making its Electronic and Information Technology (EIT) products accessible to all people, including people with disabilities, in accordance with Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

  17. Signatures of plasmoemission in two photon photoemission electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zu Heringdorf, Frank-J.; Kahl, Philip; Makris, Andreas; Sindermann, Simon; Podbiel, Daniel; Horn-von Hoegen, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The imaging of surface plasmon polariton waves in two photon photoemission microscopy has been intensely studied during the past years, with a focus on contrast mechanisms and light-plasmon interaction. The possibility of photoemission from the plasmonic fields alone has so far not been addressed in such experiments. This was justified, since the intensity of the plasmonic fields at the surface was comparatively weak and nonlinear plasmonic effects were not to be expected. Here we discuss the properties of grating couplers for creation of intense and short plasmon polariton pulses for which the emission of electrons purely from the plasmonic field cannot be neglected any more. Two examples for signatures of such nonlinear plasmoemission effects in experimental two photon photoemission microscopy images are discussed.

  18. Electronic/photonic interfaces for ultrafast data processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overberg, Mark E.; Geib, Kent Martin; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Hsu, Alan Yuan-Chun; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Finnegan, Patrick Sean (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-month program that explored the potential areas of impact for electronic/photonic integration technologies, as applied to next-generation data processing systems operating within 100+ Gb/s optical networks. The study included a technology review that targeted three key functions of data processing systems, namely receive/demultiplexing/clock recovery, data processing, and transmit/multiplexing. Various technical approaches were described and evaluated. In addition, we initiated the development of high-speed photodetectors and hybrid integration processes, two key elements of an ultrafast data processor. Relevant experimental results are described herein.

  19. On thermalization of electron-positron-photon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siutsou, I. A., E-mail: siutsou@icranet.org [CAPES–ICRANet program, ICRANet–Rio, CBPF 22290-180, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Aksenov, A. G. [Institute for Computer-Aided Design, Russian Academy of Sciences 123056, 2nd Brestskaya st., 19/18, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vereshchagin, G. V. [ICRANet 65122, p.le della Republica, 10, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Recently a progress has been made in understanding thermalization mechanism of relativistic plasma starting from a non-equilibrium state. Relativistic Boltzmann equations were solved numerically for homogeneous isotropic plasma with collision integrals for two- and three-particle interactions calculated from the first principles by means of QED matrix elements. All particles were assumed to fulfill Boltzmann statistics. In this work we follow plasma thermalization by accounting for Bose enhancement and Pauli blocking in particle interactions. Our results show that particle in equilibrium reach Bose-Einstein distribution for photons, and Fermi-Dirac one for electrons, respectively.

  20. Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Nanowires for Electronic, Photonic and Sensing Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    vapor deposition ( CVD ) using gold thin films as catalyst on a Si wafer with an insulating SiO2 layer. The structural characterization of the as-grown...advantages in improved carrier confinement over their thin film counterparts. The bandgap of the ZnO may be increased by addition of Mg. Results: We...variety of wide bandgap nanowires using GaN and ZnO and made functional devices from them for sensing,electronics and photonics.These included a very

  1. Development of an external readout electronics for a hybrid photon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Uyttenhove, Simon; Tichon, Jacques; Garcia, Salvador

    The pixel hybrid photon detectors currently installed in the LHCb Cherenkov system encapsulate readout electronics in the vacuum tube envelope. The LHCb upgrade and the new trigger system will require their replacement with new photon detectors. The baseline photon detector candidate is the multi-anode photomultiplier. A hybrid photon detector with external readout electronics has been proposed as a backup option. This master thesis covers a R & D phase to investigate this latter concept. Extensive studies of the initial electronics system underlined the noise contributions from the Beetle chip used as front-end readout ASIC and from the ceramic carrier of the photon detector. New front-end electronic boards have been developed and made fully compatible with the existing LHCb-RICH infrastructure. With this compact readout system, Cherenkov photons have been successfully detected in a real particle beam environment. The proof-of-concept of a hybrid photon detector with external readout electronics was val...

  2. Photon momentum sharing between an electron and an ion in photoionization: from one-photon (photoelectric effect) to multiphoton absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D; Corkum, Paul B

    2014-12-31

    We investigate photon-momentum sharing between an electron and an ion following different photoionization regimes. We find very different partitioning of the photon momentum in one-photon ionization (the photoelectric effect) as compared to multiphoton processes. In the photoelectric effect, the electron acquires a momentum that is much greater than the single photon momentum ℏω/c [up to (8/5) ℏω/c] whereas in the strong-field ionization regime, the photoelectron only acquires the momentum corresponding to the photons absorbed above the field-free ionization threshold plus a momentum corresponding to a fraction (3/10) of the ionization potential Ip. In both cases, due to the smallness of the electron-ion mass ratio, the ion takes nearly the entire momentum of all absorbed N photons (via the electron-ion center of mass). Additionally, the ion takes, as a recoil, the photoelectron momentum resulting from mutual electron-ion interaction in the electromagnetic field. Consequently, the momentum partitioning of the photofragments is very different in both regimes. This suggests that there is a rich, unexplored physics to be studied between these two limits which can be generated with current ultrafast laser technology.

  3. Electron-photon shower distribution function tables for lead, copper and air absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    Messel, H

    2013-01-01

    Electron-Photon Shower Distribution Function: Tables for Lead, Copper and Air Absorbers presents numerical results of the electron-photon shower distribution function for lead, copper, and air absorbers. Electron or photon interactions, including Compton scattering, elastic Coulomb scattering, and the photo-electric effect, are taken into account in the calculations. This book consists of four chapters and begins with a review of both theoretical and experimental work aimed at deducing the characteristics of the cascade produced from the propagation of high energy electrons and photons through

  4. High quantum-efficiency photon-number-resolving detector for photonic on-chip information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Brice; Mennea, Paolo L; Lita, Adriana E; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Kolthammer, W Steven; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Spring, Justin B; Humphreys, Peter C; Mirin, Richard P; Gates, James C; Smith, Peter G R; Walmsley, Ian A; Gerrits, Thomas; Nam, Sae Woo

    2013-09-23

    The integrated optical circuit is a promising architecture for the realization of complex quantum optical states and information networks. One element that is required for many of these applications is a high-efficiency photon detector capable of photon-number discrimination. We present an integrated photonic system in the telecom band at 1550 nm based on UV-written silica-on-silicon waveguides and modified transition-edge sensors capable of number resolution and over 40 % efficiency. Exploiting the mode transmission failure of these devices, we multiplex three detectors in series to demonstrate a combined 79 % ± 2 % detection efficiency with a single pass, and 88 % ± 3 % at the operating wavelength of an on-chip terminal reflection grating. Furthermore, our optical measurements clearly demonstrate no significant unexplained loss in this system due to scattering or reflections. This waveguide and detector design therefore allows the placement of number-resolving single-photon detectors of predictable efficiency at arbitrary locations within a photonic circuit - a capability that offers great potential for many quantum optical applications.

  5. Ultrafast terahertz electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Liang [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This thesis summarizes my work on using ultrafast laser pulses to study Terahertz (THz) electrodynamics of photonic and electronic nanostructures and microstructures. Ultrafast timeresolved (optical, NIR, MIR, THz) pump-probe spectroscopy setup has been successfully built, which enables me to perform a series of relevant experiments. Firstly, a novel high e ciency and compact THz wave emitter based on split-ring-resonators has been developed and characterized. The emitter can be pumped at any wavelength by tailoring the magnetic resonance and could generate gapless THz waves covering the entire THz band. Secondly, two kinds of new photonic structures for THz wave manipulation have been successfully designed and characterized. One is based on the 1D and 2D photo-imprinted di ractive elements. The other is based on the photoexcited double-split-ring-resonator metamaterials. Both structures are exible and can modulate THz waves with large tunability. Thirdly, the dark excitons in semiconducting singlewalled carbon nanotubes are studied by optical pump and THz probe spectroscopy, which provides the rst insights into the THz responses of nonequilibrium excitonic correlations and dynamics from the dark ground states in carbon nanotubes. Next, several on-going projects are brie y presented such as the study of ultrafast THz dynamics of Dirac fermions in topological insulator Bi2Se3 with Mid-infrared excitation. Finally, the thesis ends with a summary of the completed experiments and an outlook of the future plan.

  6. A review of wireless-photonic systems: Design methodologies and topologies, constraints, challenges, and innovations in electronics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsaei, Ahmadreza; Wang, Yun; Molavi, Reza; Jayatilleka, Hasitha; Caverley, Michael; Beikahmadi, Mohammad; Masnadi Shirazi, Amir Hossein; Jaeger, Nicolas; Chrostowski, Lukas; Mirabbasi, Shahriar

    2016-08-01

    Photonic networks form the backbone for data communications. In particular, in current and future wireless communication systems, photonic networks are becoming increasingly popular for data distribution between the central office and the remote antenna units at base stations. As wireless-photonic systems become in increasing demand, low-cost implementation of such systems will be desirable. This paper describes how integrated photonics and electronics, on silicon, can be used to design such systems. Various building blocks of such silicon-photonics systems are reviewed. The emphasis is on a 60 GHz wireless system which could be suitable for the emerging 5th-generation (5G) cellular networks. The implementation discussed here uses digital baseband optical transmission as opposed to the radio-over-fibre approach.

  7. Fast Monte Carlo Electron-Photon Transport Method and Application in Accurate Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Lijuan; Sun, Guangyao; Zheng, Huaqing; Song, Jing; Chen, Zhenping; Li, Gui

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method is the most accurate computational method for dose calculation, but its wide application on clinical accurate radiotherapy is hindered due to its poor speed of converging and long computation time. In the MC dose calculation research, the main task is to speed up computation while high precision is maintained. The purpose of this paper is to enhance the calculation speed of MC method for electron-photon transport with high precision and ultimately to reduce the accurate radiotherapy dose calculation time based on normal computer to the level of several hours, which meets the requirement of clinical dose verification. Based on the existing Super Monte Carlo Simulation Program (SuperMC), developed by FDS Team, a fast MC method for electron-photon coupled transport was presented with focus on two aspects: firstly, through simplifying and optimizing the physical model of the electron-photon transport, the calculation speed was increased with slightly reduction of calculation accuracy; secondly, using a variety of MC calculation acceleration methods, for example, taking use of obtained information in previous calculations to avoid repeat simulation of particles with identical history; applying proper variance reduction techniques to accelerate MC method convergence rate, etc. The fast MC method was tested by a lot of simple physical models and clinical cases included nasopharyngeal carcinoma, peripheral lung tumor, cervical carcinoma, etc. The result shows that the fast MC method for electron-photon transport was fast enough to meet the requirement of clinical accurate radiotherapy dose verification. Later, the method will be applied to the Accurate/Advanced Radiation Therapy System ARTS as a MC dose verification module.

  8. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  9. Coherent manipulation of thermal transport by tunable electron-photon and electron-phonon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Federico; Timossi, Giuliano; Solinas, Paolo; Giazotto, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    We propose a system where coherent thermal transport between two reservoirs in non-galvanic contact is modulated by independently tuning the electron-photon and the electron-phonon coupling. The scheme is based on two gate-controlled electrodes capacitively coupled through a dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) as an intermediate phase-tunable resonator. Thereby the electron-photon interaction is modulated by controlling the flux threading the dc-SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) and the impedance of the two reservoirs, while the electron-phonon coupling is tuned by controlling the charge carrier concentration in the electrodes. To quantitatively evaluate the behavior of the system, we propose to exploit the graphene reservoirs. In this case, the scheme can work at temperatures reaching 1 K, with unprecedented temperature modulations as large as 245 mK, transmittance up to 99%, and energy conversion efficiency up to 50%. Finally, the accuracy of heat transport control allows us to use this system as an experimental tool to determine the electron-phonon coupling in two-dimensional electronic systems.

  10. Experimental Detection of Information Deficit in a Photonic Contextuality Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiang; Kurzyński, Paweł; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir; Wang, Kunkun; Bian, Zhihao; Zhang, Yongsheng; Xue, Peng

    2017-12-01

    Contextuality is an essential characteristic of quantum theory, and supplies the power for many quantum information processes. Previous tests of contextuality focus mainly on the probability distribution of measurement results. However, a test of contextuality can be formulated in terms of entropic inequalities whose violations imply information deficit in the studied system. This information deficit has not been observed on a single local system. Here we report the first experimental detection of information deficit in an entropic test of quantum contextuality based on photonic setup. The corresponding inequality is violated with more than 13 standard deviations.

  11. Realization of a Cascaded Quantum System: Heralded Absorption of a Single Photon Qubit by a Single-Electron Charged Quantum Dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delteil, Aymeric; Sun, Zhe; Fält, Stefan; Imamoğlu, Atac

    2017-04-28

    Photonic losses pose a major limitation for the implementation of a quantum state transfer between nodes of a quantum network. A measurement that heralds a successful transfer without revealing any information about the qubit may alleviate this limitation. Here, we demonstrate the heralded absorption of a single photonic qubit, generated by a single neutral quantum dot, by a single-electron charged quantum dot that is located 5 m away. The transfer of quantum information to the spin degree of freedom takes place upon the emission of a photon; for a properly chosen or prepared quantum dot, the detection of this photon yields no information about the qubit. We show that this process can be combined with local operations optically performed on the destination node by measuring classical correlations between the absorbed photon color and the final state of the electron spin. Our work suggests alternative avenues for the realization of quantum information protocols based on cascaded quantum systems.

  12. Review of two-photon exchange in electron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Arrington, P. G. Blunden, W. Melnitchouk

    2011-10-01

    We review the role of two-photon exchange (TPE) in electron-hadron scattering, focusing in particular on hadronic frameworks suitable for describing the low and moderate Q^2 region relevant to most experimental studies. We discuss the effects of TPE on the extraction of nucleon form factors and their role in the resolution of the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio puzzle. The implications of TPE on various other observables, including neutron form factors, electroproduction of resonances and pions, and nuclear form factors, are summarized. Measurements seeking to directly identify TPE effects, such as through the angular dependence of polarization measurements, nonlinear epsilon contributions to the cross sections, and via e+p to e-p cross section ratios, are also outlined. In the weak sector, we describe the role of TPE and gamma-Z interference in parity-violating electron scattering, and assess their impact on the extraction of the strange form factors of the nucleon and the weak charge of the proton.

  13. Redundant information from thermal illumination: quantum Darwinism in scattered photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess Riedel, C; Zurek, Wojciech H, E-mail: criedel@physics.ucsb.edu [Theory Division, LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    We study quantum Darwinism, the redundant recording of information about the preferred states of a decohering system by its environment, for an object illuminated by a blackbody. We calculate the quantum mutual information between the object and its photon environment for blackbodies that cover an arbitrary section of the sky. In particular, we demonstrate that more extended sources have a reduced ability to create redundant information about the system, in agreement with previous evidence that initial mixedness of an environment slows-but does not stop-the production of records. We also show that the qualitative results are robust for more general initial states of the system.

  14. Redundant information from thermal illumination: quantum Darwinism in scattered photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jess Riedel, C.; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2011-07-01

    We study quantum Darwinism, the redundant recording of information about the preferred states of a decohering system by its environment, for an object illuminated by a blackbody. We calculate the quantum mutual information between the object and its photon environment for blackbodies that cover an arbitrary section of the sky. In particular, we demonstrate that more extended sources have a reduced ability to create redundant information about the system, in agreement with previous evidence that initial mixedness of an environment slows—but does not stop—the production of records. We also show that the qualitative results are robust for more general initial states of the system.

  15. Angular correlations of photons from solution diffraction at a free-electron laser encode molecular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Mendez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available During X-ray exposure of a molecular solution, photons scattered from the same molecule are correlated. If molecular motion is insignificant during exposure, then differences in momentum transfer between correlated photons are direct measurements of the molecular structure. In conventional small- and wide-angle solution scattering, photon correlations are ignored. This report presents advances in a new biomolecular structural analysis technique, correlated X-ray scattering (CXS, which uses angular intensity correlations to recover hidden structural details from molecules in solution. Due to its intense rapid pulses, an X-ray free electron laser (XFEL is an excellent tool for CXS experiments. A protocol is outlined for analysis of a CXS data set comprising a total of half a million X-ray exposures of solutions of small gold nanoparticles recorded at the Spring-8 Ångström Compact XFEL facility (SACLA. From the scattered intensities and their correlations, two populations of nanoparticle domains within the solution are distinguished: small twinned, and large probably non-twinned domains. It is shown analytically how, in a solution measurement, twinning information is only accessible via intensity correlations, demonstrating how CXS reveals atomic-level information from a disordered solution of like molecules.

  16. Study of photon emission by electron capture during solar nuclei acceleration. 3: Photon production evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Peraza, J.; Alvarez, M.; Gallegos, A.

    1985-01-01

    Lower limits of photon fluxes were evaluated from electron capture during acceleration in solar flares, because the arbitrary q sub c asterisk assumed in this work evolves very slow with velocity, probably much more slowly than the physical actual situation: in fact, more emission is expected toward the IR region. Nevertheless the authors claim to show that the factibility of sounding acceleration processes, charge evolution processes and physical parameters of the source itself, by the observational analysis of this kind of emissions. For instance, it would be interesting to search observationally, for the predicted flux and energy drift of F sub e ions interacting with the atomic 0 and F sub e of the source matter, or, even more feasible for the X-ray lines at 4.2 keV and 2.624 + 0.003 KeV from Fe and S ions in ionized Fe at T = 10 to the 7th power K respectively, the 418 + or - 2 eV and 20 + or - 4 eV lines of Fe and S in ionized Fe at 5 x 10 to the 6th power K, which are predicted from Fermi acceleration.

  17. Treatment of the electrons-photons cascade in the high energy gamma transport; Traitement de la cascade electrons - photons dans le transport des gammas de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riz, D

    1999-10-01

    The electrons-photons cascade is an important phenomena occurring in gamma transport. This phenomena called also Bremsstrahlung happens whenever electrons, produced in a photon-atom interaction, trigger emission of photons while slowing down in the matter. Some previous calculations have shown that in particular circumstances, a flux of photons going through a lead plate can be multiplied by 3 when Bremsstrahlung is taken into account. This work is dedicated to a new method developed in CEA to take into account Bremsstrahlung in any gamma transport code using multigroup constants. An electron or a positron produced by an incident photon {gamma} will move till it has lost all its energy in collisions or in emissions of Bremsstrahlung {gamma}'. The path of the electron is short so all the Bremsstrahlung {gamma}' are assumed to be produced at the point of creation of the electron or positron. The result of this method is the knowledge of a transfer probability {gamma}{yields}{gamma}' that can be used in classical gamma transport codes. (A.C.)

  18. Photonic reservoir computing: a new approach to optical information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoorne, Kristof; Fiers, Martin; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2010-06-01

    Despite ever increasing computational power, recognition and classification problems remain challenging to solve. Recently, advances have been made by the introduction of the new concept of reservoir computing. This is a methodology coming from the field of machine learning and neural networks that has been successfully used in several pattern classification problems, like speech and image recognition. Thus far, most implementations have been in software, limiting their speed and power efficiency. Photonics could be an excellent platform for a hardware implementation of this concept because of its inherent parallelism and unique nonlinear behaviour. Moreover, a photonic implementation offers the promise of massively parallel information processing with low power and high speed. We propose using a network of coupled Semiconductor Optical Amplifiers (SOA) and show in simulation that it could be used as a reservoir by comparing it to conventional software implementations using a benchmark speech recognition task. In spite of the differences with classical reservoir models, the performance of our photonic reservoir is comparable to that of conventional implementations and sometimes slightly better. As our implementation uses coherent light for information processing, we find that phase tuning is crucial to obtain high performance. In parallel we investigate the use of a network of photonic crystal cavities. The coupled mode theory (CMT) is used to investigate these resonators. A new framework is designed to model networks of resonators and SOAs. The same network topologies are used, but feedback is added to control the internal dynamics of the system. By adjusting the readout weights of the network in a controlled manner, we can generate arbitrary periodic patterns.

  19. Photonic Architecture for Scalable Quantum Information Processing in Diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kae Nemoto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Physics and information are intimately connected, and the ultimate information processing devices will be those that harness the principles of quantum mechanics. Many physical systems have been identified as candidates for quantum information processing, but none of them are immune from errors. The challenge remains to find a path from the experiments of today to a reliable and scalable quantum computer. Here, we develop an architecture based on a simple module comprising an optical cavity containing a single negatively charged nitrogen vacancy center in diamond. Modules are connected by photons propagating in a fiber-optical network and collectively used to generate a topological cluster state, a robust substrate for quantum information processing. In principle, all processes in the architecture can be deterministic, but current limitations lead to processes that are probabilistic but heralded. We find that the architecture enables large-scale quantum information processing with existing technology.

  20. Photon counting imaging and centroiding with an electron-bombarded CCD using single molecule localisation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Barber, Matthew J.; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk

    2016-06-01

    Photon event centroiding in photon counting imaging and single-molecule localisation in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy share many traits. Although photon event centroiding has traditionally been performed with simple single-iteration algorithms, we recently reported that iterative fitting algorithms originally developed for single-molecule localisation fluorescence microscopy work very well when applied to centroiding photon events imaged with an MCP-intensified CMOS camera. Here, we have applied these algorithms for centroiding of photon events from an electron-bombarded CCD (EBCCD). We find that centroiding algorithms based on iterative fitting of the photon events yield excellent results and allow fitting of overlapping photon events, a feature not reported before and an important aspect to facilitate an increased count rate and shorter acquisition times.

  1. Amplification of Information by Photons and the Quantum Chernoff Bound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Michael; Riedel, C. Jess; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2014-03-01

    Amplification was regarded, since the early days of quantum theory, as a mysterious ingredient that endows quantum microstates with macroscopic consequences, key to the ``collapse of the wavepacket,'' and a way to avoid embarrassing problems exemplified by Schrödinger's cat. This bridge between the quantum microworld and the classical world of our experience was postulated ad hoc in the Copenhagen Interpretation. Quantum Darwinism views amplification as replication, in many copies, of information about quantum states. We show that such amplification is a natural consequence of a broad class of models of decoherence, including the photon environment we use to obtain most of our information. The resultant amplification is huge, proportional to # ξQCB . Here, #  is the environment size and ξQCB is the ``typical'' Quantum Chernoff Information, which quantifies the efficiency of the amplification. The information communicated though the environment is imprinted in the states of individual environment subsystems, e.g., in single photons, which document the transfer of information into the environment and result in the emergence of the classical world. See, http://mike.zwolak.org

  2. A mirrorless photonic free-electron laser oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, P.J.M.; Strooisma, A.; Denis, T.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2017-01-01

    Photonic crystals have been used to provide fundamental control over the interaction between light and matter, including stimulated emission. For example, in Bloch-mode lasers, the photonic crystal provides field enhancement through reduced group velocity and offers larger mode volumes through

  3. Electron and photon energy reconstruction in the electromagnetic calorimeter of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075753; Mandelli, Luciano

    2007-01-01

    The Atlas LAr electromagnetic calorimeter is designed to provide a precise measurement of electrons and photons energies, in order to meet the requirements coming from the LHC physics program. This request of precision makes important to understand the behavior of the detector in all its aspect. Of fundamental importance to achieve the best possible performances is the calibration of the EM calorimeter, and this is the topic of this thesis. With detailed Monte Carlo simulations of single electrons and photons in the Atlas detector, we find a method to calibrate the electromagnetic calorimeter, based only on the informations that come from it. All the informations needed to develop a calibration method come from the simulations made with the technique of the Calibration Hits, that allows to know the en- ergy deposited in all the materials inside the detector volume, and not only in the active layer of each subdetector as possible in the standard simulations. This technique required a big effort for the develop...

  4. Probing Electron-Phonon Interaction through Two-Photon Interference in Resonantly Driven Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reigue, Antoine; Iles-Smith, Jake; Lux, Fabian

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the temperature dependence of photon coherence properties through two-photon interference (TPI) measurements from a single quantum dot (QD) under resonant excitation. We show that the loss of indistinguishability is related only to the electron-phonon coupling and is not affected...

  5. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  6. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  7. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  8. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  9. Photon Temporal Modes: A Complete Framework for Quantum Information Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, B.; Reddy, Dileep V.; Silberhorn, C.; Raymer, M. G.

    2015-10-01

    Field-orthogonal temporal modes of photonic quantum states provide a new framework for quantum information science (QIS). They intrinsically span a high-dimensional Hilbert space and lend themselves to integration into existing single-mode fiber communication networks. We show that the three main requirements to construct a valid framework for QIS—the controlled generation of resource states, the targeted and highly efficient manipulation of temporal modes, and their efficient detection—can be fulfilled with current technology. We suggest implementations of diverse QIS applications based on this complete set of building blocks.

  10. Photon and primary electron arithmetics in photoconductors for digital mammography: Monte Carlo simulation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakellaris, T; Spyrou, G; Panayiotakis, G [University of Patras, School of Medicine, Department of Medical Physics, Patras, 26500 (Greece); Tzanakos, G [University of Athens, Department of Physics, Div. Nucl. and Particle Physics, Athens, 15771 (Greece)], E-mail: panayiot@upatras.gr

    2009-06-15

    Materials like CdTe, CdZnTe, Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Te and ZnTe are suitable photoconductors for direct conversion digital flat panel x-ray image detectors. The x-ray induced primary electrons inside photoconductor's bulk comprise the initial signal that propagates and forms the final signal (image) on detector's electrodes. An already developed Monte Carlo model that simulates the primary electron generation in photoconducting materials, such as those mentioned above, has been used to study the arithmetics of fluorescent photons, escaping photons and primary electrons in these materials in the mammographic energy range. In this way insights are gained concerning the primitive stage of signal formation that lead to the investigation of the factors that affect the primary electron generation. It was found that for the typical photoconductor thicknesses (300-1000 {mu}m): (i) in all materials and incident energies the escaping of primary photons is negligible and does not influence the number of primary electrons, (ii) the overwhelming majority of escaping photons is backwards escaping fluorescent photons, (iii) the number of primary electrons increases at energies higher than Cd and Te K-edges where the fluorescent photon escaping decreases and their absorption is followed by long atomic deexcitation cascades and (iv) ZnTe has the maximum number of primary electrons produced for energies between 16 and 26 keV while CdTe for higher energies.

  11. Design of Pixellated CMOS Photon Detector for Secondary Electron Detection in the Scanning Electron Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Huang Chuah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel method of detecting secondary electrons generated in the scanning electron microscope (SEM. The method suggests that the photomultiplier tube (PMT, traditionally used in the Everhart-Thornley (ET detector, is to be replaced with a configurable multipixel solid-state photon detector offering the advantages of smaller dimension, lower supply voltage and power requirements, and potentially cheaper product cost. The design of the proposed detector has been implemented using a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology with optical enhancement. This microchip comprises main circuit constituents of an array of photodiodes connecting to respective noise-optimised transimpedance amplifiers (TIAs, a selector-combiner (SC circuit, and a postamplifier (PA. The design possesses the capability of detecting photons with low input optical power in the range of 1 nW with 100 μm × 100 μm sized photodiodes and achieves a total amplification of 180 dBΩ at the output.

  12. Interaction of electron beams with optical nanostructures and metamaterials: from coherent photon sources towards shaping the wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the interaction of electron beams with materials and light has been a field of research for more than a century. The field was advanced theoretically by the rise of quantum mechanics and technically by the introduction of electron microscopes and accelerators. It is possible nowadays to uncover a multitude of information from electron-induced excitations in matter by means of advanced techniques like holography, tomography, and, most recently, photon-induced near-field electron microscopy. The question is whether the interaction can be controlled in an even, more efficient way in order to unravel important questions like modal decomposition of the electron-induced polarization by performing experiments with better spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions. This review discusses recent advances in controlling electron and light interactions at the nanoscale. Theoretical and numerical aspects of the interaction of electrons with nanostructures and metamaterials will be discussed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms of radiation in the interaction of electrons with even more sophisticated structures. Based on these mechanisms of radiation, state-of-the art and novel electron-driven few-photon sources will be discussed. Applications of such sources to gain an understanding of quantum optical effects and also to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes will be covered. In an inverse approach, as in the case of the inverse Smith-Purcell effect, laser-induced excitations of nanostructures can cause electron beams traveling in the near-field of such structures to accelerate, provided a synchronization criterion is satisfied. This effect is the basis for linear dielectric and metallic electron accelerators. Moreover, acceleration is accompanied by bunching of the electrons. When single electrons are considered, an efficient design of nanostructures can lead to the shaping of the electron wave function travelling adjacent to them, for

  13. Production of Entangled X-Ray Photon Pairs by High Energy Electrons

    OpenAIRE

    Ispirian, K. A.; Ispiryan, M. K.

    2009-01-01

    Without developing a correct theory, the rate of the production of entangled photon pairs in the X-ray region by high energy electrons is estimated for experimental parameters used in a few experiments on X-ray parametric down conversion. Taking into account the need for X-ray entangled X-ray photons, it is proposed to begin the experimental study of such mechanism of nonlinear X-ray optics before the launch of the X-ray free electron lasers.

  14. Electron and photon reconstruction and performance in ATLAS using a dynamical, topological cell clustering-based approach

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The electron and photon reconstruction in ATLAS has moved towards the use of a dynamical, topo- logical cell-based approach for cluster building, owing to advancements in the calibration procedure which allow for such a method to be applied. The move to this new technique allows for improved measurements of electron and photon energies, particularly in situations where an electron radiates a bremsstrahlung photon, or a photon converts to an electron-poistron pair. This note details the changes to the ATLAS electron and photon reconstruction software, and assesses its performance under current LHC luminosity conditions using simulated data. Changes to the converted photon reconstruction are also detailed, which improve the reconstruction efficiency of double-track converted photons, as well as reducing the reconstruction of spurious one-track converted photons. The performance of the new reconstruction algorithm is also presented in a number of important topologies relevant to precision Standard Model physics,...

  15. Cavity-photon contribution to the effective interaction of electrons in parallel quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudmundsson, Vidar [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Sitek, Anna [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Fundamental Problems of Technology, Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland); Abdullah, Nzar Rauf [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Physics Department, Faculty of Science and Science Education, School of Science, University of Sulaimani, Kurdistan Region (Iraq); Tang, Chi-Shung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National United University, Miaoli (China); Manolescu, Andrei [School of Science and Engineering, Reykjavik University (Iceland)

    2016-05-15

    A single cavity photon mode is expected to modify the Coulomb interaction of an electron system in the cavity. Here we investigate this phenomena in a parallel double quantum dot system. We explore properties of the closed system and the system after it has been opened up for electron transport. We show how results for both cases support the idea that the effective electron-electron interaction becomes more repulsive in the presence of a cavity photon field. This can be understood in terms of the cavity photons dressing the polarization terms in the effective mutual electron interaction leading to nontrivial delocalization or polarization of the charge in the double parallel dot potential. In addition, we find that the effective repulsion of the electrons can be reduced by quadrupolar collective oscillations excited by an external classical dipole electric field. (copyright 2015 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Measurement of the BESSY II electron beam energy by Compton-backscattering of laser photons

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, R; Thornagel, R; Brandt, G; Görgen, R; Ulm, G

    2002-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of all storage ring parameters is essential for the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to operate the electron storage ring BESSY II as a primary source standard. One parameter entering the Schwinger equation for the calculation of the spectral photon flux of bending magnet radiation is the electron beam energy. So at BESSY II the electron beam energy is measured by two independent techniques one of which is described in this paper: the photons from a CO sub 2 -laser are scattered in a head-on collision with the stored electrons. From the spectrum of the backscattered photons that are detected by an energy-calibrated HPGe detector the electron beam energy can be determined. The experimental set-up at the BESSY II electron storage ring as well as the current experimental status are described for operation of the storage ring at the energies of 900 and 1700 MeV.

  17. Electromagnetic cascade in high-energy electron, positron, and photon interactions with intense laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-06-01

    The interaction of high-energy electrons, positrons, and photons with intense laser pulses is studied in head-on collision geometry. It is shown that electrons and/or positrons undergo a cascade-type process involving multiple emissions of photons. These photons can consequently convert into electron-positron pairs. As a result charged particles quickly lose their energy developing an exponentially decaying energy distribution, which suppresses the emission of high-energy photons, thus reducing the number of electron-positron pairs being generated. Therefore, this type of interaction suppresses the development of the electromagnetic avalanche-type discharge, i.e., the exponential growth of the number of electrons, positrons, and photons does not occur in the course of interaction. The suppression will occur when three-dimensional effects can be neglected in the transverse particle orbits, i.e., for sufficiently broad laser pulses with intensities that are not too extreme. The final distributions of electrons, positrons, and photons are calculated for the case of a high-energy e-beam interacting with a counterstreaming, short intense laser pulse. The energy loss of the e-beam, which requires a self-consistent quantum description, plays an important role in this process, as well as provides a clear experimental observable for the transition from the classical to quantum regime of interaction.

  18. Scalable quantum information processing with photons and atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jian-Wei

    Over the past three decades, the promises of super-fast quantum computing and secure quantum cryptography have spurred a world-wide interest in quantum information, generating fascinating quantum technologies for coherent manipulation of individual quantum systems. However, the distance of fiber-based quantum communications is limited due to intrinsic fiber loss and decreasing of entanglement quality. Moreover, probabilistic single-photon source and entanglement source demand exponentially increased overheads for scalable quantum information processing. To overcome these problems, we are taking two paths in parallel: quantum repeaters and through satellite. We used the decoy-state QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon source, and used the measurement-device-independent QKD protocol to close the loophole of imperfect photon detectors--two main loopholes in quantum cryptograph. Based on these techniques, we are now building world's biggest quantum secure communication backbone, from Beijing to Shanghai, with a distance exceeding 2000 km. Meanwhile, we are developing practically useful quantum repeaters that combine entanglement swapping, entanglement purification, and quantum memory for the ultra-long distance quantum communication. The second line is satellite-based global quantum communication, taking advantage of the negligible photon loss and decoherence in the atmosphere. We realized teleportation and entanglement distribution over 100 km, and later on a rapidly moving platform. We are also making efforts toward the generation of multiphoton entanglement and its use in teleportation of multiple properties of a single quantum particle, topological error correction, quantum algorithms for solving systems of linear equations and machine learning. Finally, I will talk about our recent experiments on quantum simulations on ultracold atoms. On the one hand, by applying an optical Raman lattice technique, we realized a two-dimensional spin-obit (SO

  19. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Behrens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The successful operation of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs, like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH, makes unprecedented research on matter at atomic length and ultrafast time scales possible. However, in order to take advantage of these unique light sources and to meet the strict requirements of many experiments in photon science, FEL photon pulse durations need to be known and tunable. This can be achieved by controlling the FEL driving electron beams, and high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics can be utilized to provide constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In this paper, we present comparative measurements of soft x-ray pulse durations and electron bunch lengths at FLASH. The soft x-ray pulse durations were measured by FEL radiation pulse energy statistics and compared to electron bunch lengths determined by frequency-domain spectroscopy of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range and time-domain longitudinal phase space measurements. The experimental results, theoretical considerations, and simulations show that high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics provide reasonable constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In addition, we demonstrated the generation of soft x-ray pulses with durations below 50 fs (FWHM after the implementation of the new uniform electron bunch compression scheme used at FLASH.

  20. Page 1 GENDER ANALYSIS OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gender and the use of electronic information resources among postgraduate ... students were more likely to use electronic information resources than female ..... knowledge. Slow internet 16 6 6. Speed. Access problems 18 2 1. (limited time allotted, lots of information time consuming, passwords). Few resources 11 2 2.

  1. Access to long-term optical memories using photon echoes retrieved from electron spins in semiconductor quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poltavtsev, S. V.; Langer, L.; Yugova, I. A.; Salewski, M.; Kapitonov, Y. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Karczewski, G.; Wojtowicz, T.; Akimov, I. A.; Bayer, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use spontaneous (two-pulse) and stimulated (three-pulse) photon echoes for studying the coherent evolution of optically excited ensemble of trions which are localized in semiconductor CdTe/CdMgTe quantum well. Application of transverse magnetic field leads to the Larmor precession of the resident electron spins, which shuffles optically induced polarization between optically accessible and inaccessible states. This results in several spectacular phenomena. First, magnetic field induces oscillations of spontaneous photon echo amplitude. Second, in three-pulse excitation scheme, the photon echo decay is extended by several orders of magnitude. In this study, short-lived optical excitation which is created by the first pulse is coherently transferred into a long-lived electron spin state using the second optical pulse. This coherent spin state of electron ensemble persists much longer than any optical excitation in the system, preserving information on initial optical field, which can be retrieved as a photon echo by means of third optical pulse.

  2. Simultaneous production of mixed electron--photon beam in a medical LINAC: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaledi, Navid; Arbabi, Azim; Sardari, Dariush; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Ameri, Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    The electron or photon beams might be used for treatment of tumors. Each beam has its own advantage and disadvantages. Combo beam can increase the advantages. No investigation has been performed for producing simultaneous mixed electron and photon beam. In current study a device has been added to the Medical Linac to produce a mixed photon-electron beam. Firstly a Varian 2300CD head was simulated by MCNP Monte Carlo Code. Two sets of perforated lead sheets with 1 and 2 mm thickness and 0.2, 0.3, and 0.5 cm punches then placed at the top of the applicator holder tray. This layer produces bremsstrahlung x-ray upon impinging fraction electrons on it. The remaining fraction of electrons passes through the holes. The simulation was performed for 10 × 10, 6 × 6, and 4 × 4 cm(2) field size. For 10 × 10 cm(2) field size, among the punched targets, the largest penumbra difference between the depth of 1 and 7 cm was 72%. This difference for photon and electron beams were 31% and 325% respectively. A maximum of 39% photon percentage was produced by 2 mm target with 0.2 cm holes diameter layer. The minimum surface dose value was 4% lesser than pure electron beam. For small fields, unlike the pure electron beam, the PDD, penumbra, and flatness variations were negligible. The advantages of mixing the electron and photon beam is reduction of pure electron's penumbra dependency with the depth, especially for small fields, also decreasing of dramatic changes of PDD curve with irradiation field size. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coherent Cerenkov emission from electrons streaming through a photonic crystal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Cerenkov radiation is usually incoherent radiation emitted by charged particles when they pass through a medium with sufficiently high, usually relativistic velocity. It has recently been shown that in photonic crystals Cerenkov emission is possible without a velocity threshold, however emission

  4. Internet and Electronic Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-04-01

    context of information retrieval, the modus operandi of information organization is not compilation but description (Svenonius 2000: 206). It may at...intellectualfoundations qf information organization . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Toffler, A. (1970). Future shock. New York: Random House. Toffler, A

  5. Multi-photon entanglement and applications in quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Christian I.T.

    2008-05-30

    In this thesis, two new linear optics networks are introduced and their application for several quantum information tasks is presented. Spontaneous parametric down conversion, is used in different configurations to provide the input states for the networks. The first network is a new design of a controlled phase gate which is particularly interesting for applications in multi-photon experiments as it constitutes an improvement of former realizations with respect to stability and reliability. This is explicitly demonstrated by employing the gate in four-photon experiments. In this context, a teleportation and entanglement swapping protocol is performed in which all four Bell states are distinguished by means of the phase gate. A similar type of measurement applied to the subsystem parts of two copies of a quantum state, allows further the direct estimation of the state's entanglement in terms of its concurrence. Finally, starting from two Bell states, the controlled phase gate is applied for the observation of a four photon cluster state. The analysis of the results focuses on measurement based quantum computation, the main usage of cluster states. The second network, fed with the second order emission of non-collinear type ii spontaneous parametric down conversion, constitutes a tunable source of a whole family of states. Up to now the observation of one particular state required one individually tailored setup. With the network introduced here many different states can be obtained within the same arrangement by tuning a single, easily accessible experimental parameter. These states exhibit many useful properties and play a central role in several applications of quantum information. Here, they are used for the solution of a four-player quantum Minority game. It is shown that, by employing four-qubit entanglement, the quantum version of the game clearly outperforms its classical counterpart. Experimental data obtained with both networks are utilized to

  6. HEALTH WORKERS' USE OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    support

    Key Words: electronic information; children with communication disorders; health workers' .... behaviour. •. When parents received adequate information regarding their children, their interventions were more effective. The children benefited as they improved in ... to, but beyond, their own professional limits (Alderson.

  7. In situ electrical and thermal monitoring of printed electronics by two-photon mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastorelli, Francesco; Accanto, Nicolo; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility and molecular packing......-destructive and low-cost testing method is needed. In this study, we demonstrate that nonlinear optical microscopy is a promising technique to achieve this goal. Using ultrashort laser pulses we stimulate two-photon absorption in a roll coated polymer semiconductor and map the resulting two-photon induced...

  8. Investigation of DNA nucleobases-thin films for potential application in electronics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchen, Fahima; Gomez, Eliot; Joyce, Donna; Yaney, Perry; Kim, Steve; Williams, Adrienne; Steckl, Andrew; Venkat, Narayanan; Grote, James

    2013-10-01

    In previous research we have demonstrated improvements in device performance with the incorporation of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based biopolymer into organic light emitting diodes, organic thin film transistors and other organic photonic and electronic devices. Here, we investigate nucleobases, nitrogen-containing biological compounds found within DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA), nucleotides and nucleosides, for use in a few of those previously investigated photonic and electronic devices. Used as an electron blocking layer in OLEDs, a gate insulator for grapheme transistors and as a dielectric in organic-based capacitors, we have produced comparable results to those using DNA-based biopolymers.

  9. Monolithic nanoscale photonics-electronics integration in silicon and other group IV elements

    CERN Document Server

    Radamson, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Silicon technology is evolving rapidly, particularly in board-to-board or chip-to chip applications. Increasingly, the electronic parts of silicon technology will carry out the data processing, while the photonic parts take care of the data communication. For the first time, this book describes the merging of photonics and electronics in silicon and other group IV elements. It presents the challenges, the limitations, and the upcoming possibilities of these developments. The book describes the evolution of CMOS integrated electronics, status and development, and the fundamentals of silicon p

  10. Characteristics of electrons emitted from aluminium, carbon and mylar slabs irradiated by photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malbert, M.; Terrissol, M.; Patau, J.P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre de Physique Atomique); Angles, M. (CEG, 46 - Gramat (France))

    1982-01-01

    The forward and backscattered electron fluence emitted by a slab under photon irradiation have been calculated using Monte-Carlo techniques for aluminium, carbon and mylar. The simulation methods used and the techniques chosen to study the low energy (< 30 keV) electron transport are presented. The agreement with experimental and other theoretical results is good.

  11. Target, purging magnet and electron collector design for scanned high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svensson, Roger; Aasell, Mats; Naefstadius, Peder; Brahme, Anders [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, PO Box 260, S-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-05-01

    A new method for producing very narrow and intense 50 MV bremsstrahlung beams with a half-width as low as 35 mm at a distance of 1 m from the target is presented. Such a beam is well suited for intensity modulation using scanned photon beams. An algorithm has been developed to minimize the width of the bremsstrahlung beam generated in a multilayer target by varying the individual layer thicknesses and atomic numbers under given constraints on the total target thickness and the mean energy of the transmitted electrons. Under such constraints the narrowest possible bremsstrahlung beam is obtained with a target composed of layers of monotonically increasing atomic number starting with the lowest possible value at the entrance side where the electrons impinge. It is also shown that the narrowest photon beam profile is associated with the highest possible forward photon yield. To be able to use the optimized target clinically it is desirable to be able to collect and stop all the electrons that are transmitted through the target. The electrons are most efficiently collected if they are kept close together, i.e. by minimizing the multiple scatter of the electrons and consequently the half-width of the generated bremsstrahlung beam. This is achieved by a thin low-atomic-number target. A dedicated electron stopper has been developed and integrated with the purging magnet. When the electron stopper is combined with a purging magnet, a primary photon collimator and a multileaf collimator, almost all of the transmitted electrons and their associated bremsstrahlung contamination can effectively be collected. The narrow photon beams from thin low-atomic-number targets have the additional advantage of producing the hardest and most penetrative photon spectrum possible, which is ideal for treating large deep-seated tumours. (author)

  12. Thermoluminescence Response of Ge-Doped Cylindrical-, Flat- and Photonic Crystal Silica-Fibres to Electron and Photon Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entezam, A; Khandaker, M U; Amin, Y M; Ung, N M; Bradley, D A; Maah, J; Safari, M J; Moradi, F

    2016-01-01

    Study has been made of the thermoluminescence (TL) response of silica-based Ge-doped cylindrical, flat and photonic crystal fibres (referred to herein as PCF-collapsed) to electron (6, 12 and 20 MeV) and photon (6, 10 MV) irradiation and 1.25 MeV γ-rays, for doses from 0.1 Gy to 100 Gy. The electron and photon irradiations were delivered through use of a Varian Model 2100C linear accelerator located at the University of Malaya Medical Centre and γ-rays delivered from a 60Co irradiator located at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory (SSDL), Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Tailor-made to be of various dimensions and dopant concentrations (6-10% Ge), the fibres were observed to provide TL yield linear with radiation dose, reproducibility being within 1-5%, with insensitivity to energy and angular variation. The sensitivity dependency of both detectors with respect to field size follows the dependency of the output factors. For flat fibres exposed to 6 MV X-rays, the 6% Ge-doped fibre provided the greatest TL yield while PCF-collapsed showed a response 2.4 times greater than that of the 6% Ge-doped flat fibres. The response of cylindrical fibres increased with core size. The fibres offer uniform response, high spatial resolution and sensitivity, providing the basis of promising TL systems for radiotherapy applications.

  13. Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Wei, Yu-Jia; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Kai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2017-08-11

    Quantum state transfer from flying photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of 0.796±0.020. Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path, and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 m. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axes on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of 78.5%.

  14. Quantum State Transfer from a Single Photon to a Distant Quantum-Dot Electron Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu; He, Yu-Ming; Wei, Yu-Jia; Jiang, Xiao; Chen, Kai; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei; Schneider, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2017-08-01

    Quantum state transfer from flying photons to stationary matter qubits is an important element in the realization of quantum networks. Self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots provide a promising solid-state platform hosting both single photon and spin, with an inherent light-matter interface. Here, we develop a method to coherently and actively control the single-photon frequency bins in superposition using electro-optic modulators, and measure the spin-photon entanglement with a fidelity of 0.796 ±0.020 . Further, by Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-type state projection on the frequency, path, and polarization degrees of freedom of a single photon, we demonstrate quantum state transfer from a single photon to a single electron spin confined in an InGaAs quantum dot, separated by 5 m. The quantum state mapping from the photon's polarization to the electron's spin is demonstrated along three different axes on the Bloch sphere, with an average fidelity of 78.5%.

  15. The two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-nucleon scattering at large momentum transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei V. Afanasev; Stanley J. Brodsky; Carl E. Carlson; Yu-Chun Chen; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2005-01-01

    We estimate the two-photon exchange contribution to elastic electron-proton scattering at large momentum transfer by using a quark-parton representation of virtual Compton scattering. We thus can relate the two-photon exchange amplitude to the generalized parton distributions which also enter in other wide angle scattering processes. We find that the interference of one- and two-photon exchange contribution is able to substantially resolve the difference between electric form factor measurements from Rosenbluth and polarization transfer experiments.

  16. Quantum Information Science with Single Atoms and Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, H. J.

    2003-03-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) offers powerful possibilities for the deterministic control of atom-photon interactions quantum by quantum [1]. Indeed, modern experiments in cavity QED have achieved the exceptional circumstance of strong coupling, for which single quanta can profoundly impact the dynamics of the atom-cavity system. The diverse accomplishments of this field set the stage for advances into yet broader frontiers in quantum information science for which cavity QED offers unique advantages, including the creation of quantum networks [2]. The primary technical challenge on the road toward such scientific goals is the need to trap and localize atoms within a cavity in a setting suitable for strong coupling. Two separate experiments in our group have achieved significant milestones in this quest, namely the real-time trapping and tracking of single atoms in cavity QED [3-5]. In one experiment, an atom is trapped by an auxiliary field that functions as a far-detuned dipole-force trap (FORT) [3,4], with trap lifetime 3s, which should be compared to the nanosecond time scale for internal dynamics of the atom-cavity system. In a second experiment, we rely upon light forces at the single-photon level to trap a single atom within the cavity mode [5]. As illustrated by the movies available at http://www.its.caltech.edu/ qoptics/atomorbits/, these reconstructions reveal single atoms bound in orbit by the mechanical forces associated with single photons, and realize a new form of microscopy. Over the duration of the observation, the sensitivity is near the standard quantum limit for sensing the motion of a Cesium atom. This work is supported by the NSF, by the Caltech MURI for Quantum Networks administered by the ARO, and by the ONR. 1. For a review, see contributions in the Special Issue of Physica Scripta T76 (1998). 2. J. I. Cirac, S. J. van Enk, P. Zoller, H. J. Kimble, and H. Mabuchi, Physica Scripta T76, 223 (1998). 3. J. Ye, D. W. Vernooy, and H. J

  17. Development of experimental techniques for the characterization of ultrashort photon pulses of extreme ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düsterer, S.; Rehders, M.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Behrens, C.; Brenner, G.; Brovko, O.; DellAngela, M.; Drescher, M.; Faatz, B.; Feldhaus, J.; Frühling, U.; Gerasimova, N.; Gerken, N.; Gerth, C.; Golz, T.; Grebentsov, A.; Hass, E.; Honkavaara, K.; Kocharian, V.; Kurka, M.; Limberg, Th.; Mitzner, R.; Moshammer, R.; Plönjes, E.; Richter, M.; Rönsch-Schulenburg, J.; Rudenko, A.; Schlarb, H.; Schmidt, B.; Senftleben, A.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Siemer, B.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Sorokin, A. A.; Stojanovic, N.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.; Vogt, M.; Wieland, M.; Wurth, W.; Wesch, S.; Yan, M.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zacharias, H.; Schreiber, S.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most challenging tasks for extreme ultraviolet, soft and hard x-ray free-electron laser photon diagnostics is the precise determination of the photon pulse duration, which is typically in the sub 100 fs range. Nine different methods, able to determine such ultrashort photon pulse durations, were compared experimentally at FLASH, the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg, in order to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods. Radiation pulses at a wavelength of 13.5 and 24.0 nm together with the corresponding electron bunch duration were measured by indirect methods like analyzing spectral correlations, statistical fluctuations, and energy modulations of the electron bunch and also by direct methods like autocorrelation techniques, terahertz streaking, or reflectivity changes of solid state samples. In this paper, we present a comprehensive overview of the various techniques and a comparison of the individual experimental results. The information gained is of utmost importance for the future development of reliable pulse duration monitors indispensable for successful experiments with ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulses.

  18. Development of experimental techniques for the characterization of ultrashort photon pulses of extreme ultraviolet free-electron lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Düsterer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging tasks for extreme ultraviolet, soft and hard x-ray free-electron laser photon diagnostics is the precise determination of the photon pulse duration, which is typically in the sub 100 fs range. Nine different methods, able to determine such ultrashort photon pulse durations, were compared experimentally at FLASH, the self-amplified spontaneous emission free-electron laser at DESY in Hamburg, in order to identify advantages and disadvantages of different methods. Radiation pulses at a wavelength of 13.5 and 24.0 nm together with the corresponding electron bunch duration were measured by indirect methods like analyzing spectral correlations, statistical fluctuations, and energy modulations of the electron bunch and also by direct methods like autocorrelation techniques, terahertz streaking, or reflectivity changes of solid state samples. In this paper, we present a comprehensive overview of the various techniques and a comparison of the individual experimental results. The information gained is of utmost importance for the future development of reliable pulse duration monitors indispensable for successful experiments with ultrashort extreme ultraviolet pulses.

  19. Entanglement transfer from electrons to photons in quantum dots: an open quantum system approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budich, Jan C; Trauzettel, Björn

    2010-07-09

    We investigate entanglement transfer from a system of two spin-entangled electron-hole pairs, each placed in a separate single mode cavity, to the photons emitted due to cavity leakage. Dipole selection rules and a splitting between the light hole and the heavy hole subbands are the crucial ingredients establishing a one-to-one correspondence between electron spins and circular photon polarizations. To account for the measurement of the photons as well as dephasing effects, we choose a stochastic Schrödinger equation and a conditional master equation approach, respectively. The influence of interactions with the environment as well as asymmetries in the coherent couplings on the photon entanglement is analysed for two concrete measurement schemes. The first one is designed to violate the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, while the second one employs the visibility of interference fringes to prove the entanglement of the photons. Because of the spatial separation of the entangled electronic system over two quantum dots, a successful verification of entangled photons emitted by this system would imply the detection of nonlocal spin entanglement of massive particles in a solid state structure.

  20. Energy discrimination for positron emission tomography using the time information of the first detected photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therrien, A. C.; Lemaire, W.; Lecoq, P.; Fontaine, R.; Pratte, J.-F.

    2018-01-01

    The advantages of Time-of-Flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) have pushed the development of detectors with better time resolution. In particular, Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) have evolved tremendously in the past decade and arrays with a fully digital readout are the next logical step (dSiPM). New multi-timestamp methods use the precise time information of multiple photons to estimate the time of a PET event with greater accuracy, resulting in excellent time resolution. We propose a method which uses the same timestamps as the time estimator to perform energy discrimination, thus using data obtained within 5 ns of the beginning of the event. Having collected all the necessary information, the dSiPM could then be disabled for the remaining scintillation while dedicated electronics process the collected data. This would reduce afterpulsing as the SPAD would be turned off for several hundred nanoseconds, emptying the majority of traps. The proposed method uses a strategy based on subtraction and minimal electronics to reject energy below a selected threshold. This method achieves an error rate of less than 3% for photopeak discrimination (threshold at 400 keV) for dark count rates up to 100 cps/μm2, time-to-digital converter resolution up to 50 ps and a photon detection efficiency ranging from 10 to 70%.

  1. Information on a Photon: Free-Space Quantum Communication (InPho: FSQC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-06

    of PE= 0.02 IAB = 10.3 bits / photon pair & IEve = 0.82 bits / photon pair 16 InPho: FSQCDetecting Eve and leaked information II •Blocking attack...time-bins 17 IAB = 10.3 bits / photon pair & IEve = 0.74 bits / photon pair • Setup still vulnerable to QND attacks InPho: FSQCSecurity against...mutually unbiased bases. • Example: η=0.3, λ=5.33x10-5 , D.C =300/s and a bit error rate of PE= 0.02 IAB = 10.3 bits / photon pair & IEve = 0.82 bits

  2. Simple scheme for expanding photonic cluster states for quantum information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalasuwan, P.; Laing, A.; Coggins, J.; Callaway, M.; O' Brien, J. L. [Centre for Quantum Photonics, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Bristol, Merchant Venturers Building, Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1UB (United Kingdom); Mendoza, G. [Centre for Quantum Photonics, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Bristol, Merchant Venturers Building, Woodland Road, Bristol, BS8 1UB (United Kingdom); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Nagata, T.; Takeuchi, S. [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Stefanov, A. [Federal Office of Metrology METAS, Laboratory Time and Frequency, Lindenweg 50, 3084 Wabern (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    We show how an entangled cluster state encoded in the polarization of single photons can be straightforwardly expanded by deterministically entangling additional qubits encoded in the path degree of freedom of the constituent photons. This can be achieved using a polarization-path controlled-phase gate. We experimentally demonstrate a practical and stable realization of this approach by using a Sagnac interferometer to entangle a path qubit and polarization qubit on a single photon. We demonstrate precise control over phase of the path qubit to change the measurement basis and experimentally demonstrate properties of measurement-based quantum computing using a two-photon, three-qubit cluster state.

  3. Patients’ views on electronic patient information leaflets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammar T

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Information in society and in health care is currently undergoing a transition from paper to digital formats, and the main source of information will probably be electronic in the future. Objective: To explore patients’ use and perceptions of the patient information leaflet included in the medication package, and their attitude towards a transition to an electronic version. Methods: The data was collected during October to November 2014 among individuals in South-Eastern Sweden, using a questionnaire (n=406, response rate 78% and interviews (n=15. Results: The questionnaire showed that the majority of the respondents (52% occasionally read the patient information leaflet, 37% always read it, and 11% never read it. Almost half of the patients (41% were positive towards reading the patient information leaflet electronically while 32% were hesitant and 26% neutral. A majority of the patients would request to get the patient information leaflet printed at the pharmacy if it was not included in the package. There were differences in attitude related to age and gender. The interviews showed that patients had mixed views on a transition to an electronic patient information leaflet. The patients perceived several positive aspects with an electronic patient information leaflet but were concerned about elderly patients. Conclusion: Although many were positive towards reading the patient information leaflet electronically, the majority prefer the patient information leaflet in paper form. Providing appropriate and useful eHealth services for patients to access the patient information leaflet electronically, along with education, could prepare patients for a transition to electronic patient information leaflet.

  4. 3D electron tomography of biological photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butz, Benjamin; Winter, Benjamin; Vieweg, Benito; Knoke, Isabel; Spallek, Stefanie; Spiecker, Erdmann [CENEM, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany); Schroeder-Turk, Gerd; Mecke, Klaus [Theoretische Physik I, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Photonic crystals, i.e. periodical nanostructures of materials with different dielectric constants, are highly interesting for applications in optics, optoelectronics, and sensing. By tailoring the geometrical parameters radically different and improved optical properties (e.g., optical band-gap structure, extreme refractive indices, or high anisotropy) can be achieved. Naturally occurring photonic crystals, like butterfly scales, exoskeletons of insects (chitin), or seashells (nacre), can serve as model systems for understanding the relationship between structure and optical properties. Butterfly scales are studied by TEM using a FEI Titan{sup 3} 80-300 instrument. An optimized FIB technique or ultramicrotome sectioning were used to prepare the sensitive specimens with desired thickness. Since the periodical structures have dimensions on the sub-{mu}m scale, HAADF-STEM tomography was employed for obtaining extended tilt series under conditions of atomic-number sensitive imaging. Since the solid crystal consists of chemically homogeneous chitin while the pores are unfilled, the distinct contrast in the images can easily be interpreted in terms of the local projected mass density allowing to reconstruct the chitin distribution within the optical unit cell of the scales with high 3D resolution.

  5. SU-E-T-238: Deriving Electron Contamination Spectra From Pure and Clinical Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, C; Plessis, F du [University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, Free State (South Africa)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To extract the electron contamination energy spectra for an Elekta Precise Linac, based on pure photon and measured clinical beam percentage depth dose data. And to include this as an additional source in isource 4 in DOSXYZnrc. Methods: A pure photon beam was simulated for the Linac using isource 4 in the DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. Percentage depth dose (PDD) data were extracted afterwards for a range of field sizes (FS). These simulated dose data were compared to actual measured dose PDD data, with the data normalized at 10 cm depth. The resulting PDD data resembled the electron contamination depth dose. Since the dose fall-off is a strictly decreasing function, a method was adopted to derive the contamination electron spectrum. Afterwards this spectrum was used in a DOSXYZnrc MC simulation run to verify that the original electron depth dose could be replicated. Results: Various square aperture FS’s for 6, 8 and 15 megavolt (MV) photon beams were modeled, simulated and compared to their respective actual measured PDD data. As FS increased, simulated pure photon depth-dose profiles shifted deeper, thus requiring electron contamination to increase the surface dose. The percentage of electron weight increased with increase in FS. For a FS of 15×15 cm{sup 2}, the percentage electron weight is 0.1%, 0.2% and 0.4% for 6, 8 and 15 MV beams respectively. Conclusion: From the PDD results obtained, an additional electron contamination source was added to the photon source model so that simulation and measured PDD data could match within 2 % / 2 mm gamma-index criteria. The improved source model could assure more accurate simulations of surface doses. This research project was funded by the South African Medical Research Council (MRC) with funds from National Treasury under its Economic Competitiveness and Support package.

  6. The Intelligent Technologies of Electronic Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianyu

    2017-08-01

    Based upon the synopsis of system intelligence and information services, this paper puts forward the attributes and the logic structure of information service, sets forth intelligent technology framework of electronic information system, and presents a series of measures, such as optimizing business information flow, advancing data decision capability, improving information fusion precision, strengthening deep learning application and enhancing prognostic and health management, and demonstrates system operation effectiveness. This will benefit the enhancement of system intelligence.

  7. Electron angular distributions in two-photon double ionization of helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makris, M.G. [Univ. of Crete, Physics Dept., Heraklion (Greece); Nikolopoulos, L.A.A. [Inst. of Electronic Structure and Laser, Forth, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Lambropoulos, P. [Univ. of Crete, Physics Dept., Heraklion (Greece); Inst. of Electronic Structure and Laser, Forth, Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2001-06-15

    We present photoelectron angular distributions (PAD) in two-photon double ionization of helium for photon energies in the range of 45 eV, where the direct double ejection is unequivocally distinguishable from the sequential. Through an approach that allows us to explore the role of correlation, we obtain conditions under which the two electrons have the tendency to be emitted in the same direction. Relevant experiments should be feasible either using high-order harmonic generation or the upcoming short-wavelength free electron laser sources. (orig.)0.

  8. Wave Propagation From Electrons to Photonic Crystals and Left-Handed Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Markos, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This textbook offers the first unified treatment of wave propagation in electronic and electromagnetic systems and introduces readers to the essentials of the transfer matrix method, a powerful analytical tool that can be used to model and study an array of problems pertaining to wave propagation in electrons and photons. It is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students in physics, materials science, electrical and computer engineering, and mathematics, and is ideal for researchers in photonic crystals, negative index materials, left-handed materials, plasmonics, nonlinear effects,

  9. Introduction to Radiotherapy with Photon and Electron Beams and Treatment Planning from Conformal Radiotherapy to IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Jan J.

    2007-11-01

    Besides surgery and chemotherapy, radiation therapy is one of the three main treatment options for cancer patients. This paper provides an introduction to the basic principles of radiotherapy with photons and electrons. It includes a brief summary of the physical properties for photon and electron beams as well as a description of treatment machines used to create these beams. The second part introduces the treatment planning process as it is commonly employed in radiotherapy. It covers dose calculation algorithms, conventional planning strategies for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and optimization techniques for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  10. Advanced photonic, electronic, and web engineering systems: WILGA Symposium, January 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2013-10-01

    The cycle of WILGA Symposia [wilga.ise.pw.edu.pl] on Photonics and Web Engineering, Advanced Electronic Systems, under the auspices of SPIE, IEEE, KEiT PAN and WEiTI PW was initiated in 1998 by a Research Team PERG/ELHEP ISE PW. The WILGA conferences take place two times a year and the participants are young scientists from this country and abroad. This paper debates chosen topical tracks and some papers presented during the 31 WILGA Multi-Conference, which took place on 8-10 February 2013 at the Faculty of WEiTI PW. The January conference was attended by around 100 persons. Here we discuss closer the subjects of biomedical photonics, electronics and informatics, as well as chosen aspects of applications of advanced photonic, electronic circuits and systems. The 32 nd WILGA Symposium took place on 27 May - 02 June 2013 in WUT WILGA resort near Warsaw. These two editions of WILGA Conferences - January and May have generated more than 250 articles, from which around 100 were chosen by the Symposium and Conference Committees to be published in this volume of Proc.SPIE. WILGA Symposium papers are traditionally submitted via the WILGA web page [wilga.ise.pw.edu.pl] to the SPIE Proceedings publishing system [spie.org]. Email for the correspondence is: photonics@ise.pw.edu.pl. All Wilga papers are published in journals Elektronika, IJET-PAN and in Proc.SPIE. Topical tracks of the symposium usually embrace, among others, new technologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium In its two editions a year is a summary of the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country and this geographical region in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also

  11. Search for New Physics in Electron-Positron Interactions with Photons in the Final State

    CERN Document Server

    Ruschmeier, D

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes a measurement of single and multi-photon events with missing energy in electron-positron interactions. The results have been used to measure the neutrino pair-production cross section and to determine the number of light neutrino species. A search for various kinds of new physics processes involving photons and missing energy in the final state like the production of supersymmetric particles, a fermiophobic Higgs boson and massive gravitons has been carried out. The analysis has been performed using data collected with the L3 detector at LEP at centre-of-mass energies between 130 GeV and 190 GeV corresponding to a total luminosity of 265 1/pb. The cross section of the process electron positron to neutrino anti-neutrino photon (photon) for a photon energy larger than 5 GeV and a photon scattering angle with respect to the beam axis larger than 14 degrees at a centre-of-mass energy of 189 GeV has been measured to be (5.25 +- 0.22 +- 0.07) pb and has been extrapolated to a total cross secti...

  12. HEALTH WORKERS' USE OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    support

    Head: Kommunika (C.E.I.C.D), Department of Communication Pathology, University of Pretoria. Key Words: electronic information; children with communication disorders; health workers' information needs. ABSTRACT. Information regarding young children who experience barriers to the development of listening, language ...

  13. Detection of Infrared Photons Using the Electronic Stress in Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, P.G.; Datskou, I.; Egert, C.M.; Rjic, S.

    1999-04-05

    It is well known that the work function of metals decreases when they are placed in a nonpolar liquid. A similar decrease occurs when the metal is placed into contact with a semiconductor forming a Schottky barrier. We report on a new method for detecting photons using the stress caused by photo-electrons emitted from a metal film surface in contact with a semiconductor microstructure. The photoelectrons diffuse into the microstructure and produce an electronic stress. The photon detection results from the measurement of the photo-induced bending of the microstructure. Internal photoemission has been used in the past to detect photons, however, in those cases the detection was accomplished by measuring the current due to photoelectrons and not due to electronic stress. Small changes in position (displacement) of microstructures are routinely measured in atomic force microscopy (AFM) where atomic imaging of surfaces relies on the measurement of small changes (< l0{sup -9} m) in the bending of microcantilevers. In the present work we studied the photon response of Si microcantilevers coated with a thin film of Pt. The Si microcantilevers were 500 nm thick and had a 30 nm layer of Pt. Photons with sufficient energies produce electrons from the platinum-silicon interface which diffuse into the Si and produce an electronic stress. Since the excess charge carriers cause the Si microcantilever to contract in length but not the Pt layer, the bimaterial microcantilever bends. In our present studies we used the optical detection technique to measure the photometric response of Pt-Si microcantilevers as a function of photon energy. The charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress in Si, were produced via internal photoemission using a diode laser with wavelength {lambda} = 1550 nm.

  14. MEMS-Electronic-Photonic Heterogeneous Integrated FMCW Ladar Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-18

    flip -­‐chip   bonding  of   the  CMOS  and   silicon  photonics  dies.  Electrical   and  mechanical...lock  the  beat  signal  to  LO  a  type-­‐II  PLL  should  be  employed.  One  of  the   poles  at  origin...addition  to  the   pole  at  origin,  loop-­‐filter  should  also  include  a  zero  to  provide

  15. Dose delivery accuracy of therapeutic photon and electron beams at low monitor unit settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravikumar, M.; Al Asmary, M.A.; Sultan, R.A.; Al Ghamdi, H.A. [Oncology Center, King Abdul Aziz Hospital and Oncology Center, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: dose delivery accuracy at low monitor units (LMU) was evaluated for photon and electron beams. Knowledge of this study is required for few dosimetric applications and to know the dose delivered to the patient when the treatment is delivered with few monitor units (MU). Material and methods: dose measurements were carried out for photon and electron beams with 0.6 cm{sup 3} PTW ion chamber in white polystyrene phantom at D{sub max} with a field size of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} at 100 cm FSD. The relative dose, which is the ratio of dose delivered per MU at the testing to that of the calibration condition, was found out. Results: significant deviation (+20% to +25%) in dose delivery was noticed for photon and electron beams (+39% to +45%) at LMU settings. Slightly higher inaccuracy in dose delivery was noticed for 6-MV compared to 18-MV photons. The deviation in dose delivery for electron beams was found to be energy-independent and the pattern of variation was similar for all electron energies. Conclusion: the dose delivery accuracy at LMU settings has to be ascertained before implementing conformal and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiotherapy) techniques. When there is dose nonlinearity, the treatment delivered with multiple small MU settings can result in significant error in dose delivery. (orig.)

  16. The response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter in megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Fujio; Ohno, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD) in megavoltage photon and electron beams. The RGD response was compared with ion chamber measurements for 4-18 MV photons and 6-20 MeV electrons in plastic water phantoms. The response was also calculated via Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with EGSnrc/egs_chamber and Cavity user-codes, respectively. In addition, the response of the RGD cavity was analyzed as a function of field sizes and depths according to Burlin's general cavity theory. The perturbation correction factor, PQ, in the RGD cavity was also estimated from MC simulations for photon and electron beams. The calculated and measured RGD energy response at reference conditions with a 10 × 10 cm(2) field and 10 cm depth in photons was lower by up to 2.5% with increasing energy. The variation in RGD response in the field size range of 5 × 5 cm(2) to 20 × 20 cm(2) was 3.9% and 0.7%, at 10 cm depth for 4 and 18 MV, respectively. The depth dependence of the RGD response was constant within 1% for energies above 6 MV but it increased by 2.6% and 1.6% for a large (20 × 20 cm(2)) field at 4 and 6 MV, respectively. The dose contributions from photon interactions (1 - d) in the RGD cavity, according to Burlin's cavity theory, decreased with increasing energy and decreasing field size. The variation in (1 - d) between field sizes became larger with increasing depth for the lower energies of 4 and 6 MV. PQ for the RGD cavity was almost constant between 0.96 and 0.97 at 10 MV energies and above. Meanwhile, PQ depends strongly on field size and depth for 4 and 6 MV photons. In electron beams, the RGD response at a reference depth, dref, varied by less than 1% over the electron energy range but was on average 4% lower than the response for 6 MV photons. The RGD response for photon beams depends on both (1 - d) and perturbation effects in the RGD cavity. Therefore, it is difficult to predict the energy dependence of RGD response by

  17. Control of coherent information via on chip photonic-phononic emitter-receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Heedeuk; Jarecki, Robert; Starbuck, Andrew; Wang, Zheng; Rakich, Peter T

    2014-01-01

    Rapid progress in silicon photonics has fostered numerous chip-scale sensing, computing, and signal processing technologies. However, many crucial filtering and signal delay operations are difficult to perform with all-optical devices. Unlike photons propagating at luminal speeds, GHz-acoustic phonons with slow velocity allow information to be stored, filtered, and delayed over comparatively smaller length-scales with remarkable fidelity. Hence, controllable and efficient coupling between coherent photons and phonons enables new signal processing technologies that greatly enhance the performance and potential impact of silicon photonics. Here, we demonstrate a novel mechanism for coherent information processing based on traveling-wave photon-phonon transduction, which achieves a phonon emit-and-receive process between distinct nanophotonic waveguides. Using this device physics-which can support 1-20GHz frequencies-we create wavelength-insensitive radio-frequency photonic filters with an unrivaled combination ...

  18. Effect of standard deviation, strength of magnetic field and electron density on the photonic band gap of an extrinsic disorder plasma photonic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chittaranjan; Aghajamali, Alireza; Scotognella, Francesco; Saha, Ardhendu

    2017-10-01

    Transmission properties of electromagnetic waves within microwave region of the one-dimensional random extrinsic plasma photonic crystals were computed using the transfer matrix method. The layers thicknesses of the extrinsic random photonic structure follow a Gaussian distribution. Compared with the periodic extrinsic photonic crystal, wider photonic band gaps (PBGs) were found in case of random extrinsic plasma photonic crystals with few resonant peaks. The PBGs are much wider while the randomness was increased and the number and the strength of resonant peaks were enhanced. The above observations were confirmed through analysis of histogram of normalized average transmissions for four different values of standard deviation with one thousand random samples for each group. The normalized average transmission was controlled by changing the strength of external magnetic field and the electron density of magnetized cold plasma. These features of disordered extrinsic plasma photonic structures would have potential applications such as omnidirectional reflectors and random multichannel filters with lower and higher rate of disorder.

  19. On Photon Spin and the Electrodynamic Origin of the charge of the Electron

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Ulrich C

    2016-01-01

    We recently performed experiments on the transfer of photon spin to electron orbital angular momentum. For an interpretation of the experimental results we used a classical electrodynamic model of the photon as a propagating electromagnetic solitary wave which is developed in detail here. A linearly polarized monochromatic photon is considered as a propagating solitary electromagnetic wave of finite energy hf which carries an angular momentum h/2pi with the frequency f and Plancks constant h. This model has, apart from being a tool for an interpretation of our experimental results, far reaching consequences of fundamental relevance and guides us to an outline to a unified quantum theory of electromagnetism and gravitation including an explanation of the electrodynamic origin of the quantized charge of an electron.

  20. Strong coupling of a single electron in silicon to a microwave photon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xiao; Cady, Jeffrey; Zajac, David; Petta, Jason

    We demonstrate a hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) architecture in which a single electron in a Si/SiGe double quantum dot is dipole-coupled to the electric field of microwave photons in a superconducting cavity. Vacuum Rabi splitting is observed in the cavity transmission when the transition energy of the single-electron charge qubit matches that of a cavity photon, demonstrating that our device is in the strong coupling regime. The achievement of strong coupling is largely facilitated by an exceptionally low charge decoherence rate of 5 MHz and paves the way toward a wide range of cQED experiments with quantum dots, such as non-local qubit interactions, strong spin-cavity coupling and single photon generation . Research sponsored by ARO Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0149, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative through Grant GBMF4535, and the NSF (DMR-1409556 and DMR-1420541).

  1. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosunen, A

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?){sup water} {sub air}, in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in {sup 60}Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?){sup water} {sub air} can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation

  2. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosunen, Antti

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realization of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: (a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionization chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b)the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S/r) waterair , in photon beams, (c)the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d)the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that UP to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionization chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in 60Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S/r) waterair can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. By a twin ionization chamber technique accuracy the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation). The general accuracy achieved by treatment planning systems is approximately 4% for photons and 5 to 7% for electrons. Large (>10%) deviations in calculated doses are possible even when relatively modern calculation approaches are used.

  3. On-chip, photon-number-resolving, telecommunication-band detectors for scalable photonic information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana E.; Calkins, Brice; Tomlin, Nathan A.; Fox, Anna E.; Linares, Antia Lamas; Mirin, Richard P.; Nam, Sae Woo [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado, 80305 (United States); Thomas-Peter, Nicholas; Metcalf, Benjamin J.; Spring, Justin B.; Langford, Nathan K.; Walmsley, Ian A. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Gates, James C.; Smith, Peter G. R. [Optoelectronics Research Centre, University of Southampton, Highfield SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Integration is currently the only feasible route toward scalable photonic quantum processing devices that are sufficiently complex to be genuinely useful in computing, metrology, and simulation. Embedded on-chip detection will be critical to such devices. We demonstrate an integrated photon-number-resolving detector, operating in the telecom band at 1550 nm, employing an evanescently coupled design that allows it to be placed at arbitrary locations within a planar circuit. Up to five photons are resolved in the guided optical mode via absorption from the evanescent field into a tungsten transition-edge sensor. The detection efficiency is 7.2{+-}0.5 %. The polarization sensitivity of the detector is also demonstrated. Detailed modeling of device designs shows a clear and feasible route to reaching high detection efficiencies.

  4. Recent advances in organic one-dimensional composite materials: design, construction, and photonic elements for information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yongli; Zhang, Chuang; Yao, Jiannian; Zhao, Yong Sheng

    2013-07-19

    Many recent activities in the use of one-dimensional nanostructures as photonic elements for optical information processing are explained by huge advantages that photonic circuits possess over traditional silicon-based electronic ones in bandwidth, heat dissipation, and resistance to electromagnetic wave interference. Organic materials are a promising candidate to support these optical-related applications, as they combine the properties of plastics with broad spectral tunability, high optical cross-section, easy fabrication, as well as low cost. Their outstanding compatibility allows organic composite structures which are made of two or more kinds of materials combined together, showing great superiority to single-component materials due to the introduced interactions among multiple constituents, such as energy transfer, electron transfer, exciton coupling, etc. The easy processability of organic 1D crystalline heterostructures enables a fine topological control of both composition and geometry, which offsets the intrinsic deficiencies of individual material. At the same time, the strong exciton-photon coupling and exciton-exciton interaction impart the excellent confinement of photons in organic microstructures, thus light can be manipulated according to our intention to realize specific functions. These collective properties indicate a potential utility of organic heterogeneous material for miniaturized photonic circuitry. Herein, focus is given on recent advances of 1D organic crystalline heterostructures, with special emphasis on the novel design, controllable construction, diverse performance, as well as wide applications in isolated photonic elements for integration. It is proposed that the highly coupled, hybrid optical networks would be an important material basis towards the creation of on-chip optical information processing. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Electron, photons, and molecules: Storing energy from light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.R. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Molecular charge separation has important potential for photochemical energy storage. Its efficiency can be enhanced by principals which maximize the rates of the electron transfer steps which separate charge and minimize those which recombine high-energy charge pairs to lose stored energy. Dramatic scientific progress in understanding these principals has occurred since the founding of DOE and its predecessor agency ERDA. While additional knowledge in needed in broad areas of molecular electron transfer, some key areas of knowledge hold particular promise for the possibility of moving this area from science toward technology capable of contributing to the nation`s energy economy.

  6. Experimental Study of Electronic Quantum Interference, Photonic Crystal Cavity, Photonic Band Edge Effects for Optical Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-26

    wavelength upon fabrication. This wavelength is ideal for strained InGaAs quantum well structures which can be embedded into the GaAs/AlGaAs matrix[3... quantum dot or an InGaAs quantum well . The band gap can be varied in addition to include either one or two electronic levels of a multi-level system...Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices,” SAND99-0921, July 1999. 4. R. L. S. Devine, “Photoluminescence characterization of InGaAs /GaAs quantum well

  7. Convergence of photonics and electronics for Terahertz wireless communications – the ITN CELTA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz wireless communications is expected to offer the required high capacity and low latency performance required from short-range wireless access and control applications. We present an overview of some the activities in this area in the newly started H2020 ITN project CELTA: convergence of...... of electronics and photonics technologies enabling Terahertz applications...

  8. Free-Electron Laser-Induced 2-Photon Absorption in Hg1-Xcdxte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burghoorn, J.; Anderegg, V. F.; Klaassen, T. O.; Wenckebach, W. T.; Bakker, R. J.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1992-01-01

    The powerful output of FELIX, the recently built Rijnhuizen free-electron laser, is used for the first frequency dependent study of nonlinear optical excitation of Hg1-xCdxTe in the far-infrared spectral region. Two-photon interband absorption has been investigated as a function of power and

  9. Dosimetric characterization of CVD diamonds in photon, electron and proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirrone, G.A.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Lo Nigro, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Italia (Italy); Mongelli, V. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali dei Sud, Catania (Italy); Raffaele, L. [Istituto di Radiologia, Universita degli Studi di Catania (Italy); Sabini, M.G. [Rem Radioterapia S.r.l., Catania (Italy)

    2006-01-15

    The purpose of this work is the characterization, in an on line configuration, of the dosimetric response of a commercial CVD diamond. The study shows the possibility of using CVD diamond for dosimetric purposes with clinical, high-energy electron (4-15 MeV), photon (6-15 MV) and proton (62 MeV) beams.

  10. Convergence of photonics and electronics for Terahertz wireless communications – the ITN CELTA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2016-01-01

    Terahertz wireless communications is expected to offer the required high capacity and low latency performance required from short-range wireless access and control applications. We present an overview of some the activities in this area in the newly started H2020 ITN project CELTA: convergence...... of electronics and photonics technologies enabling Terahertz applications...

  11. Development of an integrated photonic beamformer for electronically-steered Ku-band phased array antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, L.; Marpaung, D.A.I.; Burla, M.; Boot, R.; Hulzinga, A.; Beeker, W.P.; Beeker, Willem; van Dijk, P.; Roeloffzen, C.G.H.

    2011-01-01

    Currently an integrated photonic beamformer for electronically-steered Ku-band phased array antenna (PAA) system for satellite communications is being developed within a Dutch Point One R&D Innovation Project “Broadband Satellite Communication Services on High-Speed Transport Vehicles‿, targeting

  12. An analytical method for computing voxel S values for electrons and photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Ernesto; Minutoli, Fabio; Pacilio, Massimiliano; Campenni, Alfredo; Baldari, Sergio

    2012-11-01

    The use of voxel S values (VSVs) is perhaps the most common approach to radiation dosimetry for nonuniform distributions of activity within organs or tumors. However, VSVs are currently available only for a limited number of voxel sizes and radionuclides. The objective of this study was to develop a general method to evaluate them for any spectrum of electrons and photons in any cubic voxel dimension of practical interest for clinical dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy. The authors developed a Monte Carlo simulation in Geant4 in order to evaluate the energy deposited per disintegration (E(dep)) in a voxelized region of soft tissue from monoenergetic electrons (10-2000 keV) or photons (10-1000 keV) homogeneously distributed in the central voxel, considering voxel dimensions ranging from 3 mm to 10 mm. E(dep) was represented as a function of a dimensionless quantity termed the "normalized radius," R(n) = R∕l, where l is the voxel size and R is the distance from the origin. The authors introduced two parametric functions in order to fit the electron and photon results, and they interpolated the parameters to derive VSVs for any energy and voxel side within the ranges mentioned above. In order to validate the results, the authors determined VSV for two radionuclides ((131)I and (89)Sr) and two voxel dimensions and they compared them with reference data. A validation study in a simple sphere model, accounting for tissue inhomogeneities, is presented. The E(dep)(R(n)) for both monoenergetic electrons and photons exhibit a smooth variation with energy and voxel size, implying that VSVs for monoenergetic electrons or photons may be derived by interpolation over the range of energies and dimensions considered. By integration, S values for continuous emission spectra from β(-) decay may be derived as well. The approach allows the determination of VSVs for monoenergetic (Auger or conversion) electrons and (x-ray or gamma-ray) photons by means of two functions whose

  13. Interface between path and orbital angular momentum entanglement for high-dimensional photonic quantum information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Huber, Marcus; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Zeilinger, Anton

    2014-07-30

    Photonics has become a mature field of quantum information science, where integrated optical circuits offer a way to scale the complexity of the set-up as well as the dimensionality of the quantum state. On photonic chips, paths are the natural way to encode information. To distribute those high-dimensional quantum states over large distances, transverse spatial modes, like orbital angular momentum possessing Laguerre Gauss modes, are favourable as flying information carriers. Here we demonstrate a quantum interface between these two vibrant photonic fields. We create three-dimensional path entanglement between two photons in a nonlinear crystal and use a mode sorter as the quantum interface to transfer the entanglement to the orbital angular momentum degree of freedom. Thus our results show a flexible way to create high-dimensional spatial mode entanglement. Moreover, they pave the way to implement broad complex quantum networks where high-dimensionally entangled states could be distributed over distant photonic chips.

  14. Results on the Coherent Interaction of High Energy Electrons and Photons in Oriented Single Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Apyan, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballestrero, S.; Biino, C.; Birol, I.; Cenci, P.; Connell, S.H.; Eichblatt, S.; Fonseca, T.; Freund, A.; Gorini, B.; Groess, R.; Ispirian, K.; Ketel, T.J.; Kononets, Yu.V.; Lopez, A.; Mangiarotti, A.; van Rens, B.; Sellschop, J.P.F.; Shieh, M.; Sona, P.; Strakhovenko, V.; Uggerhoj, E.; Uggerhj, Ulrik Ingerslev; Unel, G.; Velasco, M.; Vilakazi, Z.Z.; Wessely, O.; Kononets, Yu.V.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN-NA-59 experiment examined a wide range of electromagnetic processes for multi-GeV electrons and photons interacting with oriented single crystals. The various types of crystals and their orientations were used for producing photon beams and for converting and measuring their polarisation. The radiation emitted by 178 GeV unpolarised electrons incident on a 1.5 cm thick Si crystal oriented in the Coherent Bremsstrahlung (CB) and the String-of-Strings (SOS) modes was used to obtain multi-GeV linearly polarised photon beams. A new crystal polarimetry technique was established for measuring the linear polarisation of the photon beam. The polarimeter is based on the dependence of the Coherent Pair Production (CPP) cross section in oriented single crystals on the direction of the photon polarisation with respect to the crystal plane. Both a 1 mm thick single crystal of Germanium and a 4 mm thick multi-tile set of synthetic Diamond crystals were used as analyzers of the linear polarisation. A birefringence ...

  15. Few-photon Non-linearities in Nanophotonic Devices for Quantum Information Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nysteen, Anders

    In this thesis we investigate few-photon non-linearities in all-optical, on-chip circuits, and we discuss their possible applications in devices of interest for quantum information technology, such as conditional two-photon gates and single-photon sources. In order to propose efficient devices...... by the capturing process. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are promising for realizing few-photon non-linearities in solid-state implementations, although coupling to phonon modes in the surrounding lattice have significant influence on the dynamics. By accounting for the commonly neglected asymmetry between...

  16. Level-1 trigger selection of electrons and photons with CMS for LHC Run-II.

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088114

    2016-01-01

    The CMS experiment has a sophisticated two-level online selection system that achieves a rejection factor of nearly $10^5$. The first, hardware-level trigger (L1) is based on coarse information coming from the calorimeters and the muon detectors while the High-Level Trigger combines fine-grain information from all subdetectors. During Run II, the LHC will increase its center of mass energy to 13 or 14 TeV, and progressively reach an instantaneous luminosity of $2\\times10^{34} \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. In order to guarantee a successful and ambitious physics programme in this intense environment, the CMS trigger and data acquisition system must be upgraded. The L1 calorimeter trigger hardware and architecture in particular has been redesigned to maintain the current thresholds even in presence of more demanding conditions (e.g., for electrons and photons) and improve the performance for the selection of $\\tau$ leptons. This design benefits from recent $\\mu$TCA technology, allowing sophisticated algorit...

  17. Deterministic multimode photonic device for quantum-information processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne E. B.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We propose the implementation of a light source that can deterministically generate a rich variety of multimode quantum states. The desired states are encoded in the collective population of different ground hyperfine states of an atomic ensemble and converted to multimode photonic states...... by excitation to optically excited levels followed by cooperative spontaneous emission. Among our examples of applications, we demonstrate how two-photon-entangled states can be prepared and implemented in a protocol for a reference-frame-free quantum key distribution and how one-dimensional as well as higher...

  18. Effect of silicone gel breast prosthesis on electron and photon dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, L.; St. George, F.J.; Mansfield, C.M.; Krishnan, E.C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a silicone gel breast prosthesis on the absorbed dose distribution of 9--20 MeV electron beams and 1.25--15 MV photon beams was studied. Compared to water measurements, at depths smaller than the practical range of the electron beams, the central axis depth dose values below the prothesis were lower for all energies by as much as 3.5%. However, at depths near the practical range, the central axis depth dose values for the prosthesis were greater than that of water by as much as 33%. Since this occurs near the end of the electron range, the resultant difference may not be clinically significant. Results of the effect of breast prosthesis on photon depth dose distributions reveal that no clinically significant perturbation is produced by the breast prosthesis using Co-60, 6- and 15-MV radiations.

  19. Time-dependent density functional theory for many-electron systems interacting with cavity photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokatly, I V

    2013-06-07

    Time-dependent (current) density functional theory for many-electron systems strongly coupled to quantized electromagnetic modes of a microcavity is proposed. It is shown that the electron-photon wave function is a unique functional of the electronic (current) density and the expectation values of photonic coordinates. The Kohn-Sham system is constructed, which allows us to calculate the above basic variables by solving self-consistent equations for noninteracting particles. We suggest possible approximations for the exchange-correlation potentials and discuss implications of this approach for the theory of open quantum systems. In particular we show that it naturally leads to time-dependent density functional theory for systems coupled to the Caldeira-Leggett bath.

  20. Bibliometrics of electronic journals in information science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald T. Hawkins

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The bibliometric characteristics of electronic journals (e-journals covering the field of information science have been studied. Twenty-eight e-journals were identified and ranked by number of articles on the subject they published. A Bradford plot revealed that the core is not well developed yet, but it will likely contain six journals. The publication of information science articles in e-journals began modestly in 1995 with 26 articles, but it has risen to approximately 250 articles per year. The most prolific authors are identified. The vast majority of them are located in the United States or United Kingdom. Only 26 articles have authors from more than one country, showing that electronic technology has not yet strongly influenced international collaboration. About 2/3 of the articles originate in academic institutions. Common topics of e-journal articles in information science include electronic information, electronic publishing, virtual (digital libraries, information search and retrieval, and use of the Internet. Seven online databases cover these e-journals; Information Science Abstracts is the only one to cover all 28 journals, and it has the highest number of abstracts from them - over 1,100.

  1. Electronic astronomical information handling and flexible publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, A.

    The current dramatic evolution in information technology is bringing major modifications in the way scientists work and communicate. The concept of electronic information handling encompasses the diverse types of information, the different media, as well as the various communication methodologies and technologies. It ranges from the very collection of data until the final publication of results and sharing of knowledge. New problems and challenges result also from the new information culture, especially on legal, ethical, and educational grounds. Electronic publishing will have to diverge from an electronic version of contributions on paper and will be part of a more general flexible-publishing policy. The benefits of private publishing are questioned. The procedures for validating published material and for evaluating scientific activities will have to be adjusted too. Provision of electronic refereed information independently from commercial publishers in now feasible. Scientists and scientific institutions have now the possibility to run an efficient information server with validated (refereed) material without the help of a commercial publishers.

  2. Electron- and photon-impact ionization of furfural

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ali, E.; Madison, D. H., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: madison@mst.edu, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY (United Kingdom); Limão-Vieira, P., E-mail: plimaovieira@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: madison@mst.edu, E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Ning, C. G. [State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Colgan, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Murray, A. J. [Photon Science Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-11-14

    The He(I) photoelectron spectrum of furfural has been investigated, with its vibrational structure assigned for the first time. The ground and excited ionized states are assigned through ab initio calculations performed at the outer-valence Green’s function level. Triple differential cross sections (TDCSs) for electron-impact ionization of the unresolved combination of the 4a″  +  21a′ highest and next-highest occupied molecular orbitals have also been obtained. Experimental TDCSs are recorded in a combination of asymmetric coplanar and doubly symmetric coplanar kinematics. The experimental TDCSs are compared to theoretical calculations, obtained within a molecular 3-body distorted wave framework that employed either an orientation average or proper TDCS average. The proper average calculations suggest that they may resolve some of the discrepancies regarding the angular distributions of the TDCS, when compared to calculations employing the orbital average.

  3. Theory of quantum-circuit refrigeration by photon-assisted electron tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveri, Matti; Grabert, Hermann; Masuda, Shumpei; Tan, Kuan Yen; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-09-01

    We focus on a recently experimentally realized scenario of normal-metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions coupled to a superconducting resonator. We develop a first-principles theory to describe the effect of photon-assisted electron tunneling on the quantum state of the resonator. Our results are in very good quantitative agreement with the previous experiments on refrigeration and heating of the resonator using the photon-assisted tunneling, thus providing a stringent verification of the developed theory. Importantly, our results provide simple analytical estimates of the voltage-tunable coupling strength and temperature of the thermal reservoir formed by the photon-assisted tunneling. Consequently, they are used to introduce optimization principles for initialization of quantum devices using such a quantum-circuit refrigerator. Thanks to the first-principles nature of our approach, extension of the theory to the full spectrum of quantum electric devices seems plausible.

  4. Virtual photonic couplings of quantum nanostructures for quantum information technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsueda, H.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Ducommun, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The effectiveness of virtual photons (VPHs) that need neither to conserve energy nor to follow temporal sequences because of the time-energy uncertainty principle, in the electric interactions between detuned non-identical two level atoms having different size and shape is demonstrated in terms o...

  5. Photon-Electron Interactions in Dirac Quantum Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xiaodong [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Material Science and Engineering

    2017-11-10

    The objective of this proposal was to explore the fundamental light-matter interactions in a new class of Dirac quantum materials, atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs). Monolayer TMDs are newly discovered two-dimensional semiconductors with direct bandgap. Due to their hexagonal lattice structure, the band edge localizes at corner of Brillouin zone, i.e. “Dirac valleys”. This gives the corresponding electron states a “valley index” (or pseudospin) in addition to the real spin. Remarkably, the valley pseudospins have circularly polarized optical selection rules, providing the first solid state system for dynamic control of the valley degree of freedom. During this award, we have developed a suite of advanced nano-optical spectroscopy tools in the investigation and manipulation of charge, spin, and valley degrees of freedom in monolayer semiconductors. Emerging physical phenomena, such as quantum coherence between valley pseudospins, have been demonstrated for the first time in solids. In addition to monolayers, we have developed a framework in engineering, formulating, and understanding valley pseudospin physics in 2D heterostructures formed by different monolayer semiconductors. We demonstrated long-lived valley-polarized interlayer excitons with valley-dependent many-body interaction effects. These works push the research frontier in understanding the light-matter interactions in atomically-thin quantum materials for protentional transformative energy technologies.

  6. Fisher information of two-electron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Aparna; Talukdar, Benoy; Sarkar, Pranab

    2018-01-01

    We present a theoretical model to compute numbers for position- and momentum-space Fisher information ( I_{ρ} and I_{γ} of correlated two-electron systems. The numbers for the first five members of the helium iso-electronic sequence indicate that i) values of I_{ρ} increase with the atomic number Z while those of I_{γ} decrease, and, ii) the effect of correlation reduces (increases) the bare values of I_{ρ}(I_{γ}) . The observed behavior of Fisher information in i) and ii) is opposite to that exhibited by Shannon information entropy, presumably because in describing disorder in the probability distribution, the former is convex while the latter is concave. The information measures of Fisher and of Shannon have also been found to share some common properties, the origin of which is purely physical rather than statistical.

  7. On the Coupling of Photon Spin to Electron Orbital Angular Momentum

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Ulrich C; Fuchs, Harald; Salut, Roland; Lefier, Yannick; Grosjean, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Partially gold coated 90 degree glass wedges and a semi - infinite slit in a thin film of gold ending in a conducting nano-junction serve as samples to investigate the transfer of photon spin to electron orbital angular momentum. These structures were specifically designed as samples where an incident beam of light is retroreflected. Since in the process of retroreflection the turning sense of a circularly polarized beam of light does not change and the direction of propagation is inverted, the photon spin is inverted. Due to conservation of angular momentum a transfer of photon spin to electron orbital angular momentum of conduction electrons occurs. In the structures a circular movement of electrons is blocked and therefore the transfered spin can be detected as a photovoltage due to an electromotive force which is induced by the transfer of angular momentum. Depending on the polarization of the incident beam, a maximum photovoltage of about 0,2 micro V was measured for both structures. The results are inte...

  8. Effective atomic numbers, electron densities and kinetic energy released in matter of vitamins for photon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, A.; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective atomic numbers, electron densities of some vitamins (Retinol, Riboflavin, Niacin, Biotin, Folic acid, Cobalamin, Phylloquinone and Flavonoids) composed of C, H, O, N, Co, P and S have been calculated for total and partial photon interactions by the direct method for energy range 1 keV-100 GeV by using WinXCOM and kinetic energy released in matter (Kerma) relative to air is calculated in energy range of 1 keV-20 MeV. Change in effective atomic number and electron density with energy is calculated for all photon interactions. Variation of photon mass attenuation coefficients with energy are shown graphically only for total photon interaction. It is observed that change in mass attenuation coefficient with composition of different chemicals is very large below 100 keV and moderate between 100 keV and 10 MeV and negligible above 10 MeV. Behaviour of vitamins is almost indistinguishable except biotin and cobalamin because of large range of atomic numbers from 1(H) to 16 (S) and 1(H) to 27(Co) respectively. K a value shows a peak due to the photoelectric effect around K-absorption edge of high- Z constituent of compound for biotin and cobalamin.

  9. Electronic Commerce, Digital Information, and the Firm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Howard

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of the social context of electronic commerce (ecommerce) focuses on information imperatives, or rules that are critical for ecommerce firms. Concludes with a discussion of the organizational changes that can be expected to accompany the incorporation of these imperatives into the mission and core business processes of ecommerce firms.…

  10. Students' accessibility and utilization of electronic information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper aimed at examining the accessibility and utilization of Electronic Information Resources in selected Monotechnics in Oyo State. The descriptive survey design was adopted and one hundred and fifty (150) students from three Monotechnics in Oyo State were made to respond to the questionnaire used to elicit ...

  11. The Photon-Assisted Cascaded Electron Multiplier: a concept for potential avalanche-ion blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Amaro, F. D.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Breskin, A.; Lyashenko, A.; Chechik, R.

    2006-08-01

    We present a Photon-Assisted Cascaded Electron Multipliers (PACEM) which has a potential for ion back-flow blocking in gaseous radiation detectors: the avalanche from a first multiplication stage propagates to the successive one via its photons, which in turn induce photoelectron emission from a photocathode deposited on the second multiplier stage; the multiplication process may further continue via electron-avalanche propagation. The photonmediated stage allows, by a proper choice of geometry and fields, complete blocking of the ion back-flow into the first element; thus, only ions from the latter will flow back to the drift region. The PACEM concept was validated in a double-MHSP (Micro-Hole & Strip Plate) cascaded multiplier operated in xenon, where the intermediate scintillation stage provided optical gain of ~60. The double-MHSP detector had a total gain above 104 and energy resolution of 18% FWHM for 5.9 keV x-rays.

  12. The Photon-Assisted Cascaded Electron Multiplier: a concept for potential avalanche-ion blocking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veloso, J F C A [Physics Dept., University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Amaro, F D [Physics Dept., University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Santos, J M F dos [Physics Dept., University of Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Breskin, A [Dept. of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Lyashenko, A [Dept. of Particle Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Chechik, R [Dept. of Particle Physics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2006-08-15

    We present a Photon-Assisted Cascaded Electron Multipliers (PACEM) which has a potential for ion back-flow blocking in gaseous radiation detectors: the avalanche from a first multiplication stage propagates to the successive one via its photons, which in turn induce photoelectron emission from a photocathode deposited on the second multiplier stage; the multiplication process may further continue via electron-avalanche propagation. The photonmediated stage allows, by a proper choice of geometry and fields, complete blocking of the ion back-flow into the first element; thus, only ions from the latter will flow back to the drift region. The PACEM concept was validated in a double-MHSP (Micro-Hole and Strip Plate) cascaded multiplier operated in xenon, where the intermediate scintillation stage provided optical gain of {approx}60. The double-MHSP detector had a total gain above 10{sup 4} and energy resolution of 18% FWHM for 5.9 keV x-rays.

  13. Electronic simulation of the temporal characteristics of photon memory echoes and some related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuwen; Chatterjee, Monish R.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of nonlinear photon memory echoes are investigated by means of SPICE simulations using equivalent resonator ensembles. By developing implicit nonlinear circuit models in the memory echo domain, the triple product formalism of electronic holography, involving correlation and convolution, is tested for the storage and recall of arbitrary signals and/or data bit streams in both time-inverted and nontime-inverted modes. Furthermore, a few specific optical data processing applications are also simulated in which the mixed binary multiplication of two or more binary bit streams is achieved. Higher order products, optical pattern recognition, and other possible applications are also discussed. It is shown that much insight into the nature and scope of optical photon echoes as memory storage phenomena may be derived using the electronic simulation technique.

  14. Pulse shapes from electron and photon induced events in segmented high-purity germanium detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Kröninger, K; Liu, J; Liu, X; Majorovits, B

    2007-01-01

    Experiments built to search for neutrinoless double beta-decay are limited in their sensitivity not only by the exposure but also by the amount of background encountered. Radioactive isotopes in the surrounding of the detectors which emit gamma-radiation are expected to be a significant source of background in the GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA. Methods to select electron induced events and discriminate against photon induced events inside a germanium detector are presented in this paper. The methods are based on the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. Data were taken with a segmented GERDA prototype detector. It is shown that the analysis of the time response of the detector can be used to distinguish multiply scattered photons from electrons.

  15. Handbook of theoretical atomic physics data for photon absorption, electron scattering, and vacancies decay

    CERN Document Server

    Amusia, Miron Ya; Yarzhemsky, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this book is to present highly accurate and extensive theoretical Atomic data and to give a survey of selected calculational methods for atomic physics, used to obtain these data. The book presents the results of calculations of cross sections and probabilities of a broad variety of atomic processes with participation of photons and electrons, namely on photoabsorption, electron scattering and accompanying effects. Included are data for photoabsorption and electron scattering cross-sections and probabilities of vacancy decay formed for a large number of atoms and ions. Attention is also given to photoionization and vacancy decay in endohedrals and to positron-atom scattering. The book is richly illustrated. The methods used are one-electron Hartree-Fock and the technique of Feynman diagrams that permits to include many-electron correlations. This is done in the frames of the Random Phase approximation with exchange and the many-body perturbation theory. Newly obtained and previously collected atomi...

  16. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  17. Recent progress in organic electronics and photonics: A perspective on the future of organic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2016-02-25

    The fields of organic electronics and photonics have witnessed remarkable advances over the past few years. This progress bodes well for the increased utilization of organic materials as the active layers in devices for applications as diverse as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, solar cells, or all-optical switches. In the present document, we choose to focus the discussion on organic all-optical switching applications. © 2015 The Japan Society of Applied Physics.

  18. An empirical method for deriving RBE values associated with electrons, photons and radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, M; Puskin, J; Hertel, N; Eckerman, K

    2015-12-01

    There is substantial evidence to justify using relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of >1 for low-energy electrons and photons. But, in the field of radiation protection, radiation associated with low linear energy transfer has been assigned a radiation weighting factor wR of 1. This value may be suitable for radiation protection but, for risk considerations, it is important to evaluate the potential elevated biological effectiveness of radiation to improve the quality of risk estimates. RBE values between 2 and 3 for tritium are implied by several experimental measurements. Additionally, elevated RBE values have been found for other similar low-energy radiation sources. In this work, RBE values are derived for electrons based upon the fractional deposition of absorbed dose of energies less than a few kiloelectron volts. Using this empirical method, RBE values were also derived for monoenergetic photons and 1070 radionuclides from ICRP Publication 107 for which photons and electrons are the primary emissions. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  19. Overview of Energy Reconstruction, and Electron and Photon Performances with the CMS ECAL in Run II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira de Lima, Rafael; CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Experiment is crucial for achieving high resolution measurements of electrons and photons. Maintaining and possibly improving the excellent performance achieved in Run I is vital for measurements of the Standard Model Higgs boson and searches for new higher mass resonances in final states with electrons and photons. Since spring 2015, the ECAL has operated with proton-proton collisions at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy and at a reduced bunch spacing of 25 ns. The instantaneous luminosity delivered by the LHC during Run II is expected to exceed the levels previously attained. The average number of concurrent proton-proton collisions per bunch-crossing (pileup) is expected to reach up to 40 interactions. In this summary we present new crystal energy reconstruction algorithms and clustering techniques that have been developed to maintain the excellent performance of the CMS ECAL throughout Run II. We will show first performance results from 2015 data, achieved through energy calibrations using electrons from W and Z boson decays, photons from π 0/η decays, and the azimuthally symmetric energy distribution of minimum bias events. Lastly, we present an outlook on the expected Run II performance in the next years.

  20. Group IV Light Sources to Enable the Convergence of Photonics and Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi eSaito

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Group IV lasers are expected to revolutionize chip-to-chip optical communications in terms of cost, scalability, yield, and compatibility to the existing infrastructure of silicon industries for mass production. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art developments of silicon and germanium light sources towards monolithic integration. Quantum confinement of electrons and holes in nano-structures has been the primary route for light emission from silicon, and we can use advanced silicon technologies using top-down patterning processes to fabricate these nano-structures, including fin-type vertical multiple quantum wells. Moreover, the electromagnetic environment can also be manipulated in a photonic crystal nano-cavity to enhance the efficiency of light extraction and emission by the Purcell effect. Germanium is also widely investigated as an active material in Group IV photonics, and novel epitaxial growth technologies are being developed to make a high quality germanium layer on a silicon substrate. To develop a practical germanium laser, various technologies are employed for tensile-stress engineering and high electron doping to compensate the indirect valleys in the conduction band. These challenges are aiming to contribute towards the convergence of electronics and photonics on a silicon chip.

  1. Group IV Light Sources to Enable the Convergence of Photonics and Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shinichi; Gardes, Frederic; Al-Attili, Abdelrahman; Tani, Kazuki; Oda, Katsuya; Suwa, Yuji; Ido, Tatemi; Ishikawa, Yasuhiko; Kako, Satoshi; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-09-01

    Group IV lasers are expected to revolutionize chip-to-chip optical communications in terms of cost, scalability, yield, and compatibility to the existing infrastructure of silicon industries for mass production. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art developments of silicon and germanium light sources towards monolithic integration. Quantum confinement of electrons and holes in nano-structures has been the primary route for light emission from silicon, and we can use advanced silicon technologies using top-down patterning processes to fabricate these nano-structures, including fin-type vertical multiple quantum wells. Moreover, the electromagnetic environment can also be manipulated in a photonic crystal nano-cavity to enhance the efficiency of light extraction and emission by the Purcell effect. Germanium is also widely investigated as an active material in Group IV photonics, and novel epitaxial growth technologies are being developed to make a high quality germanium layer on a silicon substrate. To develop a practical germanium laser, various technologies are employed for tensile-stress engineering and high electron doping to compensate the indirect valleys in the conduction band. These challenges are aiming to contribute towards the convergence of electronics and photonics on a silicon chip.

  2. Novel carbazole derivatives with quinoline ring: Synthesis, electronic transition, and two-photon absorption three-dimensional optical data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Wang, Ping; Hu, Yanlei; Lin, Geng; Wu, Yiqun; Huang, Wenhao; Zhao, Quanzhong

    2015-03-01

    We designed carbazole unit with an extended π conjugation by employing Vilsmeier formylation reaction and Knoevenagel condensation to facilitate the functional groups of quinoline from 3- or 3,6-position of carbazole. Two compounds doped with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) films were prepared. To explore the electronic transition properties of these compounds, one-photon absorption properties were experimentally measured and theoretically calculated by using the time-dependent density functional theory. We surveyed these films by using an 800 nm Ti:sapphire 120-fs laser with two-photon absorption (TPA) fluorescence emission properties and TPA coefficients to obtain the TPA cross sections. A three-dimensional optical data storage experiment was conducted by using a TPA photoreaction with an 800 nm-fs laser on the film to obtain a seven-layer optical data storage. The experiment proves that these carbazole derivatives are well suited for two-photon 3D optical storage, thus laying the foundation for the research of multilayer high-density and ultra-high-density optical information storage materials.

  3. Monte Carlo based beam model using a photon MLC for modulated electron radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzen, D., E-mail: henzen@ams.unibe.ch; Manser, P.; Frei, D.; Volken, W.; Born, E. J.; Vetterli, D.; Chatelain, C.; Fix, M. K. [Division of Medical Radiation Physics and Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, and University of Bern, CH-3010 Berne (Switzerland); Neuenschwander, H. [Clinic for Radiation-Oncology, Lindenhofspital Bern, CH-3012 Berne (Switzerland); Stampanoni, M. F. M. [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zürich and Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5234 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) promises sparing of organs at risk for certain tumor sites. Any implementation of MERT treatment planning requires an accurate beam model. The aim of this work is the development of a beam model which reconstructs electron fields shaped using the Millennium photon multileaf collimator (MLC) (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) for a Varian linear accelerator (linac). Methods: This beam model is divided into an analytical part (two photon and two electron sources) and a Monte Carlo (MC) transport through the MLC. For dose calculation purposes the beam model has been coupled with a macro MC dose calculation algorithm. The commissioning process requires a set of measurements and precalculated MC input. The beam model has been commissioned at a source to surface distance of 70 cm for a Clinac 23EX (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA) and a TrueBeam linac (Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA). For validation purposes, measured and calculated depth dose curves and dose profiles are compared for four different MLC shaped electron fields and all available energies. Furthermore, a measured two-dimensional dose distribution for patched segments consisting of three 18 MeV segments, three 12 MeV segments, and a 9 MeV segment is compared with corresponding dose calculations. Finally, measured and calculated two-dimensional dose distributions are compared for a circular segment encompassed with a C-shaped segment. Results: For 15 × 34, 5 × 5, and 2 × 2 cm{sup 2} fields differences between water phantom measurements and calculations using the beam model coupled with the macro MC dose calculation algorithm are generally within 2% of the maximal dose value or 2 mm distance to agreement (DTA) for all electron beam energies. For a more complex MLC pattern, differences between measurements and calculations are generally within 3% of the maximal dose value or 3 mm DTA for all electron beam energies. For the

  4. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E S M; McEwen, M R; Rogers, D W O

    2012-11-01

    In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be ∼3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 ± 0.1, 9.3 ± 0.1, and 19.3 ± 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra for the clinical linac agree with the

  5. An ultrafast NbN hot-electron single-photon detector for electronic applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatov, A; Smirnov, K V; Chulkova, G; Korneev, A; Kouminov, P; Goltsman, G N; Zhang, J; Slysz, W; Verevkin, A; Sobolewski, R

    2002-01-01

    We present the latest generation of our superconducting single-photon detector (SPD), which can work from ultraviolet to mid-infrared optical radiation wavelengths. The detector combines a high speed of operation and low jitter with high quantum efficiency (QE) and very low dark count level. The technology enhancement allows us to produce ultrathin (3.5 nm thick) structures that demonstrate QE hundreds of times better, at 1.55 mu m, than previous 10 nm thick SPDs. The best, 10x10 mu m sup 2 , SPDs demonstrate QE up to 5% at 1.55 mu m and up to 11% at 0.86 mu m. The intrinsic detector QE, normalized to the film absorption coefficient, reaches 100% at bias currents above 0.9 I sub c for photons with wavelengths shorter than 1.3 mu m.

  6. High efficiency frequency upconversion of photons carrying orbital angular momentum for a quantum information interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ruikai; Li, Xiongjie; Wu, Wenjie; Pan, Haifeng; Zeng, Heping; Wu, E

    2015-04-20

    The orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light shows great potential in quantum communication. The transmission wavelength for telecom is usually around 1550 nm, while the common quantum information storage and processing devices based on atoms, ions or NV color centers are for photons in visible regime. Here we demonstrate a quantum information interface based on the frequency upconversion for photons carrying OAM states from telecom wavelength to visible regime by sum-frequency generation with high quantum conversion efficiency. The infrared photons at 1558 nm carrying different OAM values were converted to the visible regime of 622.2 nm, and the OAM value of the signal photons was well preserved in the frequency upconversion process with pump beam in Gaussian profile.

  7. Internal photon and electron dosimetry of the newborn patient—a hybrid computational phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayson, Michael; Lee, Choonsik; Sgouros, George; Treves, S. Ted; Frey, Eric; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-03-01

    Estimates of radiation absorbed dose to organs of the nuclear medicine patient are a requirement for administered activity optimization and for stochastic risk assessment. Pediatric patients, and in particular the newborn child, represent that portion of the patient population where such optimization studies are most crucial owing to the enhanced tissue radiosensitivities and longer life expectancies of this patient subpopulation. In cases where whole-body CT imaging is not available, phantom-based calculations of radionuclide S values—absorbed dose to a target tissue per nuclear transformation in a source tissue—are required for dose and risk evaluation. In this study, a comprehensive model of electron and photon dosimetry of the reference newborn child is presented based on a high-resolution hybrid-voxel phantom from the University of Florida (UF) patient model series. Values of photon specific absorbed fraction (SAF) were assembled for both the reference male and female newborn using the radiation transport code MCNPX v2.6. Values of electron SAF were assembled in a unique and time-efficient manner whereby the collisional and radiative components of organ dose--for both self- and cross-dose terms—were computed separately. Dose to the newborn skeletal tissues were assessed via fluence-to-dose response functions reported for the first time in this study. Values of photon and electron SAFs were used to assemble a complete set of S values for some 16 radionuclides commonly associated with molecular imaging of the newborn. These values were then compared to those available in the OLINDA/EXM software. S value ratios for organ self-dose ranged from 0.46 to 1.42, while similar ratios for organ cross-dose varied from a low of 0.04 to a high of 3.49. These large discrepancies are due in large part to the simplistic organ modeling in the stylized newborn model used in the OLINDA/EXM software. A comprehensive model of internal dosimetry is presented in this study for

  8. Towards a fully functional integrated photonic-electronic platform via a single SiGe growth step

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Littlejohns, Callum G; Dominguez Bucio, Thalia; Nedeljkovic, Milos; Wang, Hong; Mashanovich, Goran Z; Reed, Graham T; Gardes, Frederic Y

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-germanium (Si(1-x)Ge(x)) has become a material of great interest to the photonics and electronics industries due to its numerous interesting properties including higher carrier mobilities than Si, a tuneable lattice constant...

  9. Information entropies of many-electron systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanez, R.J.; Angulo, J.C.; Dehesa, J.S. [Universidad de Granada (Spain)

    1995-12-05

    The Boltzmann-Shannon (BS) information entropy S{sub {rho}} = - {integral} {rho}(r)log {rho}(r) dr measures the spread or extent of the one-electron density {rho}(r), which is the basic variable of the density function theory of the many electron systems. This quantity cannot be analytically computed, not even for simple quantum mechanical systems such as, e.g., the harmonic oscillator (HO) and the hydrogen atom (HA) in arbitrary excited states. Here, we first review (i) the present knowledge and open problems in the analytical determination of the BS entropies for the HO and HA systems in both position and momentum spaces and (ii) the known rigorous lower and upper bounds to the position and momentum BS entropies of many-electron systems in terms of the radial expectation values in the corresponding space. Then, we find general inequalities which relate the BS entropies and various density functionals. Particular cases of these results are rigorous relationships of the BS entropies and some relevant density functionals (e.g., the Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy, the Dirac-Slater exchange energy, the average electron density) for finite many-electron systems. 28 refs.

  10. ELECTRONIC COMMERCE, PART OF THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEODORESCU ANA-MARIA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the role of electronic commerce in the digital economy, where information is the main resource. Internet, information society technology vector, made possible transition to a knowledge society at the beginning of XXI century. New economy involves transition from a traditional economy based on resources, to a knowledge-based economy. The development of information technology leads to major changes in the economic and social fields. In a world of globalization, e-commerce, part of the information society, manages to eliminate geographical barriers between participants at economic transactions. I presented e-commerce history, definitions. I pointed out the importance of this sector at european level by quantification of indicators. I used a theoretical research and qualitative analysis of the data. I presented values indicators at the european level, the lowest and highest value, and recorded values for Romania.

  11. Clinical application of intensity and energy modulated radiotherapy with photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangkui Mu

    2005-01-01

    In modern, advanced radiotherapy (e.g. intensity modulated photon radiotherapy, IMXT) the delivery time for each fraction becomes prolonged to 10-20 minutes compared with the conventional, commonly 2-5 minutes. The biological effect of this prolongation is not fully known. The large number of beam directions in IMXT commonly leads to a large integral dose in the patient. Electrons would reduce the integral dose but are not suitable for treating deep-seated tumour, due to their limited penetration in tissues. By combining electron and photon beams, the dose distributions may be improved compared with either used alone. One obstacle for using electron beams in clinical routine is that there is no available treatment planning systems that optimise electron beam treatments in a similar way as for IMXT. Protons have an even more pronounced dose fall-off, larger penetration depth and less penumbra widening than electrons and are therefore more suitable for advanced radiotherapy. However, proton facilities optimised for advanced radiotherapy are not commonly available. In some instances electron beams may be an acceptable surrogate. The first part of this study is an experimental in vitro study where the situation in a tumour during fractionated radiotherapy is simulated. The effect of the prolonged fraction time is compared with the predictions by radiobiological models. The second part is a treatment planning study to analyse the mixing of electron and photon beams for at complex target volume in comparison with IMXT. In the next step a research version of an electron beam optimiser was used for the improvement of treatment plans. The aim was to develop a method for translating crude energy and intensity matrices for optimised electrons into a deliverable treatment plan without destroying the dose distribution. In the final part, different methods of treating the spinal canal in medulloblastoma were explored in a treatment planning study that was evaluated with

  12. Passive and electro-optic polymer photonics and InP electronics integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Katopodis, V.; Groumas, P.; Konczykowska, A.; Dupuy, J.-.; Beretta, A.; Dede, A.; Miller, E.; Choi, J. H.; Harati, P.; Jorge, F.; Nodjiadjim, V.; Dinu, R.; Cangini, G.; Vannucci, A.; Felipe, D.; Maese-Novo, A.; Keil, N.; Bach, H.-.; Schell, Martin; Avramopoulos, H.; Kouloumentas, Ch.

    2015-05-01

    Hybrid photonic integration allows individual components to be developed at their best-suited material platforms without sacrificing the overall performance. In the past few years a polymer-enabled hybrid integration platform has been established, comprising 1) EO polymers for constructing low-complexity and low-cost Mach-Zehnder modulators (MZMs) with extremely high modulation bandwidth; 2) InP components for light sources, detectors, and high-speed electronics including MUX drivers and DEMUX circuits; 3) Ceramic (AIN) RF board that links the electronic signals within the package. On this platform, advanced optoelectronic modules have been demonstrated, including serial 100 Gb/s [1] and 2x100 Gb/s [2] optical transmitters, but also 400 Gb/s optoelectronic interfaces for intra-data center networks [3]. To expand the device functionalities to an unprecedented level and at the same time improve the integration compatibility with diversified active / passive photonic components, we have added a passive polymer-based photonic board (polyboard) as the 4th material system. This passive polyboard allows for low-cost fabrication of single-mode waveguide networks, enables fast and convenient integration of various thin-film elements (TFEs) to control the light polarization, and provides efficient thermo-optic elements (TOEs) for wavelength tuning, light amplitude regulation and light-path switching.

  13. Thermal entanglement between π-electrons in silicene and photons; occurrence of phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastgoo, S., E-mail: rastgooo@gmail.com [Mathematics and Computer Science Department, Sirjan University of Technology, Sirjan 78137 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Golshan, M.M., E-mail: golshan@susc.ac.ir [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71454 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-03-18

    In this article, the thermal entanglement between π-electronic states in a monolayer silicene sheet and a single mode quantized electromagnetic field is investigated. We assume that the system is in thermal equilibrium with the environment at a temperature T, so that the whole system is described by the Boltzmann distribution. Using the states of total Hamiltonian, the thermal density matrix and, consequently, its partially transposed one is computed, giving rise to the determination of negativity. Our analytical calculations, along with representative figures, show that the system is separable at zero temperature, exhibits a maximum, at a specific temperature, and asymptotically vanishes. Along these lines we also report the effects of electron–photon coupling, as well as the silicene buckling, on the entanglement. Specifically, we demonstrate that the maximal value of entanglement is larger for stronger electron–photon coupling, while it decreases for larger buckling effect. Moreover, we show that the gap in the total energy spectrum remains intact for any value of the buckling parameter. There is, however, one state whose energy changes sign, at a specific buckling, indicating a change of phase. - Highlights: • Thermal entanglement between π-electrons and photons in silicene is reported. • Intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and buckling effect are taken into account. • The ground state of the system is shown to be separable. • Thermal entanglement exhibits a maximum at a certain controllable temperature. • A rapid increase in the negativity for small temperature and buckling indicates a phase transition.

  14. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' ' Carlos Haya' ' , Avda. Carlos Haya s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain); Unidad de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Xanit Internacional, Avda. de los Argonautas s/n, E-29630 Benalmadena (Malaga) (Spain); NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within {approx}3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  15. Dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons at a photonic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, John

    2013-08-29

    This thesis reports on the observation of dielectric laser acceleration of non-relativistic electrons via the inverse Smith-Purcell effect in the optical regime. Evanescent modes in the vicinity of a periodic grating structure can travel at the same velocity as the electrons along the grating surface. A longitudinal electric field component is used to continuously impart momentum onto the electrons. This is only possible in the near-field of a suitable photonic structure, which means that the electron beam has to pass the structure within about one wavelength. In our experiment we exploit the third spatial harmonic of a single fused silica grating excited by laser pulses derived from a Titanium:sapphire oscillator and accelerate non-relativistic 28 keV electrons. We measure a maximum energy gain of 280 eV, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 25 MeV/m, already comparable with state-of-the-art radio-frequency linear accelerators. To experience this acceleration gradient the electrons approach the grating closer than 100 nm. We present the theory behind grating-based particle acceleration and discuss simulation results of dielectric laser acceleration in the near-field of photonic grating structures, which is excited by near-infrared laser light. Our measurements show excellent agreement with our simulation results and therefore confirm the direct acceleration with the light field. We further discuss the acceleration inside double grating structures, dephasing effects of non-relativistic electrons as well as the space charge effect, which can limit the attainable peak currents of these novel accelerator structures. The photonic structures described in this work can be readily concatenated and therefore represent a scalable realization of dielectric laser acceleration. Furthermore, our structures are directly compatible with the microstructures used for the acceleration of relativistic electrons demonstrated in parallel to this work by our collaborators in

  16. Processing of Photonic Crystal Nanocavity for Quantum Information in Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Bayn, Igal; Lahav, Alex; Salzman, Joseph; Kalish, Rafi; Fairchild, Barbara A; Prawer, Steven; Barth, Michael; Benson, Oliver; Wolf, Thomas; Siyushev, Petr; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Jorg

    2010-01-01

    The realization of photonic crystals (PC) in diamond is of major importance for the entire field of spintronics based on fluorescent centers in diamond. The processing steps for the case of diamond differ from those commonly used, due to the extreme chemical and mechanical properties of this material. The present work summarizes the state of the art in the realization of PC's in diamond. It is based on the creation of a free standing diamond membrane into which the desired nano-sized patterns are milled by the use of Focused-Ion-Beam (FIB). The optimal fabrication-oriented structure parameters are predicted by simulations. The milling strategies, the method of formation the diamond membrane, recipes for dielectric material-manipulation in FIB and optical characterization constraints are discussed in conjunction with their implication on PC cavity design. The thus produced structures are characterized via confocal photoluminescence.

  17. Atomic ionization of hydrogen-like ions by twisted photons: angular distribution of emitted electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matula, O.; Hayrapetyan, A. G.; Serbo, V. G.; Surzhykov, A.; Fritzsche, S.

    2013-10-01

    We investigate the angular distribution of electrons that are emitted in the ionization of hydrogen-like ions by twisted photons. Analysis is performed based on the first-order perturbation theory and the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation. Special attention is paid to the dependence of the electron emission pattern on the impact parameter b of the ion with respect to the centre of the twisted wave front. In order to explore such a dependence, detailed calculations were carried out for the photoionization of the 1s ground and 2 py excited states of neutral hydrogen atoms. Based on these calculations, we argue that for relatively small impact parameters, the electron angular distributions may be strongly affected by altering the position of the atom within the wave front. In contrast, if the atom is placed far from the front centre, the emission pattern of the electrons is independent of the impact parameter b and resembles that observed in the photoionization by plane wave photons.

  18. In situ electrical and thermal monitoring of printed electronics by two-photon mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorelli, Francesco; Accanto, Nicolò; Jørgensen, Mikkel; van Hulst, Niek F; Krebs, Frederik C

    2017-06-19

    Printed electronics is emerging as a new, large scale and cost effective technology that will be disruptive in fields such as energy harvesting, consumer electronics and medical sensors. The performance of printed electronic devices relies principally on the carrier mobility and molecular packing of the polymer semiconductor material. Unfortunately, the analysis of such materials is generally performed with destructive techniques, which are hard to make compatible with in situ measurements, and pose a great obstacle for the mass production of printed electronics devices. A rapid, in situ, non-destructive and low-cost testing method is needed. In this study, we demonstrate that nonlinear optical microscopy is a promising technique to achieve this goal. Using ultrashort laser pulses we stimulate two-photon absorption in a roll coated polymer semiconductor and map the resulting two-photon induced photoluminescence and second harmonic response. We show that, in our experimental conditions, it is possible to relate the total amount of photoluminescence detected to important material properties such as the charge carrier density and the molecular packing of the printed polymer material, all with a spatial resolution of 400 nm. Importantly, this technique can be extended to the real time mapping of the polymer semiconductor film, even during the printing process, in which the high printing speed poses the need for equally high acquisition rates.

  19. Novel photon detection based on electronically-induced stress in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datskos, P.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Datskou, I. [Environmental Engineering Group, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of microcantilever-based optical detection is demonstrated. Specifically, the authors report here on an evaluation of laboratory prototypes that are based on commercially available microcantilevers. In this work, optical transduction techniques were used to measure microcantilever response to photons and study the electronic stress in silicon microcantilevers, and their temporal and photometric response. The photo-generation of free charge carriers (electrons, holes) in a semiconductor gives rise to photo-induced (electronic) mechanical strain. The excess charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress, were produced via photon irradiation from a diode laser with wavelength {lambda} = 780 nm. The authors found that for silicon, the photo-induced stress results in a contraction of the crystal lattice due to the presence of excess electron-hole-pairs. In addition, the photo-induced stress is of opposite direction and about four times larger than the stress resulting from direct thermal excitation. When charge carriers are generated in a short time, a very rapid deflection of the microcantilever is observed (response time {approximately} {micro}s).

  20. Photon-photon colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1995-04-01

    Since the seminal work by Ginsburg, et at., the subject of giving the Next Linear Collider photon-photon capability, as well as electron-positron capability, has drawn much attention. A 1990 article by V.I. Teinov describes the situation at that time. In March 1994, the first workshop on this subject was held. This report briefly reviews the physics that can be achieved through the photon-photon channel and then focuses on the means of achieving such a collider. Also reviewed is the spectrum of backscattered Compton photons -- the best way of obtaining photons. We emphasize the spectrum actually obtained in a collider with both polarized electrons and photons (peaked at high energy and very different from a Compton spectrum). Luminosity is estimated for the presently considered colliders, and interaction and conversion-point geometries are described. Also specified are laser requirements (such as wavelength, peak power, and average power) and the lasers that might be employed. These include conventional and free-electron lasers. Finally, we describe the R&D necessary to make either of these approaches viable and explore the use of the SLC as a test bed for a photon-photon collider of very high energy.

  1. A Miniaturized Linear Wire Ion Trap with Electron Ionization and Single Photon Ionization Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghao; Tian, Yuan; Li, Ailin; Andrews, Derek; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Austin, Daniel E.

    2017-05-01

    A linear wire ion trap (LWIT) with both electron ionization (EI) and single photon ionization (SPI) sources was built. The SPI was provided by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) lamp with the ability to softly ionize organic compounds. The VUV lamp was driven by a pulse amplifier, which was controlled by a pulse generator, to avoid the detection of photons during ion detection. Sample gas was introduced through a leak valve, and the pressure in the system is shown to affect the signal-to-noise ratio and resolving power. Under optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for benzene was 80 ppbv using SPI, better than the LOD using EI (137 ppbv). System performance was demonstrated by distinguishing compounds in different classes from gasoline.

  2. Automated variance reduction technique for three-dimensional Monte Carlo coupled electron-photon-positron simulation using deterministic importance functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Benoit

    Three-dimensional Monte Carlo coupled electron-photon-positron transport calculations are often performed to determine characteristics such as energy or charge deposition in a wide range of systems exposed to radiation field such as electronic circuitry in a space-environment, tissues exposed to radiotherapy linear accelerator beams, or radiation detectors. Modeling these systems constitute a challenging problem for the available computational methods and resources because they can involve; (i) very large attenuation, (ii) large number of secondary particles due to the electron-photon-positron cascade, and (iii) large and highly forward-peaked scattering. This work presents a new automated variance reduction technique, referred to as ADEIS (Angular adjoint-Driven Electron-photon-positron Importance Sampling), that takes advantage of the capability of deterministic methods to rapidly provide approximate information about the complete phase-space in order to automatically evaluate variance reduction parameters. More specifically, this work focuses on the use of discrete ordinates importance functions to evaluate angular transport and collision biasing parameters, and use them through a modified implementation of the weight-window technique. The application of this new method to complex Monte Carlo simulations has resulted in speedups as high as five orders of magnitude. Due to numerical difficulties in obtaining physical importance functions devoid of numerical artifacts, a limited form of smoothing was implemented to complement a scheme for automatic discretization parameters selection. This scheme improves the robustness, efficiency and statistical reliability of the methodology by optimizing the accuracy of the importance functions with respect to the additional computational cost from generating and using these functions. It was shown that it is essential to bias different species of particles with their specific importance functions. In the case of electrons and

  3. Metallic Na formation in NaCl crystals with irradiation of electron or vacuum ultraviolet photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owaki, Shigehiro [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Sakai, Osaka (Japan). Coll. of Integrated Arts and Sciences; Koyama, Shigeko; Takahashi, Masao; Kamada, Masao; Suzuki, Ryouichi

    1997-03-01

    Metallic Na was formed in NaCl single crystals with irradiation of a variety of radiation sources and analyzed the physical states with several methods. In the case of irradiation of 21 MeV electron pulses to the crystal blocks, the optical absorption and lifetime measurement of positron annihilation indicated appearance of Na clusters inside. Radiation effects of electron beam of 30 keV to the crystals in vacuum showed the appearance of not only metallic Na but atomic one during irradiation with Auger electron spectroscopy. Intense photon fluxes in vacuum ultraviolet region of synchrotron radiation were used as another source and an analyzing method of ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The results showed the metallic Na layered so thick that bulk plasmon can exist. (author)

  4. arXiv Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    CERN Document Server

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-26

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068  e- rms/pixel. This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while ...

  5. Nonlinear interaction of photons and phonons in electron-positron plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, T.; Taniuti, T.

    1990-03-01

    Nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves and acoustic modes in an electron-positron plasma is investigated. The plasma of electrons and positrons is quite plastic so that the imposition of electromagnetic (EM) waves causes depression of the plasma and other structural imprints on it through either the nonresonant or resonant interaction. Our theory shows that the nonresonant interaction can lead to the coalescence of photons and collapse of plasma cavity in higher ({ge} 2) dimensions. The resonant interaction, in which the group velocity of EM waves is equal to the phase velocity of acoustic waves, is analyzed and a set of basic equations of the system is derived via the reductive perturbation theory. We find new solutions of solitary types: bright solitons, kink solitons, and dark solitons as the solutions to these equations. Our computation hints their stability. An impact of the present theory on astrophysical plasma settings is expected, including the cosmological relativistically hot electron-positron plasma. 20 refs., 9 figs.

  6. Nonlinear interaction of photons and phonons in electron-positron plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajima, T.; Taniuti, T. (Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (USA))

    1990-09-15

    Nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves and acoustic modes in an electron-positron plasma is investigated. The plasma of electrons and positrons is quite plastic so that the imposition of electromagnetic (em) waves causes depression of the plasma and other structural imprints on it through either the nonresonant or resonant interaction. Our theory shows that the nonresonant interaction can lead to the coalescence of photons and collapse of plasma cavity in higher ({ge}2) dimensions. The resonant interaction, in which the group velocity of em waves is equal to the phase velocity of acoustic waves, is analyzed and a set of basic equations of the system is derived via the reductive perturbation theory. We find new solutions of solitary types: bright solitons, kink solitons, and dark solitons as the solutions to these equations. An implication of the present theory on astrophysical plasma settings is suggested, including the cosmological relativistically hot electron-positron plasma.

  7. Single-photon emission associated with double electron capture in F9+ + C collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Elkafrawy, Tamer; Tanis, John A; Warczak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Radiative double electron capture (RDEC), the one-step process occurring in ion-atom collisions, has been investigated for bare fluorine ions colliding with carbon. RDEC is completed when two target electrons are captured to a bound state of a projectile simultaneously with the emission of a single photon. This work is a follow-up to our earlier measurement of RDEC for bare oxygen projectiles, thus providing a recipient system free of electron-related Coulomb fields in both cases and allowing for the comparison between the two collision systems as well as with available theoretical studies. The most significant mechanisms of x-ray emission that may contribute to the RDEC energy region as background processes are also addressed.

  8. Evaluation of Electron Contamination in Cancer Treatment with Megavoltage Photon Beams: Monte Carlo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seif F

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Megavoltage beams used in radiotherapy are contaminated with secondary electrons. Different parts of linac head and air above patient act as a source of this contamination. This contamination can increase damage to skin and subcutaneous tissue during radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulation is an accurate method for dose calculation in medical dosimetry and has an important role in optimization of linac head materials. The aim of this study was to calculate electron contamination of Varian linac. Materials and Method: The 6MV photon beam of Varian (2100 C/D linac was simulated by Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, based on its company’s instructions. The validation was done by comparing the calculated depth dose and profiles of simulation with dosimetry measurements in a water phantom (error less than 2%. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDDs, profiles and contamination electron energy spectrum were calculated for different therapeutic field sizes (5×5 to 40×40 cm2 for both linacs. Results: The dose of electron contamination was observed to rise with increase in field size. The contribution of the secondary contamination electrons on the surface dose was 6% for 5×5 cm2 to 27% for 40×40 cm2 , respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results, the effect of electron contamination on patient surface dose cannot be ignored, so the knowledge of the electron contamination is important in clinical dosimetry. It must be calculated for each machine and considered in Treatment Planning Systems.

  9. Radiation dose enhancement in skin therapy with nanoparticle addition: A Monte Carlo study on kilovoltage photon and megavoltage electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao J; Chow, James C L

    2017-02-28

    To investigated the dose enhancement due to the incorporation of nanoparticles in skin therapy using the kilovoltage (kV) photon and megavoltage (MV) electron beams. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the dose enhancement when different types and concentrations of nanoparticles were added to skin target layers of varying thickness. Clinical kV photon beams (105 and 220 kVp) and MV electron beams (4 and 6 MeV), produced by a Gulmay D3225 orthovoltage unit and a Varian 21 EX linear accelerator, were simulated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Doses at skin target layers with thicknesses ranging from 0.5 to 5 mm for the photon beams and 0.5 to 10 mm for the electron beams were determined. The skin target layer was added with the Au, Pt, I, Ag and Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles with concentrations ranging from 3 to 40 mg/mL. The dose enhancement ratio (DER), defined as the dose at the target layer with nanoparticle addition divided by the dose at the layer without nanoparticle addition, was calculated for each nanoparticle type, nanoparticle concentration and target layer thickness. It was found that among all nanoparticles, Au had the highest DER (5.2-6.3) when irradiated with kV photon beams. Dependence of the DER on the target layer thickness was not significant for the 220 kVp photon beam but it was for 105 kVp beam for Au nanoparticle concentrations higher than 18 mg/mL. For other nanoparticles, the DER was dependent on the atomic number of the nanoparticle and energy spectrum of the photon beams. All nanoparticles showed an increase of DER with nanoparticle concentration during the photon beam irradiations regardless of thickness. For electron beams, the Au nanoparticles were found to have the highest DER (1.01-1.08) when the beam energy was equal to 4 MeV, but this was drastically lower than the DER values found using photon beams. The DER was also found affected by the depth of maximum dose of the electron beam and target thickness. For other nanoparticles

  10. Patient information: confidentiality and the electronic record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Richard

    The rise of the electronic record now allows nurses to access a large archive of patient information that was more difficult to obtain when records consisted of manually held paper files. There have been several instances where curiosity and, occasionally, more malicious motivations have led nurses to access these records and read the notes of a celebrity or a person they know. In this article, Richard Griffith considers whether nurses' accessing and reading of the record of someone who is not in their care is in breach of their duty of confidentiality.

  11. Orthogonal sequencing multiplexer for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with RSFQ electronics readout circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofherr, Matthias; Wetzstein, Olaf; Engert, Sonja; Ortlepp, Thomas; Berg, Benjamin; Ilin, Konstantin; Henrich, Dagmar; Stolz, Ronny; Toepfer, Hannes; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Siegel, Michael

    2012-12-17

    We propose an efficient multiplexing technique for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors based on an orthogonal detector bias switching method enabling the extraction of the average count rate of a set of detectors by one readout line. We implemented a system prototype where the SNSPDs are connected to an integrated cryogenic readout and a pulse merger system based on rapid single flux quantum (RSFQ) electronics. We discuss the general scalability of this concept, analyze the environmental requirements which define the resolvability and the accuracy and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with experimental results for a SNSPD array with four pixels.

  12. Two-electron double quantum dot coupled to coherent photon and phonon fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuya; Chen, Jason C. H.; Hashisaka, Masayuki; Muraki, Koji; Fujisawa, Toshimasa

    2017-09-01

    Two-electron states of a double quantum dot (DQD) under irradiation of coherent boson (photon and phonon) fields are studied by measuring spin-flip tunneling current in the Pauli spin blockade regime. This measurement scheme allows us to investigate Rabi splitting and associated boson dressed states particularly in the deep dispersive regime where the detuning δ ≡ℏ ω -EAB between the boson energy ℏ ω and energy spacing EAB of the two-level system is significantly large (δ ˜ℏ ω ), where the permanent dipole moment in the DQD plays a significant role in the hybridization.

  13. The CMS electron and photon trigger for the LHC Run 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezoort, Gage; Xia, Fan

    2017-01-01

    The CMS experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds that were used in LHC Run I for the more challenging luminosity conditions experienced during Run II. The upgrades to the calorimetry trigger will be described along with performance data. The algorithms for the selection of final states with electrons and photons, both for precision measurements and for searches of new physics beyond the Standard Model, will be described in detail.

  14. Vertical instability with transient characteristics in KEK-Photon Factory electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mochihashi

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available A vertical instability of the KEK-Photon Factory electron storage ring was observed in a multibunch mode with empty buckets (bunch gap using a bunch-by-bunch beam diagnostic system that consisted of a high-speed light shutter and an optical betatron oscillation detector. It was clearly seen that vertical betatron frequencies of individual bunches varied along a bunch train. The dependence of the betatron frequencies on the bunch positions in the train was explained by modulation of trapped-ion density caused by passage of the beam. Agreement between experimental results and the theoretical prediction was quite good.

  15. Electron Energy Loss and One- and Two-Photon Excited SERS Probing of “Hot” Plasmonic Silver Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Joseph, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    between two- and one-photon excited SERS measured at different excitation wavelengths provides information about local fields in the hottest spots and their dependence on the photon energy. Our data verify experimentally the predicted increase of local optical fields in the hot spots with increasing wave...

  16. 29 CFR 1615.135 - Electronic and information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electronic and information technology requirements. 1615... INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 1615.135 Electronic and information technology requirements. (a) Development, procurement, maintenance, or use of electronic and information technology.—When developing, procuring...

  17. Harnessing temporal modes for multi-photon quantum information processing based on integrated optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, G; Ansari, V; Bartley, T J; Brecht, B; Silberhorn, C

    2017-08-06

    In the last few decades, there has been much progress on low loss waveguides, very efficient photon-number detectors and nonlinear processes. Engineered sum-frequency conversion is now at a stage where it allows operation on arbitrary temporal broadband modes, thus making the spectral degree of freedom accessible for information coding. Hereby the information is often encoded into the temporal modes of a single photon. Here, we analyse the prospect of using multi-photon states or squeezed states in different temporal modes based on integrated optics devices. We describe an analogy between mode-selective sum-frequency conversion and a network of spatial beam splitters. Furthermore, we analyse the limits on the achievable squeezing in waveguides with current technology and the loss limits in the conversion process.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. The photonic nanowire: an emerging platform for highly efficient single-photon sources for quantum information applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Munsch, Mathieu; Malik, Nitin S.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient coupling between a localized quantum emitter and a well defined optical channel represents a powerful route to realize single-photon sources and spin-photon interfaces. The tailored fiber-like photonic nanowire embedding a single quantum dot has recently demonstrated an appealing...

  19. Progress in neuromorphic photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira de Lima, Thomas; Shastri, Bhavin J.; Tait, Alexander N.; Nahmias, Mitchell A.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2017-03-01

    As society's appetite for information continues to grow, so does our need to process this information with increasing speed and versatility. Many believe that the one-size-fits-all solution of digital electronics is becoming a limiting factor in certain areas such as data links, cognitive radio, and ultrafast control. Analog photonic devices have found relatively simple signal processing niches where electronics can no longer provide sufficient speed and reconfigurability. Recently, the landscape for commercially manufacturable photonic chips has been changing rapidly and now promises to achieve economies of scale previously enjoyed solely by microelectronics. By bridging the mathematical prowess of artificial neural networks to the underlying physics of optoelectronic devices, neuromorphic photonics could breach new domains of information processing demanding significant complexity, low cost, and unmatched speed. In this article, we review the progress in neuromorphic photonics, focusing on photonic integrated devices. The challenges and design rules for optoelectronic instantiation of artificial neurons are presented. The proposed photonic architecture revolves around the processing network node composed of two parts: a nonlinear element and a network interface. We then survey excitable lasers in the recent literature as candidates for the nonlinear node and microring-resonator weight banks as the network interface. Finally, we compare metrics between neuromorphic electronics and neuromorphic photonics and discuss potential applications.

  20. An assessment of the Photon Contamination due to Bremsstrahlung Radiation in the Electron Beams of a NEPTUN 10PC Linac using a Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Jabbari

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical electron beams, most of bremsstrahlung radiation is produced by various linac head structures. This bremsstrahlung radiation dose is influenced by the geometry and construction of every component of the linac treatment head structures. Thus, it can be expected that the amount of the contaminated photon dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation varies among different linacs, even for the same electron beam energy. The aims of this study were to simulate the NEPTUN 10PC linac electron beams and to calculate the photon contamination dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation in these beams using a Monte Carlo method. Materials and methods: A NEPTUN 10PC linac was simulated in its electron mode using the BEAMnrc code. This linac can provide three electron beam energies of 6, 8 and 10 MeV. Detailed information required for the simulation, including the geometry and materials of various components of the linac treatment head, was provided by the vender. For all simulations, the cut-off energies for electron and photon transport were set at ECUT=0.521 MeV and PCUT=0.010 MeV, respectively. The KS statistical test was used for validation of the simulated models. Then, relevant bremsstrahlung radiation doses for the three electron beam energies of the linac were calculated for the reference field using the Monte Carlo method.   Results: The KS test showed a good agreement between the calculated values (resulting from the simulations and the measured ones. The results showed that the amount of contaminated photon dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation from various components of the simulated linac at the surface of the phantom was between 0.2%-0.5% of the maximum dose for the three electron beam energies. Conclusion:  Considering the good agreement between the measured and simulated data, it can be concluded that the simulation method as well as the calculated bremsstrahlung doses have been made at a good level of accuracy and precision

  1. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrons and photons at High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin

    2015-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system. The first level is implemented using custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to keep the HLT output rate manageable while maintaining thresholds low enough to cover physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the ingredients that have been successfully applied in the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. Improvements in HLT electron and photon definitions will be presented, focusing in particular on updated clustering algorithm and the energy calibration procedure, new Particle-Flow-based isolation approach and pileup mitigation techniques, a...

  3. penORNL: a parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport package using PENELOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekar, Kursat B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Thomas Martin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Weber, Charles F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The parallel Monte Carlo photon and electron transport code package penORNL was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to enable advanced scanning electron microscope (SEM) simulations on high-performance computing systems. This paper discusses the implementations, capabilities and parallel performance of the new code package. penORNL uses PENELOPE for its physics calculations and provides all available PENELOPE features to the users, as well as some new features including source definitions specifically developed for SEM simulations, a pulse-height tally capability for detailed simulations of gamma and x-ray detectors, and a modified interaction forcing mechanism to enable accurate energy deposition calculations. The parallel performance of penORNL was extensively tested with several model problems, and very good linear parallel scaling was observed with up to 512 processors. penORNL, along with its new features, will be available for SEM simulations upon completion of the new pulse-height tally implementation.

  4. Multivariate Analysis in the Reconstruction of Photon/Electron Energies in the CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Raclariu, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    A new semi-parametric multivariate regression was used to improve the energy reconstruction in the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter. The method is based on the generation of boosted decision trees by optimizing the parameters of the double crystal ball function fitted to the ratio of the raw to generated energies of simulated photons and electrons. The full training was done on half the electrons with generated transverse momenta p$_{T}\\geq$ 16 GeV in the barrel and corrections were applied to subsets of the remaining events. The dependence of the means and widths of the resulting distributions on p$_{T}$ was deduced. The corrected reconstructed energies peak close 1 for p$_{T}$ values down to 16 GeV. It was found that fixing $\\alpha$ of the double crystal ball function in the training improves its performance.

  5. Study of the electronphoton misidentification rate in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Haase, Johannes

    In this thesis, the misidentification of electrons as photons (fake rate) is investigated using the first 7 TeV data of the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. A method for the measurement of the fake rate in data, using pure electrons from the Z0 → e+e− decay, called tag-and-probe, is presented. The results are studied as functions of kinematic variables in order to show effects on the detector performance. A cross check with a so-called truth-matching method in Monte Carlo is applied. In addition, the fake rate for Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry Breaking events is estimated and compared with Z0 → e+e− studies.

  6. Parallel FE Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, C.R.; Lorenz, J.

    1999-03-02

    A novel solution method has been developed to solve the coupled electron-photon transport problem on an unstructured triangular mesh. Instead of tackling the first-order form of the linear Boltzmann equation, this approach is based on the second-order form in conjunction with the conventional multi-group discrete-ordinates approximation. The highly forward-peaked electron scattering is modeled with a multigroup Legendre expansion derived from the Goudsmit-Saunderson theory. The finite element method is used to treat the spatial dependence. The solution method is unique in that the space-direction dependence is solved simultaneously, eliminating the need for the conventional inner iterations, a method that is well suited for massively parallel computers.

  7. Unique properties of graphene quantum dots and their applications in photonic/electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Suk-Ho

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been recognized as an attractive building block for electronic, photonic, and bio-molecular device applications. This paper reports the current status of studies on the novel properties of GQDs and their hybrids with conventional and low-dimensional materials for device applications. In this review, more emphasis is placed on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of GQDs, and device structures based on the combination of GQDs with various semiconducting/insulating materials such as graphene, silicon dioxide, Si quantum dots, silica nanoparticles, organic materials, and so on. Because of GQDs’ unique properties, their hybrid structures are employed in high-efficiency devices, including photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes, flash memory, and sensors.

  8. Coplanar photonic bandgap resonators for low temperature electron and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigillito, A. J.; Tyryshkin, A. M.; Lyon, S. A.

    In recent years, superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators have become a useful tool for low temperature pulsed electron spin resonance (ESR), even at dilution refrigerator temperatures. Their small mode volumes make CPW resonators particularly well suited to measuring small numbers of spins near the resonator surface, since in this region the spin sensitivity is very high. While these resonators have proven useful for ESR at single microwave frequencies, it is difficult to also manipulate nuclear spins in electron-nuclear-double resonance (ENDOR) experiments, since manipulation of nuclear spins requires radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields. Ideally one would simply generate these fields by passing RF currents through the CPW, but because conventional CPW resonators are capacitively coupled, they will not transmit low-frequency RF currents. In this talk, we discuss the use of one dimensional photonic bandgap (PBG) resonators to overcome this challenge. PBG resonators are a promising alternative to conventional CPW resonators since they offer high quality factors at microwave frequencies, while simultaneously allowing transmission of nonresonant RF currents below the photonic bandgap. Here, we will discuss PBG resonator designs and present data showing their use for low temperature ESR of donors in 28Si. Initial ENDOR results will also be presented.

  9. ITS Version 6 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2008-04-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state-of-the-art Monte Carlo solution of lineartime-independent coupled electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 6, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 5.0 codes, and (2) conversion to Fortran 90. The general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through memory allocation to reduce the need for users to modify and recompile the code.

  10. The Photon-Assisted Cascaded Electron Multiplier Operation in CF4 for Ion Backflow Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, F. D.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.; Lyashenko, A.

    2008-06-01

    The operation of the recently introduced photon assisted cascaded electron multiplier (PACEM) in CF4 is investigated. The PACEM uses the VUV scintillation produced in the electron avalanches of the first multiplier of the cascade to transfer the signal to the subsequent ones. The VUV scintillation induces the emission of a large number of photoelectrons from a Csl photocathode placed on the top-surface of the second multiplier. The photoelectrons are further multiplied in the subsequent stages of the cascade, resulting in efficient signal amplification. A mesh, set at a fixed voltage, is placed between the first and the second multipliers to block the charge transfer between them, thus suppressing all the ion backflow (IBF) heading to the first cascade element. The PACEM electrically isolates the first multiplier of the cascade and only the ions produced in the electron avalanches of the first element may flow back into the drift region. Operating in CF4, absolute IBFs as low as 1 ion per primary electron are achieved for drift fields of 0.1 kV/cm, while for fields of 0.5 kV/cm the absolute IBF is 10 ions/primary electron. This corresponds to an IBF of 10-4 at gains of 104, for time projection chambers (TPC) operating conditions, and IBFs of 10-5 at gains of 106 for gaseous photomultipliers (GPM) operating conditions.

  11. Effects of model approximations for electron, hole, and photon transport in swift heavy ion tracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymzhanov, R. A.; Medvedev, N. A.; Volkov, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The event-by-event Monte Carlo code, TREKIS, was recently developed to describe excitation of the electron subsystems of solids in the nanometric vicinity of a trajectory of a nonrelativistic swift heavy ion (SHI) decelerated in the electronic stopping regime. The complex dielectric function (CDF) formalism was applied in the used cross sections to account for collective response of a matter to excitation. Using this model we investigate effects of the basic assumptions on the modeled kinetics of the electronic subsystem which ultimately determine parameters of an excited material in an SHI track. In particular, (a) effects of different momentum dependencies of the CDF on scattering of projectiles on the electron subsystem are investigated. The 'effective one-band' approximation for target electrons produces good coincidence of the calculated electron mean free paths with those obtained in experiments in metals. (b) Effects of collective response of a lattice appeared to dominate in randomization of electron motion. We study how sensitive these effects are to the target temperature. We also compare results of applications of different model forms of (quasi-) elastic cross sections in simulations of the ion track kinetics, e.g. those calculated taking into account optical phonons in the CDF form vs. Mott's atomic cross sections. (c) It is demonstrated that the kinetics of valence holes significantly affects redistribution of the excess electronic energy in the vicinity of an SHI trajectory as well as its conversion into lattice excitation in dielectrics and semiconductors. (d) It is also shown that induced transport of photons originated from radiative decay of core holes brings the excess energy faster and farther away from the track core, however, the amount of this energy is relatively small.

  12. Photon counting imaging with an electron-bombarded CCD: Towards a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Jiggins, Stephen; Sergent, Nicolas; Zanda, Gianmarco; Suhling, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.suhling@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Physics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    We have used an electron-bombarded CCD for optical photon counting imaging. The photon event pulse height distribution was found to be linearly dependent on the gain voltage. We propose on this basis that a gain voltage sweep during exposure in an electron-bombarded sensor would allow photon arrival time determination with sub-frame exposure time resolution. This effectively uses an electron-bombarded sensor as a parallel-processing photoelectronic time-to-amplitude converter, or a two-dimensional photon counting streak camera. Several applications that require timing of photon arrival, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, may benefit from such an approach. A simulation of a voltage sweep performed with experimental data collected with different acceleration voltages validates the principle of this approach. Moreover, photon event centroiding was performed and a hybrid 50% Gaussian/Centre of Gravity + 50% Hyperbolic cosine centroiding algorithm was found to yield the lowest fixed pattern noise. Finally, the camera was mounted on a fluorescence microscope to image F-actin filaments stained with the fluorescent dye Alexa 488 in fixed cells.

  13. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  14. Manipulation of multi-photon-entanglement. Applications in quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, Alexander Matthias

    2008-07-16

    Over the last twenty years the field of quantum information processing (QIP) has attracted the attention of many scientists, due to the promise of impressive improvements in the areas of computational speed, communication security and the ability to simulate nature on the micro scale. This thesis describes an experimental work on the physics of multi-photon entanglement and its application in the field of QIP. We have thoroughly developed the necessary techniques to generate multipartite entanglement between up to six photons. By exploiting the developed six-photon interferometer, in this thesis we report for the first time the experimental quantum teleportation of a two-qubit composite system, the realization of multi-stage entanglement swapping, the implementation of a teleportation-based controlled-NOT gate for fault-tolerant quantum computation, the first generation of entanglement in sixpartite photonic graph states and the realization of 'one-way' quantum computation with two-photon four-qubit cluster states. The methods developed in these experiments are of great significance both for exploring the field of QIP and for future experiments on the fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. (orig.)

  15. Single-electron and single-photon sensitivity with a silicon Skipper CCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffenberg, Javier [Fermilab; Sofo-Haro, Miguel [Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Drlica-Wagner, Alex [Fermilab; Essig, Rouven [YITP, Stony Brook; Guardincerri, Yann [Fermilab; Holland, Steve [LBL, Berkeley; Volansky, Tomer [Tel Aviv U.; Yu, Tien-Tien [CERN

    2017-05-31

    We have developed a non-destructive readout system that uses a floating-gate amplifier on a thick, fully depleted charge coupled device (CCD) to achieve ultra-low readout noise of 0.068 e- rms/pix. This is the first time that discrete sub-electron readout noise has been achieved reproducibly over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This allows the precise counting of the number of electrons in each pixel, ranging from pixels with 0 electrons to more than 1500 electrons. The resulting CCD detector is thus an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while astronomical applications include future direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  16. Effect of electron contamination on scatter correction factors for photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venselaar, J; Heukelom, S; Jager, N; Mijnheer, B; van der Laarse, R; van Gasteren, H; van Kleffens, H; Westermann, C

    1999-10-01

    Physical quantities for use in megavoltage photon beam dose calculations which are defined at the depth of maximum absorbed dose are sensitive to electron contamination and are difficult to measure and to calculate. Recently, formalisms have therefore been presented to assess the dose using collimator and phantom scatter correction factors, Sc and Sp, defined at a reference depth of 10 cm. The data can be obtained from measurements at that depth in a miniphantom and in a full scatter phantom. Equations are presented that show the relation between these quantities and corresponding quantities obtained from measurements at the depth of the dose maximum. It is shown that conversion of Sc and Sp determined at a 10 cm depth to quantities defined at the dose maximum such as (normalized) peak scatter factor, (normalized) tissue-air ratio, and vice versa is not possible without quantitative knowledge of the electron contamination. The difference in Sc at dmax resulting from this electron contamination compared with Sc values obtained at a depth of 10 cm in a miniphantom has been determined as a multiplication factor, Scel, for a number of photon beams of different accelerator types. It is shown that Scel may vary up to 5%. Because in the new formalisms output factors are defined at a reference depth of 10 cm, they do not require Scel data. The use of Sc and Sp values, defined at a 10 cm depth, combined with relative depth-dose data or tissue-phantom ratios is therefore recommended. For a transition period the use of the equations provided in this article and Scel data might be required, for instance, if treatment planning systems apply Sc data normalized at d(max).

  17. Will Allis Prize for the Study of Ionized Gases Lecture: Electron and Photon Collisions with Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Philip G.

    2012-06-01

    After a brief historical introduction this talk will review the broad range of collision processes involving electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules that are now being considered. Their application in the analysis of astronomical spectra, atmospheric observations and laboratory plasmas will be considered. The talk will review the R-matrix computational method which has been widely used by international collaborations and by other scientists in the field to obtain accurate scattering amplitudes and cross sections of importance in these applications. Results of some recent calculations of electron and photon collisions with atoms and molecules will be presented. In conclusion some challenges for future research will be briefly discussed.

  18. Probing Electron-Phonon Interaction through Two-Photon Interference in Resonantly Driven Semiconductor Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigue, Antoine; Iles-Smith, Jake; Lux, Fabian; Monniello, Léonard; Bernard, Mathieu; Margaillan, Florent; Lemaitre, Aristide; Martinez, Anthony; McCutcheon, Dara P S; Mørk, Jesper; Hostein, Richard; Voliotis, Valia

    2017-06-09

    We investigate the temperature dependence of photon coherence properties through two-photon interference (TPI) measurements from a single quantum dot (QD) under resonant excitation. We show that the loss of indistinguishability is related only to the electron-phonon coupling and is not affected by spectral diffusion. Through these measurements and a complementary microscopic theory, we identify two independent separate decoherence processes, both of which are associated with phonons. Below 10 K, we find that the relaxation of the vibrational lattice is the dominant contribution to the loss of TPI visibility. This process is non-Markovian in nature and corresponds to real phonon transitions resulting in a broad phonon sideband in the QD emission spectra. Above 10 K, virtual phonon transitions to higher lying excited states in the QD become the dominant dephasing mechanism, this leads to a broadening of the zero phonon line, and a corresponding rapid decay in the visibility. The microscopic theory we develop provides analytic expressions for the dephasing rates for both virtual phonon scattering and non-Markovian lattice relaxation.

  19. Study of unexplained hard photon production by electrons channelled in a crystal

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Our preceding experiment (NA33) designed to study the pair creation process in the interaction of high energy $\\gamma$ with a crystal in alignment conditions had revealed the existence of an unexpected peak in the radiation of 150 GeV e$^{-}$ beam for E$_{\\gamma}$/E$_{e^{-}} \\simeq$ 0.85 incident along the axis of a 185 $\\mu$m. Ge crystal and the photon multiplicity for the peak events has been measured to be M $\\simeq$ 5.7.\\\\ In NA42, in a 76 $\\mu$m crystal of the same crystallographic quality, the peak nearly disappears, and the photon multiplicity at x = 0.85 is only M $\\simeq$ 2.0. \\\\ The thickness dependence of the effect shows that the extrapolated multiplicity in the peak in a very thin crystal tends to unity. The high energy radiation peak emitted by axially channeled electrons in a thick crystal is then interpreted by the radiation cooling mechanism. \\\\ The extrapolation to zero thickness of these results will allow us to extract from the data the single $\\gamma$ radiation spectrum. The comparison o...

  20. Techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events using segmented germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeninger, K.

    2007-06-05

    Two techniques to distinguish between electron and photon induced events in germanium detectors were studied: (1) anti-coincidence requirements between the segments of segmented germanium detectors and (2) the analysis of the time structure of the detector response. An 18-fold segmented germanium prototype detector for the GERDA neutrinoless double beta-decay experiment was characterized. The rejection of photon induced events was measured for the strongest lines in {sup 60}Co, {sup 152}Eu and {sup 228}Th. An accompanying Monte Carlo simulation was performed and the results were compared to data. An overall agreement with deviations of the order of 5-10% was obtained. The expected background index of the GERDA experiment was estimated. The sensitivity of the GERDA experiment was determined. Special statistical tools were developed to correctly treat the small number of events expected. The GERDA experiment uses a cryogenic liquid as the operational medium for the germanium detectors. It was shown that germanium detectors can be reliably operated through several cooling cycles. (orig.)

  1. Testing QCD in Photon-Photon Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Soldner-Rembold, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    At high energies photon-photon interactions are dominated by quantum fluctuations of the photons into fermion-antifermion pairs and into vector mesons. This is called photon structure. Electron-positron collisions at LEP are an ideal laboratory for studying photon structure and for testing QCD.

  2. Reconstruction and Identification of Photons

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    This note presents the description and performance of photon identification methods in ATLAS. The reconstruction of an electromagnetic object begins in the calorimeter, and the inner detector information determines whether the object is a photon - either converted or unconverted - or an electron. Three photon identification methods are presented: a simple cut-based method, a Loglikelihood- ratio-based method and a covariance-matrix-based method. The shower shape variables based on calorimeter information and track information used in all three methods are described. The efficiencies for single photons and for photons from the benchmark H !gg signal events, as well as the rejection of the background from jet samples, are presented. The performance of the cut-based method on high-pT photons from a graviton decay process G!gg is also discussed.

  3. Response functions of imaging plates to photons, electrons and 4He particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, T; Comet, M; Denis-Petit, D; Gobet, F; Hannachi, F; Tarisien, M; Versteegen, M; Aléonard, M M

    2013-10-01

    Imaging plates from Fuji (BAS-SR, MS, and TR types) are phosphor films routinely used in ultra high intensity laser experiments. However, few data are available on the absolute IP response functions to ionizing particles. We have previously measured and modeled the IP response functions to protons. We focus here on the determination of the responses to photons, electrons, and (4)He particles. The response functions are obtained on an energy range going from a few tens of keV to a few tens of MeV and are compared to available data. The IP sensitivities to the different ionizing particles demonstrate a quenching effect depending on the particle stopping power.

  4. Photon and electron absorbed fractions calculated from a new tomographic rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peixoto, P H R [Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 50740-540, Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, J W [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil); Yoriyaz, H [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Lima, F R A [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares-CNEN, Recife, PE (Brazil)], E-mail: phrpeixoto@yahoo.com.br

    2008-10-07

    This paper describes the development of a tomographic model of a rat developed using CT images of an adult male Wistar rat for radiation transport studies. It also presents calculations of absorbed fractions (AFs) under internal photon and electron sources using this rat model and the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All data related to the developed phantom were made available for the scientific community as well as the MCNP inputs prepared for AF calculations in that phantom and also all estimated AF values, which could be used to obtain absorbed dose estimates-following the MIRD methodology-in rats similar in size to the presently developed model. Comparison between the rat model developed in this study and that published by Stabin et al (2006 J. Nucl. Med. 47 655) for a 248 g Sprague-Dawley rat, as well as between the estimated AF values for both models, has been presented.

  5. Collective, Coherent, and Ultrastrong Coupling of 2D Electrons with Terahertz Cavity Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Xinwei; Reno, John L; Pan, Wei; Watson, John D; Manfra, Michael J; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-01-01

    Nonperturbative coupling of light with condensed matter in an optical cavity is expected to reveal a host of coherent many-body phenomena and states. In addition, strong coherent light-matter interaction in a solid-state environment is of great interest to emerging quantum-based technologies. However, creating a system that combines a long electronic coherence time, a large dipole moment, and a high cavity quality ($Q$) factor has been a challenging goal. Here, we report collective ultrastrong light-matter coupling in an ultrahigh-mobility two-dimensional electron gas in a high-$Q$ terahertz photonic-crystal cavity in a quantizing magnetic field, demonstrating a cooperativity of $\\sim$360. The splitting of cyclotron resonance (CR) into the lower and upper polariton branches exhibited a $\\sqrt{n_\\mathrm{e}}$-dependence on the electron density ($n_\\mathrm{e}$), a hallmark of collective vacuum Rabi splitting. Furthermore, a small but definite blue shift was observed for the polariton frequencies due to the norma...

  6. Neutron, electron and photon transport in ICF tragets in direct and fast ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Fusion energy due to inertial confinement has progressed in the last few decades. In order to increase energy efficiency in this method various designs have been presented. The standard scheme for direct ignition and fast ignition fuel targets are considered. Neutrons, electrons and photons transport in targets containing different combinations of Li and Be are calculated in both direct and fast ignition schemes. To compress spherical multilayer targets having fuel in the central part, they are irradiated by laser or heavy ion beams. Neutrons energy deposition in the target is considered using Monte Carlo method code MCNP. A significant amount of neutrons energy is deposited in the target which resulted in growing fusion reactions rates. It is found that Beryllium compared to Lithium is more important. In an introductory consideration of relativistic electron beam transport into central part of a fast ignition target, we have calculated electron energy deposition in highly dense D-T fuel and Beryllium layer of the target. It has been concluded that a fast ignition scheme is preferred to direct ignition because of the absence of hydrodynamic instability.

  7. Configurable Electronics with Low Noise and 14-bit Dynamic Range for Photodiode-based Photon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, H; Yin, Z; Zhou, D; Cao, X; Li, Q; Liu, Y; Zou, F; Skaali, B; Awes, T C

    2006-01-01

    We describe the principles and measured performance characteristics of custom configurable 32-channel shaper/digitizer Front End Electronics (FEE) cards with 14-bit dynamic range for use with gain-adjustable photon detectors. The electronics has been designed for the PHOS calorimeter of ALICE with avalanche photodiode (APD) readout operated at -25 C ambient temperature and a signal shaping time of $1 {\\mu}s$. The electronics has also been adopted by the EMCal detector of ALICE with the same APD readout, but operated at an ambient temperature of +20 C and with a shaping time of 100ns. The CR-RC2 signal shapers on the FEE cards are implemented in discrete logic on a 10-layer board with two shaper sections for each input channel. The two shaper sections with gain ratio of 16:1 are digitized by 10-bit ADCs and provide an effective dynamic range of 14 bits. Gain adjustment for each individual APD is available through 32 bias voltage control registers of 10-bit range. The fixed gains and shaping times of the pole-z...

  8. Single-Electron and Single-Photon Sensitivity with a Silicon Skipper CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffenberg, Javier; Sofo-Haro, Miguel; Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Essig, Rouven; Guardincerri, Yann; Holland, Steve; Volansky, Tomer; Yu, Tien-Tien

    2017-09-01

    We have developed ultralow-noise electronics in combination with repetitive, nondestructive readout of a thick, fully depleted charge-coupled device (CCD) to achieve an unprecedented noise level of 0.068 e- rms /pixel . This is the first time that discrete subelectron readout noise has been achieved reproducible over millions of pixels on a stable, large-area detector. This enables the contemporaneous, discrete, and quantized measurement of charge in pixels, irrespective of whether they contain zero electrons or thousands of electrons. Thus, the resulting CCD detector is an ultra-sensitive calorimeter. It is also capable of counting single photons in the optical and near-infrared regime. Implementing this innovative non-destructive readout system has a negligible impact on CCD design and fabrication, and there are nearly immediate scientific applications. As a particle detector, this CCD will have unprecedented sensitivity to low-mass dark matter particles and coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering, while future astronomical applications may include direct imaging and spectroscopy of exoplanets.

  9. SU-F-P-49: Comparison of Mapcheck 2 Commission for Photon and Electron Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J; Yang, C; Morris, B; Markovich, A [University of Mississippi Med. Center, Jackson, MS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: We will investigate the performance variation of the MapCheck2 detector array with different array calibration and dose calibration pairs from different radiation therapy machine. Methods: A MapCheck2 detector array was calibrated on 3 Elekta accelerators with different energy of photon (6 MV, 10 MV, 15 MV and 18 MV) and electron (6 MeV, 9 MeV, 12 MeV, 15 MeV, 18 MeV and 20 MeV) beams. Dose calibration was conducted by referring a water phantom measurement following TG-51 protocol and commission data for each accelerator. A 10 cm × 10 cm beam was measured. This measured map was morphed by applying different calibration pairs. Then the difference was quantified by comparing the doses and similarity using gamma analysis of criteria (0.5 %, 0 mm). Profile variation was evaluated on a same dataset with different calibration pairs. The passing rate of an IMRT QA planar dose was calculated by using 3 mm and 3% criteria and compared with respect to each calibration pairs. Results: In this study, a dose variation up to 0.67% for matched photons and 1.0% for electron beams is observed. Differences of flatness and symmetry can be as high as 1% and 0.7% respectively. Gamma analysis shows a passing rate ranging from 34% to 85% for the standard 10 × 10 cm field. Conclusion: Our work demonstrated that a customized array calibration and dose calibration for each machine is preferred to fulfill a high standard patient QA task.

  10. CSIR's new integrated electronic library information-system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Michie, A

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available The CSIR has developed a CDROM-based electronic library information system which provides the ability to reproduce and search for published information and colour brochures on the computer screen. The system integrates this information with online...

  11. Thermoluminescence response of sodalime glass irradiated with photon and electron beams in the 1-20 Gy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolotta, A., E-mail: antonio.bartolotta@unipa.it [Dipartimento Farmacochimico, Tossicologico e Biologico, via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Brai, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V, INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Caputo, V. [Unita Operativa Complessa Fisica Sanitaria, ARNAS, Palermo (Italy); D' Oca, M.C. [Dipartimento Farmacochimico, Tossicologico e Biologico, via Archirafi 32, 90123 Palermo (Italy); Longo, A.; Marrale, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Tecnologie Relative, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V, INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2011-09-15

    The thermoluminescence response of a watch commercial glass was studied after irradiation with photons and electrons, in the range 1-20 Gy, of interest in accidental dosimetry; a linear response was obtained with both beams. This result, together with the satisfactory time stability of the thermoluminescence signal, indicates this glass as a potential material for retrospective dosimetry applications.

  12. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangiarotti, Alessio; Sona, Pietro; Ballestrero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are establi...

  13. Antiproton–to–electron mass ratio determined by two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sótér A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ASACUSA collaboration of CERN has recently carried out two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms. Three transition frequencies were determined with fractional precisions of 2.3–5 parts in 109. By comparing the results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio was determined as 1836.1526736(23.

  14. Electron heating by photon-assisted tunneling in niobium terahertz mixers with integrated niobium titanium nitride striplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leone, B; Gao, [No Value; Klapwijk, TM; Jackson, BD; Laauwen, WM; de Lange, G

    2001-01-01

    We describe the gap voltage depression and current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in pumped niobium superconductor-insulator-superconductor junction with niobium titanium nitride tuning stripline by introducing an electron heating power contribution resulting from the photon-assisted tunneling

  15. Comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo calculations of multi-photon effects in bremsstrahlung emission by high-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangiarotti, A. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Particulas, Coimbra (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Sona, P., E-mail: pietro.sona@fi.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Firenze, Polo Scientifico, Via G. Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Firenze (Italy); Ballestrero, S. [Department of Physics University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); CERN PH/ADT, Geneve (Switzerland); Uggerhoj, U.I.; Andersen, K.K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-10-15

    Approximate analytical calculations of multi-photon effects in the spectrum of total radiated energy by high-energy electrons crossing thin targets are compared to the results of Monte Carlo type simulations. The limits of validity of the analytical expressions found in the literature are established. The separate contributions to spectral distortion of electromagnetic processes other than bremsstrahlung are also studied in detail.

  16. CHALLENGES OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION RESOURCES IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the role of policy for proper and efficient library services in the electronic era. It points out some of the possible dangers of embarking in electronic resources without a proper focus at hand. Thus, it calls for today's librarians and policy makers to brainstorm and come up with working policies suitable to ...

  17. A segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics for a PET scanner

    CERN Document Server

    Chesi, Enrico Guido; Joram, C; Mathot, S; Séguinot, Jacques; Weilhammer, P; Ciocia, F; De Leo, R; Nappi, E; Vilardi, I; Argentieri, A; Corsi, F; Dragone, A; Pasqua, D

    2006-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and test results of a segmented Hybrid Photon Detector with integrated auto-triggering front-end electronics. Both the photodetector and its VLSI readout electronics are custom designed and have been tailored to the requirements of a recently proposed novel geometrical concept of a Positron Emission Tomograph. Emphasis is put on the PET specific features of the device. The detector has been fabricated in the photocathode facility at CERN.

  18. Spin-photon interface and spin-controlled photon switching in a nanobeam waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javadi, Alisa; Ding, Dapeng; Appel, Martin Hayhurst

    2017-01-01

    Access to the electron spin is at the heart of many protocols for integrated and distributed quantum-information processing [1-4]. For instance, interfacing the spin-state of an electron and a photon can be utilized to perform quantum gates between photons [2,5] or to entangle remote spin states [6......-9]. Ultimately, a quantum network of entangled spins constitutes a new paradigm in quantum optics [1]. Towards this goal, an integrated spin-photon interface would be a major leap forward. Here we demonstrate an efficient and optically programmable interface between the spin of an electron in a quantum dot...... and photons in a nanophotonic waveguide. The spin can be deterministically prepared with a fidelity of 96\\%. Subsequently the system is used to implement a "single-spin photonic switch", where the spin state of the electron directs the flow of photons through the waveguide. The spin-photon interface may...

  19. The Fisher-Shannon information plane, an electron correlation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, E; Dehesa, J S

    2004-05-15

    A new correlation measure, the product of the Shannon entropy power and the Fisher information of the electron density, is introduced by analyzing the Fisher-Shannon information plane of some two-electron systems (He-like ions, Hooke's atoms). The uncertainty and scaling properties of this information product are pointed out. In addition, the Fisher and Shannon measures of a finite many-electron system are shown to be bounded by the corresponding single-electron measures and the number of electrons of the system.

  20. Direct observation of photocarrier electron dynamics in C60 films on graphite by time-resolved two-photon photoemission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuta, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Ohta, Tsutomu; Nakaya, Masato; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PPE) spectroscopy is employed to probe the electronic states of a C60 fullerene film formed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), acting as a model two-dimensional (2D) material for multi-layered graphene. Owing to the in-plane sp2-hybridized nature of the HOPG, the TR-2PPE spectra reveal the energetics and dynamics of photocarriers in the C60 film: after hot excitons are nascently formed in C60 via intramolecular excitation by a pump photon, they dissociate into photocarriers of free electrons and the corresponding holes, and the electrons are subsequently detected by a probe photon as photoelectrons. The decay rate of photocarriers from the C60 film into the HOPG is evaluated to be 1.31 × 1012 s−1, suggesting a weak van der Waals interaction at the interface, where the photocarriers tentatively occupy the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of C60. The photocarrier electron dynamics following the hot exciton dissociation in the organic thin films has not been realized for any metallic substrates exhibiting strong interactions with the overlayer. Furthermore, the thickness dependence of the electron lifetime in the LUMO reveals that the electron hopping rate in C60 layers is 3.3 ± 1.2 × 1013 s−1. PMID:27775005

  1. Performance of electron, photon and muon triggers at the CMS High Level Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069734

    2016-01-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of the experiments. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with the detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system the Level 1 (L1) Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS reconstruction and analysis software running on a computer farm. Here we will present the design and performance of the main muon, electron and photon triggers, in view of the more challenging conditions for the LHC Run 2. For the muon case, we discuss the improvements in the isolation algorithm with the usage of Particle Flow techniques, which allow for better discrimination power between processes with prompt muons and the the effect of jets penetrating through the hadronic calorimeter into the muon chambers. For the ele...

  2. Two-photon laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium and the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Barna, Daniel; Andreas Dax,; Hayano, Ryugo; Friedreich, Susanne; Juhász, Bertalan; Pask, Thomas; Widmann, Eberhard; Horváth, Dezső; Venturelli, Luca; Zurlo, Nicola; 10.1038/nature10260

    2013-01-01

    Physical laws are believed to be invariant under the combined transformations of charge, parity and time reversal (CPT symmetry). This implies that an antimatter particle has exactly the same mass and absolute value of charge as its particle counterpart. Metastable antiprotonic helium ($\\bar{p}He^+$) is a three-body atom2 consisting of a normal helium nucleus, an electron in its ground state and an antiproton ($\\bar{p}$) occupying a Rydberg state with high principal and angular momentum quantum numbers, respectively n and l, such that n ≈ l + 1 ≈ 38. These atoms are amenable to precision laser spectroscopy, the results of which can in principle be used to determine the antiproton-to-electron mass ratio and to constrain the equality between the antiproton and proton charges and masses. Here we report two-photon spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium, in which $\\bar{p}^{3}He^{+}$ and $\\bar{p}^{4}He^{+}$ isotopes are irradiated by two counter-propagating laser beams. This excites nonlinear, two-phot...

  3. Electron and Photon High Level Trigger in CMS for Run II

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2084857

    2014-01-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system. The first level is implemented on custom-designed electronics. The second level is the so-called High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. For Run II of the Large Hadron Collider, the increase in center-of-mass energy and luminosity will raise the event rate to a level challenging for the HLT algorithms. New approaches have been studied to contain the HLT rate within the available bandwidth while keeping thresholds low enough to cover the requirements of the physics analyses. The strategy mainly relies on porting online the improvements that have been applied to the offline reconstruction, thus allowing to move HLT selection closer to offline cuts. We present such changes in the definitions of HLT electrons and photons, focusing in particular on the deployment of a new clustering algorithm allowing pileup mitigation, a new Particle-Flow based isolation replacing th...

  4. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers for high-energy photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanxiao; Willomitzer, Christian; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of depth-dose curves in water phantom using a cylindrical ionization chamber require that its effective point of measurement is located at the measuring depth. Recommendations for the position of the effective point of measurement with respect to the central axis valid for high-energy electron and photon beams are given in dosimetry protocols. According to these protocols, the use of a constant shift P(eff) is currently recommended. However, this is still based on a very limited set of experimental results. It is therefore expected that an improved knowledge of the exact position of the effective point of measurement will further improve the accuracy of dosimetry. Recent publications have revealed that the position of the effective point of measurement is indeed varying with beam energy, field size and also with chamber geometry. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the shift of P(eff) can be taken to be constant and independent from the beam energy. An experimental determination of the effective point of measurement is presented based on a comparison between cylindrical chambers and a plane-parallel chamber using conventional dosimetry equipment. For electron beams, the determination is based on the comparison of halfvalue depth R(50) between the cylindrical chamber of interest and a well guarded plane-parallel Roos chamber. For photon beams, the depth of dose maximum, d(max), the depth of 80% dose, d(80), and the dose parameter PDD(10) were used. It was again found that the effective point of measurement for both, electron and photon beams Dosimetry, depends on the beam energy. The deviation from a constant value remains very small for photons, whereas significant deviations were found for electrons. It is therefore concluded that use of a single upstream shift value from the centre of the cylindrical chamber as recommended in current dosimetry protocols is adequate for photons, however inadequate for accurate electron beam dosimetry.

  5. Monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for large-scale electronic-photonic integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jifeng; Kimerling, Lionel C.; Michel, Jurgen

    2012-09-01

    A silicon-based monolithic laser source has long been envisioned as a key enabling component for large-scale electronic-photonic integration in future generations of high-performance computation and communication systems. In this paper we present a comprehensive review on the development of monolithic Ge-on-Si lasers for this application. Starting with a historical review of light emission from the direct gap transition of Ge dating back to the 1960s, we focus on the rapid progress in band-engineered Ge-on-Si lasers in the past five years after a nearly 30-year gap in this research field. Ge has become an interesting candidate for active devices in Si photonics in the past decade due to its pseudo-direct gap behavior and compatibility with Si complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) processing. In 2007, we proposed combing tensile strain with n-type doping to compensate the energy difference between the direct and indirect band gap of Ge, thereby achieving net optical gain for CMOS-compatible diode lasers. Here we systematically present theoretical modeling, material growth methods, spontaneous emission, optical gain, and lasing under optical and electrical pumping from band-engineered Ge-on-Si, culminated by recently demonstrated electrically pumped Ge-on-Si lasers with >1 mW output in the communication wavelength window of 1500-1700 nm. The broad gain spectrum enables on-chip wavelength division multiplexing. A unique feature of band-engineered pseudo-direct gap Ge light emitters is that the emission intensity increases with temperature, exactly opposite to conventional direct gap semiconductor light-emitting devices. This extraordinary thermal anti-quenching behavior greatly facilitates monolithic integration on Si microchips where temperatures can reach up to 80 °C during operation. The same band-engineering approach can be extended to other pseudo-direct gap semiconductors, allowing us to achieve efficient light emission at wavelengths previously

  6. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V(25 Gy)). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p photon-electron (mean = 50.8 ± 40.9 cm(3)) and photon-only beams (mean = 32.2 ± 28.1 cm(3), p = 0.114). Heart V(25 Gy) was not statistically different among the plans (p = 0.999). Total lung V(20 Gy) was lowest in electron-only (mean = 10.9 ± 2.3%) followed by combined photon-electron (mean = 13.8 ± 2.3%) and highest in photon-only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V(20 Gy). The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the

  7. Bowel sparing in pediatric cranio-spinal radiotherapy: a comparison of combined electron and photon and helical TomoTherapy techniques to a standard photon method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harron, Elizabeth, E-mail: elizabeth.harron@nuh.nhs.uk [Regional Medical Physics Department, Freeman Hospital, Freeman Road, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Lewis, Joanne [Northern Centre for Cancer Care, Freeman Hospital, Freeman Road, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the dose to organs at risk (OARs) from different craniospinal radiotherapy treatment approaches available at the Northern Centre for Cancer Care (NCCC), with a particular emphasis on sparing the bowel. Method: Treatment plans were produced for a pediatric medulloblastoma patient with inflammatory bowel disease using 3D conformal 6-MV photons (3DCP), combined 3D 6-MV photons and 18-MeV electrons (3DPE), and helical photon TomoTherapy (HT). The 3DPE plan was a modification of the standard 3DCP technique, using electrons to treat the spine inferior to the level of the diaphragm. The plans were compared in terms of the dose-volume data to OARs and the nontumor integral dose. Results: The 3DPE plan was found to give the lowest dose to the bowel and the lowest nontumor integral dose of the 3 techniques. However, the coverage of the spine planning target volume (PTV) was least homogeneous using this technique, with only 74.6% of the PTV covered by 95% of the prescribed dose. HT was able to achieve the best coverage of the PTVs (99.0% of the whole-brain PTV and 93.1% of the spine PTV received 95% of the prescribed dose), but delivered a significantly higher integral dose. HT was able to spare the heart, thyroid, and eyes better than the linac-based techniques, but other OARs received a higher dose. Conclusions: Use of electrons was the best method for reducing the dose to the bowel and the integral dose, at the expense of compromised spine PTV coverage. For some patients, HT may be a viable method of improving dose homogeneity and reducing selected OAR doses.

  8. Microwave photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Chi H

    2006-01-01

    Wireless, optical, and electronic networks continue to converge, prompting heavy research into the interface between microwave electronics, ultrafast optics, and photonic technologies. New developments arrive nearly as fast as the photons under investigation, and their commercial impact depends on the ability to stay abreast of new findings, techniques, and technologies. Presenting a broad yet in-depth survey, Microwave Photonics examines the major advances that are affecting new applications in this rapidly expanding field.This book reviews important achievements made in microwave photonics o

  9. A study of Rhizophora spp wood phantom for dosimetric purposes using high-energy photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjade, D P; Tajuddin, A A; Shukri, A

    2001-09-01

    Previous scattering and depth-dose investigations involving use of the Malaysian hardwood Rhizophora spp have shown this medium to produce good agreement with measurements made in water. Present study extends the comparison, now including measurements of percentage depth-dose made for photons at 6MV and 5 and 12MeV electron beams. For the 6 MV photon and 5 MeV electron beams, discrepancies between percentage depth-dose for Rhizophora spp and water, at all depths, are found to be within 2.6 and 2.4% respectively. At 12 MeV electron energies, measured percentage depth-doses in Rhizophora spp beyond 3.5cm depth are found to be in significant discord with those for water. The absorbed dose in water measured in Rhizophora spp at d(max) for all three beams produces discrepancies of no more than 1.1% when compared with measurements made in water.

  10. A study of Rhizophora spp wood phantom for dosimetric purposes using high-energy photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banjade, D.P. E-mail: dpbl4007@stud.usm.my; Tajuddin, A.A.; Shukri, A

    2001-09-01

    Previous scattering and depth-dose investigations involving use of the Malaysian hardwood Rhizophora spp have shown this medium to produce good agreement with measurements made in water. Present study extends the comparison, now including measurements of percentage depth-dose made for photons at 6 MV and 5 and 12 MeV electron beams. For the 6 MV photon and 5 MeV electron beams, discrepancies between percentage depth-dose for Rhizophora spp and water, at all depths, are found to be within 2.6 and 2.4% respectively. At 12 MeV electron energies, measured percentage depth-doses in Rhizophora spp beyond 3.5 cm depth are found to be in significant discord with those for water. The absorbed dose in water measured in Rhizophora spp at d{sub max} for all three beams produces discrepancies of no more than 1.1% when compared with measurements made in water.

  11. DPM, a fast, accurate Monte Carlo code optimized for photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempau, J; Wilderman, S J; Bielajew, A F

    2000-08-01

    A new Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm, the 'dose planning method' (DPM), and its associated computer program for simulating the transport of electrons and photons in radiotherapy class problems employing primary electron beams, is presented. DPM is intended to be a high accuracy MC alternative to the current generation of treatment planning codes which rely on analytical algorithms based on an approximate solution of the photon/electron Boltzmann transport equation. For primary electron beams, DPM is capable of computing 3D dose distributions (in 1 mm3 voxels) which agree to within 1% in dose maximum with widely used and exhaustively benchmarked general-purpose public-domain MC codes in only a fraction of the CPU time. A representative problem, the simulation of 1 million 10 MeV electrons impinging upon a water phantom of 128(3) voxels of 1 mm on a side, can be performed by DPM in roughly 3 min on a modern desktop workstation. DPM achieves this performance by employing transport mechanics and electron multiple scattering distribution functions which have been derived to permit long transport steps (of the order of 5 mm) which can cross heterogeneity boundaries. The underlying algorithm is a 'mixed' class simulation scheme, with differential cross sections for hard inelastic collisions and bremsstrahlung events described in an approximate manner to simplify their sampling. The continuous energy loss approximation is employed for energy losses below some predefined thresholds, and photon transport (including Compton, photoelectric absorption and pair production) is simulated in an analogue manner. The delta-scattering method (Woodcock tracking) is adopted to minimize the computational costs of transporting photons across voxels.

  12. A Model for an Electronic Information Marketplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ge

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available As the information content on the Internet increases, the task of locating desired information and assessing its quality becomes increasingly difficult. This development causes users to be more willing to pay for information that is focused on specific issues, verifiable, and available upon request. Thus, the nature of the Internet opens up the opportunity for information trading. In this context, the Internet cannot only be used to close the transaction, but also to deliver the product - desired information - to the user. Early attempts to implement such business models have fallen short of expectations. In this paper, we discuss the limitations of such practices and present a modified business model for information trading, which uses a reverse auction approach together with a multiple-buyer price discovery process

  13. Devices for Information Presentation in Electronic Dictionaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For highly complex situations, we suggest guidance through a decision tree-like device. We assume that the solutions proposed here are not specific to one language only but can, after careful analysis, be applied to e-dictionaries in different languages across the world. Keywords: Electronic Dictionaries; User Guidance; ...

  14. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Argon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for argon (Ar). About 1,960 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1921 through 2000 for Ar. Finally, author's recommended Ar electron collision cross section set is given in numerical tables. (author)

  15. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Sulphur hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}). About 920 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1934 through 2000 for SF{sub 6}. Finally, author's comments for SF{sub 6} electron collision cross section are given. (author)

  16. Bibliography of electron and photon cross sections with atoms and molecules published in the 20th century. Carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Makoto [Gaseous Electronics Institute, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    A bibliography of original and review reports of experiments or theories of electron and photon cross sections and also electron swarm data are presented for atomic or molecular species with specified targets. These works covered 17 atoms and 51 molecules. The present bibliography is only for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). About 1,240 papers were compiled. A comprehensive author index is included. The bibliography covers the period 1901 through 2000 for CO{sub 2}. Finally, author's comments for CO{sub 2} electron collision cross sections are given. (author)

  17. On the exchange of orbital angular momentum between twisted photons and atomic electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Basil S.; Kaplan, L.; McGuire, J. H.

    2013-03-01

    We obtain an expression for the matrix element for scattering of a twisted (Laguerre-Gaussian profile) photon from a hydrogen atom. We consider photons incoming with an orbital angular momentum (OAM) of ℓħ, carried by a factor of eiℓϕ not present in a plane-wave or pure Gaussian profile beam. The nature of the transfer of +2ℓ units of OAM from the photon to the azimuthal atomic quantum number of the atom is investigated. We obtain simple formulas for these OAM flip transitions for elastic forward scattering of twisted photons when the photon wavelength λ is large compared with the atomic target size a, and small compared with the Rayleigh range zR, which characterizes the collimation length of the twisted photon beam.

  18. Use of electronic information resources in goverment libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Omahen

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the use of electronic information resources in government libraries in Slovenia. It starts with the definition of government libraries and electronic publications. On a selected sample of government libraries, the state of the usage of electronic information resources in government libraries was studied. On the basis of interviews, carried out in five government libraries, it was established that government libraries mostly do not focus on, or even think about, the use of electronic information resources. What they have and use seems self-evident to them.

  19. Dosimetry of an accident in mixed field (neutrons, photons) using the spectrometry by electronic paramagnetic resonance(EPR); Dosimetrie d'accident en champ mixte (neutrons, photons) utilisant la spectrometrie par resonance paramagnetique electronique (RPE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve, M.L

    2006-03-15

    In a radiological accident, the assessment of the dose received by the victim is relevant information for the therapeutic strategy. Two complementary dosimetric techniques based on physical means are used in routine practice in the laboratory: EPR spectroscopy performed on materials removed from the victim or gathered from the vicinity of the victim and Monte Carlo calculations. EPR dosimetry, has been used successfully several times in cases of photon or electron overexposures. Accidental exposure may also occur with a neutron component. The aim of this work is to investigate the potentiality of EPR dosimetry for mixed photon and neutron field exposure with different organic materials (ascorbic acid, sorbitol, glucose, galactose, fructose, mannose, lactose and sucrose). The influence of irradiation parameters (dose, dose rate, photon energy) and of environmental parameters (temperature of heating, light exposure) on the EPR signal amplitude was studied. To assess the neutron sensitivity, the materials were exposed to a mixed radiation field of experimental reactors with different neutron to photon ratios. The relative neutron sensitivity was found to range from 10% to 43% according to the materials. Prior knowledge of the ratio between the dose in samples measured by EPR spectrometry and organ or whole body dose obtained by calculations previously performed for these different configurations, makes it possible to give a first estimation of the dose received by the victim in a short delay. The second aim of this work is to provide data relevant for a quick assessment of the dose distribution in case of accidental overexposure based on EPR measurements performed on one or several points of the body. The study consists in determining by calculation the relation between the dose to the organs and whole body and the dose to specific points of the body, like teeth, bones or samples located in the pockets of victim clothes, for different external exposures corresponding

  20. 2015 Utilization of Electronic Information Resources in Ramat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of Electronic Information Resources in Ramat Library, University of Maiduguri, Nigeria. 195 ... Information Impact Vol. 6 (2) 2015. Introduction. The concept of "e-resources" which stands for electronic resources has become a global phenomenon which emerged as a ... Science, Delta State University Abaraka,.

  1. Information Impact Vol. 6 (2) 2015 Utilization of Electronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of electronic information Resource skills training for lecturers on pedagogical practices and research productivity. International journal of Education and Development using information and communication. Technology. 8(1), 16-28. Deng, H. (2010). Emerging Patterns and. Trends in Utilizing Electronic Resources in.

  2. 48 CFR 1352.239-71 - Electronic and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic and information technology. 1352.239-71 Section 1352.239-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 1352.239-71 Electronic and information technolog...

  3. The impact of electronic information resource use on research output

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the impact of the use of electronic information resources on research output in the universities in Tanzania. Research for this paper was conducted in five public universities in Tanzania with varied levels of access to electronic information resources. The selection of the sample universities was ...

  4. 48 CFR 311.7000 - Defining electronic information technology requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defining electronic information technology requirements. 311.7000 Section 311.7000 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH... Accessibility Standards 311.7000 Defining electronic information technology requirements. HHS staff that define...

  5. Analog Photonic Links for Built-in-Testing of Electronic Support Measures (ESM) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-26

    the biconical antenna under test. We also discuss extension of the photonic BIT architecture to wideband (500 MHz - 40 GHz) operation. 26-06-2009...10 Wireless Link and Composite BIT System Gain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 VI EFFECTS OF THE PHOTONIC BIT SYSTEM ON THE BICONICAL ...the biconical antenna under test. We also discuss extension of the photonic BIT architecture to wideband (∼500 MHz - 40 GHz) operation. E-1 II

  6. Electronic and photonic application of C60. Denki denshi kogaku eno oyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, T. (NTT Interdisciplinary Research Laboratories, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-01-20

    This paper describes the following matters related to application of photonic and electronic characteristics of Fullerene: C60 crystals precipitated from benzene aqueous solution have an fcc structure and an hcp structure mixed, with its mixing ratio depending on hysteresis of test specimens. Mono-crystal thin films of C60 and C70 can be formed on mica substrates by means of a vacuum deposition process. On a CaF2 (111) substrate under normal temperature, a C60 thin film with the fcc structure grows in a single direction in the plane having its (111) plane paralleled with the substrate face. However, on a substrate under elevated temperatures, the film grows in two different directions in the plane, making grid conformity better in C60 and CaF2. Thin films of C60 and C70 transfer to a low temperature phase at a temperature of about 260 K or lower. Carbon nanocapsules containing LaC2 monocrystals can be obtained from arc discharge of a graphite electrode containing La oxides. The paper introduces nonlinear optical characteristics of C60 and C70 thin films, and light conductive polymers doped with C6O and C70. 39 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Study of electron pair and photon production in lead-gold collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    Ravinovich, I; Fraenkel, Z; Gnaenski, A

    2002-01-01

    This is a continuation of the NA45 experiment dedicated to the measurement of electron-positron pairs and direct photons produced in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS energies. The main goal remains as outlined in NA45. The strong enhancement of low-mass pairs, over the expected yield from hadronic sources, observed in S-Au collisions by NA45, adds considerably to the physics potential and to the interest in the measurement of these variables. \\\\\\\\The figure shows the layout of the CERES spectrometer which has been upgraded to cope with the higher multiplicities and background of central Pb-Pb collisions. The basic spectrometer remains unchanged, namely two Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors (RICH), one situated before the other after a short superconducting double solenoid. The main elements of the upgrade are additional detectors, two silicon radial-drift chambers (instead of one in the original set-up) and a pad chamber (a large MWPC with pad readout) located behind the spectrometer. They allow real tracking and help...

  8. The CMS Level-1 electron and photon trigger: for Run II of LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, N.; Jessop, C.; Meng, F.; Marinelli, N.; Taroni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Cadamuro, L.; Davignon, O.; Romanteau, T.; Strebler, T.; Zabi, A.; Sauvan, J. B.; Marrouche, J.; Wardle, N.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Brooke, J.; Newbold, D.; Paramesvaran, S.; Smith, D.; Taylor, J.; Baber, M.; Bundock, A.; Citron, M.; Elwood, A.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Laner, C.; Penning, B.; Rose, A.; Shtipliyski, A.; Tapper, A.; Durkin, T.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.; Thea, A.; Williams, T.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Xia, F.

    2017-02-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) employs a sophisticated two-level online triggering system that has a rejection factor of up to 105. Since the beginning of Run II of LHC, the conditions that CMS operates in have become increasingly challenging. The centre-of-mass energy is now 13 TeV and the instantaneous luminosity currently peaks at 1.5 ×1034 cm-2s-1. In order to keep low physics thresholds and to trigger efficiently in such conditions, the CMS trigger system has been upgraded. A new trigger architecture, the Time Multiplexed Trigger (TMT) has been introduced which allows the full granularity of the calorimeters to be exploited at the first level of the online trigger. The new trigger has also benefited immensely from technological improvements in hardware. Sophisticated algorithms, developed to fully exploit the advantages provided by the new hardware architecture, have been implemented. The new trigger system started taking physics data in 2016 following a commissioning period in 2015, and since then has performed extremely well. The hardware and firmware developments, electron and photon algorithms together with their performance in challenging 2016 conditions is presented.

  9. Consequences of partitioning the photon into its electrical and magnetic vectors upon absorption by an electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumski, Daniel S.

    2013-10-01

    This research uses classical arguments to develop a blackbody spectral equation that provides useful insights into heat processes. The theory unites in a single equation, the heat radiation theory of Planck and the heat of molecular motion theory of Maxwell and Boltzmann. Light absorption is considered a two-step process. The first is an adiabatic reversible step, wherein one-dimensional light energy is absorbed in a quantum amount, ! h" , by an electron. The absorbed quanta is still 1-dimensional(1-D), and remains within the domain of reversible thermodynamics. There is no recourse to the Second Law during this first step. The absorption process' second step is a dimensional restructuring wherein the electrical and magnetic vectors evolve separately. The 1-D electrical quanta transforms into its 3-D equivalent, electrical charge density. The resulting displacement of the generalized coordinates translates to 3-D motion, the evolution of Joule heat, and irreversible thermodynamics. The magnetic vector has no 3-D equivalent, and can only transform to 1-D paramagnetic spin. Accordingly, photon decoupling distorts time's fabric, giving rise to the characteristic blackbody spectral emittance. This study's spectral equation introduces a new quantity to physics, the radiation temperature. Where it is identical to the classical thermodynamic temperature, the blackbody spectral curves are consistent with Planck's. However, by separating these two temperatures in a stable far-from-equilibrium manner, new energy storage modes become possible at the atomic level, something that could have profound implications in understanding matter's living state.

  10. MOCVD Grown InP and Related Thin Films on Silicon Substrates for Electron and Photonic Devices Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhenyu

    Heterogeneous integration of III-V compound semiconductor with silicon is attracting renewed attention in recent years due to its potential in electronic and photonic applications. For electronic applications, a robust integration allows low-voltage and high-speed III-V based transistors to couple with mature silicon-based technologies for functional circuit blocks. Several successful demonstrations have been achieved by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). In regard to photonic applications, silicon photonics is an important area of research with its possible replacement of copper interconnects. The well-developed III-V photonic devices can be utilized on a silicon platform if a seamless integration can be realized. This concept has been extensively demonstrated by wafer bonding, whereas the manufacturing complexity, reliability and yield are main challenges in this transfer technique. In this thesis, demonstration of heterogeneous integration of III-V based electron and photonic devices on silicon substrates is described, using Metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), which is considered more compatible with CMOS processes with good potential for wafer level manufacturing. In this work, InP thin films with smooth surface morphology were firstly achieved by introducing thin GaAs buffer layers. The GaAs buffer was optimized based on the surface morphology, crystalline quality and in situ RAS signal. The total thickness of the buffer layer was finally reduced to 1.2mum by trimming the GaAs buffers as a thin buffer is more desirable for process integration. On top of the thin InP buffer layers, high performance metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs) have been demonstrated for the first time. To implement photonic devices on the buffers, the epitaxial films quality was further improved utilizing novel post-treatment techniques, including thermal process and strained layers for defects reduction. InGaAs p-i-n photodetectors lattice-matched to In

  11. Photonic and opto-electronic applications of polydiacetylene films photodeposited from solution and polydiacetylene copolymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Mark S.; Frazier, Donald O.; Smith, David D.; Witherow, William K.; Abdeldayem, Hossin A.; Wolfe, Daniel B.

    1998-08-01

    Polydiacetylenes (PDAs) are attractive materials for both electronic and photonic applications because of their highly conjugated electronic structures. They have been investigated for applications as both 1D conductors and nonlinear optical (NLO) materials. One of the chief limitations to the use of PDAs has been the inability to readily process them into useful forms such as films and fibers. In our laboratory we have developed a novel process for obtaining amorphous films of a PDA derived from 2- methyl-4-nitroaniline using photodeposition with UV light from monomer solutions onto transparent substrates. Photodeposition from solution provides a simple technique for obtaining PDA films in any desired pattern with good optical quality. This technique has been used to produce PDA films that show potential for optical applications such as holographic memory storage and optical limiting, as well as third-order NLO applications such as all-optical refractive index modulation, phase modulation and switching. Additionally, copolymerization of diacetylenes with other monomers such as methacrylates provides a means to obtain materials with good processibility. Such copolymers can be spin cast to form films, or drawn by either melt or solution extrusion into fibers. These films or fibers can then be irradiated with UV to photopolymerize the diacetylene units to form a highly stable cross-linked PDA-copolymer network. If such films are electrically poled while being irradiated, they can achieve the asymmetry necessary for second-order NLO applications such as electro-optic switching. On Earth, formation of PDAs by the above mentioned techniques suffers from defects and inhomogeneities caused by convective flows that can arise during processing. By studying the formation of these materials in the reduced-convection, diffusion- controlled environment of space we hope to better understand the factors that affect their processing, and thereby, their nature and properties

  12. Deconvoluting the Photonic and Electronic Response of 2D Materials: The Case of MoS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kehao; Borys, Nicholas J; Bersch, Brian M; Bhimanapati, Ganesh R; Xu, Ke; Wang, Baoming; Wang, Ke; Labella, Michael; Williams, Teague A; Haque, Md Amanul; Barnard, Edward S; Fullerton-Shirey, Susan; Schuck, P James; Robinson, Joshua A

    2017-12-05

    Evaluating and tuning the properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials is a major focus of advancing 2D science and technology. While many claim that the photonic properties of a 2D layer provide evidence that the material is "high quality", this may not be true for electronic performance. In this work, we deconvolute the photonic and electronic response of synthetic monolayer molybdenum disulfide. We demonstrate that enhanced photoluminescence can be robustly engineered via the proper choice of substrate, where growth of MoS2 on r-plane sapphire can yield >100x enhancement in PL and carrier lifetime due to increased molybdenum-oxygen bonding compared to that of traditionally grown MoS2 on c-plane sapphire. These dramatic enhancements in optical properties are similar to those of super-acid treated MoS2, and suggest that the electronic properties of the MoS2 are also superior. However, a direct comparison of the charge transport properties indicates that the enhanced PL due to increased Mo-O bonding leads to p-type compensation doping, and is accompanied by a 2x degradation in transport properties compared to MoS2 grown on c-plane sapphire. This work provides a foundation for understanding the link between photonic and electronic performance of 2D semiconducting layers, and demonstrates that they are not always correlated.

  13. An OpenCL-based Monte Carlo dose calculation engine (oclMC) for coupled photon-electron transport

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Zhen; Folkerts, Michael; Qin, Nan; Jiang, Steve B; Jia, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) method has been recognized the most accurate dose calculation method for radiotherapy. However, its extremely long computation time impedes clinical applications. Recently, a lot of efforts have been made to realize fast MC dose calculation on GPUs. Nonetheless, most of the GPU-based MC dose engines were developed in NVidia CUDA environment. This limits the code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC simulations to clinical practice. The objective of this paper is to develop a fast cross-platform MC dose engine oclMC using OpenCL environment for external beam photon and electron radiotherapy in MeV energy range. Coupled photon-electron MC simulation was implemented with analogue simulations for photon transports and a Class II condensed history scheme for electron transports. To test the accuracy and efficiency of our dose engine oclMC, we compared dose calculation results of oclMC and gDPM, our previously developed GPU-based MC code, for a 15 MeV electron ...

  14. Sphinx1: Spectrometric Photon Counting and Integration Pixel for X-Ray Imaging With a 100 Electron LSB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Amr; Arques, Marc; Dupont, Bertrand; Rohr, Pierre; Sicard, Gilles; Tchagaspanian, Michaël; Verger, Loïck

    2015-06-01

    Sphinx1 is a novel pixel architecture adapted for X-ray imaging that can detect radiation by photon counting and by charge integration. In photon counting mode, each photon is compensated by one or more counter-charge packets which can be dimensioned at a level as low as 100 electrons and the number of injected counter-charge packets indicates the incoming photon energy, thus allowing a spectrometric detection. The pixel is also able to detect radiation by integrating the charges deposited by all incoming photons and converting this analog value into a digital data with a least significant bit (LSB) of 100 electrons through the use of the counter-charge concept. In this paper, Sphinx1 pixel architecture is presented with emphasis on the counter-charge design, and the two modes of operation are described in detail. The pixel was simulated using Eldo simulator. Simulation results indicate an equivalent noise charge (ENC) of 48 electrons-rms for a detector capacitance of 75 fF. The LSB linearity and the ENC are further studied for different values of detector capacitances. The analog and digital power consumptions are calculated to be less than 1 μW in static conditions, proving the architecture to be suitable for large area detectors. Finally, corner simulations show a consistent performance against transistors mismatch. Proof of concept test chip of 5 mm × 5 mm. test chip is being designed fabricated in CMOS 0.13 μm technology, with a pixel pitch of 200 μm.

  15. SU-E-T-432: Field Size Influence On the Electron and Photon Spectra Within Small MV Field Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmakhlouf, H; Andreo, P [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm and Department of Physics, Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of photon field size on the electron and photon fluence spectra in the active volume of small field detectors. Methods: The PENELOPE MC system based usercode PenEasy was used to calculate the material influence on the spectra by scoring the differential fluence in inserts of silicon, carbon, phosphorus and aluminium having 3 mm diameter and height. The spectra were then calculated inside the active volume of eleven detectors (ion chambers and solid-state detectors) whose geometry was simulated with great detail. The inserts/detectors were placed at 10 cm depth in a 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom and irradiated with 2.5 MeV photons and Varian Clinac 6 MV beams of small, medium and large size. Results: For all configurations, photon spectra in the scoring volume were similar to that in a small water volume except for additional characteristic x-ray peaks resulting from the material itself and from the materials surrounding the detectors (i.e. high-Z shielding the silicon). Electron fluence calculated in the inserts were up to 60% larger than in water; the difference increased with material density and decreasing field size. MC-calculated doses were compared to analytically determined collision kerma and restricted cema (cut-off=15keV). For the inserts, with large and medium fields K-col agreed with MC-dose, but K-col overestimated the dose for small fields due to lack of lateral CPE. For the detectors, up to 15% differences between K-col and the MC-dose were found. For all configurations the C-delta and MC-dose agreed within ±2%. Conclusion: The most relevant findings were that shielding affects substantially the photon spectra and material conditions the electron spectra, their field size dependence varying with the geometry configuration. These affect the values of factors entering into relative dosimetry.

  16. Electronic Health Information Legal Epidemiology Protocol 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Authors: Cason Schmit, JD, Gregory Sunshine, JD, Dawn Pepin, JD, MPH, Tara Ramanathan, JD, MPH, Akshara Menon, JD, MPH, Matthew Penn, JD, MLIS The Health Information...

  17. The Quality of Information in Electronic Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Bacharach; Oliver Board

    2000-01-01

    We examine some of the factors that might influence the quality of information produced in discussion groups on the internet, such as USENET and the WELL. In particular, we look at the impact of various different pricing structures, and compare regimes in which anonymity is enforced with regimes in which all contributors must identify themselves. Our main finding is that the flow of quality-weighted information within the group is maximized by a regime which front loads the cost of sending me...

  18. Silicon photonics fundamentals and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Deen, M Jamal

    2012-01-01

    The creation of affordable high speed optical communications using standard semiconductor manufacturing technology is a principal aim of silicon photonics research. This would involve replacing copper connections with optical fibres or waveguides, and electrons with photons. With applications such as telecommunications and information processing, light detection, spectroscopy, holography and robotics, silicon photonics has the potential to revolutionise electronic-only systems. Providing an overview of the physics, technology and device operation of photonic devices using exclusively silicon and related alloys, the book includes: * Basic Properties of Silicon * Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Superlattices * Absorption Processes in Semiconductors * Light Emitters in Silicon * Photodetectors , Photodiodes and Phototransistors * Raman Lasers including Raman Scattering * Guided Lightwaves * Planar Waveguide Devices * Fabrication Techniques and Material Systems Silicon Photonics: Fundamentals and Devices outlines ...

  19. The role of the CMS electron and photon trigger in the study of the Higgs boson and other resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Strebler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of the Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds used in LHC Run I for the more challenging conditions experienced during Run II.We present the performance of the upgraded CMS electron and photon trigger in the context of Higgs boson decays into final states with photons and electrons. The calorimeter trigger system plays a central role in achieving the ambitious physics program of Run II. The upgraded trigger uses the full granularity of the calorimeters to optimally reconstruct and calibrate the electromagnetic trigger objects. It also implements combinations of calorimeter objects to provide new Level-1 quantities such as invariant mass. Optimized software selection techniques have been developed and advanced algorithms to mitigate the impact of eve...

  20. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  1. Watching Electrons Transfer from Metals to Insulators using Two Photon Photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johns, James E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Ultrafast angle-resolved two photon photoemission was used to study the dynamics and interfacial band structure of ultrathin films adsorbed onto Ag(111). Studies focused on the image potential state (IPS) in each system as a probe for measuring changes in electronic behavior in differing environments. The energetics and dynamics of the IPS at the toluene/Ag(111) interface are strongly dependent upon coverage. For a single monolayer, the first IPS is bound by 0.81 eV below the vacuum level and has a lifetime of 50 femtoseconds (fs). Further adsorption of toluene creates islands of toluene with an exposed wetting layer underneath. The IPS is then split into two peaks, one corresponding to the islands and one corresponding to the monolayer. The wetting layer IPS shows the same dynamics as the monolayer, while the lifetime of the islands increases exponentially with increasing thickness. Furthermore, the island IPS transitions from delocalized to localized within 500 fs, and electrons with larger parallel momenta decay much faster. Attempts were made using a stochastic model to extract the rates of localization and intraband cooling at differing momenta. In sexithiophene (6T) and dihexyl-sexithiophene (DH6T), the IPS was used as a probe to see if the nuclear motion of spectating side chains can interfere with molecular conduction. The energy and band mass of the IPS was measured for 6T and two geometries of DH6T on Ag(111). Electrons injected into the thicker coverages of DH6T grew exponentially heavier until they were completely localized by 230 fs, while those injected into 6T remained nearly free electron like. Based off of lifetime arguments and the density of defects, the most likely cause for the mass enhancement of the IPS in this system is small polaron formation caused by coupling of the electron to vibrations of the alkyl substituents. The energetic relaxation of the molecular adsorbate was also measured to be 20 meV/100 fs for the DH6T, and 0 meV/100 fs for

  2. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  3. SU-D-19A-02: Electron and Photon Absorbed Fractions for Tumors of Varying Sizes and Compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin, E; Bolch, W [UniversityFlorida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate absorbed fractions for mono-energetic photons and electrons in tumors of varying compositions using Monte Carlo simulations in MCNPX. Although tumor dosimetry has been previously investigated, these studies are very limited as they only consider absorbed fractions for soft-tissue tumors. Methods: The tumors were modeled as spheres with radii ranging from 0.10 cm to 6.0 cm and with compositions varying from 100% soft tissue to 100% bone. The energies of both the photons and electrons were varied from 10 keV to 10 MeV and were homogenously distributed throughout the tumor volume. Furthermore, this investigation addresses the issue of spherical versus elliptical tumors. Both prolate and oblate spheroid tumors of different compositions were modeled, and absorbed fractions were calculated for various electron and photon energies. Results: The data clearly shows an absorbed fraction dependence on tumor composition. For example, a soft-tissue model for a 3 MeV electron emitted in a 1 cm diameter bone tumor would have an 83% error, and this same assumption for a 500 keV photon would yield a 74% error. Ultimately, empirical fits were created for each of the five material compositions in order to facilitate the absorbed fraction calculation, requiring only the tumor size and particle energy. Furthermore, the data shows that absorbed fractions for moderate spheroids can be well approximated by spherical tumors of equal mass to within 8%, but in the extreme cases where the spheroid resembles more of a disk, the errors can be as high as 30%. Conclusion: This comprehensive data set is most valuable for nuclear medicine dosimetry because it incorporates particle type, particle energy, tumor size, and tumor composition. Although mono-energetic particles were modeled, absorbed fractions and S-values may be calculated for any radionuclide via linear interpolation, as long as the particle energies or spectra are known.

  4. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John P; Antolak, John A; Followill, David S; Huq, M Saiful; Klein, Eric E; Lam, Kwok L; Palta, Jatinder R; Roback, Donald M; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M

    2014-03-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D'0, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D'0 = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D'0 ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with D'0 = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  5. Electronic information resources for food toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carl K

    2002-04-25

    This manuscript provides a brief overview of many useful Internet resources concerning food toxicology. Specific topic areas include pesticide residues, food additives, natural toxins, environmental contaminants, and food allergies; numerous links and evaluative information are provided within each topic area. Several helpful Internet resources have been identified and include government, industry, academic, and consumer sites.

  6. The role of the CMS electron and photon trigger in the study of the Higgs boson and high mass searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strebler, Thomas; CMS Collaboration

    2017-11-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment implements a sophisticated two-level triggering system composed of the Level-1, instrumented by custom-design hardware boards, and a software High-Level-Trigger. A new Level-1 trigger architecture with improved performance is now being used to maintain the thresholds used in LHC Run I for the more challenging conditions experienced during Run II. We present the performance of the upgraded CMS electron and photon trigger in the context of Higgs boson decays into final states with photons and electrons. The calorimeter trigger system plays a central role in achieving the ambitious physics program of Run II. The upgraded trigger uses the full granularity of the calorimeters to optimally reconstruct and calibrate the electromagnetic trigger objects. It also implements combinations of calorimeter objects to provide new Level-1 quantities such as invariant mass. Optimized software selection techniques have been developed and advanced algorithms to mitigate the impact of event pileup have been implemented. The selection techniques used to trigger efficiently on these benchmark analyses will be presented, along with the strategies employed to guarantee efficient triggering for new resonances and other new physics signals involving electron/photon final states.

  7. Extracting temporal information from electronic patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Patrick, Jon

    2012-01-01

    A method for automatic extraction of clinical temporal information would be of significant practical importance for deep medical language understanding, and a key to creating many successful applications, such as medical decision making, medical question and answering, etc. This paper proposes a rich statistical model for extracting temporal information from an extremely noisy clinical corpus. Besides the common linguistic, contextual and semantic features, the highly restricted training sample expansion and the structure distance between the temporal expression & related event expressions are also integrated into a supervised machine-learning approach. The learning method produces almost 80% F- score in the extraction of five temporal classes, and nearly 75% F-score in identifying temporally related events. This process has been integrated into the document-processing component of an implemented clinical question answering system that focuses on answering patient-specific questions (See demonstration at http://hitrl.cs.usyd.edu.au/ICNS/).

  8. PREFACE: XXIX International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, C.; Rabadán, I.; García, G.; Méndez, L.; Martín, F.

    2015-09-01

    The 29th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXIX ICPEAC) was held at the Palacio de Congresos ''El Greco'', Toledo, Spain, on 22-28 July, 2015, and was organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). ICPEAC is held biannually and is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to Spain in 2015 for the very first time. UAM and CSIC had been preparing the conference for six years, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXIX ICPEAC in Toledo. The conference gathered 670 participants from 52 countries and attracted 854 contributed papers for presentation in poster sessions. Among the latter, 754 are presented in issues 2-12 of this volume of the Journal of Physics Conference Series. In addition, five plenary lectures, including the opening one by the Nobel laureate Prof. Ahmed H. Zewail and the lectures by Prof. Maciej Lewenstein, Prof. Paul Scheier, Prof. Philip H. Bucksbaum, and Prof. Stephen J. Buckman, 62 progress reports and 26 special reports were presented following the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Detailed write-ups of most of the latter are presented in issue 1 of this volume, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting. On the occasion of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and with the support of the Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología (FECYT), the program was completed with two public lectures delivered by the Nobel laureate Prof. Serge Haroche and the Príncipe de Asturias laureate Prof. Pedro M. Echenique on, respectively, ''Fifty years of laser revolutions in physics'rquot; and ''The sublime usefulness of useless science''. Also a

  9. Information Business: Applying Infometry (Informational Geometry) in Cognitive Coordination and Genetic Programming for Electronic Information Packaging and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Bor-sheng

    1994-01-01

    Describes the use of infometry, or informational geometry, to meet the challenges of information service businesses. Highlights include theoretical models for cognitive coordination and genetic programming; electronic information packaging; marketing electronic information products, including cost-benefit analyses; and recapitalization, including…

  10. Utilisation of Electronic Information Resources By Lecturers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assesses the use of information resources, specifically, electronic databases by lecturers/teachers in Universities and Colleges of Education in South Western Nigeria. Information resources are central to teachers' education. It provides lecturers/teachers access to information that enhances research and ...

  11. Nuclear physics with laser-electron-photons. Developments and perspectives at SPring-8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Mamoru [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics

    1998-03-01

    By the Compton scattering with ultraviolet laser beam using the 8 GeV electron beam of the SPring-8, the photon beam which is polarized by nearly 100% is obtained in 1-3.5 GeV region. The quark nuclear physics research at this facility is unique in the world, and it is expected that in the experiment at the SPring-8, the collision phenomena of polarized, high energy gamma-ray and the quarks in nucleons and the knockout phenomena of quarks are observed. Also the polarization experiment for clarifying ``the origin of nucleon spin`` has been proposed. Japan can stand at the top in the world in the research of quark nuclear physics with leptons. In the inverse Compton scattering using far infrared laser, the gamma-ray with good directionality of MeV range is obtained, and it will be applied widely to the research on E1 resonance and M1 excitation of atomic nuclei. In this report, the medium energy quark nuclear physics developed at the SPring-8 is outlined, and the nuclear physics which is expected to be developed when the high intensity, high polarization gamma-ray of about 10 MeV is generated is discussed. The detection of s, anti-s components in nucleons, research on baryon deformation and baryon spectra, verification of the Gerasimov, Drell-Hearn law of sum, meson structure, test of quark model by the photolysis of deuterons, dual Ginzburg Landau theory exploration, research on the mass and behavior of mesons in nuclear media are discussed. (K.I.)

  12. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  13. Large contribution of virtual Delbrueck scattering to the emission of photons by relativistic nuclei in nucleus-nucleus and electron-nucleus collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Ginzburg, I. F.; Jentschura, U. D.; Serbo, V G

    2007-01-01

    Delbrueck scattering is an elastic scattering of a photon in the Coulomb field of a nucleus via a virtual electron loop. The contribution of this virtual subprocess to the emission of a photon in the collision of ultra-relativistic nuclei Z_1 Z_2 -> Z_1 Z_2 gamma is considered. We identify the incoming virtual photon as being generated by one of the relativistic nuclei involved in the binary collision and the scattered photon as being emitted in the process. The energy and angular distributio...

  14. Balancing Good Intentions: Protecting the Privacy of Electronic Health Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Kitty

    2008-01-01

    Electronic information is a vital but complex component in the modern health care system, fueling ongoing efforts to develop a universal electronic health record infrastructure. This innovation creates a substantial tension between two desirable values: the increased quality and utility of patient medical records and the protection of the privacy…

  15. The electronic identification, signature and security of information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horovèák Pavel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the actual methods and technologies of information and communication systems security. It introduces the overview of electronic identification elements such as static password, dynamic password and single sign-on. Into this category belong also biometric and dynamic characteristics of verified person. Widespread is authentication based on identification elements ownership, such as various cards and authentication calculators. In the next part is specified a definition and characterization of electronic signature, its basic functions and certificate categories. Practical utilization of electronic signature consists of electronic signature acquirement, signature of outgoing email message, receiving of electronic signature and verification of electronic signature. The use of electronic signature is continuously growing and in connection with legislation development it exercises in all resorts.

  16. Structure/Property Relations in "Giant" Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Opportunities in Photonics and Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Pardo, Fabiola; Zhao, Haiguang; Wang, Zhiming M; Rosei, Federico

    2017-12-20

    Semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit size-tunable absorption and emission ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, high absorption coefficient, and high photoluminescence quantum yield. Effective surface passivation of these so-called quantum dots (QDs) may be achieved by growing a shell of another semiconductor material. The resulting core/shell QDs can be considered as a model system to study and optimize structure/property relations. A special case consists in growing thick shells (1.5 up to few tens of nanometers) to produce "giant" QDs (g-QDs). Tailoring the chemical composition and structure of CdSe/CdS and PbS/CdS g-QDs is a promising approach to widen the spectral separation of absorption and emission spectra (i.e., the Stokes shift), improve the isolation of photogenerated carriers from surface defects and enhance charge carrier lifetime and mobility. However, most stable systems are limited by a thick CdS shell, which strongly absorbs radiation below 500 nm, covering the UV and part of the visible range. Modification of the interfacial region between the core and shell of g-QDs or tuning their doping with narrow band gap semiconductors are effective approaches to circumvent this challenge. In addition, the synthesis of g-QDs composed of environmentally friendly elements (e.g., CuInSe2/CuInS2) represents an alternative to extend their absorption into the NIR range. Additionally, the band gap and band alignment of g-QDs can be engineered by proper selection of the constituents according to their band edge positions and by tuning their stoichiometry during wet chemical synthesis. In most cases, the quasi-type II localization regime of electrons and holes is achieved. In this type of g-QDs, electrons can leak into the shell region, while the holes remain confined within the core region. This electron-hole spatial distribution is advantageous for optoelectronic devices, resulting in efficient electron-hole separation while

  17. Use of electronic information systems in nursing management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammintakanen, Johanna; Saranto, Kaija; Kivinen, Tuula

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nurse managers' perceptions of the use of electronic information systems in their daily work. Several kinds of software are used for administrative and information management purposes in health care organizations, but the issue has been studied less from nurse managers' perspective. The material for this qualitative study was acquired according to the principles of focus group interview. Altogether eight focus groups were held with 48 nurse managers from both primary and specialized health care organizations. The nurse managers were asked in focus groups to describe the use of information systems in their daily work in addition to some other themes. The material was analyzed by inductive content analysis using ATLAS.ti computer program. The main category "pros and cons of using information systems in nursing management" summarized the nurse managers' perceptions of using electronic information systems. The main category consisted of three sub-categories: (1) nurse managers' perceptions of the use of information technology; (2) usability of management information systems; (3) development of personnel competencies and work processes. The nurse managers made several comments on the implementation of immature electronic information systems which caused inefficiencies in working processes. However, they considered electronic information systems to be essential elements of their daily work. Furthermore, the nurse managers' descriptions of the pros and cons of using information systems reflected partly the shortcomings of strategic management and lack of coordination in health care organizations. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photonics and Web Engineering 2011, International Journal of Electronics and Telecommunication, vol.57, no 3, pp.421-428, September 2011

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities in this country during the SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2011 symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics and telecom, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonicselectronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for telecom, astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET and pi-of-the sky experiments development. The symposium is an annual summary in the development of numerable Ph.D. theses carried out in this country in the area of advanced electronic and photonic systems. It is also an occasion for young researchers to meet together in a large group (under the patronage of IEEE) spanning the whole country with guests from this part of Europe. A digest of Wilga references is pr...

  19. Electron energy loss spectroscopy on semiconductor heterostructures for optoelectronics and photonics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljarrat, A; López-Conesa, L; Estradé, S; Peiró, F

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present characterization methods for the analysis of nanometer-sized devices, based on silicon and III-V nitride semiconductor materials. These methods are devised in order to take advantage of the aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, equipped with a monochromator. This set-up ensures the necessary high spatial and energy resolution for the characterization of the smallest structures. As with these experiments, we aim to obtain chemical and structural information, we use electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The low-loss region of EELS is exploited, which features fundamental electronic properties of semiconductor materials and facilitates a high data throughput. We show how the detailed analysis of these spectra, using theoretical models and computational tools, can enhance the analytical power of EELS. In this sense, initially, results from the model-based fit of the plasmon peak are presented. Moreover, the application of multivariate analysis algorithms to low-loss EELS is explored. Finally, some physical limitations of the technique, such as spatial delocalization, are mentioned. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Radiotherapy of advanced mycosis fungoides: indications and results of total skin electron beam and photon beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingon, P; Truc, G; Dalac, S; Barillot, I; Lambert, D; Petrella, T; Naudy, S; Horiot, J C

    2000-01-01

    The goals of this retrospective study of advanced mycosis fungoides are (1) to describe the indications of a combination of total skin electron beam and photon beam irradiation and (2) to analyze the results of total body or segmental photon irradiation for patients with extension beyond the skin. From January 1975 to December 1995, 45 patients with pathologically-confirmed mycosis fungoides or Sézary syndrome received a combination of TSEB and photon beam irradiation for advanced disease: 34 males and 11 females, mean age 61 years (range 27-87 years). The mean follow-up was 111 months (range 18-244 months, median 85 months). Whole-skin irradiation treatment to a depth of 3-5 mm with a 6-MeV electron beam was produced by a linear accelerator to a total dose of 24-30 Gy in 8-15 fractions, 3-4 times a week. In cases of thick plaques or tumors that were beyond the scope of low energy electron beams or for treating nodal areas (especially in the head and neck area or axilla involvement), regional irradiation (RRT) with Co-60 photon beams was followed by whole-skin electron beam irradiation (15 patients). In cases of diffuse erythrodermia, Sézary syndrome, nodal or visceral involvement, total body irradiation was delivered with a 25-MV photon beam using a split-course regimen to prevent hematological toxicity (22 patients). The first course consisted of 1.25 Gy delivered in ten fractions and 10 days. Subsequently, patients received TSEB. Four to 6 weeks after TSEB, they received a second course of 1.25 Gy. The cumulative TBI dose ranged from 2.5 to 3 Gy in about 3 months. Hemi-body irradiation (HB) with Co-60 (and a bolus) was given in cases of multiple regional tumors with large and thick infiltration of the skin to a dose of 9-12 Gy (using fractions of 1-1.5 Gy/day) which, once flattened, were boosted with whole-skin electron beam therapy (8 patients). At 3 months, the overall response rate was 75% with 23/45 (51%) patients in complete response and 24% in partial

  1. Too Hot for Photon-Assisted Transport: Hot-Electrons Dominate Conductance Enhancement in Illuminated Single-Molecule Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, E-Dean; Adak, Olgun; Lovat, Giacomo; Scarabelli, Diego; Venkataraman, Latha

    2017-02-08

    We investigate light-induced conductance enhancement in single-molecule junctions via photon-assisted transport and hot-electron transport. Using 4,4'-bipyridine bound to Au electrodes as a prototypical single-molecule junction, we report a 20-40% enhancement in conductance under illumination with 980 nm wavelength radiation. We probe the effects of subtle changes in the transmission function on light-enhanced current and show that discrete variations in the binding geometry result in a 10% change in enhancement. Importantly, we prove theoretically that the steady-state behavior of photon-assisted transport and hot-electron transport is identical but that hot-electron transport is the dominant mechanism for optically induced conductance enhancement in single-molecule junctions when the wavelength used is absorbed by the electrodes and the hot-electron relaxation time is long. We confirm this experimentally by performing polarization-dependent conductance measurements of illuminated 4,4'-bipyridine junctions. Finally, we perform lock-in type measurements of optical current and conclude that currents due to laser-induced thermal expansion mask optical currents. This work provides a robust experimental framework for studying mechanisms of light-enhanced transport in single-molecule junctions and offers tools for tuning the performance of organic optoelectronic devices by analyzing detailed transport properties of the molecules involved.

  2. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  3. Optical dephasing of a near infrared dye in PMMA: photon echoes using the superconducting accelerator pumped free electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, S. R.; Bai, Y. S.; Fayer, M. D.

    1990-07-01

    A superconducting accelerator pumped free electron laser is used to perform picosecond photon echo experiments on the near infrared dye 1,1‧,3,3,3‧,3‧-hexamethylindotricarbocyanine iodide (HITCI) in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The temperature dependence of the optical dephasing is measured from 1.5 to 10 K. At the lowest temperatures a temperature dependence, T-1.4, characteristic of two-level system glass dynamics is observed. Above 5 K, the optical dephasing is exponentially activated with an activation energy of 15 cm-1. This is the same activation energy reported for rhodamine B in PMMA, demonstrating that 15 cm-1 corresponds to an intrinsic glass mode. These are the first photon echo experiments, and to our knowledge, the first nonlinear optical coherence experiments, performed using a FEL as a source.

  4. Extreme Band Engineering of III-Nitride Nanowire Heterostructures for Electronic and Photonic Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, ATM Golam

    Bottom-up nanowires are attractive for realizing semiconductor devices with extreme heterostructures because strain relaxation through the nanowire sidewalls allows the combination of highly lattice mismatched materials without creating dislocations. The resulting nanowires are used to fabricate light-emitting diodes (LEDs), lasers, solar cells, and sensors. The aim of this work is to investigate extreme heterostructures, which are impossible or very hard to realize in conventional planar films, exploiting the strain accommodation property of nanowires and engineer their band structure for novel electronic and photonic applications. To this end, in this thesis, III-Nitride semiconductor nanowires are investigated. In the first part of this work, a complete growth phase diagram of InN nanowires on silicon using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy is developed, and structural and optical characteristics are mapped as a function of growth parameters. Next, a novel up-side down pendeoepitaxial growth of InN forming mushroom-like microstructures is demonstrated and detail structural and optical characterizations are performed. Based on this, a method to grow strain-free large area single crystalline InN or thin film is proposed and the growth of InN on patterned GaN is investigated. The optimized growth conditions developed for InN are further used to grow InGaN nanowires graded over the whole composition range. Numerical energy band simulation is performed to better understand the effect of polarization charge on photo-carrier transport in these extremely graded nanowires. A novel photodetector device with negative differential photocurrent is demonstrated using the graded InGaN nanowires. In the second part of this thesis, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are investigated. The electrical and optical properties of the nanowire heterostructure are engineered and optimized for ultraviolet and deep ultraviolet applications. The electrical

  5. Providing Access to Electronic Information Resources in Further Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwell, Linda; Ray, Kathryn; Coulson, Graham; Urquhart, Christine; Lonsdale, Ray; Armstrong, Chris; Thomas, Rhian; Spink, Sin; Yeoman, Alison; Fenton, Roger; Rowley, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    This article aims to provide a baseline for future studies on the provision and support for the use of digital or electronic information services (EIS) in further education. The analysis presented is based on a multi-level model of access, which encompasses access to and availability of information and communication technology (ICT) resources,…

  6. Special Article Ethics and Electronic Health Information Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), and the National Identification Authority (NIA), pose ethical challenges to the physician-patient relationship due to interoperability. This paper explores (1) the national legislation on Electronic Health Information Technology (EHIT), (2) the ethics of information ...

  7. Students' access usage and awareness of electronic information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' access usage and awareness of electronic information resources at the University College Hospital, University of Ibadan, Nigeria. RA Ojo, SO Akande. Abstract. No Abstract. Lagos Journal of Library and Information Science Vol. 3(1) 2005: 16-24. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD ...

  8. Users satisfaction with electronic information resources and services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Users satisfaction with electronic information resources and services in A.B.U & UNIBEN MTN Net Libraries. ... Lastly, management of the MTN Net Libraries should conduct user studies annually in order to have feedback from users on how well the library is meeting their information needs. The results of the survey should ...

  9. Management information systems for electronic warfare command and decision support

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Niekerk, B

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available information to allow them to manage their own spectrum, to identify threats, and to deny adversaries’ use of the spectrum. In this paper, the concepts of integrated electronic warfare and spectrum battle management are introduced, and the relevant information...

  10. CDC and ATSDR electronic information resources for health officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friede, A; O'Carroll, P W

    1996-12-01

    This article catalogs some of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) more important information resource offerings, which make public health information accessible via computer and automated telephone systems and on electronic media (diskette and CD-ROM). We review mechanisms for (1) finding and retrieving CDC reports, (2) querying CDC's numeric data files, (3) transmitting surveillance and other data files to CDC, (4) exchanging electronic mail with CDC staff, and (5) disseminating state and local public health information and data by using CDC tools. Each resource is followed with a section on how to obtain access to these resources.

  11. Electro-Optic Frequency Beam Splitters and Tritters for High-Fidelity Photonic Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hsuan-Hao; Lukens, Joseph M.; Peters, Nicholas A.; Odele, Ogaga D.; Leaird, Daniel E.; Weiner, Andrew M.; Lougovski, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    We report the experimental realization of high-fidelity photonic quantum gates for frequency-encoded qubits and qutrits based on electro-optic modulation and Fourier-transform pulse shaping. Our frequency version of the Hadamard gate offers near-unity fidelity (0.999 98 ±0.000 03 ), requires only a single microwave drive tone for near-ideal performance, functions across the entire C band (1530-1570 nm), and can operate concurrently on multiple qubits spaced as tightly as four frequency modes apart, with no observable degradation in the fidelity. For qutrits, we implement a 3 ×3 extension of the Hadamard gate: the balanced tritter. This tritter—the first ever demonstrated for frequency modes—attains fidelity 0.9989 ±0.0004 . These gates represent important building blocks toward scalable, high-fidelity quantum information processing based on frequency encoding.

  12. Leptonic two-photon events measured with L3 at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP)

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmelt, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Virtual photons can fluctuate into diverse final states and among other processes, such fluctuations can yield muon-pairs. The fluctuation is a statistical process and can be described in terms of structure functions for photons. Apart from supplying another test of QED, purely leptonic processes provide a calibration fro the hadronic processes. We report on a measurement of dimuon events with single-tagged two-photon events from the LEP experiment L3, at c.m.s. energies between 189 GeV and 206 GeV, with an integrated luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}$ = 600 pb$^{-1}$. An overview of the fundamental physical processes, the detector and the anaytical tools, used for measuring dimuon events, and a discussion of the structure of dimuon events will be presented.

  13. Quantum information processing with electronic and nuclear spins in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Paul Victor

    Traditional electronic and communication devices operate by processing binary information encoded as bits. Such digital devices have led to the most advanced technologies that we encounter in our everyday lives and they influence virtually every aspect of our society. Nonetheless, there exists a much richer way to encode and process information. By encoding information in quantum mechanical states as qubits, phenomena such as coherence and entanglement can be harnessed to execute tasks that are intractable to digital devices. Under this paradigm, it should be possible to realize quantum computers, quantum communication networks and quantum sensors that outperform their classical counterparts. The electronic spin states of color-center defects in the semiconductor silicon carbide have recently emerged as promising qubit candidates. They have long-lived quantum coherence up to room temperature, they can be controlled with mature magnetic resonance techniques, and they have a built-in optical interface operating near the telecommunication bands. In this thesis I will present two of our contributions to this field. The first is the electric-field control of electron spin qubits. This development lays foundation for quantum electronics that operate via electrical gating, much like traditional electronics. The second is the universal control and entanglement of electron and nuclear spin qubits in an ensemble under ambient conditions. This development lays foundation for quantum devices that have a built-in redundancy and can operate in real-world conditions. Both developments represent important steps towards practical quantum devices in an electronic grade material.

  14. Slow light enhanced singlet exciton fission solar cells with a 126% yield of electrons per photon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Nicholas J.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Baldo, Marc A., E-mail: vmenon@qc.cuny.edu, E-mail: baldo@mit.edu [Energy Frontier Research Center for Excitonics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Goldberg, David; Menon, Vinod M., E-mail: vmenon@qc.cuny.edu, E-mail: baldo@mit.edu [Department of Physics, Queens College and Graduate Center, The City University of New York, Flushing, New York 11367 (United States)

    2013-12-23

    Singlet exciton fission generates two triplet excitons per absorbed photon. It promises to increase the power extracted from sunlight without increasing the number of photovoltaic junctions in a solar cell. We demonstrate solar cells with an external quantum efficiency of 126% by enhancing absorption in thin films of the singlet exciton fission material pentacene. The device structure exploits the long photon dwell time at the band edge of a distributed Bragg reflector to achieve enhancement over a broad range of angles. Measuring the reflected light from the solar cell establishes a lower bound of 137% for the internal quantum efficiency.

  15. 45 CFR 170.210 - Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for health information technology to protect electronic health information created, maintained, and exchanged. 170.210 Section 170.210 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STANDARDS, IMPLEMENTATION SPECIFICATION...

  16. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerberich, Heather Kay [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use ~ 202 pb-1 of data collected in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section σ($\\bar{p}$p → ee* → eeγ) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (Me*) and the compositeness energy scale (Λ). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find Me* < 906 GeV is excluded for Me* = Λ. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the Me* versus the phenomenological coupling f/Λ parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/Λ ~ 10-2 GeV-1. In comparison, other experiments have excluded Me* < 280 GeV for f/Λ ~ 10-2 GeV-1.

  17. Bone and mucosal dosimetry in skin radiation therapy: a Monte Carlo study using kilovoltage photon and megavoltage electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, James C. L.; Jiang, Runqing

    2012-06-01

    This study examines variations of bone and mucosal doses with variable soft tissue and bone thicknesses, mimicking the oral or nasal cavity in skin radiation therapy. Monte Carlo simulations (EGSnrc-based codes) using the clinical kilovoltage (kVp) photon and megavoltage (MeV) electron beams, and the pencil-beam algorithm (Pinnacle3 treatment planning system) using the MeV electron beams were performed in dose calculations. Phase-space files for the 105 and 220 kVp beams (Gulmay D3225 x-ray machine), and the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams (Varian 21 EX linear accelerator) with a field size of 5 cm diameter were generated using the BEAMnrc code, and verified using measurements. Inhomogeneous phantoms containing uniform water, bone and air layers were irradiated by the kVp photon and MeV electron beams. Relative depth, bone and mucosal doses were calculated for the uniform water and bone layers which were varied in thickness in the ranges of 0.5-2 cm and 0.2-1 cm. A uniform water layer of bolus with thickness equal to the depth of maximum dose (dmax) of the electron beams (0.7 cm for 4 MeV and 1.5 cm for 6 MeV) was added on top of the phantom to ensure that the maximum dose was at the phantom surface. From our Monte Carlo results, the 4 and 6 MeV electron beams were found to produce insignificant bone and mucosal dose (oral or nasal cavity. While the dose distribution in the pharynx region is unavailable due to the lack of a commercial treatment planning system commissioned for kVp beam planning in skin radiation therapy, our study provided an essential insight into the radiation staff to justify and estimate bone and mucosal dose.

  18. Characterization and attenuation study on tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboard at high energy photon and electron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abd; Tajuddin, Abd Aziz; Abdullah, Reduan; Hashim, Rokiah; Bauk, Sabar; Isa, Norriza Mohd; Isa, Muhammad Jamal Md

    2017-01-01

    The effective atomic number of tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards was determined based on elemental composition using Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDXA). The value of mass attenuation coefficients were measured using 137Cs and 60Co gamma energies. The attenuation properties of PDD curves and beam profile of tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards were investigated using Gafchromic EBT2 film at 6 MV photon and 6 MeV electrons and compared to the value in water and solid water phantoms. The results showed that tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards having effective atomic number close to the value of water. The mass attenuation coefficients were near to the value of water with χ2 values of 0.018 and 0.357 to 137Cs and 60Co gamma energies respectively. The PDD of tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards at 6 MV photons showed good agreement within 3.21 and 5.91% to that in solid water phantoms and water respectively. The PDD at 6 MeV electrons showed a good agreement within 3.32 and 3.12% to that in solid water phantoms and water respectively. The depth of R50 and R90 in tannin-added Rhizophora spp. also showed a good agreement to that in water and solid water pahtoms. Lower surface dose was observed in tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards at electron beams in comparison to solid water phantoms and water.

  19. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.salem@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Kanaa’n, Haitham [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Sarhan, Nasim [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Roujob, Ibrahim [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Salem, Abdel-Fattah [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan); Afifi, Shatha [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan)

    2015-10-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50 Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V{sub 25} {sub Gy}). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p < 0.001). The volume of tissue receiving ≥ 105% of the prescription dose was higher in the electron-only (mean = 69.7 ± 56.1 cm{sup 3}) as opposed to combined photon-electron (mean = 50.8 ± 40.9 cm{sup 3}) and photon-only beams (mean = 32.2 ± 28.1 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.114). Heart V{sub 25} {sub Gy} was not statistically different among the plans (p = 0.999). Total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy} was lowest in electron-only (mean = 10.9 ± 2.3%) followed by combined photon-electron (mean = 13.8 ± 2.3%) and highest in photon

  20. Modeling of the GELINA neutron target using coupled electron-photon-neutron transport with the MCNP4C3 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaska, M.; Borella, A.; Lathouwers, D.; Mihailescu, L.C.; Mondelaers, W. E-mail: willy.mondelaers@cec.eu.int; Plompen, A.J.M.; Dam, H. van; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der

    2004-10-01

    Coupled electron-photon-neutron transport calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNP4C3 to model the GELINA neutron target. Our calculations were compared with measurements of the direct and moderated flux distributions and agreement was achieved within 20%. Further, the present simulations were compared with the resolution functions established earlier with a dedicated program and with measured data for {sup 56}Fe. Here too, the agreement is excellent. New IAEA photonuclear libraries were implemented to perform these calculations. The simulations crucially rely on the new MCNP4C3 photonuclear capabilities and are made efficient by using the variance reduction and TALLYX features.

  1. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen D.; Swanwick, Michael E.; Keathley, Phillip D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm-2 (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty.

  2. Measurement of neutron energy spectra for Eg=23.1 and 26.6 MeV mono-energetic photon induced reaction on natC using laser electron photon beam at NewSUBARU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoga Toshiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Photo-neutron energy spectra for Eg=23.1 and 26.6 MeV mono-energetic photons on natC were measured using laser Compton scattering facility at NewSUBARU BL01. The photon energy spectra were evaluated through measurements and simulations with collimator sizes and arrangements for the laser electron photon. The neutron energy spectra for the natC(g,xn reaction were measured at 60 degrees in horizontal and 90 degrees in horizontal and vertical with respect to incident photon. The spectra show almost isotropic angular distribution and flat energy distribution from detection threshold to upper limit defined by reaction Q-value.

  3. Difluorenyl carbo-Benzenes: Synthesis, Electronic Structure, and Two-Photon Absorption Properties of Hydrocarbon Quadrupolar Chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglai, Iaroslav; de Anda-Villa, Manuel; Barba-Barba, Rodrigo M; Poidevin, Corentin; Ramos-Ortíz, Gabriel; Maraval, Valérie; Lepetit, Christine; Saffon-Merceron, Nathalie; Maldonado, José-Luis; Chauvin, Remi

    2015-09-28

    The synthesis, crystal and electronic structures, and one- and two-photon absorption properties of two quadrupolar fluorenyl-substituted tetraphenyl carbo-benzenes are described. These all-hydrocarbon chromophores, differing in the nature of the linkers between the fluorenyl substituents and the carbo-benzene core (C-C bonds for 3 a, C-C=C-C expanders for 3 b), exhibit quasi-superimposable one-photon absorption (1PA) spectra but different two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections σ2PA. Z-scan measurements (under NIR femtosecond excitation) indeed showed that the C≡C expansion results in an approximately twofold increase in the σ2PA value, from 336 to 656 GM (1 GM = 10(-50) cm(4) s molecule(-1) photon(-1)) at λ = 800 nm. The first excited states of Au and Ag symmetry accounting for 1PA and 2PA, respectively, were calculated at the TDDFT level of theory and used for sum-over-state estimations of σ2PA(λi), in which λi = 2 hc/Ei, h is Planck's constant, c is the speed of light, and Ei is the energy of the 2PA-allowed transition. The calculated σ2PA values of 227 GM at 687 nm for 3 a and 349 GM at 708 nm for 3 b are in agreement with the Z-scan results. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. One-photon two-electron processes in helium close to the double ionization threshold; Diexcitation electronique de l'helium par un photon au voisinage du seuil de double ionisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouri, C

    2007-04-15

    This work presents a study of the {sup 1}P{sup 0} excited states of He that can be reached by absorption of a single photon carrying an energy close to the double ionization threshold (DIT) (79 eV). Above the DIT, these states are the double continuum states; below, they are the double excited states. These two types of states are tightly coupled to the single continuum states with or without excitation of the residual ion He{sup +}, owing to their degeneracy in energy. In a one-photon process, these states can only be formed owing to the electronic correlations in the system which must be well described to obtain quantitative good results. Our study is a part of the work which aims at a united description of all these doubly excited, ionized-excited, and double continuum states. We use the Hyperspherical R-Matrix with Semiclassical Outgoing Waves (HRM-SOW) method, initially dedicated to double photoionization studies. We extend it to extract information on the single continuum. This extension allows us to compute cross sections of single photoionization with or without excitation up to n 50 for an excess of 100 meV just above the double ionization threshold. A deep insight into this process is given by a partial waves analysis. The results obtained shed light on the key role of angular and radial correlations. The numerous data we obtain on double and single ionization allow us to establish a continuity relation between these two processes. We show that single ionization with an infinite excitation of the residual ion merges into double photoionization when the excess energy is redistributed between the two electrons. It appears that this relation is valid not only for low but also for high photon energies. Since the HRM-SOW can produce the integrated cross section for double photoionization with high accuracy in the low energy domain, we check the Wannier threshold law. The parameters extracted support strongly this threshold law, and are in good agreement with

  5. Matching extended-SSD electron beams to multileaf collimated photon beams in the treatment of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Jared; Stewart, Allan; Satory, Philip

    2009-09-01

    Matching the penumbra of a 6 MeV electron beam to the penumbra of a 6 MV photon beam is a dose optimization challenge, especially when the electron beam is applied from an extended source-to-surface distance (SSD), as in the case of some head and neck treatments. Traditionally low melting point alloy blocks have been used to define the photon beam shielding over the spinal cord region. However, these are inherently time consuming to construct and employ in the clinical situation. Multileaf collimators (MLCs) provide a fast and reproducible shielding option but generate geometrically nonconformal approximations to the desired beam edge definition. The effects of substituting Cerrobend for the MLC shielding mode in the context of beam matching with extended-SSD electron beams are the subject of this investigation. Relative dose beam data from a Varian EX 2100 linear accelerator were acquired in a water tank under the 6 MeV electron beam at both standard and extended-SSD and under the 6 MV photon beam defined by Cerrobend and a number of MLC stepping regimes. The effect of increasing the electron beam SSD on the beam penumbra was assessed. MLC stepping was also assessed in terms of the effects on both the mean photon beam penumbra and the intraleaf dose-profile nonuniformity relative to the MLC midleaf. Computational techniques were used to combine the beam data so as to simulate composite relative dosimetry in the water tank, allowing fine control of beam abutment gap variation. Idealized volumetric dosimetry was generated based on the percentage depth-dose data for the beam modes and the abutment geometries involved. Comparison was made between each composite dosimetry dataset and the relevant ideal dosimetry dataset by way of subtraction. Weighted dose-difference volume histograms (DDVHs) were produced, and these, in turn, summed to provide an overall dosimetry score for each abutment and shielding type/angle combination. Increasing the electron beam SSD increased

  6. Selective dissemination of information: discussion of electronic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fernandes Souto

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The interactional perspective of this research focus on the characterization and analysis of electronic models of Selective Dissemination of Informations (SDI. In this way, it was searched at first references on the role of the technology in the services offered by Information Services. The interactional perspective, adopted is based on the concept of interaction proposed by Turner and on the concept of language of Bakhtin. The literature review on the practice of Selective Dissemination of the Information supplies a general view of SDI, its objectives and function. Based on these references, 3 parameters for the analysis of the SDI were stablished - filling of the interest profile, representation of the information and canals of interaction, which had been applied as an exploratory form, in 6 electronic services of SDI, chosen at random. This application allowed to refine and to develop a SDI interactional proposal.

  7. Hydrogen production by Tuning the Photonic Band Gap with the Electronic Band Gap of TiO2

    KAUST Repository

    Waterhouse, G. I. N.

    2013-10-10

    Tuning the photonic band gap (PBG) to the electronic band gap (EBG) of Au/TiO2 catalysts resulted in considerable enhancement of the photocatalytic water splitting to hydrogen under direct sunlight. Au/TiO2 (PBG-357 nm) photocatalyst exhibited superior photocatalytic performance under both UV and sunlight compared to the Au/TiO2 (PBG-585 nm) photocatalyst and both are higher than Au/TiO2 without the 3 dimensionally ordered macro-porous structure materials. The very high photocatalytic activity is attributed to suppression of a fraction of electron-hole recombination route due to the co-incidence of the PBG with the EBG of TiO2 These materials that maintain their activity with very small amount of sacrificial agents (down to 0.5 vol.% of ethanol) are poised to find direct applications because of their high activity, low cost of the process, simplicity and stability.

  8. Thermal conductance and thermoelectric figure of merit of C60-based single-molecule junctions: Electrons, phonons, and photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöckner, J. C.; Siebler, R.; Cuevas, J. C.; Pauly, F.

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we present here an ab initio study of the impact of the phonon transport on the thermal conductance and thermoelectric figure of merit of C60-based single-molecule junctions. To be precise, we combine density functional theory with nonequilibrium Green's-function techniques to compute these two quantities in junctions with either a C60 monomer or a C60 dimer connected to gold electrodes, taking into account the contributions of both electrons and phonons. Our results show that for C60 monomer junctions phonon transport plays a minor role in the thermal conductance and, in turn, in the figure of merit, which can reach values on the order of 0.1, depending on the contact geometry. In C60 dimer junctions, phonons are transported less efficiently, but they completely dominate the thermal conductance and reduce the figure of merit as compared to monomer junctions. Thus, claims that by stacking C60 molecules one could achieve high thermoelectric performance, which have been made without considering the phonon contribution, are not justified. Moreover, we analyze the relevance of near-field thermal radiation for the figure of merit of these junctions within the framework of fluctuational electrodynamics. We conclude that photon tunneling can be another detrimental factor for the thermoelectric performance, which has been overlooked so far in the field of molecular electronics. Our study illustrates the crucial roles that phonon transport and photon tunneling can play, when critically assessing the performance of molecular junctions as potential nanoscale thermoelectric devices.

  9. Fabrication and characterisation of phantom material made of Tannin-added Rhizophora spp. particleboards for photon and electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, M. F. Mohd; Hamid, P. N. K. Abd; Tajuddin, A. A.; Hashim, R.; Bauk, S.; Isa, N. Mohd; Isa, M. J. Md

    2017-05-01

    Particleboards made of Rhizophora spp. with addition of tannin adhesive were fabricated at target density of 1.0 g/cm3. The physical and mechanical properties of the particleboards including internal bond strength (IB) and modulus of rupture (MOR) were measured based on Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS A-5908). The characterisation of the particleboards including the effective atomic number, CT number and relative electron density were determined and compared to water. The mass attenuation coefficient of the particleboards were measured and compared to the calculated value of water using photon cross-section database (XCOM). The results showed that the physical and mechanical properties of the particleboards complied with Type 13 and 18 of JIS A-5908. The values of effective atomic number, CT number and relative electron density were also close to the value of water. The value of mass attenuation coefficients of the particleboards showed good agreement with water (XCOM) at low and high energy photon indicated by the χ2 values.

  10. ITS version 5.0 : the integrated TIGER series of coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport codes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Brian Claude; Kensek, Ronald Patrick; Laub, Thomas William

    2004-06-01

    ITS is a powerful and user-friendly software package permitting state of the art Monte Carlo solution of linear time-independent couple electron/photon radiation transport problems, with or without the presence of macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of arbitrary spatial dependence. Our goal has been to simultaneously maximize operational simplicity and physical accuracy. Through a set of preprocessor directives, the user selects one of the many ITS codes. The ease with which the makefile system is applied combines with an input scheme based on order-independent descriptive keywords that makes maximum use of defaults and internal error checking to provide experimentalists and theorists alike with a method for the routine but rigorous solution of sophisticated radiation transport problems. Physical rigor is provided by employing accurate cross sections, sampling distributions, and physical models for describing the production and transport of the electron/photon cascade from 1.0 GeV down to 1.0 keV. The availability of source code permits the more sophisticated user to tailor the codes to specific applications and to extend the capabilities of the codes to more complex applications. Version 5.0, the latest version of ITS, contains (1) improvements to the ITS 3.0 continuous-energy codes, (2)multigroup codes with adjoint transport capabilities, and (3) parallel implementations of all ITS codes. Moreover the general user friendliness of the software has been enhanced through increased internal error checking and improved code portability.

  11. Evaluation of PENFAST - A fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculations in photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, B.; Poumarede, B.; Tola, F.; Barthe, J. [CEA, LIST, Dept Technol Capteur et Signal, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of accelerated dose calculations, using the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code referred to as PENFAST, rather than the conventional MC code PENELOPE, without losing accuracy in the computed dose. For this purpose, experimental measurements of dose distributions in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with simulated results using both PENELOPE and PENFAST. The simulations and experiments were performed using a Saturne 43 linac operated at 12 MV (photons), and at 18 MeV (electrons). Pre-calculated phase space files (PSFs) were used as input data to both the PENELOPE and PENFAST dose simulations. Since depth-dose and dose profile comparisons between simulations and measurements in water were found to be in good agreement (within {+-} 1% to 1 mm), the PSF calculation is considered to have been validated. In addition, measured dose distributions were compared to simulated results in a set of clinically relevant, inhomogeneous phantoms, consisting of lung and bone heterogeneities in a water tank. In general, the PENFAST results agree to within a 1% to 1 mm difference with those produced by PENELOPE, and to within a 2% to 2 mm difference with measured values. Our study thus provides a pre-clinical validation of the PENFAST code. It also demonstrates that PENFAST provides accurate results for both photon and electron beams, equivalent to those obtained with PENELOPE. CPU time comparisons between both MC codes show that PENFAST is generally about 9-21 times faster than PENELOPE. (authors)

  12. Fluctuations in the electron system of a superconductor exposed to a photon flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Visser, P.J.; Baselmans, J.J.A.; Bueno, J.; Llombart, N.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    In a superconductor, in which electrons are paired, the density of unpaired electrons should become zero when approaching zero temperature. Therefore, radiation detectors based on breaking of pairs promise supreme sensitivity, which we demonstrate using an aluminium superconducting microwave

  13. Multi-anode photon-multiplier readout electronics for the LHCb ring imaging Cherenkov detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Smale, N J

    2004-01-01

    A readout system for the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detectors of the LHCb experiment has been developed. Two detector technologies for the measurement of Cherenkov photons are considered, the Multi-Anode Photo-Multiplier Tube (MAPMT) and the Hybrid Photon Detector (HPD), both of which meet the RICH requirements. The properties of the MAPMT are evaluated using a controlled single-photon source; a pixel-to-pixel gain variation of ~3 and a typical signal to noise of ~20 is measured. The relative tube efficiency is found to be reduced by ~26 % due to the detailed focusing structure of the MAPMT device. A radiation hard application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) chip, the Beetle1.2MA0, has been developed to capture and store signals from a pair of MAPMTs. The Beetle1.2MA0 is built on the architecture of the Beetle family that was designed for silicon strip detectors, the difference being a modified front-end amplifier. The 128 input-channels of the Beetle1.2MA0 have a charge-sensitive pre-amplifier followed...

  14. Carbon nanotubes--electronic/electrochemical properties and application for nanoelectronics and photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgobba, Vito; Guldi, Dirk M

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental chemical, redox, electrochemical, photoelectrochemical, optical and optoelectronic features of carbon nanotubes are surveyed with particular emphasis on the most relevant applications as electron donor/electron acceptor or as electron conductor/hole conductor materials, in solutions and in the solid state. Methods that aim at p- and n-doping as a means to favor hole or electron injection/transport are covered as well (critical review, 208 references).

  15. 15 CFR 30.60 - Confidentiality of Electronic Export Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Confidentiality of Electronic Export Information. 30.60 Section 30.60 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FOREIGN TRADE REGULATIONS General Administrative Provisions...

  16. Electronic information sources access and use for healthcare ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, this study was to assess Electronic Information Sources (EIS) access and use for healthcare service among hospitals of Western Oromia, Ethiopia, 2013. Materials and Methods: A descriptive study design with quantitative and qualitative data collection methods was employed. Study subjects were selected by ...

  17. Adoption and use of electronic information resources by medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the adoption and use of electronic information resources by medical science students of the University of Benin. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for the study and 390 students provided the data. Data collected were analysed with descriptive Statistics(Simple percentage and ...

  18. Electronic information resource sharing among university libraries in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study explored the state of electronic information resource sharing among university libraries in Southern part of Nigeria, highlighting the prospects and the challenges. The study was an empirical research which adopted the descriptive survey as the design. The questionnaire was used to collect data from the ...

  19. Access to electronic information resources by students of federal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper discusses access to electronic information resources by students of Federal Colleges of Education in Eha-Amufu and Umunze. Descriptive survey design was used to investigate sample of 526 students. Sampling technique used was a Multi sampling technique. Data for the study were generated using ...

  20. Gender differences in students' utilization of electronic information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study determined gender differences among students in the utilization of electronic information resources in Ramat Library, University of Maiduguri. One objective,with corresponding hypotheses guided the study. The survey research method was used. The population for the study comprised 13,995 (thirteen thousand, ...

  1. The impact of electronic information resource use on research output

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selection of the sample universities was purposive. ... This was demonstrated in the increased number of proposals prepared, submitted and funded, research reports submitted, journal articles published and chapters in books and books published with increased access to and use of electronic information resources.

  2. Electronic Information on CD--A Product or a Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the dual nature of EIPs (electronic information products), which display characteristics of both tangible products and intangible services. Differences between products, services, and EIPs are summarized in table form, and several advantages of and reasons for purchasing CD (compact disc) products are presented. (MES)

  3. Availability and Utilization of Electronic Information Databases by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was undertaken to determine the Availability and Utilization of Electronic Information Database by Staff of the Agricultural Complex, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria. A survey method was used for the study. Stratified sampling method was used to select 209 respondents to accommodate the different strata of the ...

  4. Utilization of electronic information resources by academic staff at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the utilization of Electronic Information resources by the academic staff of Makerere University in Uganda. It examined the academic staff awareness of the resources available, the types of resources provided by the Makerere University Library, the factors affecting resource utilization. The study was ...

  5. Gender Analysis Of Electronic Information Resource Use: The Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article is based on an empirical study that examined the association between gender and the use of electronic information resources among postgraduate students at the University of Dar es salaam, Tanzania. The study was conducted in December 2005 and integrated both qualitative and quantitative research ...

  6. Utilization status of Electronic Information Sources (EIS) for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: According to the World Health Organization, the use of Electronic Information Sources (EIS) in healthcare is not merely about application of technology, but it is also a foundation to provide higher quality clinical care. This study was aimed to assess Utilization Status of EIS for HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment in ...

  7. Skills and training needs for use of electronic information resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article reports on the findings regarding students' knowledge, skill and training needs in using Electronic Information Resources (EIRs). Data was collected using a questionnaire-based survey administered to 1123 undergraduate students. Probability sampling was used to sample students across the four universities, ...

  8. Information Functional Theory: Electronic Properties as Functionals of Information for Atoms and Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xia-Yu; Rong, Chunying; Lu, Tian; Zhou, Panpan; Liu, Shubin

    2016-05-26

    How to accurately predict electronic properties of a Columbic system with the electron density obtained from experiments such as X-ray crystallography is still an unresolved problem. The information-theoretic approach recently developed in the framework of density functional reactivity theory is one of the efforts to address the issue. In this work, using 27 atoms and 41 molecules as illustrative examples, we present a study to demonstrate that one is able to satisfactorily describe such electronic properties as the total energy and its components with information-theoretic quantities like Shannon entropy, Fisher information, Ghosh-Berkowitz-Parr entropy, and Onicescu information energy. Closely related to the earlier attempt of expanding density functionals using simple homogeneous functionals, this work not only confirms Nagy's proof that Shannon entropy alone should contain all the information needed to adequately describe an electronic system but also provides a feasible pathway to map the relationship between the experimentally available electron density and various electronic properties for Columbic systems such as atoms and molecules. Extensions to other electronic properties are straightforward.

  9. Acute toxicity and treatment interruption related to electron and photon craniospinal irradiation in pediatric patients treated at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eric L; Allen, Pamela; Wu, Catherine; Ater, Joann; Kuttesch, John; Maor, Moshe H

    2002-03-15

    To determine the incidence of acute toxicity and treatment interruption associated with electron and photon craniospinal irradiation (CSI) in children treated with or without chemotherapy. A retrospective study involving a computerized search of the radiotherapy database at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center identified a total of 79 eligible patients electron (n = 46) or photon (n = 33) CSI from October 1980 to March 2000. Acute toxicity was graded according to the 1998 National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria. Chemotherapy sequencing was categorized as before or after CSI or no chemotherapy. The incidences of weight loss and skin toxicity were recorded and differences in treatment interruption and hematologic values with respect to modality used (electron vs. photon), age (6 years), and sequencing of chemotherapy were compared using chi-square tests. The median age of the electron group was lower than that of the photon group (6.7 years and 11.7 years, respectively). The two groups were otherwise well matched in terms of median spinal dose (31.1 vs. 33.3 Gy), fraction size (1.57 vs. 1.63 Gy), and total treatment time (32.4 vs. 30.7 days). Only 2 patients in each group (photon and electron) had a treatment break (>3 days). The mean number of days interrupted was 0.94 (photon) and 1.1 (electron) (p = 0.72). The electron and photon groups were well balanced in terms of receiving pre-CSI chemotherapy (37% vs. 41%, p = 0.776). Chemotherapy given before radiotherapy vs. after or not at all was associated with an increased incidence of Grade 3-4 leukopenia (76% vs. 49%, p = 0.02), thrombocytopenia (90% vs. 10%, p = 0), and neutropenia (50% vs. 15%, p = 0.005). A younger age was associated with Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia (29% vs. 8.7%, p = 0.034), and decreased hemoglobin (29% vs. 6.5%, p = 0.014). The incidence of leukocyte depression of Grade 3-4 toxicity was 62% in the electron group and 32% in the photon group (p = 0.018). The incidence of

  10. Quantum photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Pearsall, Thomas P

    2017-01-01

    This textbook employs a pedagogical approach that facilitates access to the fundamentals of Quantum Photonics. It contains an introductory description of the quantum properties of photons through the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, introducing stimulated and spontaneous emission of photons at the quantum level. Schrödinger’s equation is used to describe the behavior of electrons in a one-dimensional potential. Tunneling through a barrier is used to introduce the concept of non­locality of an electron at the quantum level, which is closely-related to quantum confinement tunneling, resonant tunneling, and the origin of energy bands in both periodic (crystalline) and aperiodic (non-crystalline) materials. Introducing the concepts of reciprocal space, Brillouin zones, and Bloch’s theorem, the determination of electronic band structure using the pseudopotential method is presented, allowing direct computation of the band structures of most group IV, group III-V, and group II-VI semiconducto...

  11. Linking Informal and Formal Electronics Recycling via an Interface Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Totoki

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Informal recycling of electronics in the developing world has emerged as a new global environmental concern. The primary approach to address this problem has been command-and-control policies that ban informal recycling and international trade in electronic scrap. These bans are difficult to enforce and also have negative effects by reducing reuse of electronics, and employment for people in poverty. An alternate approach is to link informal and formal sectors so as to maintain economic activity while mitigating environmental damages. This article explores the idea of an interface organization that purchases components and waste from informal dismantlers and passes them on to formal processors. Environmental, economic and social implications of interface organizations are discussed. The main environmental questions to resolve are what e-scrap components should be targeted by the interface organization, i.e., circuit boards, wires, and/or plastic parts. Economically, when formal recycling is more profitable (e.g., for circuit boards, the interface organization is revenue positive. However, price subsidies are needed for copper wires and residual waste to incentivize informal dismantlers to turn in for formal processing. Socially, the potential for corruption and gaming of the system is critical and needs to be addressed.

  12. Linking emerging hazardous waste technologies with the electronic information era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B.E.; Suk, W.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Blackard, B. [Technology Planning and Management Corp., Durham, NC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In looking to the future and the development of new approaches or strategies for managing hazardous waste, it is important to understand and appreciate the factors that have contributed to current successful approaches. In the United States, several events in the last two decades have had a significant impact in advancing remediation of hazardous waste, including environmental legislation, legislative reforms on licensing federally funded research, and electronic transfer of information. Similar activities also have occurred on a global level. While each of these areas is significant, the electronic exchange of information has no national boundaries and has become an active part of major hazardous waste research and management programs. It is important to realize that any group or society that is developing a comprehensive program in hazardous waste management should be able to take advantage of this advanced approach in the dissemination of information. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Electronic waste and informal recycling in Kathmandu, Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parajuly, Keshav; Thapa, Khim B.; Cimpan, Ciprian

    2018-01-01

    any advancement in this sector. We characterize the informal recycling chain in Kathmandu, where a workforce of more than 10,000 people handles the recyclable items in various waste streams, including electronic waste (e-waste). A field study, supported by key informant interviews, questionnaire...... surveys, and site observations was conducted to understand the local recycling sector, the lifecycle of electronic products, and the relevant stakeholders. E-waste is found to be an integral part of the existing solid waste management chain and, therefore, needs to be addressed collectively. We identify...... the challenges and opportunities towards building a sustainable system for managing e-waste, and offer propositions for a resource-oriented waste management system. This study can serve as a baseline for future research on informal waste recycling, e-waste in particular, in Nepal and similar developing economies...

  14. Finding Text Information in the Ocean of Electronic Documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvick, Patricia A.; Calapristi, Augustin J.

    2003-02-05

    Information management in natural resources has become an overwhelming task. A massive amount of electronic documents and data is now available for creating informed decisions. The problem is finding the relevant information to support the decision-making process. Determining gaps in knowledge in order to propose new studies or to determine which proposals to fund for maximum potential is a time-consuming and difficult task. Additionally, available data stores are increasing in complexity; they now may include not only text and numerical data, but also images, sounds, and video recordings. Information visualization specialists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have software tools for exploring electronic data stores and for discovering and exploiting relationships within data sets. These provide capabilities for unstructured text explorations, the use of data signatures (a compact format for the essence of a set of scientific data) for visualization (Wong et al 2000), visualizations for multiple query results (Havre et al. 2001), and others (http://www.pnl.gov/infoviz ). We will focus on IN-SPIRE, a MS Windows vision of PNNL’s SPIRE (Spatial Paradigm for Information Retrieval and Exploration). IN-SPIRE was developed to assist information analysts find and discover information in huge masses of text documents.

  15. HIV patients' willingness to share personal health information electronically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Paul A; Gordon, Peter; Camhi, Eli; Bakken, Suzanne

    2011-08-01

    To assess the attitudes of persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) towards having their personal health information (PHI) stored and shared electronically. PLWH (n = 93) in New York City completed surveys using audio computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) that assessed willingness to share their PHI with various people and entities via a secure electronic network. The survey also included questions on satisfaction with and trust of health care providers, current health, HIV-associated stigma, and frequency of internet access. Data were analyzed with descriptive and multivariate statistical methods. The majority (84%) of individuals were willing to share their PHI with clinicians involved in their care. Fewer individuals (39%) were as willing to share with non-clinical staff. Willingness to share PHI was positively associated with trust and respect of clinicians. PLWH accepted clinicians' need for access to accurate information. Patients' trust in their primary care providers highlights the importance of the clinician-patient relationship which can be used to engage patients support for health information exchange initiatives. As electronic storage and sharing of PHI is increasing, clinicians and PLWH should discuss patients' attitudes towards sharing PHI electronically. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Photon heterodyning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Youhei; Omura, Fuminori; Yasutake, Yuhsuke; Fukatsu, Susumu

    2017-08-21

    Single-photon interference experiments are attempted in the time domain using true single-photon streams. Self-heterodyning beats are clearly observed by letting the field associated with a single photon interfere with itself on a field-quadratic detector, which is a time analogue of Young's two-slit interference experiment. The temporal first-order coherence of single-photon fields, i.e., transient interference fringes, develops as cumulative detection events are mapped point-by-point onto a virtual capture frame by properly correlating the time-series data. The ability to single out photon counts at a designated timing paves the way for digital heterodyning with faint light for such use as phase measurement and quantum information processing.

  17. Non-evaporable getter performance in the Photon Factory electron storage ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Y.; Kobayashi, M. (National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    A non-evaporable getter (NEG) was tested in the Photon Factory in the pressure range 10{sup -11} to 10{sup -9} torr. To test the pumping performance with gas load, one NEG unit was installed in the newly constructed vacuum duct and the other in a fully outgassed duct. The NEGs under both situations worked well under these conditions, as did the distributed ion pumps (DIP). The pumping speed of the NEG for hydrogen seems to be less than the nominal value. An additional pumping is required for pumping methane. A titanium sublimation pump is more effective in pumping carbon monoxide than the NEG. (author).

  18. A Deterministic Electron, Photon, Proton and Heavy Ion Radiation Transport Suite for the Study of the Jovian System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ryan B.; Badavi, Francis F.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Atwell, William

    2011-01-01

    A deterministic suite of radiation transport codes, developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), which describe the transport of electrons, photons, protons, and heavy ions in condensed media is used to simulate exposures from spectral distributions typical of electrons, protons and carbon-oxygen-sulfur (C-O-S) trapped heavy ions in the Jovian radiation environment. The particle transport suite consists of a coupled electron and photon deterministic transport algorithm (CEPTRN) and a coupled light particle and heavy ion deterministic transport algorithm (HZETRN). The primary purpose for the development of the transport suite is to provide a means for the spacecraft design community to rapidly perform numerous repetitive calculations essential for electron, proton and heavy ion radiation exposure assessments in complex space structures. In this paper, the radiation environment of the Galilean satellite Europa is used as a representative boundary condition to show the capabilities of the transport suite. While the transport suite can directly access the output electron spectra of the Jovian environment as generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Galileo Interim Radiation Electron (GIRE) model of 2003; for the sake of relevance to the upcoming Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM), the 105 days at Europa mission fluence energy spectra provided by JPL is used to produce the corresponding dose-depth curve in silicon behind an aluminum shield of 100 mils ( 0.7 g/sq cm). The transport suite can also accept ray-traced thickness files from a computer-aided design (CAD) package and calculate the total ionizing dose (TID) at a specific target point. In that regard, using a low-fidelity CAD model of the Galileo probe, the transport suite was verified by comparing with Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for orbits JOI--J35 of the Galileo extended mission (1996-2001). For the upcoming EJSM mission with a potential launch date of 2020, the transport suite is used to compute

  19. Flow injection of liquid samples to a mass spectrometer with ionization under vacuum conditions: a combined ion source for single-photon and electron impact ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepler, Claudia; Sklorz, Martin; Passig, Johannes; Famiglini, Giorgio; Cappiello, Achille; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-09-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI), and atmospheric pressure photo-ionization (APPI) are the most important techniques for the ionization of liquid samples. However, working under atmospheric pressure conditions, all these techniques involve some chemical rather than purely physical processes, and therefore, side reactions often yield to matrix-dependent ionization efficiencies. Here, a system is presented that combines both soft single-photon ionization (SPI) and hard 70 eV electron impact ionization (EI) of dissolved compounds under vacuum conditions. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was modified to enable direct EI, a technique developed by Cappiello et al. to obtain library-searchable EI mass spectra as well as soft SPI mass spectra of sample solutions. An electron beam-pumped rare gas excimer lamp working at 126 nm was used as well as a focusable vacuum UV light source for single-photon ionization. Both techniques, EI and SPI, were applied successfully for flow injection experiments providing library-matchable EI fragment mass spectra and soft SPI mass spectra, showing dominant signals for the molecular ion. Four model compounds were analyzed: hexadecane, propofol, chlorpropham, and eugenol, with detection limits in the picomolar range. This novel combination of EI and SPI promises great analytical benefits, thanks to the possibility of combining database alignment for EI data and molecular mass information provided by SPI. Possible applications for the presented ionization technology system are a matrix-effect-free detection and a rapid screening of different complex mixtures without time-consuming sample preparation or separation techniques (e.g., for analysis of reaction solutions in combinatorial chemistry) or a switchable hard (EI) and soft (SPI) MS method as detection step for liquid chromatography.

  20. Photonics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Photonic Crystals, Metamaterials , nano-materials & 2D materials & Nano-Probes & Novel Sensing - Integrated Photonics & Silicon Photonics...nanostructures, plasmonics, metamaterials --Overcoming current interconnect challenges --Need for Design Tools for photonic IC’s: scattered landscape...DARPA NNI/NNCO BRI (2D Materials & Devices Beyond Graphene – planning phase) LRIR PIs Szep – RY: PICS Quantum Information

  1. Phthalocyanine molecules with extremely strong two-photon absorption for 3D rewritable optical information storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobizhev, M.; Makarov, N. S.; Rebane, A.; Wolleb, H.; Spahni, H.

    2006-08-01

    Phthalocyanines (Pcs) show exceptional stability against high temperatures (up to 900°C, for certain metallophthalocyanines), harsh chemical environments (strong acids and bases), γ-radiation (up to 100 MRad) and neutron radiation (up to 10 19 thermal neutrons/cm2). On the other hand, Pcs exhibit a number of unique physical properties, including semi-conductivity, photoconductivity, large linear and nonlinear optical coefficients, and the ability of photo-switch between two different forms, in case of non-symmetrical metal-free Pcs. This has led to an advancement of phthalocyanine-based prototype field-effect transistors, gas- and photo-sensors, solar cells, optical power limiters, and optical memory devices (CDs). For increasing the capacity of carriers of information, it has been suggested to use the effect of simultaneous two-photon absorption (2PA), which can allow for writing and reading information in many layers, thus resulting in Terabyte (TB) disks. Our estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio shows, however, that for fast (MB/s) processing, molecular 2PA cross section must be extremely large, σ II > 10 3 - 10 4 GM (1GM = 10 -50 cm 4 s), which has not been achieved yet in any photochromic material. In this paper we demonstrate, for the first time, that some specially designed non-symmetric metal-free phthahlocyanines are almost ideally suited for TB rewritable memory due to their extremely high, resonantly enhanced, 2PA cross section (~ 104 GM) in near-IR region and their intrinsic ability of reversible photo-tautomerization at lowered (~ 100 K) temperatures. We discuss how the special technical specifications, such as short pulse laser excitation and lowered working temperature, can be satisfied for space and terrestrial application.

  2. Research Students in the Electronic Age: Impacts of Changing Information Behavior on Information Literacy Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty Williamson

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Because of the rapid uptake of information and communication technology (ICT, understanding the ways in which information seeking has changed over the past decade is crucial to gaining a picture of how information literacy needs may also be changing in the electronic age. This qualitative research took an interpretivist/ constructivist approach in examining the ways in which access to electronic information-seeking affects the information literacy needs of 15 research students in an Australian university setting. An ethnographic technique, the interview, was used for the data collection. Three particular areas, related to information seeking and use, were selected: (1 information source use because of the burgeoning availability of electronic sources; (2 knowing when to stop collecting information because the advent of the Internet has the consequence of greater quantities of information being more easily available than was the case in the past; and 3 managing information following its collection, which has also been affected by the vast amount of information that is now accessible. The conclusion points to enhanced roles for both supervisors and academic librarians, with the need for the latter to become perceived as educators within their university communities.

  3. Analysis of Quantum Information Test-Bed by Parametric Down-Converted Photons Interference Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Wing H.

    2005-01-01

    Quantum optical experiments require all the components involved to be extremely stable relative to each other. The stability can be "measured" by using an interferometric experiment. A pair of coherent photons produced by parametric down-conversion could be chosen to be orthogonally polarized initially. By rotating the polarization of one of the wave packets, they can be recombined at a beam splitter such that interference will occur. Theoretically, the interference will create four terms in the wave function. Two terms with both photons going to the same detector, and two terms will have the photons each going to different detectors. However, the latter will cancel each other out, thus no photons will arrive at the two detectors simultaneously under ideal conditions. The stability Of the test-bed can then be inferred by the dependence of coincidence count on the rotation angle.

  4. Transverse momentum and centrality dependence of high-ptnon-photonic electron suppression in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2006-07-11

    The STAR collaboration at RHIC reports measurements of theinclusive yield of non-photonic electrons, which arise dominantly fromsemi-leptonic decays of heavy flavor mesons, over a broad range oftransverse momenta (1.2photonic electron yieldexhibits unexpectedly large suppression in central AuAu collisions athigh pt, suggesting substantial heavy quark energy loss at RHIC. Thecentrality and \\pt dependences of the suppression provide constraints ontheoretical models of suppression.

  5. Consumer Information in the Electronic Media: Neutral Information, Advertising, Selling. Working Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepstrup, Preben; Olander, Folke

    This paper presents a self-contained summary in English of the results of a research project conducted for the Nordic Council of Ministers to define problems, advantages, and disadvantages of the electronic dissemination of information for consumers, and to determine whether consumer organizations should adapt their information activities and…

  6. Correlative two-photon and serial block face scanning electron microscopy in neuronal tissue using 3D near-infrared branding maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Robert M; Peddie, Christopher J; Collinson, Lucy M; Ashby, Michael C; Verkade, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Linking cellular structure and function has always been a key goal of microscopy, but obtaining high resolution spatial and temporal information from the same specimen is a fundamental challenge. Two-photon (2P) microscopy allows imaging deep inside intact tissue, bringing great insight into the structural and functional dynamics of cells in their physiological environment. At the nanoscale, the complex ultrastructure of a cell's environment in tissue can be reconstructed in three dimensions (3D) using serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM). This provides a snapshot of high resolution structural information pertaining to the shape, organization, and localization of multiple subcellular structures at the same time. The pairing of these two imaging modalities in the same specimen provides key information to relate cellular dynamics to the ultrastructural environment. Until recently, approaches to relocate a region of interest (ROI) in tissue from 2P microscopy for SBF-SEM have been inefficient or unreliable. However, near-infrared branding (NIRB) overcomes this by using the laser from a multiphoton microscope to create fiducial markers for accurate correlation of 2P and electron microscopy (EM) imaging volumes. The process is quick and can be user defined for each sample. Here, to increase the efficiency of ROI relocation, multiple NIRB marks are used in 3D to target ultramicrotomy. A workflow is described and discussed to obtain a data set for 3D correlated light and electron microscopy, using three different preparations of brain tissue as examples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of characteristics of photon and electron beams generated by Philips/Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Haijun; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M

    2002-06-01

    Commissioning data of the common energy of 6 MV photon beams are analyzed for seven Philips/ Elekta linacs of five different models: SL 75/5, SL 15, SL 25, SLi Precise, and SLi. The observed beam quality %dd(10)x of 67.7% +/- 0.3 agrees with the manufacturer's specification of 67.5% +/- 2% but with a much smaller variation, suggesting the possibility of a more accurate beam quality guideline for acceptance commissioning of these linac models. Field size factors are less uniform, especially for the biggest field size of 40 x 40 cm2, but all agree within 1.1% between the five models. These 6 MV photon beams are also shown to be 0.4 MV harder than the Varian 2100C model. For commissioning electron beams generated by the Philips/Elekta models SL 15, SLi Precise and SLi, guidelines can be found from this work for the following parameters: actual field size at 100 SSD (up to +/- 0.6%) (different from manufacturer specified values at 95 SSD), and virtual source distance (up to +/- 0.7%). Significant differences are seen for R50 (up to 3.7 mm), sigma-theta-x, effective source distance, and cone size factor. However, except for R50 where Varian 2100C datasets are not available for comparison, the differences between the different Philips/Elekta models are comparable to those between the same Varian 2100C model linacs measured by us and Watts.

  8. Photon dose calculation based on electron multiple-scattering theory: practical representation of dose and particle transport integrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, D

    1999-06-01

    In modern photon dose-calculation algorithms one is frequently called upon to evaluate the integral at various points throughout the irradiated material of a dose or particle transport quantity multiplied by a weighting factor. For example, for a given dose-calculation point one might be integrating the product of the dose deposited by a monoenergetic beam and the energy distribution of the actual beam, and want to do this throughout the treatment volume. We have developed explicit formulas for replacing such integrations with a weighted sum of two or three functions (of, for example, the point of dose calculation) in order to greatly reduce the calculation time for the algorithm being used. We demonstrate the accuracy of this method of representing dose and particle transport integrals through comparisons with Monte Carlo calculations of dose distributions for two typical problems, in dealing with the energy spectrum of the photon beam and with the energy deposited by all the Compton electrons emerging from a particular interaction point, respectively.

  9. 36 CFR 1236.26 - What actions must agencies take to maintain electronic information systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... take to maintain electronic information systems? 1236.26 Section 1236.26 Parks, Forests, and Public... electronic information systems? (a) Agencies must maintain inventories of electronic information systems and... electronic information systems that is adequate to: (1) Specify all technical characteristics necessary for...

  10. Status of the Development of Superconducting Undulators for Storage Rings and Free Electron Lasers at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanyushenkov, Y.; Doose, C.; Fuerst, J.; Harkay, K.; Hasse, Q.; Kasa, M.; Shiroyanagi, Y.; Skiadopoulos, D.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Gluskin, E.; Emma, P.

    2017-06-01

    Development of superconducting undulator (SCU) technology continues at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The experience of building and successful operating the first short-length, 16-mm period length superconducting undulator SCU0 paved the way for a 1-m long, 18-mm period device— SCU18-1— which has been in operation since May 2015. The APS SCU team has also built and tested a 1.5-m long, 21-mm period length undulator as a part of the LCLS SCU R&D program, aimed at demonstration of SCU technology availability for free electron lasers. This undulator successfully achieved all the requirements including a phase error of 5° RMS. Our team has recently completed one more 1-m long, 18-mm period length undulator— SCU18-2— that is replacing the SCU0. We are also working on a helical SCU for the APS. The status of these projects will be presented.

  11. Comparison of deep inelastic electron-photon scattering data with the HERWIG and PHOJET Monte Carlo models

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Braccini, S.; Chamizo, M.; Cowan, G.; de Roeck, A.; Field, J.H.; Finch, A.J.; Lin, C.H.; Lauber, J.A.; Lehto, M.H.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Miller, D.J.; Nisius, R.; Saremi, S.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Surrow, B.; Taylor, R.J.; Wadhwa, M.; Wright, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    Deep inelastic electron-photon scattering is studied in the $Q^2$ range from 1.2 to 30 GeV$^2$ using the LEP1 data taken with the ALEPH, L3 and OPAL detectors at centre-of-mass energies close to the mass of the Z boson. Distributions of the measured hadronic final state are corrected to the hadron level and compared to the predictions of the HERWIG and PHOJET Monte Carlo models. For large regions in most of the distributions studied the results of the different experiments agree with one another. However, significant differences are found between the data and the models. Therefore the combined LEP data serve as an important input to improve on the Monte Carlo models.

  12. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John P.; Antolak, John A.; Followill, David S.; Huq, M. Saiful; Klein, Eric E.; Lam, Kwok L.; Palta, Jatinder R.; Roback, Donald M.; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M.

    2014-01-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$D_0^\\prime $\\end{document}D0′, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$D_0^\\prime $\\end{document}D0′ = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$D_0^\\prime $\\end{document}D0′ ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with

  13. Silicon/III-V laser with super-compact diffraction grating for WDM applications in electronic-photonic integrated circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yadong; Wei, Yongqiang; Huang, Yingyan; Tu, Yongming; Ng, Doris; Lee, Cheewei; Zheng, Yunan; Liu, Boyang; Ho, Seng-Tiong

    2011-01-31

    We have demonstrated a heterogeneously integrated III-V-on-Silicon laser based on an ultra-large-angle super-compact grating (SCG). The SCG enables single-wavelength operation due to its high-spectral-resolution aberration-free design, enabling wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) applications in Electronic-Photonic Integrated Circuits (EPICs). The SCG based Si/III-V laser is realized by fabricating the SCG on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrate. Optical gain is provided by electrically pumped heterogeneous integrated III-V material on silicon. Single-wavelength lasing at 1550 nm with an output power of over 2 mW and a lasing threshold of around 150 mA were achieved.

  14. Two-Photon Exchange Effects in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Myriam James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Two methods, Rosenbluth separation and polarization transfer, can be used to extract the proton form factor ratio μp GEp/GMp, but they do not yield the same results. It is thought that the disagreement is due to two photon exchange corrections to the differential cross sections. High precision proton Rosenbluth extractions were carried out at 102 kinematics points spanning 16 values of momentum transfer Q2, from 0.40 to 5.76 GeV2. Reduced cross sections were found to 1.1% or better for Q2 less than 3 GeV2 increasing to 4% at 5.76 GeV2 The form factor ratios were determined to 1:5-3% for Q2 < 1.5 GeV2, increasing to 9% by 3 GeV2 and rapidly above. Our data agrees with prior Rosenbluth, improving upon it the 1.0 - 2.0 GeV2 range to conclusively show a separation from polarization transfer where it had not been certain before. In addition, reduced cross sections at each Q2 were tested for nonlinearity in the angular variable. Such a departure from linearity would be a signature of two photon exchange effects, and prior data had not been sufficiently precise to show nonzero curvature. Our data begins to hint at negative curvature but does not yet show a significant departure from zero.

  15. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement for various detectors used in photon and electron beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looe, Hui Khee; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2011-07-21

    The subject of this study is the 'shift of the effective point of measurement', Δz, well known as a method of correction compensating for the 'displacement effect' in photon and electron beam dosimetry. Radiochromic EBT 1 films have been used to measure the 'true' TPR curves of 6 and 15 MV photons and 6 and 9 MeV electrons in the solid water-equivalent material RW3. For the Roos and Markus chambers, the cylindrical 'PinPoint', 'Semiflex' and 'Rigid-Stem' chambers, the 2D-Array and the E-type silicon diode (all from PTW-Freiburg), the positions of the effective points of measurement have been determined by direct or indirect comparison between their TPR curves and those of the EBT 1 film. Both for the Roos and Markus chambers, we found Δz = (0.4 ± 0.1) mm, which confirms earlier experimental and Monte Carlo results, but means a shortcoming of the 'water-equivalent window thickness' formula. For the cylindrical chambers, the ratio Δz/r was observed to increase with r, confirming a recent Monte Carlo prediction by Tessier (2010 E2-CN-182, Paper no 147, IDOS, Vienna) as well as the experimental observations by Johansson et al (1978 IAEA Symp. Proc. (Vienna) IAEA-SM-222/35 pp 243-70). According to a theoretical consideration, the shift of the effective point of measurement from the reference point of the detector is caused by a gradient of the fluence of the ionizing particles. As the experiments have shown, the value of Δz depends on the construction of the detector, but remains invariant under changes of radiation quality and depth. Other disturbances, which do not belong to the class of 'gradient effects', are not corrected by shifting the effective point of measurement.

  16. Evaluation of PENFAST--a fast Monte Carlo code for dose calculations in photon and electron radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, B; Poumarede, B; Tola, F; Barthe, J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the potential of accelerated dose calculations, using the fast Monte Carlo (MC) code referred to as PENFAST, rather than the conventional MC code PENELOPE, without losing accuracy in the computed dose. For this purpose, experimental measurements of dose distributions in homogeneous and inhomogeneous phantoms were compared with simulated results using both PENELOPE and PENFAST. The simulations and experiments were performed using a Saturne 43 linac operated at 12 MV (photons), and at 18 MeV (electrons). Pre-calculated phase space files (PSFs) were used as input data to both the PENELOPE and PENFAST dose simulations. Since depth-dose and dose profile comparisons between simulations and measurements in water were found to be in good agreement (within +/-1% to 1 mm), the PSF calculation is considered to have been validated. In addition, measured dose distributions were compared to simulated results in a set of clinically relevant, inhomogeneous phantoms, consisting of lung and bone heterogeneities in a water tank. In general, the PENFAST results agree to within a 1% to 1 mm difference with those produced by PENELOPE, and to within a 2% to 2 mm difference with measured values. Our study thus provides a pre-clinical validation of the PENFAST code. It also demonstrates that PENFAST provides accurate results for both photon and electron beams, equivalent to those obtained with PENELOPE. CPU time comparisons between both MC codes show that PENFAST is generally about 9-21 times faster than PENELOPE. Copyright 2009 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluating the appropriateness of electronic information resources for learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saparova, Dinara; Nolan, Nathanial S

    2016-01-01

    Current US medical students have begun to rely on electronic information repositories-such as UpToDate, AccessMedicine, and Wikipedia-for their pre-clerkship medical education. However, it is unclear whether these resources are appropriate for this level of learning due to factors involving information quality, level of evidence, and the requisite knowledgebase. This study evaluated appropriateness of electronic information resources from a novel perspective: amount of mental effort learners invest in interactions with these resources and effects of the experienced mental effort on learning. Eighteen first-year medical students read about three unstudied diseases in the above-mentioned resources (a total of fifty-four observations). Their eye movement characteristics (i.e., fixation duration, fixation count, visit duration, and task-evoked pupillary response) were recorded and used as psychophysiological indicators of the experienced mental effort. Post reading, students' learning was assessed with multiple-choice tests. Eye metrics and test results constituted quantitative data analyzed according to the repeated Latin square design. Students' perceptions of interacting with the information resources were also collected. Participants' feedback during semi-structured interviews constituted qualitative data and was reviewed, transcribed, and open coded for emergent themes. Compared to AccessMedicine and Wikipedia, UpToDate was associated with significantly higher values of eye metrics, suggesting learners experienced higher mental effort. No statistically significant difference between the amount of mental effort and learning outcomes was found. More so, descriptive statistical analysis of the knowledge test scores suggested similar levels of learning regardless of the information resource used. Judging by the learning outcomes, all three information resources were found appropriate for learning. UpToDate, however, when used alone, may be less appropriate for first

  18. A closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy for photons and electrons in the Compton energy range in Cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Volnei; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: borges@ufrgs.b, E-mail: vilhena@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PROMEC/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Fernandes, Julio Cesar Lombaldo, E-mail: julio.lombaldo@ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (DMPA/UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Matematica Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we report on a closed-form formulation for the build-up factor and absorbed energy, in one and two dimensional Cartesian geometry for photons and electrons, in the Compton energy range. For the one-dimensional case we use the LTS{sub N} method, assuming the Klein-Nishina scattering kernel for the determination of the angular radiation intensity for photons. We apply the two-dimensional LTS{sub N} nodal solution for the averaged angular radiation evaluation for the two-dimensional case, using the Klein-Nishina kernel for photons and the Compton kernel for electrons. From the angular radiation intensity we construct a closed-form solution for the build-up factor and evaluate the absorbed energy. We present numerical simulations and comparisons against results from the literature. (author)

  19. REVIEW ARTICLE: From single photons to milliwatt radiant power—electron storage rings as radiation sources with a high dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Roman; Thornagel, Reiner; Ulm, Gerhard

    2010-10-01

    The spectral radiant intensity of synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings can be calculated from basic electrodynamic relations (Schwinger equation) and it is directly proportional to the stored electron beam current, i.e. the number of stored electrons. With the necessary equipment installed to measure and control the electron beam current over a wide dynamic range, the radiant intensity of the synchrotron radiation can be adjusted accordingly without changing the spectrum. This is done, e.g., at the Metrology Light Source (MLS), the dedicated electron storage ring of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. The MLS is operated as a primary radiation source standard from the near IR up to the soft x-ray region and its operational parameters can be adjusted and accurately measured in a wide range: the electron beam current can be varied from 1 pA (one stored electron) up to 200 mA and thus the radiant intensity can be changed by more than 11 decades. The photon flux or radiant power for typical angular acceptances can thus be varied from single photons to milliwatts. This is a very powerful tool, e.g., for the characterization of the linearity of the response of radiation detectors or for the calibration of photon counting detectors. In this article we present an overview of past, current and possible future activities exploiting this feature.

  20. Searching electronically for information on transcultural nursing and health subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Margaret; Burr, Jennifer; Janetos, Deborah H

    2004-07-01

    With the proliferation of electronic resources available to search for subjects related to transcultural nursing and health, nurses must keep abreast of computer-based tools that enable them to quickly and efficiently obtain information on a variety of topics. This article provides suggestions for narrowing and focusing a search on transcultural nursing and related subjects using important research databases such as Medline and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL). Information about additional useful databases such as Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and Psychological Abstracts (PsycINFO) is also provided. In the article, selected examples of Internet sites of interest in transcultural nursing and health are identified and described in brief annotations. Web sites for U.S. government agencies, organizations, and commercial groups that concern transcultural nursing and health care are cited. Global transcultural health and nursing Internet resources also are included.

  1. Electronic and photonic band engineering for novel optoelectronic and nanophotonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Dong

    Fundamental electrical and optical properties of strained wurtzite InGaN/GaN-based quantum-well structures are calculated based on the Rashba-Sheka-Pikus (RSP) Hamiltonian in the vicinity of the Gamma point since the simple parabolic model is very poor to fit the valence band structures of the nitride wurtzite materials. The model includes the spontaneous and the strain-induced piezoelectric polarization, as well as the crystal-field and the spin-orbit interactions and the strain effect that are already included in the RSP Hamiltonian. The propagation method is used for the QW structure calculation and the nitride parameters were optimized based on the up-to-date experimental results and the theoretical calculations. It is found that the strain-induced piezoelectric field significantly alters the subband structure and determines the output intensity of the nitride quantum well light emitting diodes. The calculations are compared with the available experimental data of the nitride light emitting diodes (LEDs) and a good match exists for low In composition LEDs. For the case with high In composition (> 0.2), the comparison between the calculations and the experiments supports the possibility of strain relaxation in the quantum well. The resulting model can accurately investigate the optoelectronic properties of nitride based QW LEDs over a wide range of In composition (< 0.5). Based on the understanding of the polarization fields, a design that uses AlInGaN as the quantum barrier is proposed to control the strain, and thus the piezoelectric polarization field. So an efficient red emission can be realized, which is hard to achieve if GaN is used as the barrier. In the proposed design, three different InGaN/AlInGaN QW structures emit red, green and blue light with similar intensities. Also, to achieve high efficiency, important factors related to the oscillator strength are discussed in detail. Since the initial predictions, photonic crystals (PCs) have offered new

  2. HOSPITAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS: A STUDY OF ELECTRONIC PATIENT RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Luiz Cortês

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of patient records, also known as medical records, is related to different needs and objectives, as they constitute permanent documents on the health of patients. With the advancement of information technologies and systems, patient records can be stored in databases, resulting in a positive impact on patient care. Based on these considerations, a research question that arises is “what are the benefits and problems that can be seen with the use of electronic versions of medical records?” This question leads to the formulation of the following hypothesis: although problems can be identified during the process of using electronic record systems, the benefits outweigh the difficulties, thereby justifying their use. To respond to the question and test the presented hypothesis, a research study was developed with users of the same electronic record system, consisting of doctors, nurses, and administrative personnel in three hospitals located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. The results show that, despite some problems in their usage, the benefits of electronic patient records outweigh possible disadvantages.

  3. Search for new paradigms in organic materials for photonics and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wei

    This dissertation describes detailed synthesis and physical studies of novel organic materials for photorefractive application and molecular electronics. Two organic photorefractive material systems were developed, namely, polymeric materials and monolithic organic materials. For polymeric photorefractive materials, it was found that careful design of energy levels between photosensitizers and transporting moieties leads to optimized PR effect. When an electron-rich photosensitizer is used, the electron deficient charge transporting component enhances photorefractive performance and reduces the response time. By incorporating the efficient non-linear optical chromophore into the fully functionalized polymers, high net optical gain and diffraction efficiency were obtained. A small library of monolithic photorefractive materials with 2-dicyanomethylene-3-cyano-2,5-dihydrofuran as the eletron-withdrawing moieties was prepared and the detailed structure-property correlation was investigated. The PR performance was significantly enhanced by fine-tuning structures of these materials It was found that the photorefractive properties were affected by doping a small amount of electron trapping moiety into two monolithic materials. The trapping molecule plays different roles in the two closely related photorefractive materials. Results from different measurements on photorefractive properties, charge mobility and charge transport activation energy confirmed that the trapping molelcule acts as an effective electron-trapping center in one of the materials but traps both electron and hole in the other material. These results shed light into the PR mechanisms and indicate that the PR performance of organic photorefractive materials can be further improved by the deliberate addition of suitable charge trapping center. A series of switch molecules was synthesized based on the novel design rationale to achieve switching behavior at molecular level. The monolayers were prepared from

  4. LHCb RICH Upgrade: an overview of the photon detector and electronics system

    CERN Document Server

    Cassina, L

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb experiment is one of the four large detectors operating at the LHC at CERN and it is mainly devoted to CP violation measurements and to the search for new physics in rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The data from the two Ring Image Cherenkov (RICH-1 and RICH-2) detectors are essential to identify particles in a wide momentum range. From 2019 onwards 14 TeV collisions with luminosities reaching up to $2\\cdot10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ with 25 ns bunch spacing are planned, with the goal of collecting 5 fb$^{-1}$ of data per year. In order to avoid degradation of the PID performance at such high rate (40 MHz), the RICH detector has to be upgraded. New photodetectors (Multi-anode photomultiplier tubes, MaPMTs) have been chosen and will be read out using a 8-channels chip, named CLARO, designed to sustain a photon counting rate up to 40 MHz, while minimizing the power consumption and the cross-talk. A 128-bit digital register allows selection of thresholds and attenuation values and provides featu...

  5. Combining optics and SDN to enable true hybrid integration of electronic and photonic switching solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guelbenzu, Gonzalo; Miao, Wang; Ben-Itzhak, Yaniv

    2017-01-01

    We present two hybrid fabrics integrating optical and electronic switches with SDN, and a novel approach improving the scaling of fast optical switches. C-Share reroute flows through optical switches increasing network performance. E-WDM exploits the optical switch transparency by emulating...

  6. SU-E-T-112: An OpenCL-Based Cross-Platform Monte Carlo Dose Engine (oclMC) for Coupled Photon-Electron Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z; Shi, F; Folkerts, M; Qin, N; Jiang, S; Jia, X [The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Ctr, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Low computational efficiency of Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation impedes its clinical applications. Although a number of MC dose packages have been developed over the past few years, enabling fast MC dose calculations, most of these packages were developed under NVidia’s CUDA environment. This limited their code portability to other platforms, hindering the introduction of GPU-based MC dose engines to clinical practice. To solve this problem, we developed a cross-platform fast MC dose engine named oclMC under OpenCL environment for external photon and electron radiotherapy. Methods: Coupled photon-electron simulation was implemented with standard analogue simulation scheme for photon transport and Class II condensed history scheme for electron transport. We tested the accuracy and efficiency of oclMC by comparing the doses calculated using oclMC and gDPM, a previously developed GPU-based MC code on NVidia GPU platform, for a 15MeV electron beam and a 6MV photon beam in a homogenous water phantom, a water-bone-lung-water slab phantom and a half-slab phantom. We also tested code portability of oclMC on different devices, including an NVidia GPU, two AMD GPUs and an Intel CPU. Results: Satisfactory agreements were observed in all photon and electron cases, with ∼0.48%–0.53% average dose differences at regions within 10% isodose line for electron beam cases and ∼0.15%–0.17% for photon beam cases. It took oclMC 3–4 sec to perform transport simulation for electron beam on NVidia Titan GPU and 35–51 sec for photon beam, both with ∼0.5% statistical uncertainty. The computation was 6%–17% slower than gDPM due to the differences in both physics model and development environment, which is considered not significant for clinical applications. In terms of code portability, gDPM only runs on NVidia GPUs, while oclMC successfully runs on all the tested devices. Conclusion: oclMC is an accurate and fast MC dose engine. Its high cross

  7. Spectrometer for shot-to-shot photon energy characterization in the multi-bunch mode of the free electron laser at Hamburg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palutke, S; Gerken, N C; Mertens, K; Klumpp, S; Mozzanica, A; Schmitt, B; Wunderer, C; Graafsma, H; Meiwes-Broer, K-H; Wurth, W; Martins, M

    2015-11-01

    The setup and first results from commissioning of a fast online photon energy spectrometer for the vacuum ultraviolet free electron laser at Hamburg (FLASH) at DESY are presented. With the use of the latest advances in detector development, the presented spectrometer reaches readout frequencies up to 1 MHz. In this paper, we demonstrate the ability to record online photon energy spectra on a shot-to-shot base in the multi-bunch mode of FLASH. Clearly resolved shifts in the mean wavelength over the pulse train as well as shot-to-shot wavelength fluctuations arising from the statistical nature of the photon generating self-amplified spontaneous emission process have been observed. In addition to an online tool for beam calibration and photon diagnostics, the spectrometer enables the determination and selection of spectral data taken with a transparent experiment up front over the photon energy of every shot. This leads to higher spectral resolutions without the loss of efficiency or photon flux by using single-bunch mode or monochromators.

  8. Detection of dark states in two-dimensional electronic photon-echo signals via ground-state coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Dassia

    2015-06-01

    Several recent experiments report on possibility of dark-state detection by means of so called beating maps of two-dimensional photon-echo spectroscopy [Ostroumov et al., Science 340, 52 (2013); Bakulin et al., Ultrafast Phenomena XIX (Springer International Publishing, 2015)]. The main idea of this detection scheme is to use coherence induced upon the laser excitation as a very sensitive probe. In this study, we investigate the performance of ground-state coherence in the detection of dark electronic states. For this purpose, we simulate beating maps of several models where the excited-state coherence can be hardly detected and is assumed not to contribute to the beating maps. The models represent strongly coupled electron-nuclear dynamics involving avoided crossings and conical intersections. In all the models, the initially populated optically accessible excited state decays to a lower-lying dark state within few hundreds femtoseconds. We address the role of Raman modes and of interstate-coupling nature. Our findings suggest that the presence of low-frequency Raman active modes significantly increases the chances for detection of dark states populated via avoided crossings, whereas conical intersections represent a more challenging task.

  9. Single-photon double and triple ionization of acetaldehyde (ethanal) studied by multi-electron coincidence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorodskikh, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Origovägen 6B, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Zhaunerchyk, V. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Origovägen 6B, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Mucke, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Eland, J.H.D. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Origovägen 6B, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Squibb, R.J. [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Origovägen 6B, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Karlsson, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Linusson, P. [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Feifel, R., E-mail: raimund.feifel@gu.se [Department of Physics, University of Gothenburg, Origovägen 6B, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2015-12-16

    Highlights: • The first ever valence double ionization spectrum of acetaldehyde is reported. • The first ever site-selectively extracted Auger spectra of acetaldehyde are reported. • The first ever Auger spectra of acetaldehyde involving shake-up states are reported. • The first ever triple ionization spectra of acetaldehyde are reported. • The first ever energy sharing of electron pairs emitted by acetaldehyde is presented. - Abstract: Single-photon multiple ionization processes of acetaldehyde (ethanal) have been experimentally investigated by utilizing a multi-particle coincidence technique based on the time-of-flight magnetic bottle principle, in combination with either a synchrotron radiation source or a pulsed helium discharge lamp. The processes investigated include double and triple ionization in the valence region as well as single and double Auger decay of core-ionized acetaldehyde. The latter are studied site-selectively for chemically different carbon core vacancies, scrutinizing early theoretical predictions specifically made for the case of acetaldehyde. Moreover, Auger processes in shake-up and core-valence ionized states are investigated. In the cases where the processes involve simultaneous emission of two electrons, the distributions of the energy sharing are presented, emphasizing either the knock-out or shake-off mechanism.

  10. Two-photon contributions to the elastic electron-nucleon scattering in the Skyrme model; Zwei-Photon-Beitraege zur elastischen Elektron-Nukleon-Streuung im Skyrme-Modell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Markus

    2008-09-23

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial for our understanding of the inner structure of the proton. Recently it has become feasible to measure them by the use of polarisation transfer techniques in addition to the traditional Rosenbluth separation method. Thereby emerged an incompatibility of the results obtained by these two different experimental methods. It is commonly assumed that the discrepance is induced by higher order corrections to the cross section, especially through two-photon exchange processes. Unfortunately these processes cannot be calculated in a model independent manner because off-shell photon nucleon vertices arise. Effective chiral lagrangians contain already local two-photon couplings and therefore seem exceptionally well suited to study the anomaly contribution to the two-photon exchange. These couplings give two-photon exchange contributions that can be understood as the coupling of the nucleon to pions, decaying into two virtual photons. A particular contribution emerges from the chiral anomaly of QCD, that describes the two-photon decay of the neutral pion. The most important goal of this work is the calculation of the contribution arising from the anomaly to the elastic electron-proton scattering. The results are expected to be widely model independent since the anomaly directly reflects a QCD property. Based on the Skyrme model the protons are realized as soliton solutions in effective chiral theories. The next to leading order contribution to the cross section is given by the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange. The latter contains an ultraviolet divergence, which is renormalized by a local effective counterterm. This counterterm contributes to the width of the neutral pion decay which determines the finite part of the counterterm coefficient. The affect of the anomaly to the Rosenbluth separation of the electromagnetic form factors as well as the discrepance regarding the polarization measurements is extensively

  11. IMPACT OF MODERN INFORMATION SOCIETY ON THE UNIVERSITY ELECTRONIC BRANDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubov L. Skovorodina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necessity to develop of electronic information model for the formation of a virtual image of the University connected first with the dynamic trends of the modern society. Internet branding as an element of market sustainability of the University gives him an advantage over competitors and by that increases its competitiveness, оптимизация и продвижение сайта. 

  12. OSA Trends in Optics and Photonics Series. Volume 13: Ultrafast Electronics and Optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Kawanishi, H. Takara and M. Saruwatari, "Multiple-output 100 Gb/s all-optical demultiplexer based on multichannel four-wave mixing pumped by a linearly...1995). [7] S. Kawanishi, H. Takara , T. Morioka, O. Kamatani, and M. Saruwatari, 薘 Gb/s, 100 km time division multiplexed optical transmission...47] P.A. Andrekson, "Picosecond optical sampling using four wave mixing in fibre", Electron. Lett.,.27, no. 16, p. 1440, (1991). [48] H. Takara

  13. Heterogeneous Integration of 3-5 Photonics and Silicon Electronics for Advanced Optical Microsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    incorporate strained InGaAs quantum wells for high bandwidths at low drive currents. Modified fabrication processes were used to achieve the...surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), InGaAs photodiodes on InP, and advanced silicon CMOS circuits through die-level hybrid integration. Electronic...current. InGaAs photodiodes were fabricated on InP with layouts similar to that of the VCSEL arrays. Figure 4 shows detectors prior to integration

  14. The water-water cycle as alternative photon and electron sinks.

    OpenAIRE

    Asada, K

    2000-01-01

    The water-water cycle in chloroplasts is the photoreduction of dioxygen to water in photosystem I (PS I) by the electrons generated in photosystem II (PS II) from water. In the water-water cycle, the rate of photoreduction of dioxygen in PS I is several orders of magnitude lower than those of the disproportionation of superoxide catalysed by superoxide dismutase, the reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water catalysed by ascorbate peroxidase, and the reduction of the resulting oxidized forms of...

  15. Excessive production of electron pairs by soft photons in low multiplicity ion interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, T. H.; Dake, S.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Iwai, J.; Jones, W. V.; Jurak, A.; Lord, J. J.

    1985-01-01

    Three multiply charged primary cosmic ray interactions with carbon nuclei are reported, in which the number of materialized electron pairs within a distance of about 0.3 conversion length is larger than predicted from isospin considerations. These are the most energetic (sigma E gamma 4 TeV) of the low multiplicity ( 15 tracks) events observed in the Japanese-American Cooperative Experiment (JACEE-2) emulsion chamber.

  16. Theoretical modelling of semiconductor surfaces microscopic studies of electrons and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, G P

    1999-01-01

    The state-of-the-art theoretical studies of ground state properties, electronic states and atomic vibrations for bulk semiconductors and their surfaces by the application of the pseudopotential method are discussed. Studies of bulk and surface phonon modes have been extended by the application of the phenomenological bond charge model. The coverage of the material, especially of the rapidly growing and technologically important topics of surface reconstruction and chemisorption, is up-to-date and beyond what is currently available in book form. Although theoretical in nature, the book provides

  17. Rapid and Versatile Photonic Annealing of Graphene Inks for Flexible Printed Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secor, Ethan B; Ahn, Bok Y; Gao, Theodore Z; Lewis, Jennifer A; Hersam, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Intense pulsed light (IPL) annealing of graphene inks is demonstrated for rapid post-processing of inkjet-printed patterns on various substrates. A conductivity of ≈25,000 S m(-1) is achieved following a single printing pass using a concentrated ink containing 20 mg mL(-1) graphene, establishing this strategy as a practical and effective approach for the versatile and high-performance integration of graphene in printed and flexible electronics. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Photons with a Twist: Coherent Optical Vortices From Relativistic Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazik, Andrey

    The purpose of this dissertation is to examine a proof of principle experiment and its background that generates and amplifies coherent light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM) in a single pass via free-electron laser (FEL) at the fundamental operating frequency using the HGHMG (High Gain High Mode Generation) scheme. The background to this experiment was done uniting two rapidly expanding and distinct fields of study: (a) high-order OAM light modes, which interact in new ways with matter, and (b) FELs, in which a relativistic electron beam emits coherent, ultra bright, frequency-tunable light via Bremsstrahlung radiation. Due to the medium less nature of FELs, the OAM light generated via FEL interaction enables new frontiers of exploration at Angstrom wavelengths and femtosecond time scales. This dissertation will be divided into two parts: theory and background necessary to perform a proof of principle experiment described in Chapters 1 through 3; and physical description of insertion devices and experiment setup, execution and data analysis described in Chapters 4 and 5.

  19. COLLECTIONS OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION RESOURCES AND THEIR METADESCRIPTIONS AS COMPONENTS OF SCIENTIFIC ELECTRONIC LIBRARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya V. Savchenko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of scientific research components of digital libraries, the main ones being the collection of electronic scientific information resources. An important specific characteristics of collections of scientific information resources, resources of their formation, structure collections, methods of their organization, technology creation, support and use of scientific collections, the role and function of metadata in collections and metadata management technology are represented. On the stage of planning and introduction of scientific e-libraries there can be used results of researches presented in the article, namely: chart of forming of collections of scientific informative resources; stages of planning and development of metadescriptions, and similarly the use of standard the Dublin kernel, creation of metadescriptions.

  20. Single photon response in GaAs quantum transport devices for photon-spin quantum state transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsuwa, T. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan); Arai, K. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan); ERATO-JST, Semiconductor Spintronics, Project, JST (Japan); Shigyo, H.; Kinjo, H.; Edamatsu, K. [Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ono, K. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan); Low Temperature Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, Saitama (Japan); Mitsumori, Y.; Kosaka, H. [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan); Research Institute of Electrical Communication, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Quantum information can be stored and manipulated by an electron spin if its state was faithfully transferred from messenger photon qubit. Such a quantum state transfer needs to have a function of conversion from photon polarization to electron spin state and flagging the safe conversion without destroying the spin state. We have achieved single photon response by using a quantum dot as an electron trap and a quantum point contact as a charge sensor on GaAs/AlGaAs-based modulation doped structure. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. The ‘cutting away’ of potential secondary electron tracks explains the effects of beam size and detector wall density in small-field photon dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Delfs, Björn; Poppinga, Daniela; Jiang, Ping; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2018-01-01

    The well-known field-size dependent overresponse in small-field photon-beam dosimetry of solid-state detectors equipped with very thin sensitive volumes, such as the PTW microDiamond, cannot be caused by the photon and electron interactions within these sensitive layers because they are only a few micrometers thick. The alternative explanation is that their overresponse is caused by the combination of two effects, the modification of the secondary electron fluence profile (i) by a field size too small to warrant lateral secondary electron equilibrium and (ii) by the density-dependent electron ranges in the structural detector materials placed in front of or backing the sensitive layer. The present study aims at the numerical demonstration and visualization of this combined mechanism. The lateral fluence profiles of the secondary electrons hitting a 1 µm thick scoring layer were Monte-Carlo simulated by modelling their generation and transport in the upstream or downstream adjacent layers of thickness 0.6 mm and densities from 0.0012 to 3 g cm‑3, whose atomic composition was constantly kept water-like. The scoring layer/adjacent layer sandwich was placed in an infinite water phantom irradiated by circular 60Co, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams with diameters from 3 to 40 mm. The interpretation starts from the ideal case of lateral secondary electron equilibrium, where the Fano theorem excludes any density effect. If the field size is then reduced, electron tracks potentially originating from source points outside the field border will then be numerically ‘cut away’. This geometrical effect reduces the secondary electron fluence at the field center, but the magnitude of this reduction also varies with the density-dependent electron ranges in the adjacent layers. This combined mechanism, which strongly depends on the photon spectrum, explains the field size and material density effect on the response of detectors with very thin sensitive layers used in small

  2. Investigation of Electron Transfer-Based Photonic and Electro-Optic Materials and Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J; Abbott, Edwin H; Dickensheets, David; Donovan, Richard P; Hobbs, J D; Spangler, Lee; McGuirl, Michele A; Spangler, Charles; Rebane, Aleksander; Rosenburg, Edward; Schmidt, V H; Singel, David J

    2008-03-28

    Montana's state program began its sixth year in 2006. The project's research cluster focused on physical, chemical, and biological materials that exhibit unique electron-transfer properties. Our investigators have filed several patents and have also have established five spin-off businesses (3 MSU, 2 UM) and a research center (MT Tech). In addition, this project involved faculty and students at three campuses (MSU, UM, MT Tech) and has a number of under-represented students, including 10 women and 5 Native Americans. In 2006, there was an added emphasis on exporting seminars and speakers via the Internet from UM to Chief Dull Knife Community College, as well as work with the MT Department of Commerce to better educate our faculty regarding establishing small businesses, licensing and patent issues, and SBIR program opportunities.

  3. Electronic Properties of Tin and Bismuth from Angular Correlation of Annihilation Photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.E.; Trumpy, Georg

    1969-01-01

    A linear slit setup has been used to obtain results of angular-correlation measurements in (a) tin single crystals in three orientations: [001], [100], and [110], (b) bismuth single crystals in four orientations: [111], [100], [1¯10], and [2¯1¯1], (c) solid and liquid tin and bismuth, and (d......) deformed bismuth. For both metals, the single-crystal angular-correlation curves lie near to the free-electron parabola. The tin curves show more anisotropy than the bismuth curves. An important result is the clear anisotropy found in the high-momentum part of the curves—the tails—for both metals. Little...... of the liquid-metal curves are smaller and of another form than the tails of polycrystalline curves; no Gaussian with only one adjustable constant factor can give a fit to both tails. No useful method for interpreting liquid-metal angular-correlation curves seems to exist. Two deformed bismuth samples gave...

  4. Photonic Potential of Haloarchaeal Pigment Bacteriorhodopsin for Future Electronics: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini, Ravi; Vijayanand, S; Hemapriya, J

    2017-08-01

    Haloarchaea are known for its adaptation in extreme saline environment. Halophilic archaea produces carotenoid pigments and proton pumps to protect them from extremes of salinity. Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a light-driven proton pump that resides in the membrane of haloarchaea Halobacterium salinarum. The photocycle of Bacteriorhodopsin passes through several states from K to O, finally liberating ATP for host's survival. Extensive studies on Bacteriorhodopsin photocycle has provided in depth knowledge on their sequential mechanism of converting solar energy into chemical energy inside the cell. This ability of Bacteriorhodopsin to harvest sunlight has now been experimented to exploit the unexplored and extensively available solar energy in various biotechnological applications. Currently, bacteriorhodopsin finds its importance in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), logic gates (integrated circuits, IC's), optical switching, optical memories, storage devices (random access memory, RAM), biosensors, electronic sensors and optical microcavities. This review deals with the optical and electrical applications of the purple pigment Bacteriorhodopsin.

  5. Serial 100 Gb/s connectivity based on polymer photonics and InP-DHBT electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katopodis, Vasilis; Kouloumentas, Christos; Konczykowska, Agnieszka; Jorge, Filipe; Groumas, Panos; Zhang, Ziyang; Beretta, Antonio; Dede, Alberto; Dupuy, Jean-Yves; Nodjiadjim, Virginie; Cangini, Giulio; Von Büren, George; Miller, Eric; Dinu, Raluca; Choi, Jung Han; Pech, Detlef; Keil, Norbert; Bach, Heinz-Gunter; Grote, Norbert; Vannucci, Antonello; Avramopoulos, Hercules

    2012-12-17

    We demonstrate the first integrated transmitter for serial 100 Gb/s NRZ-OOK modulation in datacom and telecom applications. The transmitter relies on the use of an electro-optic polymer modulator and the hybrid integration of an InP laser diode and InP-DHBT electronics with the polymer board. Evaluation is made at 80 and 100 Gb/s through eye-diagrams and BER measurements using a receiver module that integrates a pin-photodiode and an electrical 1:2 demultiplexer. Error-free performance is confirmed both at 80 and 100 Gb/s revealing the viability of the approach and the potential of the technology.

  6. Parallel Finite Element Electron-Photon Transport Analysis on 2-D Unstructured Mesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1999-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to solve the linear Boltzmann transport equation on an unstructured mesh of triangles, from a Pro/E model. An arbitriwy arrangement of distinct material regions is allowed. Energy dependence is handled by solving over an arbitrary number of discrete energy groups. Angular de- pendence is treated by Legendre-polynomial expansion of the particle cross sections and a discrete ordinates treatment of the particle fluence. The resulting linear system is solved in parallel with a preconditioned conjugate-gradients method. The solution method is unique, in that the space-angle dependence is solved si- multaneously, eliminating the need for the usual inner iterations. Electron cross sections are obtained from a Goudsrnit-Saunderson modifed version of the CEPXS code. A one-dimensional version of the code has also been develop@ for testing and development purposes.

  7. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  8. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  9. Spectromicroscopy of Polymers: Comparison of Radiation Damage with Electron and Photon Core Excitation Spectroscopy Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, H.; Smith, A. P.; Rightor, E. G.; Hitchcock, A. P.; Urquhart, S.; Leapman, R.

    1997-03-01

    Core excitation microspectroscopy has become a powerful tool for the characterization of polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to chemical functionality. However, the excitations utilized in electron energy loss spectroscopy performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope (TEM-EELS) and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy can introduce radiation damage and chemically modify the sample. In order to understand the radiation damage associated with TEM-EELS and NEXAFS spectroscopy we have studied the radiation damage of the common polymer poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as exhibited by changes in the acquired C K-edge excitation spectra. By fitting gaussian functions to the spectral intensity changes as a function of dose, we have determined the critical radiation dose of PET for both NEXAFS spectroscopy and TEM-EELS under typical operating conditions. This critical radiation dose for TEM-EELS is found to be 1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^8 grey (1.7 ± 0.2 x 10^4 Mrad) compared to a critical radiation dose for NEXAFS spectroscopy of 1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^9 grey (1.4 ± 0.7 x 10^5 Mrad). By considering the G factors of the two techniques and the critical radiation dose, a rule of thumb was derived that indicates that with typical present operating conditions, NEXAFS spectroscopy can analyze areas 500 times smaller than TEM-EELS given the same amount of radiation damage. Work supported by: NSF Young Investigator Award (DMR-9458060) and Dow Chemical

  10. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tseng-Te, E-mail: huangtt@iner.gov.tw [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Lin [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations

  11. Making USGS information effective in the electronic age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Debbie R.; Sanders, Rex; Faust, T.

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) held a workshop on 'Making USGS Information Effective in the Electronic Age' in Woods Hole, MA, on 6-8 February 2001. The workshop was designed to address broad issues of knowledge and communication, and to help develop the mission, vision, and goals of the National Knowledge Bank called for in the 1999 NRC review of the CMGP. Presentations led by historians and philosophers yield to a wide-ranging review and discussion of the role of USGS science in society: USGS science is important to government to understand certain complicated public policy issues (such as the environment), but we must participate in two-way public dialogs to increase our relevance and usefulness. Presentations led by USGS communications experts reviewed the principles of audience analysis and effective communications: this focused look at audiences, markets, and products provided an introduction to the behaviors, the tools, and the terminology that might be applied to public discourse. Presentations by several information technology experts showed the potential - and pitfalls - of current schemes for Web-based information access. Finally, several brainstorming sessions developed action items, vision, and characteristics of a knowledge bank. Based on the workshop discussions and results, the authors developed the National Knowledge Bank Mission, Vision, and Goals statements.

  12. Ion energy distributions from photon- and electron-stimulated desorption. II. The quasiclassical final state and reneutralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, William L.; Pal, Sipra; Jutila, Ronald E.

    1987-09-01

    Franck-Condon overlap integrals are calculated to fit ion energy distributions (IED's) resulting from photon- or electron-stimulated desorption. The WKB or quasiclassical trajectory approximation is used to compute the final-state wave function. The final-state potential consists of a repulsive exponential and an image term. The calculated IED's compare well with those found previously using the reflection or classical trajectory approximation. Both methods agree well with a wide range of experimental IED's all of which are mildly asymmetric Gaussian functions of the ion energy. It is shown how these two approximations are related through the classical limit of the final-state wave function. In addition, the quasiclassical wave function is generalized to include an optical potential giving rise in a natural way to the reneutralization reduction factor. The Gaussian asymmetry in the IED's is usually to the high-energy side reflecting a ``normal'' exponential repulsion. However, in a few anomalous cases the Gaussian is skewed to the low-energy side of the IED peak. This anomaly cannot be explained by expected influences on the initial-state wave function such as anharmonicities. On the other hand, the reneutralization factor, when it predominates, provides a natural explanation for this effect. In addition, this reneutralization factor can cause significant shifts in the IED peak, away from the Franck-Condon peak.

  13. Overview of the High-Level Trigger Electron and Photon Selection for the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gesualdi-Mello, A; Armstrong, S; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, J A C; Bosman, M; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Comune, G; Conde-Muíño, P; Crone, G; Damazio, D; De Santo, A; Díaz-Gómez, M; Di Mattia, A; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Epp, B; Falciano, S; Garitaonandia, H; George, S; Ghete, V; Goncalo, R; Haller, J; Kabana, S; Khomich, A; Kilvington, G; Kirkc, J; Konstantinidis, N P; Kootz, A; Lankford, A J; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Maeno, T; Masik, J; Meessen, C; Moore, R; Morettini, P; Negri, A; Nikitin, N; Nisati, A; Osuna, C; Padilla, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Pasqualucci, E; Pérez-Réale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Sánchez, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; Seixas, J M; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sobreira, A; Soluk, R A; Stefanidis, E; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Thomas, E; Touchard, F; Usaib, G; Venda-Pinto, B; Ventura, A; Vercesi, V; Wengler, T; Werner, P; Wheeler, S J; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; 14th IEEE - NPSS Real Time Conference 2005 Nuclear Plasma Sciences Society

    2006-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will face the challenge of efficiently selecting interesting candidate events in pp collisions at 14 TeV center-of-mass energy, whilst rejecting the enormous number of background events. The High-Level Trigger (HLT = second level trigger and Event Filter), which is a software based trigger will need to reduce the level-1 output rate of ~75 kHz to ~200 Hz written out to mass storage. In this talk an overview of the current physics and system performance of the HLT selection for electrons and photons is given. The performance has been evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations and has been partly demonstrated in the ATLAS testbeam in 2004. The efficiency for the signal channels, the rate expected for the selection, the global data preparation and execution times will be highlighted. Furthermore, some physics examples will be discussed to demonstrate that the triggers are well adapted for the physics programme envisaged at the LHC.

  14. Description of diffraction grating experiments for photons and electrons in Feynman's space-time formulation of quantum mechanics: The quantum origins of classical wave theories of light and massive particles

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J H.

    2013-01-01

    The five laws of relativistic quantum mechanics, according to Feynman's path integral formulation, are concisely stated and applied to experiments. Reflection diffraction grating experiments for both photons and electrons are analysed, in particular the Davisson-Germer experiment in which the wave-like property of electrons was first established. It is shown how classical, purely spatial, effective wave theories for both photons and electrons are predicted by the path integral formulation of ...

  15. An overview of the Boltzmann transport equation solution for neutrons, photons and electrons in cartesian geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Barbara D. do Amaral, E-mail: barbara.arodriguez@gmail.co [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Vilhena, Marco Tullio, E-mail: vilhena@mat.ufrgs.b [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Pura e Aplicada

    2009-07-01

    Questions regarding accuracy and efficiency of deterministic transport methods are still on our mind today, even with modern supercomputers. The most versatile and widely used deterministic methods are the P{sub N} approximation, the S{sub N} method (discrete ordinates method) and their variants. In the discrete ordinates (S{sub N}) formulations of the transport equation, it is assumed that the linearized Boltzmann equation only holds for a set of distinct numerical values of the direction-of-motion variables. In this work, looking forward to confirm the capabilities of deterministic methods in obtaining accurate results, we present a general overview of deterministic methods to solve the Boltzmann transport equation for neutral and charged particles. First, we describe a review in the Laplace transform technique applied to S{sub N} two dimensional transport equation in a rectangular domain considering Compton scattering. Next, we solved the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, an alternative approach for the Boltzmann transport equation, assuming a monoenergetic electron beam in a rectangular domain. The main idea relies on applying the P{sub N} approximation, a recent advance in the class of deterministic methods, in the angular variable, to the two dimensional Fokker-Planck equation and then applying the Laplace Transform in the spatial x-variable. Numerical results are given to illustrate the accuracy of deterministic methods presented. (author)

  16. Integrating two-photon microscopy and cryo-electron microscopy for studying the interaction of Cafeteria roenbergensis and CroV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghvami, Seyedmohammadali

    Cafeteria roenbergensis (Cro) is a marine zooplankton; its voracious appetite plays a significant role in regulating bacteria populations. The giant virus that lives within Cro, known as Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), has an important effect on the mortality of Cro populations. Although viral infections are extremely abundant in oceans, the complete procedure of the infection is still unknown. We study the infection process of Cro by CroV to find out whether the initial contact is through phagocytosis or CroV penetrating the host cell membrane directly. Cro is a moving at speed in the range of 10-100 um/s, therefore, there are many difficulties and challenges for traditional imaging techniques to study this viral-host interaction. We apply two-photon fluorescence microscopy to image this infection process. The image is taken at video rate (30 frame/s), which makes us able to catch the moment of interaction. We are able to image host and virus simultaneously where CroV is stained by SYBR gold dye and Cro is excited through NADH autofluorescence. For further structural biology study, we will obtain atomic level resolution information of infection. After catching the initial moment of infection, we will freeze the sample instantly and image it with cryo-electron microscope .

  17. Electronic structure of atoms: atomic spectroscopy information system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, V. V.; Kazakov, V. G.; Kovalev, V. S.; Meshkov, O. I.; Yatsenko, A. S.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents a Russian atomic spectroscopy, information system electronic structure of atoms (IS ESA) (http://grotrian.nsu.ru), and describes its main features and options to support research and training. The database contains over 234 000 records, great attention paid to experimental data and uniform filling of the database for all atomic numbers Z, including classified levels and transitions of rare earth and transuranic elements and their ions. Original means of visualization of scientific data in the form of spectrograms and Grotrian diagrams have been proposed. Presentation of spectral data in the form of interactive color charts facilitates understanding and analysis of properties of atomic systems. The use of the spectral data of the IS ESA together with its functionality is effective for solving various scientific problems and training of specialists.

  18. Analysis of the EBT3 Gafchromic film irradiated with 6 MV photons and 6 MeV electrons using reflective mode scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, Nicolas; Francis, Ziad; Abboud, Marie

    2014-09-01

    We explore in our study the effects of electrons and X-rays irradiations on the newest version of the Gafchromic EBT3 film. Experiments are performed using the Varian "TrueBeam 1.6" medical accelerator delivering 6 MV X-ray photons and 6 MeV electron beams as desired. The main interest is to compare the responses of EBT3 films exposed to two separate beams of electrons and photons, for radiation doses ranging up to 500 cGy. The analysis is done on a flatbed EPSON 10000 XL scanner and cross checked on a HP Scanjet 4850 scanner. Both scanners are used in reflection mode taking into account landscape and portrait scanning positions. After thorough verifications, the reflective scanning method can be used on EBT3 as an economic alternative to the transmission method which was also one of the goals of this study. A comparison is also done between single scan configuration including all samples in a single A4 (HP) or A3 (EPSON) format area and multiple scan procedure where each sample is scanned separately on its own. The images analyses are done using the ImageJ software. Results show significant influence of the scanning configuration but no significant differences between electron and photon irradiations for both single and multiple scan configurations. In conclusion, the film provides a reliable relative dose measurement method for electrons and photons irradiations in the medical field applications. Copyright © 2014 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Processing challenges for GaN-based photonic and electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearton, S.J. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Ren, F. [Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Shul, R.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-09-01

    The wide gap materials SiC, GaN and to a lesser extent diamond are attracting great interest for high power/high temperature electronics. There are a host of device processing challenges presented by these materials because of their physical and chemical stability, including difficulty in achieving stable, low contact resistances, especially for one conductivity type, absence of convenient wet etch recipes, generally slow dry etch rates, the high temperatures needed for implant activation, control of suitable gate dielectrics and the lack of cheap, large diameter conducting and semi-insulating substrates. The relatively deep ionization levels of some of the common dopants (Mg in GaN; B, Al in SiC; P in diamond) means that carrier densities may be low at room temperature, and thus contact resistances will be greatly improved provided the metallization is stable and reliable. Some recent work with CoSi{sub x} on SiC and W-alloys on GaN show promise for improved ohmic contacts. The issue of unintentional hydrogen passivation of dopants will also be covered - this leads to strong increases in resistivity of p-SiC and GaN, but to large decreases in resistivity of diamond. Recent work on development of wet etches has found recipes for AlN (KOH), while photochemical etching of SiC and GaN has been reported. In the latter cases p-type materials is not etched, which can be a major liability in some devices. The dry etch results obtained with various novel reactors, including ICP, ECR and LE4 will be compared - the high ion densities in the former techniques produce the highest etch rates for strongly-bonded materials, but can lead to preferential loss of N from the nitrides and therefore to a highly conducting surface. This is potentially a major problem for fabrication of dry etched, recessed gate FET structures.

  20. 76 FR 40454 - Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Activity; Comment... attorney by veterans who have medical information recorded in VHA electronic health records system... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health...

  1. 19 CFR 123.91 - Electronic information for rail cargo required in advance of arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for Cargo Arriving by Rail or Truck § 123.91 Electronic information for rail cargo required in advance.... Specifically, to effect the advance electronic transmission of the required rail cargo information to CBP, the... States from point to point in the same foreign country are subject to the advance electronic information...

  2. Single-photon imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Seitz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The acquisition and interpretation of images is a central capability in almost all scientific and technological domains. In particular, the acquisition of electromagnetic radiation, in the form of visible light, UV, infrared, X-ray, etc. is of enormous practical importance. The ultimate sensitivity in electronic imaging is the detection of individual photons. With this book, the first comprehensive review of all aspects of single-photon electronic imaging has been created. Topics include theoretical basics, semiconductor fabrication, single-photon detection principles, imager design and applications of different spectral domains. Today, the solid-state fabrication capabilities for several types of image sensors has advanced to a point, where uncoooled single-photon electronic imaging will soon become a consumer product. This book is giving a specialist´s view from different domains to the forthcoming “single-photon imaging” revolution. The various aspects of single-photon imaging are treated by internati...

  3. Ion/neutral, ion/electron, ion/photon, and ion/ion interactions in tandem mass spectrometry: do we need them all? Are they enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLuckey, Scott A; Mentinova, Marija

    2011-01-01

    A range of strategies and tools have been developed to facilitate the determination of primary structures of analyte molecules of interest via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The two main factors that determine the primary structural information present in an MS/MS spectrum are the type of ion generated from the analyte molecule and the dissociation method. The ion type subjected to dissociation is determined by the ionization method/conditions and ion transformation processes that might take place after initial gas-phase ion formation. Furthermore, the range of analyte-related ion types can be expanded via derivatization reactions prior to mass spectrometry. Dissociation methods include those that simply alter the population of internal states of the mass-selected ion (i.e., activation methods like collision-induced dissociation) as well as processes that rely on the transformation of the ion type prior to dissociation (e.g., electron capture dissociation). A variety of ion interactions have been studied for the purpose of ion dissociation and ion transformation, including ion/neutral, ion/photon, ion/electron, and ion/ion interactions. A wide range of phenomena have been observed, many of which have been explored/developed as means for structural analysis. The techniques arising from these phenomena are discussed within the context of the elements of structural determination in tandem mass spectrometry: ion-type definition and dissociation. Unique aspects of the various ion interactions are emphasized along with any barriers to widespread implementation. © American Society for Mass Spectrometry, 2011

  4. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  5. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexis

    2005-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid-state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as a cage for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale thus paves the way to the realisation of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This should contribute toward meeting the demands for a greater miniaturisation that the processing of an ever increasing number of data requires. Photonic Crystals intends at providing students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background needed for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found applications. As such, it aims at building brid...

  6. Photonic Crystals Towards Nanoscale Photonic Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lourtioz, Jean-Michel; Berger, Vincent; Gérard, Jean-Michel; Maystre, Daniel; Tchelnokov, Alexei; Pagnoux, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Just like the periodical crystalline potential in solid state crystals determines their properties for the conduction of electrons, the periodical structuring of photonic crystals leads to envisioning the possibility of achieving a control of the photon flux in dielectric and metallic materials. The use of photonic crystals as cages for storing, filtering or guiding light at the wavelength scale paves the way to the realization of optical and optoelectronic devices with ultimate properties and dimensions. This will contribute towards meeting the demands for greater miniaturization imposed by the processing of an ever increasing number of data. Photonic Crystals will provide students and researchers from different fields with the theoretical background required for modelling photonic crystals and their optical properties, while at the same time presenting the large variety of devices, ranging from optics to microwaves, where photonic crystals have found application. As such, it aims at building bridges between...

  7. SU-E-T-502: Dose Perturbation Effects Near Implant Surfaces Caused by Secondary Electron Transport in Photon-Beam Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chofor, N; Poppe, B; Harder, D

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the dose perturbation effects at interfaces between water and a Titanium implant, attributable to secondary electron transport across the interface, during high energy photon radiotherapy. While dose enhancement is characteristic for the proximal interface of a high-atomic number implant, the dose perturbation at the distal interface varies from reduction to enhancement, requiring proper computation of secondary electron transport effects. The backward and forward perturbation factors pb and pf will be calculated. Using DOSRZnrc, depth dose curves were computed in a water phantom using photon spectra of nominal energies 4, 6, 10, 15, 24 MV for conditions (i) homogeneous water without any insert, (ii) alternatively with Titanium inserts of thicknesses 3 and 5 cm placed at 10 cm water depth. Backscatter factor pb was computed as the ratio of the dose with implant against that without implant, whereas pf was calculated by first accounting for photon attenuation in the implant and then taking the ratio of the dose with implant against that without implant. At the front interface, pb is independent of the material thickness and varies slightly with beam energy and incident angle. On consideration of photon attenuation in the implant, pf was also found to be independent on material thickness, but strongly varying with energy, including change of sign. For 4-24 MV photon beams the maximum spread of the dose perturbation effect remains within only a few millimeters from the interface, with pb values ranging from 1.18-1.22, while factor pf ranges from 0.9-1.21 at normal incidence, indicating the extent to which planning systems may over- or underestimate the doses near implant interfaces. At inclined beam incidence the dose perturbation effects even increase, and for instance pb (1.24-1.25) and pf (0.85-1.32) were determined for 6 MV and 24 MV beams at 45° incidence. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Electronic Information Resources in Undergraduate Education: An Exploratory Study of Opportunities for Student Learning and Independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Liz

    2002-01-01

    This qualitative interview-based study examines lecturer perspectives on the roles of electronic information resources in undergraduate education. Highlights include electronic academic libraries; changes toward more constructivist approaches to learning; information quality on the Web; plagiarism; information use; information literacy; and…

  9. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, D.L.

    1982-10-01

    Studies of photon-photon collisions are reviewed with particular emphasis on new results reported to this conference. These include results on light meson spectroscopy and deep inelastic e..gamma.. scattering. Considerable work has now been accumulated on resonance production by ..gamma gamma.. collisions. Preliminary high statistics studies of the photon structure function F/sub 2//sup ..gamma../(x,Q/sup 2/) are given and comments are made on the problems that remain to be solved.

  10. Silicon applications in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  11. A menu of electron probes for optimising information from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2018-01-01

    We assess a selection of electron probes in terms of the spatial resolution with which information can be derived about the structure of a specimen, as opposed to the nominal image resolution. Using Ge [001] as a study case, we investigate the scattering dynamics of these probes and determine their relative merits in terms of two qualitative criteria: interaction volume and interpretability. This analysis provides a 'menu of probes' from which an optimum probe for tackling a given materials science question can be selected. Hollow cone, vortex and spherical wave fronts are considered, from unit cell to Ångstrom size, and for different defocus and specimen orientations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Photonic crystal light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G [Albuquerque, NM; Lin, Shawn-Yu [Albuquerque, NM; Bur, James A [Corrales, NM

    2004-07-27

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  13. Generation of a superposition of odd photon number states for quantum information networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard-Nielsen, Jonas Schou; Nielsen, B.; Hettich, C.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum information networks, quantum memories, quantum repeaters, linear optics quantum computers Udgivelsesdato: 25 August......Quantum information networks, quantum memories, quantum repeaters, linear optics quantum computers Udgivelsesdato: 25 August...

  14. 45 CFR 170.207 - Vocabulary standards for representing electronic health information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vocabulary standards for representing electronic... Specifications for Health Information Technology § 170.207 Vocabulary standards for representing electronic... vocabulary standards for the purpose of representing electronic health information: (a) Problems—(1) Standard...

  15. 76 FR 56503 - Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection Activity (VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records) Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: VSO Access to VHA Electronic Health Records, VA Form 10- 0400. OMB Control Number: 2900... recorded in VHA electronic health records system. An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not...

  16. Hybrid photon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C

    2003-01-01

    Hybrid photon detectors detect light via vacuum photocathodes and accelerate the emitted photoelectrons by an electric field towards inversely polarized silicon anodes, where they are absorbed, thus producing electron-hole pairs. These, in turn, are collected and generate electronic signals on their ohmic contacts. This review first describes the characteristic properties of the main components of hybrid photon detectors: light entrance windows, photocathodes, and silicon anodes. Then, essential relations describing the trajectories of photoelectrons in electric and magnetic fields and their backscattering from the silicon anodes are derived. Depending on their anode configurations, three families of hybrid photon detectors are presented: hybrid photomultiplier tubes with single anodes for photon counting with high sensitivity and for gamma spectroscopy; multi-anode photon detector tubes with anodes subdivided into square or hexagonal pads for position-sensitive photon detection; imaging silicon pixel array t...

  17. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1988-07-01

    Highlights of the VIIIth International Workshop on Photon-Photon Collisions are reviewed. New experimental and theoretical results were reported in virtually every area of ..gamma gamma.. physics, particularly in exotic resonance production and tests of quantum chromodynamics where asymptotic freedom and factorization theorems provide predictions for both inclusive and exclusive ..gamma gamma.. reactions at high momentum transfer. 73 refs., 12 figs.

  18. Studies of electroweak interactions and searches for new physics using photonic events with missing energy at the Large Electron-Positron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Gataullin, Marat I

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis I study the production of photonic events with missing energy in e+e- collisions at the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) Collider. My analysis was based on 619 inverse picobarns of data collected by the L3 detector during 1998--2000 at center-of-mass energies between 189 and 208 GeV, the highest energies ever attained in an e+e- collider. I selected a high-purity sample of 2,022 well-reconstructed single- and multi-photon events with missing energy. I used this sample to study the pair-production of neutrinos accompanied by the emission of one or more photons. The average ratio of the measured to expected cross section was found to be R = 0.987±0.022(stat)±0.014 (syst). The number of light neutrino species was measured to be 2.98±0.05(stat)±0.04(syst), and the first direct evidence for the pair-production of electron neutrinos was found. The experimental errors in these results are smaller than those of comparable previous measurements. The selection results are also given in the form of table...

  19. 76 FR 9024 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Electronic Records; Electronic Signatures AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing an opportunity for...

  20. Quasi-simultaneous acquisition of hard electron ionization and soft single-photon ionization mass spectra during GC/MS analysis by rapid switching between both ionization methods: analytical concept, setup, and application on diesel fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschner, Markus S; Gröger, Thomas M; Horvath, Thomas; Gonin, Marc; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2011-05-15

    This work describes the realization of rapid switching between hard electron ionization (EI) and soft single-photon ionization (SPI) integrated in a compact orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photons of 9.8 eV (126 nm) emitted from the innovative electron-beam-pumped rare-gas excimer light source (EBEL) filled with argon are focused into the ion chamber by an ellipsoidal mirror optic for accomplishing of SPI. This novel orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight mass spectrometer with switching capability was hyphenated to one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) and comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) gas chromatography (GC × GC) for the first time. Within this demonstration study, a maximum switching frequency of 80 Hz was applied for investigation of a mineral-oil-type diesel sample. This approach allows the quasi-simultaneous acquisition of complementary information about the fragmentation pattern (EI) as well as the molecular mass (SPI) of compounds within a single analysis. Furthermore, by application of a polar GC column for separation, the SPI data can be displayed in a 2D contour plot, leading to a comprehensive 2D characterization (GC × MS), whereas the typical group-type assignment for diesel is also met.

  1. Dublin Core and Electronic Information Retrieval | Gbaje | Samaru ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dublin Core (DC) provides a relatively simple and concise method for resource discovery of composite electronic resources over various networks. This article examines the importance and application of Dublin Core metadata in electronic resource discover over various networks. It is expected that the endorsement of ...

  2. A comparative dosimetric study on tangential photon beams, intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) for breast cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C.-M.; Ding, M.; Li, J. S.; Lee, M. C.; Pawlicki, T.; Deng, J.

    2003-04-01

    Recently, energy- and intensity-modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) has garnered a growing interest for the treatment of superficial targets. In this work, we carried out a comparative dosimetry study to evaluate MERT, photon beam intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional tangential photon beams for the treatment of breast cancer. A Monte Carlo based treatment planning system has been investigated, which consists of a set of software tools to perform accurate dose calculation, treatment optimization, leaf sequencing and plan analysis. We have compared breast treatment plans generated using this home-grown treatment optimization and dose calculation software for these treatment techniques. The MERT plans were planned with up to two gantry angles and four nominal energies (6, 9, 12 and 16 MeV). The tangential photon treatment plans were planned with 6 MV wedged photon beams. The IMRT plans were planned using both multiple-gantry 6 MV photon beams or two 6 MV tangential beams. Our results show that tangential IMRT can reduce the dose to the lung, heart and contralateral breast compared to conventional tangential wedged beams (up to 50% reduction in high dose volume or 5 Gy in the maximum dose). MERT can reduce the maximum dose to the lung by up to 20 Gy and to the heart by up to 35 Gy compared to conventional tangential wedged beams. Multiple beam angle IMRT can significantly reduce the maximum dose to the lung and heart (up to 20 Gy) but it induces low and medium doses to a large volume of normal tissues including lung, heart and contralateral breast. It is concluded that MERT has superior capabilities to achieve dose conformity both laterally and in the depth direction, which will be well suited for treating superficial targets such as breast cancer.

  3. Electron-positron pair production by gamma-rays in an anisotropic flux of soft photons, and application to pulsar polar caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Guillaume; Mottez, Fabrice; Bonazzola, Silvano

    2018-02-01

    Electron-positron pair production by collision of photons is investigated in view of application to pulsar physics. We compute the absorption rate of individual gamma-ray photons by an arbitrary anisotropic distribution of softer photons, and the energy and angular spectrum of the outgoing leptons. We work analytically within the approximation that 1 ≫ mc2/E > ɛ/E, with E and ɛ the gamma-ray and soft-photon maximum energy and mc2 the electron mass energy. We give results at leading order in these small parameters. For practical purposes, we provide expressions in the form of Laurent series which give correct reaction rates in the isotropic case within an average error of ˜ 7 per cent. We apply this formalism to gamma-rays flying downward or upward from a hot neutron star thermally radiating at a uniform temperature of 106 K. Other temperatures can be easily deduced using the relevant scaling laws. We find differences in absorption between these two extreme directions of almost two orders of magnitude, much larger than our error estimate. The magnetosphere appears completely opaque to downward gamma-rays while there are up to ˜ 10 per cent chances of absorbing an upward gamma-ray. We provide energy and angular spectra for both upward and downward gamma-rays. Energy spectra show a typical double peak, with larger separation at larger gamma-ray energies. Angular spectra are very narrow, with an opening angle ranging from 10-3 to 10-7 radians with increasing gamma-ray energies.

  4. The organization of information in electronic patient record under the perspective of usability recommendations: proposition of organization of information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Tissa Kawakami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among the various areas of studies, health information is highlighted in this study. More specifically, the patient's electronic medical records and issues related to it’s informational organization and usability. Objectives: suggest Usability recommendations applicable to the Electronic Patient Record. More specifically, identify, according to the specialized literature, recommendations of Usability, as well as to develop a checklist with recommendations of Usability for the Electronic Patient Record. Methodology: the study’s basic purpose is the theoretical nature. The deductive method of documental delimitation was chosen. Results: elaboration of checklist with recommendations of Usability for Electronic Patient Records. Conclusion: Usability recommendations can be used to improve electronic patient records. However, it should be noted that knowledge in the scope of Information Science should be considered and summed up, since a great deal of content related to Usability refers to operational and visual aspects of the interface, not clearly or directly contemplating the issues related to information.

  5. Beyond usage: understanding the use of electronic journals on the basis of information activity analysis. Electronic journals, Use studies, Information activity, Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annaïg Mahé

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, which reports the second part of a two-part study of the use of electronic journals by researchers in two French research institutions, we attempt to explain the integration of the use of electronic journals in the scientists' information habits, going beyond usage analysis. First, we describe how the development of electronic journals use follows a three-phase innovation process - research-development, first uses, and technical acculturation. Then, we attempt to find more significant explanatory factors, and emphasis is placed on the wider context of information activity. Three main information activity types are outlined - marginal, parallel, and integrated. Each of these types corresponds to a particular attitude towards scientific information and to different levels of electronic journal use.

  6. Dosimetric analysis for photon and electron beams in Whole body irradiation; Analisis dosimetrico para haces de fotones y electrones en irradiacion corporal total

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado G, M. [Posgrado. Fisica Medica Radiologica. Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota. Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia. Instituto Regional de Cancer de la Orinoquia. Hospital Regional de Villavicencio, Meta (Colombia)

    1998-12-31

    To initiate the Whole body irradiation as an alternative for the treatment of the hematological diseases, leukemia and assistant for the osseous marrow transplantation, it may be taken account the application of International Protocols about control and quality assurance. It is established the intercomparison by the different dosimetric methods: cylindrical ionization chambers and parallel plane, radiographic emulsion film, semiconductor diodes (Mosfet transistors) and TLD-100 thermoluminescent crystals, obtained measurements for 140 x 140 cm{sup 2} fields and large distances 340 cm respect conventional fields in Radiotherapy. The in vitro dosimetry was realized at the Universal Anthropomorphic puppet Alderson Rando basically with the cylindrical crystals (1 mm diameter) of TLD-100 lithium fluoride. It was obtained the dose value with a 0.6 cm{sup 3} cylindrical ionization chamber and the Farmer electrometer for Whole body irradiation (ICT) with photons for electrons and were obtained values with the Markus plane parallel camera. Knowing the dose rate value to the source-surface distance DFS= 80 cm, it was calibrated the crystals with the reference radiation beam of {sup 60} Co for obtaining the response curve: Dose vs. Tl lecture. It was characterized the 10 % of the total population for 300 crystals for applying the statistics corresponding. The luminescence curve obtained of Gaussian form was considered satisfactory by its stability during the pre-anneal lecture and anneal process, getting the main peak lecture at 300 Centigrade according to assigned parameters at lecture equipment TLD Harshaw model 4500. The results indicate the functional dependence with the distance DFS= 340 cm for the following depth PPD, the relations TMR and TPR, the TAR is not calculated by the increment of the dispersion in air. The penumbra increment indicates an increase of the radiation field respect of luminous field. The dispersion angle q{sub 1} respect at the field central axis

  7. Integrated Information Systems for Electronic Chemotherapy Medication Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Mia A.; Giuse, Dario A.; Eck, Carol; Holder, Gwen; Lippard, Giles; Cartwright, Julia; Rudge, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Paper-based approaches to medication administration have several disadvantages and do not provide any decision support for patient safety checks. Electronic medication administration may provide additional safety checks and enable consistent documentation structure.

  8. Innovative information visualization of electronic health record data: a systematic review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    West, Vivian L; Borland, David; Hammond, W Ed

    Objective This study investigates the use of visualization techniques reported between 1996 and 2013 and evaluates innovative approaches to information visualization of electronic health record (EHR...

  9. Photon-Photon Luminosities in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Hencken, Kai; Trautmann, Dirk; Baur, Gerhard

    1994-01-01

    Effective photon-photon luminosities are calculated for various realistic hadron collider scenarios. The main characteristics of photon-photon processes at relativistic heavy-ion colliders are established and compared to the corresponding photon-photon luminosities at electron-positron and future Photon Linear Colliders (PLC). Higher order corrections as well as inelastic processes are discussed. It is concluded that feasible high luminosity Ca-Ca collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)...

  10. Photon-Photon Luminosities in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collisions at LHC Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Hencken, Kai; Trautmann, Dirk; Baur, Gerhard

    1995-01-01

    Effective photon-photon luminosities are calculated for various realistic hadron collider scenarios. The main characteristics of photon-photon processes at relativistic heavy-ion colliders are established and compared to the corresponding photon-photon luminosities at electron-positron and future Photon Linear Colliders (PLC). Higher order corrections as well as inelastic processes are discussed. It is concluded that feasible high luminosity Ca-Ca collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)...

  11. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  12. PHENIX Low Momentum Direct Photon Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenqing; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The PHENIX experiment operates with one of the major detectors at the RHIC collider. One of the major goals of PHENIX is to identify and study Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP). Direct photons turn out to be an excellent probe due to their small interaction cross section with the collision produced medium hence carrying information of its properties from the space-time production points. In the PHENIX direct photon measurement, a large excess of low-pT photons in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV is discovered compared to reference p+p collisions, which has been interpreted as thermal radiation from the QGP and hadron-gas (HG) medium. At the same time the excess photons have a large azimuthal anisotropy, expressed as Fourier coefficients v2 and v3. Measurements at a lower collision energy may provide new insight on the origin of the low-pT direct photons. In the experiment the current effort is to reduce the experimental uncertainties in Au+Au and p+p collisions via the photons' external conversion to di-electron pairs, and measure the direct photon yield in Cu+Au and p+Au collisions at 200 GeV as well as the yield in Au+Au collisions at lower 39 GeV and 62.4 GeV. We will present the improvements and the status of the ongoing analyses.

  13. FDTD method for computing the off-plane band structure in a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Sanshui; He Sailing

    2002-12-01

    An FDTD numerical method for computing the off-plane band structure of a two-dimensional photonic crystal consisting of nearly free-electron metals is presented. The method requires only a two-dimensional discretization mesh for a given off-plane wave number k{sub z} although the off-plane propagation is a three-dimensional problem. The off-plane band structures of a square lattice of metallic rods with the high-frequency metallic model in the air are studied, and a complete band gap for some nonzero off-plane wave number k{sub z} is founded.

  14. Chemiluminescence from the Ca*(/sup 3/P) + SF/sub 6/ reaction: absolute cross section, photon yields, and electronic branching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdasco, E.; Rabanos, V.S.; Aoiz, F.J.; Urena, A.G.

    1987-04-09

    A study of the chemiluminescence under single-collision conditions of the reaction of the metastable Ca(4s4p /sup 3/P/sup 0/) of atomic calcium with SF/sup 6/ is presented. Chemiluminescence cross sections and photon yields for production of various CaF (A,B) band systems are also reported. The observed electronic branching ratio sigma/sub A//sigma/sub B/ is 4.77, and a comparison with several statistical model calculations is also discussed.

  15. Procedure for the determination of uranium on cellulose air-sampling filters by photon-electron-rejecting-alpha-liquid-scintillation spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, W.J.; Case, G.N.

    1986-08-01

    A procedure is described for obtaining from cellulose air-sampling filters the total uranium content whether it be in the form of metal, oxide, tetrafluoride or most other salts of uranium. It is demonstrated that the uranium content can be accurately assayed by low-temperature ashing of the filter paper, dissolving the ash in a mixed nitrate-sulfate system, extracting the uranium selectively into a scintillator containing a high-molecular-weight amine sulfate, and counting the extract using a Photon-Electron-Rejecting-Alpha-Liquid-Scintillation (PERALS) spectrometer. 2 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Breaches of health information: are electronic records different from paper records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    Breaches of electronic medical records constitute a type of healthcare error, but should be considered separately from other types of errors because the national focus on the security of electronic data justifies special treatment of medical information breaches. Guidelines for protecting electronic medical records should be applied equally to paper medical records.

  17. 76 FR 9012 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Electronic Consulting Services, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-16

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Electronic Consulting Services, Inc. AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has authorized its contractor, Electronic...? Under EPA contract number GS-35F-0601K, Order Number 1666, contractor Electronic Consulting Services...

  18. Electronic Mentoring as an Example for the Use of Information and Communications Technology in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sigrid

    2004-01-01

    Electronic mentoring programmes at colleges and universities and especially in engineering and science are a relatively new phenomenon. Electronic mentoring has been developed based on the possibilities unique to information and communications technology. The common feature of electronic mentoring programmes is the independence from geography and…

  19. Twisted photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Terriza, Gabriel; Torres, Juan P.; Torner, Lluis

    2007-05-01

    The orbital angular momentum of light represents a fundamentally new optical degree of freedom. Unlike linear momentum, or spin angular momentum, which is associated with the polarization of light, orbital angular momentum arises as a subtler and more complex consequence of the spatial distribution of the intensity and phase of an optical field - even down to the single photon limit. Consequently, researchers have only begun to appreciate its implications for our understanding of the many ways in which light and matter can interact, or its practical potential for quantum information applications. This article reviews some of the landmark advances in the study and use of the orbital angular momentum of photons, and in particular its potential for realizing high-dimensional quantum spaces.

  20. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  1. Sharpening high resolution information in single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J J; Luque, D; Castón, J R; Carrascosa, J L

    2008-10-01

    Advances in single particle electron cryomicroscopy have made possible to elucidate routinely the structure of biological specimens at subnanometer resolution. At this resolution, secondary structure elements are discernable by their signature. However, identification and interpretation of high resolution structural features are hindered by the contrast loss caused by experimental and computational factors. This contrast loss is traditionally modeled by a Gaussian decay of structure factors with a temperature factor, or B-factor. Standard restoration procedures usually sharpen the experimental maps either by applying a Gaussian function with an inverse ad hoc B-factor, or according to the amplitude decay of a reference structure. EM-BFACTOR is a program that has been designed to widely facilitate the use of the novel method for objective B-factor determination and contrast restoration introduced by Rosenthal and Henderson [Rosenthal, P.B., Henderson, R., 2003. Optimal determination of particle orientation, absolute hand, and contrast loss in single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. J. Mol. Biol. 333, 721-745]. The program has been developed to interact with the most common packages for single particle electron cryomicroscopy. This sharpening method has been further investigated via EM-BFACTOR, concluding that it helps to unravel the high resolution molecular features concealed in experimental density maps, thereby making them better suited for interpretation. Therefore, the method may facilitate the analysis of experimental data in high resolution single particle electron cryomicroscopy.

  2. 19 CFR 192.14 - Electronic information for outward cargo required in advance of departure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Specifically, to effect the advance electronic transmission of the required cargo information to CBP, the USPPI... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic information for outward cargo required in advance of departure. 192.14 Section 192.14 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION...

  3. eIFL (Electronic Information for Libraries): A Global Initiative of the Soros Foundations Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feret, Blazej; Kay, Michael

    This paper presents the history, current status, and future development of eIFL (Electronic Information for Libraries Direct)--a large-scale project run by the Soros Foundations Network and the Open Society Institute. The project aims to provide libraries in developing countries with access to a menu of electronic information resources. In 1999,…

  4. 12 CFR 352.5 - Accessibility to electronic and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Accessibility to electronic and information technology. 352.5 Section 352.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY § 352.5 Accessibility to electronic and information technology. (a) In...

  5. 39 CFR 255.4 - Accessibility to electronic and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accessibility to electronic and information technology. 255.4 Section 255.4 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES TO POSTAL SERVICE PROGRAMS, ACTIVITIES, FACILITIES, AND ELECTRONIC AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY § 255.4...

  6. Description of diffraction-grating experiments for photons and electrons in Feynman's spacetime formulation of quantum mechanics: the quantum origins of classical wave theories of light and massive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The five laws of relativistic quantum mechanics, according to Feynman's path integral formulation, are concisely stated and applied to experiments. Reflection-diffraction-grating experiments for both photons and electrons are analysed, in particular, the Davisson-Germer experiment in which the wave-like property of electrons was first established. It is shown how classical, purely spatial, effective wave theories for both photons and electrons are predicted by the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics. The standard Copenhagen interpretation of wave mechanics is critically discussed in the light of the described experimental applications of the path integral formulation.

  7. Biomedical photonics handbook biomedical diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2014-01-01

    Shaped by Quantum Theory, Technology, and the Genomics RevolutionThe integration of photonics, electronics, biomaterials, and nanotechnology holds great promise for the future of medicine. This topic has recently experienced an explosive growth due to the noninvasive or minimally invasive nature and the cost-effectiveness of photonic modalities in medical diagnostics and therapy. The second edition of the Biomedical Photonics Handbook presents fundamental developments as well as important applications of biomedical photonics of interest to scientists, engineers, manufacturers, teachers, studen

  8. Comparison of photon-photon and photon-magnetic field pair production rates. [in neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, M. L.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron stars were proposed as the site of gamma-ray burst activity and the copious supply of MeV photons admits the possibility of electron-positron pair production. If the neutron star magnetic field is sufficiently intense (10 to the 12th power G), both photon-photon (2 gamma) and photon-magnetic field (gamma) pair production should be important mechanisms. Rates for the two processes were calculated using a Maxwellian distribution for the photons. The ratio of 1 gamma to 2 gamma pair production rates was obtained as a function of photon temperature and magnetic field strength.

  9. Comparison of Photon-photon and Photon-magnetic Field Pair Production Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, M. L.; Harding, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Neutron stars were proposed as the site of gamma-ray burst activity and the copious supply of MeV photons admits the possibility of electron-positron pair production. If the neutron star magnetic field is sufficiently intense ( 10 to the 12th power G), both photon-photon (2 gamma) and photon-magnetic field ( gamma) pair production should be important mechanisms. Rates for the two processes were calculated using a Maxwellian distribution for the photons. The ratio of 1 gamma to 2 gamma pair production rates was obtained as a function of photon temperature and magnetic field strength.

  10. 2008 Availability and Utilization of Electronic Information Databases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gbaje E.S

    research and training are the rock foundation of a sound agricultural development in any nation and the success of this to a large extent depends on access to information. Information on agriculture span across major subject fields such as Animal production, Nutrition, Crop and Plant Science, Soil Science, Agricultural.

  11. Multipurpose silicon photonics signal processor core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Daniel; Gasulla, Ivana; Crudgington, Lee; Thomson, David J; Khokhar, Ali Z; Li, Ke; Cao, Wei; Mashanovich, Goran Z; Capmany, José

    2017-09-21

    Integrated photonics changes the scaling laws of information and communication systems offering architectural choices that combine photonics with electronics to optimize performance, power, footprint, and cost. Application-specific photonic integrated circuits, where particular circuits/chips are designed to optimally perform particular functionalities, require a considerable number of design and fabrication iterations leading to long development times. A different approach inspired by electronic Field Programmable Gate Arrays is the programmable photonic processor, where a common hardware implemented by a two-dimensional photonic waveguide mesh realizes different functionalities through programming. Here, we report the demonstration of such reconfigurable waveguide mesh in silicon. We demonstrate over 20 different functionalities with a simple seven hexagonal cell structure, which can be applied to different fields including communications, chemical and biomedical sensing, signal processing, multiprocessor networks, and quantum information systems. Our work is an important step toward this paradigm.Integrated optical circuits today are typically designed for a few special functionalities and require complex design and development procedures. Here, the authors demonstrate a reconfigurable but simple silicon waveguide mesh with different functionalities.

  12. Energy deposition model for I-125 photon radiation in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C.; Garcia, G. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Williart, A.; Garcia, G. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, an electron-tracking Monte Carlo algorithm developed by us is combined with established photon transport models in order to simulate all primary and secondary particle interactions in water for incident photon radiation. As input parameters for secondary electron interactions, electron scattering cross sections by water molecules and experimental energy loss spectra are used. With this simulation, the resulting energy deposition can be modelled at the molecular level, yielding detailed information about localization and type of single collision events. The experimental emission spectrum of I-125 seeds, as used for radiotherapy of different tumours, was used for studying the energy deposition in water when irradiating with this radionuclide. (authors)

  13. Access to government information in Japan: a long way toward electronic government?

    OpenAIRE

    Koga, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Supported by the development of information technology, the Japanese government is facilitating access to its information and taking steps toward electronic government. The policy initiatives concerning access to government information are divided into five areas: promotion of IT use in internal administrative activities, the Information Disclosure Law, information provision, records management, and general policy toward information society. However, these policy initiatives do not reflect th...

  14. Information Sharing for Computing Trust Metrics on COTS Electronic Components

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McMillon, William J

    2008-01-01

    .... It is challenging for the DoD to determine whether and how much to trust in COTS components, given uncertainty and incomplete information about the developers and suppliers of COTS components as well...

  15. Utilization of electronic information resources in Ramat Library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data was analysed using descriptive statistics of percentage and frequency counts. ... available in the Ramat Library for the purpose of enhancing learning outcome. Keywords: e-Resources, information resources, utilization, Ramat library ...

  16. Water and tissue equivalence properties of biological materials for photons, electrons, protons and alpha particles in the energy region 10 keV-1 GeV: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2016-09-01

    To compare some biological materials in respect to the water and tissue equivalence properties for photon, electron, proton and alpha particle interactions as means of the effective atomic number (Zeff) and electron density (Ne). A Z-wise interpolation procedure has been adopted for calculation of Zeff using the mass attenuation coefficients for photons and the mass stopping powers for charged particles. At relatively low energies (100 keV-3 MeV), Zeff and Ne for photons and electrons were found to be constant while they vary much more for protons and alpha particles. In contrast, Zeff and Ne for protons and alpha particles were found to be constant after 3 MeV whereas for photons and electrons they were found to increase with the increasing energy. Also, muscle eq. liquid (with sucrose) have Zeff and Ne values close to the Muscle Skeletal (ICRP) and Muscle Striated (ICRU) within low relative differences below 9%. Muscle eq. liquid (without sucrose) have Zeff and Ne values close to the Muscle Skeletal (ICRP) and Muscle Striated (ICRU) with difference below 10%. The reported data should be useful in determining best water as well as tissue equivalent materials for photon, electron, proton and alpha particle interactions.

  17. Information Dissemination: Case Studies on Electronic Dissemination at Four Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    MEDLARS Databases Information Available on TOXNET 45 Appendix VI 46 Objectives, Scope, and Methodology Appendix VII 47 Major Contributors to This Report...Substances SDILINE Selective Dissemination of Information On-line SERLINE Serials On-line TRI Toxic Chemical Release Inventory TOXNET Toxicology Data...Network ( TOXNET ), located at a Kensington, Maryland, contractor. The NLM computer runs software called Elhill, created in 1972, which handles the

  18. Electronic health information in use: Characteristics that support employee workflow and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Alissa L; Saleem, Jason J; Justice, Connie F; Woodward-Hagg, Heather; Woodbridge, Peter A; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess helpful and challenging aspects of electronic health information with respect to clinical workflow and identify a set of characteristics that support patient care processes. We conducted 20 semi-structured interviews at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center, with a fully implemented electronic health record (EHR), and elicited positive and negative examples of how information technology (IT) affects the work of healthcare employees. Responses naturally shed light on information characteristics that aid work processes. We performed a secondary analysis on interview data and inductively identified characteristics of electronic information that support healthcare workflow. Participants provided 199 examples of how electronic information affects workflow. Seventeen characteristics emerged along with four primary domains: trustworthy and reliable; ubiquitous; effectively displayed; and adaptable to work demands. Each characteristic may be used to help evaluate health information technology pre- and post-implementation. Results provide several strategies to improve EHR design and implementation to better support healthcare workflow.

  19. Photonics and Nanophotonics and Information and Communication Technologies in Modern Food Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapulova, Olha; Sherstiuk, Valentyn; Shvalagin, Vitaliy; Kukhta, Aleksander

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of the problem of conjunction of information and communication technologies (ICT) with packaging industry and food production was made. The perspective of combining the latest advances of nanotechnology, including nanophotonics, and ICT for creating modern smart packaging was shown. There were investigated luminescent films with zinc oxide nanoparticles, which change luminescence intensity as nano-ZnO interacts with decay compounds of food products, for active and intelligent packaging. High luminescent transparent films were obtained from colloidal suspension of ZnO and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The influence of molecular mass, concentration of nano-ZnO, and film thickness on luminescent properties of films was studied in order to optimize the content of the compositions. The possibility of covering the obtained films with polyvinyl alcohol was considered for eliminating water soluble properties of PVP. The luminescent properties of films with different covers were studied. The insoluble in water composition based on ZnO stabilized with colloidal silicon dioxide and PVP in polymethylmethacrylate was developed, and the luminescent properties of films were investigated. The compositions are non-toxic, safe, and suitable for applying to the inner surface of active and intelligent packaging by printing techniques, such as screen printing, flexography, inkjet, and pad printing.

  20. Development of an electronic radiation oncology patient information management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of patient care is critically influenced by the availability of accurate information and its efficient management. Radiation oncology consists of many information components, for example there may be information related to the patient (e.g., profile, disease site, stage, etc., to people (radiation oncologists, radiological physicists, technologists, etc., and to equipment (diagnostic, planning, treatment, etc.. These different data must be integrated. A comprehensive information management system is essential for efficient storage and retrieval of the enormous amounts of information. A radiation therapy patient information system (RTPIS has been developed using open source software. PHP and JAVA script was used as the programming languages, MySQL as the database, and HTML and CSF as the design tool. This system utilizes typical web browsing technology using a WAMP5 server. Any user having a unique user ID and password can access this RTPIS. The user ID and password is issued separately to each individual according to the person′s job responsibilities and accountability, so that users will be able to only access data that is related to their job responsibilities. With this system authentic users will be able to use a simple web browsing procedure to gain instant access. All types of users in the radiation oncology department should find it user-friendly. The maintenance of the system will not require large human resources or space. The file storage and retrieval process would be be satisfactory, unique, uniform, and easily accessible with adequate data protection. There will be very little possibility of unauthorized handling with this system. There will also be minimal risk of loss or accidental destruction of information.